Science.gov

Sample records for adherent human polymorphonuclear

  1. Antibiotic proteins of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, J E; Scott, R W; Campanelli, D; Griffith, J; Wilde, C; Marra, M N; Seeger, M; Nathan, C F

    1989-01-01

    Nine polypeptide peaks with antibiotic activity were resolved from human polymorphonuclear leukocyte azurophil granule membranes. All but 1 of the 12 constituent polypeptides were identified by N-terminal sequence analysis. Near quantitative recovery of protein and activity permitted an assessment of the contribution of each species to the overall respiratory-burst-independent antimicrobial capacity of the cell. Three uncharacterized polypeptides were discovered, including two broad-spectrum antibiotics. One of these, a defensin that we have designated human neutrophil antimicrobial peptide 4, was more potent than previously described defensins but represented less than 1% of the total protein. The other, named azurocidin, was abundant and comparable to bactericidal permeability-increasing factor in its contribution to the killing of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:2501794

  2. Oxidation of glucosamine by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Swendsen, C L; DeChatelet, L R

    1981-03-01

    When exposed to a phagocytic stimulus (opsonized zymosan), human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) produced 14CO2 from [1-14C]glucosamine at a rate 10-25% of that produced from glucose under the same conditions. The production of CO2 from glucosamine by intact PMNs was inhibited by glucose and dependent upon activation of the hexosemonophosphate shunt (HMPS). However, the metabolic pathways for the oxidation of glucose and glucosamine by PMNs are not identical. This is suggested by the fact that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initiating enzyme for the HMPS, did not utilize glucosamine-6-phosphate as a substrate. In addition, glucosamine was not oxidized by sonically disrupted PMNs whereas oxidation of glucose by the same preparation was increased sevenfold over intact cells. Taken together, the data suggest that PMNs oxidize glucosamine by converting it to a compound compatible with the enzymes of the HMPS. This conversion requires intact PMNs and/or an as yet unidentified cofactor.

  3. Intracellular Penetration and Activity of Gemifloxacin in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    García, Isabel; Pascual, Alvaro; Ballesta, Sofía; Joyanes, Providencia; Perea, Evelio J.

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular penetration and activity of gemifloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were evaluated. Gemifloxacin reached intracellular concentrations eight times higher than extracellular concentrations. The uptake was rapid, reversible, and nonsaturable and was affected by environmental temperature, cell viability, and membrane stimuli. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, gemifloxacin showed intracellular activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:11036051

  4. Pentoxifylline modulation of plasma membrane functions in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hand, W L; Butera, M L; King-Thompson, N L; Hand, D L

    1989-01-01

    Pentoxifylline is known to have major effects on cell membrane function in mammalian cells, including human leukocytes. The protective effects of this agent in animal models of infection and inflammation may be due to alterations in phagocyte (neutrophil and macrophage) function. However, the exact mechanism of action of pentoxifylline is unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the drug on several membrane-associated activities in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and investigated possible mechanisms for the observed changes in neutrophil function. Pentoxifylline inhibited ingestion of microbial particles (Staphylococcus aureus and zymosan); decreased superoxide generation activated by zymosan, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, and concanavalin A (but not phorbol myristate acetate); and decreased uptake (transport) of adenosine stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and zymosan. In contrast, pentoxifylline actually increased clindamycin uptake in zymosan-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. However, pentoxifylline had no effect on uptake of adenosine or clindamycin in unstimulated neutrophils. In comparison with known inhibitors of nucleoside transport (nitrobenzylthioinosine and dipyridamole), the results suggested that pentoxifylline does not bind to membrane nucleoside transport receptors. At concentrations which inhibit neutrophil function, pentoxifylline activity is not mediated through external membrane nucleoside regulatory sites. Thus, pentoxifylline affects the activation signal chain at a point beyond the membrane receptors. Whatever its precise mechanism of action, pentoxifylline has a striking modulatory effect on cell membrane-associated responses in stimulated leukocytes and may prove useful for control of injurious inflammatory states. PMID:2553608

  5. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by oxygenated sterol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.I.; Bass, J.; Yachnin, S.

    1980-07-01

    When preincubated with certain oxygenated sterol compounds in lipoprotein-depleted serum (20% (vol/vol)), human polymorphonuclear leukocytes show inhibition of chemotaxis toward the synthetic dipeptide N-formylmethionylphenylalinine without alteration of random movement or loss of cell viability. These effects can occur at sterol concentrations as low as 6.25 ..mu..M and after as little as 5 min of preincubation, but they are increased at higher concentrations and longer preincubation times. The inhibition can be almost completely reversed by preincubation in lipoprotein-replete serum (human AB serum, 20% (vol/vol)) and may be partially corrected by addition of free cholesterol (0.125 mM) to the medium. These effects are unlikely to be due to inhibition of cellular sterol synthesis, competition for chemotaxin membrane binding sites, or deactivation of the leukocytes but they may be a consequence of insertion of the sterol molecule into the leukocyte plasma membranes.

  6. Extracellular release of antimicrobial defensins by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, T

    1987-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) contain three antimicrobial and cytotoxic peptides which belong to a family of mammalian granulocyte peptides named defensins. To determine their potential availability for extracellular microbicidal or cytotoxic events, we quantified the extracellular release of defensins after stimulation of human PMN with phorbol myristate acetate and opsonized zymosan. As determined by enzyme immunoassay and confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and densitometry, 10(6) human PMN contained 4 to 5 micrograms of defensins. After stimulation with a high concentration of phorbol myristate acetate (1 microgram/ml), about 8% of PMN defensins were found in the media. Release of defensins correlated best with the release of azurophil granule marker beta-glucuronidase or elastase and poorly with the release of either the specific granule marker lactoferrin or cytoplasmic lactate dehydrogenase. Phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan resulted in the extracellular release of less than 3% of PMN defensins. The factors responsible for less release of defensins into media relative to the release of other azurophil granule proteins may include heterogeneity of azurophil granules and the affinity of defensins for cellular surfaces and opsonized particles. In vivo, defensins are most likely to reach effective microbicidal or cytotoxic concentrations in PMN-rich exudates (pus), in confined environments of the phagolysosomes, or in intercellular clefts between PMN and their targets. PMID:3643886

  7. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L. , Decatur, GA )

    1990-06-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes.

  8. Uptake and intracellular activity of fluconazole in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, A; García, I; Conejo, C; Perea, E J

    1993-01-01

    The penetration of fluconazole into human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and tissue culture epithelial cells (McCoy) was evaluated. At different extracellular concentrations (0.5 to 10 mg/liter), fluconazole reached cell-associated concentrations greater than the extracellular ones in either human PMNs (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 2.2) or McCoy cells (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 1.3). The uptake of fluconazole by PMNs was rapid and reversible but was not energy dependent. The intracellular penetration of fluconazole was not affected by environmental pH or temperature. Ingestion of opsonized zymosan and opsonized Candida albicans did not significantly increase the amount of PMN-associated fluconazole. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, the intracellular activity of fluconazole against C. albicans in PMNs was significantly lower than that of amphotericin B. It was concluded that fluconazole reaches high intracellular concentrations within PMNs but shows moderate activity against intracellular C. albicans in vitro. PMID:8452347

  9. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes respond to waves of chemoattractant, like Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Jeremy; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R

    2003-09-01

    It has been assumed that the natural chemotactic signal that attracts human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) over long distances to sites of infection is in the form of a standing spatial gradient of chemoattractant. We have questioned this assumption on the grounds, first, that standing spatial gradients may not be stable over long distances for long periods of time and, second, that in the one animal cell chemotaxis system in which the natural chemotactic signal has been described in space and time, aggregation of Dicytostelium discoideum, the signal is in the form of an outwardly relayed, nondissipating wave of attractant. Here, it is demonstrated that PMNs alter their behavior in each of the four phases of a wave of PMN chemoattractant, fashioned after the Dictyostelium wave, in a manner similar to Dictyostelium. These results demonstrate that PMNs have all of the machinery to respond to a natural wave of attractant, providing support to the hypothesis that the natural signal that attracts PMNs over large distances to sites of infection in the human body may also be in the form of a wave. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Analysis of cell locomotion. Contact guidance of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Matthes, T; Gruler, H

    1988-01-01

    The methods of statistical physics have been applied to the analysis of cell movement. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were exposed to different surfaces possessing parallel oriented physical structures (scratched glass surface, machine drilled aluminum surface, optical grid and stretched polyethylene foil) and cell migration was observed using time-lapse photography. We demonstrate that in cell migration along physical structures, referred to as contact guidance, two subgroups can be distinguished: 1) The nematic type where the cell size is large in relation to the grid distance of the undulate surface. 2) The smectic type where the cell size is small in relation to the grid distance of the substrate. Nematic contact guidance is characterized by an anisotropic random walk. In all substrates investigated the diffusion process parallel to the lines was faster than the diffusion process perpendicular to them. The angular dependent diffusion coefficient was described by an ellipse. Deviation from a circle defined an apolar order parameter, whose value was about 0.3. The amount of information which the cells collected from, the undulate surface was very low, between 0.1 and 0.2 bits. We demonstrate that cells do not recognize all the details of their surroundings and that their migration can be compared to the "groping around" of a short sighted man. The blurred environment can be described by a mean field whose strength is proportional to the apolar order parameter. It is argued that the anisotropic surface tension is the basic source for nematic contact guidance. Smectic contact guidance is characterized by an anisotropic random walk and is quantified by a density order parameter which is 0.28 in the case of the scratched glass surface of a Neubauer counting chamber. The information which the cells collect from their environment is very low (0.03 bits). The lines seen by the cell can be described by a mean field whose strength is proportional to the density oder

  11. Lipoproteins of Treponema denticola: their effect on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sela, M N; Bolotin, A; Naor, R; Weinberg, A; Rosen, G

    1997-07-01

    The presence of lipoproteins and lipooligosaccharides in Treponema denticola, an oral spirochaete associated with periodontal diseases, was investigated. T. denticola ATCC 35404 and the clinical isolate GM-1 were metabolically labeled with [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid and extracted with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114. The extract was phase separated, precipitated with acetone and delipidated to remove non-covalently bound lipid (dLPP). In T. denticola ATCC 35404, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide electrophoretic separation followed by autoradiography showed [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation in bands with apparent molecular masses of 14, 20, 26, 31, 38, 72 and 85 kDa and a broad band running from 113 kDa to the top of the gel. This last band resolved into a 53 kDa [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid band upon heating for 10 min, at 100 degrees C. The structural relationship of the outer sheath major oligomeric polypeptide of strain ATCC 35404 and the 53 kDa protein was demonstrated immunologically. Antibodies against the 113 kDa component of the oligomer cross-reacted with the 53 kDa protein. Proteinase K degraded the [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid bands with the exception of the 14 kDa. The 14 kDa was also the major [3H]-fatty acid labeled compound found in the water phase following phenol-water extraction of whole T. denticola ATCC 35404 cells. This compound was purified from the water phase by gel filtration followed by hydrophobic chromatography. Chemical analysis showed that hexadecanoic acid was the predominant fatty acid bound to T. denticola lipoproteins. In the GM-1 strain [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation was observed in the 116 kDa and 14 kDa bands. dLPP from strain ATCC 35404 caused an enhanced (0.8-8 micrograms/ml) luminol dependent chemiluminiscence (LDCL) effect in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) which could be related to protein concentration. The addition of dLPP to PMN together with FMLP at submaximal concentration (1

  12. Anaerobiosis increases resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to O2-independent antimicrobial proteins from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, S G; Shafer, W M; Spitznagel, J K

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA19 to the O2-independent antimicrobial systems of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Acid extracts of polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules (crude granule extracts) and a purified granule protein (57 kilodaltons) were, at low concentrations, bactericidal for gonococci under aerobic conditions that permitted growth. However, they were less effective under anaerobic conditions that imposed bacteriostasis. We found that adding sodium nitrite to reduced growth media permitted the growth of strain FA19 in an anaerobic environment. Under these conditions with nitrite, anaerobic cultures of strain FA19 were no more resistant to the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton protein than aerobic cultures. In contrast, Salmonella typhimurium SL-1004, a facultative anaerobe, was readily killed by both the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton antimicrobial protein regardless of the presence or absence of free molecular oxygen. This is the first demonstration that an isolated antimicrobial protein from polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules is active against bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Our results also indicated that the efficacy of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte O2-independent killing of N. gonorrhoeae may, in part, be inhibited by bacteriostatic conditions imposed by hypoxia. Images PMID:3917976

  13. Effects of hypertonic saline on expression of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Buessecker, F; Eberhardt, K; Chouker, A; Setzer, F; Kreimeier, U; Arfors, K E; Peter, K; Messmer, K

    2001-08-01

    Hypertonic saline prevents vascular adherence of neutrophils and ameliorates ischemic tissue injury. We hypothesized that hypertonic saline attenuates N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated expression of adhesion molecules on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs). fMLP-stimulated up-regulation of beta2-integrins was diminished by hypertonic saline but not by hypertonic choline chloride-, mannitol-, or sucrose-modified Hanks' buffered salt solution. Shedding of L-selectin was decreased by hypertonic saline and choline chloride but not by hypertonic mannitol or sucrose. When the effects of hypertonic sodium chloride- and choline chloride-modified media were compared, neither solution affected fMLP-receptor binding but both equally inhibited fMLP-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium, ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated numerical up-regulation of beta2-integrins. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases p38 and p44/42 for phosphorylation revealed that hypertonic solutions did not differ in preventing fMLP-stimulated increases in phospho-p38 and phospho-p44/42. Resting PMNLs shrunk by hypertonic saline increased their volume during incubation and further during chemotactic stimulation. Addition of amiloride further enhanced inhibition of up-regulation of beta2-integrins. No fMLP-stimulated volume changes occurred in PMNLs exposed to hypertonic choline chloride, resulting in significant cell shrinkage. Results suggest a sodium-specific inhibitory effect on up-regulation of beta2-integrins of fMLP-stimulated PMNLs, which is unlikely to be caused by alterations of fMLP receptor binding, decrease in cytosolic calcium, attenuation of calcium or protein kinase C-dependent pathways, suppression of p38- or p44/42 MAP kinase-dependent pathways, or cellular ability to increase or decrease volumes.

  14. Effect of piliation on interactions of Haemophilus influenzae type b with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, M F; Anderson, D C; Barrish, J; Mason, E O; Kaplan, S L

    1985-01-01

    Piliated, adherent (P+) and nonpiliated, nonadherent (P-) strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) were compared with respect to their ability to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemiluminescence (CL) and superoxide (O2-) generation and their susceptibility to phagocytosis by PMNs. P+ strains opsonized in normal human serum (NHS) induced significantly greater CL than did P- strains (500 X 10(5) +/- 112 X 10(5) versus 242 X 10(5) +/- 65 X 10(5) total counts per 60 min; P less than 0.001) when reacted with normal PMNs. Contributions of immunoglobulin and complement to CL activity in these mixtures were shown by findings of lower overall levels of CL when hypogammaglobulinemic serum or heat-inactivated NHS was used to opsonize either P+ or P- organisms. Results obtained with mixtures of hypogammaglobulinemic plus adsorbed heat-inactivated NHS (with P+ or P- organisms) suggested a role for an antipilus antibody in the enhancement of CL by these strains. NHS-opsonized P+ strains also induced significantly greater (P less than 0.002) O2- generation than did P- strains (2.83 +/- 0.08 versus 1.94 +/- 0.14 nmol of ferricytochrome c reduced per 10 min/10(6) PMN). Comparable ingestion of P+ or P- strains opsonized in NHS by PMNs was demonstrated by a radiolabeled uptake technique and transmission electron microscopy, and primary granule release (beta-glucuronidase) was comparable during ingestion of P+ or P- strains. The basis for the observed enhanced capacity of P+ Hib to stimulate PMN oxidative metabolism as compared with P- organisms is uncertain. Possible clinical implications of these findings deserve further study. Images PMID:2857685

  15. Chemotactic activity of Helicobacter pylori sonicate for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1992-01-01

    The immunopathology of Helicobacter pylori associated active chronic gastritis, which is characterised by predominance of polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration, is largely unknown. To evaluate the role of bacterial components as inflammatory mediators ultracentrifuged sonicated preparations were made of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The crude sonicates were shown to exhibit chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood monocytes in a concentration dependent fashion. The potency was comparable with previously described bacterial derived cytotaxins. The cytotaxin(s) was non-dialysable and completely destroyed by proteinase. Heat treatment did not decrease the chemotactic activity, but in sonicate subjected to 100 degrees C for 15 minutes all activity disappeared after dialysis suggesting the breakdown of a larger protein to small fragments that are still biological active. By ammonium sulphate precipitation at increasing concentrations the cytotaxin(s) was selectively found in 10% ammonium sulphate saturation, and by further molecular gel separation the chemotactic activity was found in the molecular size range from 25 to 35 kDa. The demonstration of a polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte cytotaxin from Helicobacter pylori sonicate may help in understanding the mucosal immune response in gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:1624151

  16. Superoxide generation from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes by liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Abe, H; Ikebuchi, K; Niwa, K; Inanami, O; Kuwabara, M; Fujihara, M; Hirayama, J; Ikeda, H

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the interactions between liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (Neo Red Cells: NRC) and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as assessed by superoxide generation. NRC triggered superoxide generation from neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Empty liposomes also induced superoxide production of neutrophils. Superoxide generation of neutrophils induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was delayed but intensified both by NRC and empty liposomes. The intensity of superoxide generation induced by NRC was smaller than that by the empty liposomes. As NRC contained superoxide dismutase (SOD) that was copurified with hemoglobin from red blood cells and its activity remained, SOD contained in NRC may partially eliminate superoxide.

  17. Mannose-inhibitable adhesins and T3-T7 receptors of Klebsiella pneumoniae inhibit phagocytosis and intracellular killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pruzzo, C; Debbia, E; Satta, G

    1982-01-01

    It has recently been shown that Klebsiella pneumoniae strains adhere to human epithelial cells and that adherence is mediated by mannose-inhibitable adhesins which are also receptors for coliphages T3 and T7. We have now found that Klebsiella strain K59, which adheres to human epithelial cells and carries the receptors for coliphages T3 and T7, adheres to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) at 4 degrees C. Strains KRTT1 and KRTT2, which are spontaneous mutants unable to adsorb coliphages T3 and T7 and adhere to human epithelial cells, at this temperature did not adhere to PMN. Adherence of K59 cells to PMN at 4 degrees C was inhibited by D-mannose, by UV-inactivated T7 phages, and by pepsin-digested anti-K59 antibodies absorbed with KRTT1 cells. At 37 degrees C the number of PMN with KRTT bacteria associated was fourfold higher than at 4 degrees C. On the contrary, the number of PMN with K59 bacteria associated at this temperature was fourfold lower than at 4 degrees C. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing experiments performed at 37 degrees C showed that KRTT1 and KRTT2 were phagocytized and killed at a higher rate than K59. After blocking of the mannose-inhibitable adhesins and T3-T7 receptors (MIAT) by D-mannose, UV-inactivated bacteriophage T7, or specific antibodies, K59 cells became more sensitive to phagocytosis and intracellular killing at 37 degrees C. K59 cells lysogenic for prophage AP3 were approximately as sensitive to phagocytosis and intracellular killing by human PMN as strains KRTT1 and KRTT2. Unencapsulated Klebsiella strains isolated from clinical specimens were found to carry MIAT most often. Four such strains were found much more resistant to phagocytosis and intracellular killing than their spontaneous mutants resistant to bacteriophages T3 and T7. PMID:7047402

  18. Isolation of human salivary polymorphonuclear leukocytes and their stimulation-coupled responses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Saeki, K; Utsumi, K

    1991-08-15

    A simple method was developed to isolate viable human salivary polymorphonuclear leukocytes (SPMN) from the oral cavity, and stimulation-coupled responses of these cells were examined. From morphological characteristics and the presence of neutrophil-specific annexin protein (39-kDa protein), we found that these cells seemed to be very similar to human peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PPMN), although they were in rather young stages. Stimulation-coupled responses of these cells were observed in terms of superoxide (O2.-) genration, luminol chemiluminescence response (LCL), membrane depolarization, and changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i). The rates of superoxide generation by various stimuli, such as formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were different. Superoxide generation and strong chemiluminescence response were observed without addition of any stimuli. This endogenous LCL was inhibited by azide and superoxide dismutase (SOD), but not by uric acid (UA). The intensity of the endogenous LCL decreased with time after isolation from the oral cavity. This decrease was accompanied by the appearance of a FMLP-coupled response. Furthermore, the endogenous activity which produced active oxygen species was maintained in the medium at 4 degrees C for a long period after isolation. From these results, it is suggested that SPMN have the ability to show characteristic responses to various stimuli, and that SPMN play important roles in the defense mechanisms in the oral cavity.

  19. Effects of gatifloxacin on phagocytosis, intracellular killing and oxidant radical production by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Dal Sasso, M; Bovio, C; Zavaroni, E; Fonti, E

    2002-03-01

    The ingestion and killing of bacteria by phagocytic cells is an important step in the sequence of interactions between invading microorganisms and host defense systems and may be affected by antibiotics. We investigated the effects of gatifloxacin on the phagocytosis, killing and oxidative bursts of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). The percentage phagocytosis and the phagocytosis index were unaffected by exposure of Escherichia coli strains to sub-MICs of gatifloxacin to a 1/64 dilution. However a significant increase in percentage intraphagocytic killing and the killing index occurred in one E. coli strain at 1/32 MIC and in two strains at 1/16 MIC. The incubation of PMNs with sub-MICs and supra-MICs of gatifloxacin (to 32 MIC) did not affect the oxidative bursts.

  20. Activation of the lipoxygenase pathway in the methionine enkephalin induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, J.T.; Foris, G.; Fulop, T. Jr.; Paragh, G.; Plotnikoff, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    In comparative studies of f-met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and methionine enkephalin (ME) induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) stimulation the following results were obtained: (i) both FMLP and ME increased the intracellular killing (IK) capability of human PMNLs probably through NADPH oxidase activation, (ii) the ME-induced respiratory burst (RB) differed from the chemotactic peptide FMLP-triggered superoxide generation because the former was not accompanied by the activation of the glutathione system and the duration of the superoxide production was prolonged. The reaction was dependent on lipoxygenation, was potentiated by indomethacin (IM) and was inhibited by nordihidro-guairetic acid (NDGA), (iii) both /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid release and leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) synthesis of ME-treated PMNLs were elevated as compared to those of FMLP triggered cells. Their results suggest that lipoxygenation and even an increased LTB/sub 4/ synthesis are involved in the ME-induced RB of leukocytes.

  1. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  2. Key Roles of Human Polymorphonuclear Cells and Ciprofloxacin in Lactobacillus Species Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Petronio Petronio, Giulio; Fuochi, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli have the potential to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes similar to those found in human pathogens, with the risk of transferring these genes to many pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we investigated the role of human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) against Lactobacillus spp. both resistant and susceptible to ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone) and the effect of ciprofloxacin on the interaction between PMNs and three Lactobacillus spp. with different patterns of susceptibility to this drug. Hence, the primary functions of PMNs, such as phagocytosis and bacterial intracellular killing, against lactobacilli were investigated. The rate of PMN phagocytosis was high for ciprofloxacin-sensitive and ciprofloxacin-resistant strains. The patterns of intracellular killing of ciprofloxacin-sensitive and ciprofloxacin-resistant strains by PMNs underline that PMNs alone were able to kill lactobacilli. The addition of ciprofloxacin to PMNs did not result in a significant increase in the bacterial uptake by phagocytes. On the contrary, ciprofloxacin had a marked effect on PMN intracellular killing, resulting in increased numbers of killed ciprofloxacin-sensitive bacteria in comparison with antibiotic-free controls. Our data show that by itself, the profile of antibiotic resistance does not constitute an intrinsic factor of greater or lesser pathogenicity toward the host. The ability of PMNs to kill a diverse array of bacterial pathogens is essential for human innate host defense, primarily in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26711767

  3. Key Roles of Human Polymorphonuclear Cells and Ciprofloxacin in Lactobacillus Species Infection Control.

    PubMed

    Mandras, Narcisa; Tullio, Vivian; Furneri, Pio Maria; Roana, Janira; Allizond, Valeria; Scalas, Daniela; Petronio Petronio, Giulio; Fuochi, Virginia; Banche, Giuliana; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2015-12-28

    Lactobacilli have the potential to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes similar to those found in human pathogens, with the risk of transferring these genes to many pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we investigated the role of human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) against Lactobacillus spp. both resistant and susceptible to ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone) and the effect of ciprofloxacin on the interaction between PMNs and three Lactobacillus spp. with different patterns of susceptibility to this drug. Hence, the primary functions of PMNs, such as phagocytosis and bacterial intracellular killing, against lactobacilli were investigated. The rate of PMN phagocytosis was high for ciprofloxacin-sensitive and ciprofloxacin-resistant strains. The patterns of intracellular killing of ciprofloxacin-sensitive and ciprofloxacin-resistant strains by PMNs underline that PMNs alone were able to kill lactobacilli. The addition of ciprofloxacin to PMNs did not result in a significant increase in the bacterial uptake by phagocytes. On the contrary, ciprofloxacin had a marked effect on PMN intracellular killing, resulting in increased numbers of killed ciprofloxacin-sensitive bacteria in comparison with antibiotic-free controls. Our data show that by itself, the profile of antibiotic resistance does not constitute an intrinsic factor of greater or lesser pathogenicity toward the host. The ability of PMNs to kill a diverse array of bacterial pathogens is essential for human innate host defense, primarily in immunocompromised patients.

  4. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration.

  5. The effects of some antirheumatic drugs on an in vitro model of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. J.; Walker, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    1 A rapid, reproducible in vitro assay for studying the chemokinetic movement of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) is described. Two synthetic peptides, formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and formyl methionyl-phenylalanine (FMP), were used as a standard chemokinesins. 2 Maximal chemokinetic movement was observed with peptide concentrations of 2.5 nM (FMLP) and 100 muM (FMP). EC50 values of 650.0 +/- 60.0 pM and 27.0 +/- 3.5 muM respectively are similar to those reported for chemotactic activity of the peptides in micropore filter assays. 3 The PMN chemokinetic response to FMLP was enhanced by histamine (100 nM) and vitamin C (2.5 muM). 4 Human serum albumin was shown to induce chemokinesis but to antagonize the response to FMLP in a dose-related fashion. Fibrinogen similarly antagonized the cell response to peptide. 5 Levamisole (250 nM to 2.5 muM) significantly potentiated the chemokinetic responses to FMLP and FMP in a dose-related manner. The chemokinetic response to FMLP was unaffected by D-penicillamine (250 muM to 10 mM) while alclofenac (500 muM to 1 mM), salicylic acid (250 muM to 10 mM) and indomethacin (100 muM to 1 mM) caused dose-related inhibition. PMID:7397456

  6. Radical scavenger activity of phenylethanoid glycosides in FMLP stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, J; Calis, I; Kirmizibekmez, H; Schühly, W; Harput, S; Sticher, O

    2000-12-01

    Radical scavenger activities of 21 phenylethanoid glycosides, including 15 ester derivatives of caffeic, ferulic, vanillic and syringic acid as well as 6 deacyl derivatives were determined by quantifying their effects on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). All phenylethanoids acylated with phenolic acids showed strong antioxidant activity whereas the deacyl derivatives were more than 30-fold less active. Therefore, the antioxidant activity is mainly related to the number of aromatic methoxy and hydroxy groups and the structure of the acyl moiety (C6-C1 or C6-C3). In contrast, modification of the sugar chain or replacement of hydroxy groups by methoxy groups in the acyl or the phenylethanoid moiety is of minor importance. The position of the acyl moiety is without significance. Free caffeic, ferulic, vanillic and syringic acid are less active compared to the phenylethanoid derivatives. This points to the importance of dissociation and lipophilicity of these acids in a cellular test system.

  7. Bryostatins trigger human polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte oxidative metabolism: association with in vitro antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Esa, A H; Warren, J T; Hess, A D; May, W S

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin-1-but not bryostatin-13-a macrocyclic lactone isolated from the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina, triggered human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte release of reactive oxygen radicals, as measured by the generation of lucigenin chemiluminescence and by the ferricytochrome c reduction assay. The release of oxygen radicals by bryostatins was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinases, but resistant to the inhibition of phospholipase A2 activity and arachidonic acid metabolism (prior treatment with mepacrine or indomethacin). Comparison of the effect of protein kinase (PK) inhibitors H-8, H-7 and staurosporine on bryostatin-1-induced neutrophil oxygen radical release further suggested a requirement for activation of phospholipid-dependent PKC, but not for cGMP- or cAMP-dependent PK. In cytostatic assays, PMNs treated with bryostatin-1 inhibited the growth of the erythroleukaemic cell line K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the reported antineoplastic effect of bryostatins may result at least in part from activation of PMNs and monocytes.

  8. Characterization of a protein from normal human polymorphonuclear leukocytes with bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hovde, C J; Gray, B H

    1986-01-01

    Purification of a bactericidal protein (BP) from the cytoplasmic granules of normal human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is described. Bactericidal activity from acid extracts of a mixed granule population was purified 175-fold by a two-step chromatographic procedure. The first step, dye-ligand affinity chromatography with Matrex-Gel Orange A, was followed by cation-exchange chromatography with Bio-Rex 70 resin, and this combination routinely gave a yield near 80%. Only one peak of bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa type I was found after each chromatographic step. Characterization of BP showed a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 55,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified BP was most active against the six strains of P. aeruginosa tested and against Escherichia coli B (a deep rough mutant). Purified BP killed 5 X 10(6) CFU of P. aeruginosa type I per ml at a concentration of 60 to 80 ng/ml. Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus aureus were both resistant to the bactericidal activity of BP. BP was shown to be glycosylated by periodic acid staining after gel electrophoresis and to have an isoelectric point near 7.5 by chromatofocusing. The amino acid composition of BP is presented. Images PMID:3093381

  9. Effect on polymorphonuclear cell function of a human-specific cytotoxin, intermedilysin, expressed by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Macey, M G; Whiley, R A; Miller, L; Nagamune, H

    2001-10-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the normal flora of the mouth but is also an opportunistic pathogen associated with purulent infections at oral and nonoral sites. Intermedilysin (ILY) has been shown to be a cytolysin capable of generating pores in the cell membrane of erythrocytes demonstrable by electron microscopy. This effect has been shown to be specific for human cells. Since polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) are the main cell involved in innate immunity we investigated the effect of purified intermedilysin from Streptococcus intermedius on PMN function. Active ILY at a concentration of 40 ng/microl caused a significant decrease in the number of intact PMNs after 60 min. The active cytolysin, when compared with heat-inactivated ILY, did not appear to be chemotactic for the PMNs but did cause an increase in intracellular calcium, with increased cell surface CD11b expression, metabolic burst, and phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. These findings may have implications for the role of ILY in deep-seated abscesses.

  10. Albumin inhibits human polymorphonuclear leucocyte luminol-dependent chemiluminescence: evidence for oxygen radical scavenging.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, M. E.; Ryall, M. E.; Campbell, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of normal human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) which were resting, or stimulated by unopsonized latex beads, opsonized zymosan or the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe was decreased more than 80% in the presence of physiological concentrations of albumin (4%, w/v). This inhibition did not result from impairment of light transmission, cellular toxicity, luminol excited-state quenching or a dialysable contaminant in the albumin preparation, but was reduced by 30% when the fall induced by albumin in extracellular free Ca2+ concentration was corrected. The inhibition was most apparent in the larger second phase of the PMN chemiluminescent response to chemotactic peptide or opsonized zymosan stimulation. The smaller first phase of these responses was in fact enhanced by low concentrations of albumin (0.05-0.5%, w/v) and only inhibited up to 50% by 4% (w/v) albumin. Albumin in the range 0.1-4% (w/v) exerted a similar effect on chemiluminescence resulting from superoxide anion (O-2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by xanthine oxidase catalysed oxidation of xanthine in the presence of luminol. We suggest that the effect of albumin on PMN luminol-dependent chemiluminescence is mediated by modification of the oxygen radical generating pathway, or oxygen radical scavenging. This previously undocumented property of the major extracellular protein requires further examination if oxygen radicals are to be established as important mediators of inflammation. PMID:6712882

  11. Mechanisms of interaction among subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, and gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, L A; Afnan, M

    1991-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that pretreatment of bacteria with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics enhances the susceptibility of the organisms to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Our purpose was to study a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action and to determine whether the mechanism and locus of action altered the sub-MIC effect. The following outcome measures were used: ingestion and killing of bacteria by PMNs, bacterial killing in the absence of phagosome formation, and binding requirements of the bacteria to PMNs. The antibiotics used were representative of a variety of classes, including beta-lactams (piperacillin and imipenem) and quinolones (ciprofloxacin). Bacterial uptake and killing were measured by using standard techniques, and results were analyzed by using the analysis-of-variance technique and Dunnett's t test. Pretreatment of Escherichia coli with all drugs showed significantly enhanced killing of bacteria by PMNs, which was independent of ingestion by the phagocytes. Even in the absence of phagosome formation, statistically significant killing persisted with piperacillin-pretreated bacteria but not with imipenem- or ciprofloxacin-pretreated organisms. The opsonization experiments showed that contact between bacteria and PMNs was necessary for killing to occur. The sub-MIC effect appears to be independent of the locus or mechanism of action of the antibiotic. It results in enhanced killing by PMNs which is independent of ingestion and also may persist even in the absence of phagosome formation. Killing is dependent upon specific contact between bacteria and an intact phagocyte. PMID:1929284

  12. Mechanisms of interaction among subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, and gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Mandell, L A; Afnan, M

    1991-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that pretreatment of bacteria with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics enhances the susceptibility of the organisms to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Our purpose was to study a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action and to determine whether the mechanism and locus of action altered the sub-MIC effect. The following outcome measures were used: ingestion and killing of bacteria by PMNs, bacterial killing in the absence of phagosome formation, and binding requirements of the bacteria to PMNs. The antibiotics used were representative of a variety of classes, including beta-lactams (piperacillin and imipenem) and quinolones (ciprofloxacin). Bacterial uptake and killing were measured by using standard techniques, and results were analyzed by using the analysis-of-variance technique and Dunnett's t test. Pretreatment of Escherichia coli with all drugs showed significantly enhanced killing of bacteria by PMNs, which was independent of ingestion by the phagocytes. Even in the absence of phagosome formation, statistically significant killing persisted with piperacillin-pretreated bacteria but not with imipenem- or ciprofloxacin-pretreated organisms. The opsonization experiments showed that contact between bacteria and PMNs was necessary for killing to occur. The sub-MIC effect appears to be independent of the locus or mechanism of action of the antibiotic. It results in enhanced killing by PMNs which is independent of ingestion and also may persist even in the absence of phagosome formation. Killing is dependent upon specific contact between bacteria and an intact phagocyte.

  13. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: sequence of phagocytosis and cytotoxicity by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; Cardoni, R L; Olabuenaga, S E; de Bracco, M M

    1981-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between phagocytosis and cytotoxicity of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) to sensitized Trypanosoma cruzi. Assays were done simultaneously using [3H]-uridine labelled epimastigotes as target cells. Phagocytosis was evaluated by the uptake and cytotoxicity by the release of parasite associated [3H]-uridine. Both reactions reached maximum levels at the same effector- to target-cell ratio and antibody concentration. Uptake of epimastigotes by PMN was highest at 30 min and intracellular disruption and release of parasite debris took place later. In conditions that precluded repeated uptake of sensitized radiolabelled T. cruzi, the release profile of [3H]-uridine from PMN that contained intracellular parasites was similar to that of the standard cytotoxic assay. However, as the ingestion phase was separated from the release step, no lag in the onset of the reaction was observed. Although we cannot rule out extracellular killing, the results of this study demonstrate that the bulk of damaged T. cruzi epimastigotes had been previously internalized by the PMN. PMID:7016743

  15. Localization of NADH oxidase on the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes by a new cytochemical method

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of NADH oxidase, a possible enzyme in the increased oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) during phagocytosis, was studied. A new cytochemical technique for the localization of H2O2, a product of NADH oxidase activity, was developed. Cerous ions, in the presence of peroxide, form an electron- dense precipitate. Resting and phagocytically stimulated PMN were exposed to cerous ions at pH 7.5 to demonstrate sites of NADH- dependent, cyanide-insensitive H2O2 production. Resting PMN exhibites slight activity on the plasma membrane; phagocytizing PMN had extensive deposits of reaction product localized within the phagosome and on the plasma membrane. Peroxide involvement was demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of catalase on cerium precipitation; the surface localization of the enzyme responsible was confirmed by using nonpenetrating inhibitors of enzymatic activity. A correlative study was performed with an NADH-dependent, tetrazolium-reduction system. As with cerium, formazan deposition on the surface of the cell was NADH dependent, cyanide insensitive, and stimulated by phagocytosis. Superoxide dismutase did not inhibit tetrazolium reduction, as observed cytochemically, indicating direct enzymatic dye reduction without superoxide interposition. These findings, combined with oxygen consumption studies on resting and stimulated PMN in the presence or absence of NADH, indicate that NADH oxidase is a surface enzyme in human PMN. It is internalized during phagocytosis and retains its peroxide-generating capacity within the phagocytic vacuole. PMID:407

  16. Simultaneous flow cytometric evaluation of phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Horvathova, M; Wsolova, L; Jahnova, E

    2005-01-01

    Phagocytosis and oxidative burst (OXIBURST) activity of human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) has been simultaneously measured directly in whole blood samples. The ingestion of yeast was assessed by the phagocytosis activity (FA) and phagocytosis index (FI), and the respiratory burst of PMNs was determined as dihydroethidine (DHE) oxidation. We received comparable results in the ingestion of yeast cells by PMNs using either light microscopy (77.31+/-7.56) or flow cytometry detection method (78.26+/-5.14). The significant differences (p<0.05) in FI and OXIBURST activity were find in the patients (2.29+/-0.29 and 14.67+/-3.99, respectively) when compared to healthy donors (1.64+/-0.21 and 32.38+/-14.94, respectively). The two-color flow cytometric procedure permits measurement of two different functions of neutrophils in one step. This flow cytometric procedure is simple, rapid and has the potential to be an alternative assay to test leukocyte function. (Fig. 3, Ref: 30.)

  17. Nitric oxide-generating system as an autocrine mechanism in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Riesco, A; Caramelo, C; Blum, G; Montón, M; Gallego, M J; Casado, S; López Farré, A

    1993-01-01

    Recent data [Lopéz-Farré, Riesco, Moliz, Egido, Casado, Hernando and Caramelo (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 178, 884-891] revealed that endothelin 1 (ET-1) increases intracellular free [Ca2+] in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) by a mechanism that can be inhibited by L-arginine. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanisms of the interaction between the effects of ET-1 and L-arginine in human PMN. The experimental findings showed that in human PMN: (a) ET-1 and the chemoattractant peptide N-formylmethionyl- leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) induce both the metabolism of L-arginine to L-citrulline and cyclic GMP (cGMP) formation; (b) the ET-1-induced cGMP production is inhibitable by the L-arginine antagonist NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, therefore suggesting the involvement of NO; (c) the ET-1- or fMLP-induced NO/cGMP stimulation is critically dependent on the availability of L-arginine; (d) human PMN possess a L-arginine transport system with both Na(+)-dependent and -independent components; (e) the L-arginine transport system in PMN appears to be feedback-regulated by NO/cGMP in ET-1-stimulated conditions, but not under baseline conditions; (f) the L-arginine transport system in PMN is independent of the gamma-glutamyl cycle and is not modified by either ET-1 or fMLP. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP-dependent mechanisms characterized in the present study may be relevant in the regulation of PMN activation in pathophysiological conditions in vivo. PMID:7686367

  18. Phagocytosis of virulent Porphyromonas gingivalis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes requires specific immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, C W; Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1991-01-01

    No studies to date clearly define the interactions between Porphyromonas gingivalis and human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), nor has a protective role for antibody to P. gingivalis been defined. Using a fluorochrome phagocytosis microassay, we investigated PMN phagocytosis and killing of P. gingivalis as a function of P. gingivalis-specific antibody. Sera from a nonimmune rabbit and a healthy human subject were not opsonic for virulent P. gingivalis A7436, W83, and HG405; phagocytosis of these strains (but not 33277) required opsonization with hyperimmune antiserum (RaPg). Diluting RaPg with a constant complement source decreased proportionally the number of P. gingivalis A7436 cells phagocytosed per phagocytic PMN. Enriching for the immunoglobulin G fraction of RAPg A7436 enriched for opsonic activity toward A7436. An opsonic evaluation of 18 serum samples from adult periodontitis patients revealed that only 3 adult periodontitis sera of 17 with elevated immunoglobulin G to P. gingivalis A7436 were opsonic for A7436 and, moreover, that the serum sample with the highest enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titer was most opsonic (patient 1). However, the opsonic activity of serum from patient 1 was qualitatively and not just quantitatively different from that of the nonopsonic human sera (but was less effective opsonin than RaPg). Strain variability was observed in resistance of P. gingivalis to phagocytosis, and opsonization was strain specific for some, but not all, strains tested. An evaluation of killing of A7436 revealed that serum killing and extracellular killing of P. gingivalis were less effective alone when compared with intracellular PMN killing alone. PMID:2037370

  19. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  20. Production of reactive oxygen species by man-made vitreous fibres in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Hirvonen, M R; Luoto, K; Savolainen, K M

    1999-06-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or erythrocytes, isolated from human blood, were exposed to graded doses of asbestos (chrysotile), quartz, or man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF), i.e. refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), glasswool, or rockwool fibres. None of the MMVF affected either the viability of PMNL, as measured by trypan blue exclusion test, or induced haemolysis, whereas the positive controls, quartz and chrysotile, dose-dependently induced haemolysis in PMNL. MMVF did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the PMNL, whereas the positive controls, chrysotile and quartz, induced a marked and dose-dependent release of LDH. When PMNL were exposed to MMVF, some of the fibre types slightly increased the levels of free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) within the cells in a manner similar to that induced by chrysotile or quartz. All MMVF induced a dose-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNL, with RCF-induced production of ROS being the most marked. Production of ROS by MMVF seemed to depend on the availability of extracellular calcium because it could be attenuated with a Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil, or a Ca2+ chelating agent, EGTA. Production of ROS may be a common pathway through which PMNL respond to MMVF-induced cell activation, but alterations of levels of free intracellular Ca2+ do not seem to be an absolute prerequisite for this effect. Fibre length seemed not to be an important factor in affecting the ability of MMVF to induce ROS production in PMNL. However, the balance between different elements in the fibre seemed importantly to affect the biological activity of a fibre.

  1. Antipseudomonal agents exhibit differential pharmacodynamic interactions with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes against established biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen infecting the lower respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where it forms tracheobronchial biofilms. Pseudomonas biofilms are refractory to antibacterials and to phagocytic cells with innate immunity, leading to refractory infection. Little is known about the interaction between antipseudomonal agents and phagocytic cells in eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Herein, we investigated the capacity of three antipseudomonal agents, amikacin (AMK), ceftazidime (CAZ), and ciprofloxacin (CIP), to interact with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) against biofilms and planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from sputa of CF patients. Three of the isolates were resistant and three were susceptible to each of these antibiotics. The concentrations studied (2, 8, and 32 mg/liter) were subinhibitory for biofilms of resistant isolates, whereas for biofilms of susceptible isolates, they ranged between sub-MIC and 2 × MIC values. The activity of each antibiotic alone or in combination with human PMNs against 48-h mature biofilms or planktonic cells was determined by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. All combinations of AMK with PMNs resulted in synergistic or additive effects against planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates compared to each component alone. More than 75% of CAZ combinations exhibited additive interactions against biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates, whereas CIP had mostly antagonistic interaction or no interaction with PMNs against biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Our findings demonstrate a greater positive interaction between AMK with PMNs than that observed for CAZ and especially CIP against isolates of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract of CF patients.

  2. Nongenomic effect of thyroid hormone on free-radical production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Mezosi, E; Szabo, J; Nagy, E V; Borbely, A; Varga, E; Paragh, G; Varga, Z

    2005-04-01

    Over the past few years increasing evidence has suggested the nongenomic effects of thyroid hormone, such as the activation of the signal transduction pathways and the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB by the induction of oxidative stress. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of thyroid hormone on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) which are known as important sources of reactive oxygen species in the circulation. The production of superoxide anion (O2-) and the activity of myeloperoxidase were determined in the presence and absence of several inhibitors of the signalling pathway. L-thyroxine (T4) l-3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine (T3) and L-3,5-di-iodothyronine (T2) stimulated O2- production in PMNLs in a dose-dependent manner within a few minutes of addition to cells. Thyroid hormone-stimulated O2- production was partially inhibited by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of GTP-binding G protein, and was completely abolished by the protein kinase C inhibitors calphostin C and Ro-32-0432, and by a calcium chelator (BAPTA; bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid). Thyroid hormone stimulated myeloperoxidase activity and induced 125I- incorporation into PMNLs. Furthermore, thyroid hormone pre-incubation enhanced O2- production for n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (FMLP) stimulation. In conclusion, novel nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone, the induction of superoxide anion production and the stimulation of myeloperoxidase activity in PMNLs were demonstrated. The induction of O2- production requires calcium and is mediated by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein via stimulation of protein kinase C(s). These results suggest the existence of a membrane-bound binding site for thyroid hormone in PMNLs and a physiological role for thyroid hormone in the cellular defence mechanisms by stimulating free-radical production.

  3. Effect of monodesethyl amodiaquine on human polymorphonuclear neutrophil functions in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Labro, M T; el Benna, J

    1991-01-01

    We have previously observed that the antimalarial drug amodiaquine impairs the human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) oxidative burst in vitro. However, the drug acted at a concentration of 100 micrograms/ml, far higher than that which is achievable therapeutically. Since amodiaquine is extensively metabolized into monodesethyl amodiaquine, we investigated whether the metabolite modified PMN functions at lower concentrations than amodiaquine does. Monodesethyl amodiaquine strongly depressed PMN chemotaxis and phagocytosis at concentrations as low as 10 micrograms/ml. This inhibition was reversed by washing out the drug. The PMN oxidative burst was markedly depressed by monodesethyl amodiaquine, whatever the assay technique (luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, myeloperoxidase activity) or stimulus used (opsonized zymosan, phorbol myristate acetate, formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine). There were extreme interindividual variations in sensitivity to the depressive effect of monodesethyl amodiaquine when the PMN oxidative burst was assayed in terms of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence or lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence. PMN samples were divided into two groups on the basis of the MIC of the drug: 60% of the samples were "highly sensitive," being strongly inhibited at concentrations as low as 0.1 micrograms/ml (obtained during therapy), whereas the "moderately sensitive" samples were inhibited at concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml and above. The difference between the two groups was highly significant. This PMN sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of the drug was not related to intrinsic oxidative metabolism. Our data indicate that monodesethyl amodiaquine, the main metabolite of amodiaquine, has a far stronger inhibitory effect on various PMN functions in vitro than the parent drug, warranting relevant in vivo studies. PMID:1649569

  4. Flow cytometric approach to human polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation induced by gingival crevicular fluid in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Biselli, R; Ferlini, C; Di Murro, C; Paolantonio, M; Fattorossi, A

    1995-08-01

    In gingival pockets of patients with periodontal disease, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are in contact with a peculiar exudate, the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Because of the pivotal role played by PMN in periodontal disease, we evaluated the ability of GCF in modulating normal human PMN. GCF was obtained from two gingival sites with severe periodontitis (SP) and two gingival sites with only mild periodontitis (MP) in 12 patients. Purified PMN were exposed to GCF from SP and MP sites and, as a control, to sterile culture medium. GCF activity was evaluated by monitoring the modulation of membrane molecules relevant to cell function. Compared to control medium, GCF from SP and MP sites was able to induce an activation status in PMN evidenced by an increased CD11b (62 +/- 9% and 28 +/- 7%, respectively) and f-Met-Leu-Phe (56 +/- 5% and 31 +/- 7%, respectively) receptor expression, with a concomitant reduction of CD62L expression (56 +/- 8% and 23 +/- 7%, respectively). Thus, reflecting the clinical status, GCF from SP sites was significantly more efficient in affecting PMN than GCF from MP sites. Cell size modifications, evaluated as an additional indicator of PMN activation, were consistent with membrane molecule modulation. The difference in PMN-activating capacity between SP and MP was abrogated by the successful completion of an appropriate periodontal therapy that dramatically improved clinical status. This is the first direct demonstration that GCF from periodontitis has the capacity to activate normal resting PMN and that this capacity reflects the magnitude of the inflammatory process that takes place in the gingiva.

  5. Cellular Uptake of Two Fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghaffar, H.; Vazifeh, D.; Labro, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular accumulation of two new fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro. Both compounds were rapidly taken up by PMN, with a cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratio (C/E) of about 141 (HMR 3562) and 117 (HMR 3787) at 5 min, and this was followed by a plateau at 60 to 180 min, with a C/E of >300 at 180 min. Both ketolides were mainly located in PMN granules (about 75%) and egressed slowly from loaded cells (about 40% at 60 min), owing to avid reuptake. Uptake was moderately sensitive to external pH, and activation energy was also moderate (about 70 kJ/mol). As with other macrolides and ketolides, the existence of an active transport system was suggested by (i) the strong interindividual variability in uptake kinetics, suggesting variability in the number or activity of a transport protein; (ii) the saturation kinetics characteristic of a carrier-mediated transport system (Vmax, about 2,300 ng/2.5 × 106 PMN/5 min; Km, about 50 μg/ml); (iii) the inhibitory effects of Ni2+ (a blocker of the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger), phorbol myristate acetate (a protein kinase C activator), and H89 (a protein kinase A inhibitor). Although these two ketolides are more related to HMR 3647 (telithromycin), it is interesting that the presence of a fluoride gave these molecules a cellular pharmacokinetics more like those of HMR 3004 than those of HMR 3647. The macrolide transport system has not been yet elucidated, but our data confirm that, despite variations in chemical structure, all erythromycin A derivatives share a transmembrane transport system. PMID:11557472

  6. The cytokineplast: purified, stable, and functional motile machinery from human blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, SE; De Boisfleury Chevance, A

    1982-01-01

    We examined the formation of motile, chemotactically active, anucleate fragments from human blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN, granulocytes), induced by the brief application of heat. These granule-poor fragments are former protopods (leading fronts, lamellipodia) that become uncoupled from the main body of the cell and leave it, at first with a connecting filament that breaks and seals itself. The usual random orientation of such filaments can be controlled by preorientation of cells in a gradient of the chemotactic peptide, N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (F-Met-Leu-Phe) (2x10(-9) M- 1x10(-8)). Cytochalsin B, 2.5-5 μg/ml, prevents fragment formation; colchicine, 10(-5) M, does not. In scanning electron micrographs, fragments are ruffled and the cell body rounded up and rather smooth. In transmission electron micrographs, fragments contain microfilaments but lack centrioles and microtubules. Like intact cells, both bound and free fragments can respond chemotactically to an erythrocyte destroyed by laser microirradiation (necrotaxis); the free, anucleate fragments may do so repeatedly, even after having been held overnight at ambient temperatures. We propse the name cytokineplast for the result of this self-purification of motile apparatus. The exodus of the motile machinery from the granulocyte requires anchoring of the bulk of the cell to glass and uncoupling, which may involve heat-induced dysfunction of the centrosome. In ultrastructural studies of the centrosomal region after heat, centriolar structure remains intact, but pericentriolar osmiophilic material appears condensed, and microtubules are sparse. These changes are found in all three blood cell types examined: PMN, eosinophil, and monocyte. Of these, the first two make fragments under our conditions; the more sluggish monocyte does not. Uncoupling is further linked to centrosomal dysfunction by the observation that colchicines-treated granulocytes (10(-5)M, to destroy the centrosome

  7. Inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine on superoxide anion generation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Villagrasa, V; Cortijo, J; Martí-Cabrera, M; Ortiz, J L; Berto, L; Esteras, A; Bruseghini, L; Morcillo, E J

    1997-05-01

    It has been suggested that reactive oxygen species released by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in man is one mechanism of tissue injury. Therapeutic action aimed at increasing antioxidant defence mechanisms is still a clinical challenge. This study examines the activity of N-acetylcysteine, a known antioxidant, in the protection of PMN exposed in-vitro to the chemoattractant peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (FMLP), the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate or the lipid peroxidation promoter t-butyl hydroperoxide. FMLP (3-300 nM) and phorbol myristate acetate (160 pm-160 nM) induced concentration-related superoxide anion generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (33-333 microM) resulted in concentration-related inhibition of superoxide production induced by FMLP (30 nM) or phorbol myristate acetate (16 nM);-log IC50 values were 3.97 +/- 0.07 and 3.91 +/- 0.10, respectively. Changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) induced by FMLP (30 nM) were studied in fura-2-loaded human PMN. FMLP produced a transient calcium response, i.e. a peak followed by decay to a residual value above baseline. N-Acetylcysteine (333 microM) did not affect either basal [Ca2+]i values or changes in [Ca2+]i values after treatment with FMLP. Activation by phorbol myristate acetate caused a reduction in glutathione levels from 5.94 +/- 0.86 (control) to 1.84 +/- 0.51 nmol/3 x 10(6) cells (P < 0.05 compared with control). Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (333 microM) fully reversed the reduction in glutathione levels induced by phorbol myristate acetate (4.83 +/- 0.68 nmol/3 x 10(6) cells; P > 0.05 compared with control). Exposure to t-butyl hydroperoxide (0.5 mM, 30 min) markedly increased malondialdehyde levels (from 0.03 +/- 0.02 to 0.73 +/- 0.07 nmol/10(6) cells), and index of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde levels were significantly reduced in PMN treated with N-acetylcysteine (333 microM; 0.55 +/- 0.04 nmol/10(6) cells; P < 0.05 compared with

  8. Hydrogen peroxide signals E. coli phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear cells; up-stream and down-stream pathway.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Michalis; Karamolegkou, Georgia; Rosmaraki, Eleftheria; Tsakas, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (Η2Ο2) is produced during a variety of cellular procedures. In this paper, the regulatory role of Η2Ο2, in Escherichia coli phagocytosis by the human polymorphonuclears, was investigated. White blood cells were incubated with dihydrorhodamine (DHR) in order to study H2O2 synthesis and E. coli-FITC to study phagocytosis. Flow cytometry revealed increased synthesis of H2O2 in polymorphonuclears which incorporated E. coli-FITC. The blocking of H2O2 synthesis by specific inhibitors, N-ethylmaleimide (ΝΕΜ) for NADPH oxidase and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) for superoxide dismutase (SOD), decreased E. coli phagocytosis, as well. Immunoblot analysis of white blood cell protein extracts revealed that the blocking of NADPH oxidase and SOD decreased ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, while it had no effect on JNK and p38. Confocal microscopy showed that phosphorylation of MAPKs and phagocytosis solely occur in the polymorphonuclear and not in mononuclear cells. The use of specific MAPKs inhibitors showed that all of them are necessary for phagocytosis, but only phospho-p38 affects H2O2 synthesis. The blocking of JNK phosphorylation, in the presence of E. coli, evoked a further decrease of cytoplasmic p47 thus increasing its translocation onto the plasma membrane for the assembly of NADPH oxidase. It appears that newly synthesised H2O2 invigorates the phosphorylation and action of ERK-1/2 in E. coli phagocytosis, while phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 appear to regulate H2O2 production.

  9. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    1. Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function. 2. Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 microM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50 approximately 100 microM). 3. Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2 approximately 4.5). Glaucine (10 microM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2 approximately 3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (-log IC50 approximately 4.3). 4. Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89. 5. In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies.

  10. TRK-530 inhibits accumulation of superoxide anions derived from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and bone resorption induced by activated osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, M; Funaba, Y; Tateishi, A; Kawabe, N; Nakadate-Matsushita, T

    1998-03-01

    TRK-530, a newly synthesized bisphosphonate, was assessed for its effects on the accumulation of superoxide anions derived from human formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and for its effects on bone resorption using a pit formation assay. TRK-530 concentration-dependently inhibited superoxide accumulation derived from PMN and osteoclast pit formation stimulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Incadronate and risedronate had a strong inhibitory effect on pit formation, but no antioxidative activity. These data suggest that the anti-bone resorption activities of TRK-530 are possibly unrelated to its antioxidant properties. However, it is difficult to conclude at present which mechanisms play the most important role in the anti-bone resorption activities of TRK-530.

  11. In vitro evaluation of the behaviour of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils in direct contact with chitosan-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Santos, T C; Marques, A P; Silva, S S; Oliveira, J M; Mano, J F; Castro, A G; Reis, R L

    2007-10-31

    Several novel biodegradable materials have been proposed for wound healing applications in the past few years. Taking into consideration the biocompatibility of chitosan-based biomaterials, and that they promote adequate cell adhesion, this work aims at investigating the effect of chitosan-based membranes, over the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). The recruitment and activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) reflects a primary reaction to foreign bodies. Activation of neutrophils results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O(2)(-) and HO(-) and the release of hydrolytic enzymes which are determinant factors in the inflammatory process, playing an essential role in the healing mechanisms. PMNs isolated from human peripheral blood of healthy volunteers were cultured in the presence of chitosan or chitosan/soy newly developed membranes. The effect of the biomaterials on the activation of PMNs was assessed by the quantification of lysozyme and ROS. The results showed that PMNs, in the presence of the chitosan-based membranes secrete similar lysozyme amounts, as compared to controls (PMNs without materials) and also showed that the materials do not stimulate the production of either O(2)(-) or HO(-). Moreover, PMNs incubated with the biomaterials when stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) showed a chemiluminescence profile with a slightly lower intensity, to that observed for positive controls (cells without materials and stimulated with PMA), which reflects the maintenance of their stimulation capacity. Our data suggests that the new biomaterials studied herein do not elicit activation of PMNs, as assessed by the low lysozyme activity and by the minor detection of ROS by chemiluminescence. These findings reinforce previous statements supporting the suitability of chitosan-based materials for wound healing applications.

  12. Reduced bioenergetics and toll-like receptor 1 function in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Guo, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yuan, Xiaoling; Chen, Shu; Malawista, Stephen E; Bockenstedt, Linda K; Allore, Heather G; Montgomery, Ruth R

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in immune function (immunosenescence) resulting in an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. Here we show reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and an underlying age-dependent deficiency in PMN bioenergetics. In older (>65 years) adults, stimulation through TLR1 led to lower activation of integrins (CD11b and CD18), lower production of the chemokine IL-8, and lower levels of the phosphorylated signaling intermediate p38 MAP kinase than in PMN from younger donors (21-30 years). In addition, loss of CD62L, a marker of PMN activation, was reduced in PMN of older adults stimulated through multiple pathways. Rescue of PMN from apoptosis by stimulation with TLR1 was reduced in PMN from older adults. In seeking an explanation for effects of aging across multiple pathways, we examined PMN energy utilization and found that glucose uptake after stimulation through TLR1 was dramatically lower in PMN of older adults. Our results demonstrate a reduction in TLR1 expression and TLR1-mediated responses in PMN with aging, and reduced efficiency of bioenergetics in PMN. These changes likely contribute to reduced PMN efficiency in aging through multiple aspects of PMN function and suggest potential therapeutic opportunities.

  13. Effects of SCA40 on human isolated bronchus and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: comparison with rolipram, SKF94120 and levcromakalim.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Navarrete, C; Sanz, C; Berto, L; Michel, A; Bonnet, P A; Morcillo, E J

    1996-09-01

    1. SCA40 (0.1 nM-0.1 mM) produced concentration-dependent suppression of the spontaneous tone of human isolated bronchus (-log EC50 = 6.85 +/- 0.09; n = 10) and reached a maximal relaxation similar to that of theophylline (3 mM). The potency (-log EC50 values) of SCA40 compared to other relaxants was rolipram (7.44 +/- 0.12; n = 9) > SCA40 > or = levcromakalim (6.49 +/- 0.04; n = 6) > SKF94120 (5.87 +/- 0.10; n = 9). 2. When tested against the activity of the isoenzymes of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isolated from human bronchus, SCA40 proved highly potent against PDE III (-log IC50 = 6.47 +/- 0.16; n = 4). It was markedly less potent against PDE IV (4.82 +/- 0.18; n = 4) and PDE V (4.32 +/- 0.11; n = 4). 3. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) stimulated with N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) produced a concentration-dependent superoxide anion generation and elastase release. SCA40 (1 nM-10 microM) produced a concentration-related inhibition of FMLP (30 nM approximately EC50)-induced superoxide production (-log IC50 = 5.48 +/- 0.10; n = 6) and elastase release (-log IC50 = 5.50 +/- 0.26; n = 6). Rolipram was an effective inhibitor of superoxide generation and elastase release (-log IC50 values approximately 8) while SKF94120 and levcromakalim were scarcely effective. 4. FMLP (30 nM) and thimerosal (20 microM) induced leukotriene B4 production and elevation of intracellular calcium concentration in human PMNs. The production of leukotriene B4 was inhibited by SCA40 in a concentration-related manner (-log IC50 = 5.94 +/- 0.22; n = 6) but SCA40 was less effective against the elevation of intracellular calcium. Rolipram was an effective inhibitor of leukotriene B4 synthesis (-log IC50 approximately 7) and intracellular calcium elevation (-log IC50 approximately 6) while SKF94120 and levcromakalim were scarcely effective. 5. It is concluded that SCA40 is an effective inhibitor of the inherent tone of human isolated bronchus. The

  14. Effects of SCA40 on human isolated bronchus and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: comparison with rolipram, SKF94120 and levcromakalim.

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, J.; Villagrasa, V.; Navarrete, C.; Sanz, C.; Berto, L.; Michel, A.; Bonnet, P. A.; Morcillo, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. SCA40 (0.1 nM-0.1 mM) produced concentration-dependent suppression of the spontaneous tone of human isolated bronchus (-log EC50 = 6.85 +/- 0.09; n = 10) and reached a maximal relaxation similar to that of theophylline (3 mM). The potency (-log EC50 values) of SCA40 compared to other relaxants was rolipram (7.44 +/- 0.12; n = 9) > SCA40 > or = levcromakalim (6.49 +/- 0.04; n = 6) > SKF94120 (5.87 +/- 0.10; n = 9). 2. When tested against the activity of the isoenzymes of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isolated from human bronchus, SCA40 proved highly potent against PDE III (-log IC50 = 6.47 +/- 0.16; n = 4). It was markedly less potent against PDE IV (4.82 +/- 0.18; n = 4) and PDE V (4.32 +/- 0.11; n = 4). 3. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) stimulated with N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) produced a concentration-dependent superoxide anion generation and elastase release. SCA40 (1 nM-10 microM) produced a concentration-related inhibition of FMLP (30 nM approximately EC50)-induced superoxide production (-log IC50 = 5.48 +/- 0.10; n = 6) and elastase release (-log IC50 = 5.50 +/- 0.26; n = 6). Rolipram was an effective inhibitor of superoxide generation and elastase release (-log IC50 values approximately 8) while SKF94120 and levcromakalim were scarcely effective. 4. FMLP (30 nM) and thimerosal (20 microM) induced leukotriene B4 production and elevation of intracellular calcium concentration in human PMNs. The production of leukotriene B4 was inhibited by SCA40 in a concentration-related manner (-log IC50 = 5.94 +/- 0.22; n = 6) but SCA40 was less effective against the elevation of intracellular calcium. Rolipram was an effective inhibitor of leukotriene B4 synthesis (-log IC50 approximately 7) and intracellular calcium elevation (-log IC50 approximately 6) while SKF94120 and levcromakalim were scarcely effective. 5. It is concluded that SCA40 is an effective inhibitor of the inherent tone of human isolated bronchus. The

  15. Aspirin Triggered-Lipoxin A4 Reduces the Adhesion of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Endothelial Cells Initiated by Preeclamptic Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Villa, AM; Norling, LV; Serhan, CN; Cordero, D; Rojas, M; Cadavid, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. Here, we evaluated the role of aspirin triggered-lipoxin A4 (ATL, 15-epi-LXA4) on the modulation of the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelial cells initiated by preeclamptic plasma. Materials and methods Plasma from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant, and non-pregnant women were analysed for factors involved in regulating angiogenesis, inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Plasma from preeclamptic women was added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and the adhesion of PMN (incubated with or without ATL) to cells was evaluated. Results Preeclampsia was associated with some augmented anti-angiogenic, oxidative and pro-inflammatory markers, as well as increasing human PMN-endothelial cell adhesion. This cell adhesion was reduced when human PMN were incubated with ATL prior to addition to endothelial monolayers. Discussions and Conclusions Our results are the starting point for further research on the efficacy and rational use of aspirin in preeclampsia. PMID:22974760

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa variants isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis are killed by a bactericidal protein from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, C M; Regelmann, W E; Gray, B H

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of paired mucoid and nonmucoid variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from 13 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) to killing by a 55,000-Da bactericidal protein (BP55) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. Mucoid and nonmucoid variants were equally sensitive to killing by BP55 at both pH 5.6 and pH 7.2. Eleven of the isolates were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 10% normal human serum but were as sensitive as the serum-sensitive isolates to BP55. Similarly, the 15 isolates with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) containing O-polysaccharide side chains (smooth LPS) were as sensitive to BP55 as those isolates with rough LPS.P. aeruginosa isolates from patients in poor clinical condition were more likely to have LPS of the smooth type and to be resistant to killing by 10% human serum than the isolates from patients in good clinical condition. We have concluded that the susceptibility of the P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with CF to killing by BP55 does not correlate with mucoid or nonmucoid variations, with the presence or absence of smooth LPS, or with the sensitivity or resistance to killing by normal human serum. Images PMID:1903774

  17. Endocytosis and shedding of the decay accelerating factor on human polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tausk, F; Fey, M; Gigli, I

    1989-11-15

    The decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a cell membrane glycoprotein that functions in the control of C activation. We studied the modulation of membrane DAF on polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) by using anti-DAF antibodies. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis showed that DAF expression was reduced by 43 +/- 7% on resting or stimulated cells that were held at 37 degrees C for 30 min when compared with those kept on ice. Most of this reduction occurred within the first 15 min, and was followed by a gradual further decrease in surface DAF. PMN that were held at 37 degrees C for varying periods of time before DAF measurement had a gradual decrease suggestive of release of DAF from the PMN membrane or endocytosis. To examine the latter, PMN were reacted with anti-DAF at 0 degree C, followed by 125I-Fab'2 secondary antibodies at either 0 degree C or 37 degrees C, and subsequently treated with pronase. Thirty +/- 11% of the 125I remained bound to cells kept at 37 degrees C compared to 2% in those held at 0 degrees C. Internalization was further confirmed by electron microscopy. In PMN that were not exposed to pronase, 26 +/- 2% of the surface-associated 125I was released at 37 degrees C compared with 7% at 0 degrees C. Immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE of surface-labeled PMN showed that the temperature-dependent released DAF had a lower m.w. than membrane DAF. Immunofluorescent studies revealed that 37 degrees C mediated the redistribution of DAF from a homogeneous pattern into caps. These results show that under the conditions studied DAF is partially internalized and partially released from the PMN membrane to the fluid phase; the latter may contribute to the presence of DAF in body fluids.

  18. In Vitro Effect of Tobacco Smoke Components on the Functions of Normal Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Corberand, Joël; Laharrague, Patrick; Nguyen, Françoise; Dutau, Guy; Fontanilles, Anne Marie; Gleizes, Bernard; Gyrard, Elisabeth

    1980-01-01

    The function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) has previously been shown to be impaired in smokers in comparison with healthy nonsmokers. Potent inhibition of PMN chemotaxis has been achieved with whole tobacco smoke, the gas phase of smoke, and a water-soluble extract of whole smoke. In the present work several aspects of PMN function were studied after exposure to water-soluble fraction of the particle phase of tobacco smoke collected on glass fiber filters. These tests included capillary tube random migration, chemotaxis under agarose, phagocytosis of yeasts, Nitro Blue Tetrazolium dye reduction, and whole-blood bactericidal activity. The water extract of the particle fraction of smoke had a high content of nicotine when compared with the levels achieved in plasma of smokers and a much lower concentration of aldehydes when compared with the gas phase of smoke. It had no cytotoxic effect and did not affect phagocytosis, oxygen consumption, or bactericidal activity. Nitro Blue Tetrazolium reduction of both resting and stimulated PMNs was significantly decreased only with the most concentrated solution. The tested solutions exerted a dose-related depressive effect on capillary tube random migration, whereas the random migration measured in the agarose chemotaxis test was normal. Nevertheless, the chemotactic response to a caseine solution was significantly decreased. The same tests were performed in the presence of several concentrations of a nicotine solution and the only test to be affected was the capillary tube random migration, and, that only at a very high concentration. The results of this study contribute to the more precise delineation of the extent of the dysfunction of PMNs exposed to tobacco smoke components and indicate that deleterious products are released from the particle phase of the smoke, which deposits all along the respiratory tree. PMID:7228386

  19. Specificity of immunoglobulin M antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron by by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Bjornson, H S; Kitko, B P

    1980-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the specificity of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis 1365 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Purified normal human IgM was adsorbed with washed heat-killed cells of the homologous strains and heterologous strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from the homologous strains. Hypogammaglobulinemic serum was supplemented with the adsorbed IgM preparations, and the ability of the supplemented sera to support opsonophagocytosis and killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was measured in vitro under anaerobic conditions. Normal IgM adsorbed with heat-killed cells of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 or with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from these strains failed to restore the ability of hypogammaglobulinemic serum to support opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of the homologous strain. In contrast, adsorption of normal IgM with heat-killed cells of the heterologous strains did not alter its opsonophagocytosis-promoting activity for either test strain. These results indicated that the IgM antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 are directed against strain-specific antigenic determinants contained in the outer membrane complex. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6160104

  20. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  1. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. )

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  2. Role of the Yersinia YopJ protein in suppressing interleukin-8 secretion by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Justin L; Hasenkrug, Aaron M; Shannon, Jeffrey G; Kobayashi, Scott D; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes, in addition to their direct bactericidal activities, produce cytokines involved in the activation and regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response to infection. In this study we evaluated the cytokine response of human PMNs following incubation with the pathogenic Yersinia species. Yersinia pestis strains with the pCD1 virulence plasmid, which encodes cytotoxic Yop proteins that are translocated into host cells, stimulated little or no cytokine production compared to pCD1-negative strains. In particular, PMNs incubated with pCD1-negative Y. pestis secreted 1000-fold higher levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8), a proinflammatory chemokine important for PMN recruitment and activation. Deletion of yopE, -H, -T, -M or ypkA had no effect on pCD1-dependent inhibition, whereas deletion of yopJ resulted in significantly increased IL-8 production. Like Y. pestis, the enteropathogenic Yersinia species inhibited IL-8 secretion by PMNs, and strains lacking the virulence plasmid induced high levels of IL-8. Our results show that virulence plasmid-encoded effector Yops, particularly YopJ, prevent IL-8 secretion by human PMNs. Suppression of the chemotactic IL-8 response by Y. pestis may contribute to the delayed PMN recruitment to the infected lymph node that typifies bubonic plague. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Adherence of skin bacteria to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Steiner, S; Witek, T; Balish, E

    1990-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria isolated from human axillae were tested for their capacity to adhere to buccal epithelial cells, immortalized human epithelial (HEp-2) cells, and undifferentiated and differentiated human epithelial cells. In general, both aerobic and anaerobic diphtheroids adhered better to differentiated human epithelial cells than to HEp-2 and undifferentiated human epithelial cells (P less than 0.05). Mannose, galactose, fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and fibronectin were also assayed for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of diphtheroids to human epithelial cells. A great deal of variability was observed in the capacity of the latter compounds to inhibit the attachment of aerobic diphtheroids to undifferentiated and differentiated epithelial cells. Overall, mannose appeared to be best at inhibiting the adherence of the aerobic diphtheroids to undifferentiated human epithelial cells. Galactose, fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and fibronectin showed a greater capacity to inhibit attachment of aerobic diphtheroids to differentiated than to undifferentiated human epithelial cells. The inhibition of adherence to differentiated human epithelial cells varied with the microorganism and the compound tested; however, the highest and most consistent inhibition of adherence (76.1 to 88.6%) was observed with a 5% solution of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The in vitro adherence and adherence inhibition assays presented here demonstrate that a number of adhesins and receptors are involved in the adherence of skin bacteria to human epithelial cells and receptors on human epithelial cells are apparently altered during differentiation. PMID:2298877

  4. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  5. [Influence of ion pump-inhibiting drugs on the accumulation of ofloxacin and grepafloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Orero, A; Cantón, E; Pemán, J; Velert, M M; Bermejo, M V

    2002-12-01

    In this study we tested the influence of three ion pump-inhibiting drugs (digoxin, omeprazole and verapamil) on the accumulation of ofloxacin and grepafloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Two assay conditions were established: cell preincubation with the drug for 30 or 60 minutes before addition of quinolone, or addition of both drugs simultaneously. The maximum I/E for ofloxacin is different depending on the assay conditions: 7.69+/-0.88; 5.64+/-1.91 and 3.56+/-1.04 for the assay without preincubation and with preincubation for 30 or 60 minutes at 37 masculine C, respectively. Similarly, grepafloxacin reached the following maximums: 61.27+/-3.04; 32.18+/-3.25 and 22.52+/-3.86. Digoxin did not significantly modify the accumulation of the quinolones, but it increased the I/E compared with the control. In general, omeprazole reduced the accumulation of both quinolones. When omeprazole and ofloxacin were added together, ofloxacin's I/E was significantly lower; however, for grepafloxacin, 60 minutes of preincubation were necessary. Verapamil induced a significant increase in the I/E for both quinolones when the cells were preincubated at 10 times the plasma concentration.

  6. Reduced intracellular oxidative metabolism promotes firm adhesion of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to vascular endothelium under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Montoya, M C; Luscinskas, F W; del Pozo, M A; Aragonés, J; de Landázuri, M O

    1997-08-01

    The interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with the vascular endothelium and their subsequent extravasation to the tissues is a key step during different physiological and pathological processes. In certain of these pathologies the oxygen tension becomes very low, leading to reduced cellular oxidative status. To evaluate the effect of lowering the intracellular redox status in the interaction of PMN with the endothelium, exposure to hypoxic conditions as well as treatment with different antioxidant agents was carried out. PMN exposure to hypoxia enhanced beta2 integrin-dependent adhesion to intercellular adhesion molecule-1-coated surfaces, concomitant with a decrease in the intracellular redox status of the cell. As occurs with hypoxia, treatment with antioxidants produced a decrease in the oxidation state of PMN. These agents enhanced adhesion of PMN to human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and this effect was also mediated by beta2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. Adhesion studies under defined laminar flow conditions showed that the antioxidant treatment induced an enhanced adhesion mediated by beta2 integrins with a decrease in the fraction of PMN rolling on TNF-alpha-activated endothelial cells. The up-regulated PMN adhesion was correlated to an increase in the expression and activation of integrin Mac-1, without loss of L-selectin surface expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that a reduction in the intracellular oxidative state produces an enhanced beta2 integrin-dependent adhesion of PMN to stimulated endothelial cells under conditions of flow.

  7. Comparative evaluation of the cytomegalovirus DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Murray, G; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G

    1998-02-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load was determined in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and plasma samples from 106 human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects at risk of developing CMV disease (group 1) and from 27 AIDS patients with documented CMV disease (group 2). For both groups, the number of CMV copies in PMNL was significantly higher than in plasma when results were derived from an equivalent blood volume (P < .001, PMNL vs. plasma). Additionally, group 2 (symptomatic) patients had a greater viral DNA load than group 1 (asymptomatic) subjects (P < .001 for both PMNL and plasma). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of qualitative polymerase chain reaction using PMNL (PCR-PMNL) for the presence of CMV disease were 100%, 58%, 38%, and 100%, respectively, compared with 70%, 93%, 74%, and 92% for qualitative PCR-plasma and 93%, 92%, 76%, and 98% for quantitative PCR-PMNL using a cutoff of 16,000 copies/mL. Thus, the best strategy for diagnosing CMV disease in these individuals relies on quantitative assessment of the viral DNA load in PMNL.

  8. Magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase as a marker enzyme for the plasma membrane of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Harlan, J; DeChatelet, L R; Iverson, D B; McCall, C E

    1977-02-01

    The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activities of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) were studied with an assay that monitored the release of 32P-labeled inorganic pyrophosphate (32P1) from gamma-[32P]adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). In cell homogenates, (Na+ + K+)-sensitive, ouabain-inhibitable ATPase comprised an insignificant fraction of the total ATPase activity. Additions of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and beta-glycerophosphate (substrates for nonspecific acid and alkaline phosphatases) and of tartrate (inhibitor of acid phosphatase) gave no indication of inhibition. This suggested that the assay was relatively specific for ATP hydrolysis. The activity was found to have a pH optimum of 8.7 and a Km for ATP of 0.6 mM. There was an absolute requirement for Mg2+, with other divalent cations substituting less efficiently. When the Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity of intact cells was compared with that in homogenized cells, no significant difference was observed. The activity in intact cells was linear with respect to incubation time up to at least l0 min. Trypan blue staining and lactate dehydrogenase assays revealed that greater than 92% of the PMNL remained intact and viable during the assay. No soluble ATPase was released from the cells under assay conditions. In following the distribution of gamma[32P]ATP and 32P2 counts became cell associated. Since the experimental evidence supports the observation that PMNL remain intact and viable and that ATP does not penetrate the cell under assay conditions, it is proposed that greater than 90% of the Mg2+-dependent ATPase of the human PMNL is associated with a plasma membrnae enzyme. This would qualify the enzyme for the role of a plasma membrane marker for future fractionation and isolation attempts.

  9. Areca nut extracts reduce the intracellular reactive oxygen species and release of myeloperoxidase by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y-L; Lin, J-C; Yang, S-F; Liu, T-Y; Hung, S-L

    2007-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) represent the first line of host defense. Areca nut extract inhibits the bactericidal activity of, and the release of superoxide anion (O2- ) by, PMN. This study investigated the effects of areca nut extract on the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and on the extracellular release of lysosomal enzyme, myeloperoxidase (MPO), by PMN. The effects of arecoline, a principal component of areca nut, were also examined. Human PMN were treated with various concentrations of areca nut extract or arecoline followed by treatment with Hanks' balanced salt solution, with or without cytochalasin B and fMet-Leu-Phe (CB/fMLP). The viability of PMN was determined using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. The presence of intracellular ROS was determined using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate and fluorometry. MPO release was determined using a substrate assay. Areca nut extract (25 and 50 microg/ml) significantly decreased the viability of PMN. The intracellular levels of ROS and the extracellular release of MPO were induced in PMN by CB/fMLP. Exposure of PMN to areca nut extract (up to 25 microg/ml) or to arecoline (up to 2 mg/ml) did not directly affect the levels of ROS and MPO activity. However, under conditions that did not affect the viability of PMN, the ability of CB/fMLP to trigger production of intracellular ROS and release of MPO in human PMN was significantly suppressed by areca nut extract and arecoline. Areca nut impaired the activation of PMN by CB/fMLP that might decrease the effectiveness of PMN in the host defense. Alternatively, exposure of PMN to areca nut extract could decrease the capacity of PMN to damage tissues.

  10. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Its Amide Analogue Are Potent Inhibitors of Leukotriene Biosynthesis in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Maillet, Jacques; LeBlanc, Luc M.; Jean-François, Jacques; Touaibia, Mohamed; Flamand, Nicolas; Surette, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    Background 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyses the transformation of arachidonic acid (AA) into leukotrienes (LTs), which are important lipid mediators of inflammation. LTs have been directly implicated in inflammatory diseases like asthma, atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis; therefore inhibition of LT biosynthesis is a strategy for the treatment of these chronic diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Analogues of caffeic acid, including the naturally-occurring caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), were synthesized and evaluated for their capacity to inhibit 5-LO and LTs biosynthesis in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and whole blood. Anti-free radical and anti-oxidant activities of the compounds were also measured. Caffeic acid did not inhibit 5-LO activity or LT biosynthesis at concentrations up to 10 µM. CAPE inhibited 5-LO activity (IC50 0.13 µM, 95% CI 0.08–0.23 µM) more effectively than the clinically-approved 5-LO inhibitor zileuton (IC50 3.5 µM, 95% CI 2.3–5.4 µM). CAPE was also more effective than zileuton for the inhibition of LT biosynthesis in PMNL but the compounds were equipotent in whole blood. The activity of the amide analogue of CAPE was similar to that of zileuton. Inhibition of LT biosynthesis by CAPE was the result of the inhibition of 5-LO and of AA release. Caffeic acid, CAPE and its amide analog were free radical scavengers and antioxidants with IC50 values in the low µM range; however, the phenethyl moiety of CAPE was required for effective inhibition of 5-LO and LT biosynthesis. Conclusions CAPE is a potent LT biosynthesis inhibitor that blocks 5-LO activity and AA release. The CAPE structure can be used as a framework for the rational design of stable and potent inhibitors of LT biosynthesis. PMID:22347509

  11. Arginine-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L E; Rendell, N B; Murray, S; Allport, J R; Lo, G; Kefalas, P; Taylor, G W; MacDermot, J

    1996-01-01

    An Arg-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes (PMNs) was confirmed by the use of diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)guanidine (DEA-BAG) as an ADP-ribose acceptor. Two separate HPLC systems were used to separate ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG from reaction mixtures, and its presence was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG was produced in the presence of PMNs, but not in their absence. Incubation of DEA-BAG with ADP-ribose (0.1-10 mM) did not yield ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG, which indicates that ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG formed in the presence of PMNs was not simply a product of a reaction between DEA-BAG and free ADP-ribose, due possibly to the hydrolysis of NAD+ by an NAD+ glycohydrolase. The assay of mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase with agmatine as a substrate was modified for intact PMNs, and the activity was found to be approx. 50-fold lower than that in rabbit cardiac membranes. The Km of the enzyme for NAD+ was 100.1 30.4 microM and the Vmax 1.4 0.2 pmol of ADP-ribosylagmatine/h per 10(6) cells. The enzyme is likely to be linked to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, since incubation of intact PMNs with phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) led to a 98% decrease in mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity in the cells. Cell surface proteins were labelled after exposure of intact PMNs to [32P]NAD+. Their molecular masses were 79, 67, 46, 36 and 26 kDa. The time course for labelling was non-linear under these conditions over a period of 4 h. The labelled products were identified as mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins by hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-AMP. PMID:8615841

  12. The effects of heparin and related molecules upon the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes to vascular endothelium in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Rebecca; Hoult, J Robin S; Page, Clive P

    2000-01-01

    The effects of an unfractionated heparin preparation (Multiparin), a low molecular weight heparin preparation (Fragmin) and a selectively O-desulphated derivative of heparin lacking anticoagulant activity, have been investigated for their effects on the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. The effect of poly-L-glutamic acid, a large, polyanionic molecule was also studied. Unfractionated heparin (50–1000 U ml−1), the O-desulphated derivative (0.3–6 mg ml−1) and the low molecular weight heparin (50 U–1000 U ml−1) all inhibited significantly the adhesion of 51Cr labelled PMNs to HUVECs stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β; 10 U ml−1), bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2.5 μg ml−1) or tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; 125 U ml−1) for 6 h, whereas poly-L-glutamic acid had no effect. In addition, the three heparin preparations in the same concentration range inhibited significantly the adhesion of f-met-leu-phe-stimulated PMNs to resting HUVECs. The effects of unfractionated heparin upon the expression of adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selection were also investigated, as were the effects of unfractionated heparin upon adhesion of human PMNs to previously stimulated HUVECs. Heparin had little effect upon levels of expression of these adhesion molecules on stimulated HUVECs. However, a profound effect upon PMN adhesion to previously stimulated HUVECs was demonstrated using the same preparation, suggesting that inhibition of adhesion molecule expression is not a major component of the described inhibitory effects of heparin. Pre-incubation of PMNs with heparin followed by washing inhibited their adhesion to HUVECs, under different conditions of cellular activation, implying that heparin can bind to these cells and exert its anti-adhesive effects even when not directly present in the system. These

  13. The Afa/Dr adhesins of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli stimulate interleukin-8 secretion, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases, and promote polymorphonuclear transepithelial migration in T84 polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bétis, Fréderic; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Véronique; Guignot, Julie; Bernet-Camard, Marie-Françoise; Rossi, Bernard; Servin, Alain; Hofman, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains cause symptomatic urinary tract and intestinal infections. The proinflammatory effects of Afa/Dr DAEC strains in vitro have been not investigated to date. In the present study, we used confluent polarized monolayers of intestinal cell line T84 to evaluate the consequences of epithelial infection by Afa/Dr DAEC strains in terms of proinflammatory response. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) migration across the epithelial barrier was induced after incubation of the T84 monolayers with the wild-type Afa/Dr DAEC strain C1845 harboring the fimbrial F1845 adhesin and strain IH11128 harboring the Dr hemagglutinin, and the E. coli laboratory strain HB101 was transformed with the pSSS1 plasmid, producing Afa/Dr F1845 adhesin. PMNL migrations were correlated with a basolateral secretion of interleukin-8 by T84 cells and were abolished after incubation of epithelial cells with an anti-decay accelerating factor (DAF) antibody that recognized the short consensus repeat 3 domain of DAF (monoclonal antibody 1H4). Moreover, Afa/Dr DAEC strains induced tyrosine phosphorylation of several T84 proteins and activated the mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein, P38, and Jun-C kinases). These data demonstrated for the first time that, in vitro, Afa/Dr DAEC strains exert a proinflammatory signal in intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-01-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase bacteria, compared with those growing in logarithmic phase. The antibacterial effect of granule extract was destroyed by boiling, but some activity was retained after heating to 56 degrees C and 80 degrees C. Granule extract activity was tested under conditions in which oxygen-dependent antibacterial systems were inhibited. The rate and extent of killing was not affected by anaerobiosis, sodium azide, or cysteine hydrochloride. These results suggest that the activity of granule extract is independent of oxidative antibacterial systems, and therefore, under conditions that occur in anaerobic infections, potent leukocyte granule-associated mechanisms exist for the destruction of B. fragilis. PMID:6698601

  15. Relationship of F-actin distribution to development of polar shape in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Polymerization of actin has been associated with development of polar shape in human neutrophils (PMN). To examine the relation of filamentous actin (F-actin) distribution to shape change in PMN, we developed a method using computerized video image analysis and fluorescence microscopy to quantify distribution of F-actin in single cells. PMN were labeled with fluorescent probe NBD-phallicidin to measure filamentous actin and Texas red to assess cell thickness. We show that Texas red fluorescence is a reasonable measure of cell thickness and that correction of the NBD-phallicidin image for cell thickness using the Texas red image permits assessment of focal F-actin content. Parameters were derived that quantify total F-actin content, movement of F-actin away from the center of the cell, asymmetry of F- actin distribution, and change from round to polar shape. The sequence of change in F-actin distribution and its relation to development of polar shape in PMN was determined using these parameters. After stimulation with chemotactic peptide at 25 degrees C, F-actin polymerized first at the rim of the PMN. This was followed by development of asymmetry of F-actin distribution and change to polar shape. The dominant pseudopod developed first in the region of lower F- actin concentration followed later by polymerization of actin in the end of the developed pseudopod. Asymmetric F-actin distribution was detected in round PMN before development of polar shape. Based upon these data, asymmetric distribution of F-actin is coincident with and probably precedes development of polar shape in PMN stimulated in suspension by chemotactic peptide. PMID:1577856

  16. Basic science for the clinician 59: polymorphonuclear cells: mechanisms in human defense and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Leonard H

    2012-12-01

    When I learned about polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in medical school, they were presented as pretty much 1-trick ponies: PMNs were phagocytes with no intrinsic specificity; their only specificity was supplied by the Fcγ receptors on their surfaces and that would then be the specificity of the bound immunoglobulin G, nothing intrinsic to the PMN. My, how simple life was in those days! And how wrong! Turns out, these circulating cells are involved in bridging the innate immune system and the acquired immune response in some very interesting ways and may play a crucial role in the immunopathogenesis of some of "our" diseases. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are often underappreciated as drivers of inflammatory diseases, which is why I think it is time for us to turn our attention to this underappreciated component of the immune response.

  17. Adherence targets of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in human small intestines.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Yokota, T

    1989-01-01

    Formalin-fixed human small intestinal mucosa with mucus coating, villi, and lymphoid follicle epithelium at the mucosal surface was used to test the adherence sites of clinically isolated (Kanagawa phenomenon-positive) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 3 h at 37 degrees C possessed various levels of cell-associated hemagglutinins (HAs) which were detected with human or guinea pig erythrocytes. The observed adherence abilities of V. parahaemolyticus strains to human small intestinal mucosa correlated roughly with the HA levels of the strains. Under the test conditions, ileal lymphoid follicle epithelium (especially M cells) provided the best adherence target for V. parahaemolyticus. Adherence to villus absorptive cells or to mucus coating was observed at lower levels. In addition, all 3-h-grown V. parahaemolyticus strains tested produced high levels of HAs as detected with rabbit erythrocytes. The strains were all strikingly motile. In contrast, V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 20 h at 37 degrees C had much lower levels of HAs, adherence abilities, and motility. In contrast to the above observations, piliation of V. parahaemolyticus was more extensive at ca. 20 h of incubation at 37 degrees C than at ca. 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. The remarkable ability of V. parahaemolyticus to adhere to lymphoid follicle epithelium was also confirmed by using rabbit small intestinal mucosa. Images PMID:2568344

  18. Chemical, biochemical, pharmacokinetic, and biological properties of L-680,833: a potent, orally active monocyclic beta-lactam inhibitor of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, J B; Shah, S K; Finke, P E; Dorn, C P; Hagmann, W K; Hale, J J; Kissinger, A L; Thompson, K R; Brause, K; Chandler, G O

    1993-01-01

    A series of potent and highly selective time-dependent monocyclic beta-lactam inhibitors of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase (PMNE, EC 3.4.21.37) is described. The intrinsic potency of these compounds, as exemplified by L-680,833 (k(inactivation)/K(i) of 622,000 M-1.s-1), is reflected at the cellular level where it inhibits generation of the specific N-terminal cleavage product A alpha-(1-21) from the A alpha chain of fibrinogen by enzyme released from isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe with an IC50 of 0.06 microM. The inhibitory activity of L-680,833 is also apparent in whole blood stimulated with A23187, where it inhibits formation of A alpha-(1-21) and PMNE-alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor complex formation with IC50 values of 9 microM. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that after oral dosing L-680,833 is bioavailable in rats and rhesus monkeys. This oral bioavailability is reflected by the inhibition (i) of tissue damage elicited in hamster lungs by intratracheal instillation of human PMNE and (ii) enzyme released from human PMN stimulated after their transfer into the pleural cavity of mice. The properties of L-680,833 allow it to effectively supplement the activity of natural inhibitors of PMNE in vivo, suggesting that this type of low-molecular-weight synthetic inhibitor could have therapeutic value in diseases where PMNE damages tissue. PMID:8378355

  19. Kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization, attachment, ingestion and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: a quantitative assay using [3H]thymidine labeled bacteria.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, J; Peterson, P K; Quie, P G

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed for studying quantitatively the separate processes of bacterial opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes using [3H]thymidine labeled Staphylococcus aureus. Phagocytosis is determined by assaying for leukocytes-associated radioactivity after differential centrifugation and washing the leukocytes. Opsonization is studied by incubating bacteria with an opsonic source for varying durations and then adding leukocytes. By treatment of samples with the muralytic enzyme, lysostaphin, the attachment and ingestion phases of phagocytosis can be separated. Sampling for colony forming units after disruption of the leukocytes permits the measurement of bacterial killing. Using this method, differences in the kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization by normal and C2 deficient sera were defined, opsonic influences on the attachment and ingestion phases of pH agocytosis were delineated, and the influences of different opsonins and leukocyte populations on killing were determined.

  20. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  1. Neutral red uptake inhibition in adhered and adhering rat hepatoma-derived Fa32 cells to predict human toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, Paul J; Scheers, Ellen M

    2002-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the MEIC (Multicentre Evaluation of In vitro Cytotoxicity) reference chemicals was investigated by measuring the neutral red uptake inhibition in adhered and adhering rat hepatoma-derived Fa32 cells. The adhered cells were seeded and then treated and the adhering cells were treated simultaneously upon seeding. Five of the 44 test chemicals were twofold more toxic in adhering cells; ethylene glycol was 28-fold more toxic and mercuric chloride was 5.2-fold more toxic than in adhered cells. The cytotoxicity of dithiothreitol was altered in the same way as that of ethylene glycol, probably by interacting with calcium. When the neutral red uptake inhibition was compared with human toxicity, the correlation coefficient for adhering cells was almost identical to that obtained previously in human hepatoma-derived Hep G2 cells and slightly higher for adhered cells. The Hep G2 assay was the best acute in vitro assay for the prediction of human toxicity within the MEIC study. An obviously better correlation was obtained when the strong intoxicant mercuric chloride was withdrawn from the comparison, both for the adhered and the adhering cells. Altogether, the results can be integrated very well with the basal cytotoxicity concept.

  2. Effects of colchicine, vinblastine and nocodazole on polarity, motility, chemotaxis and cAMP levels of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Keller, H U; Naef, A; Zimmermann, A

    1984-07-01

    We present evidence for intrinsic polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) polarity manifested in presence of microtubule-disrupting drugs. Polarization in response to colchicine correlated with the known dose-dependent effects of this drug on microtubule disassembly. The response to 10(-5) M colchicine, 10(-5) M vinblastine and 10(-6) M nocodazole was associated with stimulated motility and random locomotion. Responses elicited by microtubule-disrupting drugs differed from f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)-induced polarization by functional and morphological criteria. Polarization, motility and orthokinesis responses were much weaker. Furthermore, ruffling was almost absent in PMNs polarized in response to colchicine, vinblastine or nocodazole. The response was inhibited by cytochalasin B, indicating that it is microfilament-dependent. We suggest that microtubule-disrupting drugs induce motility via structural changes in the cytoskeleton which act as signals for the motor apparatus. The intrinsic polarity manifested in the presence of microtubule-disrupting drugs could be reversed by an extracellular chemotactic gradient. Stimulated locomotion and motility in response to microtubule-disrupting drugs was only observed with initially spherical PMNs but not with initially motile cells. The findings provide an explanation for the numerous conflicting statements on the chemokinetic activities of these drugs. The role of cAMP in stimulated polarization and motility has been studied. Colchicine, vinblastine and nocodazole elicited a transient elevation of cAMP levels within 1 min of stimulation. cAMP elevation and stimulated motility were not quantitatively correlated.

  3. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, K; Christophersen, L; Bjarnsholt, T; Jensen, P Ø; Moser, C; Høiby, N

    2015-07-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are essential cellular constituents in the innate host response, and their recruitment to the lungs and subsequent ubiquitous phagocytosis controls primary respiratory infection. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary decline governed by a persistent, exaggerated inflammatory response dominated by PMNs. The principal contributor is chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection, which attracts and activates PMNs and thereby is responsible for the continuing inflammation. Strategies to prevent initial airway colonization with P. aeruginosa by augmenting the phagocytic competence of PMNs may postpone the deteriorating chronic biofilm infection. Anti-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies significantly increase the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa in vitro. The mode of action is attributed to IgY-facilitated formation of immobilized bacteria in aggregates, as visualized by fluorescence microscopy and the induction of increased bacterial hydrophobicity. Thus, the present study demonstrates that avian egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) targeting P. aeruginosa modify bacterial fitness, which enhances bacterial killing by PMN-mediated phagocytosis and thereby may facilitate a rapid bacterial clearance in airways of people with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P. Ø.; Moser, C.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are essential cellular constituents in the innate host response, and their recruitment to the lungs and subsequent ubiquitous phagocytosis controls primary respiratory infection. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary decline governed by a persistent, exaggerated inflammatory response dominated by PMNs. The principal contributor is chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection, which attracts and activates PMNs and thereby is responsible for the continuing inflammation. Strategies to prevent initial airway colonization with P. aeruginosa by augmenting the phagocytic competence of PMNs may postpone the deteriorating chronic biofilm infection. Anti-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies significantly increase the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa in vitro. The mode of action is attributed to IgY-facilitated formation of immobilized bacteria in aggregates, as visualized by fluorescence microscopy and the induction of increased bacterial hydrophobicity. Thus, the present study demonstrates that avian egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) targeting P. aeruginosa modify bacterial fitness, which enhances bacterial killing by PMN-mediated phagocytosis and thereby may facilitate a rapid bacterial clearance in airways of people with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25895968

  5. Formyl peptide-induced chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes does not require either marked changes in cytosolic calcium or specific granule discharge. Role of formyl peptide receptor reexpression (or recycling).

    PubMed Central

    Perez, H D; Elfman, F; Marder, S; Lobo, E; Ives, H E

    1989-01-01

    We examined the role of intracellular and extracellular calcium on the ability of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to migrate chemotactically and reexpress (or recycle) formyl peptide receptors when challenged with the synthetic chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). Extracellular calcium was not required for either optimal chemotactic responses or receptor reexpression. Depletion and chelation of intracellular calcium resulted in significant diminution in the ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the specific granule constituents lactoferrin and vitamin B12-binding protein during the process of chemotaxis, but had no effect on the capability of these cells to respond chemotactically. Similarly, chelation of intracellular calcium did not affect the ability of these cells to reexpress a population of formyl peptide receptors. Inhibition of receptor reexpression, by a nonagglutinating derivative of wheat-germ agglutinin, was associated with inhibition of chemotactic responses to FMLP. Thus, it appears that large changes in cytosolic free calcium are not necessary for formyl peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis. In contrast, continuous reexpression (or recycling) of formyl peptide receptors is required for polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotactic responses to FMLP, a process that appears to be independent from specific granule fusion with plasma membrane. PMID:2723068

  6. Intracellular calcium changes induced by the endozepine triakontatetraneuropeptide in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of protein kinase C and effect of calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco; Ferrari, Marco; Cattaneo, Simona; Frigo, Giuseppina; Fietta, Anna M; Lecchini, Sergio; Frigo, Gian Mario

    2004-06-30

    BACKGROUND: The endozepine triakontatetraneuropeptide (TTN) induces intracellular calcium ([Ca++]i) changes followed by activation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of protein kinase (PK) C in the modulation of the response to TTN by human PMNs, and to examine the pharmacology of TTN-induced Ca++ entry through the plasma membrane of these cells. RESULTS: The PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (PMA) concentration-dependently inhibited TTN-induced [Ca++]i rise, and this effect was reverted by the PKC inhibitors rottlerin (partially) and Ro 32-0432 (completely). PMA also inhibited TTN-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. In the absence of PMA, however, rottlerin (but not Ro 32-0432) per se partially inhibited TTN-induced [Ca++]i rise. The response of [Ca++]i to TTN was also sensitive to mibefradil and flunarizine (T-type Ca++-channel blockers), but not to nifedipine, verapamil (L-type) or omega-conotoxin GVIA (N-type). In agreement with this observation, PCR analysis showed the expression in human PMNs of the mRNA for all the alpha1 subunits of T-type Ca++ channels (namely, alpha1G, alpha1H, and alpha1I). CONCLUSIONS: In human PMNs TTN activates PKC-modulated pathways leading to Ca++ entry possibly through T-type Ca++ channels.

  7. Intracellular calcium changes induced by the endozepine triakontatetraneuropeptide in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of protein kinase C and effect of calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco; Ferrari, Marco; Cattaneo, Simona; Frigo, Giuseppina; Fietta, Anna M; Lecchini, Sergio; Frigo, Gian Mario

    2004-01-01

    Background The endozepine triakontatetraneuropeptide (TTN) induces intracellular calcium ([Ca++]i) changes followed by activation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of protein kinase (PK) C in the modulation of the response to TTN by human PMNs, and to examine the pharmacology of TTN-induced Ca++ entry through the plasma membrane of these cells. Results The PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (PMA) concentration-dependently inhibited TTN-induced [Ca++]i rise, and this effect was reverted by the PKC inhibitors rottlerin (partially) and Ro 32-0432 (completely). PMA also inhibited TTN-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. In the absence of PMA, however, rottlerin (but not Ro 32-0432) per se partially inhibited TTN-induced [Ca++]i rise. The response of [Ca++]i to TTN was also sensitive to mibefradil and flunarizine (T-type Ca++-channel blockers), but not to nifedipine, verapamil (L-type) or ω-conotoxin GVIA (N-type). In agreement with this observation, PCR analysis showed the expression in human PMNs of the mRNA for all the α1 subunits of T-type Ca++ channels (namely, α1G, α1H, and α1I). Conclusions In human PMNs TTN activates PKC-modulated pathways leading to Ca++ entry possibly through T-type Ca++ channels. PMID:15228623

  8. Inhibition by soya isoflavones of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function: possible relevance for the beneficial effects of soya intake.

    PubMed

    Rotondo, Serenella; Krauze-Brzósko, Katarzyna; Manarini, Stefano; Martelli, Nicola; Pecce, Romina; Evangelista, Virgilio; Benedetta Donati, Maria; Cerletti, Chiara

    2008-02-01

    Lower CVD incidence is reported in Asian populations consuming soya-containing food. As polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are involved in the risk of CVD, we investigated the modulatory effect of soya isoflavones on several PMN functions and their molecular mechanisms in vitro. PMN, isolated from blood from healthy subjects, were tested upon activation with 1 microm- n-formyl-methyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) for superoxide anion production (ferric cytochrome c reduction) and released elastase (chromogenic test). PMN homotypic aggregates stimulated by fMLP or P-selectin in dynamic conditions were detected by optical microscopy. PMN, mixed with thrombin-activated, washed platelets, formed cell aggregates, measured by flow cytometry. Phosphorylation of Pyk2, a focal adhesion kinase, was studied by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Genistein, daidzein and equol inhibited superoxide anion production (IC50 0.25 (sem 0.1), 21.0 (sem 4.2) and 13.0 (sem 2.8) microm, respectively); the release of elastase was prevented by genistein (IC50 63 (sem 17) microm). PMN homotypic aggregates, stimulated by fMLP, were significantly reduced (24 (sem 12) and 51 (sem 14) % of control) by 100 microm genistein and equol. P-selectin-induced aggregates were reduced to 19 (sem 6), 44 (sem 10) and 28 (sem 9) % of control by 100 microm genistein, daidzein and equol, respectively. Genistein, daidzein and equol also significantly reduced mixed platelet-PMN aggregates (IC50 4.0 (sem 0.9), 57 (sem 6) and 66 (sem 23) microm, respectively). In PMN challenged by fMLP or P-selectin, activation of Pyk2 was prevented by isoflavones. The cardioprotective effect of soya-containing food might be linked to reduction of PMN activation and PMN-platelet interaction, novel targets for the biological effects of soya isoflavones.

  9. Regulation of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis by nitric oxide in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes upon their interaction with zymosan and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Viryasova, Galina M; Galkina, Svetlana I; Gaponova, Tatjana V; Romanova, Julia M; Sud'ina, Galina F

    2014-05-23

    In the present study we have presented data on the regulation of LT (leukotriene) and 5-oxo-ETE (5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) syntheses in human neutrophils upon interaction with OZ (opsonized zymosan) or Salmonella typhimurium. Priming of neutrophils with PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) and LPS (lipopolysaccharide) elicits 5-oxo-ETE formation in neutrophils exposed to OZ, and the addition of AA (arachidonic acid) significantly increases 5-oxo-ETE synthesis. We found that NO (nitric oxide)-releasing compounds induce 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in neutrophils treated with OZ or S. typhimurium. Exposure of neutrophils to zymosan or bacteria in the presence of the NO donor DEA NONOate (1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-hydrazine sodium) considerably increased the conversion of endogenously formed 5-HETE (5S-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) to 5-oxo-ETE. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NO is a potent regulator of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes exposed to Salmonella typhimurium and zymosan.

  10. O antigen and lipid A phosphoryl groups in resistance of Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 to nonoxidative killing in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Stinavage, P; Martin, L E; Spitznagel, J K

    1989-01-01

    We have compared the intraleukocytic survival of isogenic strains of Salmonella typhimurium, whose outer membrane lipopolysaccharide differed in O antigen and lipid A composition and whose susceptibility to nonoxidative antimicrobial granule proteins of human polymorphonuclear neutrophilis (PMN) could be established. We found that the order of resistance to the bactericidal activity of intact PMN of the three bacterial strains utilized closely resembled their ordered resistance to the purified human cationic antimicrobial 57,000-dalton protein (CAP57). LT-2, a smooth wild-type strain, was far more resistant than SH9178, its rough (Rb LPS) mutant. It was most significant that SH7426, a polymyxin B-resistant pmrA mutant of SH9178, not only was substantially more resistant to CAP57 and to intraphagocytic killing than SH9178 but also came close to being as resistant as LT-2. These experiments confirm earlier work that showed the importance of the glycosyl groups of O antigens of S. typhimurium for their resistance to O2-independent antimicrobial phagocytosis by PMN. The surprising result was that a rough strain, very susceptible to bactericide, became substantially more resistant when a mutation led to its lipid A phosphoryl groups being 100% substituted with amino pentoses. Yet unresolved is whether the protection is due to the loss of negative charges on the lipid A, the substitution of sugar molecules in vulnerable loci in the outer membrane, or both. PMID:2478480

  11. In vitro adherence of type 1-fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli to human ureteral mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, K; Yamamoto, T; Yokota, T; Kitagawa, R

    1989-01-01

    Type 1-fimbriated Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infections adhered in vitro to the epithelial cell surface of an excised human ureter. The bacteria also adhered to a mucous coating and to Formalin-fixed human ureteral mucosa. D-Mannose strongly inhibited such adherence. The bacteria in their nonfimbriated phase lacked the ability to adhere. We concluded that type 1 fimbriae play a role, at least in part, in upper urinary tract infections in humans. Images PMID:2568346

  12. Energy dispersive spectroscopy-scanning transmission electron microscope observations of free radical production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes phagocytosing non-opsonized Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Keiichi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Higuchi, Naoya; Murakami, Yukitaka; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Honda, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the association between human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and non-opsonized Tannerella forsythia ATCC 43037 displaying a serum-resistant surface layer (S-layer). When PMNs were mixed with T. forsythia in suspension, the cells phagocytosed T. forsythia cells. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, indicative of O2- production, was observed by light microscopy; cerium (Ce) perhydroxide deposition, indicative of H2 O2 production, was observed by electron microscopy. We examined the relationship between high-molecular-weight proteins of the S-layer and Ce reaction (for T. forsythia phagocytosis) using electron microscopic immunolabeling. Immunogold particles were localized within the PMNs and on cell surfaces, labelling at the same Ce-reacted sites where the S-layer was present. We then used energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to perform Ce and nitrogen (N) (for S-layer immunocytochemistry) elemental analysis on the phagocytosed cells. That is, the elemental mapping and analysis of N by EDS appeared to reflect the presence of the same moieties detected by the 3,3'-diaminobenzidine-tetrahydrochloride (DAB) reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibodies, instead of immunogold labeling. We focused on the use of EDS-STEM to visualize the presence of N resulting from the DAB reaction. In a parallel set of experiments, we used EDS-STEM to perform Ce and gold (Au; from immunogold labeling of the S-layer) elemental analysis on the same phagocytosing cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of immunomodulatory effect of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on polymorphonuclear cell from dogs with cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Axiak-Bechtel, S; Friedman Cowan, C; Amorim, J; Tsuruta, K; DeClue, A E

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) function in dogs with cancer. PMNs were harvested from dogs with naturally developing cancer as a pre-clinical model to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of rhGM-CSF on PMN phagocytic and cytotoxic functions, cytokine production and receptor expression. Some aspects of cancer-related PMN dysfunction in dogs with cancer were restored following incubation with rhGM-CSF including PMN phagocytosis, respiratory burst and LPS-induced TNF-α production. In addition, rhGM-CSF increased surface HLA-DR expression on the PMNs of dogs with cancer. These data suggests that dysfunction of innate immune response in dogs with cancer may be improved by rhGM-CSF. The results of this study provided a pathophysiologic rationale for the initiation of clinical trials to continue evaluating rhGM-CSF as an immunomodulatory therapy in dogs with cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Promotion of DNA strand breaks in cocultured mononuclear leukocytes by protein kinase C-dependent prooxidative interactions of benoxaprofen, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, G.; Beyers, A.D.; Anderson, R.; Nel, A.E.

    1988-06-01

    At concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and greater the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug benoxaprofen caused dose-related activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Benoxaprofen-mediated activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence by PMNL was increased by UV radiation and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by the selective protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. To identify the molecular mechanism of the prooxidative activity of benoxaprofen, the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug on the activity of purified protein kinase C in a cell-free system were investigated. Benoxaprofen caused a dose-related activation of protein kinase C by interaction with the binding site for the physiological activator phosphatidylserine, but could not replace diacylglycerol. When autologous mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) were cocultured with PMNL and benoxaprofen in combination, but not individually, the frequency of DNA strand breaks in MNL was markedly increased. UV radiation significantly potentiated damage to DNA mediated by benoxaprofen and PMNL. Inclusion of superoxide dismutase, H-7, and, to a much lesser extent, catalase during exposure of MNL to benoxaprofen-activated PMNL prevented oxidant damage to DNA. These results clearly demonstrate that potentially carcinogenic prooxidative interactions, which are unlikely to be detected by conventional assays of mutagenicity, may occur between phagocytes, UV radiation, and certain pharmacological agents.

  15. Induction of inflammatory mediators from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and rat mast cells by haemolysin-positive and -negative E. coli strains with different adhesins.

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, J; Vosbeck, K; König, W

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the role of various E. coli strains that expressed different adhesins and/or generated haemolysin with regard to the induction of inflammatory mediators, e.g. histamine release from rat mast cells as well as the chemiluminescence response and the release of lipoxygenase transformation products from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Our data show that the degree of haemagglutination did not parallel the induction of the chemiluminescence response. Haemolysin-negative bacteria with different adhesins induced more 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as compared to haemolysin-positive bacteria, which generated more leukotriene B4 as compared to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Among the leukotrienes, more leukotriene B4 as compared to leukotriene C4 was released from peripheral leucocytes. Studies with rat mast cells showed that histamine release was dependent on the haemolysin activity expressed by washed bacteria or present within the bacterial culture supernatant. Histamine release was markedly diminished when haemolysin activity decayed. Several haemolysin-negative bacteria with defined adhesins also released histamine, suggesting that, in addition to haemolysin, other factors contribute to mediator release. Thus, various properties of bacteria (e.g. adhesins, haemolysin) may participate to varying degrees in the induction of inflammatory mediators, e.g. oxygen radicals, lipoxygenase transformation products, leucotrienes and histamine. PMID:2433215

  16. Adherence of Brucella to human epithelial cells and macrophages is mediated by sialic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Roldán, Elsa I; Avelino-Flores, Fabiola; Dall'Agnol, Monique; Freer, Enrique; Cedillo, Lilia; Dornand, Jacques; Girón, Jorge A

    2004-05-01

    The basis for the interaction of Brucella species with the surface of epithelial cells before migration in the host within polymorphonuclear leucocytes is largely unknown. Here, we studied the ability of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis to adhere to cultured epithelial (HeLa and HEp-2) cells and THP-1-derived macrophages, and to bind extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). The brucellae adhered to epithelial cells forming localized bacterial microcolonies on the cell surface, and this process was inhibited significantly by pretreatment of epithelial cells with neuraminidase and sodium periodate and by preincubation of the bacteria with heparan sulphate and N-acetylneuraminic acid. Trypsinization of epithelial cells yielded increased adherence, suggesting unmasking of target sites on host cells. Notably, the brucellae also adhered to cultured THP-1 cells, and this event was greatly reduced upon removal of sialic acid residues from these cells with neuraminidase. B. abortus bound in a dose-dependent manner to immobilized fibronectin and vitronectin and, to a lesser extent, to chondroitin sulphate, collagen and laminin. In sum, our data strongly suggest that the adherence mechanism of brucellae to epithelial cells and macrophages is mediated by cellular receptors containing sialic acid and sulphated residues. The recognition of ECM (fibronectin and vitronectin) by the brucellae may represent a mechanism for spread within the host tissues. These are novel findings that offer new insights into understanding the interplay between Brucella and host cells.

  17. Pharmacological activity of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schultz-Bip.): assessment by inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemiluminescence in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M; Edwards, C M; Davey, M R; Power, J B; Lowe, K C

    1997-05-01

    The bioactivity of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) leaf extracts has been analysed, by use of a human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) bioassay, to assess the relative contributions of solvent extraction and parthenolide content to the biological potency of the extract. Extracts prepared in acetone-ethanol (system 1) contained significantly more parthenolide (mean +/- s.d. 1.3 +/- 0.2% dry leaf weight) than extracts in chloroform-PBS (phosphate-buffered saline; system 2; 0.1 +/- 0.04% dry leaf weight) or PBS alone (system 3; 0.5 +/- 0.1% dry leaf weight). Extract bioactivity, measured as inhibition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced, 5-amino-2,3-dihydro-1,4-phthalazinedione (luminol)-enhanced PMNL, chemiluminescence, followed a similar trend. Extracts inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced oxidative burst by amounts which, if solely attributable to parthenolide, indicated parthenolide concentrations for the respective solvent systems of 2.2 +/- 0.6%, 0.2 +/- 0.1% and 0.9 +/- 0.1% dry leaf weight. The mean ratio of parthenolide concentration to the parthenolide equivalent/PMNL-bioactivity value, for acetone-ethanol and PBS extracts were both 1:1.7. Parthenolide, although a key determinant of biological activity for T. parthenium leaf extracts based on the PMNL-bioassay, seems not to be the sole pharmacologically-active constituent. The identical and elevated bioactivity-parthenolide ratios for both organic and aqueons-phase leaf extracts suggest that a proportion of the other bioactive compounds have solubilities similar to that of parthenolide.

  18. Enhanced susceptibility of Escherichia coli to intracellular killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after in vitro incubation with chloramphenicol.

    PubMed Central

    Pruul, H; Wetherall, B L; McDonald, P J

    1981-01-01

    The effect of brief exposure to chloramphenicol of a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli on susceptibility to normal human leukocytes was examined. Leukocytes killed chloramphenicol-pretreated E. coli more efficiently than they did untreated controls. Phagocytosis of pretreated bacteria, as measured by the uptake of radiolabeled bacteria and by direct visual count of engulfed bacteria, was not significantly increased. The decrease in viability was associated with enhanced intracellular killing of phagocytosed antibiotic-damaged bacteria. Chloramphenicol pretreatment altered the frequency distribution of intracellular bacteria by decreasing the number of leukocytes containing multiple stainable bacteria. Leukocytes failed to kill chloramphenicol-pretreated E. coli in the presence of phenylbutazone, which allowed an accumulation of intracellular bacteria. These results indicate that exposure of E. coli to chloramphenicol renders the bacteria more susceptible to intracellular killing and degradation. PMID:7023384

  19. Characteristics of adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to human and animal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Endo, S; Yokota, T; Echeverria, P

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli strain (serotype O127a:H2) that had been isolated from a child with diarrhea in Thailand and that was negative for the virulence factors of the four categories of diarrheagenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, and enterohemorrhagic) and that showed an aggregative pattern of adherence to HeLa cells was investigated for adherence to native or Formalin-fixed human and animal mucosa. The hemagglutinating activity and adherence ability of the bacteria were resistant to D-mannose and were strictly regulated by environmental conditions. Genetic data supported the close relation between the hemagglutinating activity and adherence ability. In accordance with the adherence pattern on tissue-cultured cells, the bacteria adhered to human and animal mucosa, as evidenced by a direct gold-labeling analysis. In human intestines, Formalin-fixed mucous coatings, epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, epithelial cells of ileal single lymphoid follicles and Peyer's patches, and the absorptive cells of jejunal or ileal villi provided adherence targets. Adherence to M cells in the Peyer's patch-associated epithelium was also confirmed. The adherence levels to native jejunal or ileal human villi were low, as was the case with the corresponding Formalin-fixed villi. In human urinary tract, the superficial epithelial cells of both native and Formalin-fixed ureter provided striking adherence targets. In animal (porcine and rabbit) small intestines, the bacteria adhered to the native villi to a lesser extent than to the Formalin-fixed villi. The adherence levels were compared with those of enterotoxigenic E. coli with colonization factor antigen (CFA)/I pili or CFA/II pili. The data suggested unique mucosa adherence characteristics of the enteroaggregative E. coli strain. The possibility of the adherence ability as a virulence factor was discussed. Images PMID:1680107

  20. Severe microvascular injury induced by lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Increase in vasopermeability, hemorrhage, and microthrombosis due to degradation of subendothelial and perivascular matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Movat, H. Z.; Wasi, S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the nature of the lesions in the microcirculation of the dermis of rabbits induced with lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). No attempt was made in the studies presented in this publication to deal with the offending agent in the releasate. Four parameters of microvascular injury were quantitated: increase in vascular permeability with 125I-labeled serum albumin, hemorrhage with 59Fe-labeled erythrocytes, accumulation (aggregation) of platelets with 111In-labeled platelets. In one experiment accumulation of 51Cr-PMNs was investigated. The lysosomal releasate induced a rapid increase in vasopermeability, but both hemorrhage and exudate formation peaked 1 hour after intradermal injection. Platelet accumulation was also demonstrable in these lesions, and microthrombosis was a very prominent feature. The microvascular injury, including microthrombosis, could be elicited also in animals rendered leukopenic with nitrogen mustard. Simultaneous injection of prostaglandin E2 with the releasate enhanced the microvascular injury. The morphologic changes in the microcirculation of the rabbit's dermis were assessed in lesions 5 minutes to 5 hours old. Several changes were encountered, primarily in the wall of venules and small veins and to a lesser degree in small arteries and capillaries. Ultrastructurally very early lesions (up to 15 minutes) had gaps or spaces in the endothelium, resembling those induced by mediators such as histamine or bradykinin. Older lesions were different, quite characteristic, and represent the hallmark of these lesions. Lysis and disappearance of vascular basement membrane, of perivascular collagen, and of the internal elastic lamina were a frequent finding, best demonstrable when microthrombi did not abut on vessel walls. Cellular components of vessels (endothelium, pericytes, smooth muscle) showed fragmentation, leading to complete disappearance of cellular elements. These

  1. High-density lipoprotein 3 physicochemical modifications induced by interaction with human polymorphonuclear leucocytes affect their ability to remove cholesterol from cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cogny, A; Atger, V; Paul, J L; Soni, T; Moatti, N

    1996-01-01

    1. We have recently reported that a short incubation (60 min) in vitro of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) 3 with human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) leads to a proteolytic cleavage of apolipoprotein (apo) AII and to a change in the distribution of apo AI isoforms [Cogny, Paul, Atger, Soni and Moatti (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 222, 965-973]. Since PMNs have been observed to be present in the earliest atherosclerotic lesions for a number of days, we investigated the HDL3 physiochemical modifications induced by in vitro interaction for a long period of time (24 h) with PMNs and the consequences of the changes on the ability of HDL3 to remove cholesterol from cells. 2. The stimulated PMN modification of HDL3 over 24 h resulted in a partial loss of protein with no variation in lipid molar ratio and a loss of 50% of HDL alpha-tocopherol content. The decrease in total protein was due first to a complete degradation of apo AII, and secondly to a partial loss of apo AI. The apo AI remaining on the particles was in part hydrolysed and the apo AI-1 isoform was completely shifted to the apo AI-2 isoform. These apo changes were accompanied by a displacement of the native HDL3 apparent size toward predominantly larger particles. 3. The ability of PMN-modified HDL3 to remove 3H-labelled free cholesterol from cells was measured in two cell lines: Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and J774 mouse macrophages. HDL3 which had only a limited contact with PMNs (60 min) showed only a small non-significant reduction in the efficiency of cholesterol efflux. On the other hand, compared with native HDL3, HDL3 modified by PMNs for 24 h had a markedly reduced ability to remove cholesterol from cells, regardless of the type of cell. 4. The results suggest that PMN-modified HDL3, if occurring in vivo, could contribute to acceleration of the atherogenic process by decreasing the cholesterol efflux from cells. PMID:8660296

  2. Inhibitory effect of plant phenolics on fMLP-induced intracellular calcium rise and chemiluminescence of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and their chemotactic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Piotr Jan; Zasowska-Nowak, Anna; Bialasiewicz, Piotr; de Graft-Johnson, Jeffrey; Nowak, Dariusz; Nowicki, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) produce oxidants, contributing to systemic oxidative stress. Diets rich in plant polyphenols seem to decrease the risk of oxidative stress-induced disorders including cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effect of each of the 14 polyphenols on PMNs chemotaxis, intracellular calcium response, oxidants production. Blood samples and PMNs suspensions were obtained from 60 healthy non-smoking donors and incubated with a selected polyphenol (0.5-10 µM) or a control solvent. We assessed resting and fMLP-dependent changes of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in PMNs with the Fura-2AM method and measured fMLP-induced luminol enhanced whole blood chemiluminescence (fMLP-LBCL). Polyphenol chemoattractant activity for PMNs was tested with Boyden chambers. Polyphenols had no effect on resting [Ca(2+)]i. Unaffected by other compounds, fMLP-dependent increase of [Ca(2+)]i was inhibited by quercetin and catechol (5 µM) by 32 ± 14 and 12 ± 10% (p < 0.04), respectively. Seven of the 14 tested substances (5 µM) influenced fMLP-LBCL by decreasing it. Catechol, quercetin, and gallic acid acted most potently reducing fMLP-LBCL by 49 ± 5, 42 ± 15, and 28 ± 18% (p < 0.05), respectively. 3,4-Dihydroxyhydrocinnamic, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and catechin (5 µM) revealed distinct (p < 0.02) chemoattractant activity with a chemotactic index of 1.9 ± 0.8, 1.8 ± 0.7, 1.6 ± 0.6, 1.4 ± 0.2, respectively. Catechol, quercetin, and gallic acid at concentrations commensurate in human plasma strongly suppressed the oxidative response of PMNs. Regarding quercetin and catechol, this could result from an inhibition of [Ca(2+)]i response.

  3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblasts and modifies cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Garcés, Carla Portillo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to human gingival fibroblast cells induces cytoskeletal reorganization. A. actinomycetemcomitans is considered a pathogenic bacteria involved in localized aggressive periodontitis. Studies with epithelial cells have shown an adherent capacity of bacteria that is increased under anaerobic conditions. For adherence to take place, there is a need for interaction between extracellular vesicles and bacterial fimbriae. However, molecular events associated with the adherence process are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence to human gingival fibroblasts promotes cytoskeletal reorganization. Adherence was determined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. For F-actin visualization, cells were treated with fluorescein-isothiocyanate-phalloidin and samples were examined with epifluorescence optics. Fluorescent was recorded on Kodak T-Max 400 film. We showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, this property stimulating an increase in the intracellular calcium levels. In human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, we observed that maximal A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence took place 1.5h after culture infection occurred and remained for 6h. The adherence was associated with morphologic alterations and an increased in the intracellular calcium levels. These experiments suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence cause morphological alterations, induce actin stress fibers and recruitment of intracellular calcium levels.

  4. Reduced in vitro adherence of Staphylococcus species to feline corneocytes compared to canine and human corneocytes.

    PubMed

    Woolley, K L; Kelly, R F; Fazakerley, J; Williams, N J; Nuttall, T J; McEwan, N A

    2008-02-01

    It is apparent that in-contact humans and animals exchange commensal staphylococci. Previous in vitro studies, however, indicate that staphylococci preferentially adhere to corneocytes from host species. This study compared adherence of meticillin-sensitive and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA), S. intermedius, S. felis and S. hominis to feline, canine and human corneocytes acquired from 10 healthy subjects using adhesive tape discs. Adherent bacteria were counted using an image processing and analysis programme. Mean adherence of MSSA (P = 0.0009), MRSA (P = 0.0162) and S. intermedius (P = 0.0117), but not S. felis or S. hominis, to feline corneocytes was significantly lower than that to canine and human corneocytes. All the isolates had similar adherence to both human and canine corneocytes. S. felis was the most adherent species to feline corneocytes followed by S. intermedius, and then MSSA, MRSA and S. hominis. For dogs and humans, S. intermedius and S. felis were the most adherent, followed by MRSA and MSSA, and then S. hominis. These results do not reveal any preferential adherence of staphylococci to canine or human corneocytes. Poor adherence to feline corneocytes could suggest that cats are relatively resistant to pyoderma and cross-species transmission of staphylococci.

  5. Factors involved in adherence of lactobacilli to human Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, J D; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative assay performed with bacterial cells labelled with [3H]thymidine was used to investigate factors involved in the adherence of human isolates Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 and Lactobacillus gasseri ADH to human Caco-2 intestinal cells. For all three strains, adherence was concentration dependent, greater at acidic pH values, and significantly greater than adherence of a control dairy isolate, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 1489. Adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 was decreased by protease treatment of the bacterial cells, whereas adherence of L. gasseri ADH either was not affected or was enhanced by protease treatment. Putative surface layer proteins were identified on L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 cells but were not involved in adherence. Periodate oxidation of bacterial cell surface carbohydrates significantly reduced adherence of L. gasseri ADH, moderately reduced adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4, and had no effect on adherence of L. acidophilus NCFM/N2. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species adhere to human intestinal cells via mechanisms which involve different combinations of carbohydrate and protein factors on the bacterial cell surface. The involvement of a secreted bridging protein, which has been proposed as the primary mediator of adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 in spent culture supernatant (M.-H. Coconnier, T. R. Klaenhammer, S. Kernéis, M.-F. Bernet, and A. L. Servin, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2034-2039, 1992), was not confirmed in this study. Rather, a pH effect on Caco-2 cells contributed significantly to the adherence of this strain in spent culture supernatant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7811085

  6. Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to rat and human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; John, J E; Johnston, L I; Innes, D J; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) to in vitro preparations of rat and human colonic mucosa. Studies were performed with fixed or unfixed rat colonic mucosa, unfixed rat mucosa exposed to trypsin, unfixed rat submucosa, and fixed human colonic mucosa. Twenty percent of the amebae adhered to fixed rat colonic mucosa; adherence was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), galactose, and asialofetuin. The adherence of amebae to fixed human colonic mucosa was also GalNAc inhibitable. Greater adherence was found with unfixed rat colonic mucosa (40.9%) and was not GalNAc inhibitable unless the tissue was first exposed to trypsin. However, GalNAc did inhibit the adherence of amebae to unfixed rat submucosa. Glutaraldehyde fixation of amebae inactivates known amebic adhesion proteins; there was a markedly decreased adherence of fixed amebae to trypsin-exposed mucosa or fixed rat colonic mucosa. However, fixed or viable amebae had equal levels of adherence to unfixed rat colonic mucosa, suggesting the presence of a host adhesion protein that binds to receptors on amebae. Human (10%) and rabbit (5%) immune sera reduced the adherence of viable amebae to fixed rat colonic mucosa. We concluded that the GalNAc-inhibitable adhesion protein on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites mediated adherence to fixed rat mucosa, fixed human colonic mucosa, trypsin-exposed unfixed rat mucosa, and unfixed rat submucosa. The surface of unfixed rat colonic mucosa contained a glutaraldehyde- and trypsin-sensitive host adhesion protein, perhaps in the overlying mucus blanket, which bound viable or fixed E. histolytica trophozoites. Images PMID:2580787

  7. In vitro effect of different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of the whole blood.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, A S; Jawad, A M; Al-Hashimi, A H

    2001-04-01

    To define the well-known variability in the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and to search for predictors of such variability using an in vitro model. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of the whole blood using barium sulphate as a stimulator. Blood was taken from 40 apparently healthy volunteers (22 males and 18 females; their age ranged from 20-50 years). Drugs (indomethacin 10 ug/ml, aspirin 300 ug/ml, ibuprofen 25 ug/ml or diclofenac 8 ug/ml) were added into the blood of each individual in vitro. The chemiluminescence was measured in a photon counting system. There was a marked inter and intra individual variation in the chemiluminescence response to the 4 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, added in vitro. The variation exhibited a continuous pattern. No statistically significant correlation was found between the in vitro effect of one non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and the other 3 drugs, nor between the effect of each drug and factors like age, sex, weight, height, packed cell volume, hemoglobin percentage and white blood cell count. Subjects with hemoglobin-AS type (number = 9) responded mainly by enhancement to indomethacin and diclofenac. When the number of subjects rather than the average net effect was compared according to blood groups, those with blood group A showed chemiluminescence responses towards enhancement with indomethacin and diclofenac and blood group O with aspirin. A consistent pattern of enhancement and inhibition was evident; enhancements and inhibitions by any 2 drugs involve a seemingly constant proportion of subjects. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence responses of polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity could be a good in vitro model to study the variability in response to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Characteristics of each individual are not able to predict the pattern of variability. Abnormal hemoglobin and the type of blood group seem to be an

  8. Dysfunction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in uremia.

    PubMed

    Haag-Weber, M; Hörl, W H

    1996-05-01

    There is increased incidence of infectious complications in uremic patients, indicating impairment of cellular host defense in these patients. Several reports confirm metabolic and functional abnormalities of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) including altered adherence to endothelial cells, altered generation of reactive oxygen species, altered release of microbial enzymes, impaired chemotaxis, phagocytosis, intracellular killing of bacteria, altered carbohydrate metabolism, and/or impaired ATP formation. Several studies report on correlations between PMNL dysfunction, especially phagocytosis and oxidative burst, and ferritin content. Deferoxamine therapy improved PMNL function. Chronic renal failure is a state of increased cytosolic calcium. Increased cytosolic calcium is associated with several alterations of PMNL function and metabolism, which improve by normalization of cytosolic calcium either by calcium channel blockers or by lowering of elevated parathyroid hormone. Each hemodialysis session using bioincompatible membranes triggers neutrophil activation, evidenced by overexpression of adhesion molecules, elevation of cytosolic calcium, release of PMNL granular enzymes, and generation of reactive oxygen species. Several studies claim that this results in chronic downregulation of phagocyte function. Several granulocyte inhibitory compounds have been isolated and characterized from uremic serum. The uremic retention product p-cresol depresses respiratory burst activity. The following granulocyte inhibitory peptides could be isolated from dialysis patients: granulocyte inhibitory protein I and II with homology to light chain proteins and beta 2-microglobulin, degranulation inhibitory protein I and II being identical to angiogenin and complement factor D, and immunoglobulin light chains. These proteins inhibit PMNL function in nanomolar concentrations.

  9. A beta-linked mannan inhibits adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Azghani, A O; Williams, I; Holiday, D B; Johnson, A R

    1995-02-01

    Adherence through carbohydrate-binding adhesins is an early step in colonization of the lung by gram-negative organisms, and because published data indicate that binding involves mannose groups, we tested the ability of a beta-linked acetyl-mannan (acemannan) to inhibit adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to cultures of human lung epithelial cells. Adherence of radiolabelled P.aeruginosa to A549 cells (a type II-like pneumocyte line) increased linearly with the duration of the incubation. Acemannan inhibited adherence of bacteria, and the extent of inhibition was related to the concentration of the mannan. Inhibition required continued contact between acemannan and the target epithelial cells; cells washed free of acemannan no longer discouraged bacterial binding. Comparison of binding between seven different strains of P.aeruginosa indicated that fewer mucoid than non-mucoid bacteria adhered, but binding of either phenotype was inhibited by acemannan. Mannose, methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside, methyl beta-D-mannopyranoside and dextran did not affect adherence of any of the non-mucoid strains. Mannose inhibited adherence by one mucoid strain, but not the other, indicating differences between strains of the same phenotype. Since prior treatment of epithelial cells with concanavalin A did not affect acemannan-induced inhibition of bacterial adherence, we concluded that the inhibitory effect of acemannan probably does not involve mannose-containing receptors.

  10. Acidic fibroblast growth factor modulates Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, E A; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1988-01-01

    Alteration of human endothelial cells may increase their susceptibility to staphylococcal invasion and thus may contribute to the development of intravascular staphylococcal disease. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, a potent regulator of endothelial cell function, had a significant effect on Staphylococcus aureus infection of cultured human endothelial cells. Three of four S. aureus strains had diminished adherence to endothelial cells when the latter were grown in the presence of acidic fibroblast growth factor (P less than 0.05). The diminished adherence was time dependent, maximal at 72 h, and independent of the initial bacterial inoculum. A twofold enhancement of S. aureus adherence was observed when endothelial cells were pretreated with heparitinase. Adherence was unaffected by endothelial cell activation by interleukin-1 or endotoxin. Thus, acidic fibroblast growth factor exerted a protective effect, deterring S. aureus adherence to cultured endothelial cells. Endothelial cell heparan sulfate was also directly involved in the adherence process. Subtle modulations of endothelial cells can significantly affect the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and then infect these cells. Similar alterations may contribute to the ability of S. aureus to infect endovascular tissue in vivo. PMID:3259546

  11. Comparison of medication adherence in diabetes mellitus patients on human versus analogue insulins.

    PubMed

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Medina-Morales, Diego Alejandro; Echeverri-Cataño, Luis Felipe

    2017-02-01

    Objetive: This study evaluated the results of treatment adherence scales in two cohorts of patients with diabetes mellitus treated either with human or analogue insulins. A cohort study was conducted in diabetes mellitus patients older than 18 that were being treated with human or analogue insulins. Two instruments were applied to each patient [medication possession ratio, Morisky-Green test] to evaluate treatment adherence. A total of 238 patients, were included. The majority (69.4%) of the subjects had human insulin and 30.6% had insulin analogue prescriptions. Out of the total, 163 (68.5%) cases were classified as adherent to therapy, according to the type of insulin, as follows: 69.9% for conventional and 65.3% for analogues; without differences between the groups (CI95%:0.450-1.458). The adherence to treatment was more probable in patients with elementary-secondary education (OR:2.341; CI95%:1.199-4.568) and less probable for those in the age range of 31-45 years (OR:0.427; CI95%:0.187-0.971). The results of this study show that there are no significant statistical differences in adherence when comparing human with analogue insulin therapy. Strategies to improve treatment adherence are particularly important since they improve the clinical results.

  12. A peptide derived from neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) blocks neutrophil adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Madden, K; Janczak, J; McEnroe, G; Lim, D; Hartman, T; Liu, D; Stanton, L

    1997-06-01

    Peptides derived from neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF), a known antagonist of Mac-1, were evaluated as inhibitors of neutrophil adherence. In vitro assays of adherence employed: 1) human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), 2) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and 3) CHO cells expressing ICAM-1 (CHO-ICAM cells). Cells, pretreated with NIF-derived peptides (0.1-100 microM) for 10 minutes, were permitted to adhere for 20 min in the continued presence of peptide. Cell-based assays: 1) PMN adherence to HUVEC, 2) PMN adhesion to immobilized human serum proteins, and 3) adherence of CHO-ICAM cells to immobilized Mac-1. A NIF-derived peptide of 29 amino acids blocked PMN adherence to HUVEC, but behaved somewhat differently than the parent NIF protein. NIF specifically antagonized Mac-1 dependent adherence, but the peptide blocked neutrophil adherence that was dependent upon both Mac-1 and LFA-1 integrins. CHO-ICAM adherence to Mac-1 was blocked by NIF, but not by the peptide. Binding studies with NIF and the peptide indicate that the molecules bind to different sites. A peptide derived from NIF blocks PMN adherence but, unlike NIF, the mechanism of action is not mediated by direct antagonism Mac-1.

  13. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cornely, Oliver A.; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro. In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time. PMID:27021317

  14. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time.

  15. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Guardabassi, Luca

    2014-06-24

    The recent worldwide spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is a reason for concern due to the typical multidrug resistance patterns displayed by some MRSP lineages such as sequence type (ST) 71. The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro adherence properties between MRSP and methicillin-susceptible (MSSP) strains. Four MRSP, including a human and a canine strain belonging to ST71 and two canine non-ST71 strains, and three genetically unrelated MSSP were tested on corneocytes collected from five dogs and six humans. All strains were fully characterized with respect to genetic background and cell wall-anchored protein (CWAP) gene content. Seventy-seven strain-corneocyte combinations were tested using both exponential- and stationary-phase cultures. Negative binomial regression analysis of counts of bacterial cells adhering to corneocytes revealed that adherence was significantly influenced by host and strain genotype regardless of bacterial growth phase. The two MRSP ST71 strains showed greater adherence than MRSP non-ST71 (p < 0.0001) and MSSP (p < 0.0001). This phenotypic trait was not associated to any specific CWAP gene. In general, S. pseudintermedius adherence to canine corneocytes was significantly higher compared to human corneocytes (p < 0.0001), but the MRSP ST71 strain of human origin adhered equally well to canine and human corneocytes, suggesting that MRSP ST71 may be able to adapt to human skin. The genetic basis of the enhanced in vitro adherence of ST71 needs to be elucidated as this phenotypic trait may be associated to the epidemiological success and zoonotic potential of this epidemic MRSP clone.

  16. [Human antitumor immunity according to leukocyte adherence inhibition test data].

    PubMed

    Riatsep, V I; Kurtenkov, O A; Nikitin, Iu G; Miliukhina, L M

    1980-01-01

    A microvariant of the test of leucocytes adherence inhibition, which results were assessed by fluorescence, has revealed antitumor immune reactions to allogenic tumor antigens in gastric cancer (n = 38) and breast cancer (n = 35) in 51.7 and 68.5% of patients respectively. A correlation between the reaction and stage was found only in breast cancer patients. Postive reactions to heterogenous tumor antigen were noted in 17-25% of cases. The reactions to tumor antigens in nontumor lesions of the corresponding localizations were noted in 29.2 and 25%. The data obtained indicated that homogeneity of the antigenic tumor pattern is high enough within the limits of a particular localization irrespective of the degree of morphological tumor differentiation. It seems essential to take into account some possible autoimmune reactions to normal organotypical antigens to interprete the tumor specificity of the reactions under study.

  17. Characterization of the adherence properties of human Lactobacilli strains to be used as vaginal probiotics.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Sánchez, Borja; Suárez, Juan Evaristo; Urdaci, María C

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, the adhesion of 43 human lactobacilli isolates to mucin has been studied. The most adherent strains were selected, and their capacities to adhere to three epithelial cell lines were studied. All intestinal strains and one vaginal isolate adhered to HT-29 cells. The latter was the most adherent to Caco-2 cells, although two of the intestinal isolates were also highly adherent. Moreover, five of the eight strains strongly adhered to HeLa cells. The binding of an Actinomyces neuii clinical isolate to HeLa cells was enhanced by two of the lactobacilli and by their secreted proteins, while those of another two strains almost abolished it. None of the strains were able to interfere with the adhesion of Candida albicans to HeLa cells. The components of the extracellular proteome of all strains were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. Among them, a collagen-binding A precursor and aggregation-promoting factor-like proteins are suggested to participate on adhesion to Caco-2 and HeLa cells, respectively. In this way, several proteins with LysM domains might explain the ability of some bacterial supernatants to block A. neuii adhesion to HeLa cell cultures. Finally, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) could explain the good adhesion of some strains to mucin.

  18. Curcumin suppresses Streptococcus mutans adherence to human tooth surfaces and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, J; Choi, B; Jin, E-J; Yoon, Y; Choi, K-H

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the key causative agent of caries and infective endocarditis. The first step in biofilm development and the consequent initiation of further disease is bacterial adherence to host cell surfaces. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of curcumin on S. mutans adherence to extracellular matrices and tooth surfaces. The effect of curcumin on the ability of S. mutans to adhere to glass surfaces coated with collagen and fibronectin was tested in order to determine whether the decrease of the bacterial adhesion by curcumin is achieved by hindering the bacteria in adhering to collagen and/or fibronectin. Also, human teeth inoculated with S. mutans were treated with curcumin in vitro in order to assess the relevance of the anti-adhesive effect to oral conditions in vivo. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at which curcumin completely inhibited bacterial growth was 128 μg/mL. The addition of curcumin below the MIC diminished bacterial adherence onto both collagen- and fibronectin-coated glass surfaces and human tooth surfaces. It appears that the anti-adhesive effect of curcumin against S. mutans is mediated through collagen and fibronectin. These results support the widespread use of curcumin as a food-based antimicrobial agent.

  19. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the formation of a serum inducible element complex containing STAT1. The analysis of biological effects of TPO on PMN demonstrated that TPO, at concentrations of 1-10 ng/ml, primes the response of PMN to n-formyl-met-leu-phe (FMLP) by inducing an early oxidative burst. TPO-induced priming on FMLP-stimulated PMN was also detected on the tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 28 kD. Moreover, we demonstrated that TPO by itself was able to stimulate, at doses ranging from 0.05 to 10 ng/ml, early release and delayed synthesis of interleukin 8 (IL-8). Thus, our data indicate that, in addition to sustaining megakaryocytopoiesis, TPO may have an important role in regulating PMN activation. PMID:9120001

  20. Adherence to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For years Plasmodium vivax has been considered the cause of benign malaria. Nevertheless, it has been observed that this parasite can produce a severe disease comparable to Plasmodium falciparum. It has been suggested that some physiopathogenic processes might be shared by these two species, such as cytoadherence. Recently, it has been demonstrated that P. vivax-infected erythrocytes (Pv-iEs) have the capacity to adhere to endothelial cells, in which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) seems to be involved in this process. Methods Adherence capacity of 21 Colombian isolates, from patients with P. vivax mono-infection to a microvascular line of human lung endothelium (HMVEC-L) was assessed in static conditions and binding was evaluated at basal levels or in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulated cells. The adherence specificity for the ICAM-1 receptor was determined through inhibition with an anti-CD54 monoclonal antibody. Results The majority of P. vivax isolates, 13 out of 21 (61.9%), adhered to the HMVEC-L cells, but P. vivax adherence was at least seven times lower when compared to the four P. falciparum isolates. Moreover, HMVEC-L stimulation with TNF led to an increase of 1.6-fold in P. vivax cytoadhesion, similar to P. falciparum isolates (1.8-fold) at comparable conditions. Also, blockage of ICAM-1 receptor with specific antibodies showed a significant 50% adherence reduction. Conclusions Plasmodium vivax isolates found in Colombia are also capable of adhering specifically in vitro to lung endothelial cells, via ICAM-1 cell receptor, both at basal state and after cell stimulation with TNF. Collectively, these findings reinforce the concept of cytoadherence for P. vivax, but here, to a different endothelial cell line and using geographical distinct isolates, thus contributing to understanding P. vivax biology. PMID:24080027

  1. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  2. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  3. Assessment of factors influencing adherence to anti-retroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus positive mothers and their infected children.

    PubMed

    De, Arun Kumar; Dalui, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Mothers and children are biologically related and dependent. They should be considered as a single unit which is very important regarding adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Very high levels of adherence are required for effective ART. We therefore carried out this study to examine the adherence levels and different factors associated with adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive mothers and their HIV-positive children receiving ART. A hospital-based cross-sectional study. Ninety-four HIV-positive mothers and their 94 HIV-positive children under ART attending the ART center of a tertiary care hospital were recruited in this study. Consenting mothers were asked to complete the "Case Study Form" containing socio-demographic and care-giving details. Mothers were also asked to complete the Beck's depression inventory, State trait anxiety inventory, and Ways of coping inventory. Adherence was assessed using pill count. Criteria for good and poor adherence were defined. Current CD4 counts were retrieved from the hospital record. Fifty-six percent of respondent mothers and 65.8% of respondent children showed good adherence to ART. Different factors were associated with poor adherence in both mothers and their children. Adherence of HIV-positive mothers and their HIV-positive children to ART is influenced by multiple factors and identification of these factors is necessary to get complete adherence to ART. There is statistically significant relationship between maternal and pediatric adherence to ART.

  4. Human IgA inhibits adherence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga to epithelial cells and contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Oliver-Aguillón, Gabriela; Vega-Pérez, Luz M; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Hernández-Martínez, Dolores; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; González-Robles, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Specific anti-Acanthamoeba IgA antibodies have been detected in the serum and tears of patients and healthy individuals. However, the role of human secretory IgA antibodies in inhibiting the adherence of Acanthamoeba had not been previously investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to purify secretory IgA from human colostrum and analyze its effect on the adherence of Acanthamoeba trophozoites to contact lenses and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. IgA antibodies to Acanthamoeba polyphaga in colostrum of healthy women as well as in saliva and serum of healthy subjects were analyzed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. In serum, saliva, and colostrum, we detected IgA antibodies that recognized several antigens of A. polyphaga. In addition, colostrum and IgA antibodies purified from it inhibited adherence of A. polyphaga trophozoites to contact lenses and MDCK cells. These results suggest that IgA antibodies may participate in the resistance to the amoebic infection, probably by inhibiting the adherence of the trophozoites to contact lenses and corneal epithelial cells.

  5. Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Golda, Anna; Malek, Natalia; Dudek, Bartosz; Zeglen, Slawomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Kucewicz, Ewa; Zembala, Marian; Potempa, Jan; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of augmented bacterial pathogenicity in post-viral infections is the first step in the development of an effective therapy. This study assessed the effect of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) on the adherence of bacterial pathogens associated with respiratory tract illnesses. It was shown that HCoV-NL63 infection resulted in an increased adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to virus-infected cell lines and fully differentiated primary human airway epithelium cultures. The enhanced binding of bacteria correlated with an increased expression level of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), but detailed evaluation of the bacterium-PAF-R interaction revealed a limited relevance of this process.

  6. Purification and characterization by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of the polymorphonuclear-leucocyte-elastase-generated A alpha (1-21) fragment of fibrinogen from human blood after incubation with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, R S; Liesch, J M; Williams, H R; Sugg, E E; Dolan, C A; Davies, P; Mumford, R A; Albers-Schönberg, G

    1992-01-01

    The stimulation of human blood with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, leads to activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) with release of small amounts of catalyticaly active elastase, as demonstrated by the formation of a characteristic product, the N-terminal A alpha (1-21) peptide of the Aa subunit of fibrinogen. The identity of the peptide was initially established by radioimmunoassay (r.i.a.) with an antibody raised to A alpha (1-21). We now provide independent confirmation of the formation of A alpha (1-21) by fast-atom-bombardment-m.s. analysis of the fractions separated chromatographically after spiking of plasma samples with peptide labelled with [2H8]Phe at position 8. Identity of the peptides was established on the basis of their chromatographic retention time and by the distinct peaks in the mass spectra of these fractions. The relative intensities of the molecular ions of natural and labelled peptides were measured. On the basis of a comparison of the peaks of similar intensities, the concentration of the natural peptide at the time of spiking was close (79%) to the amount obtained by r.i.a. An additional peptide, des-alanyl-A alpha (2-21), was also seen. The total amount of material measured by r.i.a. could be accounted for by the sum of these two provides. The addition of label and assay by m.s. has provided an independent physical-chemical method for identifying A alpha (1-21) as a characteristic product of PMN elastase release in whole blood, but which is absent in freshly drawn blood. PMID:1736899

  7. Pilus-Mediated Adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to Human Respiratory Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Kubiet, Martin; Ramphal, Reuben; Weber, Allan; Smith, Arnold

    2000-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, especially the nontypeable strains, are among the most common pathogens encountered in patients with chronic lung disease and otitis media. We and others have demonstrated that respiratory isolates of nontypeable H. influenzae bind to human mucins, but the mechanism of binding is not entirely clear. We have therefore examined the role of pili in the adherence of both type b and nontypeable H. influenzae to human respiratory mucins. We used isogenic H. influenzae strains with a mutation in the structural gene for pilin (hifA), a laboratory H. influenzae strain transformed with a type b pilus gene cluster (from strain C54), antibodies raised against H. influenzae HifA, and Escherichia coli strains carrying a cloned type b pilus gene cluster (from strain AM30) in these studies. All bacteria lacking HifA or the pilus gene cluster had decreased adherence of piliated H. influenzae to mucins, and Fab fragments of anti-HifA antibodies inhibited the adherence. E. coli strains carrying the cloned type b pilus gene cluster were six to seven times more adhesive than strains carrying the vector. The role of other putative adhesins was not examined and thus cannot be excluded, but these studies support a role for pili in the binding of H. influenzae to human respiratory mucins. PMID:10816486

  8. Supportive Accountability: A Model for Providing Human Support to Enhance Adherence to eHealth Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of and adherence to eHealth interventions is enhanced by human support. However, human support has largely not been manualized and has usually not been guided by clear models. The objective of this paper is to develop a clear theoretical model, based on relevant empirical literature, that can guide research into human support components of eHealth interventions. A review of the literature revealed little relevant information from clinical sciences. Applicable literature was drawn primarily from organizational psychology, motivation theory, and computer-mediated communication (CMC) research. We have developed a model, referred to as “Supportive Accountability.” We argue that human support increases adherence through accountability to a coach who is seen as trustworthy, benevolent, and having expertise. Accountability should involve clear, process-oriented expectations that the patient is involved in determining. Reciprocity in the relationship, through which the patient derives clear benefits, should be explicit. The effect of accountability may be moderated by patient motivation. The more intrinsically motivated patients are, the less support they likely require. The process of support is also mediated by the communications medium (eg, telephone, instant messaging, email). Different communications media each have their own potential benefits and disadvantages. We discuss the specific components of accountability, motivation, and CMC medium in detail. The proposed model is a first step toward understanding how human support enhances adherence to eHealth interventions. Each component of the proposed model is a testable hypothesis. As we develop viable human support models, these should be manualized to facilitate dissemination. PMID:21393123

  9. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  10. Modulation of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Response to N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-10

    Clin. Immun. and Immunopath., 15:525, 1980. 16. Gray, G.D., Ohlmann, G.M., Morton. D.R. and Schaaub, R.G., Feline Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Respond...Polymorphonuclear Leucocytes. Br. J. of Haem., 66:219, 1987. Collins, S.J., The HL-60 Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Line: Proliferation, Differentiation, and...T.J. and Niedel, J.E., Cyclic Nucleotide-Induced Maturation of Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells, J. Clin. Inv., 70:953, 1982. Gonder, J.C., Thomas

  11. Effects of mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients on inflammatory mediator release from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, P; König, B; König, W

    1992-01-01

    Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing chronic bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may interfere with host defence mechanisms. We investigated 13 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from sputa of CF patients with regard to the induction or modulation of inflammatory mediator release from human neutrophils (PMN) and rat mast cells. The effects of mucoid as compared to non-mucoid bacteria were studied using a mucoid strain and its non-mucoid revertant. The release of leukotrienes (LT) and histamine in response to the majority of the CF strains was insignificant. However, preincubation of PMN with P. aeruginosa caused a dose-dependent decrease (50-95%) of LTB4 and LTC4 generation and LTB4 metabolism induced by the Ca(2+)-ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan (ZX) (P less than 0.001). The mucoid strains caused a three- to 10-fold higher impairment of LTB4 release (P less than 0.05) and a concomitant down-regulation of LTB4 receptors on neutrophils. Inhibitory effects were also obtained for mucoid and non-mucoid bacteria when the phorbol-ester or the Ca(2+)-ionophore induced luminol enhanced chemiluminescence response (P less than 0.001) or the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (P less than 0.01) was studied. The bacteria-cell contact with non-mucoid strains was associated with an increased Ca2+ influx into PMN, whereas mucoid bacteria had no effect. In addition, a protein kinase C-dependent decrease of the C3bi receptor was suppressed by the mucoid--and less effectively--by the non-mucoid strain. The results suggest that the impairment of the phagocytic and inflammatory system may contribute to the pathogenesis and persistence of mucoid P. aeruginosa infection in CF. PMID:1321094

  12. [Modified method for whole bone marrow adherent culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qing; Zhong, Zhao-Dong; Chen, Zhi-Chao; Zou, Ping

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate a more convenient and efficient method to cultivate the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by means of natural erythrocyte sedimentation principle, based on the whole bone marrow adherent method. The bone marrow was cultured with a six-well plate instead of the flasks.Firstly, the bone marrow specimen was cultivated with the MSC complete medium for 48 h, then the upper RBC-free supernatant layer was drawn and placed into the new wells to isolate MSC. Inverted microscope was used to observe the cell morphology and to record the adherent time of first cell passage, first passaging time. The traditional whole bone marrow adherent method was used as the control. The cell cycle and cell surface markers were detected by flow cytometry,and the differentiative capacity of MSC into osteocyte and adipocyte was identified by alkaline phosphatase kit and oil red O, respectively. Besides, the proliferative curve of P1,P3,P5 of BMSC was depicted by counting method. The results showed that MSC cultured by the modified method highly expressed CD90, CD105, CD13, CD44 and lowly expressed CD14, CD45, CD34. Concerning the cell cycle feature, it was found that most of the cells were in G0/G1 phase (88.76%) , followed by G2/M phase (3.04%) and S phase (8.2%), which was in accordance with stem cell cycle characteristics. The proliferative curve showed a typical "S" type, and both the oil red O and alkaline phosphatase staining of MSC were positive. Compared with the traditional method, the modified method had the advantage of high adherence rate (P = 0.0001) and shorter passaging time for the first passage (P = 0.001), with the statistically significant difference. It is concluded that there is a large number of adherent, active and suspended MSC in the RBC-free supernatant layer after the culture of bone marrow for 48 h. Isolating MSC by the modified method is more convenient and efficient than the traditional whole bone marrow adherent method.

  13. Brugia malayi microfilariae adhere to human vascular endothelial cells in a C3-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jan-Hendrik; McCarthy, David; Szestak, Tadge; Cook, Darren A.; Taylor, Mark J.; Craig, Alister G.; Lawson, Charlotte; Lawrence, Rachel A.

    2017-01-01

    Brugia malayi causes the human tropical disease, lymphatic filariasis. Microfilariae (Mf) of this nematode live in the bloodstream and are ingested by a feeding mosquito vector. Interestingly, in a remarkable co-evolutionary adaptation, Mf appearance in the peripheral blood follows a circadian periodicity and reaches a peak when the mosquito is most likely to feed. For the remaining hours, the majority of Mf sequester in the lung capillaries. This circadian phenomenon has been widely reported and is likely to maximise parasite fitness and optimise transmission potential. However, the mechanism of Mf sequestration in the lungs remains largely unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that B. malayi Mf can, directly adhere to vascular endothelial cells under static conditions and under flow conditions, they can bind at high (but not low) flow rates. High flow rates are more likely to be experienced diurnally. Furthermore, a non-periodic nematode adheres less efficiently to endothelial cells. Strikingly C3, the central component of complement, plays a crucial role in the adherence interaction. These novel results show that microfilariae have the ability to bind to endothelial cells, which may explain their sequestration in the lungs, and this binding is increased in the presence of inflammatory mediators. PMID:28481947

  14. DMSO-Free Programmed Cryopreservation of Fully Dissociated and Adherent Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katkov, Igor I.; Kan, Natalia G.; Cimadamore, Flavio; Nelson, Brandon; Snyder, Evan Y.; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    Three modes for cryopreservation (CP) of human iPSC cells have been compared: STD: standard CP of small clumps with 10% of CPA in cryovials, ACC: dissociation of the cells with Accutase and freezing in cryovials, and PLT: programmed freezing of adherent cells in plastic multiwell dishes in a programmable freezer using one- and multistep cooling protocols. Four CPAs were tesetd: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), and glycerol (GLY). The cells in ACC and PLT were frozen and recovered after thawing in the presence of a ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 (RI). EG was less toxic w/o CP cryopreservation than DMSO and allowed much better maintenance of pluripotency after CP than PG or GLY. The cells were cryopreserved very efficiently as adherent cultures (+RI) in plates (5-6-fold higher than STD) using EG and a 6-step freezing protocol. Recovery under these conditions is comparable or even higher than ACC+RI. Conclusions. Maintenance of cell-substratum adherence is a favorable environment that mitigates freezing and thawing stresses (ComfortFreeze® concept developed by CELLTRONIX). CP of cells directly in plates in ready-to-go after thawing format for HT/HC screening can be beneficial in many SC-related scientific and commercial applications such as drug discovery and toxicity tests. PMID:21716669

  15. DMSO-Free Programmed Cryopreservation of Fully Dissociated and Adherent Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Katkov, Igor I; Kan, Natalia G; Cimadamore, Flavio; Nelson, Brandon; Snyder, Evan Y; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-01-01

    THREE MODES FOR CRYOPRESERVATION (CP) OF HUMAN IPSC CELLS HAVE BEEN COMPARED: STD: standard CP of small clumps with 10% of CPA in cryovials, ACC: dissociation of the cells with Accutase and freezing in cryovials, and PLT: programmed freezing of adherent cells in plastic multiwell dishes in a programmable freezer using one- and multistep cooling protocols. Four CPAs were tesetd: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), and glycerol (GLY). The cells in ACC and PLT were frozen and recovered after thawing in the presence of a ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 (RI). EG was less toxic w/o CP cryopreservation than DMSO and allowed much better maintenance of pluripotency after CP than PG or GLY. The cells were cryopreserved very efficiently as adherent cultures (+RI) in plates (5-6-fold higher than STD) using EG and a 6-step freezing protocol. Recovery under these conditions is comparable or even higher than ACC+RI. Conclusions. Maintenance of cell-substratum adherence is a favorable environment that mitigates freezing and thawing stresses (ComfortFreeze(®) concept developed by CELLTRONIX). CP of cells directly in plates in ready-to-go after thawing format for HT/HC screening can be beneficial in many SC-related scientific and commercial applications such as drug discovery and toxicity tests.

  16. Modulation of Kingella kingae Adherence to Human Epithelial Cells by Type IV Pili, Capsule, and a Novel Trimeric Autotransporter

    PubMed Central

    Porsch, Eric A.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Geme, Joseph W. St.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kingella kingae is an emerging bacterial pathogen that is being recognized increasingly as an important etiology of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacteremia, especially in young children. Colonization of the posterior pharynx is a key step in the pathogenesis of K. kingae disease. Previous work established that type IV pili are necessary for K. kingae adherence to the respiratory epithelium. In this study, we set out to identify additional factors that influence K. kingae interactions with human epithelial cells. We found that genetic disruption of the gene encoding a predicted trimeric autotransporter protein called Knh (Kingella NhhA homolog) resulted in reduced adherence to human epithelial cells. In addition, we established that K. kingae elaborates a surface-associated polysaccharide capsule that requires a predicted ABC-type transporter export operon called ctrABCD for surface presentation. Furthermore, we discovered that the presence of a surface capsule interferes with Knh-mediated adherence to human epithelial cells by nonpiliated organisms and that maximal adherence in the presence of a capsule requires the predicted type IV pilus retraction machinery, PilT/PilU. On the basis of the data presented here, we propose a novel adherence mechanism that allows K. kingae to adhere efficiently to human epithelial cells while remaining encapsulated and more resistant to immune clearance. PMID:23093386

  17. Complement (C5)-derived chemotactic activity accounts for accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, J D; Hartiala, K T; Goldstein, I M; Sande, M A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to identify the chemoattractant for polymorphonuclear leukocytes that appears in the cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with experimental pneumococcal meningitis. Meningitis was induced in anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits by injecting 10(4) cells of stationary-phase Streptococcus pneumoniae type III intracisternally. Before bacteria were injected, cerebrospinal fluid contained neither polymorphonuclear leukocytes nor chemotactic activity. Significant chemotactic activity for rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes was detected 12 h after inoculation with bacteria and was maximal after 18 to 20 h. Chemotactic activity appeared in cerebrospinal fluid while concentrations of pneumococci and total protein were increasing but before there was any accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chemotactic activity in cerebrospinal fluid was heat stable (56 degrees C for 30 min), eluted from Sephadex G-75 with a profile identical to that of the chemotactic activity in zymosan-activated rabbit serum, and was inhibited by treatment with antibodies to native human C5. In addition, preincubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes with partially purified rabbit C5a selectively inhibited their subsequent chemotactic responses to cerebrospinal fluid. These data indicate that complement (C5)-derived chemotactic activity appears in cerebrospinal fluid during the course of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rabbits and suggest that this activity accounts for the accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes observed in this infection. PMID:6480117

  18. Adherence and intracellular survival within human macrophages of Enterococcus faecalis isolates from coastal marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Raffaella; Di Cesare, Andrea; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Vignaroli, Carla; Citterio, Barbara; Amiri, Mehdi; Rossi, Luigia; Magnani, Mauro; Mauro, Alessandro; Biavasco, Francesca

    2015-09-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the human intestinal microbiota and an important nosocomial pathogen. It can be found in the marine environment, where it is also employed as a fecal indicator. To assess the pathogenic potential of marine E. faecalis, four strains isolated from marine sediment were analyzed for their ability to survive in human macrophages. Escherichia coli DH5α was used as a negative control. The number of adherent and intracellular bacteria was determined 2.5 h after the infection (T0) and after further 24h (T24) by CFU and qPCR counts. At T24 adherent and intracellular enterococcal CFU counts were increased for all strains, the increment in intracellular bacteria being particularly marked. No CFU of E. coli DH5α were detected. In contrast, qPCR counts of intracellular enterococcal and E. coli bacteria were similar at both time points. These findings suggest that whereas E. coli was killed within macrophages (no CFU, positive qPCR), the E. faecalis isolates not only escaped killing, but actually multiplied, as demonstrated by the increase in the viable cell population. These findings support earlier data by our group, further documenting that marine sediment can be a reservoir of pathogenic enterococci.

  19. Metabolic glycoengineering of Staphylococcus aureus reduces its adherence to human T24 bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Memmel, Elisabeth; Homann, Arne; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Seibel, Jürgen

    2013-08-25

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen increasingly causing severe infections, especially in hospital environments. Moreover, strains which are resistant against various types of antibiotics are developing and spreading widely as in the case of the community-acquired MRSA (methicillin resistant S. aureus). In this study metabolic glycoengineering with N-azidoacetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAz) has been successfully applied to S. aureus for the first time. The following bioorthogonal Mendal-Sharpless-Huisgen click reaction between the azido-functionalized S. aureus cells and alkyne dyes enabled staining of these bacteria and reduced their adherence to human T24 bladder carcinoma cells by 48%. The results are of urgent interest to study S. aureus infections.

  20. Preceding human metapneumovirus infection increases adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and severity of murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shen-Hao; Liao, Sui-Ling; Wong, Kin-Sun; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2016-04-01

    Coinfection with respiratory virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae has been frequently reported in several epidemiologic studies. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of preceding human metapneumovirus (hMPV) inoculation on subsequent pneumococcal infection. Hep-2 and A549 cells were infected with hMPV then inoculated with S. pneumoniae. Bacterial adhesion was measured using colony forming unit and cytometric-fluorescence assays. In vivo bacterial adhesion was examined in hMPV-infected mice after inoculation of fluorescence-conjugated S. pneumoniae. Pulmonary inflammation (bacterial titers, cytokine levels, and histopathology) of hMPV-infected mice was investigated after inoculation with S. pneumoniae. In vitro results of bacterial infection with S. pneumoniae on A549 and Hep-2 monolayer cells showed that even though cellular adherence was variable among different serotypes, there was significantly enhanced bacterial adherence in A549 cells with preceding hMPV infection. In addition, in vivo study of hMPV-infected mice showed increased adhesion of S. pneumoniae on the bronchial epithelium with delayed bacterial clearance and exacerbated histopathology. Furthermore, mice with preceding hMPV infection showed repressed recruitment of airway neutrophils with decreased expression of neutrophil chemoattractants during pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that hMPV-infected airway cells, especially the lower airway epithelium, express increased adherence with S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, hMPV-infected mice showed impaired recruitment of airway neutrophils, possibly leading to delayed bacterial clearance and exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, after secondary infection with pneumococcal isolates. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa selective adherence to and entry into human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Plotkowski, M C; Saliba, A M; Pereira, S H; Cervante, M P; Bajolet-Laudinat, O

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa disseminated infections depends on bacterial interaction with blood vessels. We have hypothesized that in order to traverse the endothelial barrier, bacteria would have to adhere to and damage endothelial cells. To test this hypothesis, we studied the adherence to human endothelial cells in primary culture of the piliated P. aeruginosa strain PAK and of two isogenic nonpiliated strains: PAK/p-, which carries a mutation in the pilin structural gene, and PAK-N1, a mutant defective in the regulatory rpoN gene. PAK adhered significantly more than did the pilus-lacking strains. P. aeruginosa was also taken up by endothelial cells, as determined by quantitative bacteriologic assays and by transmission electron microscopy. This internalization of P. aeruginosa seems to be a selective process, since the piliated strain was taken up significantly more than the nonpiliated bacteria and the avirulent Escherichia coli DH5 alpha, even following bacterial centrifugation onto the cell monolayers. A significant fraction of the internalized P. aeruginosa PAK was recovered in a viable form after 6 h of residence within endothelial cells. Progressive endothelial cell damage resulted from PAK intracellular harboring, as indicated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. An increasing concentration of PAK cells was recovered from the extracellular medium with time, suggesting that ingested bacteria were released from endothelial cells and multiplied freely. We speculate that in vivo the ability of some P. aeruginosa strains to resist intracellular residence would afford protection from host defenses and antibiotics and that the release of viable bacteria into bloodstream may represent a central feature of the pathogenesis of bacteremia in compromised patients. Images PMID:7960126

  2. Adherence of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to measles-virus infected cells: modulation by solubilized rhesus erythrocyte membranes and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Bankhurst, A D; Maki, D; Sanchez, M; McLaren, L

    1979-01-01

    The adherence of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to HeLa cells persistently infected with measles virus (HeLa-K11) was studied. The following data were observed. (i) The proportion of HeLa-K11 cells with adherent human peripheral blood lymphocytes of rhesus monkey erythrocytes was similar over a wide range of ratios of HeLa-K11 cells to lymphocytes or erythrocytes. (ii) The great majority of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and erythrocytes reacted with the same HeLa-K11 cell (iii). The adherence of lymphocytes or erythrocytes to HeLa-K11 cells was blocked by rabbit anti-measles virus antibody or solubilized monkey erythrocyte membranes. The pretreatment of erythrocytes or lymphocytes with receptor-destroying enzyme did not alter their adherence properties. (iv) The pattern of inhibition observed with several carbohydrates was similar in both the erythrocyte and the lymphocyte adherence assays. These data are consistent with the possibility that the receptor present on both rhesus monkey erythrocytes and human lymphocytes has similar specificities and biochemical composition. PMID:572346

  3. Effects of eugenol on polymorphonuclear cell migration and chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Woolverton, C J; Van Dyke, K; Powell, R L

    1987-03-01

    In this study, the effects of eugenol on human polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell migration and chemiluminescence were examined in vitro. Utilizing zymosan-activated serum or crude Bacteroides sonicate fractions as chemotractants, we found that eugenol inhibits PMN migration at 6.6 X 10(-2) to 6.6 X 10(-5) mol/L (P less than 0.05). Also, similar effects were observed in PMNs pre-incubated in eugenol. Regardless of concentration, eugenol was not found to induce chemotaxis of PMNs. An examination of PMN membrane activation through chemiluminescence gave results consistent with the chemotaxis data, demonstrating a decrease in light emission at concentrations as low as 6.6 X 10(-6) mol/L (P less than 0.05). In view of these data, the potential effect of eugenol on in vivo (sulcular or periapical) PMN function deserves further study.

  4. Nerve growth factor: stimulation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gee, A P; Boyle, M D; Munger, K L; Lawman, M J; Young, M

    1983-01-01

    Topical application of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) to superficial skin wounds of mice has previously been shown to accelerate the rate of wound contraction. Results of the present study reveal that NGF in the presence of plasma is also chemotactic for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro, and the concentration of NGF required for this effect is similar to that which stimulates ganglionic neurite outgrowth. This property does not arise from liberation of the C5a fragment of complement, nor does it require the known enzymic activity of NGF. (NGF inactivated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate is equally active.) We conclude that NGF can display biological effects on cells of nonneural origin and function, and this feature might play a role in the early inflammatory response to injury. PMID:6580641

  5. Effects of adherence, activation and distinct serum proteins on the in vitro human monocyte maturation process.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Y; Griffith, R; Miller, P; Stevenson, G W; Lund, S; Kanapa, D J; Stevenson, H C

    1988-03-01

    Elutriator-purified human monocytes were cultured in a serum-free (SF) medium, and various serum proteins and functional activating agents were assessed for their effects on the in vitro maturation of human monocytes to macrophages. Following 3 days of suspension culture in Teflon labware, 60% of the monocytes were easily recovered. When varying concentrations of human AB serum (HuAB) were employed, human monocyte maturation progressed rapidly; the kinetics of this maturation process during cell suspension culture were very similar to the pattern observed following adherence culture. In contrast, when SF medium was employed, a marked retardation of the monocyte maturation process was observed; this could not be attributed to any changes in cell recovery and/or viability. Thus, cells could be maintained in their monocytoid form for 3 days when cultured in SF medium. When HuAB was added after 3 days of culture, human monocyte maturation into macrophages proceeded at a normal rate. We attempted to characterize certain of the serum protein(s) found in HuAB which promoted the monocyte maturation process. Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be the most potent serum protein in increasing 5'-N activity and decreasing peroxidase activity of suspension cultured monocytes. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and albumin (Alb) were shown not to have significant monocyte maturation activity. Heat-treated human gamma globulin and IgG purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were shown to have patterns identical with that of untreated HGG and IgG with regard to promoting monocyte maturation; F(ab')2 was not an active maturation promoter, indicating the need for an intact Fc portion of the IgG molecule. Fibrinogen and fibronectin also had maturation promoting activity. Finally, addition of the potent monocyte functional activators, muramyl dipeptide (MDP), polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) had no effect on the monocyte

  6. Adhering maternal platelets can contribute to the cytokine and chemokine cocktail released by human first trimester villous placenta.

    PubMed

    Blaschitz, A; Siwetz, M; Schlenke, P; Gauster, M

    2015-11-01

    Placental villous explant culture has been increasingly recognized as suitable model to study secretion of inflammatory and immune modulating factors by human placenta. Most of these factors likely derive from the syncytiotrophoblast, whereas extraplacental sources such as maternal peripheral blood cells are rarely considered. Due to their small size and absence of a nucleus, platelets adhering to perivillous fibrinoid of normal placenta are frequently ignored in routine immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrate adhering maternal platelets on first trimester placental villi after explant culture and point out that platelet-derived factors must be considered when analyzing the inflammatory secretion profile of human placenta. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adhering maternal platelets can contribute to the cytokine and chemokine cocktail released by human first trimester villous placenta

    PubMed Central

    Blaschitz, A.; Siwetz, M.; Schlenke, P.; Gauster, M.

    2015-01-01

    Placental villous explant culture has been increasingly recognized as suitable model to study secretion of inflammatory and immune modulating factors by human placenta. Most of these factors likely derive from the syncytiotrophoblast, whereas extraplacental sources such as maternal peripheral blood cells are rarely considered. Due to their small size and absence of a nucleus, platelets adhering to perivillous fibrinoid of normal placenta are frequently ignored in routine immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrate adhering maternal platelets on first trimester placental villi after explant culture and point out that platelet-derived factors must be considered when analysing the inflammatory secretion profile of human placenta. PMID:26388607

  8. Human responses to Florida red tides: policy awareness and adherence to local fertilizer ordinances.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kohler, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Scheller, Karen; Reich, Andrew; Hitchcock, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Ullmann, Steven; Hoagland, Porter

    2014-09-15

    To mitigate the damages of natural hazards, policy responses can be beneficial only if they are effective. Using a self-administered survey approach, this paper focuses on the adherence to local fertilizer ordinances (i.e., county or municipal rules regulating the application of fertilizer to private lawns or facilities such as golf courses) implemented in jurisdictions along the Southwest Florida coast in response to hazardous blooms of Florida red tides (Karenia brevis). These ordinances play a role in the context of evolving programs of water pollution control at federal, state, water basin, and local levels. With respect to policy effectiveness, while the strength of physical linkages is of critical importance, the extent to which humans affected are aware of and adhere to the relevant rules, is equally critical. We sought to understand the public's depth of understanding about the rationales for local fertilizer ordinances. Respondents in Sarasota, Florida, were asked about their fertilizer practices in an area that has experienced several major blooms of Florida red tides over the past two decades. A highly educated, older population of 305 residents and "snowbirds" reported relatively little knowledge about a local fertilizer ordinance, its purpose, or whether it would change the frequency, size, or duration of red tides. This finding held true even among subpopulations that were expected to have more interest in or to be more knowledgeable about harmful algal blooms. In the face of uncertain science and environmental outcomes, and with individual motivations at odds with evolving public policies, the effectiveness of local community efforts to decrease the impacts of red tides may be compromised. Targeted social-science research on human perceptions about the risks of Florida red tides and education about the rationales for potential policy responses are warranted.

  9. Comparative adherence to human A549 cells, plant fibronectin-like protein, and polystyrene surfaces of four Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from different ecological origin.

    PubMed

    Cossard, Elisabeth; Gallet, Olivier; Di Martino, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the adherence properties of four Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates from different ecological niches (human tissue, rhizosphere, drinking water, and cow milk). The substrates used to test P. fluorescens adherence were as follows: cultured human respiratory epithelial cells A549, immobilized plant fibronectin-like protein, and polystyrene. For all the experiments, bacteria were grown at 27 degrees C. The adherence assay to human cells was performed at 37 degrees C, whereas adherence to fibronectin and polystyrene was done at 27 degrees C. The four strains tested adhered to A549 cells but showed different adherence patterns. At 3 h, the milk isolate showed an aggregative adherence phenotype, whereas the three other isolates showed a diffuse adherence pattern. With a longer incubation time of 24 h, the aggregative pattern of the milk isolate disappeared, the adherence of the clinical strain increased, the adherence of the water isolate decreased, and morphological changes in A549 cells were observed with the clinical, water, and soil isolates. The four strains tested formed biofilms on polystyrene dishes. The clinical and milk isolates were the more efficient colonizers of polystyrene surfaces and also the more adherent to immobilized plant fibronectin-like protein. There was no relation between bacterial surface hydrophobicity and P. fluorescens adherence to the substrates tested. The main conclusions of these results are that P. fluorescens is an adherent bacterium, that no clear correlation exists between adherence and ecological habitat, and that P. fluorescens can adhere well to substrates not present in its natural environment.

  10. Effect of antiarrhythmic drugs on In-111-labeled leukocytes: chemotaxis and adherence to nylon wool

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Walsh, L.J.; Zaret, B.L.; Gottschalk, A.

    1982-02-01

    The influence of lidocaine (L) and procainamide (P) on the chemotactic ability and adherence to nylon wool of In-111-labeled human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was investigated. At the normal therapeutic levels of L (0.022 mM whole blood) or P (0.03 mM whole blood) no change in PMN function was observed. However, at and above five times the aforementioned blood levels of L, significant reduction in the chemotactic ability of PMNs was noted (p less than 0.005). The adverse effects of In-111 radiation appeared insignificant at all L or P concentrations during the 3-hr observation period. The labeled PMNs were resistant to the toxic effects of a higher concentration of P than that of L, and the reduction in PMN chemotaxis and adherence to nylon wool was not apparent until the P concentration reached 1.5 mM.

  11. Effect of antiarrhythmic drugs on In-111-labeled leukocytes: chemotaxis and adherence to nylon wool

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Walsh, L.J.; Zaret, B.L.; Gottschalk, A.

    1982-02-01

    The influence of lidocaine (L) and procainamide (P) on the chemotactic ability and adherence to nylon wool of In-111-labeled human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was investigated. At the normal therapeutic levels of L (0.022 mM whole blood) or P (0.03 mM whole blood) no change in PMN function was observed. However, at and above five times the aforementioned blood levels of L, significant reduction in the chemotactic ability of PMNs was noted (P <0.005). The adverse effects of In-111 radiation appeared insignificant at all L or P concentrations during the 3-hr observation period. The labeled PMNs were resistant to the toxic effects of a higher concentration of P than that of L, and the reduction in PMN chemotaxis and adherence to nylon wool was not apparent until the P concentration reached 1.5 mM.

  12. Neisseria cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by type IV pilus-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wörmann, Mirka E.; Horien, Corey L.; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Guangyu; Aho, Ellen; Tang, Christoph M.

    2016-01-01

    In pathogenic Neisseria species the type IV pili (Tfp) are of primary importance in host–pathogen interactions. Tfp mediate initial bacterial attachment to cell surfaces and formation of microcolonies via pilus–pilus interactions. Based on genome analysis, many non-pathogenic Neisseria species are predicted to express Tfp, but aside from studies on Neisseria elongata, relatively little is known about the formation and function of pili in these organisms. Here, we have analysed pilin expression and the role of Tfp in Neisseria cinerea. This non-pathogenic species shares a close taxonomic relationship to the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and also colonizes the human oropharyngeal cavity. Through analysis of non-pathogenic Neisseria genomes we identified two genes with homology to pilE, which encodes the major pilin of N. meningitidis. We show which of the two genes is required for Tfp expression in N. cinerea and that Tfp in this species are required for DNA competence, similar to other Neisseria. However, in contrast to the meningococcus, deletion of the pilin gene did not impact the association of N. cinerea to human epithelial cells, demonstrating that N. cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by Tfp-independent mechanisms. PMID:26813911

  13. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal‐Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez‐Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez‐Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González‐Rodríguez, Patricia; López‐Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno‐Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal‐free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal‐free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217–1226 PMID:28213969

  14. Neisseria cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by type IV pilus-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wörmann, Mirka E; Horien, Corey L; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Guangyu; Aho, Ellen; Tang, Christoph M; Exley, Rachel M

    2016-03-01

    In pathogenic Neisseria species the type IV pili (Tfp) are of primary importance in host-pathogen interactions. Tfp mediate initial bacterial attachment to cell surfaces and formation of microcolonies via pilus-pilus interactions. Based on genome analysis, many non-pathogenic Neisseria species are predicted to express Tfp, but aside from studies on Neisseria elongata, relatively little is known about the formation and function of pili in these organisms. Here, we have analysed pilin expression and the role of Tfp in Neisseria cinerea. This non-pathogenic species shares a close taxonomic relationship to the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and also colonizes the human oropharyngeal cavity. Through analysis of non-pathogenic Neisseria genomes we identified two genes with homology to pilE, which encodes the major pilin of N. meningitidis. We show which of the two genes is required for Tfp expression in N. cinerea and that Tfp in this species are required for DNA competence, similar to other Neisseria. However, in contrast to the meningococcus, deletion of the pilin gene did not impact the association of N. cinerea to human epithelial cells, demonstrating that N. cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by Tfp-independent mechanisms.

  15. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; López-Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Erceg, Slaven

    2017-04-01

    Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal-free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal-free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217-1226. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  16. Human Antibodies to PhtD, PcpA, and Ply Reduce Adherence to Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Murine Nasopharyngeal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravinder; Surendran, Naveen; Ochs, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae adherence to human epithelial cells (HECs) is the first step in pathogenesis leading to infections. We sought to determine the role of human antibodies against S. pneumoniae protein vaccine candidates PhtD, PcpA, and Ply in preventing adherence to lung HECs in vitro and mouse nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization in vivo. Human anti-PhtD, -PcpA, and -Ply antibodies were purified and Fab fragments generated. Fabs were used to test inhibition of adherence of TIGR4 and nonencapsulated strain RX1 to A549 lung HECs. The roles of individual proteins in adherence were tested using isogenic mutants of strain TIGR4. Anti-PhtD, -PcpA, and -Ply human antibodies were assessed for their ability to inhibit NP colonization in vivo by passive transfer of human antibody in a murine model. Human antibodies generated against PhtD and PcpA caused a decrease in adherence to A549 cells (P < 0.05). Anti-PhtD but not anti-PcpA antibodies showed a protective role against mouse NP colonization. To our surprise, anti-Ply antibodies also caused a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in S. pneumoniae colonization. Our results support the potential of PhtD, PcpA, and Ply protein vaccine candidates as alternatives to conjugate vaccines to prevent non-serotype-specific S. pneumoniae colonization and invasive infection. PMID:25245804

  17. Analysis of Endothelial Adherence of Bartonella henselae and Acinetobacter baumannii Using a Dynamic Human Ex Vivo Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Weidensdorfer, Marko; Chae, Ju Ik; Makobe, Celestine; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Müller, Volker; Schürmann, Christoph; Brandes, Ralf P; Wilharm, Gottfried; Ballhorn, Wibke; Christ, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Fischer, Doris; Göttig, Stephan; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2015-12-28

    Bacterial adherence determines the virulence of many human-pathogenic bacteria. Experimental approaches elucidating this early infection event in greater detail have been performed using mainly methods of cellular microbiology. However, in vitro infections of cell monolayers reflect the in vivo situation only partially, and animal infection models are not available for many human-pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, ex vivo infection of human organs might represent an attractive method to overcome these limitations. We infected whole human umbilical cords ex vivo with Bartonella henselae or Acinetobacter baumannii under dynamic flow conditions mimicking the in vivo infection situation of human endothelium. For this purpose, methods for quantifying endothelium-adherent wild-type and trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA)-deficient bacteria were set up. Data revealed that (i) A. baumannii binds in a TAA-dependent manner to endothelial cells, (ii) this organ infection model led to highly reproducible adherence rates, and furthermore, (iii) this model allowed to dissect the biological function of TAAs in the natural course of human infections. These findings indicate that infection models using ex vivo human tissue samples ("organ microbiology") might be a valuable tool in analyzing bacterial pathogenicity with the capacity to replace animal infection models at least partially.

  18. Analysis of Endothelial Adherence of Bartonella henselae and Acinetobacter baumannii Using a Dynamic Human Ex Vivo Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Weidensdorfer, Marko; Chae, Ju Ik; Makobe, Celestine; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Müller, Volker; Schürmann, Christoph; Brandes, Ralf P.; Wilharm, Gottfried; Ballhorn, Wibke; Christ, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Fischer, Doris; Göttig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adherence determines the virulence of many human-pathogenic bacteria. Experimental approaches elucidating this early infection event in greater detail have been performed using mainly methods of cellular microbiology. However, in vitro infections of cell monolayers reflect the in vivo situation only partially, and animal infection models are not available for many human-pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, ex vivo infection of human organs might represent an attractive method to overcome these limitations. We infected whole human umbilical cords ex vivo with Bartonella henselae or Acinetobacter baumannii under dynamic flow conditions mimicking the in vivo infection situation of human endothelium. For this purpose, methods for quantifying endothelium-adherent wild-type and trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA)-deficient bacteria were set up. Data revealed that (i) A. baumannii binds in a TAA-dependent manner to endothelial cells, (ii) this organ infection model led to highly reproducible adherence rates, and furthermore, (iii) this model allowed to dissect the biological function of TAAs in the natural course of human infections. These findings indicate that infection models using ex vivo human tissue samples (“organ microbiology”) might be a valuable tool in analyzing bacterial pathogenicity with the capacity to replace animal infection models at least partially. PMID:26712205

  19. C-reactive protein (CRP) induces chemokine secretion via CD11b/ICAM-1 interaction in human adherent monocytes.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Burger, Fabienne; Pelli, Graziano; Monaco, Claudia; Mach, François

    2008-10-01

    Several studies support C-reactive protein (CRP) as a systemic cardiovascular risk factor. The recent detection of CRP in arterial intima suggests a dual activity in atherosclerosis as a circulating and tissue mediator on vascular and immune cells. In the present paper, we focused on the inflammatory effects of CRP on human monocytes, which were isolated by Ficoll-Percoll gradients and cultured in adherence to polystyrene, endothelial cell monolayer, or in suspension. Chemokine levels, adhesion molecule, and chemokine receptor expression were detected by ELISA, flow cytometry, and real-time RT-PCR. Migration assays were performed in a Boyden chamber. Stimulation with CRP induced release of CCL2, CCL3, and CCL4 in adherent monocytes through the binding to CD32a, CD32b, and CD64, whereas no effect was observed in suspension culture. This was associated with CRP-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules membrane-activated complex 1 (Mac-1) and ICAM-1 on adherent monocytes. Blockade of Mac-1/ICAM-1 interaction inhibited the CRP-induced chemokine secretion. In addition, CRP reduced mRNA and surface expression of corresponding chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 in adherent monocytes. This effect was a result of chemokine secretion, as coincubation with neutralizing anti-CCL2, anti-CCL3, and anti-CCL4 antibodies reversed the effect of CRP. Accordingly, a reduced migration of CRP-treated monocytes to CCL2 and CCL3 was observed. In conclusion, our data suggest an in vitro model to study CRP activities in adherent and suspension human monocytes. CRP-mediated induction of adhesion molecules and a decrease of chemokine receptors on adherent monocytes might contribute to the retention of monocytes within atherosclerotic lesions and recruitment of other circulating cells.

  20. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  1. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P < 0.001). However, when the yeast cells were grown at 37°C, no significant difference between the adhesion of C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P < 0.001). Using surface plasmon resonance analysis, C. dubliniensis isolates were found to adhere in significantly greater numbers than C. albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  2. Effect of carbohydrates on adherence of Escherichica coli to human urinary tract epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, A J; Amundsen, S K; Jones, J M

    1980-01-01

    Adherence of Escherichia coli cells to voided uroepithelial cells from healthy women was measured by use of [3H]uridine-labeled bacteria filtered through a polycarbonate membrane filter (5-micrometer pore size). At a concentration of 2.5% (wt/vol), D-mannose, D-mannitol, alpha-methyl-D-mannoside, and yeast mannan completely inhibited adherence of the bacteria to the epithelial cells. At this same concentration, D-fructose, D-lyxose, D-arabinose, and D-glyceraldehyde partially inhibited adherence. Reducing the concentration of D-mannose, or its derivatives, to between 1.0 and 0.1% resulted in partial inhibition in the adherence of the bacteria; a further reduction in the concentration to between 0.01 and 0.001% caused an enhancement of adherence up to 160% of the control level. Bacterial preincubation in 2.5% D-mannose for 1 min before epithelial cells were added completely inhibited adherence; similar treatment of the epithelial cells had no significant effect on subsequent adherence of the bacteria. Bacteria that were preincubated for 1 h with D-mannose at concentrations between 0.1 and 0.75% showed enhanced adherence. The inhibitory effect of D-mannose was decreased if bacterial adhesive ability, or cell receptivity, increased. A variety of other carbohydrates tested had no effect on the adherence of E. coli to the uroepithelial cells. These results suggest that adherence can be altered by interaction(s) between specific carbohydrate molecules and receptors on the bacterial surface. PMID:7002802

  3. Reduced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to herpes simplex virus-infected cells of salivary polymorphonuclear leukocytes and inhibition of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytotoxicity by saliva.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, M; Kohl, S

    1990-06-15

    Blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (BPMN) have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against HSV-infected cells. Although HSV infections are frequently found in the oral cavity, the ADCC capacity of salivary PMN (SPMN) has not been studied, mainly because methods to isolate SPMN were not available. We have recently developed a method to isolate SPMN, and in this study have evaluated their ADCC activity against HSV-infected cells. SPMN were obtained by repeated washings of the oral cavity, and separated from epithelial cells by nylon mesh filtration. ADCC was quantitatively determined by 51Cr release from HSV-infected Chang liver cells. SPMN in the presence of antibody were able to destroy HSV-infected cells, but SPMN were much less effective in mediating ADCC than BPMN (3.4% vs 40.7%, p less than 0.0001). In the presence of antiviral antibody, SPMN were able to adhere to HSV-infected cells, but less so than BPMN (34% vs 67%), and specific antibody-induced adherence was significantly lower in SPMN (p less than 0.04). The spontaneous adherence to HSV-infected cells was higher for SPMN than BPMN. SPMN demonstrated up-regulation of the adhesion glycoprotein CD18, but down-regulation of the FcRIII receptor. Incubation with saliva decreased ADCC capacity of BPMN, up-regulated CD18 expression, and down-regulated FcRIII expression.

  4. Retinoid modulation of collagenase production by adherent human mononuclear cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, A; Louie, J S; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    Previous observations have suggested that retinoids might be useful for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study we examined the effects of various retinoids on collagenase production by adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. We have previously shown that these cells, consisting predominantly of monocyte-macrophages, actively synthesize and secrete collagenase upon stimulation with concanavalin A. The cells were incubated in serum free medium with all-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, all-trans-retinal, or Ro 10-9359 (trimethylmethoxyphenyl retinoic acid ethyl ester) for up to 72 hours, and the collagenase activity was determined with [3H]proline labelled type I collagen as substrate. The incubation of mononuclear cells with all-trans-retinoic acid in the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-5) mol/l resulted in a dose dependent inhibition of the collagenase production. All-trans-retinal was also a potent inhibitor, whereas 13-cis-retinoic acid and Ro 10-9359 in a concentration of 10(-5) mol/l had a lesser effect. Control experiments indicated that the inhibition of collagenase production by all-trans-retinoic acid did not result from inhibition of total protein synthesis nor could it be explained by induction of an inhibitory molecule. These results indicate that retinoids with distinct structural features can inhibit collagenase production by monocyte-macrophages, and suggest a role for retinoids in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3036026

  5. Sacha Inchi Oil (Plukenetia volubilis L.), effect on adherence of Staphylococus aureus to human skin explant and keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Aspajo, German; Belkhelfa, Haouaria; Haddioui-Hbabi, Laïla; Bourdy, Geneviève; Deharo, Eric

    2015-08-02

    Plukenetia volubilis L. (Euphorbiaceae) is a domesticated vine distributed from the high-altitude Andean rain forest to the lowlands of the Peruvian Amazon. Oil from the cold-pressed seeds, sold under the commercial name of Sacha Inchi Oil (SIO) is actually much in favour because it contains a high percentage of omega 3 and omega 6, and is hence used as a dietary supplement. SIO is also used traditionally for skin care, in order to maintain skin softness, and for the treatment of wounds, insect bites and skin infections, in a tropical context where the skin is frequently damaged. This study was designed in order to verify whether the traditional use of SIO for skin care would have any impact on Staphylococcus aureus growth and skin adherence, as S. aureus is involved in many skin pathologies (impetigo, folliculitis, furuncles and subcutaneous abscesses) being one if the main pathogens that can be found on the skin. Therefore, our objective was to assess SIO bactericidal activity and interference with adherence to human skin explants and the keratinocyte cell line. Cytotoxicity on that cells was also determined. The activity of SIO was compared to coconut oil (CocO), which is widely used for skin care but has different unsaturated fatty acids contents. Laboratory testing with certified oil, determined antibacterial activity against radio labelled S. aureus. Cytotoxic effects were measured with XTT on keratinocyte cells and with neutral red on human skin explants; phenol was used as cytotoxic control. Adherence assays were carried out by mixing H3-labelled S. aureus bacteria with keratinocyte cells and human skin explants, incubated with oils 2h before (to determine the inhibition of adherence, assimilated to a preventive effect) or 2h after the contact of the biological material with S. aureus (to assess the detachment of the bacteria, assimilated to a curative effect). Residual radioactivity measured after washings made it possible to determine the adherence

  6. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  7. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  8. Hypothyroidism modifies lipid composition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Coria, Mariela J; Carmona Viglianco, Yamila V; Marra, Carlos A; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Ramirez, Dario C; Anzulovich, Ana C; Gimenez, Maria S

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of lipid metabolism. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are essential components of innate immune response. Our goal was to determine whether hypothyroidism affects lipid metabolism in PMN cells. Wistar rats were made hypothyroid by administrating 0.1 g/L 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) in drinking water during 30 days. Triacylglycerides (TG), cholesterol and phospholipids were determined in PMN and serum by conventional methods. The mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoAR), sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT-2) were quantified by Real-Time PCR. Cellular neutral lipids were identified by Nile red staining. We found hypothyroidism decreases serum TG whereas it increases them in PMN. This result agrees with those observed in Nile red preparations, however DAGT-2 expression was not modified. Cholesterol synthesizing enzyme HMGCoAR mRNA and protein was reduced in PMN of hypothyroid rats. As expected, cholesterol content decreased in the cells although it increased in serum. Hypothyroidism also reduced relative contents of palmitic, stearic, and arachidonic acids, whereas increased the myristic, linoleic acids, and the unsaturation index in PMN. Thus, hypothyroidism modifies PMN lipid composition. These findings would emphasize the importance of new research to elucidate lipid-induced alterations in specific function(s) of PMN.

  9. Chapter 17 Sterile Plate-Based Vitrification of Adherent Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives Using the TWIST Method.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Julia C; Stracke, Frank; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    Due to their high biological complexity, e.g., their close cell-to-cell contacts, cryopreservation of human pluripotent stem cells with standard slow-rate protocols often is inefficient and can hardly be standardized. Vitrification that means ultrafast freezing already showed very good viability and recovery rates for this sensitive cell system, but is only applicable for low cell numbers, bears a high risk of contamination, and can hardly be implemented under GxP regulations. In this chapter, a sterile plate-based vitrification method for adherent pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives is presented based on a procedure and device for human embryonic stem cells developed by Beier et al. (Cryobiology 66:8-16, 2013). This protocol overcomes the limitations of conventional vitrification procedures resulting in the highly efficient preservation of ready-to-use adherent pluripotent stem cells with the possibility of vitrifying cells in multi-well formats for direct application in high-throughput screenings.

  10. Proportional distribution and relative adherence of Streptococcus miteor (mitis) on various surfaces in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Liljemark, W F; Gibbons, R J

    1972-11-01

    A group of streptococci possessing the characteristics of Streptococcus miteor (S. mitis) was found to predominate on nonkeratinized human oral mucosa. These organisms averaged from 76 to 89% of the total flora cultivable on anaerobically incubated blood agar plates from cheek, lip, and ventral tongue surfaces. They averaged 34, 40, and 18% of the streptococci in dental plaque, in saliva, and on the tongue dorsum, respectively. Their ability to adhere to oral surfaces was studied by introducing mixtures of streptomycin-resistant strains of S. miteor, S. salivarius, and S. mutans into the mouths of volunteers. Samples of oral surfaces taken 1 hr later indicated S. miteor adhered far better than the other streptococci to buccal mucosa and to teeth, but S. salivarius showed a higher affinity to the tongue dorsum. Glucose-grown cells of S. mutans adhered feebly to all oral surfaces studied and were rapidly cleared from the mouth. Cells of S. miteor and S. salivarius present naturally in saliva adhered to cleaned teeth comparable to in vitro cultivated strains. Electron microscopy of cells of S. miteor attached to buccal epithelial cells obtained from germfree rats indicated that the organisms possessed a fibrillar "fuzzy" coat which appeared to mediate their attachment to the epithelial cell membrane. This "fuzzy" coat was removed by treatment with trypsin, and it appears to be similar to that previously observed on cells of S. pyogenes and S. salivarius.

  11. Pathogen and host differences in bacterial adherence to human buccal epithelial cells in a northeast Brazilian community.

    PubMed Central

    Walser, B L; Newman, R D; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L

    1992-01-01

    The adherence of several strains of Escherichia coli to human buccal epithelial cells was studied, using cells obtained from five groups: healthy adults, healthy children, children with acute diarrhea, children with persistent diarrhea associated with cryptosporidial parasites, and children with noncryptosporidial persistent diarrhea. All groups lived or worked in an urban slum in northeastern Brazil. Samples of buccal epithelial cells from subjects in each of these groups were incubated with wild-type E. coli K-12 (strain C600), the enteroaggregative E. coli strains 17-2 and PDAS 30-5, CFA/II-positive E. coli 1392+ and its plasmid-cured derivative 1392-, and hydrophobic E. coli 132-3. Samples were evaluated microscopically to determine background contamination and the percentage of cells with more than 15% of their surface area obscured by adherent bacteria after incubation and washing. The assay was tested under field conditions and was shown to produce reliable and consistent results. Both enteroaggregative strains of E. coli were shown to adhere to a significantly higher percentage of all groups of human buccal epithelial cells than any of the other tested strains. In addition, buccal epithelial cells from children with nonparasitic persistent diarrhea showed substantially more bacterial adherence in both the native state and with all tested strains of E. coli than did cells from children with persistent cryptosporidial diarrhea or acute diarrhea or from healthy controls. This study provides evidence that enteroaggregative strains of E. coli demonstrate increased adherence to human buccal epithelial cells (as well as to cultured HEp-2 cells) and that buccal epithelial cells from children with noncryptosporidial persistent diarrhea appear to be more susceptible to bacterial adherence and colonization than buccal epithelial cells from control groups. These findings suggest that host differences as well as pathogen differences are important in the pathogenesis of

  12. Adherence to antiretrovirals in people coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis1

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Larissa de Araújo; Fiuza, Maria Luciana Teles; Reis, Renata Karina; Ferrer, André Carvalho; Gir, Elucir; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: assess the adherence levels to antiretroviral therapy in people coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis and correlate these levels with the sociodemographic and clinical variables of the study population. Method: cross-sectional study involving 74 male and female adults coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis. For the data collection, a sociodemographic and clinical assessment form and the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Assessment Questionnaire were used. For the data analysis, the software STATA version 11 was used, through descriptive statistics, Fisher's chi-square exact test and the probability test. Results: men were predominant (79.7%), between 30 and 39 years of age (35.1%), low income (75.7%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (71.6%). Adherence to antiretroviral therapy was inappropriate in 78.1% of the men; 61.0% of single people; 47.0% unemployed and 76.5% among people gaining less than one minimum wage. A significant difference was observed between compliance and length of use of antiretrovirals (p=0.018), sexual orientation (p=0.024) and number of children (p=0.029). Conclusion: the coinfected patients presented inappropriate adherence to the antiretrovirals, a fact that negatively affects the health conditions of the people living with HIV/tuberculosis coinfection. A statistically significant correlation was found between the levels of adherence and some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. PMID:27192416

  13. Alteration of polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity by viable Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Hilger, A E; Danley, D L

    1980-01-01

    The response of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to blastospores and pseudo-hyphae of the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans has been studied in vitro and in vivo. Of the fungicidal mechanisms elucidated thus far, the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-halide system appears to be most effective against cells of this fungus. In our studies on the interaction between murine PMN and blastospores, we assayed the release of H2O2 by PMN incubated with viable or killed, unopsonized or opsonized blastospores by using two assay systems, lysis of murine erythrocytes and oxidation of scopoletin. Our results showed that PMN released increasing amounts of H2O2 when incubated with increasing numbers of opsonized or unopsonized killed blastospores, but released decreasing amounts of H2O2 when incubated with increasing numbers of opsonized or unopsonized viable blastospores. The oxidative metabolic burst by PMN in the presence of viable or killed blastospores was also measured by using reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and chemiluminescence. Viable blastospores stimulated a stronger metabolic burst than killed blastospores, suggesting that PMN respond to live blastospores more vigorously than killed blastospores; however, live blastospores appear to alter or inhibit the release of H2O2 by PMN. PMID:6991429

  14. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis efficiently escapes polymorphonuclear neutrophils during early infection.

    PubMed

    Westermark, Linda; Fahlgren, Anna; Fällman, Maria

    2014-03-01

    The human-pathogenic species of the Gram-negative genus Yersinia preferentially target and inactivate cells of the innate immune defense, suggesting that this is a critical step by which these bacteria avoid elimination and cause disease. In this study, bacterial interactions with dendritic cells, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in intestinal lymphoid tissues during early Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection were analyzed. Wild-type bacteria were shown to interact mainly with dendritic cells, but not with PMNs, on day 1 postinfection, while avirulent yopH and yopE mutants interacted with PMNs as well as with dendritic cells. To unravel the role of PMNs during the early phase of infection, we depleted mice of PMNs by using an anti-Ly6G antibody, after which we could see more-efficient initial colonization by the wild-type strain as well as by yopH, yopE, and yopK mutants on day 1 postinfection. Dissemination of yopH, yopE, and yopK mutants from the intestinal compartments to mesenteric lymph nodes was faster in PMN-depleted mice than in undepleted mice, emphasizing the importance of effective targeting of PMNs by these Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). In conclusion, escape from interaction with PMNs due to the action of YopH, YopE, and YopK is a key feature of pathogenic Yersinia species that allows colonization and effective dissemination.

  15. Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to Human Epithelial Cells: The Role of Intimin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-04-28

    Typhlocolltlsd genotype· adherence" LAlFAS + NA LAlFAS NAIweak DAIweak FAS· 118 Intimate bacterial adherence and NE lesions, as described by Staley...Additionally, two independent TnphoA mutants of EHEC strain CL-8 (0157:H7) were isolated and found deficient in bacterial factors necessary for NE lesion...intestinal NE lesions in gnotobiotic piglets. In vitro attachment and in vivo lesion formation by 86-24eaeMO was fully restored by a clone of EHEC 86-24

  16. S-carboxymethylcysteine inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen of respiratory infections that utilizes platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) for firm adherence to host cells. The mucolytic agent S-carboxymethylcysteine (S-CMC) has been shown to exert inhibitory effects against infection by several respiratory pathogens including S. pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, clinical studies have implicated the benefits of S-CMC in preventing exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is considered to be related to respiratory infections. In this study, to assess whether the potency of S-CMC is attributable to inhibition of pneumococcal adherence to host cells, an alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated with interleukin-1α was used as a model of inflamed epithelial cells. Despite upregulation of PAFR by inflammatory activation, treatment with S-CMC efficiently inhibited pneumococcal adherence to host epithelial cells. In order to gain insight into the inhibitory mechanism, the effects of S-CMC on PAFR expression were also investigated. Following treatment with S-CMC, PAFR expression was reduced at both mRNA and post-transcriptional levels. Interestingly, S-CMC was also effective in inhibiting pneumococcal adherence to cells transfected with PAFR small interfering RNAs. These results indicate S-CMC as a probable inhibitor targeting numerous epithelial receptors that interact with S. pneumoniae.

  17. Drug resistance and adherence to human intestines of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Echeverria, P; Yokota, T

    1992-04-01

    Clinical isolates of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAggEC) were tested for their in vitro susceptibilities to 27 antimicrobial agents. Marked drug resistance was observed with sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol in contrast to such antimicrobial agents as cefixime, sparfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. One of the EAggEC strains carried a plasmid that conferred on its host resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, and spectinomycin and an ability to adhere to child ileal villi or HeLa cells in the characteristic aggregative pattern. This plasmid also mediated D-mannose-resistant hemagglutinin production and bacterial clump formation (autoagglutination). The data demonstrate appearance of marked drug resistance and an intestine-adherence and drug-resistance plasmid in the newest category of diarrheagenic E. coli.

  18. New method to quantitate platelets adhered on biomaterials using monoclonal antibodies to human platelet membrane glycoprotein SZ-21

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T.F.; Zhang, J.C.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, C.R.; Lei, X.H.; Wai, H.Y.; Ruan, C.G. )

    1990-01-01

    This study developed a new technique to quantitate platelets adhered on biomaterials surfaces in vitro, based on a surface phased radioimmunoassay using a monoclonal antibody SZ-21, directed specifically against the membrane glycoprotein complex IIIa of human platelets. In vitro perfusion is performed in system which consists of testing tubes and infusion pump. After 5 minutes perfusion with fresh ACD anticoagulated human whole blood at 2,000s-1 platelets deposition on surface precoated with proteins determined using anti-human platelet antibody (125 I-SZ-21) are 4,173 +/- 932 (Albumin), 59,032 +/- 25,554 (Fibrinogen), and 71,253 +/- 11,484 (Collagen). Meanwhile, platelets adhered on surfaces of four polymers were determined (platelet/mm2): 19,493 +/- 2,050 (Silicone), 48,193 +/- 4,055 (Polytetrafluoroethylene), 50,375 +/- 8,675 (Polyvinyl chloride) and 101,906 +/- 5,916 (Polyethylene). These results were confirmed by SEM. This method is not only applied for evaluating rapidly and reliably blood compatibility of biomaterials in vitro, but will be used at basic study for interaction of blood materials.

  19. Pathologic interaction between megakaryocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, A; Jouault, H; Guichard, J; Wendling, F; Drouin, A; Cramer, E M

    2000-08-15

    Idiopathic myelofibrosis (MF) is a myeloproliferative syndrome characterized by an increase in bone marrow collagen. Megakaryocytes (Mks), which store growth factors in their alpha granules, are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of MF. Previously, mice given bone marrow grafts infected with a retrovirus carrying murine thrombopoietin (TPO) complementary DNA developed a disease resembling human idiopathic MF. In this study, we used this murine model (TPO mice) to determine whether release of alpha granules is responsible for fibroblast activation and development of fibrosis. The intracellular trafficking of several alpha-granule proteins (von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), which are stored in the granule matrix; and alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin and P-selectin (CD62p), which are located in the alpha-granule membrane) was studied with immune electron microscopy in bone marrow Mks from TPO mice. P-selectin immunolabeling increased consistently and was occasionally found lining the demarcation membrane system. Evidence of extensive emperipolesis was also found in TPO mouse Mks, involving almost exclusively neutrophil and eosinophil polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells with altered morphologic features. In parallel, the host Mks had myeloperoxidase-positive granules scattered in their cytoplasm, associated with marked ultrastructural cytoplasmic alterations and ruptured alpha-granule membranes. Similar observations were made in bone marrow biopsy specimens from 12 patients with idiopathic MF; indeed, there was an increased rate of emperipolesis involving mostly PMN cells, abnormal P-selectin expression, and mutual subcellular PMN and Mk alterations. This study indicates that in idiopathic MF, abnormal P-selectin distribution in Mks induces selective sequestration of PMN cells. This results in a release of alpha-granular proteins and growth factors, which in turn induces fibroblast activation and fibrosis deposition. (Blood

  20. Influence of light sources on the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Beard, Richard B.; Dai, Xiaoyan

    1995-05-01

    In the process of inflammation, leukocytes must travel from the intraluminal space of the capillary to the interstitial space in order to reach the site of the inflammation. The two major populations of mature human leukocytes based on the morphology are the polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). Previous research on PMNs and MNLs at the Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute of Drexel University have shown that their migration can be markedly enhanced by excitation with electric and magnetic fields. This presentation demonstrates that the migration of PMNs under excitation of photons is enhanced in the red light region of (lambda) equals 660 nm and inhibited in the green light region of (lambda) equals 565 nm. There is an intensity threshold at which red light enhances migration and an intensity threshold at which green light inhibits migration. In these experiments the Boyden technique was used with the distance of the cell migration through a cellulose filter measured in terms of the leading edge. The comparison of the relative value of the distance to cell migration under a light to cell migration without a light stimulus was recorded as a cytokinetic index, K.I.. K.I. is a measure of the cytokinesis which is the progress of the cell movement in which the migration is enhanced by substances in the cell environment irrespective of a concentration gradient. The cytotactic index is a measure of cytotaxis which is the directional movement along a chemical gradient formed by a chemotactic factor. A Russian pulsed commercial laser biostimulator in the near infrared wavelength above an intensity threshold enhances PMN migration. Intermittent green and red stimulators below the intensity threshold markedly influence the cytokinetic index of PMNs while above the intensity threshold, this influence is deminished.

  1. Crohn disease--associated adherent-invasive E. coli bacteria target mouse and human Peyer's patches via long polar fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Rolhion, Nathalie; de Vallée, Amélie; Salim, Sa'ad Y; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Neut, Christel; Campbell, Barry J; Söderholm, Johan D; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2011-03-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease in which an abnormal immune response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract leads to chronic inflammation. The small intestine, particularly the ileum, of patients with CD is colonized by adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC)--a pathogenic group of E. coli able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. As the earliest inflammatory lesions are microscopic erosions of the epithelium lining the Peyer's patches (PPs), we investigated the ability of AIEC bacteria to interact with PPs and the virulence factors involved. We found that AIEC bacteria could interact with mouse and human PPs via long polar fimbriae (LPF). An LPF-negative AIEC mutant was highly impaired in its ability to interact with mouse and human PPs and to translocate across monolayers of M cells, specialized epithelial cells at the surface of PPs. The prevalence of AIEC strains harboring the lpf operon was markedly higher in CD patients compared with controls. In addition, increased numbers of AIEC, but not LPF-deficient AIEC, bacteria were found interacting with PPs from Nod2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. In conclusion, we have identified LPF as a key factor for AIEC to target PPs. This could be the missing link between AIEC colonization and the presence of early lesions in the PPs of CD patients.

  2. Inhibition of Streptococcus pneumoniae adherence to human epithelial cells in vitro by the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colonization of the nasopharynx by Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered a prerequisite for pneumococcal infections such as pneumonia and otitis media. Probiotic bacteria can influence disease outcomes through various mechanisms, including inhibition of pathogen colonization. Here, we examine the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on S. pneumoniae colonization of human epithelial cells using an in vitro model. We investigated the effects of LGG administered before, at the same time as, or after the addition of S. pneumoniae on the adherence of four pneumococcal isolates. Results LGG significantly inhibited the adherence of all the pneumococcal isolates tested. The magnitude of inhibition varied with LGG dose, time of administration, and the pneumococcal isolate used. Inhibition was most effective when a higher dose of LGG was administered prior to establishment of pneumococcal colonization. Mechanistic studies showed that LGG binds to epithelial cells but does not affect pneumococcal growth or viability. Administration of LGG did not lead to any significant changes in host cytokine responses. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that LGG can inhibit pneumococcal colonization of human epithelial cells in vitro and suggest that probiotics could be used clinically to prevent the establishment of pneumococcal carriage. PMID:23561014

  3. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    PubMed

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel).

  4. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae adhere to and invade human bronchial epithelial cells via an interaction of lipooligosaccharide with the PAF receptor.

    PubMed

    Swords, W E; Buscher, B A; Ver Steeg Ii, K; Preston, A; Nichols, W A; Weiser, J N; Gibson, B W; Apicella, M A

    2000-07-01

    Adherence and invasion are thought to be key events in the pathogenesis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The role of NTHi lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in adherence was examined using an LOS-coated polystyrene bead adherence assay. Beads coated with NTHi 2019 LOS adhered significantly more to 16HBE14 human bronchial epithelial cells than beads coated with truncated LOS isolated from an NTHi 2019 pgmB:ermr mutant (P = 0.037). Adherence was inhibited by preincubation of cell monolayers with NTHi 2019 LOS (P = 0.0009), but not by preincubation with NTHi 2019 pgmB:ermr LOS. Competitive inhibition studies with a panel of compounds containing structures found within NTHi LOS suggested that a phosphorylcholine (ChoP) moiety was involved in adherence. Further experiments revealed that mutations affecting the oligosaccharide region of LOS or the incorporation of ChoP therein caused significant decreases in the adherence to and invasion of bronchial cells by NTHi 2019 (P < 0.01). Analysis of infected monolayers by confocal microscopy showed that ChoP+ NTHi bacilli co-localized with the PAF receptor. Pretreatment of bronchial cells with a PAF receptor antagonist inhibited invasion by NTHi 2109 and two other NTHi strains expressing ChoP+ LOS glycoforms exhibiting high reactivity with an anti-ChoP antibody on colony immunoblots. These data suggest that a particular subset of ChoP+ LOS glycoforms could mediate NTHi invasion of bronchial cells by means of interaction with the PAF receptor.

  5. The α-helical regions of KERP1 are important in Entamoeba histolytica adherence to human cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Baron, Bruno; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Raynal, Bertrand; England, Patrick; Guillén, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The lysine and glutamic acid rich protein KERP1 is a unique surface adhesion factor associated with virulence in the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica. Both the function and structure of this protein remain unknown to this date. Here, we used circular dichroism, analytical ultracentrifugation and bioinformatics modeling to characterize the structure of KERP1. Our findings revealed that it is an α-helical rich protein organized as a trimer, endowed with a very high thermal stability (Tm = 89.6°C). Bioinformatics sequence analyses and 3D-structural modeling indicates that KERP1 central segments could account for protein trimerization. Relevantly, expressing the central region of KERP1 in living parasites, impair their capacity to adhere to human cells. Our observations suggest a link between the inhibitory effect of the isolated central region and the structural features of KERP1. PMID:23378906

  6. Adherence of Candida albicans to silicone is promoted by the human salivary protein SPLUNC2/PSP/BPIFA2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Rodrigues, E; van der Wielen, P; Lyons, K M; Haigh, B J; Wheeler, T T; Dawes, P J D; Cannon, R D

    2014-04-01

    Interactions between Candida albicans, saliva and saliva-coated oral surfaces are initial events in the colonization of the oral cavity by this commensal yeast, which can cause oral diseases such as candidiasis and denture stomatitis. Candida albicans also colonizes silicone voice prostheses, and the microbial biofilm formed can impair valve function, necessitating frequent prosthesis replacement. We have previously shown that saliva promoted binding of C. albicans cells to silicone in vitro, and that the selective binding of specific salivary proteins to voice prosthesis silicone mediated attachment of C. albicans cells. The C. albicans cells adhered to a polypeptide (or polypeptides) of ~36 kDa eluted from saliva-treated silicone. We show here that a protein of similar size was identified in replicate blots of the eluate from saliva-treated silicone when the blots were probed with antibodies to human SPLUNC2, a salivary protein with reported microbial agglutination properties. In addition, SPLUNC2 was depleted from saliva that had been incubated with silicone coupons. To determine whether SPLUNC2 is a yeast-binding protein, SPLUNC2 cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant His-tagged protein (SPLUNC2r) bound to silicone as demonstrated by immunoblot analysis of an eluate from SPLUNC2r-treated silicone coupons and (35) S-radiolabelled C. albicans cells adhered in a dose-dependent manner to SPLUNC2r-coated silicone. We conclude that SPLUNC2 binds to silicone and acts as a receptor for C. albicans adherence to, and subsequent colonization of, voice prosthesis silicone.

  7. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh K.; Mallela, Ramya K.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Reifler, Aaron N.; Chervenak, Andrew P.; West, Michael D.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Nasonkin, Igor O.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue for

  8. Ultrastructural evidence for eosinophil-parasite adherence (EPA) reaction in human onchocercal lymphadenitis in the early period following diethylcarbamazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Rácz, P; Tenner-Rácz, K; Büttner, D W; Albiez, E J

    1982-12-01

    Specimens of lymph nodes from eight patients with onchocerciasis after treatment with diethylcarbamazine (DEC) were studied by electron microscopy. The sequence of events during the eosinophil-parasite adherence (EPA) reaction in human onchocercal lymphadenitis was similar to that in EPA reaction described in in vitro models. The majority of microfilariae showed severe degeneration. Eosinophils adhered to the microfilariae forming an exact template of their surface. Not seldom, the surface of microfilariae or part of it was covered with electron dense material containing several well preserved cores of eosinophil granules. Large vacuoles containing eosinophil granules developed also in vivo. Some vacuoles disclosed granules with preserved morphology, others revealed altered granules. In addition to the mature granules in the vacuoles also small type eosinophilic granules were observed. The intracytoplasmic granules showed a variety of morphologic alterations too (partial solubilization of granule content with preserved crystalloid; crystalloid material was dissolved within the matrix, etc.). Sometimes, around the granules tubulo-vesicular structures were observed. This study suggested that, in contrast to in vitro experiments, immunologically mediated necrosis of eosinophils with subsequent release of granules was the most important way of eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity in vivo.

  9. Benidipine, an anti-hypertensive drug, inhibits reactive oxygen species production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and oxidative stress in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Akizuki, Osamu; Ikeda, Jun-ichi; Saeki, Koji; Yao, Kozo; Sasaki, Katsutoshi

    2008-02-02

    Oxidative stress is associated with exacerbation of renal injuries in hypertension. In clinical studies benidipine hydrochloride (benidipine), a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker with antioxidant activity, reduced oxidative stress. However, the mechanism of suppression of oxidative stress remains to be fully characterized. Reactive oxygen species production by polymorphonuclear leukocyte plays important pathological roles in hypertension. Therefore, we examined the effects of benidipine both on reactive oxygen species production of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and oxidative stress of an animal model. Human peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocyte-like differentiated HL-60 cells were used to examine effects of benidipine (0.1-30 microM) on formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced reactive oxygen species production, calcium mobilization, NADPH oxidase activation and phosphorylation of protein kinase C substrates. High-salt (8% NaCl) loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with or without benidipine (1, 3, 10 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a plasma oxidative stress marker, and renal expression of oxidative stress-induced genes were measured. Benidipine concentration-dependently suppressed formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced reactive oxygen species production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes more potently than other calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine, azelnidipine, nitrendipine and nifedipine. Benidipine partially inhibited all of intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, protein kinase C activation and NADPH oxidase activation. Salt loading in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats augmented plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels; renal dysfunction; and renal expression of transforming growth factor-beta, collagen I and collagen III mRNAs; which were attenuated by benidipine treatment. These results indicate that benidipine prevents the polymorphonuclear leukocyte

  10. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  11. Relationship between viral load and behavioral measures of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children living with human immunodeficiency virus in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Horacio A; Harris, Donald Robert; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Leister, Erin; Negrini, Silvia Fabiana Biason de Moura; Ferreira, Flávia Faleiro; Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Pinto, Jorge; Allison, Susannah; Hazra, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined antiretroviral therapy adherence in Latin American children. Standardized behavioral measures were applied to a large cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children in Brazil, Mexico, and Peru to assess adherence to prescribed antiretroviral therapy doses during the three days prior to study visits, assess timing of last missed dose, and evaluate the ability of the adherence measures to predict viral suppression. Time trends in adherence were modeled using a generalized estimating equations approach to account for possible correlations in outcomes measured repeatedly in the same participants. Associations of adherence with human immunodeficiency virus viral load were examined using linear regression. Mean enrollment age of the 380 participants was 5 years; 57.6% had undetectable' viral load (<400 copies/mL). At enrollment, 90.8% of participants were perfectly (100%) adherent, compared to 87.6% at the 6-month and 92.0% at the 12-month visit; the proportion with perfect adherence did not differ over time (p=0.1). Perfect adherence was associated with a higher probability of undetectable viral load at the 12-month visit (odds ratio=4.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.8-9.1; p<0.001), but not at enrollment or the 6-month visit (p>0.3). Last time missed any antiretroviral therapy dose was reported as "never" for 52.0% at enrollment, increasing to 60.7% and 65.9% at the 6- and 12-month visits, respectively (p<0.001 for test of trend). The proportion with undetectable viral load was higher among those who never missed a dose at enrollment and the 12-month visit (p≤0.005), but not at the 6-month visit (p=0.2). While antiretroviral therapy adherence measures utilized in this study showed some association with viral load for these Latin American children, they may not be adequate for reliably identifying non-adherence and consequently children at risk for viral resistance. Other strategies are needed to improve the evaluation of adherence in

  12. Increased rate of apoptosis and diminished phagocytic ability of human neutrophils infected with Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Brest, Patrick; Bétis, Frédéric; Cuburu, Nicolas; Selva, Eric; Herrant, Magali; Servin, Alain; Auberger, Patrick; Hofman, Paul

    2004-10-01

    The proinflammatory effect of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains have been recently demonstrated in vitro by showing that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transepithelial migration is induced after bacterial colonization of apical intestinal monolayers. The effect of Afa/Dr DAEC-PMN interaction on PMN behavior has been not investigated. Because of the putative virulence mechanism of PMN apoptosis during infectious diseases and taking into account the high level of expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF, or CD55), the receptor of Afa/Dr DAEC on PMNs, we sought to determine whether infection of PMNs by Afa/Dr DAEC strains could promote cell apoptosis. We looked at the behavior of PMNs incubated with Afa/Dr DAEC strains once they had transmigrated across polarized monolayers of intestinal (T84) cells. Infection of PMNs by Afa/Dr DAEC strains induced PMN apoptosis characterized by morphological nuclear changes, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and a high level of annexin V expression. However, transmigrated and nontransmigrated PMNs incubated with Afa/Dr DAEC strains showed similar elevated global caspase activities. PMN apoptosis depended on their agglutination, induced by Afa/Dr DAEC, and was still observed after preincubation of PMNs with anti-CD55 and/or anti-CD66 antibodies. Low levels of phagocytosis of Afa/Dr DAEC strains were observed both in nontransmigrated and in transmigrated PMNs compared to that observed with the control E. coli DH5alpha strain. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that interaction of Afa/Dr DAEC with PMNs may increase the bacterial virulence both by inducing PMN apoptosis through an agglutination process and by diminishing their phagocytic capacity.

  13. Adherence support workers: a way to address human resource constraints in antiretroviral treatment programs in the public health setting in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Torpey, Kwasi E; Kabaso, Mushota E; Mutale, Liya N; Kamanga, Mpuma K; Mwango, Albert J; Simpungwe, James; Suzuki, Chiho; Mukadi, Ya Diul

    2008-05-21

    In order to address staff shortages and improve adherence counseling for people on antiretroviral therapy (ART), the Zambia Prevention, Care and Treatment Partnership (ZPCT) developed an innovative strategy of training community volunteers to provide adherence support at the health facility and community levels. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of these 'adherence support workers' (ASWs) in adherence counseling, treatment retention and addressing inadequate human resources at health facilities. The study used quantitative and qualitative research techniques at five selected ART sites in four provinces in Zambia. Five hundred patients on ART were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to compare the quality of adherence counseling before and after the ASW scheme was introduced at the selected sites and between ASWs and HCWs after the introduction of ASWs. In addition, 3,903 and 4,972 electronic records of all new patients accessing antiretroviral therapy for the time period of 12 months before and 12 months after the introduction of ASWs respectively, were analyzed to assess loss to follow-up rates. Two focus group discussions with ASWs and health care workers (HCWs) were conducted in each clinic. Key informant interviews in the ART clinics were also conducted. There was a marked shift of workload from HCWs to ASWs without any compromise in the quality of counseling. Quality of adherence counseling by ASWs was comparable to HCWs after their introduction. The findings suggest that the deployment of ASWs helped reduce waiting times for adherence counseling. Loss to follow-up rates of new clients declined from 15% to 0% after the deployment of ASWs. Adherence counseling tasks can be shifted to lay cadres like ASWs without compromising the quality of counseling. Follow-up of clients by ASWs within the community is necessary to improve retention of clients on ART.

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis adherence mediates differential gene expression in human vaginal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Trichomonas vaginalis, an ancient protist, colonizes the vaginal mucosa causing trichomonosis, a vaginitis that sometimes leads to severe health complications. Preparatory to colonization of the vagina is the adhesion to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by trichomonads. We hypothesized that VECs alter the gene expression to form a complex signalling cascade in response to trichomonal adherence. In order to identify the genes that are upregulated, we constructed a subtraction cDNA library after contact with parasites that is enriched for differentially expressed genes from the immortalized MS-74 VECs. Sixty cDNA clones were sequenced and to our knowledge for the first time, differentially regulated genes were identified in response to early trichomonal infection. The identified genes were found to encode functional proteins with specific functions associated with cell structure maintenance and extracellular matrix components, proinflammatory molecules and apoptosis. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed expression of selected genes. Further, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expression was analysed using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Data suggest that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and tyrosine kinases play a role in COX-2 induction. Finally, T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus but not Pentatrichomonas hominis induce expression of COX-2. This is a first attempt at elucidating the basis of interaction of trichomonads with host cells and the corresponding host responses triggered by the parasites. PMID:15888089

  15. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A; Landoni, Verónica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  16. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A.; Landoni, Verónica I.; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M. Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C.

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  17. An in vitro adherence assay reveals that Helicobacter pylori exhibits cell lineage-specific tropism in the human gastric epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, P; Roth, K A; Borén, T; Westblom, T U; Gordon, J I; Normark, S

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach of asymptomatic humans as well as patients with acid peptic disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. We have developed an in situ adherence assay to examine the cell lineage-specific nature of binding of this organism and to characterize the nature of cell surface receptors that recognize its adhesin. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled H. pylori strains were bound to surface mucous cells present in the pit region of human and rat gastric units but not to mucous neck, parietal, or chief cell lineages present in the glandular domains of these units. Binding was abolished by proteinase K treatment of tissue sections and by pretreatment of the bacteria with bovine submaxillary gland mucin, a rich source of fucosylated and sialylated carbohydrates. Several lines of evidence suggest that binding to surface mucous cells is not dependent upon terminal nonsubstituted alpha 2,3- and alpha 2,6-linked sialic acids in the adhesin receptor: (i) binding was not inhibited by incubating H. pylori strains with sialylated glycoconjugates such as fetuin and free sialyllactose; (ii) immunohistochemical stainings using the sialic acid-specific Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins and the cholera toxin B subunit did not detect any sialylated glycoconjugates in these epithelial cells; and (iii) binding was not sensitive to metaperiodate under conditions that selectively cleaved carbons 8 and 9 of terminal nonmodified sialic acids. A role for fucosylated epitopes in the glycoprotein(s) that mediate binding of H. pylori to surface mucous cells was suggested by the facts that this lineage coexpresses the adhesin receptor and major fucosylated histo-blood group antigens, that monoclonal antibodies specific for histo-blood group antigens H, B, and Leb block binding, and that the lectin Ulex europaeus type 1 agglutinin, which is specific for alpha-L-fucose, also bound to the same cells that bound the bacteria

  18. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on the human oviductal epithelium and mediation of lymphoid cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Utreras, E; Ossandon, P; Acuña-Castillo, C; Varela-Nallar, L; Müller, C; Arraztoa, J A; Cardenas, H; Imarai, M

    2000-09-01

    The epithelium of the human oviduct expresses the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and shows endocytic properties towards luminal antigens. Therefore, the epithelial cells might behave as antigen-presenting cells, inducing a local immune response. The activation of antigen-specific T cells not only requires presentation of the peptide antigen by MHC class II, but also the presence of co-stimulatory molecules in the antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, the expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was examined in the epithelium of the human oviduct. Most oviducts showed epithelial ICAM-1 expression, as assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot analysis and RT-PCR assay, and the expression was restricted to the luminal border of ciliated and secretory cells. Interferon gamma, interleukin 1 and lipopolysaccharide treatments increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive cells in primary cultures, indicating that the expression of ICAM-1 in the oviduct might be upregulated in vivo by inflammatory cytokines or bacterial infections. Binding assays between allogenic phytohaemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes and epithelial monolayers expressing ICAM-1 demonstrated that this molecule stimulated lymphocyte adherence. The presence of ICAM-1, in addition to MHC class II, supports the putative role of the oviductal epithelium in antigen presentation. The exclusive apical distribution of ICAM-1 indicates that T-cell activation would occur in a polarized manner. Binding of lymphoid cells to the surface of the oviductal epithelium may help to retain these immune cells that are required for the clearance of pathogens.

  19. Characterization of Influenza Virus-Induced Leukocyte Adherence to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    maximally thelial cells lining blood vessels, since as both enteroviruses induced expression of E-%electin and ICAM- I Ag (data not that cause ain...Kirkpatrick, C. J., B. D. Bultnann. and H. Cruler. 1985. In- In summary, we have demonstrated a time- and teraction between enteroviruses and human

  20. Humans robustly adhere to dynamic walking principles by harnessing motor abundance to control forces.

    PubMed

    Toney, Megan E; Chang, Young-Hui

    2013-12-01

    Human walking dynamics are typically framed in the context of mechanics and energetics rather than in the context of neuromuscular control. Dynamic walking principles describe one helpful theoretical approach to characterize efficient human walking mechanics over many steps. These principles do not, however, address how such walking is controlled step-by-step despite small perturbations from natural variability. Our purpose was to identify neuromechanical control strategies used to achieve consistent and robust locomotion despite natural step-to-step force variability. We used the uncontrolled manifold concept to test whether human walkers select combinations of leading and trailing leg-forces that generate equivalent net-force trajectories during step-to-step transitions. Subjects selected leading and trailing leg-force combinations that generated consistent vertical net-force during step-to-step transitions. We conclude that vertical net-force is an implicit neuromechanical goal of human walking whose trajectory is stabilized for consistent step-to-step transitions, which agrees with the principles of dynamic walking. In contrast, inter-leg-force combinations modulated anterior-posterior net-force trajectories with each step to maintain constant walking speed, indicating that a consistent anterior-posterior net-force trajectory is not an implicit goal of walking. For a more complete picture of hierarchical locomotor control, we also tested whether each individual leg-force trajectory was stabilized through the selection of leg-force equivalent joint-torque combinations. The observed consistent vertical net-force trajectory was achieved primarily through the selection of joint-torque combinations that modulated trailing leg-force during step-to-step transitions. We conclude that humans achieve robust walking by harnessing inherent motor abundance of the joints and legs to maintain consistent step-by-step walking performance.

  1. Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cells Prevent Bone loss, Stimulate Bone formation, and Suppress Growth of Multiple Myeloma in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Pennisi, Angela; Wang, Yuping; Khan, Sharmin; Heidaran, Mohammad; Pal, Ajai; Zhang, Xiaokui; He, Shuyang; Zeitlin, Andy; Abbot, Stewart; Faleck, Herbert; Hariri, Robert; Shaughnessy, John D.; van Rhee, Frits; Nair, Bijay; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    Human placenta has emerged as a valuable source of transplantable cells of mesenchymal and hematopoietic origin for multiple cytotherapeutic purposes, including enhanced engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells, modulation of inflammation, bone repair, and cancer. Placenta-derived adherent cells (PDACs) are mesenchymal-like stem cells isolated from postpartum human placenta. Multiple myeloma is closely associated with induction of bone disease and large lytic lesions, which are often not repaired and are usually the sites of relapses. We evaluated the antimyeloma therapeutic potential, in vivo survival, and trafficking of PDACs in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)–rab model of medullary myeloma-associated bone loss. Intrabone injection of PDACs into non-myelomatous and myelomatous implanted bone in SCID-rab mice promoted bone formation by stimulating endogenous osteoblastogenesis, and most PDACs disappeared from bone within 4 weeks. PDACs inhibitory effects on myeloma bone disease and tumor growth were dose-dependent and comparable with those of fetal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Intrabone, but not subcutaneous, engraftment of PDACs inhibited bone disease and tumor growth in SCID-rab mice. Intratumor injection of PDACs had no effect on subcutaneous growth of myeloma cells. A small number of intravenously injected PDACs trafficked into myelomatous bone. Myeloma cell growth rate in vitro was lower in coculture with PDACs than with MSCs from human fetal bone or myeloma patients. PDACs also promoted apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and inhibited their differentiation. This study suggests that altering the bone marrow microenvironment with PDAC cytotherapy attenuates growth of myeloma and that PDAC cytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach for myeloma osteolysis. PMID:21732484

  2. A Serine-Threonine Kinase (StkP) Regulates Expression of the Pneumococcal Pilus and Modulates Bacterial Adherence to Human Epithelial and Endothelial Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Jenny A; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The pneumococcal serine threonine protein kinase (StkP) acts as a global regulator in the pneumococcus. Bacterial mutants deficient in StkP are less virulent in animal models of infection. The gene for this regulator is located adjacent to the gene for its cognate phosphatase in the pneumococcal genome. The phosphatase dephosphorylates proteins phosphorylated by StkP and has been shown to regulate a number of key pneumococcal virulence factors and to modulate adherence to eukaryotic cells. The role of StkP in adherence of pneumococci to human cells has not previously been reported. In this study we show StkP represses the pneumococcal pilus, a virulence factor known to be important for bacterial adhesion. In a serotype 4 strain regulation of the pilus by StkP modulates adherence to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human lung epithelial cells. This suggests that the pneumococcal pilus may play a role in adherence during infections such as meningitis and pneumonia. We show that regulation of the pilus occurs at the population level as StkP alters the number of pili-positive cells within a single culture. As far as we are aware this is the first gene identified outside of the pilus islet that regulates the biphasic expression of the pilus. These findings suggest StkPs role in cell division may be linked to regulation of expression of a cell surface adhesin.

  3. Modification of adherence to plastic and to human buccal cells of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by a subinhibitory concentration of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M T; Morales, J J; Lucio, L; Pérez-Giraldo, C; Hurtado, C; Gómez-García, A C

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents can influence the adherence of Candida spp. to the host cell. In this study the adherence of Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and Candida dubliniensis CECT 11455 to plastic and to human buccal epithelial cells was evaluated following pre-exposure to 0.5 x minimum inhibitory capacity (MIC) of itraconazole and compared with the corresponding cellular surface hydrophobicity. The yeasts were grown in Sabouraud broth or RPMI-1640 with itraconazole (0.5 x MIC) for 24-26 h at 37 degrees C and the drug was then removed. The adhesion capacity to plastic was studied by turbidimetry in a polystyrene microtiter plate. The adhesion of the yeast to buccal epithelial cells was determined using microscopy techniques. The cellular surface hydrophobicity levels were determined by the microbial adhesion hydrocarbons test. Pre-exposure to itraconazole decreased plastic adherence and cellular surface hydrophobicity in both species when grown in RPMI. When C. albicans was grown in Sabouraud broth, it was nonhydrophobic and did not adhere and therefore no change was detected with the antibiotic. Itraconazole increased adherence to buccal epithelial cells in both species and media studied, as compared to controls without antifungal agents. To study the effects of these antifungal agents on pathogenicity mechanisms, it will be necessary to standardize the methodology for evaluation to determine their in vivo therapeutic efficacy.

  4. HEp-2 Cell-Adherent Escherichia coli and Intestinal Secretory Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Outpatients with HIV-Associated Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, John J.; Salameh, Bassam M.; DuPont, Herbert L.; Jiang, Zhi D.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Arduino, Roberto; Smith, Melinda A.; Masozera, Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    HEp-2 cell-adherent Escherichia coli and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) itself have recently been incriminated as causes of chronic HIV-associated diarrhea. This study sought to determine the prevalence of these two agents among HIV-infected patients with diarrhea in an outpatient setting in the United States and to compare their prevalence to that of other commonly recognized enteropathogens known to be present in this population. HEp-2 cell-adherent E. coli was found in 20 of 83 (24.1%) patients with diarrhea. A diffuse pattern of adherence was the most common, found in 14 of 20 (70%) patients, followed by a localized adherence pattern (6 of 20; 30%). An intestinal secretory immune response against the p24 antigen of HIV was found in 9 of 34 (27.5%) patients with HIV-associated diarrhea. The following pathogens or products were also detected in lower frequencies: Cryptosporidium spp. (10.8%), Clostridium difficile toxin (8.8%), microsporidia (6%), Isospora belli (3.6%), Blastocystis hominis (2.4%), Giardia spp. (1.2%), Salmonella spp. (1.2%), and Mycobacterium spp. (1.2%). The role of HEp-2 cell-adherent E. coli and HIV enteric infections in patients with HIV-associated diarrhea deserves further study. PMID:9455887

  5. Development of a Modular Automated System for Maintenance and Differentiation of Adherent Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Duncan E; Daniszewski, Maciej; Liang, Helena H; Kulkarni, Tejal; Li, Fan; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Conquest, Alison; Hernández, Damian; Hung, Sandy S; Gill, Katherine P; De Smit, Elisabeth; Kearns, Lisa S; Clarke, Linda; Sluch, Valentin M; Chamling, Xitiz; Zack, Donald J; Wong, Raymond C B; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have tremendous potential for development of regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug discovery. However, the processes of reprogramming, maintenance, and differentiation are labor intensive and subject to intertechnician variability. To address these issues, we established and optimized protocols to allow for the automated maintenance of reprogrammed somatic cells into iPSCs to enable the large-scale culture and passaging of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) using a customized TECAN Freedom EVO. Generation of iPSCs was performed offline by nucleofection followed by selection of TRA-1-60-positive cells using a Miltenyi MultiMACS24 Separator. Pluripotency markers were assessed to confirm pluripotency of the generated iPSCs. Passaging was performed using an enzyme-free dissociation method. Proof of concept of differentiation was obtained by differentiating human PSCs into cells of the retinal lineage. Key advantages of this automated approach are the ability to increase sample size, reduce variability during reprogramming or differentiation, and enable medium- to high-throughput analysis of human PSCs and derivatives. These techniques will become increasingly important with the emergence of clinical trials using stem cells.

  6. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte motility in men with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fennell, M; Brewerton, D A

    1989-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) response to a chemotactic or chemokinetic stimulus is enhanced in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This effect does not parallel the severity of disease activity or the size of the acute phase response, and it is independent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Polymorph function is normal in HLA-B27 positive brothers of probands with AS and in other HLA-B27 positive individuals in the absence of disease. Polymorph motility is also normal in patients with psoriasis vulgaris or Crohn's disease, indicating that enhanced PMN motility is not a non-specific consequence of all inflammatory disorders. PMID:2784306

  7. Griseofulvin inhibition of polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis in Boyden chambers.

    PubMed

    Bandmann, U; Norberg, B; Simmingsköld, G

    1975-09-01

    Griseofulvin inhibited the chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN's) in vitro in the concentration range 0.1-1.0 mug/ml, i.e. at concentrations comparable to those obtained in serum during peroral treatment with griseofulvin. It is suggested that PMN chemotaxis is inhibited by griseofulvin interference with the redistribution of cytoplasmic microtubules, which is thought to be essential in the direction-finding of PMNs during chemotaxis. Furthermore, it is suggested that the griseofulvin inhibition of PMN chemotaxis - together with the previously known pharmacodynamic properties of griseofulvin - may provide the rationale for griseofulvin therapy in PMN-mediated tissue injury of the gut.

  8. Candida albicans adherence to resin-composite restorative dental material: influence of whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Maza, José Luis; Elguezabal, Natalia; Prado, Carlota; Ellacuría, Joseba; Soler, Iñaki; Pontón, José

    2002-11-01

    Attachment of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is believed to be a critical event in the colonization of the oral cavity and in the development of oral diseases such as Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adhesion of C albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information about the adhesion of C albicans to composite restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of adhesion of C albicans to a resin-composite restorative material (Herculite). The adhesion of 2 strains of C albicans, a germinative and a germ tube-deficient mutant, was studied by a visual method after incubating the fungus and the resin with and without human whole saliva. In absence of saliva, the adhesion of the C albicans germinative isolate to the resin showed an increase in parallel with the germination, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes). However, no significant differences were observed in the adhesion of the agerminative mutant during the period of time studied. In the presence of saliva, the adhesion of both isolates to the resin was significantly lowered. Germination and the presence of human whole saliva are important factors in the adhesion of C albicans to the resin-composite restorative material Herculite.

  9. Pulmonary accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Powe, J.E.; Short, A.; Sibbald, W.J.; Driedger, A.A.

    1982-11-01

    The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plays an integral role in the development of permeability pulmonary edema associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This report describes 3 patients with ARDS secondary to systemic sepsis who demonstrated an abnormal diffuse accumulation of Indium (/sup 111/In)-labeled PMNs in their lungs, without concomitant clinical or laboratory evidence of a primary chest infection. In one patient, the accumulation of the pulmonary activity during an initial pass suggested that this observation was related to diffuse leukoaggregation within the pulmonary microvasculature. A 4th patient with ARDS was on high-dose corticosteroids at the time of a similar study, and showed no pulmonary accumulation of PMNs, suggesting a possible reason for the reported beneficial effect of corticosteroids in human ARDS.

  10. Particulate matter adheres to human hair exposed to severe aerial pollution: consequences for certain hair surface properties.

    PubMed

    Galliano, A; Ye, C; Su, F; Wang, C; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wagle, A; Guerin, M; Flament, F; Steel, A

    2017-07-26

    The deposit and adherence of particulate matter (PM) from aerial pollution onto the surface of human hair is a poorly studied phenomenon. (i) To reproduce in vitro the deposit of known PM on standardized hair swatches in a closed box, (ii) to compare in vitro data with those obtained under 'real-life' conditions of severe aerial pollution and (iii) to assess the changes of the hair surface properties, potentially caused by the adherence of airborne PM onto the hair. In vitro: a PM was sprayed onto untreated or sebum-coated hair swatches. Real-life conditions: other swatches were exposed to a severely polluted environment, for 24 to 72 h, in Baoding (PR China). In both cases, swatches were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The shine, the frictional properties and the level of metals were measured and compared to those same properties for the unexposed swatches. This work clearly indicates that, under real-life conditions, a large number of PM of various sizes are deposited onto the hair surface. This phenomenon is increased by the presence of sebum and longer exposure times. The in vitro level of PM deposited onto the hair surface is comparable to the in vivo level. The presence of sebum seems to favour the deposit of larger PM. The shine of the exposed swatches is significantly decreased, whereas their respective friction coefficients are significantly increased. Both the presence of sebum and length of exposure time increased the amount of analysed metals present on the exposed hair surface (Al, Fe, Cu, Ba and Zn). This work indicates that a very high amount (e.g. billions) of PM can be deposited on a full head of hair for subjects living in a severely aerially polluted environment. This process can be reproduced in vitro. In real-life, pollution has a strong impact on hair surface properties, leading to a modification of the visual aspect (loss of shine) and the alteration of hair surface (increase in friction force). This work may be used to pave the

  11. Adherence to ACIP Recommendation for Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Among US Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Hirth, Jacqueline M; Berenson, Abbey B

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use according to Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)'s recommendations among US adolescent girls. We used National Immunization Survey of Teens 2013 data. Based on provider-verified (n = 9403) information, 57.3, 39.1 and 19.0 % of adolescent girls, initiated, completed and completed the HPV vaccine according to ACIP's recommendation (by age 12), respectively. Hispanic race/ethnicity, a physician recommendation for HPV vaccine and ≥1 influenza vaccine in the past 3 years were all associated with a higher likelihood of compliance with ACIP's recommendation. Girls from a larger family and those whose immunization provider was a STD/school/teen clinic were less likely to receive the vaccine at the recommended age compared to a girl raised in a smaller sized family and received immunization from a hospital facility, respectively. Only one-fifth of 13-17 yo girls receive the HPV vaccine by age 12 as recommended by ACIP. Physician visits and influenza vaccination settings are opportunities to improve vaccine series completion at the recommended age.

  12. Modulation of human eosinophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration and function.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Eosinophil migration toward a concentration gradient of a chemotactic factor is regulated at four levels. Diverse immunologic pathways generate stimuli with eosinophil chemotactic activity, including the complement products C5a and a fragment of C3a and the peptide products of mast cells and basophils activated by IgE-mediated reactions, such as eosinophil chemotactic factor of anaphylaxis (ECF-A) and other oligopeptides. The intrinsic preferential leukocyte activity of the chemotactic stimuli represents the second level of modulation, with ECF-A and other mast cell-derived peptides exhibiting the most selective action on eosinophils. The third level of control of eosinophil chemotaxis is composed of inactivators and inhibitors of chemotactic stimuli and is exemplified by degradation of C5a by anaphylatoxin inactivator or chemotactic factor inactivator and of ECF-A by carboxypeptidase-A or aminopeptidases. The activity of ECF-A is uniquely suppressed by equimolar quantities of its NH2- terminal tripeptide substituent, presumably by eosinophil membrane receptor competition. Factors comprising the fourth level of regulation, which alter eosinophil responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli, include the chemotactic factors themselves, through deactivation; nonchemotactic inhibitors such as the COOH-terminal tripeptide substituent of ECF-A, the neutrophil-immobilizing factor (NIF), the phagocytosis-enhancing factor Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg, and histamine at concentrations greater than 400 ng/ml; and nonchemotactic enhancing principles represented by ascorbate and by histamine at concentrations of 30 ng/ml or less. Local concentrations of eosinophils called to and immobilized at the site of a hypersenitivity reaction may express their regulatory functions by degrading the chemical mediators elaborated including histamine, slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A), and platelet-activating factor (PAF) by way of their content of histaminase, arylsulfatase B, and phospholipase D, respectively. Immunologic pathways may thus provide the capability for early and specific host defense reactions with a later influx of eosinophils preventing irreversible local tissue alterations or distant organ effects. PMID:793410

  13. Does tuftsin alter phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.R.; DeChatelet, L.R.; Shirley, P.S.; Cooper, M.R.

    1982-03-01

    The physiological significance of the putative phagocytosis-promoting peptide, tuftsin, was investigated by measurement of chemiluminescence generated during phagocytosis and by assay of the uptake of radiolabeled bacteria. Researchers found no differences in either assay when reasearchers compared serum from splenectomized patients (which purportedly lacks tuftsin) with normal serum. Further, there was no difference when serum from splenectomized patients was employed in the presence of absence of exogenous tuftsin. Similar results were obtained under a variety of conditions, utilizing three different challenge particles with varying particle-cell ratios and serum from 20 different splenectomized patients. These results do not agree with the hypothesis that tuftsin plays a major role in promoting phagocytosis.

  14. Inhibitory effect of FUT-175 on the production of interleukin 8 and polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, M; Endo, S; Inada, K; Yamashita, H; Takakuwa, T; Nakae, H; Kasai, T; Baba, N; Yamada, Y

    1995-03-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of a protease inhibitor, FUT-175, on the production of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase (PMNE) by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and vascular endothelial cells. IL-8 production by PMN and vascular endothelial cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was inhibited by FUT-175. This compound also inhibited PMNE production by PMN following LPS stimulation.

  15. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes in coagulating whole blood recognize hydrophilic and hydrophobic titanium surfaces by different adhesion receptors and show different patterns of receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, C; Nygren, H

    2001-04-01

    The mechanism of healing or rejection of implant materials is unknown, but the process always starts at the contact with coagulating blood. Here, the initial reactions of clean (hydrophilic) and alkylated (hydrophobic) titanium with blood were investigated by short-term exposure to human blood and detection of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) surface antigens with an immunofluorescence technique. The fluorescence intensity was quantitated by computer-aided image analysis. Antibodies specific to CD11b, CD16, CD18, CD62L, and CD162 were used to block PMNL adhesion. The respiratory burst of adhering cells was stimulated with opsonized zymosan and measured by chemiluminiscence. The thrombin dependence of PMNL reactions was studied by using hirudin, a specific thrombin inhibitor. The expression of CD62L decreased with increasing exposure time, and the rate of decrease was faster at the hydrophilic surface. At the hydrophilic surface, the CD16 exposure was high after 8 minutes of blood contact, and it decreased with time. At the hydrophobic surface, a peak in CD16 expression was seen after 32 minutes of blood exposure. At the hydrophobic surface, the expression of CD11b increased slowly with increasing blood exposure time, whereas at the hydrophilic surface, a peak of CD11b expression was seen after 32 minutes of blood exposure. The expression of CD11b and that of CD16 were found to be thrombin dependent. At the hydrophilic surface, adhesion of PMNLs was blocked by CD16 antibodies, whereas adhesion to the hydrophobic surface was blocked by anti-CD162. Mixing blood with antibodies to CD11b, CD18, and CD62L amplified the adhesion of PMNLs to the hydrophilic surface.

  16. Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Nigerian Patients With Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Influence of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Oladele, Rita O.; Akanmu, Alani S.; Nwosu, Augustina O.; Ogunsola, Folasade T.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Denning, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis has a high mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. This is preventable with early screening and preemptive therapy. We evaluated the prevalence of cryptococcal disease by antigen testing, possible associated factors, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients being managed in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods. Sera were collected from 214 consenting HIV-infected participants with CD4+ counts <250 cells/mm3, irrespective of their antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, between November 2014 and May 2015. A cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) lateral flow assay was used for testing. Pertinent clinical data were obtained from patients and their case notes. Results. Of the 214 participants, females (124; 57.9%) outnumbered males. Mean age was 41.3 ± 9.4 (standard deviation) years. The majority (204; 95.3%) were ART experienced. The median CD4+ cell count was 160 cells/mm3 (interquartile range, 90–210). The overall seroprevalence of cryptococcal antigenemia was 8.9% (19 of 214); 6 of 61 (9.8%) in those with CD4+ cell counts <100 cells/mm3, 4 of 80 (5.0%) in the 100–200 group, and 9 of 73 (12.3%) in 200–250 cells/mm3 group. Among ART-naive patients, 1 of 10 (10%) was CrAg positive. Twenty-seven of 214 (12.6%) had associated oral thrush. Potential baseline meningitis symptoms (3 of 214 [1.4%] experienced neck pain or stiffness and 21 of 214 [9.8%] experienced headache) were common in the study group, but the result was not statistically significant in relation to CrAg positivity. Two of 19 (10.5%) CrAg-positive patients died, 10 of 19 (52.6%) were lost to follow up, and 7 of 19 (36.8%) were alive. Empirical fluconazole was routinely given to those with low CD4 counts <100 cells/mm3, which was unrelated to CrAg positivity (P = .018). Conclusions. We report a prevalence of 8.9% cryptococcal antigenemia in a setting where first-line antifungals are not readily available. We recommend Cr

  17. Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Nigerian Patients With Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Influence of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence.

    PubMed

    Oladele, Rita O; Akanmu, Alani S; Nwosu, Augustina O; Ogunsola, Folasade T; Richardson, Malcolm D; Denning, David W

    2016-03-01

    Background.  Cryptococcal meningitis has a high mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. This is preventable with early screening and preemptive therapy. We evaluated the prevalence of cryptococcal disease by antigen testing, possible associated factors, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients being managed in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods.  Sera were collected from 214 consenting HIV-infected participants with CD4(+) counts <250 cells/mm(3), irrespective of their antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, between November 2014 and May 2015. A cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) lateral flow assay was used for testing. Pertinent clinical data were obtained from patients and their case notes. Results.  Of the 214 participants, females (124; 57.9%) outnumbered males. Mean age was 41.3 ± 9.4 (standard deviation) years. The majority (204; 95.3%) were ART experienced. The median CD4(+) cell count was 160 cells/mm(3) (interquartile range, 90-210). The overall seroprevalence of cryptococcal antigenemia was 8.9% (19 of 214); 6 of 61 (9.8%) in those with CD4(+) cell counts <100 cells/mm(3), 4 of 80 (5.0%) in the 100-200 group, and 9 of 73 (12.3%) in 200-250 cells/mm(3) group. Among ART-naive patients, 1 of 10 (10%) was CrAg positive. Twenty-seven of 214 (12.6%) had associated oral thrush. Potential baseline meningitis symptoms (3 of 214 [1.4%] experienced neck pain or stiffness and 21 of 214 [9.8%] experienced headache) were common in the study group, but the result was not statistically significant in relation to CrAg positivity. Two of 19 (10.5%) CrAg-positive patients died, 10 of 19 (52.6%) were lost to follow up, and 7 of 19 (36.8%) were alive. Empirical fluconazole was routinely given to those with low CD4 counts <100 cells/mm(3), which was unrelated to CrAg positivity (P = .018). Conclusions.  We report a prevalence of 8.9% cryptococcal antigenemia in a setting where first-line antifungals are not readily available. We

  18. Experimental evidence for the role of lipids in adherence of Candida spp. to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, M A; Burns, G R; Elteen, K A; Radwan, S S

    1986-01-01

    Lipids extracted from Candida albicans and C. tropicalis, but not from the weakly adherent C. pseudotropicalis, significantly blocked in vitro adherence of the respective yeast cells to buccal epithelial cells. The percentage of reduction from control values ranged between 16.4 and 42.1%, depending on the species, the strain, and the solvent used for lipid extraction. The constituent lipid classes of both the acetone and chloroform-methanol extracts of C. albicans ATCC 10231 were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The individual classes were isolated by preparative thin-layer chromatography and then tested for their effects on the adherence of this strain to buccal epithelial cells. Individual phospholipids, sterols, and steryl esters blocked adherence significantly (between 15.5 and 55.7% reduction). Triacylglycerols and free fatty acids showed no effect whatsoever. The same results were obtained when standard lipid samples were investigated. Images PMID:3759234

  19. The pathogenic potential of Helicobacter cinaedi isolated from non-human sources: adherence, invasion and translocation ability in polarized intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takako; Yamazaki, Wataru; Saeki, Yuji; Takajo, Ichiro; Okayama, Akihiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Misawa, Naoaki

    2016-05-03

    Helicobacter cinaedi infection has been recognized as an increasingly important emerging disease in humans. Infection with H. cinaedi causes bacteremia, cellulitis and enteritis. H. cinaedi has been isolated from non-human sources, including dogs, cats and rodents; however, it remains unclear whether animal strains are pathogenic in humans and as zoonotic pathogens. In this study, H. cinaedi isolates were recovered from a dog and a hamster, and the ability of these isolates to adhere to, invade and translocate across polarized human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells was examined in vitro. To better understand the pathogenic potential of animal H. cinaedi isolates, these results were compared with those for a human strain that was isolated from a patient with bacteremia. The animal and human strains adhered to and invaded Caco-2 cells, but to a lesser degree than the C. jejuni 81-176 strain, which was used as a control. The integrity of tight junctions was monitored by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) with a membrane insert system. The TER values for all H. cinaedi strains did not change during the experimental periods compared with those of the controls; however, translocation of H. cinaedi from the apical side to the basolateral side was confirmed by cultivation and H. cinaedi-specific PCR, suggesting that the H. cinaedi strains translocated by transcellular route. This study demonstrated that H. cinaedi strains of animal origin might have a pathogenic potential in human epithelial cells as observed in a translocation assay in vitro with a human isolate.

  20. Diazepam inhibits phagocytosis and killing exerted by polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes from healthy donors. In vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Covelli, V; Decandia, P; Altamura, M; Jirillo, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a benzodiazepine (BDZ), diazepam on human polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) and monocyte phagocytosis and killing from healthy volunteers has been evaluated. Diazepam is able to inhibit in vitro both functions exerted by PMN and monocytes at 10(-5) and 10(-6) M concentrations/ 4 x 10(6) phagocytes. 10(-7) M concentration was not effective in all the instances. These results are discussed for their possible clinical implications, since previous studies have shown that in patients with phobic disorder there is evidence for reduced phagocytosis and killing capacities.

  1. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  2. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×106 cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective “off the shelf” therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  3. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×10(6) cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective "off the shelf" therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia.

  4. Competing causes of death and medical comorbidities among patients with human papillomavirus-positive vs human papillomavirus-negative oropharyngeal carcinoma and impact on adherence to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hess, Clayton B; Rash, Dominique L; Daly, Megan E; Farwell, D Gregory; Bishop, John; Vaughan, Andrew T; Wilson, Machelle D; Chen, Allen M

    2014-04-01

    Survival of patients with head and neck cancer can be affected by competing causes of mortality, as well as comorbidities that result in radiation treatment interruptions. To discern how differences in preexisting medical and psychosocial comorbidities potentially influence adherence to radiation therapy according to human papillomavirus (HPV) status. Retrospective analysis at a comprehensive cancer center of 162 consecutive patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated with primary chemoradiation (n = 95) or primary surgery followed by adjuvant radiation (n = 67). Immunostaining for p16 was used to determine HPV status. Difference in alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use was compared between patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors, as well as the prevalence of the following comorbidities: diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), anxiety disorder, and major depression. The number of total missed treatment days was analyzed as both a continuous and categorical variable. Rates of self-reported heavy alcohol use (47% vs 16%; P = .02) and any marijuana use (47% vs 23%; P = .003) were significantly higher among HPV-negative patients. Fifty-four percent of HPV-positive patients self-identified as never smokers, compared with only 12% of HPV-negative patients (P < .001). HPV-negative patients had more missed treatment days (mean, 2.8 vs 1.7 days; P = .02), as well as an increased rate of at least 5 missed days (24% vs 10%; P = .04), and higher prevalences of COPD (12% vs 7%; P = .37) and anxiety disorder (12% vs 6%; P = .35). Pronounced differences exist in lifestyle habits between patients with HPV-negative and HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer at diagnosis. These differences, as well as those of medical and psychosocial burden, may contribute to observed discrepancies in treatment adherence and need to be considered in outcomes reporting and clinical trial design.

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae ClpL Modulates Adherence to A549 Human Lung Cells through Rap1/Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Le, Nhat-Tu; Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kim, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang-Sang; Luong, Truc Thanh; Chung, Kyung-Tae; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2014-01-01

    Caseinolytic protease L (ClpL) is a member of the HSP100/Clp chaperone family, which is found mainly in Gram-positive bacteria. ClpL is highly expressed during infection for refolding of stress-induced denatured proteins, some of which are important for adherence. However, the role of ClpL in modulating pneumococcal virulence is poorly understood. Here, we show that ClpL impairs pneumococcal adherence to A549 lung cells by inducing and activating Rap1 and Rac1, thus increasing phosphorylation of cofilin (inactive form). Moreover, infection with a clpL mutant (ΔclpL) causes a greater degree of filopodium formation than D39 wild-type (WT) infection. Inhibition of Rap1 and Rac1 impairs filopodium formation and pneumococcal adherence. Therefore, ClpL can reduce pneumococcal adherence to A549 cells, likely via modulation of Rap1- and Rac1-mediated filopodium formation. These results demonstrate a potential role for ClpL in pneumococcal resistance to host cell adherence during infection. This study provides insight into further understanding the interactions between hosts and pathogens. PMID:24980975

  6. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility. PMID:6608924

  7. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility.

  8. Impaired polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the oral cavity of edentulous individuals.

    PubMed

    Rijkschroeff, Patrick; Loos, Bruno G; Nicu, Elena A

    2017-10-01

    Oral health is characterized by functional oral polymorphonuclear neutrophils (oPMNs). Edentulism might be associated with a loss of oPMNs because these cells enter the oral cavity primarily through the gingival crevices. The main aim of this study was to investigate the numbers of oPMNs in rinse samples obtained from edentulous (n = 21) and dentate (n = 20) subjects. A second study aim was to investigate possible differences between oPMNs and peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (cPMNs). Apoptosis/necrosis and cell-activation markers (CD11b, CD63 and CD66b) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined either without stimulation (constitutive) or in response to 10 μM phorbol myristate acetate or Fusobacterium nucleatum. The edentulous subjects presented with lower oPMN counts and higher percentages of apoptotic/necrotic oPMNs compared with dentate subjects. Furthermore, oPMNs from edentulous donors expressed low levels of all three activation markers and low constitutive ROS. In contrast, oPMNs from dentate subjects expressed high levels of all three activation markers and a higher level of constitutive ROS than cPMNs. When challenged, oPMNs from edentulous subjects showed no upregulation in ROS production, whereas oPMNs from dentate subjects retained their ability to respond to stimulation. The functional characteristics of cPMNs were comparable between edentulous and dentate subjects. This study demonstrates that despite having functional cPMNs, edentulous subjects have low oPMN numbers that are functionally impaired. © 2017 The Authors. Eur J Oral Sci published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils in periodontitis and their possible modulation as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Elena A; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this review is polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils play a pivotal role in normal host resistance to subgingival dental-plaque biofilm. Both hyper- and hypo-responsiveness of the immune system toward the microbial challenge in periodontitis have been described. We review polymorphonuclear neutrophil physiology with emphasis on the role of neutrophil functions and dysfunctions in periodontitis. Text boxes are given at the end of each subsection, which present the current knowledge on neutrophil-modulating agents as a potential therapeutic approach in periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Recognition of laminin by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia: a possible mechanism of adherence to human type II alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Caro, Erika; Gonzalez, Angel; Muñoz, César; Urán, Marta E; Restrepo, Angela; John Hamilton, Andrew; Elena Cano, Luz

    2008-12-01

    This study addresses the recognition of laminin by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia, as well as its possible role in the adherence of conidia to A549 cells. Adherence of conidia to immobilized laminin was shown to be specific, as anti-laminin antibodies, soluble laminin or the laminin-derived peptides IKVAV and CDPGYIGSR inhibited this interaction. RGD containing peptides and various monosaccharides had no effect on adherence, with the exception of N-acetylneuraminic acid. Pre-treatment of conidia with fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not with BSA, also resulted in significant inhibition, suggesting that P. brasiliensis conidia might cross-recognize host proteins involved in colonization. In assays using transmission electron microscopy, we observed internalization of conidia 30 min after exposition to A549 cells. Laminin present on the surface of A549 cells shown to serve as mediator of this interaction, with a significant decrease in fungal adherence when the epithelial cells were pre-treated with anti-laminin antibodies or when conidia were pre-incubated with either soluble laminin or the laminin-specific peptides. Together these results suggest that the recognition of laminin by P. brasiliensis conidia is a key process in the interaction with pulmonary epithelial cells, where this extracellular matrix protein acts as bridging molecule.

  11. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  12. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-12-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of 'universal access' and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients' health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested.

  13. Lectinlike interactions of Fusobacterium nucleatum with human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, D F; Novak, M J; Vora, S A; Mourad, J; Kriger, P S

    1989-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum expresses lectinlike adherence factors which mediate binding to a variety of human tissue cells. Adherence is selectively inhibited by galactose, lactose, and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. In this study, adherence of F. nucleatum to human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was investigated. The results indicated that the fusobacteria adhered to live and metabolically inactivated or fixed PMNs. Adherence of F. nucleatum resulted in activation of PMNs as determined by PMN aggregation, membrane depolarization, increased intracellular free Ca2+, superoxide anion production, and lysozyme release. Transmission electron micrographs showed that F. nucleatum was phagocytized by the PMNs. Microbicidal assays indicated that greater than 98% of F. nucleatum organisms were killed by PMNs within 60 min. Adherence to and activation of PMNs by F. nucleatum were inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine or lactose greater than galactose, whereas equal concentrations of glucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, mannose, and fucose had little or no effect on F. nucleatum-PMN interactions. Pretreatment of the fusobacteria with heat (80 degrees C, 20 min) or proteases inhibited adherence to and activation of PMNs, but superoxide production was also stimulated by heated bacteria. The results indicate that interaction of F. nucleatum with PMNs is lectinlike and is probably mediated by fusobacterial proteins which bind to other human tissue cells. Adherence of F. nucleatum to PMNs in the absence of serum opsonins, such as antibodies and complement, may play an important role in PMN recognition and killing of F. nucleatum in the gingival sulcus and in the subsequent release of PMN factors associated with tissue destruction. Images PMID:2553609

  14. Psychological factors, beliefs about medication, and adherence of youth with human immunodeficiency virus in a multisite directly observed therapy pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Patricia A; Flynn, Patricia M; Belzer, Marvin; Britto, Paula; Hu, Chengcheng; Graham, Bobbie; Neely, Michael; McSherry, George D; Spector, Stephen A; Gaur, Aditya H

    2011-06-01

    This study examined psychological functioning and beliefs about medicine in adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a community-based directly observed therapy (DOT) pilot feasibility study. Participants were youth with behaviorally acquired HIV (n = 20; 65% female; median age, 21 years) with adherence problems, who received once-daily DOT. Youth were assessed at baseline, week 12 (post-DOT), and week 24 (follow-up). At baseline, 55% of youth reported having clinical depressive symptoms compared to 27% at week 12 with sustained improvements at week 24. At baseline, substance use was reported within the borderline clinical range (T(score) = 68), with clinical but statistically nonsignificant improvement (T(score) = 61) at week 12. Hopelessness scores reflected optimism for the future. Coping strategies showed significantly decreased cognitive avoidance (p = .02), emotional discharge (p = .004), and acceptance/resignation ("nothing I can do," p = .004), whereas positive reappraisal and seeking support emerged. With the exception of depressive symptoms, week 12 improvements were not sustained at week 24. DOT adherence was predicted by higher baseline depression (p = .05), beliefs about medicine (p = .006) and perceived threat of illness scores (p = .03). Youth with behaviorally acquired HIV and adherence problems who participated in a community-based DOT intervention reported clinically improved depressive symptoms, and temporarily reduced substance use and negative coping strategies. Depressive symptoms, beliefs about medicine, and viewing HIV as a potential threat predicted better DOT adherence. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Complement C4-derived monocyte-directed chemotaxis-inhibitory factor. A molecular mechanism to cause polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruta, T.; Takagi, K.; Kambara, T.

    1991-01-01

    To reveal the mechanism of the lesser infiltration of monocytes in synovial cavities with rheumatoid arthritis despite the presence of chronic inflammation, the synovial fluid from 15 rheumatoid arthritis patients was analyzed with respect to leukocyte chemotaxis. The synovial fluid possessed strong chemotactic activity to polymorphonuclear leukocytes but rather suppressed one to monocytes. The synovial fluid contained two different inhibitory activities in monocyte chemotaxis. One, which also suppressed polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis, was identified as alpha 1 protease inhibitor. The other, with molecular weight of 8 kd, possessed the specificity to monocytes and shared the antigenicity with complement C4 but not with C3 or C5. A similar inhibitor was generated in normal human plasma when the classical pathway of the complement system was initiated with aggregated human IgG, while it was not when alternative pathway was initiated with zymosan. The small size factor in the synovial fluid, apparently derived from C4, seemed to be a cyto-directed factor that might block an early part of signal transduction system of monocytes in the chemotaxis. After removal of the small-size inhibitor, the synovial fluid exhibited chemotactic ability to monocytes. Therefore the apparent C4-derived factor might play a key role in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2024711

  16. In vitro modulation of canine polymorphonuclear leukocyte function by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    D'Alesandro, M M; Gruber, D F; O'Halloran, K P; MacVittie, T J

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) promotes the growth of granulocytes and macrophages from undifferentiated bone marrow cells and modulates the oxidative responses of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to endogenous chemoattractants. We found that, in vitro, naturally occurring glycolsylated human GMCSF does not disturb the resting canine PMN membrane potential, may attentuate PMN oxidative responses to PMA, and is, to a small degree, chemotaxigenic. GMCSF, however, inhibits PMN chemotaxis to zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP). Compared to temperature controls, GMCSF (1-100 U/ml) produced up to 1.5-fold increases in H2O2 production after 15 minutes, while phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treated cells increased H2O2 production 8-12-fold after 15 minutes. Preincubation of cells with GMCSF (1-100 U/ml) prior to PMA stimulation significantly reduced the H2O2 levels induced by PMA. H2O2 production was inhibited up to 15% after 15 minutes of GMCSF preincubation and up to 40% after 60 minutes of preincubation. As a chemotaxigenic agent, GMCSF (10-1000 U/ml) was able to elicit 49%-102% increases in quantitative cellular migration, compared to random migration. Total cellular chemotaxis to GMCSF was less than 30% of the response to ZAP. Preincubation of PMNs with GMCSF for 15 minutes significantly inhibited ZAP-induced cellular migration. Human GMCSF does not appear to activate canine PMN in vitro and may actually down-regulate PMN inflammatory responses.

  17. Calcium ionophore A23187 induces release of chemokinetic and aggregating factors from polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, M. A.; Ford-Hutchinson, A. W.; Shipley, M. E.; Smith, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    1. Rat and human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) when exposed to calcium ionophore A23187 10 microM release products which cause aggregation of rat PMNs and chemokinesis of human PMNs. 2. Aggregating and chemokinetic activities are rapidly generated; maximal release occurs after 4 min, and can be detected in dilutions of the supernatant of up to 1:1000. 3. Generation of aggregating and chemokinetic activities is inhibited by nordihydroguaiaretic acid 10(-4) to 10(0-7) M, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid 10(-4) and 10(-5) M, BW 755C 10(-4) M and benoxaprofen 10(-4) M, all compounds known to inhibit lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. 4. Conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin and indomethacin, inhibited little or not at all the generation of these activities. 5. We conclude that the aggregating and chemokinetic activities induced by A23187 represent generation of biologically active products of lipoxygenase pathways of AA metabolism. PMID:6781577

  18. Contribution of phosphoglucosamine mutase to the resistance of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 to polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ayako; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Shimazu, Kisaki; Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Uchikawa, Yoshimori; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-01

    Phosphoglucosamine mutase (GlmM; EC 5.4.2.10) catalyzes the interconversion of glucosamine-6-phosphate to glucosamine-1-phosphate, an essential step in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of the peptidoglycan precursor uridine 5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine. We have recently identified the gene (glmM) encoding the enzyme of Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer on the human tooth and an important cause of infective endocarditis, and indicated that the glmM mutation in S. gordonii appears to influence bacterial cell growth, morphology, and sensitivity to penicillins. In the present study, we assessed whether the glmM mutation also affects escape from polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-dependent killing. Although no differences in attachment to human PMNs were observed between the glmM mutant and the wild-type S. gordonii, the glmM mutation resulted in increased sensitivity to PMN-dependent killing. Compared with the wild type, the glmM mutant induced increased superoxide anion production and lysozyme release by PMNs. Moreover, the glmM mutant is more sensitive to lysozyme, indicating that the GlmM may be required for synthesis of firm peptidoglycans for resistance to bacterial cell lysis. These findings suggest that the GlmM contributes to the resistance of S. gordonii to PMN-dependent killing. Enzymes such as GlmM could be novel drug targets for this organism.

  19. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 ..mu..g/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function.

  20. Role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, I.Y.; Bowden, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    Silicosis is usually attributed to fibroblast stimulation by secretion of damaged alveolar macrophages (AMs), but the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and of continuing cell injury in the pathogenesis has not been fully studied. Mice given intratracheal injections of 2 mg of silica received 3H-thymidine 1 hour before death at intervals to 20 weeks. Cellular populations and lysosomal content of lavage fluids were correlated with morphology, DNA synthesis, and collagen content of the lung. The initial response involved rapid PMN and AM recruitment to the alveoli. Some free particles crossed Type 1 epithelial cells, and silica was found in interstitial macrophages. Focal Type 1 cell damage was rapidly repaired by Type 2 cell proliferation. Although PMN numbers dropped after a few days, they never reached control levels and rose again after 8 weeks; the number of AMs fell to control values from 2 to 8 weeks, then increased again. Glucosaminidase and glucuronidase levels in the lavage fluid were much higher than control levels throughout the study. Increased DNA synthesis by interstitial cells occurred from 2 days to 20 weeks; increased collagen synthesis was found from 4 weeks onward. The continuing inflammatory response of the lung to silica suggests may contribute to fibroblastic stimulation.

  1. EDU pretreatment decreases polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration into rat lung airways.

    PubMed

    Bassett, D J; Elbon, C L; Ishii, Y; Yang, H; Otterbein, L; Boswell, G A; Kerr, J S

    1994-07-01

    Pretreatment with the heterocyclic compound EDU (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolindinyl)ethyl]-N'-phenylurea) has previously been shown to reduce polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration into the airways of ozone-exposed rats. The present study further examined the effects of 1 and 2 days EDU pretreatment on rat lung inflammatory responses by determining PMN infiltration in response to intratracheal instillation with the chemoattractant formyl-norleucine-leucine-phenylalanine (fNLP). Maximal recovery of PMNs by bronchoalveolar lavage was observed 4 hr after fNLP instillation with no alteration in the numbers of recoverable macrophages and lymphocytes. Although 1-day pretreatment with EDU did not affect PMN recovery from fNLP-instilled rat lungs, 2 days of EDU pretreatment prevented PMN infiltration as indicated by PMN recoveries that were similar to those obtained from saline-instilled lungs. Measurements of lung-marginated and interstitial pools of inflammatory cells using collagenase tissue digestion demonstrated no effect of 2 days EDU pretreatment. Although 2 days EDU pretreatment alone did not alter blood PMN content, lung permeability, and the lavage recoveries of inflammatory cells, blood PMN responses to chemotactic stimuli in vitro were impaired. In addition, EDU was shown to directly inhibit PMN chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation in vitro. These data demonstrated that EDU acts by interfering with PMN activation and migration rather than by decreasing PMN availability. EDU, by modulating the inflammatory response, represents a useful compound for preventing PMN-associated amplification of acute lung injuries.

  2. Ethylene formation by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Role of myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene formation from the thioethers, beta-methylthiopropionaldehyde (methional) and 2-keto-4-thiomethylbutyric acid by phagocytosing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was found to be largely dependent on myeloperoxidase (MPO). Conversion was less than 10% of normal when MPO-deficient PMNs were employed; formation by normal PMNs was inhibited by the peroxidase inhibitors, azide, and cyanide, and a model system consisting of MPO, H2O2, chloride (or bromide) and EDTA was found which shared many of the properties of the predominant PMN system. MPO-independent mechanisms of ethylene formation were also identified. Ethylene formation from methional by phagocytosing eosinophils and by H2O2 in the presence or absence of catalase was stimulated by azide. The presence of MPO-independent, azide-stimulable systems in the PMN preparations was suggested by the azide stimulation of ethylene formation from methional when MPO-deficient leukocytes were employed. Ethylene formation by dye-sensitized photooxidation was also demonstrated and evidence obtained for the involvement of singlet oxygen (1O2). These findings are discussed in relation to the participation of H2O2, hydroxyl radicals, the superoxide anion and 1O2 in the formation of ethylene by PMNs and by the MPO model system. PMID:212502

  3. Adherence of neutrophils to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation by chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators and dependence upon the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family.

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, M G; Anderson, D C; Springer, T A; Knedler, A; Avdi, N; Henson, P M

    1989-01-01

    The process of neutrophil adhesion to and migration through the microvascular endothelium, an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractants. Although both chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators enhance neutrophil adherence in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism(s) involved in the interaction between circulating neutrophils and microvascular endothelial cells is still not completely understood. In a microtiter well adherence assay, the chemotactic peptides, FMLP and C5a, and the lipid mediators, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and platelet activating factor (PAF), enhanced human neutrophil adherence to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells as well as to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner with a rapid time course. This stimulated adhesive interaction between neutrophils and cultured human endothelial cells was dependent on the expression of the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family on the neutrophil surface since neutrophils from patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, lacking surface expression of the adhesive glycoproteins, exhibited markedly diminished adherence to human endothelial cells in response to stimulation with chemotactic factors compared to normal control neutrophils. All four mediators enhanced expression of the glycoprotein family on the surface of normal neutrophils as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the glycoprotein common beta subunit. In addition, TS1/18 inhibited up to 100% the adherence of normal neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by maximal concentrations of FMLP, C5a, LTB4, or PAF. Moreover, HL-60 cells, human promyelocytic leukemia cells, neither increased glycoprotein surface expression nor adherence in response to stimulation. Thus, peptide and lipid mediators of the acute inflammatory response appear to enhance adherence of circulating neutrophils to the

  4. Crohn disease–associated adherent-invasive E. coli bacteria target mouse and human Peyer’s patches via long polar fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Rolhion, Nathalie; de Vallée, Amélie; Salim, Sa’ad Y.; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Neut, Christel; Campbell, Barry J.; Söderholm, Johan D.; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease in which an abnormal immune response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract leads to chronic inflammation. The small intestine, particularly the ileum, of patients with CD is colonized by adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) — a pathogenic group of E. coli able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. As the earliest inflammatory lesions are microscopic erosions of the epithelium lining the Peyer’s patches (PPs), we investigated the ability of AIEC bacteria to interact with PPs and the virulence factors involved. We found that AIEC bacteria could interact with mouse and human PPs via long polar fimbriae (LPF). An LPF-negative AIEC mutant was highly impaired in its ability to interact with mouse and human PPs and to translocate across monolayers of M cells, specialized epithelial cells at the surface of PPs. The prevalence of AIEC strains harboring the lpf operon was markedly higher in CD patients compared with controls. In addition, increased numbers of AIEC, but not LPF-deficient AIEC, bacteria were found interacting with PPs from Nod2–/– mice compared with WT mice. In conclusion, we have identified LPF as a key factor for AIEC to target PPs. This could be the missing link between AIEC colonization and the presence of early lesions in the PPs of CD patients. PMID:21339647

  5. Mobile Text Messaging to Improve Medication Adherence and Viral Load in a Vulnerable Canadian Population Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Repeated Measures Study.

    PubMed

    King, Elizabeth; Kinvig, Karen; Steif, Jonathan; Qiu, Annie Q; Maan, Evelyn J; Albert, Arianne Yk; Pick, Neora; Alimenti, Ariane; Kestler, Mary H; Money, Deborah M; Lester, Richard T; Murray, Melanie Caroline Margaret

    2017-06-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) as treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is effective and available, but poor medication adherence limits benefits, particularly in vulnerable populations. In a Kenyan randomized controlled trial, a weekly text-messaging intervention (WelTel) improved cART adherence and HIV viral load (VL). Despite growing evidence for short message service (SMS) text-message interventions in HIV care, there is a paucity of data utilizing these interventions in marginalized or female cohorts. This study was undertaken to assess whether the standardized WelTel SMS text-message intervention applied to a vulnerable, predominantly female, population improved cART adherence and VL. We conducted a repeated measures study of the WelTel intervention in high-risk HIV-positive persons by measuring change in VL, CD4 count, and self-reported adherence 12 months before and 12 months after the WelTel intervention was introduced. Inclusion criteria included VL ≥200 copies/mL, indication for treatment, and meeting vulnerability criteria. Participants were given a mobile phone with unlimited texting (where required), and weekly check-in text messages were sent for one year from the WelTel computer platform. Clinical data were collected for control and intervention years. Participants were followed by a multidisciplinary team in a clinical setting. Outcomes were assessed using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests for change in CD4 and VL from control year to study end and mixed-effects logistic regressions for change in cART adherence and appointment attendance. A secondary analysis was conducted to assess the effect of response rate on the outcome by modeling final log10 VL by number of responses while controlling for mean log10 VL in the control year. Eighty-five participants enrolled in the study, but 5 withdrew (final N=80). Participants were predominantly female (90%, 72/80) with a variety of vulnerabilities. Mean VL decreased from 1098

  6. Spin-trapping detection of superoxides in polymorphonuclear leukocytes stimulated with serum-opsonized zymosan.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, M; Takahashi, T A; Nagahata, H; Inanami, O

    2000-05-01

    To clarify where oxygen radicals are generated in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during phagocytosis, superoxides (O2-) from opsonized symosan (OZ)--stimulated human PMNs were detected by the ESR and spin-trapping methods. PMNs were preactivated with OZ for the indicated periods of time at 37 degrees C. Then a spin-trapping agent, 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), was added to them, and they were further incubated for 30 sec for ESR observations. The ESR spectra consisted of two components due to the DMPO-OOH and DMPO-OH spin adducts. To clarify where these spin-adducts were present, cells were separated from extracellular fluid by brief centrifugation and resuspended in Hanks' balanced salt solution. ESR examination of two fractions showed that the DMPO-OOH adducts was present in the cell fraction, whereas the DMPO-OH adducts were present in the extracellular fluid. When DMSO was used as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (.OH), DMPO-CH3 adducts were observed in the fluid fraction but not in the cell fraction. Both spin adducts were completely abolished by Cu, Zn-SOD but not catalase. These results indicated that O2- were produced inside phagosomes of OZ-stimulated PMNs and .OH were produced outside them by spontaneous decomposition of the DMPO-OOH adducts.

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Mediated Inhibition of Apoptotic Signalling in Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Adrienne; Seifert, H. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae recruits and interacts extensively with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during infection. N. gonorrhoeae is able to survive the bactericidal activity of these innate immune cells and can actively modulate PMN functions in vitro. PMNs are short-lived cells which readily undergo apoptosis, and thus the effect of N. gonorrhoeae infection on PMN survival has implications for whether PMNs might serve as an important site of bacterial replication during infection. We developed and validated an HL-60 myeloid leukemia cell culture model for PMN infection and used both these cells and primary PMNs to show that N. gonorrhoeae infection alone does not induce apoptosis and furthermore that N. gonorrhoeae can inhibit both spontaneous apoptosis and apoptosis induced by the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis inducers staurosporine (STS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), respectively. N. gonorrhoeae infection also results in the activation of NF-κB signaling in neutrophils and induces secretion of an identical profile of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in both HL-60 cells and primary PMNs. Our data show that the HL-60 cell line can be used to effectively model N. gonorrhoeae-PMN interactions and that N. gonorrhoeae actively inhibits apoptosis induced by multiple stimuli to prolong PMN survival and potentially facilitate bacterial survival, replication, and transmission. PMID:21844239

  8. Intra- and extracellular events in luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Briheim, G; Stendahl, O; Dahlgren, C

    1984-01-01

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and soluble or particulate matter interact, the cells produce chemiluminescence. Luminol-dependent light emission from PMNL is linked to the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2 system. Light emission from a cell-free MPO-H2O2 system was found to be totally inhibited by human serum albumin (HSA), and since HSA is a large molecular protein that does not readily gain access to intracellular sites of PMNL, it could be used to determine the importance of extra- and intracellular events in PMNL chemiluminescence. In studies with cells from an MPO-deficient patient, we found that HSA inhibited more than 90% of extracellularly produced chemiluminescence. The chemotactic peptide formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine induced a two-peak chemiluminescence response in normal PMNL, and addition of HSA reduced the first peak, whereas the second peak was unaffected. This result indicated that the first peak was a result of extracellular reactions and the second peak was a result of intracellular reactions of the MPO-H2O2 system. Most of the phorbol myristate acetate-induced response in normal PMNL was due to intracellular events. Furthermore, chemiluminescence of intracellular origin seems to be limited not by generation of oxidative metabolites but by diffusion of luminol into the cells. PMID:6329953

  9. Analysis of autofluorescence in polymorphonuclear neutrophils: a new tool for early infection diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Monsel, Antoine; Lécart, Sandrine; Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cédric; Mirault, Tristan; Troude, Thibaut; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Asehnoune, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosing bacterial infection (BI) remains a challenge for the attending physician. An ex vivo infection model based on human fixed polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) gives an autofluorescence signal that differs significantly between stimulated and unstimulated cells. We took advantage of this property for use in an in vivo pneumonia mouse model and in patients hospitalized with bacterial pneumonia. A 2-fold decrease was observed in autofluorescence intensity for cytospined PMNs from broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) in the pneumonia mouse model and a 2.7-fold decrease was observed in patients with pneumonia when compared with control mice or patients without pneumonia, respectively. This optical method provided an autofluorescence mean intensity cut-off, allowing for easy diagnosis of BI. Originally set up on a confocal microscope, the assay was also effective using a standard epifluorescence microscope. Assessing the autofluorescence of PMNs provides a fast, simple, cheap and reliable method optimizing the efficiency and the time needed for early diagnosis of severe infections. Rationalized therapeutic decisions supported by the results from this method can improve the outcome of patients suspected of having an infection.

  10. [Role of polymorphonuclear neutrophil in exogenous hydrogen sulfide attenuating endotoxin-induced acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Ding, Chun-Hua; Xian, Xiao-Hui

    2009-08-25

    The animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) caused by intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and cultured human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) were used to study the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor, on LPS-induced PMN accumulation, microvascular permeability and PMN apoptosis. Control group, NaHS group, LPS group and LPS + NaHS group were established both in in vivo and in vitro studies. Microvascular permeability, PMN accumulation in lung and apoptosis of PMN were detected. The results showed that: (1) In in vivo study, PMN accumulation in lung, the protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the Evans blue dye in lung tissue of LPS group were markedly higher than those of both sham operation group and LPS + NaHS group (P<0.05, P<0.01); (2) In in vitro study, the apoptotic rates of PMN in LPS group and NaHS group were significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.01), while compared with LPS group, LPS + NaHS group showed significantly higher apoptotic rate (P<0.01). These results suggest that NaHS attenuates LPS-induced microvascular permeability and alleviates ALI. PMN apoptosis induced by NaHS is possibly one of the potential mechanisms underlying the decrease of PMN accumulation in lung tissue.

  11. A simple method for establishing adherent ex vivo explant cultures from human eye pathologies for use in subsequent calcium imaging and inflammatory studies.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Lumi, Xhevat; Veréb, Zoltán; Josifovska, Natasha; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko; Petrovski, Goran

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, and reproducible method for cultivating pathological tissues obtained from human eyes during surgery was developed using viscoelastic material as a tissue adherent to facilitate cell attachment and expansion and calcium imaging of cultured cells challenged by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation as well as inflammatory studies. Anterior lens capsule-lens epithelial cells (aLC-LECs) from cataract surgery and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from human eyes were used in the study. We hereby show calcium signaling in aLC-LECs by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and indicate presence of ACh receptors in these cells. Furthermore, an ex vivo study model was established for measuring the inflammatory response in fvERMs and aLC-LECs upon TNFα treatment.

  12. A Simple Method for Establishing Adherent Ex Vivo Explant Cultures from Human Eye Pathologies for Use in Subsequent Calcium Imaging and Inflammatory Studies

    PubMed Central

    Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, and reproducible method for cultivating pathological tissues obtained from human eyes during surgery was developed using viscoelastic material as a tissue adherent to facilitate cell attachment and expansion and calcium imaging of cultured cells challenged by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation as well as inflammatory studies. Anterior lens capsule-lens epithelial cells (aLC-LECs) from cataract surgery and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from human eyes were used in the study. We hereby show calcium signaling in aLC-LECs by mechanical and acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and indicate presence of ACh receptors in these cells. Furthermore, an ex vivo study model was established for measuring the inflammatory response in fvERMs and aLC-LECs upon TNFα treatment. PMID:25276840

  13. Growth hormone activation of human monocytes for superoxide production but not tumor necrosis factor production, cell adherence, or action against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Warwick-Davies, J; Lowrie, D B; Cole, P J

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) is a human macrophage-activating factor which primes monocytes for enhanced production of H2O2 in vitro. This report extends our observations to other monocyte functions relevant to infection. We find that GH also primes monocytes for O2- production, to a degree similar to the effect of gamma interferon. Neither macrophage-activating factor alone stimulates monocytes to release bioactive tumor necrosis factor. However, GH, unlike gamma interferon, does not synergize with endotoxin for enhanced tumor necrosis factor production. In further contrast, GH does not alter monocyte adherence or morphology, while phagocytosis and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by GH-treated monocytes are also unaffected. Therefore, despite the multiplicity of the effects of GH on the immune system in vivo, its effects on human monocytes in vitro appear to be limited to priming for the release of reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:7591064

  14. Direct binding of respiratory syncytial virus to pneumococci: a phenomenon that enhances both pneumococcal adherence to human epithelial cells and pneumococcal invasiveness in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Hament, Jeanne-Marie; Aerts, Piet C; Fleer, Andre; van Dijk, Hans; Harmsen, Theo; Kimpen, Jan L L; Wolfs, Tom F W

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that pneumococcal adherence to epithelial cells was enhanced by a preceding respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. RSV-glycoproteins, expressed on the infected cell surface, may play a role in this enhanced pneumococcal binding, by acting as bacterial receptors. In the current study, it was attempted to analyze the capacity of pneumococci to interact directly with RSV virions. By flow-cytometry, a direct interaction between RSV and pneumococci could be detected. Heparin, an inhibitor of RSV infectivity that interacts with RSV protein-G, blocked RSV-pneumococcal binding, indicating that the latter interaction is indeed mediated by protein-G. RSV-pneumococcal complexes showed enhanced adherence to uninfected human epithelial cells, compared with pneumococcal adherence without bound RSV, and this enhancement was also blocked by heparin. In addition, the significance of these findings in vitro was explored in vivo in a murine model. Both mice that were pretreated with RSV at day 4 before pneumococcal challenge and mice infected with both agents simultaneously showed significantly higher levels of bacteraemia than controls. Simultaneous infection with both agents enhanced the development of pneumococcal bacteraemia most strongly. It was hypothesized that direct viral binding is another mechanism by which RSV can induce enhanced pneumococcal binding to epithelial cells, a phenomenon that is translated in vivo by a higher invasiveness of pneumococci when administered simultaneously with RSV to mice. Apparently, RSV acts in this process as a direct coupling particle between bacteria and uninfected epithelial cells, thereby increasing colonization by and enhancing invasiveness of pneumococci.

  15. Surface-layer (S-layer) of human and animal Clostridium difficile strains and their behaviour in adherence to epithelial cells and intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barketi-Klai, Amira; Collignon, Anne; Mastrantonio, Paola; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Rupnik, Maja; Janezic, Sandra; Kansau, Imad

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is a frequent cause of severe, recurrent post-antibiotic diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. The surface layer (S-layer) is the predominant outer surface component of C. difficile which is involved in pathogen-host interactions critical to pathogenesis. In this study, we characterized the S-layer protein A (SlpA) of animal and human strains belonging to different PCR-ribotypes (PR) and compared the in vitro adherence and in vivo colonization properties of strains showing different SlpA variants. Since each SlpA variant has been recently associated with an S-layer cassette, we were able to deduce the cassette for each of our strains. In this study, an identity of 99-100 % was found among the SlpA of isolates belonging to PR 012, 014/020, 045 and 078. One exception was the SlpA of a poultry isolate, PR 014/020, which showed 99 % identity with that of strain 0160, another PR 014/020 which contains an S-layer cassette 6. Interestingly, this cassette has also been found in a PR 018 strain, an emerging virulent type currently predominant in Italy. Five other SlpA variants (v014/020a-e) were identified in strains PR 014/020. In vitro adherence assays and in vivo colonization experiments were performed on five PR 014/020 strains: human 1064 (v014/020e), human 4684/08 (v014/020b), human IT1106 (v078a), poultry P30 (v014/020d) and poultry PB90 (v014/020b) strains. Adhesion assays indicate that C. difficile strains vary in their capacity to adhere to cells in culture and that adhesion seems to be independent of the SlpA variant. Colonization properties were assessed in vivo using a dixenic mouse model of colonization. The kinetics of faecal shedding and caecal colonization were similar when human 4684/08 (v014/020b) strain was compared with human 1064 (v014/020e) and poultry PB90 (v014/020b) strain. In contrast, poultry P30 (v014/020d) strain outcompeted both human 4684/08 (v014/020b) and IT1106 (v078a) strains and its adherence to caeca at day 7 was

  16. Short-term garlic supplementation and highly active antiretroviral treatment adherence, CD4+ cell counts, and human immunodeficiency virus viral load.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Cuiwei; Robison, Esther; Levine, Alexandra M; Gandhi, Monica; Schwartz, Rebecca; Weber, Kathleen M; Merenstein, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic's association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically. To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women. The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the studies visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit. Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS. The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research teams selection criteria and contributed 99 pairs of visits for the study. Among the women who used garlic

  17. Short-term Garlic Supplementation and Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence, CD4+ Cell Counts, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Cuiwei; Robison, Esther; Levine, Alexandra M.; Gandhi, Monica; Schwartz, Rebecca; Weber, Kathleen M.; Merenstein, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Context Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic’s association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically. Objective To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women. Design The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the study’s visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit. Participants Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS. Outcome Measures The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. Results From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research team’s selection criteria and contributed 99

  18. Characterization of Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Its Association with Virulence Genes Related to Adherence, Invasion, and Cytotoxicity in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Isolates from Animals, Meat, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Lisette; Gatica, María A; Riquelme, Víctor; Vergara, Constanza; Yañez, José Manuel; San Martín, Betty; Sáenz, Leonardo; Vidal, Maricel; Martínez, María Cristina; Araya, Pamela; Flores, Roberto; Duery, Oscar; Vidal, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to statistically analyze the association between antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance to erythromycine, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline and 11 virulence genes associated with adherence, invasion, and cytotoxicity in 528 isolates of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni obtained from retail meat and fecal samples from food-producing animals and human patients. A high percentage of Campylobacter strains were resistant to antimicrobials, specifically ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. Moreover, we observed a wide distribution of virulence genes within the analyzed strains. C. jejuni strains were more susceptible to antimicrobials, and showed greater number of virulence genes than C. coli strains. Genes related to invasion capability, such as racR, ciaB, and pldA, were associated with antimicrobial-susceptible strains in both species. The genes cdtA and dnaJ, a citotoxin unit and an adherence-related gene, respectively, were associated with antimicrobial-resistant strains in both species. In conclusion, Campylobacter strains show a statistically significant association between antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of virulence genes.

  19. Harvesting the noncirculating pool of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in rats by hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET): yield and functional assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.H. Jr.; Moser, K.M.; Ulich, T.; Cairo, M.S.

    1987-11-01

    Isolation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) provides an opportunity to study PMN activity in vitro and to label PMN for study of in vivo kinetics. However, simple phlebotomy (SP) of a small animal frequently yields too few PMN for in vitro handling, while PMN harvested from an induced-peritonitis may not accurately reflect PMN in a less stimulated state. We report a novel method of harvesting PMN from the circulation of rats, using hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET), which is both time and animal sparing. HET harvested 8-fold more PMN than SP. In vitro cell function was examined with assays of adherence, chemotaxis, bacterial killing, and superoxide generation. No significant (p less than 0.05) difference was found between PMN obtained by HET and pooled-PMN obtained by SP. In vivo function was examined following labeling with indium 111-oxine. The kinetics pattern described suggested normal migratory activity when compared to previous reports. The data demonstrate that rats possess a relatively large, noncirculating pool of PMN which is readily accessible by HET.

  20. Ability of abnormally-shaped human spermatozoa to adhere to and penetrate zona-free hamster eggs: correlation with sperm morphology and postincubation motility.

    PubMed

    Bronson, Richard A; Bronson, Susan K; Oula, Lucila D

    2007-01-01

    A body of evidence indicates that morphologically abnormal human spermatozoa may exhibit impaired ability to fertilize. Yet teratospermia has widely varying etiologies, including associations with varicoceles, following fever, cigarette smoking, and exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Abnormalities of sperm shape in mice have also been shown to be associated with autosomal gene mutations. These varying causes of teratospermia could have different molecular consequences reflected in altered sperm function. We studied the ability of morphologically abnormal human sperm to penetrate zona-free hamster eggs as a measure of their ability to undergo an acrosome reaction and gamete membrane fusion. Motile sperm from ejaculates containing 15% normal sperm or less, as judged by World Health Organization (1999) criteria, were recovered by ISolate density centrifugation and capacitated by overnight incubation. Zona-free hamster eggs were inseminated with 1 x 10(6) motile capacitated cells and scored for sperm penetration after 3 hours of coincubation. A significant trend was found between the percent of abnormal spermatozoa within the ejaculate and impaired egg-penetrating ability, reflected in the percent of eggs penetrated, the number of penetrating sperm per egg, and the number of sperm adherent to the oolemma. Because only acrosome-reacted human spermatozoa adhere to the oolemma, these results support the notion that abnormally shaped sperm may exhibit an impaired ability to undergo an acrosome reaction. A correlation was also noted between the loss of motility of sperm following overnight incubation and impairment of their ability to undergo gamete membrane fusion. These results confirm prior findings at the level of the zona pellucida that abnormally shaped sperm exhibit functional abnormalities. However, a wide variation was observed between men in the behavior of such sperm, including occasionally high rates of egg penetration. These observations suggest that

  1. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion triggers the disorganization of endothelial cell-to-cell adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration into tissues is frequently accompanied by increase in vascular permeability. This suggests that PMN adhesion and transmigration could trigger modifications in the architecture of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions. In the present paper, using indirect immunofluorescence, we found that PMN adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-activated endothelial cells (EC) induced the disappearance from endothelial cell-to-cell contacts of adherens junction (AJ) components: vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and plakoglobin. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of the VE- cadherin/catenin complex showed that the amount of beta-catenin and plakoglobin was markedly reduced from the complex and from total cell extracts. In contrast, VE-cadherin and alpha-catenin were only partially affected. Disorganization of endothelial AJ by PMN was not accompanied by EC retraction or injury and was specific for VE- cadherin/catenin complex, since platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) distribution at cellular contacts was unchanged. PMN adhesion to EC seems to be a prerequisite for VE-cadherin/catenin complex disorganization. This phenomenon could be fully inhibited by blocking PMN adhesion with an anti-integrin beta 2 mAb, while it could be reproduced by any condition that induced increase of PMN adhesion, such as addition of PMA or an anti-beta 2-activating mAb. The effect on endothelial AJ was specific for PMN since adherent activated lymphocytes did not induce similar changes. High concentrations of protease inhibitors and oxygen metabolite scavengers were unable to prevent AJ disorganization mediated by PMN. PMN adhesion to EC was accompanied by increase in EC permeability in vitro. This effect was dependent on PMN adhesion, was not mediated by proteases and oxygen- reactive metabolites, and could be reproduced by EC treatment with EGTA. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis showed that VE

  2. Single-colour flow cytometric assay to determine NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and viability against non-adherent human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ajit; Zaman, Abeyat; Hummel, Jeff; Jones, Kim; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2012-03-01

    A flow cytometry-based cytotoxicity (FCC) assay was developed using a single fluorophore, calcein-acetoxymethyl diacetylester (calcein-AM), to measure NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Non-adherent human K562 and U937 target cells were individually labelled with calcein-AM and co-incubated with effector NK cells to measure calcein loss, and therefore calculate target cell cytotoxicity. This FCC assay also provided a measure of sample viability. Notably, cell viability measured by traditional calcein/7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) double labelling and Trypan Blue methods were comparable to the viability calculated using calcein-loss FCC. This FCC assay may also be used with various effector and target cell types and as a multi-parameter tool to measure viability and immunophenotype cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  3. Characterization of SP41, a surface protein of Brucella associated with adherence and invasion of host epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Roldán, Elsa I; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Saldaña, Zeus; Avelino, Fabiola; Rendón, María A; Dornand, Jacques; Girón, Jorge A

    2006-12-01

    Brucella is an invasive organism that multiplies and survives within eukaryotic cells. The brucellae are able to adhere to the surface of cultured epithelial cells, a mechanism that may facilitate penetration and dissemination to other host tissues. However, no adhesins that allow the bacteria to interact with the surface of epithelial cells before migration within polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes and macrophages have been described. Here, we show that Brucella surface proteins (SPs) with apparent molecular masses of 14, 18 and 41 kDa bound selectively to HeLa cells. However, only antibodies directed against the 41 kDa surface protein (SP41) inhibited in dose-response manner, bacterial adherence and invasion of HeLa cells. HeLa cells treated with neuraminidase did not bind SP41, suggesting the involvement of cellular sialic acid residues in this interaction. Biochemical analysis of SP41 revealed that this protein is the predicted product of the ugpB locus, which showed significant homology to the glycerol-3-phosphate-binding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein found in several bacterial species. SP41 appears to be exposed on the bacterial surface as determined by immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling with anti-SP41 antibody. An isogenic DeltaugpB mutant showed a significant inhibitory effect on Brucella adherence and invasion of human cultured epithelial cells and this effect could be reversed by restoration of the ugpB on a plasmid. Lastly, we also show that most of the sera from individuals with acute brucellosis, but not sera obtained from healthy donors or patients with chronic brucellosis, mount antibody reactivity against SP41, suggesting that this protein is produced in vivo and that it elicits an antibody immune response. These data are novel findings that offer new insights into understanding the interplay between this bacterium and host target cells, and identify a new target for vaccine development and prevention of brucellosis.

  4. A monoclonal antibody to beta 1 integrin (CD29) stimulates VLA- dependent adherence of leukocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and matrix components

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The leukocyte beta 1 integrin receptor very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4) (alpha 4 beta 1, CD49d/CD29) binds to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressed on cytokine-activated endothelium. A mAb designated 8A2 was identified that stimulated the binding of U937 cells to CHO cells transfected with VCAM-1 cDNA but not endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule or CD4 cDNA. mAb 8A2 also rapidly stimulated the adherence of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) to VCAM-1-transfected CHO cells or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. mAb 8A2-stimulated binding of PBL was inhibited by mAbs to VLA-4 or VCAM-1. Surface expression of VLA-4 was not altered by mAb 8A2 treatment and monovalent Fab fragments of mAb 8A2 were active. Immunoprecipitation studies reveal that mAb 8A2 recognizes beta 1-subunit (CD29) of integrin receptors. In contrast to mAbs directed to VLA-4 alpha-subunit (alpha 4, CD49d), mAb 8A2 did not induce homotypic aggregation of PBL. Additionally, mAb 8A2 stimulated adherence of PBL and hematopoietic cell lines to purified matrix components laminin and fibronectin. This binding was blocked by mAbs to the VLA alpha-subunits alpha 6 (CD49f), or alpha 5 (CD49e) and alpha 4 (CD49d), respectively. We conclude that mAb 8A2 modulates the affinity of VLA-4 and other leukocyte beta 1 integrins, and should prove useful in studying the regulation of beta 1 integrin function. PMID:1370496

  5. First-in-Human Trial of MIV-150 and Zinc Acetate Coformulated in a Carrageenan Gel: Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Acceptability, Adherence, and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hoesley, Craig J.; Plagianos, Marlena; Hoskin, Elena; Zhang, Shimin; Teleshova, Natalia; Alami, Mohcine; Novak, Lea; Kleinbeck, Kyle R.; Katzen, Lauren L.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Creasy, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of MIV-150 and zinc acetate in a carrageenan gel (PC-1005). Acceptability, adherence, and pharmacodynamics were also explored. Design: A 3-day open-label safety run-in (n = 5) preceded a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in healthy, HIV-negative, abstinent women randomized (4:1) to vaginally apply 4 mL of PC-1005 or placebo once daily for 14 days. Methods: Assessments included physical examinations, safety labs, colposcopy, biopsies, cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs), and behavioral questionnaires. MIV-150 (plasma, CVL, tissue), zinc (plasma, CVL), and carrageenan (CVL) concentrations were determined with LC-MS/MS, ICP-MS, and ELISA, respectively. CVL antiviral activity was measured using cell-based assays. Safety, acceptability, and adherence were analyzed descriptively. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental techniques and actual sampling times. CVL antiviral EC50 values were calculated using a dose–response inhibition analysis. Results: Participants (n = 20) ranged from 19–44 years old; 52% were black or African American. Among those completing the trial (13/17, PC-1005; 3/3, placebo), 11/17 reported liking the gel overall; 7 recommended reducing the volume. Adverse events, which were primarily mild and/or unrelated, were comparable between groups. Low systemic MIV-150 levels were observed, without accumulation. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged from baseline. Seven of seven CVLs collected 4-hour postdose demonstrated antiviral (HIV, human papillomavirus) activity. High baseline CVL anti–herpes-simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) activity precluded assessment of postdose activity. Conclusions: PC-1005 used vaginally for 14 days was well tolerated. Low systemic levels of MIV-150 were observed. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged. Postdose CVLs had anti-HIV and anti–human papillomavirus activity. These data warrant further development of PC-1005 for HIV and sexually transmitted

  6. The effect of an NADH oxidase inhibitor (hydrocortisone) on polymorphonuclear leukocyte bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Gerald L.; Rubin, Walter; Hook, Edward W.

    1970-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from patients with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood have impaired bactericidal activity and are deficient in diphosphopyridine nucleotide, reduced form of, (NADH) oxidase. Since hydrocortisone had been shown to inhibit NADH oxidation, experiments were undertaken to determine the effect of hydrocortisone on several parameters of human PMN function. The phagocytic and bactericidal capacity of PMN with or without hydrocortisone (2.1 mM) was determined by quantitation of cell-free, cell-associated, and total bacteria. Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and several gram-negative rods was unimpaired by the presence of hydrocortisone in the media. In contrast, killing of bacteria was markedly impaired by hydrocortisone. After 30 min of incubation, there were 20-400 times as many bacteria surviving in hydrocortisone-treated PMN as in simultaneously run controls without hydrocortisone. The defect of intracellular killing noted in the presence of hydrocortisone was not related to impaired degranulation. Quantitative kinetic studies of degranulation revealed no difference in the release of granule associated acid phosphatase in hydrocortisone-treated and control PMN after phagocytosis. Electron microscopy of PMN also indicated that the presence of hydrocortisone had no effect on the extent of degranulation after phagocytosis. These observations were confirmed by studies using histochemical techniques to detect lysosomal enzymes. After phagocytosis, hydrocortisone-treated PMN demonstrated less NADH oxidase activity, oxygen consumption, and hydrogen peroxide production than postphagocytic control PMN. In addition, Nitro blue tetrazolium dye reduction was diminished in hydrocortisone-treated PMN. Thus, impairment of NADH oxidase activity in normal human PMN by hydrocortisone results in reduced intracellular killing of bacteria, diminished postphagocytic oxygen consumption, decreased ability to reduce Nitro blue tetrazolium, and

  7. Respiratory burst facilitates the digestion of Escherichia coli killed by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J; Kao, L; Victor, M; Elsbach, P

    1987-01-01

    We examined factors that may limit degradation of bacterial protein of Escherichia coli S15 killed by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Both human and rabbit PMN degraded up to 40% of [14C]amino acid-labeled protein of ingested and killed E. coli in 2 h as determined by loss of acid-precipitable radioactivity. In contrast, equally bactericidal broken-PMN preparations or isolated granules degraded only about 10% of bacterial protein regardless of pH. To determine whether activation of the respiratory burst contributes to digestion, we compared degradation by intact PMN in room air and under N2. Depletion of O2 by N2 flushing had no effect on the bactericidal activity of either human or rabbit PMN but reduced degradation by approximately 50%. Protein degradation during phagocytosis was also reduced in the presence of cyanide or azide, inhibitors of myeloperoxidase (MPO). PMN of two patients with chronic granulomatous disease ingested and killed E. coli S15 as well as did normal PMN but degraded bacterial protein as did normal PMN incubated under N2. The low degradative activity of PMN disrupted by sonication could be raised to nearly the level of intact PMN incubated in room air by preincubation of the PMN with 10(-7) M formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) before sonication and by pretreatment of E. coli with MPO. Depletion of O2 or chloride during these preincubations with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine respectively, virtually abolished and markedly diminished stimulation of bacterial protein degradation. We conclude that enhanced MPO-mediated O2 metabolism of intact PMN plays a role in the digestion of killed E. coli. PMID:3305366

  8. Cellular Pharmacokinetics of the Novel Biaryloxazolidinone Radezolid in Phagocytic Cells: Studies with Macrophages and Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils▿

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Radezolid (RX-1741) is the first biaryloxazolidinone in clinical development. It shows improved activity, including against linezolid-resistant strains. Radezolid differs from linezolid by the presence of a biaryl spacer and of a heteroaryl side chain, which increases the ionization and hydrophilicity of the molecule at physiological pH and confers to it a dibasic character. The aim of this study was to determine the accumulation and subcellular distribution of radezolid in phagocytic cells and to decipher the underlying mechanisms. In THP-1 human macrophages, J774 mouse macrophages, and human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, radezolid accumulated rapidly and reversibly (half-lives of approximately 6 min and 9 min for uptake and efflux, respectively) to reach, at equilibrium, a cellular concentration 11-fold higher than the extracellular one. This process was concentration and energy independent but pH dependent (accumulation was reduced to 20 to 30% of control values for cells in medium at a pH of <6 or in the presence of monensin, which collapses pH gradients between the extracellular and intracellular compartments). The accumulation at equilibrium was not affected by efflux pump inhibitors (verapamil and gemfibrozil) and was markedly reduced at 4°C but was further increased in medium with low serum content. Subcellular fractionation studies demonstrated a dual subcellular distribution for radezolid, with ∼60% of the drug colocalizing to the cytosol and ∼40% to the lysosomes, with no specific association with mitochondria. These observations are compatible with a mechanism of transmembrane diffusion of the free fraction and partial segregation of radezolid in lysosomes by proton trapping, as previously described for macrolides. PMID:20385873

  9. Killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of an O2-independent bactericidal system.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Victor, M; Stendhal, O; Elsbach, P

    1982-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a cationic bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) present in both rabbit and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes is the principal O2-independent bactericidal agent of these cells toward several strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium (1978. J. Biol. Chem. 253: 2664--2672; 1979. J. Biol. Chem. 254: 11000--11009). To further evaluate the possible role of this protein in the killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the bactericidal activity of intact rabbit peritoneal exudate leukocytes under aerobic or anaerobic conditions and of intact human leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. Anaerobic conditions were created by flushing the cells under a nitrogen stream. Effective removal of oxygen was demonstrated by the inability of nitrogen-flushed leukocytes to mount a respiratory burst (measured as increased conversion of 1-[14C]glucose leads to 14CO2 or by superoxide production) during bacterial ingestion. At a bacteria/leukocyte ratio of 10:1, killing of gram-positive, BPI-resistant, Staphylococcus epidermidis is markedly impaired in the absence of oxygen (76.4 +/- 3.3% killing in room air, 29.2 +/- 8.2% killing in nitrogen). Essentially all increased bacterial survival is intracellular. In contrast, both a nonopsonized rough strain (MR-10) and an opsonized smooth strain (MS) of S. typhimurium 395 are killed equally well in room air and nitrogen. A maximum of 70--80 MR-10 and 30--40 MS are killed per leukocyte either in the presence or absence of oxygen. There is no intracellular bacterial survival in either condition indicating that intracellular O2-independent bactericidal system(s) of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes can at least match the leukocyte's ingestive capacity. Whole homogenates and crude acid extracts manifest similar bactericidal capacity toward S. typhimurium 395. This activity can be accounted for by the BPI content of these

  10. Killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of an O2-independent bactericidal system.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J; Victor, M; Stendhal, O; Elsbach, P

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a cationic bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) present in both rabbit and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes is the principal O2-independent bactericidal agent of these cells toward several strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium (1978. J. Biol. Chem. 253: 2664--2672; 1979. J. Biol. Chem. 254: 11000--11009). To further evaluate the possible role of this protein in the killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the bactericidal activity of intact rabbit peritoneal exudate leukocytes under aerobic or anaerobic conditions and of intact human leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. Anaerobic conditions were created by flushing the cells under a nitrogen stream. Effective removal of oxygen was demonstrated by the inability of nitrogen-flushed leukocytes to mount a respiratory burst (measured as increased conversion of 1-[14C]glucose leads to 14CO2 or by superoxide production) during bacterial ingestion. At a bacteria/leukocyte ratio of 10:1, killing of gram-positive, BPI-resistant, Staphylococcus epidermidis is markedly impaired in the absence of oxygen (76.4 +/- 3.3% killing in room air, 29.2 +/- 8.2% killing in nitrogen). Essentially all increased bacterial survival is intracellular. In contrast, both a nonopsonized rough strain (MR-10) and an opsonized smooth strain (MS) of S. typhimurium 395 are killed equally well in room air and nitrogen. A maximum of 70--80 MR-10 and 30--40 MS are killed per leukocyte either in the presence or absence of oxygen. There is no intracellular bacterial survival in either condition indicating that intracellular O2-independent bactericidal system(s) of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes can at least match the leukocyte's ingestive capacity. Whole homogenates and crude acid extracts manifest similar bactericidal capacity toward S. typhimurium 395. This activity can be accounted for by the BPI content of these

  11. Effects of neutrophil adherence on the characteristics of receptors for tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Chamba, A; Stockley, R A; Burnett, D

    1991-05-06

    Human recombinant [125I]TNF-alpha was incubated with non-adherent human neutrophils, cells adherent to fibronectin-coated plastic, or adherent cells scraped into suspension (post-adherent). Binding of TNF to all cells increased with doses of added TNF but adherent cells bound little TNF. Binding of TNF by post-adherent cells was greater than when adherent, but still significantly less than that of non-adhered neutrophils, suggesting that TNF receptors were relocated on the adherent surface of neutrophils. Scatchard analysis showed that adherent cells expressed significantly fewer TNF receptors, but of higher affinity, than non-adherent cells. The results suggest that altered expression of TNF receptors might contribute to the differential effects of TNF on adherent and non-adherent neutrophils.

  12. Human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins that use human CD55 (decay-accelerating factor) as a receptor does not bind the rodent and pig analogues of CD55.

    PubMed

    Hudault, Sylvie; Spiller, O Brad; Morgan, B Paul; Servin, Alain L

    2004-08-01

    Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) bacteria that are responsible for recurrent urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections recognized as a receptor the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55) at the brush border of cultured human intestinal cells. Results show that Afa/Dr DAEC C1845 bacteria were poorly associated with the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract of infected mice. We conducted experiments with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with mouse (GPI or transmembrane forms), pig, or human CD55 or mouse Crry cDNAs or transfected with empty vector pDR2EF1 alpha. Recombinant E. coli AAEC185 bacteria expressing Dr or F1845 adhesins bound strongly to CHO cells expressing human CD55 but not to the CHO cells expressing mouse (transmembrane and GPI anchored), rat, or pig CD55 or mouse Crry. Positive clustering of CD55 around Dr-positive bacteria was observed in human CD55-expressing CHO cells but not around the rarely adhering Dr-positive bacteria randomly distributed at the cell surface of CHO cells expressing mouse, rat, or pig CD55.

  13. Effects of leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on degranulation and superoxide production of polymorphonuclear neutrophils from Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Soliman, Mohamed; Yamaji, Daisuke; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Makondo, Kennedy; Inanami, Osamu; Saito, Masayuki

    2007-02-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone regulating food intake and energy expenditure, has been shown to directly modulate human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) functions or indirectly through the action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Bovine PMN have considerable different characteristics from human PMN. For example, it does not respond to N-formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-phenylalanine, a well known human PMN activator. In the present study, we tested the effects of leptin and TNF-alpha on superoxide production and degranulation of bovine peripheral PMN, in which both long isoform of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and TNF receptor 1 were expressed. Human leptin, human TNF-alpha, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan particles (OZP) did not stimulate degranulation responses, while zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) did. Neither leptin nor TNF-alpha enhanced the ZAS-induced degranulation responses. TNF-alpha, PMA, OZP and ZAS increased superoxide production in different magnitudes, whereas leptin did not. TNF-alpha, but not leptin, enhanced OZP- and ZAS-induced superoxide production, possibly, in part due to facilitating translocation of p47(phox), a component of NADPH oxidase. These results indicate that, unlike in human PMN, leptin does not have any direct effect on degranulation and superoxide production in bovine PMN, although TNF-alpha influences superoxide production.

  14. Identification of a Surface Protein from Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081 That Adheres to Porcine Gastric Mucin and Human Enterocyte-Like HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Yuan, Jing; Li, Qiurong; Li, Yousheng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion of lactobacilli to the host gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered an important factor in health-promoting effects. However, studies addressing the molecular mechanisms of the adhesion of lactobacilli to the host GI tract have not yet been performed. The aim of this work was to identify Lactobacillus reuteri surface molecules mediating adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucins. Nine strains of lactobacilli were tested for their ability to adhere to human enterocyte-like HT-29 cells. The cell surface proteins involved in the adhesion of Lactobacillus to HT-29 cells and gastric mucin were extracted. The active fractions were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting with horseradish peroxidase-labeled mucin and NHS-Biotin-labeled HT-29 cells. Furthermore, tandem mass spectrometry analysis was performed to identify the surface protein that participates in adhesion. It was shown that the ability of lactobacilli to adhere to HT-29 cells in vitro varied considerably among different strains. The most adhesive strain was the chicken intestinal tract isolate Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081 (495.07 ± 80.03 bacterial cells/100 HT-29 cells). The adhesion of L. reuteri JCM1081 to HT-29 cells appeared to be mediated by a cell surface protein, with an approximate molecular mass of 29 kDa. The peptides generated from the 29-kDa protein significantly matched the Lr0793 protein sequence of L. reuteri strain ATCC55730 (∼71.1% identity) and displayed significant sequence similarity to the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter protein CnBP. PMID:18379843

  15. Are primed polymorphonuclear leukocytes contributors to the high heparanase levels in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Cohen-Mazor, Meital; Sela, Shifra; Mazor, Rafi; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Rops, Angelique L; van der Vlag, Johan; Cohen, Hector I; Kristal, Batya

    2008-02-01

    Patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) are at high risk for developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. Heparanase, an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate (HS) side chains of proteoglycans, is involved in extracellular matrix degradation and, as such, may be involved in the atherosclerotic lesion progression. We hypothesize that heparanase is elevated in HD patients, partly due to its release from primed circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), undergoing degranulation. Priming of PMNLs was assessed by levels of CD11b and the rate of superoxide release. Heparanase mRNA expression in PMNLs was determined by RT-PCR. PMNL and plasma levels of heparanase were determined by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry analyses. The levels of soluble HS in plasma were measured by a competition ELISA. This study shows that PMNLs isolated from HD patients have higher mRNA and protein levels of heparanase compared with normal control (NC) subjects and that heparanase levels correlate positively with PMNL priming. Plasma levels of heparanase were higher in HD patients than in NC subjects and were further elevated after the dialysis session. In addition, heparanase expression inversely correlates with plasma HS levels. A pronounced expression of heparanase was found in human atherosclerotic lesions. The increased heparanase activity in the blood of HD patients results at least in part from the degranulation of primed PMNLs and may contribute to the acceleration of the atherosclerotic process. Our findings highlight primed PMNLs as a possible source for the increased heparanase in HD patients, posing heparanase as a new risk factor for cardiovascular complications and atherosclerosis.

  16. Cerebral endothelial expression of Robo1 affects brain infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils during mouse stroke recovery.

    PubMed

    Gangaraju, Sandhya; Sultan, Khadeejah; Whitehead, Shawn N; Nilchi, Ladan; Slinn, Jacqueline; Li, Xuesheng; Hou, Sheng T

    2013-06-01

    Increased brain infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) occurs early after stroke and is important in eliciting brain inflammatory response during stroke recovery. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of PMN entry, we investigated the expression and requirement for Slit1, a chemorepulsive guidance cue, and its cognate receptor, Robo1, in a long-term recovery mouse model of cerebral ischemia. The expression levels of Robo1 were significantly decreased bilaterally at 24h following reperfusion. Robo1 expression levels remained suppressed in the ipsilateral cortex until 28d post MCAO-reperfusion, while the levels of Robo1 in the contralateral cortex recovered to the level of sham-operated mouse by 7d reperfusion. Circulating PMNs express high levels of Slit1, but not Robo1. Influx of PMNs into the ischemic core area occurred early (24h) after cerebral ischemia, when endothelial Robo1 expression was significantly reduced in the ischemic brain, indicating that Robo1 may form a repulsive barrier to PMN entry into the brain parenchyma. Indeed, blocking Slit1 on PMNs in a transwell migration assay in combination with an antibody blocking of Robo1 on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) significantly increased PMN transmigration during oxygen glucose deprivation, an in vitro model of ischemia. Collectively, in the normal brain, the presence of Slit1 on PMNs, and Robo1 on cerebral endothelial cells, generated a repulsive force to prevent the infiltration of PMNs into the brain. During stroke recovery, a transient reduction in Robo1 expression on the cerebral endothelial cells allowed the uncontrolled infiltration of Slit1-expressing PMNs into the brain causing inflammatory reactions.

  17. Contributions of NanI sialidase to Caco-2 cell adherence by Clostridium perfringens type A and C strains causing human intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Contributions of NanI Sialidase to Caco-2 Cell Adherence by Clostridium perfringens Type A and C Strains Causing Human Intestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  19. A direct assessment of human prion adhered to steel wire using real-time quaking-induced conversion

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tsuyoshi; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Furukawa, Kana; Takatsuki, Hanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ishibashi, Daisuke; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accidental transmission of prions during neurosurgery has been reported as a consequence of re-using contaminated surgical instruments. Several decontamination methods have been studied using the 263K-hamster prion; however, no studies have directly evaluated human prions. A newly developed in vitro amplification system, designated real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC), has allowed the activity of abnormal prion proteins to be assessed within a few days. RT-QuIC using human recombinant prion protein (PrP) showed high sensitivity for prions as the detection limit of our assay was estimated as 0.12 fg of active prions. We applied this method to detect human prion activity on stainless steel wire. When we put wires contaminated with human Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease brain tissue directly into the test tube, typical PrP-amyloid formation was observed within 48 hours, and we could detect the activity of prions at 50% seeding dose on the wire from 102.8 to 105.8 SD50. Using this method, we also confirmed that the seeding activities on the wire were removed following treatment with NaOH. As seeding activity closely correlated with the infectivity of prions using the bioassay, this wire-QuIC assay will be useful for the direct evaluation of decontamination methods for human prions. PMID:27112110

  20. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 induces neutrophil extracellular traps that kill bacteria and damage human enterocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Turbica, Isabelle; Dufour, Guillaume; Semiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Gorges, Roseline; Beau, Isabelle; Servin, Alain L; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sandré, Catherine; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2012-05-01

    We recently documented the neutrophil response to enterovirulent diffusely adherent Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC), using the human myeloid cell line PLB-985 differentiated into fully mature neutrophils. Upon activation, particularly during infections, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides, histones, and proteases, which entrap and kill pathogens. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy, we observed NET production by PLB-985 cells infected with the Afa/Dr wild-type (WT) E. coli strain C1845. We found that these NETs were able to capture, immobilize, and kill WT C1845 bacteria. We also developed a coculture model of human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cells and PLB-985 cells previously treated with WT C1845 and found, for the first time, that the F-actin cytoskeleton of enterocyte-like cells is damaged in the presence of bacterium-induced NETs and that this deleterious effect is prevented by inhibition of protease release. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to bacterial infection via the production of bactericidal NETs and suggest that NETs may damage the intestinal epithelium, particularly in situations such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Erin; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to antihypertensive medication remains a key modifiable factor in the management of hypertension. The multidimensional nature of adherence and blood pressure (BP) control call for multicomponent, patient-centered interventions to improve adherence. Promising strategies to improve antihypertensive medication adherence and BP control include regimen simplification, reduction of out-of-pocket costs, use of allied health professionals for intervention delivery, and self-monitoring of BP. Research to understand the effects of technology-mediated interventions, mechanisms underlying adherence behavior, and sex-race differences in determinants of low adherence and intervention effectiveness may enhance patient-specific approaches to improve adherence and disease control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dendritic Cells Take up and Present Antigens from Viable and Apoptotic Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Carlos; Suarez, Natalia; Oñate, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, Jose L.; Martinez-Forero, Ivan; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Perez, Guiomar; Bolaños, Elixabet; Palazon, Asis; de Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8), for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA) protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1) and CD4 (OT-2) TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2d) mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2d) are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2b). In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC. PMID:22206007

  3. Effect of histamine-receptor blocking on human natural and lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against adherent HEP-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Perl, A; Gonzalez-Cabello, R; Benedek, K; Nékam, K; Láng, I; Gergely, P

    1985-01-01

    The effect of histamine (H) and H1-, H2-receptor blocking agents was studied on natural (NCMC) and lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (LDCC) of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from eight healthy subjects on HEP-2 adherent human epipharynx carcinoma target cells. Cytotoxicity was measured by detachment from the monolayer of 3H-TdR-prelabelled HEp-2 cells. LDCC was evaluated in a 24 h assay with a Concanavalin A (Con A) dose of 25 micrograms/ml at 50:1 effector-target cell ratio. Under these conditions, but without Con A, considerable NCMC was not elicited by normal lymphocytes. The presence of histamine and the H2-receptor blocker cimetidine resulted in a significant NCMC to HEp-2 cells. On the contrary, histamine and cimetidine reduced LDCC. The H1-receptor blocker clemastine had no significant effect on either NCMC or LDCC to HEp-2 targets. The possible involvement of H2-receptor bearing cells in the regulation of cytotoxicity to HEp-2 cells is suggested.

  4. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli C1845 infection promotes selective injuries in the junctional domain of polarized human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, I; Blanc-Potard, A B; Bernet-Camard, M F; Guignot, J; Barbat, A; Servin, A L

    2000-06-01

    The Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 strain harboring the F1845 fimbrial adhesin interacts with the brush border-associated CD55 molecule and promotes elongation of brush border microvilli resulting from rearrangement of the F-actin network. This phenomenon involves the activation of a cascade of signaling coupled to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor of the F1845 adhesin. We provide evidence that infection of the polarized human intestinal cell line Caco-2/TC7 by strain C1845 is followed by an increase in the paracellular permeability for [(3)H]mannitol without a decrease of the transepithelial resistance of the monolayers. Alterations in the distribution of tight-junction (TJ)-associated occludin and ZO-1 protein are observed, whereas the distribution of the zonula adherens-associated E-cadherin is not affected. Using the recombinant E. coli strains HB101(pSSS1) and -(pSSS1C) expressing the F1845 fimbrial adhesin, we demonstrate that the adhesin-CD55 interaction is not sufficient for the induction of structural and functional TJ lesions. Moreover, using the actin filament-stabilizing agent Jasplakinolide, we demonstrate that the C1845-induced functional alterations in TJs are independent of the C1845-induced apical cytoskeleton rearrangements. The results indicated that pathogenic factor(s) other than F1845 adhesin may be operant in Afa/Dr DAEC C1845.

  5. The relationship between the acid and alkaline phosphatase activity and the adherence of clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fernanado, P H; Panagoda, G J; Samaranayake, L P

    1999-11-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an emerging fungal pathogen implicated in many diseases, especially in compromised hosts. Candidal colonization and infection depends on the initial ability to adhere to host surfaces, which in turn depends upon the cell wall components and the allied structures of both the host and the fungus. Examination of a miscellaneous collection of 24 C. parapsilosis isolates, from both superficial and deep infections, for their potential pathogenic traits displayed a relationship between the phosphatase activity measured with p-nitrophenol phosphate and adhesion of the yeasts to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs). Significant intraspecies differences were seen in both the alkaline and acid phosphatase activity as well as in their adhesion to BECs (p<0.0001). The acid phosphatase activity of the superficial isolates was significantly greater (152%) than that of the systemic isolates (p = 0.0352). A highly significant positive correlation was also established between the yeast adhesion to BECs and both the acid (r = 0.88, p<0.0001) and alkaline (r = 0.9, p<0.0001) phosphatase activity. These relationships, described here for the first time, imply that phosphatases of Candida species may play a crucial role in potentiating their virulence.

  6. Scalable expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in the defined xeno-free E8 medium under adherent and suspension culture conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah; He, Chaoxia; Gerecht, Sharon; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by robust and economic methods has been one of the major challenges for translational realization of hiPSC technology. Here we demonstrate a scalable culture system for hiPSC expansion using the E8 chemically defined and xeno-free medium under either adherent or suspension conditions. To optimize suspension conditions guided by a computational simulation, we developed a method to efficiently expand hiPSCs as undifferentiated aggregates in spinner flasks. Serial passaging of two different hiPSC lines in the spinner flasks using the E8 medium preserved their normal karyotype and expression of undifferentiated state markers of TRA-1–60, SSEA4, OCT4, and NANOG. The hiPSCs cultured in spinner flasks for more than 10 passages not only could be remained pluripotent as indicated by in vitro and in vivo assays, but also could be efficiently induced toward mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, we established a xeno-free protocol of single-cell cryopreservation and recovery for the scalable production of hiPSCs in spinner flasks. This system is the first to enable an efficient scale-up bioprocess in completely xeno-free condition for the expansion and cryopreservation of hiPSCs with the quantity and quality compliant for clinical applications. PMID:23973800

  7. AHCC Activation and Selection of Human Lymphocytes via Genotypic and Phenotypic Changes to an Adherent Cell Type: A Possible Novel Mechanism of T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Olamigoke, Loretta; Mansoor, Elvedina; Mann, Vivek; Ellis, Ivory; Okoro, Elvis; Wakame, Koji; Fuji, Hajime; Kulkarni, Anil; Francoise Doursout, Marie; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2015-01-01

    Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is a fermented mushroom extract and immune supplement that has been used to treat a wide range of health conditions. It helps in augmentation of the natural immune response and affects immune cell activation and outcomes. The goal of this project was to study and understand the role and mechanisms of AHCC supplementation in the prevention of immunosuppression through T cell activation. The method described here involves "in vitro" culturing of lymphocytes, exposing them to different concentrations of AHCC (0 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, and 500 μg/mL) at 0 hours. Interestingly, clumping and aggregation of the cells were seen between 24 and 72 hours of incubation. The cells lay down extracellular matrix, which become adherent, and phenotypical changes from small rounded lymphocytes to large macrophage-like, spindle shaped, elongated, fibroblast-like cells even beyond 360 hours were observed. These are probably translated from genotypic changes in the cells since the cells propagate for at least 3 to 6 generations (present observations). RNA isolated was subjected to gene array analysis. We hypothesize that cell adhesion is an activation and survival pathway in lymphocytes and this could be the mechanism of AHCC activation in human lymphocytes.

  8. AHCC Activation and Selection of Human Lymphocytes via Genotypic and Phenotypic Changes to an Adherent Cell Type: A Possible Novel Mechanism of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Olamigoke, Loretta; Mansoor, Elvedina; Mann, Vivek; Ellis, Ivory; Okoro, Elvis; Wakame, Koji; Fuji, Hajime; Kulkarni, Anil; Francoise Doursout, Marie; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2015-01-01

    Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is a fermented mushroom extract and immune supplement that has been used to treat a wide range of health conditions. It helps in augmentation of the natural immune response and affects immune cell activation and outcomes. The goal of this project was to study and understand the role and mechanisms of AHCC supplementation in the prevention of immunosuppression through T cell activation. The method described here involves “in vitro” culturing of lymphocytes, exposing them to different concentrations of AHCC (0 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, and 500 μg/mL) at 0 hours. Interestingly, clumping and aggregation of the cells were seen between 24 and 72 hours of incubation. The cells lay down extracellular matrix, which become adherent, and phenotypical changes from small rounded lymphocytes to large macrophage-like, spindle shaped, elongated, fibroblast-like cells even beyond 360 hours were observed. These are probably translated from genotypic changes in the cells since the cells propagate for at least 3 to 6 generations (present observations). RNA isolated was subjected to gene array analysis. We hypothesize that cell adhesion is an activation and survival pathway in lymphocytes and this could be the mechanism of AHCC activation in human lymphocytes. PMID:26788109

  9. Adherence: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Carrie Lee

    2015-04-01

    To utilize a Wilsonian method of concept analysis to define and describe the concept of adherence. Published research articles, nursing literature, published books, and national and international advisory reports. The concept of adherence was analyzed using the Wilson method. Results, applications, and practice implications in regards to the concept of adherence were then derived from the analysis. Adherence is a complex, multifaceted concept that can greatly impact patient behaviors and nursing practice. Further clarification of adherence is needed to help delineate this concept from other related terms. Healthcare providers should have an understanding of the concept of adherence in the context of patient care in order to guide patient self-care behaviors. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  10. Medication adherence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco Javier; Hernández, José Luis; Pereira, José; Herrera, Judit; Rodríguez, Carlos J

    2012-10-22

    Non-adherence is a major problem in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its high prevalence, potentially severe consequences and associated costs make the study of this phenomenon a priority issue. In this article, basic non-adherence concepts of prevalence, consequences, evaluation methods, methodological restrictions of available studies, risk factors and intervention strategies, are reviewed. Studying non-adherence risk factors is a necessary step toward designing adequately oriented intervention strategies. An operative definition of adherence and good knowledge of its evaluation methods are essential to study this phenomenon. Unfortunately, most available studies contain methodological restrictions, especially concerning the evaluation methods, and an agreed operative definition of adherence has only very recently been reached. Knowing non-adherence risk factors, intervention strategies and available evidence on their effectiveness is essential in making treatment decisions in daily clinical practice.

  11. Medication adherence in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Francisco Javier; Hernández, José Luis; Pereira, José; Herrera, Judit; Rodríguez, Carlos J

    2012-01-01

    Non-adherence is a major problem in the treatment of schizophrenia. Its high prevalence, potentially severe consequences and associated costs make the study of this phenomenon a priority issue. In this article, basic non-adherence concepts of prevalence, consequences, evaluation methods, methodological restrictions of available studies, risk factors and intervention strategies, are reviewed. Studying non-adherence risk factors is a necessary step toward designing adequately oriented intervention strategies. An operative definition of adherence and good knowledge of its evaluation methods are essential to study this phenomenon. Unfortunately, most available studies contain methodological restrictions, especially concerning the evaluation methods, and an agreed operative definition of adherence has only very recently been reached. Knowing non-adherence risk factors, intervention strategies and available evidence on their effectiveness is essential in making treatment decisions in daily clinical practice. PMID:24175171

  12. Clonogenic Assay: Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T.; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 19561. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture1. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811)2. Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  13. Isolation and Functional Analysis of Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Douglas B.; Long Priel, Debra A.; Chu, Jessica; Zarember, Kol A.

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes the isolation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from blood using dextran sedimentation and Percoll or Ficoll-Paque density gradients. Assays of neutrophil functions including respiratory burst activation, phagocytosis, and microbial killing are also described. PMID:26528633

  14. Mutations in hns reduce the adherence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli 091:H21 strain B2F1 to human colonic epithelial cells and increase the production of hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Scott, Maria E; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D

    2003-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) 091:H21 strain B2F1, an isolate from a patient with the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), produces elastase-activatable Shiga toxin (Stx) type 2d and adheres well to human colonic epithelial T84 cells. This adherence phenotype occurs even though B2F1 does not contain the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) that encodes the primary adhesin for E. coli O157:H7. To attempt to identify genes involved in binding of B2F1 to T84 cells a bank of mini-Tn5phoACm(r) transposon mutants of this strain was generated. Several of these mutants exhibited a reduced adherence phenotype, but none of the insertions in these mutants were within putative adhesin genes. Rather, insertional mutations within hns resulted in the loss of adherence. Moreover, the hns mutant also displayed an increase in the production of hemolysin and alkaline phosphatase and a loss of motility with no change in Stx2d-activatable expression levels. When B2F1 was cured of the large plasmid that encodes the hemolysin, the resulting strain adhered well to T84 cells. However, an hns mutant of the plasmid-cured B2F1 strain exhibited a reduction in adherence to T84 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that H-NS regulates the expression of several genes and some potential virulence factors in the intimin-negative B2F1 STEC strain and that the large plasmid is not required for T84 cell colonization.

  15. Characterization of a distinct population of circulating human non-adherent endothelial forming cells and their recruitment via intercellular adhesion molecule-3.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Sarah L; Cockshell, Michaelia P; Pippal, Jyotsna B; Thompson, Emma J; Barrett, Jeffrey M; Tooley, Katie; Sen, Shaundeep; Sun, Wai Yan; Grose, Randall; Nicholson, Ian; Levina, Vitalina; Cooke, Ira; Talbo, Gert; Lopez, Angel F; Bonder, Claudine S

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+) population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs) which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38) together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31). These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8) or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14) which distinguishes them from 'early' endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i) bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii) demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii) increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv) in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs). Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis.

  16. Characterization of a Distinct Population of Circulating Human Non-Adherent Endothelial Forming Cells and Their Recruitment via Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emma J.; Barrett, Jeffrey M.; Tooley, Katie; Sen, Shaundeep; Sun, Wai Yan; Grose, Randall; Nicholson, Ian; Levina, Vitalina; Cooke, Ira; Talbo, Gert; Lopez, Angel F.; Bonder, Claudine S.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs) which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38) together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31). These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8) or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14) which distinguishes them from ‘early’ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i) bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii) demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii) increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv) in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs). Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis. PMID:23144795

  17. Studies on immune adherence (C3b) receptor activity of human erythrocytes: relationship between receptor activity and presence of immune complexes in serum.

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Y; Kamiyama, M; Kanemitsu, T; Hyman, C L; Clark, W S

    1982-01-01

    Human erythrocytes (E) have surface receptors for the third component of complement (C3b-IA receptors) which mediate immune adherence haemagglutination (IAHA). We have observed that E from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus had imparied or defective C3b receptor (C3b-R) activity when circulating immune complexes (CIC) were found in serum. This phenomenon has been investigated by a newly developed method involving competitive inhibition of IAHA in patients with immune complex diseases. IAHA involving sheep E coated with antibody and complement (EAC), and indicator human E was inhibited by lysates of E with normal C3b-R activity from healthy donors and a monkey. In contrast, the lysates of E from 95% of patients bearing CIC did not inhibit IAHA, which indicated such E had defective or impaired C3b-R activity. This phenomenon was supported by control studies in which IAHA was not inhibited by lysates of E with absent, inactivated or occupied C3b-R. In those patients, in whom CIC disappeared during immunosuppressive therapy, C3b-R activity slowly returned to normal levels. Moreover, it was observed that C3b-R activity of patients' E decreased with the reappearance of CIC during exacerbations of disease. These observations suggest that CIC are carried in vivo by the C3b-R of E as well as those of the mononuclear phagocyte system, and that the E C3b-R may also contribute to the clearance of CIC. PMID:6216998

  18. Effects of fasting and immobilization stresses on the phagocytic capacity of rat polymorphonuclear phagocyte monolayers.

    PubMed

    Quindos, G; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; Burgos, A; Ponton, J; Cisterna, R

    1986-01-01

    The effect of two different types of acute stress (immobilization and fasting) on the polymorphonuclear leukocyte phagocytic function has been studied in male and female rats. With this aim, a subgroup of rats was under immobilization and fasting, another under complete energy deprivation and a third one (controls), exposed to the normal activity of the animal room, for 15 hours. The stress induction was assessed by controlling weight variations and gastric ulcers generation. Both stressors induced weight loss but only immobilization resulted in the development of gastric ulcer in all the animals studied. Phagocytosis was increased in male rats stressed by fasting and in immobilized female rats. In the remaining subgroups polymorphonuclear leukocyte cells showed a phagocytic capacity within the range of control values. Only comparison of the males group stressed by fasting with the male group stressed by fasting and immobilization showed a significant depression in phagocytosis.

  19. [The effect of glucoprotein component of musk on arachidonic acid metabolizing enzymes in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Bai, J; Cheng, G; Zhu, X

    1997-05-01

    To investigate the effects of musk-1, a glucoprotein component isolated from the water extract of musk, on arachidonic acid metabolizing enzymes, which include phospholipase A2(PLA2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and cyclooxygenase (COX), in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes, an in vitro incubation system with rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes or homogenate supernatant of the same cells was used. In comparison with control, musk-1 at final concentrations of 1-100 micrograms/ml can increase AA release from PMNL by 6.0%-21.6%, decrease LTB4 biosynthesis in homogenate supernatant of the cells by 9%-81%, but increase 6-keto-PGF1 alpha production by 18.2%-85.4%.

  20. Medical and sociodemographic factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination adherence among female survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Klosky, James L; Russell, Kathryn M; Simmons, Jessica L; Foster, Rebecca H; Peck, Kelly; Green, Daniel M; Hudson, Melissa M

    2015-09-01

    Among those 9-26 years of age, vaccination can prevent specific types of genital human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection and cause of cervical and other cancers. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of and factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation and completion among females surviving childhood cancer. One-hundred fourteen young adults and 230 mothers with daughters surviving childhood cancer completed surveys querying HPV vaccination history along with medical and sociodemographic factors potentially associated with vaccination outcomes. Vaccination rate differences by age necessitated analysis of outcomes by age group: 9-13 years (preadolescents), 14-17 years (adolescents), and 18-26 years (young adults). Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to identify factors associated with HPV vaccination outcomes. Overall, 34.6% (119/344) of survivors initiated and 20.9% (72/344) completed HPV vaccination. Preadolescents were least likely to have initiated vaccination (P < 0.001). Physician recommendation was associated with initiation across age groups (OR = 6.81-11.96, Ps < 0.001-.01), whereas older age at diagnosis (≥12 years of age) was associated with lower vaccination initiation among young adults only (OR = 0.28; 95%CI, 0.10-0.76, P = 0.012). Physician recommendation (OR = 7.54; 95%CI, 1.19-47.69, P = 0.032; adolescent group) and greater treatment intensity (OR = 5.25; 95%CI, 1.00-27.61, P = 0.050; young adult group) were associated with vaccine completion, whereas being non-White was associated with decreased vaccination completion (OR = 0.17; 95%CI, 0.05-0.66, P = 0.010; adolescent group). A minority of youths surviving childhood cancer have initiated or completed HPV vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination among survivors are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Defect of In Vitro Digestive Ability of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes in Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio; Essenfeld-Yahr, Ervin; De Albornoz, María C.; Yarzábal, Luis; De Gómez, MaríA H.; Martín, Blanca San; Ocanto, Ana; Gil, Francisco; Convit, Jacinto

    1980-01-01

    Selected functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis), in healthy control individuals, and in patients with diseases unrelated to paracoccidioidomycosis. Patients with paracoccidioidomycosis were also evaluated by standard immunological techniques. Phagocytosis and digestion of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeastlike cells in vitro was estimated by an original method. It was based on the appearance of phagocytosed P. brasiliensis in preparations stained by a modification of the Papanicolaou method and examined with phase-contrast optics. Interpretation of such findings was confirmed by electron microscopy. Two strains of P. brasiliensis were used. Strain 8506 was freshly isolated from a patient. Strain Pb9 was known to be nonpathogenic and to have a peculiar cell wall composition. Yeastlike cells of the Pb9 strain were digested significantly better than those of strain 8506. A higher number of leukocytes per fungus cells led to a higher proportion of digested P. brasiliensis. Leukocytes from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis phagocytosed the fungus in a normal way, but had a significant lower ability to digest it in vitro. When individual cases were analyzed, there was an excellent correlation between clinical evolution and digestive ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. There was good correlation between both of these and immunological parameters. Leukocytes from all groups behaved comparably in tests of general leukocyte function and in their abilities to kill and digest Candida albicans. Our results indicate that, as a group, polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis had a significant, rather specific, defect in their in vitro digestive capacity against phagocytosed P. brasiliensis. There was also an inverse correlation between strain pathogenicity and its susceptibility to in vitro digestion by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Our findings are

  2. Opsonic activity of anti-flagellar serum against Clostridium chauvoei by mouse polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Tanaka, M

    1987-05-01

    The role of anti-flagellar serum against Clostridium chauvoei in phagocytosis by mouse polymorphonuclear leucocytes was examined. Anti-flagellar serum markedly increased phagocytic rate against the flagellated strain Okinawa but not against a non-flagellated mutant (NFM) derived from the same strain, while anti-NFM serum increased the phagocytic rate against both strains. These results indicate that anti-flagellar serum exerts its protective effect by opsonic activity.

  3. Effects of carvedilol on oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Watanabe, Takanori; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Asada, Akira

    2004-04-01

    To compare the effects of carvedilol and propranolol on oxidative stress in leukocytes and C-reactive protein levels in patients with hypertension. Sixty hypertensive patients were randomly assigned to carvedilol (20 mg; n = 30) or propranolol (60 mg; n = 30) for 6 months. Thirty normotensive subjects who were given placebo served as controls. Oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells were measured by gated flow cytometry. C-reactive protein levels were measured by immunonephelometric assay. Oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells was increased significantly in hypertensive patients compared with in normotensive controls. After 6 months of treatment, carvedilol decreased oxidative stress significantly in polymorphonuclear cells by a mean of 45 arbitrary units (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32 to 59 arbitrary units; P <0.001) and propranolol decreased oxidative stress significantly by 20 arbitrary units (95% CI: 7 to 33 arbitrary units; P <0.003; P = 0.001 for difference between treatments). Carvedilol also decreased oxidative stress significantly in mononuclear cells by 23 arbitrary units (95% CI: 15 to 31 arbitrary units; P <0.001), whereas propranolol decreased oxidative stress by 2 arbitrary units (95% CI: 7 to 12 arbitrary units; P = 0.62; P = 0.002 for difference between treatments). Carvedilol decreased C-reactive protein levels significantly by a median of 0.073 mg/dL (interquartile range, 0.034 to 0.112 mg/dL; P <0.001), whereas propranolol decreased levels by 0.012 mg/dL (interquartile range, 0.009 to 0.032 mg/dL; P = 0.26; P = 0.003 for difference between treatments). These findings suggest that carvedilol inhibits oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, as well as lowers C-reactive protein levels, to a greater extent than does propranolol in hypertensive patients.

  4. Effect of amino acids on luminol-dependent chemiluminescence generated by peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Minuk, G Y; Rascanin, N; Woods, D E

    1986-01-01

    Individual amino acids and amino acid mixtures caused a dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence generated by peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes. A visual assay for opsonophagocytosis, however, failed to identify any quantitative differences between leukocytes incubated with amino acids and those incubated in amino-acid-free solutions. The results of this study suggest that the presence of amino acids may interfere with the proper interpretation of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence curves. PMID:3745427

  5. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  6. Effect of cigarette smoke extract on the polymorphonuclear leukocytes chemiluminescence: influence of a filter containing glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zappacosta, B; Persichilli, S; Minucci, A; Fasanella, S; Scribano, D; Giardina, B; De Sole, P

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to be a risk factor for several chronic and neoplastic diseases. Many compounds formed by cigarette burning, ranging from particulate materials to water solutes and gaseous extracts, are considered to be noxious agents, and many biochemical and molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the toxic effects of cigarette smoke. The oral cavity and the upper respiratory tract represent the first contact areas for smoke compounds; even a single cigarette can produce marked effects on some components of the oral cavity, either chemical compounds, such as glutathione and enzymes, or cellular elements, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Several studies suggest a protective role of glutathione against the noxious effects of tobacco smoke; the sulphydril groups of glutathione, in fact, could react with some smoke products, such as unsaturated aldehydes, leading to the formation of harmless intermediate compounds and simultaneously preventing the inactivation of metabolically essential molecules, such as some enzymes. In this paper we analyse the effect of a filter containing glutathione on the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to aqueous extract of cigarette smoke, measuring their chemiluminescence activity. The results of this paper indicate that the GSH-containing filter has a likely protective effect against the inhibition of cigarette smoke extract on polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity.

  7. Endotoxin activation of endothelium for polymorphonuclear leucocyte transendothelial migration and modulation by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Issekutz, A C; Lopes, N

    1993-01-01

    Endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] is a potent inflammatory stimulus and can activate human umbilical vein endothelium (HUVE) for leucocyte adhesiveness and transendothelial migration. Here we investigated the role of HUVE-secreted cytokines in this process. When HUVE monolayers were grown on filters and preincubated for 3 hr with LPS, 51Cr-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) migrated across the HUVE in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximal PMNL transmigration with LPS (1 ng/ml) was 26 +/- 3% of added PMNL in 75 min. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-8 or recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist had no effect on the activation by LPS of the HUVE for supporting migration of PMNL. The HUVE 'activated state' declined with prolonged (22 hr) exposure to LPS, as reflected by a decrease in PMNL transendothelial migration to 5.5 +/- 1% and in the expression of the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, E-selectin, as compared to stimulation with LPS for 3 hr. However, simultaneous exposure to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (200 IU/ml) and LPS maintained maximal PMNL transendothelial migration (28 +/- 4%) for at least 24 hr, prolonged E-selectin expression by HUVE and superinduced intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. The PMNL transendothelial migration was blocked by > 90% by monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD18 with either 3 hr of LPS or 22 hr LPS + IFN-gamma stimulation. Migration was partially inhibited by mAb to E-selectin (30-40%) or to ICAM-1 (35-45%) and by a combination of both reagents (50-60%) under both stimulation conditions. Thus, LPS activation of HUVE for PMNL transendothelial migration: (a) does not require secretion of IL-1, TNF-alpha or IL-8 by the endothelium, (b) IFN-gamma enhances and prolongs endothelial activation by LPS and may increase leucocyte infiltration in LPS or bacterial inflammatory reactions, and (c) CD18-dependent mechanisms are

  8. Exercise Adherence. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Pat

    This digest discusses exercise adherence, noting its vital role in maximizing the benefits associated with physical activity. Information is presented on the following: (1) factors that influence adherence to self-monitored programs of regular exercise (childhood eating habits, and psychological, physical, social, and situational factors); (2)…

  9. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    essential to improve outpatients’ primary medication adherence. We identified predictive factors of primary nonadherence in order to target the most eligible patients for discharge counseling sessions. Moreover, implementation of discharge counseling could be facilitated by using Health Information Technology to adapt human resources and select patients at risk of nonadherence. PMID:26469927

  10. Abnormal mobility of neonatal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Relationship to impaired redistribution of surface adhesion sites by chemotactic factor or colchicine.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D C; Hughes, B J; Smith, C W

    1981-01-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of diminished, stimulated, and directed migration of neonatal (N) polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), chemotactic factor (CF) sensory and PMN effector functions were studied in healthy N and adult or maternal controls (C). N PMN demonstrated high affinity binding for N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-[3H]phenylalanine (fMLP), which was saturable between 40 and 100 nM as observed with C PMN. The kinetics of binding and the characteristics of dissociation of binding by N PMN were equivalent to control PMN. Both "threshold" and "peak" concentrations (1 and 10 nM, respectively) of fMLP effected comparable PMN chemiluminescence among neonates and controls. An equivalent threshold concentration (0.05 nM) of fMLP effected N and C PMN shape change in suspension, and a maximally effective concentration (5 nM) induced comparable bipolar configuration, although uropod formation was only 38 +/- 8% of N PMN, compared with 73 +/- 11% of C PMN (P less than 0.01). Striking abnormalities of N PMN adherence were identified: mean +/- SD base-line (unstimulated) N adherence values (39 +/- 8%) were equal to C (38 +/- 9%), but diminished increments in response to single CF stimuli were noted among N (fMLP: 42 +/- 7% (N), 70 +/- 11% (C); C5a: 41 +/- 6% (N), 68 +/- 6% (C); BCF: 41 +/- 6% (N), 63 +/- 9% (C), P less than 0.01 for each CF). On sequential exposure to increasing concentrations of CF N PMN failed to demonstrate expected decreased adherence values; sequential stimuli with fMLP (0.1 nM, 10 nM) or C5a (8 microgram protein/ml, 32 microgram protein/ml) effected mean +/- 1 SD values of 51 +/- 9% (N), 30 +/- 9% (C), and 34 +/- 10 (N), 48 +/- 14% (C), respectively. As demonstrated with a latex bead-binding technique, N PMN failed to redistribute adhesion sites to the cell's tail under the same experimental conditions; in 21 N samples studied, restricted unipolar binding occurred in 33 +/- 8% (fMLP) or 37 +/- 7% (C5a) of PMN in contrast to C values of 70% (f

  11. Human decay-accelerating factor and CEACAM receptor-mediated internalization and intracellular lifestyle of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Guignot, Julie; Hudault, Sylvie; Kansau, Imad; Chau, Ingrid; Servin, Alain L

    2009-01-01

    We used transfected epithelial CHO-B2 cells as a model to identify the mechanism mediating internalization of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli. We provide evidence that neither the alpha5 or beta1 integrin subunits nor alpha5beta1 integrin functioned as a receptor mediating the adhesion and/or internalization of Dr or Afa-III fimbria-positive bacteria. We also demonstrated that (i) whether or not the AfaD or DraD invasin subunits were present, there was no difference in the cell association and entry of bacteria and that (ii) DraE or AfaE-III adhesin subunits are necessary and sufficient to promote the receptor-mediated bacterial internalization into epithelial cells expressing human decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CEACAM1, CEA, or CEACAM6. Internalization of Dr fimbria-positive E. coli within CHO-DAF, CHO-CEACAM1, CHO-CEA, or CHO-CEACAM6 cells occurs through a microfilament-independent, microtubule-dependent, and lipid raft-dependent mechanism. Wild-type Dr fimbria-positive bacteria survived better within cells expressing DAF than bacteria internalized within CHO-CEACAM1, CHO-CEA, or CHO-CEACAM6 cells. In DAF-positive cells, internalized Dr fimbria-positive bacteria were located in vacuoles that contained more than one bacterium, displaying some of the features of late endosomes, including the presence of Lamp-1 and Lamp-2, and some of the features of CD63 proteins, but not of cathepsin D, and were acidic. No interaction between Dr fimbria-positive-bacterium-containing vacuoles and the autophagic pathway was observed.

  12. P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Activation Up-regulates Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecular-1 Expression and Enhances Lymphocyte Adherence to a Human Submandibular Gland Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.; Camden, Jean M.; Rome, Danny E.; Seye, Cheikh I.; Weisman, Gary A.

    2007-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS. PMID:17599409

  13. P2Y2 nucleotide receptor activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [corrected] expression and enhances lymphocyte adherence to a human submandibular gland cell line.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Camden, Jean M; Rome, Danny E; Seye, Cheikh I; Weisman, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS.

  14. Ormocomp-modified glass increases collagen binding and promotes the adherence and maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Käpylä, Elli; Sorkio, Anni; Teymouri, Shokoufeh; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Valden, Mika; Skottman, Heli; Kellomäki, Minna; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati

    2014-12-09

    In in vitro live-cell imaging, it would be beneficial to grow and assess human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells on thin, transparent, rigid surfaces such as cover glasses. In this study, we assessed how the silanization of glass with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPTMS), or polymer-ceramic material Ormocomp affects the surface properties, protein binding, and maturation of hESC-RPE cells. The surface properties were studied by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a protein binding assay. The cell adherence and proliferation were evaluated by culturing hESCRPE cells on collagen IV-coated untreated or silanized surfaces for 42 days. The Ormocomp treatment significantly increased the hydrophobicity and roughness of glass surfaces compared to the APTES and MAPTMS treatments. The XPS results indicated that the Ormocomp treatment changes the chemical composition of the glass surface by increasing the carbon content and the number of C-O/═O bonds. The protein-binding test confirmed that the Ormocomp-treated surfaces bound more collagen IV than did APTES- or MAPTMS-treated surfaces. All of the silane treatments increased the number of cells: after 42 days of culture, Ormocomp had 0.38, APTES had 0.16, MAPTMS had 0.19, and untreated glass had only 0.062, all presented as million cells cm(-2). There were no differences in cell numbers compared to smoother to rougher Ormocomp surfaces, suggesting that the surface chemistry and, more specifically, the collagen binding in combination with Ormocomp are beneficial to hESC-RPE cell culture. This study clearly demonstrates that Ormocomp treatment combined with collagen coating significantly increases hESC-RPE cell attachment compared to commonly used silanizing agents APTES and MAPTMS. Ormocomp silanization could thus enable the use of microscopic live cell imaging methods for h

  15. Activation and IL-1β secretion of human peripheral phagocytes infected with Actinomadura madurae, Nocardia asteroides and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Palma-Ramos, Alejandro; Casillas-Pétriz, Gilberto; Castrillón-Rivera, Laura Estela; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Arenas-Guzmán, Roberto; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of Actinomadura madurae (A. madurae) and Nocardia asteroides (N. asteroides), using Candida albicans (C. albicans) as prototypic control, to elicit the activation and IL-1β secretion of blood phagocytic cells from healthy donors. Microscopic evaluation of phagocytosis/activation, cell viability and spectrophotometric quantitation of endocytosis/activation, were assessed by using formazan blue test in human blood phagocytes infected with C. albicans, A. madurae or N. asteroides treated with either normal human serum (NHS) or with decomplemented NHS. Interlukin-1β from culture supernatants of infected polymorphonuclear was tested by ELISA kit assay. Microscopic assay showed that phagocytosis and activation of adherent mononuclear phagocytes were greater with C. albicans followed by A. madurae and then by N. asteroides. Spectrophotometric assay in polymorphonuclear phagocytes infected with NHS-treated pathogens indicated that activation was similarly higher by C. albicans and A. madurae and lower by N. asteroides. Kinetic assays in infected polymorphonuclear cells showed that viability was decreased by C. albicans and N. asteroides or unaffected with A. madurae. Levels of IL-1β at 8 h of incubation were higher with C. albicans followed by A. madurae whereas lower levels were found with N. asteroides. The extent of cell-viability and activation as well IL-1β secretion may be related with the virulence of C. albicans and N. asteroides and other parameters remain to be explored for assessing the virulence of A. madurae. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Expansion of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease may lead to infectious complications.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan-Fang; Cai, Rui-Ming; Lin, Qu; Ye, Qing-Jian; Ren, Jian-Hua; Yin, Liang-Hong; Li, Xing

    2017-02-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are recently identified immune suppressive cells in multiple chronic inflammations. Here, we investigated MDSCs in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and their clinical significance in these patients and healthy individuals (49 each). Polymorphonuclear and mononuclear MDSCs were investigated by flow cytometry. Patients with ESRD before hemodialysis presented a significantly higher level of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Depletion of polymorphonuclear-MDSCs resolved T cell IFN-γ responses. By co-culture, T cell proliferation and the production of IFN-γ were abrogated by the addition of polymorphonuclear MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Both of these effects were reversed by a reactive oxygen species inhibitor. The levels of reactive oxygen species were higher in polymorphonuclear MDSCs derived from patients with ESRD than from normal individuals. The mRNA level of NOX2, the key protein complex responsible for reactive oxygen species production, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. The phospho-STAT3 level, a key activator of MDSCs, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Finally, the polymorphonuclear MDSC level before and after hemodialysis was positively related to infectious diseases. Patients with ESRD were dichotomized into 2 groups by the amount of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Patients with high levels of polymorphonuclear MDSCs presented with a higher incidence of infectious events. Thus, polymorphonuclear MDSCs were elevated in ESRD patients with strong immune-suppressive capability through a phospho-STAT3/reactive oxygen species pathway. Hence, polymorphonuclear MDSCs might increase the risk of infectious complications.

  17. HIV Treatment Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Risk Activities When One Partner Is HIV+ Substance Abuse/Use Pregnancy & Childbirth Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Post-Exposure ... Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations ...

  18. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  19. Myeloperoxidase deficient polymorphonuclear leucocytes in leukaemia and allied disorders.

    PubMed

    Bendix-Hansen, K

    1988-12-01

    This thesis is a survey of nine previously published articles on MPO deficient PMN. The incidences in leukaemia and allied disorders of the presence of this abnormal subpopulation of mature neutrophils and the relationship to clinical course in AML, susceptibility to infections in AML, FAB classification in AML and MDS, cytogenetically defined aberrations in MDS and morphometrical characteristics were investigated. The aims of the studies were to examine the diagnostic as well as the prognostic value of the parameter, to examine the usefulness of the parameter as an predictive indicator of CR and relapse in AML and to examine the concept that MPO deficient PMN may originate from leukaemic precursors. MPO deficient PMN were found to occur in a minor number (less than 4% of the total number of PMN) in normal humans and the incidences of an abnormal number (greater than 4%) were found to be about 40% in AML (I, II, III, IV, VIII), 60% in CML (I, VII), 30% in MPD other than CML (VII) and 30% in MDS (V). The highest incidences in AML were found in the FAB subtypes possessing the most myeloid differentiation potential i.e. FAB M2 and FAB M4 (IV). In ALL, CLL, HCL, Hodgkin's disease, anaemia not related to leukaemia and leukaemoid reactions the incidences all were 0% (I, unpublished data). The abnormal MPO deficient PMN subpopulation, if present, disappeared when CR was achieved and reappeared when relapse eventually was developed (II, VIII). In both situations serial determinations showed that the change occurred before the usual routine blood examinations predicted CR and relapse; several days and several months prior, respectively (VIII). The probability of obtaining CR was lower in the AML patients with the abnormal subpopulation and the risk of developing relapse higher than in AML patients without the anomaly (II, VIII). These differences were not statistically significant, however. AML patients, showing an increased number of MPO deficient PMN, revealed a

  20. Adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to endothelium enhances the efficiency of detoxification of oxygen-free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, R. L.; Robinson, J. M.; Karnovsky, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes can produce active oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide under various conditions. Because these substances can be toxic to cells, it is possible that the interaction between the circulating leukocytes and the blood vessel wall, either in normal circulation or during the acute inflammatory response, could damage the endothelial lining. Using an in vitro system of cultured endothelial cells and isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the levels of detectable superoxide when neutrophils are attached to either endothelial monolayers or to plastic. Our results show that the levels of superoxide, on a per-cell basis, are lower when the neutrophils are attached to endothelium than when attached to plastic, even if the neutrophils are stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. This is also reflected in data showing that no injury occurs to the endothelial cells, as measured by 51Cr release, under these same conditions. When endothelial cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase, diethyldithiocarbamate, the levels of superoxide detected are the same for neutrophils stimulated on plastic and those on the endothelial monolayer, suggesting that endothelial superoxide dismutase may remove a portion of the neutrophil-generated superoxide from the detection system. Further evidence for the role of endothelium in destroying superoxide is suggested by results that show that the level of detectable superoxide released from neutrophils attached to formalin-fixed endothelial monolayers is the same as that for neutrophils attached to plastic. It is important to note that with the inhibitor of superoxide dismutase present, the endothelial monolayers do not display enhanced 51Cr release under the conditions employed. When both endothelial catalase and glutathione reductase are inhibited, we detect increased 51Cr release from endothelial cells in response to stimulated neutrophils. Our results show that

  1. Enhanced microscopic definition of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176 adherence to, invasion of, translocation across, and exocytosis from polarized human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lan; Tall, Ben D; Curtis, Sherill K; Kopecko, Dennis J

    2008-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni-mediated pathogenesis involves gut adherence and translocation across intestinal cells. The current study was undertaken to examine the C. jejuni interaction with and translocation across differentiated Caco-2 cells to better understand Campylobacter's pathogenesis. The efficiency of C. jejuni 81-176 invasion of Caco-2 cells was two- to threefold less than the efficiency of invasion of INT407 cells. Adherence-invasion analyses indicated that C. jejuni 81-176 adhered to most INT407 cells but invaded only about two-thirds of the host cells over 2 h (two bacteria/cell). In contrast, only 11 to 17% of differentiated Caco-2 cells were observed to bind and internalize either C. jejuni strain 81-176 or NCTC 11168, and a small percentage of infected Caco-2 cells contained 5 to 20 internalized bacteria per cell after 2 h. Electron microscopy revealed that individual C. jejuni cells adhered to the tips of host cell microvilli via intimate flagellar contacts and by lateral bacterial binding to the sides of microvilli. Next, bacteria were observed to bind at the apical host membrane surface via presumed interactions at one pole of the bacterium and with host membrane protrusions located near intercellular junctions. The latter contacts apparently resulted in coordinated, localized plasma membrane invagination, causing simultaneous internalization of bacteria into an endosome. Passage of this Campylobacter endosome intracellularly from the apical surface to the basolateral surface occurred over time, and bacterial release apparently resulted from endosome-basolateral membrane fusion (i.e., exocytosis). Bacteria were found intercellularly below tight junctions at 60 min postinfection, but not at earlier times. This study revealed unique host cell adherence contacts, early endocytosis-specific structures, and a presumptive exocytosis component of the transcellular transcytosis route.

  2. Antibiotic-Enhanced Phagocytosis of ’Borrelia recurrentis’ by Blood Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-30

    ANTIBIOTIC-ENHANCED P)4ASOCYTOSIS OF ’ BORRELIA RECURRENT!S* BY B-ETC(U) UCNOV 79 T BUTLER N00014-77-C-0050 W4CLASSIFIEO TR-3 N LIM,1 li 13 2 . 1112...enhanced Phagocytosis of Borrelia recurrentis by Blood Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes 0 ( ---- by rm 046omas / t’e Prepared for Publication in W Infection...jo? Butler 2 Abstract. "The removal of Borrelia spirochetes from the blood in relapsing fever was studied by examining patients’ blood phagocytic

  3. Impaired metabolic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in glycogen storage disease Ib.

    PubMed

    Gahr, M; Heyne, K

    1983-09-01

    To elucidate the basis for the recurrent infections in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) Ib we tested polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) function in one patient. Bactericidal capacity and phagocytosis-induced O2 consumption were reduced. Also, phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated superoxide production and glucose oxidation through the hexose monophosphate shunt were diminished compared to control subjects. Therefore it could be speculated that in PMN of patients with GSD Ib, glucose-6-phosphate has no access to the enzymes of the hexose monophosphate shunt due to a transport-related defect as shown for glucogenesis in hepatocytes.

  4. Killing of Pseudomonas pseudomallei by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and peritoneal macrophages from chicken, sheep, swine and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Markova, N; Kussovski, V; Radoucheva, T

    1998-07-01

    Differences in the kinetics of Pseudomonas pseudomallei killing by peritoneal macrophages (PM) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) from chickens, sheep, swine and rabbits were found. P. pseudomallei was rapidly killed by porcine PM and PMNL. However the bacterial killing by ovine and lapine PM and PMNL proceeded at a slower rate. In contrast, chicken PM and PMNL ingested and killed the lowest number of P. pseudomallei bacteria. The differences in the bactericidal activity of PM and PMNL from different animal species correlated with the level of their acid phosphatase and glycolytic activity.

  5. Ocular microbiota and polymorphonuclear leucocyte recruitment during overnight contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, F; Willcox, M D; Sansey, N; Holden, B A

    1997-05-01

    Bacterial colonization of the ocular surface and contact lens (CL) and recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during overnight CL wear was examined in 11 asymptomatic wearers. The ocular surface was more frequently colonized than the CL, with commensal bacteria (P < 0.05). Following sleep, more bacteria were recovered from the CL compared with daily use (P < 0.05), and fewer PMN were recruited compared to sleep without CL wear (P < 0.05). Overnight CL wear may inhibit physiological PMN recruitment to the cornea by preventing their access, by modifying the chemotactic signal or by altering the activation state of the recruited cells.

  6. A large mobility of hydrophilic molecules at the outmost layer controls the protein adsorption and adhering behavior with the actin fiber orientation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Seo, Ji-Hun; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yui, Nobuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion behaviors of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are interestingly affected by the mobility of hydrophilic chains on the material surfaces. Surfaces with different molecular mobilities were prepared using ABA-type block copolymers consisting polyrotaxane (PRX) or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) central block (A block), and amphiphilic anchoring B blocks of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB). Two different molecular mobilities of the PRX chains were designed by using normal α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) or α-CD whose hydroxyl groups were converted to methoxy groups in a given ratio to improve its molecular mobility (PRX-PMB and OMe-PRX-PMB). The surface mobility of these materials was assessed as the mobility factor (Mf), which is measured by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring system. HUVECs adhered on OMe-PRX-PMB surface much more than PRX-PMB and PMB-block-PEG-block-PMB (PEG-PMB) surfaces. These different HUVEC adhesions were correlated with the density of cell-binding site of adsorbed fibronectin. In addition, the alignment of the actin cytoskeleton of adhered HUVECs was strongly suppressed on the PEG-PMB, PRX-PMB, and OMe-PRX-PMB in response to the increased Mf value. Remarkably, the HUVECs adhered on the OMe-PRX-PMB surface with much less actin organization. We concluded that not only the cell adhesion but also the cellular function are regulated by the molecular mobility of the outmost material surfaces.

  7. Hydrocortisone differentially affects the ability of murine stromal cells and human marrow-derived adherent cells to promote the differentiation of CD34++/CD38- long-term culture-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Croisille, L; Auffray, I; Katz, A; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1994-12-15

    Very primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells are identified indirectly by their ability to give rise to clonogenic progenitors in the presence of either human or murine stromal cells. These long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays are usually performed in the presence of hydrocortisone based on the initial observation that hydrocortisone was required for prolonged hematopoiesis in standard long-term bone marrow cultures. In this report, we investigated the role of hydrocortisone in LTC-IC assays initiated with CD34++/CD38- cells seeded onto either human bone marrow LTC-derived adherent cells or a murine marrow-derived stromal cell line, MS-5. It was found that weekly addition of hydrocortisone to the cultures reduced the frequency of LTC-IC (from 1/5 to 1/20) calculated from limiting dilution experiments and also reduced fivefold to 10-fold the number of their progeny clonogenic cells detected after 4 to 5 weeks. In contrast, the frequency and differentiative potential of CD34++/CD38- grown in the presence of human marrow feeders was unaltered by the addition of glucocorticoids. Data are consistent with the hypothesis that hydrocortisone inhibited LTC-IC differentiation by downregulating the expression of a synergistic factor produced by MS-5 cells. (1) In the absence of hydrocortisone, the number of clonogenic progenitors generated by LTC-IC was much higher in cultures seeded on MS-5 than in cultures seeded on human marrow adherent cells, which was also true when cytokines were added to the cocultures. However, based on the phenotype of the colonies, progenitors produced in MS-5 cocultures were more mature than those generated on human marrow adherent cells. (2) Hydrocortisone counteracted the stimulatory effect of recombinant human cytokines (interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and steel factor) in assays performed on MS-5 but not on human marrow feeders. (3) Hydrocortisone led to a 50% decrease in the numbers of colony-forming units

  8. Antimicrobial mechanisms against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus of rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte granule extract.

    PubMed Central

    Loeffelholz, M J; Modrzakowski, M C

    1988-01-01

    The antimicrobial mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte granule extract and isolated extract fractions against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were examined. Crude granule extract and a fraction containing low-molecular-weight cationic peptides (peak D) reduced the viability of A. calcoaceticus and inhibited the uptake of radiolabeled macromolecule precursors by cells. The inhibitory activity observed with peak D was not as great as that of crude granule extract containing equivalent amounts of peak D protein. Crude extract also inhibited incorporation of uracil into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material, while no isolated fraction, including peak D, had any substantial effect on incorporation. The antimicrobial activities of crude granule extract were more sensitive to boiling than those of isolated peak D. Preincubation of A. calcoaceticus with either crude granule extract or a fraction (peak B) possessing proteolytic activity but lacking any antimicrobial activity caused cells to become sensitive to a subinhibitory concentration of actinomycin D, suggesting that granule extract and peak B increase the outer membrane permeability of A. calcoaceticus. The antimicrobial granule extract fraction, peak D, did not affect outer membrane permeability. These results suggest that rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte granule extract reduces the viability of A. calcoaceticus by inhibiting the transport and incorporation of macromolecule precursors and that either whole granule extract is required for complete antimicrobial activity or an unidentified component is responsible for antimicrobial activity in addition to peak D. The granule extract activity that increases outer membrane permeability does not appear to be directly responsible for the observed decrease in viability. PMID:2449397

  9. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes are activated during atelectasis before lung reexpansion in rat.

    PubMed

    Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Saito, Hajime; Takahashi, Naoko; Kawai, Hideki; Ito, Manabu; Hosono, Yukiko; Motoyama, Satoru; Ogawa, Jun-ichi

    2008-07-01

    Although reexpansion of a collapsed lung often causes pulmonary edema, the pathogenesis of the condition is not yet fully understood. To determine whether inflammatory changes occur in the pulmonary circulation during atelectasis and study the mechanism underlying the development of reexpansion pulmonary edema, we used a rat model in which the left lung was collapsed by bronchial occlusion for 1 h and then reexpanded and ventilated for an additional 1 h. We evaluated the accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in the lung and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pulmonary circulation using a fluorescent imaging technique. We also used confocal laser scanning microscopy and computerized image analysis to evaluate the membrane translocation of p47-phox, one of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form) oxidase subunits, in PMNs sequestered in the lung. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes accumulated in the lung during atelectasis, and p47-phox was translocated to the plasma membrane, but no ROS production was observed. Marked PMN ROS production was observed after reexpansion of the collapsed lung with air. Little ROS production was observed when the lung was reexpanded with nitrogen. During atelectasis, PMNs accumulate in the lung, where they are primed for respiratory bursting. After pulmonary reexpansion, oxygen is supplied from the alveoli, and PMN respiratory bursting occurs.

  10. Relationship between somatic cell count, polymorphonuclear leucocyte count and quality parameters in bovine bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Wickström, Erik; Persson-Waller, Karin; Lindmark-Månsson, Helena; Ostensson, Karin; Sternesjö, Ase

    2009-05-01

    The somatic cell count (SCC) in bovine bulk tank milk is presently used as an indicator of raw milk quality, reflecting the udder health status of the herd. During mastitis, SCC increases, mostly owing to an influx of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from blood into milk, with a concomitant change in milk composition. Bulk tank milk samples were categorized according to their SCC, as well as polymorphonuclear leucocyte count (PMNC), to study relationships between SCC, PMNC and various raw milk quality traits, i.e. contents of total protein, whey protein, casein, fat and lactose, casein number, proteolysis and rheological properties. The proportion of PMN, obtained by direct microscopy, was significantly higher in samples with high SCC compared with low SCC samples. SCC and PMNC were strongly correlated, yielding a correlation coefficient of 0.85. High SCC samples had lower lactose and casein contents, lower casein number and more proteolysis than low SCC samples. Samples with high PMNC had a lower casein number than low PMNC samples. Samples with high and low SCC or PMNC did not differ in respect to rheological properties. Our results do not indicate that PMNC is a better biomarker than SCC for raw bulk tank milk quality, as previously proposed.

  11. Quinine as a potential tracer for medication adherence: A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessment of quinine alone and in combination with oxycodone in humans.

    PubMed

    Babalonis, Shanna; Hampson, Aidan J; Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Walsh, Sharon L

    2015-12-01

    Effective strategies to monitor pharmacotherapy adherence are necessary, and sensitive biological markers are lacking. This study examined a subtherapeutic dose of quinine as a potential adherence tracer. Primary aims included examination of the plasma and urinary pharmacokinetic profile of once-daily quinine; secondary aims assessed pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interactions with oxycodone (a CYP3A and CYP2D substrate). Healthy, nondependent opioid users (n = 9) were enrolled in this within-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study. Participants received the following oral doses: day 1, oxycodone (30 mg); days 2-4, quinine (80 mg); day 5, quinine and oxycodone (2 hours postquinine). Blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected throughout the study, and pharmacodynamic outcomes were assessed during experimental sessions (days 1, 4, 5). Quinine displayed a plasma Tmax ∼2 hours and t1/2 ∼10 hours. Oxycodone and noroxycodone parameters (Tmax , Cmax , t1/2 ) were similar with or without quinine present, although drug exposure (AUC) was slightly greater when combined with quinine. No pharmacodynamic interactions were detected, and doses were safely tolerated. During washout, quinine urinary concentrations steadily declined (elimination t1/2 ∼16 hours), with a 94% decrease observed 72 hours postdose. Overall, low-dose quinine appears to be a good candidate for a medication additive to monitor adherence for detection of missed medication.

  12. Quinine as a potential tracer for medication adherence: A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessment of quinine alone and in combination with oxycodone in humans

    PubMed Central

    Babalonis, Shanna; Hampson, Aidan J.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Effective strategies to monitor pharmacotherapy adherence are necessary, and sensitive biological markers are lacking. This study examined a sub-therapeutic dose of quinine as a potential adherence tracer. Primary aims included examination of the plasma and urinary pharmacokinetic profile of once-daily quinine; secondary aims assessed pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interactions with oxycodone (a CYP3A and CYP2D substrate). Healthy, non-dependent opioid users (n=9) were enrolled in this within-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled, inpatient study. Participants received the following oral doses, Day 1: oxycodone (30 mg), Days 2-4: quinine (80 mg), Day 5: quinine and oxycodone (2 hrs post-quinine). Blood and 24-hr urine samples were collected throughout the study, and pharmacodynamic outcomes were assessed during experimental sessions (Days 1, 4, 5). Quinine displayed a plasma Tmax ∼2 hrs and t1/2 ∼10 hrs. Oxycodone and noroxycodone parameters (Tmax, Cmax, t1/2) were similar with or without quinine present, although drug exposure (AUC) was slightly greater when combined with quinine. No pharmacodynamic interactions were detected and doses were safely tolerated. During washout, quinine urinary concentrations steadily declined (elimination t1/2 ∼16 hrs), with a 94% decrease observed 72 hrs post-dose. Overall, low-dose quinine appears to be a good candidate for a medication additive to monitor adherence for detection of missed medication. PMID:26032168

  13. Cervical cancer screening practices, knowledge of screening and risk, and highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence among women living with human immunodeficiency virus in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Jeanne R; Menacho, Luis; Segura, Eddy R; Roman, Fernando; Cabello, Robinson

    2017-03-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the leading cause of cancer death among Peruvian women. Awareness shown by women living with HIV (WLHIV) of their increased risk and Papanicoloau (Pap) smear frequency is understudied, particularly in Peru. We assessed the uptake of guidelines-based CC screening practices and its associations with two predictors, knowledge of CC screening and risk and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence, among WLHIV. Collected by self-administered questionnaires from 2014 to 2016, we analyzed the data of 71 WLHIV. Most WLHIV (77.5%, n = 55/71) were overdue to CC screening by not having a Pap smear within the prior 12 months. WLHIV who had on-time Pap smears had a higher median composite 'knowledge' score of 3.0 ([interquartile range] 1.5-4) compared to 2.0 (IQR 1-3) for overdue WLHIV. On-time and overdue WLHIV had the same median composite 'HAART adherence' score of 3.0 (IQR 2-4). Bivariate analysis found no association between knowledge nor adherence with on-time Pap smears. Although on-time WLHIV were more knowledgeable about CC screening and risk, overall CC screening uptake was poor. Larger studies of this population are needed to assess the educational, social, and structural barriers contributing to this low prevalence of screening.

  14. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  15. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health... potential solutions associated with the public health problem of prescription medication non-adherence in..., health care providers, and industry and private organizations in efforts to improve medication...

  16. [Anticancer drug adherence].

    PubMed

    Despas, Fabien; Roche, Henri; Laurent, Guy

    2013-05-01

    A large number of anticancer drugs have been introduced during the two last decades with significant impact for survival, making cancer a chronic disease in a growing number of indications. However, these drugs are costly, induce adverse effects and their efficacy frequently depends on the dose. For all these reasons, adherence in cancer therapy is critical for an optimal benefit-risk ratio. Patient adherence remains virtually unexplored in many cancers, such as malignant blood diseases. When measured, adherence is poor, especially when the drug is administered as oral and prolonged therapy (hormonotherapy in breast cancer, imatinib). Physician nonadherence represents another form of drug misadministration; poorly documented, its mechanism remains obscure. Adherence may be measured by a panel of methods, each of them displaying limits and pitfalls, suggesting that several complementary methods should be used in the context of prospective studies. Risk factors are age, socio-educative profile, disease stage and physician profile. This review emphasizes some methods to prevent nonadherence. Finally, this review argues for prospective studies, which should integrate a social pharmacology approach, including medicine, psycho-sociology and economics.

  17. Interaction of Bovine Peripheral Blood Polymorphonuclear Cells and Leptospira Species; Innate Responses in the Natural Bovine Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H.; Frank, Ami T.; Hornsby, Richard L.; Olsen, Steven C.; Alt, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and Leptospira interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia, and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2) was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of Leptospira strains

  18. [Effects of the glucoprotein component of musk on functions of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by LTB4 in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Bai, J; Cheng, G; Zhu, X

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the effects of musk-1, a glucoprotein component isolated from the water extract of musk, on some functions of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by LTB4, an in vitro incubation system with rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes was used. The superoxide anion production was determined by cytochrome C reduction, and the beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme release was quantitated by enzyme reactions in which phenolphthaleinglucuronic acid and micrococcus lysodeikticus were used as the substrates. In comparison with the control, musk-1 at final concentrations of 1 microgram/ml-100 micrograms/ml can increase the superoxide anion production by 28.7%-202.1% and decrease the beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme release by 3%-46% and 6%-32% respectively in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that musk-1 can significantly affect the functions of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by LTB4. One of the mechanisms of this anti-inflammatory action of musk may consist in the inhibition of lysosomal enzyme release.

  19. Immunological Activation of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils for Fungal Killing: Studies with Murine Cells and Blastomyces dermatitidis In Vitro,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The interaction of elicited murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and the thermally dimorphic fungal pathogen Blastomyces dermatitidis in vitro...albicans compared to normal PMN. Fungicidal activity was abrogated in the presence of catalase , implicating hydrogen peroxide generation as the killing mechanism in the activated cells.

  20. Recruitment of CD55 and CD66e brush border-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins by members of the Afa/Dr diffusely adhering family of Escherichia coli that infect the human polarized intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells.

    PubMed

    Guignot, J; Peiffer, I; Bernet-Camard, M F; Lublin, D M; Carnoy, C; Moseley, S L; Servin, A L

    2000-06-01

    The Afa/Dr family of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) includes bacteria expressing afimbrial adhesins (AFA), Dr hemagglutinin, and fimbrial F1845 adhesin. We show that infection of human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells by the Afa/Dr DAEC strains C1845 and IH11128 is followed by clustering of CD55 around adhering bacteria. Mapping of CD55 epitopes involved in CD55 clustering by Afa/Dr DAEC was conducted using CD55 deletion mutants expressed by stable transfection in CHO cells. Deletion in the short consensus repeat 1 (SCR1) domain abolished Afa/Dr DAEC-induced CD55 clustering. In contrast, deletion in the SCR4 domain does not modify Afa/Dr DAEC-induced CD55 clustering. We show that the brush border-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein CD66e (carcinoembryonic antigen) is recruited by the Afa/Dr DAEC strains C1845 and IH11128. This conclusion is based on the observations that (i) infection of Caco-2/TC7 cells by Afa/Dr DAEC strains is followed by clustering of CD66e around adhering bacteria and (ii) Afa/Dr DAEC strains bound efficiently to stably transfected HeLa cells expressing CD66e, accompanied by CD66e clustering around adhering bacteria. Inhibition assay using monoclonal antibodies directed against CD55 SCR domains, and polyclonal anti-CD55 and anti-CD66e antibodies demonstrate that CD55 and CD66e function as a receptors for the C1845 and IH11128 bacteria. Moreover, using structural draE gene mutants, we found that a mutant in which cysteine replaced aspartic acid at position 54 displayed conserved binding capacity but failed to induce CD55 and CD66e clustering. Taken together, these data give new insights into the mechanisms by which Afa/Dr DAEC induces adhesin-dependent cross talk in the human polarized intestinal epithelial cells by mobilizing brush border-associated GPI-anchored proteins known to function as transducing molecules.

  1. Testing an optimized community-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk reduction and antiretroviral adherence intervention for HIV-infected injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Michael M; Lee, I-Ching; Margolin, Arthur; Bruce, Robert D; Altice, Frederick L

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a preliminary study of the 4-session Holistic Health for HIV (3H+), which was adapted from a 12-session evidence-based risk reduction and antiretroviral adherence intervention. Improvements were found in the behavioral skills required to properly adhere to HIV medication regimens. Enhancements were found in all measured aspects of sex-risk reduction outcomes, including HIV knowledge, motivation to reduce sex-risk behavior, behavioral skills related to engaging in reduced sexual risk, and reduced risk behavior. Improvements in drug use outcomes included enhancements in risk reduction skills as well as reduced heroin and cocaine use. Intervention effects also showed durability from post-intervention to the follow-up assessment point. Females responded particularly well in terms of improvements in risk reduction skills and risk behavior. This study suggests that an evidence-based behavioral intervention may be successfully adapted for use in community-based clinical settings where HIV-infected drug users can be more efficiently reached.

  2. Ethical considerations in adherence research

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient’s adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient’s rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research. PMID:27980394

  3. Ethical considerations in adherence research.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient's adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient's rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research.

  4. Effects of polymorphonuclear leucocyte depletion on the pathogenesis of experimental Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgeorge, R. B.; Featherstone, A. S.; Baskerville, A.

    1988-01-01

    Guinea-pigs were depleted of circulating polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) by administration of anti-polymorph serum. Groups of animals were then infected by aerosols containing different doses of Legionella pneumophila and the effects compared with those in intact infected controls. Elimination of PMN lowered the dose of L. pneumophila necessary to establish infection, increased bacterial numbers in the lungs and caused much higher mortality. It did not change the nature or extent of pulmonary lesions. The findings confirm the importance of PMN in defence of the lung against L. pneumophila infection and indicate that PMN and their enzymes are not responsible for the pulmonary lesions, which are probably caused directly by the bacteria. PMID:3348954

  5. Migration and chemiluminescence of polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes to Bacteroides sonicates.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Lewis, D M; Gerencser, V F; Gerencser, M A; Snyder, I S

    1992-01-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that various preparations obtained from representatives of the genus Bacteroides are poorly phagocytized by polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) and macrophages. Crude cell sonicates derived from Bacteroides have been examined for their ability to inhibit migration of PMN and monocytes using a modified migration under agarose in vitro assay. B. gingivalis and B. intermedius were found to be inhibitors of such migration while B. asaccharolyticus did not share this property (P less than 0.005). In addition, B. intermedius sonicates were found to inhibit PMN chemiluminescence to known stimulants (P less than 0.001). These data were not found to result from direct sonicate cytotoxicity and therefore lend additional support to the etiologic importance of specific Bacteroides strains in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic dentoalveolar infections.

  6. Effect of Phenylbutazone on Phagocytosis and Intracellular Killing by Guinea Pig Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Robert R.; Paul, Benoy B.; Sbarra, Anthony J.

    1968-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory drug phenylbutazone has been found to inhibit both engulfment and intracellular killing of E. coli by guinea pig peritoneal polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes. The bactericidal activity of leukocytic homogenates was also inhibited by the drug. Addition of the drug at various time intervals to a phagocytic reacting system caused an almost immediate cessation of bactericidal activity. Metabolic studies showed that the drug sharply curtailed glucose-l-14C and 14C-formate oxidation of both resting and phagocytizing PMN leukocytes. These data indicated an effect upon the hexose monophosphate shunt and H2O2 formation. Further investigation showed that the sites of inhibition were on glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. These inhibitions resulted in decreased H2O2 production. It is suggested that H2O2 activates lysosomes and subsequently complexes with the lysosomal enzyme, myeloperoxidase. This complex is a potent bactericidal agent in the phagocyte. PMID:4881700

  7. [Chemiluminescence in a stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes--luminol system: suppression by thiols].

    PubMed

    Murina, M A; Roshchupkin, D I; Belakina, N S; Filippov, S V

    2005-01-01

    The effect of some scavengers of thiol nature, which eliminate all reactive oxygen species and oxidants with reactive chlorine, on the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. The use of two scavengers of this type (penetrating and not penetrating into the cell) made it possible to separate the luminescence of cell structures from the luminescence generated by oxidants in the surrounding medium. It was found that about a half of luminol luminescence is due to its oxidation in the medium surrounding the cell, and it is completely inhibited by the nonpenetrating reduced glutathione. The cell itself is a source of a considerable portion of luminescence, and this luminescence is quenched by penetrating sulfhydryl compounds such as dithiothreitol and N-acethyl cysteine. Reduced glutathione, which penetrates into cells and whose action is due only to the sulfhydryl group, is recommended as a candidate for the selective neutralization of extracellular oxidants.

  8. [Chemiluminescence of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes-luminol system in the presence of biogenic chloramines].

    PubMed

    Murina, M A; Belakina, N S; Roshchupkin, D I

    2004-01-01

    It was demonstrated that N-chlorphenylalanine and other chloramines strengthen sharply chemiluminescence in the polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PML)-luminol system without special activation of cells. The intensity of chemiluminescence is higher than the intensity of luminol solution emission induced by N-chlorphenylalanine. But it was nearly equal to chemiluminescence intensity of a mixture of luminol, N-chlorphenylalanine and 20-30 nM H2O2. The increase in chemiluminescence in the PML-luminol system in the presence of N-chlorphenylalanine is not related to PML activation but is the result of direct oxidation of luminol by N-chlorphenylalanine. Chloramine derivatives of amino acids and taurine at final concentrations of 0.01-0.1 mM do not suppress luminol chemiluminescence in suspension of PML stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. At the same time, hypochlorite inhibits sharply luminol emission induced by stimulated cells.

  9. [Effects of musk glucoprotein on chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vivo and in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-jie; Zhong, Miao; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Long-en; Cheng, Gui-fang; Zhu, Xiu-yuan

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Musk glucoprotein on chemotaxis of Polymorphonuclear leukocytes(PMN). The chemotaxis of PMN in abdominal cavity in rat induced by carboxymethyl cellulose(CMC) was used as an in vivo animal model and in in vitro it was evaluated by Boyden chamber. The concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+ was quantitated with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Fura-2. The water extract of Musk at dose of 5, 20, 80 mg.kg-1 (s.c.) significantly inhibited the chemotaxis of PMN in rat; Musk-1 at concentration of 1-100 micrograms.mL-1 can significantly inhibit the chemotaxis of rabbit PMN in vitro; Musk-1 at concentration of 1-100 micrograms.mL-1 can significantly inhibit the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in PMN of rat. Part of mechanisms underlying antiinflammatory action of Musk is to inhibit the chemotaxis of PMN.

  10. Shigella flexneri is trapped in polymorphonuclear leukocyte vacuoles and efficiently killed.

    PubMed Central

    Mandic-Mulec, I; Weiss, J; Zychlinsky, A

    1997-01-01

    We examined the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) against an invasive wild-type strain of Shigella flexneri (M90T) and a plasmid-cured noninvasive derivative (BS176). Both Shigella strains, as well as a rough strain of Escherichia coli, were killed with similar efficiencies by intact inflammatory PMN in room air and under N2 (i.e., killing was O2 independent). Bacterial killing by PMN extracts was substantially inhibited by antibodies to the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI). Whereas wild-type Shigella escapes from the phagosome to the cytoplasm in epithelial cells and macrophages, wild-type Shigella was trapped in the phagolysosome of PMN as visualized by electron microscopy. The efficient killing of Shigella by PMN suggests that these inflammatory cells may not only contribute initially to the severe tissue damage characteristic of shigellosis but also ultimately participate in clearance and resolution of infection. PMID:8975899

  11. Phagocytosis of bovine blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes after ozone gas administration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ducusin, Rio John T; Nishimura, Masakazu; Sarashina, Takao; Uzuka, Yuji; Tanabe, Shigeyuki; Otani, Masayuki

    2003-04-01

    To determine the effects of ozone on the phagocytosis of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), ozone gas was administered in vitro on the blood and milk of healthy lactating cows, cows with acute mastitis, and cows with milk fever. In the blood of healthy dairy cattle, although there was no significant effect of ozone gas on the viability of the leukocytes, phagocytosis of PMNs significantly decreased. In contrast, ozone gas administration in vitro significantly increased phagocytosis of PMNs from the blood of cows with acute mastitis and milk fever, and from mastitic milk. These findings showed that ozone administration in vitro has positive and negative effects on bovine PMN phagocytosis, depending on the health status of the animal.

  12. The effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocyte response experiment MA-032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    In a series of studies performed at intervals from 30 day before flight to 30 days after recovery, blood samples were obtained from the three astronauts of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project and from eight control subjects. To determine the effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocytes, tests were performed on blood samples obtained as quickly as possible after splashdown and on the day following recovery. The astronauts' inhalation of propellant gases and the inception of corticosteroid therapy 1 day after recovery provided an additional opportunity to investigate the possible effects of these factors on leukocyte function. Data were obtained during each time period on the total leukocyte count, differential count, leukocyte adhesion, leukocyte migration and chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and histochemical staining for leukocyte acid and alkaline phosphatase. These observations present a variety of in vitro correlates to white blood cell function within the body. Taken together, they serve as a reasonable approximation of the effects of space flight on leukocyte function.

  13. Determination of phagocytosis of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dulin, A.M.; Paape, M.J.; Weinland, B.T.

    1984-04-01

    A procedure for the measurement of phagocytosis by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was modified so that a larger number of samples could be compared in a single run, and smaller volumes of sample, PMN, and /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus could be used. Results were highly reproducible, with a coefficient of variation between duplicate determinations of less than or equal to 2%. Lysostaphin was prepared from the supernatant of S staphylolyticus and was compared with a commercially available preparation. Effects of lysostaphin on PMN and influence of incubation media on release of /sup 32/P from /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus by lysostaphin were examined.

  14. Effect of donkey seminal plasma on sperm movement and sperm-polymorphonuclear neutrophils attachment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miró, Jordi; Vilés, Karina; García, Wilber; Jordana, Jordi; Yeste, Marc

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of seminal plasma in endometrial inflammation in donkeys, samples from fresh pure, fresh diluted and frozen-thawed semen of three different jackasses were co-incubated in water bath at 37°C with uterine Jennie's secretions collected 6h after artificial insemination with frozen-thawed donkey semen. Individual sperm movement parameters using the computerised sperm analysis system (CASA) and sperm-polymorphonuclear neutrophils (sperm-PMN) attachment observed in Diff-Quick stained smears were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4h of co-incubation. Controls consisted of incubating diluted or frozen-thawed sperm in the absence of uterine secretions. For data analyses, a repeated measures ANOVA was performed with incubation time as intra-subject factor and with treatment and donkey as inter-subject factor, followed by a post-hoc Bonferroni's test. Greater values (P<0.05) of sperm-PMN percentages and a loss of progressive motility were observed in frozen-thawed semen compared with pure and diluted fresh semen samples throughout the incubation time. In addition, the presence of seminal plasma in fresh and diluted semen samples reduced the inflammatory response of polymorphonuclear neutrophils produced after insemination by suppressing the sperm-PMN attachment in vitro. Motility sperm parameters analysed by CASA were also less affected than those in frozen-thawed semen samples. In conclusion, seminal plasma in jennies appears to have a modulation on the endometrial response after artificial insemination with frozen-thawed donkey semen. As a result, spermatozoa with the greater motility characteristics are selected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adherence of bacteria to heart valves in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gould, K; Ramirez-Ronda, C H; Holmes, R K; Sanford, J P

    1975-12-01

    The abilities of 14 strains of aerobic gram-positive cocci and gram-negative bacilli to adhere in vitro to human or canine aortic valve leaflets were compared. 2-mm sections of excised valve leaflets were obtained by punch biopsy and were incubated under standardized conditions in suspensions of bacteria. Valve sections were subsequently washed and homogenized, and quantitative techniques were used to determine the proportions of bacteria from the initial suspensions that had adhered to the valve sections. Comparable results were obtained when these adherence ratios were determined by two independent methods based either on measurements of bacterial viability or of radioactivity in 51Cr-labeled bacteria. For each bacterial strain, the adherence ratio was constant over a wide range of concentrations of bacteria in the incubation medium. Strains of enterococci, viridans streptococci, coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (adherence ratios 0.003-0.017) were found to adhere more readily to valve sections than strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae (adherence ratios 0.00002-0.00004). The organisms that most frequently cause bacterial endocarditis were found to adhere best to heart valves in vitro, suggesting that the ability to adhere to valvular endothelium may be an important or essential charcteristic of bacteria that cause endocarditis in man.

  16. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  17. Comparison of human monocytes isolated by elutriation and adherence suggests that heterogeneity may reflect a continuum of maturation/activation states.

    PubMed Central

    Dransfield, I; Corcoran, D; Partridge, L J; Hogg, N; Burton, D R

    1988-01-01

    Monocytes are heterogeneous both in terms of physical properties and in their functional capacity. Isolation of monocytes from peripheral blood may perturb the observed heterogeneity for purified cell preparations. To explore this possibility we examined monocytes prepared by two techniques, counter-flow centrifugation elutriation (CCE) and fibronectin adherence, in terms of cell-surface molecule expression and several physical properties. Although such cells would be expected to represent dissimilar cross-sections of the total monocyte population, they were found to have similar cell-surface antigenic profiles. Observed differences in levels of expression of several molecules (CR1, CR3 and the antigen recognized by LP9 antibody) were found to be a temperature-related phenomenon. These results indicate that monocytes are not divisible into 'subpopulations' on the basis of cell-surface molecule expression and suggest that heterogeneity of monocytes may reflect the presence in the circulation of a continuum of maturational/activation states. PMID:3350583

  18. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tracheal cells injured by influenza infection or by endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ramphal, R; Small, P M; Shands, J W; Fischlschweiger, W; Small, P A

    1980-02-01

    Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to normal, injured, and regenerating tracheal mucosa was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Uninfected and influenza-infected murine tracheas were exposed to six strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from human sources and one strain of platn origin. All of the strains tested adhered to desquamating cells of the infected tracheas, but not to normal mucosa, the basal cell layer, or the regenerating epithelium. Adherence increased when the incubation time of the bacteria with the trachea was prolonged. Strains isolated from human tracheas appeared to adhere better than strains derived from the urinary tract. After endotracheal intubation of ferrets, P. aeruginosa adhered only to the injured cells and to areas of exposed basement membrane. We call this phenomenon "opportunistic adherence" and propose that alteration of the cell surfaces or cell injury facilitates the adherence of this bacterium and that adherence to injured cells may be a key to the pathogenesis of opportunistic Pseudomonas infections.

  19. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence.

  20. The Adherent/Invasive Escherichia coli Strain LF82 Invades and Persists in Human Prostate Cell Line RWPE-1, Activating a Strong Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Aleandri, Marta; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Conte, Antonietta L.; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Gambara, Guido; Palombi, Fioretta; De Cesaris, Paola; Ziparo, Elio; Palamara, Anna T.; Riccioli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adherent/invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains have recently been receiving increased attention because they are more prevalent and persistent in the intestine of Crohn's disease (CD) patients than in healthy subjects. Since AIEC strains show a high percentage of similarity to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, here we compared AIEC strain LF82 with a UPEC isolate (strain EC73) to assess whether LF82 would be able to infect prostate cells as an extraintestinal target. The virulence phenotypes of both strains were determined by using the RWPE-1 prostate cell line. The results obtained indicated that LF82 and EC73 are able to adhere to, invade, and survive within prostate epithelial cells. Invasion was confirmed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Moreover, cytochalasin D and colchicine strongly inhibited bacterial uptake of both strains, indicating the involvement of actin microfilaments and microtubules in host cell invasion. Moreover, both strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are strong biofilm producers. In silico analysis reveals that LF82 shares with UPEC strains several virulence factors: namely, type 1 pili, the group II capsule, the vacuolating autotransporter toxin, four iron uptake systems, and the pathogenic island (PAI). Furthermore, compared to EC73, LF82 induces in RWPE-1 cells a marked increase of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and of NF-κB already by 5 min postinfection, thus inducing a strong inflammatory response. Our in vitro data support the hypothesis that AIEC strains might play a role in prostatitis, and, by exploiting host-cell signaling pathways controlling the innate immune response, likely facilitate bacterial multiplication and dissemination within the male genitourinary tract. PMID:27600504

  1. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Adherent/Invasive Escherichia coli Strain LF82 Invades and Persists in Human Prostate Cell Line RWPE-1, Activating a Strong Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Conte, Maria P; Aleandri, Marta; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Conte, Antonietta L; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Gambara, Guido; Palombi, Fioretta; De Cesaris, Paola; Ziparo, Elio; Palamara, Anna T; Riccioli, Anna; Longhi, Catia

    2016-11-01

    Adherent/invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains have recently been receiving increased attention because they are more prevalent and persistent in the intestine of Crohn's disease (CD) patients than in healthy subjects. Since AIEC strains show a high percentage of similarity to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, here we compared AIEC strain LF82 with a UPEC isolate (strain EC73) to assess whether LF82 would be able to infect prostate cells as an extraintestinal target. The virulence phenotypes of both strains were determined by using the RWPE-1 prostate cell line. The results obtained indicated that LF82 and EC73 are able to adhere to, invade, and survive within prostate epithelial cells. Invasion was confirmed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Moreover, cytochalasin D and colchicine strongly inhibited bacterial uptake of both strains, indicating the involvement of actin microfilaments and microtubules in host cell invasion. Moreover, both strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are strong biofilm producers. In silico analysis reveals that LF82 shares with UPEC strains several virulence factors: namely, type 1 pili, the group II capsule, the vacuolating autotransporter toxin, four iron uptake systems, and the pathogenic island (PAI). Furthermore, compared to EC73, LF82 induces in RWPE-1 cells a marked increase of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and of NF-κB already by 5 min postinfection, thus inducing a strong inflammatory response. Our in vitro data support the hypothesis that AIEC strains might play a role in prostatitis, and, by exploiting host-cell signaling pathways controlling the innate immune response, likely facilitate bacterial multiplication and dissemination within the male genitourinary tract.

  3. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    trapping. • Human peripheral blood leukocytes capture and concentrate quinacrine. • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes do so with higher apparent affinity. • Polymorphonuclear are also more competent than lymphocytes for pinocytosis.

  4. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  5. Tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages: a simple and efficient method for the generation and long-term cultivation as non-adherent cells in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Streck, R J; Hurley, E L; Epstein, D A; Pauly, J L

    1992-01-01

    We report a simple and efficient culture procedure for the generation of tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages (MAC). In this method, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, isolated using a conventional Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient procedure, are cultured as a heterogenous leukocyte population in Teflon or other hydrophobic cultureware, in a commercially available serum-free culture medium (M-SFM) that has been formulated specifically for the cultivation and ex vivo stimulation of human monocytes and MAC, and in the absence of exogenous mitogens, antigens, cytokines or other stimulants. This procedure features a negative-selection technique that takes advantage of the differential survival of blood leukocytes. Using the prescribed in vitro conditions, lymphocytes survived relatively poorly, whereas monocytes differentiated in the absence of exogenous stimulants into mature tumour-cytolytic MAC. The MAC were present as non-adherent, single cells that expressed good viability (greater than 95%) for a prolonged period (greater than 60 days). When compared to conventional procedures for generating MAC, the prescribed technique is thought to offer several important advantages in that it: (a) eliminates the tedious and cumbersome monocyte isolation procedures, thus providing a significant savings not only in time and money but also in eliminating repetitive cell manipulations that have often been associated with damage to monocyte morphology and/or function; (b) reduces the loss of monocyte subsets that are not recovered during specific isolation procedures; (c) facilitates harvesting a single cell, non-adherent suspension of immunocompetent MAC suitable for various examinations including analyses defining MAC morphology, cytochemistry, phenotype and function; and (d) eliminates variability and artifacts associated with different sera that are utilised frequently as medium supplements. The utility of the prescribed method is illustrated by the

  6. Phospholipase C Activity in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes: Partial Characterization and Effect of Indomethacin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    phospholipase C activity alone, and in the presence of 0.5 mM and I mM indomethacin, is plotted according to Lineweaver and Burke as described previously...The data were plotted according to the method of Lineweaver and Burke (26). The values represent the mean + S.E.M. of values derived from neutrophils of 4 subjects. 18

  7. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  8. Health behavior change: can genomics improve behavioral adherence?

    PubMed

    McBride, Colleen M; Bryan, Angela D; Bray, Molly S; Swan, Gary E; Green, Eric D

    2012-03-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute recommends pursuing "genomic information to improve behavior change interventions" as part of its strategic vision for genomics. The limited effectiveness of current behavior change strategies may be explained, in part, by their insensitivity to individual variation in adherence responses. The first step in evaluating whether genomics can inform customization of behavioral recommendations is evidence reviews to identify adherence macrophenotypes common across behaviors and individuals that have genetic underpinnings. Conceptual models of how biological, psychological, and environmental factors influence adherence also are needed. Researchers could routinely collect biospecimens and standardized adherence measurements of intervention participants to enable understanding of genetic and environmental influences on adherence, to guide intervention customization and prospective comparative effectiveness studies.

  9. Health Behavior Change: Can Genomics Improve Behavioral Adherence?

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Angela D.; Bray, Molly S.; Swan, Gary E.; Green, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute recommends pursuing “genomic information to improve behavior change interventions” as part of its strategic vision for genomics. The limited effectiveness of current behavior change strategies may be explained, in part, by their insensitivity to individual variation in adherence responses. The first step in evaluating whether genomics can inform customization of behavioral recommendations is evidence reviews to identify adherence macrophenotypes common across behaviors and individuals that have genetic underpinnings. Conceptual models of how biological, psychological, and environmental factors influence adherence also are needed. Researchers could routinely collect biospecimens and standardized adherence measurements of intervention participants to enable understanding of genetic and environmental influences on adherence, to guide intervention customization and prospective comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:22390502

  10. Adherent neutrophils mediate permeability after atelectasis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, G; Welbourn, R; Rothlein, R; Wiles, M; Kobzik, L; Valeri, C R; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1992-01-01

    Re-expansion of atelectatic lung is associated with increased permeability. This study tests whether neutrophils mediate this event. Right middle lobar atelectasis was induced in anesthesized rabbits (n = 18) by intraluminal obstruction of the bronchus after a 20-minute ventilation with 100% O2. After 1 hour of bronchial obstruction and 20 minutes after lobar re-expansion, leukopenia was noted, 2870 +/- 210 white blood cells (WBC)/mm3, relative to control animals treated with a noninflated balloon catheter, 6500 +/- 410 WBC/mm3 (p less than 0.05). Three hours after re-expansion, neutrophils were sequestered in the previously atelectatic region 78 +/- 7 polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)/10 high-power field (HPF), as well as in nonatelectatic areas, 40 +/- 3 PMN/10 HPF, higher than control values of 26 +/- 3 PMN/10 HPF (p less than 0.05). In the atelectatic region, neutrophil sequestration was associated with increased protein concentration in lobar bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of 1370 +/- 100 micrograms/mL, higher than control values of 270 +/- 20 micrograms/mL (p less than 0.05). Reexpansion also induced increases in lung wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/d) of 6.2 +/- 0.2, higher than control values of 4.3 +/- 0.1 (p less than 0.05). Rendering rabbits neutropenic (n = 18) (0 to 4 PMN/mm3) limited the atelectasis-induced protein accumulations in BAL (520 +/- 60 micrograms/mL) and increase in lung W/d (5.2 +/- 0.1) (both p less than 0.05). Intravenous (I.V.; treatment of another group (n = 18) with an anti-CD 18 monoclonal antibody (R 15.7, 1 mg/kg) before balloon deflation prevented leukopenia (6550 +/- 560 WBC/mm3), minimized neutrophil sequestration (36 +/- 2 PMN/10 HPF), and attenuated protein leak (710 +/- 95 micrograms/mL) and the increased lung W/d (5.6 +/- 0.1) (all p less than 0.05). A final atelectatic group (n = 9) was treated I.V. with the anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody (RR 1/1, 1 mg/kg), which also prevented leukopenia and showed

  11. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli infection in T84 cell monolayers induces increased neutrophil transepithelial migration, which in turn promotes cytokine-dependent upregulation of decay-accelerating factor (CD55), the receptor for Afa/Dr adhesins.

    PubMed

    Bétis, Fréderic; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Véronique; Guignot, Julie; Kansau, Imad; Rossi, Bernard; Servin, Alain; Hofman, Paul

    2003-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are inflammatory bowel diseases thought to involve strains of Escherichia coli. We report here that two wild-type Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli (DAEC) strains, C1845 and IH11128, which harbor the fimbrial F1845 adhesin and the Dr hemagglutinin, respectively, and the E. coli laboratory strain HB101, transformed with the pSSS1 plasmid to produce Afa/Dr F1845 adhesin, all induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production and transepithelial migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in polarized monolayers of the human intestinal cell line T84 grown on semipermeable filters. We observed that after PMNL migration, expression of decay-accelerating factor (DAF, or CD55), the brush border-associated receptor for Afa/Dr adhesins, was strongly enhanced, increasing the adhesion of Afa/Dr DAEC bacteria. When examining the mechanism by which DAF expression was enhanced, we observed that the PMNL transepithelial migration induced epithelial synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and IL-1beta, which in turn promoted the upregulation of DAF.

  12. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  13. Adherence to antiepilepsy drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-11-01

    Adherence to antiepilepsy drug (AED) therapy is critical for effective disease management, yet adherence and persistence rates are low due to several barriers. The definitions of adherence (80% rate of total pills taken, medication possession ratio, and days covered by prescriptions filled) and methods of measurement (patient self-reports, serum drug levels, pill counts, electronic bottle tops, and reviews of pharmacy records) are not without limitations, and their applicability to epilepsy is not clear. The use of simple adherence scales during office visits can provide an overall impression of a patient's adherence and can serve as a basis for practitioner-patient dialog. Efforts to improve adherence should focus on provider and healthcare system determinants versus those focused only on the patient. These interventions include non-judgmental communication, patient education, simplification of the dosage regimen with once-daily therapies, and the use of patient reminders.

  14. Differentiation of cultured keratinocytes promotes the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, G L; Fleckman, P; Jonas, M; Chi, E; Rubens, C E

    1998-01-01

    Based on a consideration of the histopathology of nonbullous impetigo that shows localization of Streptococcus pyogenes to highly differentiated, subcorneal keratinocytes, we hypothesized that adherence of an impetigo strain of S. pyogenes would be promoted by terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. An assay was developed in which S. pyogenes adhered via pilus-like projections from the cell wall to the surface of cultured human keratinocytes in a time- and inoculum-dependent manner suggestive of a receptor-mediated process. Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes was induced by increasing the calcium concentration in the growth medium, and was confirmed by morphologic analysis using electron microscopy. Adherence of S. pyogenes was three and fourfold greater to keratinocytes differentiated in 1.0 and 1.5 mM calcium, respectively, compared with undifferentiated keratinocytes in 0.15 mM calcium. The presence of calcium during the adherence assay further enhanced adherence nearly twofold. Adherence occurred preferentially to sites of contact between adjacent keratinocytes, suggesting that the keratinocyte receptor may be a molecule involved in cell-to-cell adhesion. In contrast, nonpathogenic Streptococcus gordonii adhered poorly to keratinocytes regardless of their state of terminal differentiation, and adherence of a pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes was twofold greater to undifferentiated than differentiated keratinocytes. This is the first report of in vitro adherence of S. pyogenes to keratinocytes in a manner that emulates human impetigo. Adherence of only the impetigo strain, and not the pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes or the nonpathogenic S. gorgonii isolate, was promoted by keratinocyte differentiation. This result provides a model system for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of streptococcal skin infections. PMID:9421474

  15. Factors governing adherence of Candida species to plastic surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, S A; Drutz, D J; Zajic, J E

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans and Candida spp. to adhere to inert polymeric surfaces may allow these organisms direct ingress into the human host. Biophysical characterization of this adherence shows that the forces responsible for such adherence are attractive London-van der Waals forces (or hydrophobic forces) and electrostatic forces. The hydrophobic affinity of yeasts was determined by (i) a water-hydrocarbon two-phase assay and by (ii) measurement of the contact angle (theta) of a liquid droplet on a monolayer of yeast cells. The hydrophobicity of the yeasts correlated with the tendency of yeasts to adhere to polystyrene and was reduced in the presence of Tween 20. The adherence of yeasts to polymers of increasing hydrophobicity (determined by the contact angle method) was directly proportional to theta. Yeast surface charges were altered by selectively blocking amino and carboxyl groups. The more positively charged yeasts adhered in greater numbers. Increasing the molarity of NaCl increased yeast adherence. These forces probably contribute to the negative cooperativity (determined by Scatchard and Hill plot) that characterizes the adherence of yeasts to polymers. PMID:3899942

  16. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  17. Patient adherence to allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reisacher, William R; Visaya, Jiovani M

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the literature on patient adherence to two different approaches to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic disease. Factors related to adherence in general, as well as the various methods used to measure adherence, will be discussed. Although a complex interaction of factors related to both the physician and the patient influence the adherence to a particular therapeutic regimen, effective communication between these two parties and the simplicity of the regimen are frequently noted to be of primary importance. Variability with respect to the definition of adherence, the method of measuring adherence, and the length of the measuring period has resulted in a wide range of adherence rates to allergy immunotherapy reported in the literature. Patients most often site inconvenience, side-effects, and poor efficacy as reasons for discontinuing allergy immunotherapy. Adherence to therapy not only improves individual patient outcomes, but also helps determine the best treatment modalities and reduces the burden of disease on society. As new methods of delivering immunotherapy are being developed, such as allergy immunotherapy tablets and oral mucosal immunotherapy, the factors associated with patient adherence should be carefully considered.

  18. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Stephen M M; Jensen, Emily L; Simon, Stacey L; Friedman, Norman R

    2016-06-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ(2) test. Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20-4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27-5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the pathophysiology of and to develop adherence

  19. Adherence as a language game.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Espen Skarstein

    2017-03-02

    Non-adherence, i.e. medication intake behavior not corresponding with agreed recommendations, is associated with increased morbidity and death, and it has been estimated that as many as 50% of patients in developed countries are not taking their medications as prescribed. But even as efforts in improving medication adherence over the years have increased, results are inconsistent, with only a minority of clinical trials showing any improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome. Since patient education is central to promoting good medication adherence, and language is integral to education, perhaps an exploration of the meaning and use of language, using the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, is in order.

  20. Inhibition of superoxide anion production in guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes by a seleno-organic compound, ebselen.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, S; Omura, K; Katayama, T; Okamura, N; Ohtsuka, T; Ishibashi, S; Masayasu, H

    1987-10-01

    Production of superoxide anion (O2-) induced by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) in intact guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was markedly inhibited by a seleno-organic compound, 2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one (Ebselen), with glutathione peroxidase-like activity. The compound almost completely inhibited O2- production by a particulate fraction prepared from TPA-treated PMNL at a concentration as low as 250 nM.

  1. Zidovudine-loaded PLA and PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles: influence of polymer type on phagocytic uptake by polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Khalil, Najeh Maissar

    2009-01-01

    Mononuclear (macrophages) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes cells play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Zidovudine is a broad-spectrum drug used in current antiretroviral therapy. The development of controlled drug delivery systems for the treatment of chronic diseases is of great interest since these systems can act as vectors, carrying the drug only to the target, and the adverse effects can be reduced. In this study, PLA and PLA/PEG blend nanoparticles containing zidovudine were developed and their uptake by polymorphonuclear leucocytes were studied in vitro. The influence of polymer type on particle size, Zeta potential and particle uptake by polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated. The cells were isolated from rat peritoneal exudate and their activation by nanoparticles was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence and microscopical analysis. The PEG in the blend modified the Zeta potential suggested the formation of a PEG coat on the particle surface. The phagocytosis depended on the PEG and its ratio in the blend, the results showed that the PLA nanoparticles were more efficiently phagocytosed than PLA/PEG blends. The blend with the highest PEG proportion did not prevent phagocytosis, indicating that the steric effect of PEG was concentration dependent. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  2. Pathogenesis of human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): current insights and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Servin, Alain L

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as "silent pathogens" with the capacity to emerge as "pathobionts" for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis.

  3. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  4. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  5. Delivery of rifampicin-chitin nanoparticles into the intracellular compartment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Smitha, K T; Nisha, N; Maya, S; Biswas, Raja; Jayakumar, R

    2015-03-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) provide the primary host defence against invading pathogens by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal products. However, few pathogens can survive for a prolonged period of time within the PMNs. Additionally their intracellular lifestyle within the PMNs protect themselves from the additional lethal action of host immune systems such as antibodies and complements. Antibiotic delivery into the intracellular compartments of PMNs is a major challenge in the field of infectious diseases. In order to deliver antibiotics within the PMNs and for the better treatment of intracellular bacterial infections we synthesized rifampicin (RIF) loaded amorphous chitin nanoparticles (RIF-ACNPs) of 350±50 nm in diameter. RIF-ACNPs nanoparticles are found to be non-hemolytic and non-toxic against a variety of host cells. The release of rifampicin from the prepared nanoparticles was ∼60% in 24 h, followed by a sustained pattern till 72 h. The RIF-ACNPs nanoparticles showed 5-6 fold enhanced delivery of RIF into the intracellular compartments of PMNs. The RIF-ACNPs showed anti-microbial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and a variety of other bacteria. In summary, our results suggest that RIF-ACNPs could be used to treat a variety of intracellular bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria and PMNs, which we found to consist of DNA and other polymers. Here we present a novel method to study a pathogen-host interaction in detail. The data presented provide the first direct, high-resolution visualization of the failure of PMNs to protect against bacterial biofilms.

  7. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration intensity as consequence of Entamoeba histolytica density in amebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Dickson-Gonzalez, Sonia M; de Uribe, Marleny Lunar; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2009-04-01

    It has been suggested that the damage observed in invasive amebiasis is related to interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. We analyzed the relation between infiltrating inflammatory cell populations and E. histolytica density in intestinal amebic lesions. Biopsies obtained endoscopically from patients with amebic colitis were analyzed to describe their morphologic abnormalities. Cellular populations and E. histolytica trophozoites were measured quantitatively in order to assess the correlation between infiltrating inflammatory cell populations and parasite density. Amebic lesions were most often located in the colon (55%). The histopathologic diagnoses were colitis in 31%, erosive colitis in 26%, and ulcerated colitis in 24%. The predominant cellular populations found in the lesions were lymphocytes (59.8%) (3,672 +/- 2,413/mm(2)) followed by PMN (17%) (1,038 +/- 1,171 PMN/mm(2)) (p < 0.01). A higher density of PMN infiltration was observed in severe cases. Cellular populations predictive of the presence of E. histolytica trophozoites (p = 0.047) were PMN (p = 0.019) and lymphocytes (p = 0.033). The highest association was found between E. histolytica trophozoites and PMN (p = 0.0221). Neutrophils and lymphocytes, particularly the former, are associated significantly with the density of parasites. Our findings support the theory that PMN interaction with E. histolytica contributes to the pathogenesis of amebic intestinal lesions.

  8. Role of myeloperoxidase in luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlgren, C; Stendahl, O

    1983-01-01

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and soluble or particulate matter interact, the cells produce chemiluminescence, linked to activation of the oxidative metabolism of the cells. PMNL isolated from a patient with a myeloperoxidase deficiency were found to produce almost no luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, despite a pronounced production of superoxide anions (O2-). The chemotactic peptide formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine induced a two-peak chemiluminescence response in control PMNL. The response was modified, both in magnitude and in time-course, when the cells were incubated at 22 degrees C for 120 min. Addition of purified myeloperoxidase to the PMNL lacking this enzyme, before stimulus addition, resulted in a chemiluminescence response. In the response to formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, only one peak, corresponding to the initial peak of control PMNL, was found. This indicated that luminol-dependent chemiluminescence is dependent on and directly related to the presence of myeloperoxidase in PMNL and that both intra- and extracellularly located myeloperoxidase has to be taken into account when interpreting the cellular response assayed as chemiluminescence. PMID:6299947

  9. Assessment of the functional capacity for intracellular death and phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear cells in healthy neonates.

    PubMed

    Del Rey-Pineda, G; Gómez-González, M V; Solórzano-Santos, F; Arredondo-García, J L

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the functional capacity for intracellular death (ID) and/or phagocytic index (PI) of polymorphonuclear cells of 24-h-old healthy newborns with respect to the PMN cells of adults using the same standard exogenous source of opsonins. The ID and PI techniques were standardized and 2-3 ml of blood were used. No differences were found in the percentages of ID, P, PI among the PMNs of the newborns and those of the adults: 43.95 +/- 15.70 vs. 44.56 +/- 8.43 for ID; 38.96 +/- 14.34 vs. 39.00 +/- 14.54 for P; 1.71 +/- 0.54 vs. 1.73 0.45 for PI, respectively. It was concluded that the PMNs of 24-h newborns have an ID, P, PI functionality comparable to adult PMNs; differences observed in PMN function in newborns may be due to humoral deficiencies (opsonins).

  10. Prepartal Energy Intake Alters Blood Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Transcriptome During the Peripartal Period in Holstein Cows

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, A; Khan, MJ; Graugnard, DE; Vailati-Riboni, M; Rodriguez-Zas, SL; Osorio, JS; Loor, JJ

    2017-01-01

    In the dairy industry, cow health and farmer profits depend on the balance between diet (ie, nutrient composition, daily intake) and metabolism. This is especially true during the transition period, where dramatic physiological changes foster vulnerability to immunosuppression, negative energy balance, and clinical and subclinical disorders. Using an Agilent microarray platform, this study examined changes in the transcriptome of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) due to prepartal dietary intake. Holstein cows were fed a high-straw, control-energy diet (CON; NEL = 1.34 Mcal/kg) or overfed a moderate-energy diet (OVE; NEL = 1.62 Mcal/kg) during the dry period. Blood for PMNL isolation and metabolite analysis was collected at −14 and +7 days relative to parturition. At an analysis of variance false discovery rate <0.05, energy intake (OVE vs CON) influenced 1806 genes. Dynamic Impact Approach bioinformatics analysis classified treatment effects on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, including activated oxidative phosphorylation and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids and inhibited RNA polymerase, proteasome, and toll-like receptor signaling pathway. This analysis indicates that processes critical for energy metabolism and cellular and immune function were affected with mixed results. However, overall interpretation of the transcriptome data agreed in part with literature documenting a potentially detrimental, chronic activation of PMNL in response to overfeeding. The widespread, transcriptome-level changes captured here confirm the importance of dietary energy adjustments around calving on the immune system. PMID:28579762

  11. Feline polymorphonuclear neutrophils produce pro-inflammatory cytokines following exposure to Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Cambier, Ludivine; Mathy, Anne; Baldo, Aline; Bagut, Elena Tatiana; Tabart, Jérémy; Antoine, Nadine; Mignon, Bernard

    2013-03-23

    The mechanisms involved in the establishment of the specific immune response against dermatophytes remain unknown. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are recruited early during the infection process and participate in the elimination of dermatophytes. They could therefore be involved in the induction of the immune response during dermatophytoses by producing specific cytokines. The aim of this work was to assess the in vitro cytokine production by feline PMNs exposed to living arthroconidia from the dermatophyte species Microsporum canis or stimulated with either a secreted or a structural component of M. canis, the latter consisting of heat-killed arthroconidia. The levels of specific cytokines produced by PMNs were determined by capture ELISA and/or quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that PMNs secrete TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 following exposure to M. canis living arthroconidia and stimulation with both a secreted component and heat-killed arthroconidia. The level of IL-8 mRNA was also increased in PMNs stimulated with M. canis living arthroconidia. In conclusion, infective M. canis arthroconidia induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by feline PMNs that can be activated either by secreted or structural fungal components. Our results suggest that these granulocytes are involved in the initiation of the immune response against M. canis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Systemic immunomodulatory effects of topical dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in rats. Activity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Belij, Sandra; Popov, Aleksandra; Zolotarevski, Lidija; Mirkov, Ivana; Djokic, Jelena; Kataranovski, Dragan; Kataranovski, Milena

    2012-03-01

    Topical application of dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) is employed in the immunotherapy of skin diseases. Activation of T-cell mediated immune responses (Th1/type1) is the supposed mechanism of the clinical effect of DNCB, but there are no data concerning innate/inflammatory mechanisms. In this study, the effect of repeated topical DNCB application on peripheral blood polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes has been examined in two rat strains which differ in the propensity to mount Th1/type1 or Th2/type2 responses. The dynamics of changes in PMN numbers and effector activities (respiratory burst, nitric oxide production and myeloperoxidase content), as well as in adhesion and TNF-α production following the rat skin sensitization with low (0.4%) and high (4%) DNCB doses were measured. Both priming and activation of PMNs were observed following skin sensitization with DNCB, with dose-dependent as well as time-dependent differences in some PMN activities. Obtained data might be relevant for understanding the immune mechanisms of topical DNCB therapy. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Impaired bactericidal but not fungicidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Georgiadou, Sarah P; Wierda, William G; Wright, Susan; Albert, Nathaniel D; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Lewis, Russell E

    2013-08-01

    We examined the qualitative polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated immune impairment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by characterizing phagocytic killing of key non-opsonized bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) pathogens. Neutrophils were collected from 47 non-neutropenic patients with CLL (PMN count > 1000/mm(3)) and age-matched and young healthy controls (five each). A subset of patients (13%) had prior or subsequent infections. We found that the patients with CLL had diminished PMN microbicidal response against bacteria but not against fungi compared with the controls. Compared to patients with effective PMN responses, we did not identify differences of basal PMN pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor gene expression, soluble pathogen-associated molecular pattern gene expression or inflammatory cytokine signatures in patients with impaired PMN responses when PMNs were analyzed in multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. However, differences in PMN microbicidal response against A. fumigatus in patients with CLL were associated with the degree of hypogammaglobulinemia.

  14. Impaired bactericidal but not fungicidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Georgiadou, Sarah P.; Wierda, William G.; Wright, Susan; Albert, Nathaniel D.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Lewis, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the qualitative polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated immune impairment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by characterizing phagocytic killing of key nonopsonized bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) pathogens. Neutrophils were collected from 47 nonneutropenic CLL patients (PMN count > 1000/mm3), and age-matched and young healthy controls (five each). A subset of patients (13%) had prior or subsequent infections. We found that the CLL patients had diminished PMN microbicidal response against bacteria but not against fungi than did the controls. Compared to patients with effective PMN responses, we did not identify differences of basal PMN pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor gene expression, soluble pathogen-associated molecular pattern gene expression, or inflammatory cytokine signatures in patients with impaired PMN responses when PMNs were analyzed in multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. However, differences in PMN microbicidal response against A. fumigatus in CLL patients were associated with the degree of hypogammaglobulinemia. PMID:23163595

  15. [Inhibitory effect of nafamostat mesilate (FUT-175) on O2- production in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes].

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Ogihara, M; Sato, T; Kurumi, M; Iwaki, M

    1986-05-01

    Effect of nafamostat mesilate (FUT-175), a serine protease inhibitor, having anti-inflammatory effects was studied on superoxide (O2-) production in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and compared with those of other serine protease inhibitors and typical anti-inflammatory agents. 1) O2- productions in rat PMN stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) and cytochalasin B (Cyt B) were too weak to observe. With NADH, however, strong O2- production was induced by Con A and Cyt B. 2) FUT-175 at 10(-6) and 10(-5) M inhibited O2- production in rat PMN induced by Con A and Cyt B with NADH in a concentration-dependent manner. 3) The serine protease inhibitor L-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) inhibited O2- production at 10(-5) M and 10(-4) M, respectively, while aprotinin, chymostatin and leupeptin did not. 4) Neither indomethacin nor dexamethasone, typical anti-inflammatory agents, inhibited O2- production. Mepacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, strongly inhibited it. 5) O2- production in PMN prepared from the rat administered FUT-175, 200 mg/kg, p.o., was significantly decreased in comparison with that of the control rat. 6) FUT-175 had no effect on O2- production by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase. These results showed FUT-175 had a strong inhibitory effect on O2- production in rat PMN which other typical anti-inflammatory agents did not have.

  16. Increased CD64 expression on polymorphonuclear neutrophils indicates infectious complications following solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grey, Daniel; Sack, Ulrich; Scholz, Markus; Knaack, Heike; Fricke, Stephan; Oppel, Christoph; Luderer, Daniel; Fangmann, Josef; Emmrich, Frank; Kamprad, Manja

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of monitoring CD64 antigen upregulation on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) for the identification of infectious complications in the postoperative course of solid organ transplanted patients. Twenty-five kidney, 13 liver, and four pancreas-kidney transplanted patients were included. Beginning with preoperative values up to postoperative values after 3 months for each patient, the PMN CD64 Index, HLA-DR on monocytes, NKp44+ NK and NK/T cells, CXCR3+ NK cells, CXCR3+ T helper cells, CXCR3+ NK/T cells, and CD4/CD8 ratio were measured by flow cytometry. Subsequently they were correlated with confirmed postoperative complications. Measuring the PMN CD64 Index reached a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 65% in the detection of infectious complications. Concerning this matter, it was a significantly better marker than all other included parameters except CXCR3+ NK/T cells. In contrast, according to our results the PMN CD64 Index has no diagnostic relevance in detection of rejections. The combination of included parameters showed no improved diagnostic value. Due to its high sensitivity and specificity for infectious complications CD64 on PMN could be proven a very good indicator in evaluating suspected infectious complications in the postoperative course of transplanted patients.

  17. Characterization of a neutral protease from lysosomes of rabbit polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Philip; Rita, Giuseppe A.; Krakauer, Kathrin; Weissmann, Gerald

    1971-01-01

    1. The subcellular distribution has been investigated of a protease from rabbit polymorphonuclear leucocytes, obtained from peritoneal exudates. The enzyme, optimally active between pH7.0 and 7.5, hydrolyses histone but not haemoglobin, sediments almost exclusively with a granule fraction rich in other lysosomal enzymes, and is latent until the granules are disrupted by various means. 2. Enzymic analysis of specific and azurophilic granules separated by zonal centrifugation showed that neutral protease activity was confined to fractions rich in enzymes characteristic of azurophile granules. 3. Recovery of neutral protease activity from subcellular fractions was several times greater than that found in whole cells. This finding was explained by the presence of a potent inhibitor of the enzyme activity in the cytoplasm. 4. The effect of the inhibitor was reversed by increasing ionic strength (up to 2.5m-potassium chloride) and by polyanions such as heparin and dextran sulphate, but not by an uncharged polymer, dextran. 5. The enzyme was also inhibited, to a lesser extent, by 1-chloro-4-phenyl-3-l-toluene-p-sulphonamidobutan-2-one, soya-bean trypsin inhibitor and ∈-aminohexanoate (∈-aminocaproate). 6. The granule fractions failed to hydrolyse artificial substrates for trypsin and chymotrypsin. 7. Partial separation of the enzyme was achieved by Sephadex gel filtration at high ionic strength and by isoelectric focusing. The partially separated, activated enzyme showed an approximately 300-fold increase in specific activity over that in whole cells. PMID:5126908

  18. Repeatability of flow cytometric and classical measurement of phagocytosis and respiratory burst in bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Kampen, Annette H; Tollersrud, Tore; Larsen, Stig; Roth, James A; Frank, Dagmar E; Lund, Arve

    2004-01-01

    Five methods for measurement of phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of bovine blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were evaluated. Eight cows were repeatedly sampled over a two week period and parallel samples tested in all five assays to assess the repeatability and stability of the methods. In the flow cytometric phagocytosis assay, ingestion of fluorescein labeled bacteria was measured, and in the flow cytometric assay for respiratory burst, oxidation of a dye by reactive oxygen species was recorded. In the classical assays, bactericidal effect on opsonized, live bacteria was quantified by the conversion of an indicator substance, superoxide anion production was assayed by the reduction of cytochrome c, whereas myeloperoxidase activity was determined with a radioactive iodination assay. The results showed that the Phagotest, Bursttest, cytochrome c and iodination assays gave repeatable results when samples were run in the same setup on the same day. Although day-to-day variability was significant in all assays, the described methods comprise a panel of useful tests for the evaluation of phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity in bovine PMNs. The flow cytometric methods represent a convenient alternative to the classical methods for measurement of phagocytosis and respiratory burst in bovine blood PMNs.

  19. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte membrane fluidity before and after activation in subjects with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Sinagra, D; Canino, B; Scarpitta, A M; Montana, M; Bonaventura, V; Lo Presti, R

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this research was the evaluation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) membrane fluidity in subjects with insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity, in fact, may be influenced by plasma membrane fluidity. We enrolled 19 subjects with insulin resistance previously demonstrated during an euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. PMN membrane fluidity was studied by labeling intact cells with the fluorescent probe 1-[4-(trimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and calculating the fluorescence polarization degree. The measurement was made before and after incubation of PMNs with two activating agents: 4-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). The baseline data showed a reduction of PMN membrane fluidity in subjects with insulin resistance. After PMN activation with PMA and fMLP, no significant variation in membrane fluidity was present in PMNs from normals, while in those from subjects with insulin resistance a slight decrease in PMN membrane fluidity was found only after activation with fMLP. The behavior of PMN membrane fluidity, before and after activation, distinguishes insulin-resistant subjects from normal controls, although the effect cannot be directly correlated with the degree of insulin resistance.

  20. Cytosolic Ca2+ content and membrane fluidity of platelets and polymorphonuclear leucocytes in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Lo Presti, R; Canino, B; Montana, M; Ventimiglia, G; Catania, A; Sarno, A

    1995-08-01

    Considering the role played by platelets and leucocytes in diabetic disease and keeping in mind the strong correlation between functional and metabolic aspects that characterizes this clinical condition, we evaluated, in two groups of diabetics, respectively the platelet and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cytosolic Ca2+ content (employing the fluorescent probe Fura 2-AM) and membrane fluidity (using the fluorescent probe TMA-DPH and considering the fluorescence polarization degree, inversely related to the membrane fluidity). From the obtained results, it is evident that the platelet cytosolic Ca2+ content does not distinguish normals from diabetics of type 1 and 2; the platelet membrane fluidity instead does not discriminate normals from diabetics, but differentiates diabetics of type 1 and 2 (type 1 = 0.284 +/- 0.015; type 2 = 0.314 +/- 0.018; p < 0.001). PMN cytosolic Ca2+ content and membrane fluidity do not discriminate normals from diabetics. In the two groups of diabetics none of the platelet and PMN parameters (cytosolic Ca2+ content and membrane fluidity) are related to the glycometabolic pattern.

  1. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte membrane fluidity and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Canino, B; Montana, M; Ventimiglia, G; Catania, A; Lo Presti, R

    1998-10-01

    We evaluated polymorphonuclear membrane (PMN) fluidity in 32 subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 38 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 38 normal control subjects, by marking intact and unstimulated PMN cells with the fluorescent probe 1-[4-(trimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH). We also evaluated PMN cytosolic Ca2+ content by marking intact and unstimulated PMN cells with the fluorescent probe Fura 2-AM. PMN membrane fluidity differentiated normal subjects from type 1 and 2 diabetic subjects. The PMN cytosolic Ca2+ concentration did not discriminate type 1 and 2 diabetic subjects from normal control subjects. No statistical correlation was found between PMN membrane fluidity and PMN cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in any of the groups of subjects, nor were significant correlations found between PMN membrane fluidity and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in several plasma parameters (serum glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides). In conclusion, in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients we found a decrease in PMN membrane fluidity and this decrease, which was greater in type 2 diabetic patients, may be a marker of PMN dysfunction.

  2. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  3. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  4. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  5. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of Adherent Oxide Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-14

    oxide scale-metal interface, thereby improving scale adherence. Because the reactive elements which improve scale adherence (yttrium, hafnium , etc...temperature range, the chromium in the alloy lowers the sulfur activity greater than that of aluminium . Despite this ability of chromium to reduce sulfur

  7. [Strategies to improve medication adherence].

    PubMed

    Laufs, U; Böhm, M; Kroemer, H K; Schüssel, K; Griese, N; Schulz, M

    2011-08-01

    Up to 50 % of patients with chronic diseases do not take their medication regularly. Poor adherence to drug therapy is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. A selective literature search using the terms adherence, compliance, concordance, persistence, medication management, and pharmaceutical care was performed. Evidence for improving adherence has been provided for the following principles: individual counselling of patients and care givers, medication management including simplifying dosing and use of combination tablets as well as the use of individual unit doses, e. g. blister cards. The effectiveness has only been shown for the duration of the interventions. The improvement of medication adherence represents an area of research with high impact on outcomes and cost. Measures to improve adherence may be as important as the development of novel therapies. However, prospective clinical evaluations with clinical endpoints are missing especially for the German health care system in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice. Joint efforts of physicians and pharmacists are needed.

  8. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell- dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence. PMID:1704376

  9. Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kidong; Millet, Larry J.; Kim, Namjung; Li, Huan; Jin, Xiaozhong; Popescu, Gabriel; Aluru, N. R.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of physical properties of cells such as their mass and stiffness has been of great interest and can have profound implications in cell biology, tissue engineering, cancer, and disease research. For example, the direct dependence of cell growth rate on cell mass for individual adherent human cells can elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression. Here we develop an array of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) resonant mass sensors that can be used to directly measure the biophysical properties, mass, and growth rate of single adherent cells. Unlike conventional cantilever mass sensors, our sensors retain a uniform mass sensitivity over the cell attachment surface. By measuring the frequency shift of the mass sensors with growing (soft) cells and fixed (stiff) cells, and through analytical modeling, we derive the Young’s modulus of the unfixed cell and unravel the dependence of the cell mass measurement on cell stiffness. Finally, we grew individual cells on the mass sensors and measured their mass for 50+ hours. Our results demonstrate that adherent human colon epithelial cells have increased growth rates with a larger cell mass, and the average growth rate increases linearly with the cell mass, at 3.25%/hr. Our sensitive mass sensors with a position-independent mass sensitivity can be coupled with microscopy for simultaneous monitoring of cell growth and status, and provide an ideal method to study cell growth, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:21068372

  10. Understanding Non-Adherence From the Inside: Hypertensive Patients' Motivations for Adhering and Not Adhering.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Pablo A; Moncada, Laura; Defey, Denise

    2017-06-01

    Patients' low adherence to medical treatment in chronic illnesses is one of the biggest public health problems. Numerous studies attend to the diverse factors associated with patient adherence. However, little research has been done to explore patients' reasons for non-compliance from their own point of view. In this article, we aim to understand patient non-adherence using dialogical self-theory and qualitative research methods. We interviewed 51 hypertensive patients to explore their anti- and pro-adherence motivations. Results show that most patients adhere and non-adhere to different aspects of treatment programs (medication, exercise, diet) according to the way they construct meaning to those activities. Also, our findings support the notion that patients' non-adherent behavior aims to preserve important values such as self-esteem, autonomy, affiliation, well-being, freedom, and health (or that more adherence is not worth the extra effort). We discuss the therapeutic relevance of empathically understanding patients' worldview and implicit beliefs.

  11. Humanized In Vivo Model for Streptococcal Impetigo

    PubMed Central

    Scaramuzzino, Dominick A.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Bessen, Debra E.

    2000-01-01

    An in vivo model for group A streptococcal (GAS) impetigo was developed, whereby human neonatal foreskin engrafted onto SCID mice was superficially damaged and bacteria were topically applied. Severe infection, indicated by a purulent exudate, could be induced with as few as 1,000 CFU of a virulent strain. Early findings (48 h) showed a loss of stratum corneum and adherence of short chains of gram-positive cocci to the external surface of granular keratinocytes. This was followed by an increasing infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) of mouse origin, until a thick layer of pus covered an intact epidermis, with massive clumps of cocci accumulated at the outer rim of the pus layer. By 7 days postinoculation, the epidermis was heavily eroded; in some instances, the dermis contained pockets (ulcers) filled with cocci, similar to that observed for ecthyma. Importantly, virulent GAS underwent reproduction, resulting in a net increase in CFU of 20- to 14,000-fold. The majority of emm pattern D strains had a higher gross pathology score than emm pattern A, B, or C (A–C) strains, consistent with epidemiological findings that pattern D strains have a strong tendency to cause impetigo, whereas pattern A–C strains are more likely to cause pharyngitis. PMID:10768985

  12. Apoptosis is associated with reduced expression of complement regulatory molecules, adhesion molecules and other receptors on polymorphonuclear leucocytes: functional relevance and role in inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J; Morgan, B P

    1995-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) express proteins that protect them from damage by homologous complement. Protection may be particularly important when these cells migrate to inflammatory sites where complement activation is taking place. Resolution of inflammation involves removal of these PMN. The major mechanism of removal is likely to involve PMN apoptosis followed by recognition and engulfment by macrophages. However, little attention has been paid to the possible relevance of apoptosis to PMN susceptibility to immune effectors. Here we describe a reduction in cell surface expression of two complement regulatory proteins, CD59, an inhibitor of the membrane attack complex and CD55 (decay accelerating factor), an inhibitor of the C3/C5 convertase, on a subpopulation of PMN aged in culture. Loss of these proteins, both attached to the membrane by glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, correlated closely with the appearance of apoptotic morphology. We also observed a marked reduction in expression of the GPI-anchored molecule CD16 on apoptotic PMN. Reduced expression of membrane proteins was not confined to those anchored through GPI--several transmembrane molecules including CD11a CD11b and CD18 were also reduced on apoptotic PMN, whilst other were little changed (CD35, CD46). The precipitous fall in CD16 surface expression on PMN was not specific for apoptosis--in vitro incubation of PMN with lipopolysaccharide-inhibited apoptosis but caused a reduction in CD16 expression to 'apoptotic' levels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8567034

  13. Treatment adherence among adolescents with epilepsy: what really matters?

    PubMed

    Carbone, Loretta; Zebrack, Bradley; Plegue, Melissa; Joshi, Sucheta; Shellhaas, Renée

    2013-04-01

    Treatment adherence is often suboptimal among adolescents with epilepsy. However, knowledge is lacking regarding factors that affect adherence. Empirical studies and theories of human development suggest that self-management skills, self-efficacy, and sense of control are related to adherence. Eighty-eight adolescents with epilepsy, and their parents, completed standardized measures assessing epilepsy knowledge and expectations, treatment self-management, sense of control, and self-efficacy. Better self-reported parent adherence was correlated with greater epilepsy knowledge/expectations (p<0.001) and more medications (p = 0.042). Better self-reported adolescent adherence was correlated with fewer siblings (p = 0.003) and higher adolescent epilepsy knowledge/expectations (p<0.001). Greater adolescent epilepsy knowledge/expectations correlated with parent self-reported adherence (p<0.001), Powerful others locus of control (p = 0.008), and adolescent/parent discordance regarding epilepsy knowledge/expectations (p<0.001). Interventions that enhance adolescent's knowledge of epilepsy and their treatment plan, while ensuring that teens and parents are in agreement with regard to epilepsy treatment, might contribute to better adherence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Can we improve adolescent adherence?

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Adherence has been defined as the extent to which a person's action and behaviour matches the agreed recommendations from a clinician.(1,2) It is a continuous and dynamic process influenced by many factors, including the disease, the treatments, the healthcare team and system, social and economic factors, as well as patient-related factors.(1) Non-adherence may adversely affect clinical outcomes and lead to increased healthcare costs.(1-3) Reported rates of adherence are around 50% for people with long-term conditions, and may be as low as 30% among adolescents (aged 10-19 years).(1,3,4) Around 20% of those aged under 18 years have a chronic illness and treatment often requires long-term cumbersome regimens including multiple daily medicines, making adherence challenging.(1,3,5) It is important to distinguish between intentional and non-intentional adherence and to tailor interventions to the individual, using every healthcare contact as an opportunity to discuss adherence.(1) Here we consider the challenges faced by healthcare professionals in encouraging adolescents to adhere to treatment regimens (in particular taking medicines) and some strategies that may help. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Reinforcing adherence to antihypertensive medications.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Alessi, Sheila M; Byrne, Shannon; White, William B

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated a reinforcement intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Twenty-nine participants were randomized to standard care or standard care plus financial reinforcement for 12 weeks. Participants in the reinforcement group received a cell phone to self-record videos of adherence, for which they earned rewards. These participants sent videos demonstrating on-time adherence 97.8% of the time. Pill count adherence differed significantly between the groups during treatment, with 98.8%±1.5% of pills taken during treatment in the reinforcement condition vs 92.6%±9.2% in standard care (P<.002). Benefits persisted throughout a 3-month follow-up, with 93.8%±9.3% vs 78.0%±18.5% of pills taken (P<.001). Pill counts correlated significantly (P<.001) with self-reports of adherence, which also differed between groups over time (P<.01). Systolic blood pressure decreased modestly over time in participants overall (P<.01) but without significant time-by-group effects. These results suggest that reinforcing medication adherence via cellular phone technology and financial reinforcement holds potential to improve adherence.

  16. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m2/gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm3, an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm.

  17. Morbidly adherent placenta.

    PubMed

    Abuhamad, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Morbidly adherent placenta, which describes placenta accreta, increta, and percreta, implies an abnormal implantation of the placenta into the uterine wall. The incidence of placenta accreta has increased significantly over the past several decades, with the main risk factors include prior cesarean section and placental previa. Sonographic markers of placenta accreta can be present as early as the first trimester and include a low uterine implantation of a gestational sac, multiple vascular lacunae within the placenta, loss of the normal hypoechoic retroplacental zone, and abnormality of the uterine serosa-bladder interface, among others. Ultrasound has high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of placenta accreta and MRI should be reserved for rare cases in which the ultrasound is non-diagnostic. The optimum time for planned delivery for a patient with placenta accreta is around 34-35 weeks following a course of corticosteroid injection. The successful management of placenta accreta includes a multidisciplinary care team approach with the successful management relying heavily on the prenatal diagnosis of this entity and preparing for the surgical management in a multidisciplinary approach by assuring the most skilled team is available for those patients.

  18. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, H.H.; D'Amico, R.; Monfils, P.; Burchard, K.W. )

    1991-03-01

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions.

  19. Effect of thrombopoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Schattner, M; Pozner, R G; Gorostizaga, A B; Lazzari, M A

    2000-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be administered together in aplastic patients. We evaluated the effect of both cytokines alone or combined on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional responses. TPO, G-CSF, or the combination of both cytokines, induced neither platelet nor PMN activation. TPO but not G-CSF synergized with threshold ADP concentrations to induce maximal aggregation and ATP release. The synergistic effect of TPO with ADP was not modified by the presence of G-CSF. Flow cytometry studies have shown that thrombin-induced loss of GPIb from platelet surface was significantly increased by pretreatment of platelets with TPO, G-CSF, or both cytokines. P-selectin expression induced by thrombin was augmented by TPO, but not by G-CSF. Coincubation of the cells with TPO and G-CSF did not modify the values obtained with TPO alone. Expression of CD11b on PMN surface was augmented by G-CSF or fMLP. G-CSF-treated PMN increased the effect of fMLP on CD11b expression. TPO did not modify either basal levels of CD11b or the increased expression induced by G-CSF or fMLP. Incubation of PMN with both cytokines showed no differences compared to G-CSF alone. Platelet-PMN aggregates induced by thrombin in whole blood were augmented by TPO. G-CSF alone neither synergized with thrombin nor changed the results observed with TPO. These data show that in vitro functional responses of platelets, or PMN induced by TPO or G-CSF alone, were neither further increased nor inhibited by treatment of the cells with both cytokines.

  20. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  1. Clinical relevance of polymorphonuclear (PMN-) elastase determination in semen and serum during infertility investigation.

    PubMed

    Eggert-Kruse, W; Zimmermann, K; Geissler, W; Ehrmann, A; Boit, R; Strowitzki, T

    2009-08-01

    The polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase is secreted by activated granulocytes and is widely used as a marker of male accessory gland infection. However, the clinical value of routine determination of seminal plasma (SP) PMN elastase in asymptomatic patients during infertility investigation has not clearly been established and not much is known about the significance of PMN-elastase levels in serum as a potential biochemical determinant associated with infection/inflammation of the male genital tract. This prospective study included a total of 221 asymptomatic males from unselected subfertile couples, to evaluate the relationship of (i) serum and (ii) same-day SP PMN elastase concentrations with established semen quality parameters, including sperm functional capacity, local antisperm antibodies (ASA), seminal leucocytes, and the outcome of semen cultures including typical sexually transmitted disease pathogens, and a potential association with patients' medical history and results of clinical andrological examination. Furthermore, couples were followed up for subsequent fertility (controlled for female infertility factors). The concentrations of PMN elastase in serum and in SP were not significantly related to semen quality [with regard to microscopic (e.g. count, motility, morphology) as well as biochemical parameters, and also to local ASA of the IgG- or IgA-class]. There was no strong relationship with sperm functional capacity. No significant relationship with the outcome of the microbial screening was found. PMN-elastase levels in serum and SP were not significantly correlated and there was no association with subsequent fertility. Therefore, the value of routine determination of PMN elastase in semen and/or serum samples, particularly when used as a single parameter to screen for subclinical infection/inflammation in males under infertility investigation is limited.

  2. In vivo ultrastructural analysis of the intimate relationship between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and the chlamydial developmental cycle.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Whittimore, Judy; Bowlin, Anne K; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2011-08-01

    We utilized a recently developed model of intracervical infection with Chlamydia muridarum in the mouse to elicit a relatively synchronous infection during the initial developmental cycle in order to examine at the ultrastructural level the development of both the chlamydial inclusion and the onset of the inflammatory response. At 18 h after infection, only a few elementary bodies attached to cells were visible, as were an occasional intracellular intermediate body and reticulate body. By 24 h, inclusions had 2 to 5 reticulate bodies and were beginning to fuse. A few polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were already present in the epithelium in the vicinity of and directly adjacent to infected cells. By 30 h, the inclusions were larger and consisted solely of reticulate bodies, but by 36 to 42 h, they contained intermediate bodies and elementary bodies as well. Many PMNs were adjacent to or actually inside infected cells. Chlamydiae appeared to exit the cell either (i) through disintegration of the inclusion membrane and rupture of the cell, (ii) by dislodgement of the cell from the epithelium by PMNs, or (iii) by direct invasion of the infected cell by the PMNs. When PMNs were depleted, the number of released elementary bodies was significantly greater as determined both visually and by culture. Interestingly, depletion of PMNs revealed the presence of inclusions containing aberrant reticulate bodies, reminiscent of effects seen in vitro when chlamydiae are incubated with gamma interferon. In vivo evidence for the contact-dependent development hypothesis, a potential mechanism for triggering the conversion of reticulate bodies to elementary bodies, and for translocation of lipid droplets into the inclusion is also presented.

  3. Generation of hydrogen peroxide by Candida albicans and influence on murine polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Danley, D L; Hilger, A E; Winkel, C A

    1983-01-01

    Iodide fixation by murine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) incubated with viable Candida albicans blastoconidia increases directly with yeast cell concentration up to about 3 x 10(6) cells per ml, but above this concentration bound activity declines dramatically. To understand the basis for this decline, we examined the oxidative metabolism of fungi and stimulated PMN and found some remarkable similarities between these cell types. Both produced 14CO2 when incubated with [1-14C]glucose, both reduced cytochrome c, and both fixed radiolabeled iodide, although the fungi required exogenous lactoperoxidase. In dose-response experiments, iodination by fungi with lactoperoxidase was identical to that with PMN, i.e., the maximum bound activity occurred in cultures with 10(6) to 3 x 10(6) blastoconidia per ml. Iodination by fungi with lactoperoxidase was reduced when blastoconidia were incubated at 25 degrees C or in the presence of catalase and the metabolic inhibitors rotenone, antimycin A, and 2-deoxyglucose. Results from assays for oxidation of scopoletin and o-dianisidine showed that 10(6) blastoconidia in 1.0 ml of medium released 0.5 to 0.7 nmol of H2O2 after 1 h, but 3 X 10(6) and 10(7) cells released significantly less H2O2. These results suggest that iodide fixation by PMN and low numbers of fungal cells may reflect a cooperative effort, with fungi generating some H2O2 that reacts with the myeloperoxidase released from the PMN. With high concentrations of blastoconidia, H2O2 activity appeared to be specifically inhibited, possibly to protect fungal cells from damage. PMID:6299966

  4. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  5. Bovine Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Cast Neutrophil Extracellular Traps against the Abortive Parasite Neospora caninum

    PubMed Central

    Villagra-Blanco, Rodolfo; Silva, Liliana M. R.; Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Yang, Zhengtao; Li, Jianhua; Gärtner, Ulrich; Taubert, Anja; Zhang, Xichen; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum represents a relevant apicomplexan parasite causing severe reproductive disorders in cattle worldwide. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) generation was recently described as an efficient defense mechanism of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) acting against different parasites. In vitro interactions of bovine PMN with N. caninum were analyzed at different ratios and time spans. Extracellular DNA staining was used to illustrate the typical molecules of NETs [i.e., histones (H3), neutrophil elastase (NE), myeloperoxidase (MPO), pentraxin] via antibody-based immunofluorescence analyses. Functional inhibitor treatments were applied to reveal the role of several enzymes [NADPH oxidase (NOX), NE, MPO, PAD4], ATP-dependent P2Y2 receptor, store-operated Ca++entry (SOCE), CD11b receptor, ERK1/2- and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathway in tachyzoite-triggered NETosis. N. caninum tachyzoites triggered NETosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed NET structures being released by bovine PMN and entrapping tachyzoites. N. caninum-induced NET formation was found not to be NOX-, NE-, MPO-, PAD4-, ERK1/2-, and p38 MAP kinase-dependent process since inhibition of these enzymes led to a slight decrease of NET formation. CD11b was also identified as a neutrophil receptor being involved in NETosis. Furthermore, N. caninum-triggered NETosis depends on Ca++ influx as well as neutrophil metabolism since both the inhibition of SOCE and of P2Y2-mediated ATP uptake diminished NET formation. Host cell invasion assays indicated that PMN-derived NETosis hampered tachyzoites from active host cell invasion, thereby inhibiting further intracellular replication. NET formation represents an early and effective mechanism of response of the innate immune system, which might reduce initial infection rates during the acute phase of cattle neosporosis. PMID:28611772

  6. Bovine Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Cast Neutrophil Extracellular Traps against the Abortive Parasite Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Villagra-Blanco, Rodolfo; Silva, Liliana M R; Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Yang, Zhengtao; Li, Jianhua; Gärtner, Ulrich; Taubert, Anja; Zhang, Xichen; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum represents a relevant apicomplexan parasite causing severe reproductive disorders in cattle worldwide. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) generation was recently described as an efficient defense mechanism of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) acting against different parasites. In vitro interactions of bovine PMN with N. caninum were analyzed at different ratios and time spans. Extracellular DNA staining was used to illustrate the typical molecules of NETs [i.e., histones (H3), neutrophil elastase (NE), myeloperoxidase (MPO), pentraxin] via antibody-based immunofluorescence analyses. Functional inhibitor treatments were applied to reveal the role of several enzymes [NADPH oxidase (NOX), NE, MPO, PAD4], ATP-dependent P2Y2 receptor, store-operated Ca(++)entry (SOCE), CD11b receptor, ERK1/2- and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathway in tachyzoite-triggered NETosis. N. caninum tachyzoites triggered NETosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed NET structures being released by bovine PMN and entrapping tachyzoites. N. caninum-induced NET formation was found not to be NOX-, NE-, MPO-, PAD4-, ERK1/2-, and p38 MAP kinase-dependent process since inhibition of these enzymes led to a slight decrease of NET formation. CD11b was also identified as a neutrophil receptor being involved in NETosis. Furthermore, N. caninum-triggered NETosis depends on Ca(++) influx as well as neutrophil metabolism since both the inhibition of SOCE and of P2Y2-mediated ATP uptake diminished NET formation. Host cell invasion assays indicated that PMN-derived NETosis hampered tachyzoites from active host cell invasion, thereby inhibiting further intracellular replication. NET formation represents an early and effective mechanism of response of the innate immune system, which might reduce initial infection rates during the acute phase of cattle neosporosis.

  7. Differential Alterations in Host Peripheral Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Chemiluminescence During the Course of Bacterial and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James P.; Bodroghy, Robert S.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Sobocinski, Philip Z.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stimulation of the oxidative metabolism in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) by in vitro phagocytosis of various microorganisms results in photon emission, termed chemiluminescence (CL). Studies were conducted to determine whether bacterial and viral infections induce enhanced basal endogenous host peripheral PMN CL in the absence of in vitro phagocytic stimulation. Nonimmune rats and guinea pigs as well as immune rats were inoculated with various doses (105 to 107) of live vaccine strain Francisella tularensis (per 100 g of body weight). In addition, nonimmune guinea pigs were inoculated with 40,000 plaque-forming units of Pichinde virus. Luminol-assisted endogenous PMN CL was measured at various time intervals after inoculation of microorganisms. Enhanced endogenous PMN CL was detected as early as the appearance of fever (12 h) in nonimmune animals infected with F. tularensis. Addition of sodium azide, N-ethylmaleimide, superoxide dismutase, or catalase to the CL reaction mixture containing PMN from infected animals significantly decreased the CL response. Immune rats challenged with F. tularensis exhibited resistance to infection and a decreased PMN CL compared with nonimmune rats 24 and 48 h after inoculation. However, the CL response from immune rats was significantly elevated, compared with control values. In contrast to the results obtained with the model bacterial infection, PMN isolated from guinea pigs inoculated with Pichinde virus failed to exhibit enhanced CL, compared with controls, despite significant viremia and fever. Results suggest that enhanced endogenous CL during bacterial infection occurs through mechanisms involving increased PMN oxidative metabolism and the subsequent generation of microbicidal forms of oxygen. Further, measurement of endogenous PMN CL may have diagnostic and prognostic value in infectious diseases. PMID:7228389

  8. Expression of CD64 on polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Migita, K; Agematsu, K; Yamazaki, K; Suzuki, A; Yazaki, M; Jiuchi, Y; Miyashita, T; Izumi, Y; Koga, T; Kawakami, A; Eguchi, K

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and serosal or synovial inflammation. We examined the utility of CD64 (FcγRI) expression in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as clinical and biological parameters in patients with FMF. We studied 12 Japanese FMF patients (mean age; 22·8 ± 15·5 years, male/female: 2/10), along with rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA, n = 38 male/female: 6/32, mean age; 52·2 ± 15·3 years), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 15 male/female: 0/15, mean age; 38·5 ± 15·9 years) and 12 healthy subjects (male/female: 3/9, mean age; 37·9 ± 17·2 years). CD64 expression on PMNs was determined using flow cytometry. The quantitative expression of CD64 in patients with FMF (2439·6 ± 2215·8 molecules per PMN) was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (547·8 ± 229·5, P = 0·003) or in patients with RA (606·5 ± 228·2, P < 0·0001) and SLE (681·3 ± 281·1, P = 0·004). The increased CD64 expression on PMNs isolated from untreated FMF patients was down-regulated by colchicine treatment. NACHT-LRR-PYD-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) activation using MurNAc-L-Ala-D-isoGln (MDP) resulted in increased CD64 expression on PMNs from healthy subjects. Our results suggest that quantitative measurement of CD64 expression on PMNs can be a valuable tool to discriminate between FMF and autoimmune diseases. PMID:21438869

  9. Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Restrict Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Moser, Claus; Scheike, Thomas; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Seier Poulsen, Steen; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert; Trøstrup, Hannah; Christoffersen, Lars; Hougen, Hans-Petter; Rickelt, Lars F.; Kühl, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have increased susceptibility to chronic lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the ecophysiology within the CF lung during infections is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the in vivo growth physiology of P. aeruginosa within lungs of chronically infected CF patients. A novel, quantitative peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)-based method was used to estimate the in vivo growth rates of P. aeruginosa directly in lung tissue samples from CF patients and the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in infected lungs in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also observed in vitro, where this limitation was alleviated in the presence of the alternative electron acceptor nitrate. The finding that P. aeruginosa growth patterns correlate with the number of surrounding PMNs points to a bacteriostatic effect by PMNs via their strong O2 consumption, which slows the growth of P. aeruginosa in infected CF lungs. In support of this, the growth of P. aeruginosa was significantly higher in the respiratory airways than in the conducting airways of mice. These results indicate a complex host-pathogen interaction in chronic P. aeruginosa infection of the CF lung whereby PMNs slow the growth of the bacteria and render them less susceptible to antibiotic treatment while enabling them to persist by anaerobic respiration. PMID:25114118

  10. Posttraumatic hypothermia reduces polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation following spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chatzipanteli, K; Yanagawa, Y; Marcillo, A E; Kraydieh, S; Yezierski, R P; Dietrich, W D

    2000-04-01

    The present study addresses the effects of moderate posttraumatic hypothermia (32 degrees C) on the temporal and regional profile of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) accumulation after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that posttraumatic hypothermia would reduce the degree of inflammation by reducing PMNL infiltration. Rats underwent moderate spinal cord injury at T10 using the NYU impactor device. In the first study, the temporal profile of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (a marker of neutrophil accumulation) under normothermic (37 degrees C) conditions was determined. The animals were allowed to survive for 3 or 24 h, or 3 or 7 days after SCI. Spinal cords were dissected into five segments rostral and caudal to the injury site. Additional animals were studied for the immunocytochemical visualization of MPO. In the second study, rats were sacrificed at 24 h after a monitoring period of normothermia (36.5 degrees C/3 h) or hypothermia (32.4 degrees C/3 h) with their controls. In the time course studies, MPO enzymatic activity was significantly increased at 3 and 24 h within the traumatized T10 segment compared to controls. MPO activity was also increased at 3 h within the rostral T8 and T9 segments and caudal T11 and T12 segments compared to controls. At 24 h after trauma, MPO activity remained elevated within both the rostral and caudal segments compared to control. By 3 days, the levels of MPO activity were reduced compared to the 24-h values but remained significantly different from control. Neutrophils that exhibited MPO immunoreactivity were seen at 6 and 24 h, with a higher number at 3 days. PMNLs were located within the white and gray matter of the lesion and both rostral and caudal to the injury site. Posttraumatic hypothermia reduced MPO activity at 24 h in the injured spinal cord segment, compared to normothermic values. The results of this study indicate that a potential mechanism by which hypothermia improves outcome following SCI is

  11. Kinetic analysis of microbe opsonification based on stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxygenation activity.

    PubMed

    Allen, R C; Lieberman, M M

    1984-08-01

    With Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the target microbes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) as effector phagocytes, the microbe-specific, immunoglobulin G (IgG)-dependent opsonic capacities of preimmune and immune sera were measured as the rate of stimulated PMNL dioxygenation of luminol yielding chemiluminescence (CL). When the reactants other than opsonin are present in concentrations that are not rate limiting, the information-effector relationship linking specific opsonin concentration to effector PMNL stimulation is described by the rate equation: L' = k'[IgG]i, where L' is the peak CL velocity (photons per minute), k' is the proportionality constant, [IgG] is the concentration of specific opsonin, and the exponent i is the order of the reaction with respect to opsonin. Since the specific opsonins were polyclonal IgG of unknown absolute serum concentration, the reciprocal rate expression, L' = k'D-i, was employed for data presentation; D is the serum dilution (final volume/initial serum volume), and the sign of i is changed to negative. The relationships of integral, first-derivative, and second-derivative expressions of the CL response to opsonin concentration are illustrated with experimentally obtained data. Based on peak CL velocity or peak CL acceleration measurements taken over different time intervals of testing, the estimated order with respect to opsonin is highest, and probably most accurate, using the shortest test interval allowing reasonably good precision of measurement. As an alternative temporal approach, microbe opsonification kinetics are analyzed based on nodal time (Tn) measurements. The Tn is the time point separating the acceleration and deceleration phases of the PMNL oxygenation response to stimulation and as such satisfies the criterion of a selected condition of PMNL activation.

  12. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  13. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte membrane fluidity and cytosolic Ca2+ content in different clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Canino, B; Montana, M; Ventimiglia, G; Catania, A; Lo Presti, R

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) membrane fluidity and PMN cytosolic Ca2+ content in several clinical conditions: diabetes mellitus, vascular atherosclerotic disease (VAD), chronic renal failure (CRF), essential hypertension (EH). In 13 subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), in 24 subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), in 42 VAD subjects, in 23 VAD subjects with NIDDM, in 15 subjects with CRF and in 12 subjects with EH, we determined the PMN membrane fluidity, obtained marking unstimulated PMN cells with fluorescent probe 1-[4-(trimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH), and considering the fluorescence polarization degree, and the PMN cytosolic Ca2+ content, obtained marking unstimulated PMN cells with the fluorescent probe Fura2-AM and considering the ratio between the Fura2-Ca2+ complex and the unchelated Fura 2 fluorescence intensity. From the obtained data it is evident that PMN membrane fluidity does not distinguish normals from IDDM subjects, NIDDM subjects, VAD subjects with and without NIDDM, CRF subjects and hypertensives. PMN cytosolic Ca2+ content, in comparison with normal controls, is significantly increased in VAD subjects (p < 0.01), in VAD subjects with NIDDM (p < 0.001), in CRF subjects (p < 0.001) and in hypertensives (p < 0.05). No correlation was found between PMN membrane fluidity and PMN cytosolic Ca2+ content. The study of these PMN parameters can be useful in the understanding of the role of leukocytes in the vascular damage that characterizes these clinical conditions.

  14. Diabetes mellitus: polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) filtration parameters and PMN membrane fluidity after chemotactic activation.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, R; Montana, M; Canino, B; Ventimiglia, G; Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine leukocyte rheology at baseline and after chemotactic activation in type I and type II diabetics. In 19 normal subjects, 21 type I diabetics, and 16 type II diabetics at baseline and after in vitro chemotactic activation (prolonged for 5 and 15 minutes) with two stimulating agents (4-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA] and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine [fMLP]), we evaluated polymorphonuclear (PMN) filtration parameters (using a St. George filtrometer [Carri-Med, Dorking, UK] and considering the initial relative flow rate [IRFR] and the concentration of clogging particles [CP]) and PMN membrane fluidity (obtained by marking PMNs with the fluorescent probe 1-(4-[trimethylamino]phenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH). At baseline, there was a difference between normals and type I and II diabetics for PMN membrane fluidity only. After activation in normals and diabetics of both types, a significant variation was present in PMN filtration parameters (IRFR and CP) at both 5 and 15 minutes. In normals, no variation was present in PMN membrane fluidity after activation with PMA or fMLP. After PMN activation, only in type I diabetics was a significant decrease in PMN membrane fluidity present at both 5 and 15 minutes. After PMN activation with either PMA or fMLP in comparison to basal values, only the mean variation (delta%) of the IRFR was significantly different between normals, type I diabetics, and type II diabetics at both 5 and 15 minutes. From the data obtained, it is evident that after activation, the PMN filtration pattern shows a specific behavior in diabetics of both types, while PMN membrane fluidity changes only in type I diabetics. The latter finding may be the basis of a metabolic pattern present in PMNs of this type, revealed after in vitro activation.

  15. Polymorphonuclear counts in ascitic fluid and microorganisms producing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: an under-recognized relationship.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Xavier; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Castellote, José; Xiol, Xavier; Ariza, Javier

    2013-10-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS. In cirrhotic patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) higher polymorphonuclear (PMN) count in ascitic fluid have been reported in infections caused by Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) as opposed to Gram-positive cocci (GPC). However, the influence of other associated factors on the PMN count, such as the specific microorganism causing the episode of SBP, has not been well established. METHODS. Retrospective observational study of 194 episodes of positive ascitic and/or blood culture SBP in 159 patients with liver cirrhosis (2001-2009). Parameters associated with PMN count in ascitic fluid at diagnosis were evaluated. RESULTS. The multivariate analysis (model 1) showed that a virulent etiology of the infection [coefficient 3.941 (95% confidence interval (95 CI): 0.421-7.461)] and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score [coefficient 0.196 (95 CI: 0.007-0.384)] were positively associated with the PMN count in ascites, while a nosocomial acquisition was inversely associated [coefficient -3.546 (95 CI: -6.855 - -0.238)]. A nonsignificant trend toward higher PMN count was found in GNB versus GPC, but there were differences between groups of microorganisms: pyogenic streptococci [median (p25-p75): 3211 (1615-8004)], Enterobacteriaceae [2958 (917-7690)], Vibrionaceae [9215 (375-17280)], nonfermenting GNB [1384 (565-3865)], viridans group streptococci [1044 (503-2354)] and enterococci [1050 (476-4655)](p = 0.005). No clear cut-offs of ascitic PMN count predicting a particular etiology could be calculated out of these data. CONCLUSIONS. In cirrhotic patients with SBP, the causing microorganism, the place of acquisition of the infection and the host liver condition were the main factors determining PMN count in ascitic fluid. Third-generation cephalosporin resistance was associated with low PMN count probably because this group included bacteria with inherent low virulence.

  16. Activation of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes by Candidate Biomaterials for an Implantable Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Andrey; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Lambris, John D; Johannessen, Erik A; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background Continuous monitoring of glucose by implantable microfabricated devices offers key advantages over current transcutaneous glucose sensors that limit usability due to their obtrusive nature and risk of infection. A successful sensory implant should be biocompatible and retain long-lasting function. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) play a key role in the inflammatory system by releasing enzymes, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species, typically as a response to complement activation. The aim of this study was to perform an in vitro analysis of PMN activation as a marker for biocompatibility of materials and to evaluate the role of complement in the activation of PMN. Methods Fifteen candidate materials of an implantable glucose sensor were incubated in lepirudin-anticoagulated whole blood. The cluster of differentiation molecule 11b (CD11b) expression on PMN was analyzed with flow cytometry and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in plasma was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Complement activation was prevented by the C3 inhibitor compstatin or the C5 inhibitor eculizumab. Results Three of the biomaterials (cellulose ester, polyamide reverse osmosis membrane, and polyamide thin film membrane), all belonging to the membrane group, induced a substantial and significant increase in CD11b expression and MPO release. The changes were virtually identical for these two markers. Inhibition of complement with compstatin or eculizumab reduced the CD11b expression and MPO release dose dependently and in most cases back to baseline. The other 12 materials did not induce significant PMN activation. Conclusion Three of the 15 candidate materials triggered PMN activation in a complement-dependent manner and should therefore be avoided for implementation in implantable microsensors. PMID:22226271

  17. Interaction of Mycobacterium leprae with human airway epithelial cells: adherence, entry, survival, and identification of potential adhesins by surface proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos A M; Danelishvili, Lia; McNamara, Michael; Berredo-Pinho, Márcia; Bildfell, Robert; Biet, Franck; Rodrigues, Luciana S; Oliveira, Albanita V; Bermudez, Luiz E; Pessolani, Maria C V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the in vitro interaction between Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, and human alveolar and nasal epithelial cells, demonstrating that M. leprae can enter both cell types and that both are capable of sustaining bacterial survival. Moreover, delivery of M. leprae to the nasal septum of mice resulted in macrophage and epithelial cell infection in the lung tissue, sustaining the idea that the airways constitute an important M. leprae entry route into the human body. Since critical aspects in understanding the mechanisms of infection are the identification and characterization of the adhesins involved in pathogen-host cell interaction, the nude mouse-derived M. leprae cell surface-exposed proteome was studied to uncover potentially relevant adhesin candidates. A total of 279 cell surface-exposed proteins were identified based on selective biotinylation, streptavidin-affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry; 11 of those proteins have been previously described as potential adhesins. In vitro assays with the recombinant forms of the histone-like protein (Hlp) and the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA), considered to be major mycobacterial adhesins, confirmed their capacity to promote bacterial attachment to epithelial cells. Taking our data together, they suggest that the airway epithelium may act as a reservoir and/or portal of entry for M. leprae in humans. Moreover, our report sheds light on the potentially critical adhesins involved in M. leprae-epithelial cell interaction that may be useful in designing more effective tools for leprosy control.

  18. Interaction of Mycobacterium leprae with Human Airway Epithelial Cells: Adherence, Entry, Survival, and Identification of Potential Adhesins by Surface Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos A. M.; Danelishvili, Lia; McNamara, Michael; Berredo-Pinho, Márcia; Bildfell, Robert; Biet, Franck; Rodrigues, Luciana S.; Oliveira, Albanita V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the in vitro interaction between Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, and human alveolar and nasal epithelial cells, demonstrating that M. leprae can enter both cell types and that both are capable of sustaining bacterial survival. Moreover, delivery of M. leprae to the nasal septum of mice resulted in macrophage and epithelial cell infection in the lung tissue, sustaining the idea that the airways constitute an important M. leprae entry route into the human body. Since critical aspects in understanding the mechanisms of infection are the identification and characterization of the adhesins involved in pathogen-host cell interaction, the nude mouse-derived M. leprae cell surface-exposed proteome was studied to uncover potentially relevant adhesin candidates. A total of 279 cell surface-exposed proteins were identified based on selective biotinylation, streptavidin-affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry; 11 of those proteins have been previously described as potential adhesins. In vitro assays with the recombinant forms of the histone-like protein (Hlp) and the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA), considered to be major mycobacterial adhesins, confirmed their capacity to promote bacterial attachment to epithelial cells. Taking our data together, they suggest that the airway epithelium may act as a reservoir and/or portal of entry for M. leprae in humans. Moreover, our report sheds light on the potentially critical adhesins involved in M. leprae-epithelial cell interaction that may be useful in designing more effective tools for leprosy control. PMID:23670556

  19. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-10-13

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis, permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218's effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  20. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis, permeabilizes the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218’s effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB. PMID:27754355

  1. Impairments in enzyme activity and biosynthesis of brush border-associated hydrolases in human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells infected by members of the Afa/Dr family of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, I; Bernet-Camard, M F; Rousset, M; Servin, A L

    2001-05-01

    Wild-type diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) harbouring afimbrial adhesin (Afa) or fimbrial Dr and F1845 adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) apically infecting the human intestinal epithelial cells promote injuries in the brush border of the cells. We report here that infection by Afa/Dr DAEC wild-type strains C1845 and IH11128 in polarized human fully differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cells dramatically impaired the enzyme activity of functional brush border-associated proteins sucrase-isomaltase (SI) and dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV). Blockers of the transduction signal molecules, previously found to be active against the Afa/Dr DAEC-induced cytoskeleton injury, were inactive against the Afa/Dr-induced decrease in sucrase enzyme activity. In parallel, Afa/Dr DAEC infection promotes the blockade of the biosynthesis of SI and DPP IV without affection enzyme stability. The observation that no changes occurred in mRNA levels of SI and DPP IV upon infection suggested that the decrease in biosynthesis probably resulted from a decrease in the translation rate. When the cells were infected with recombinant E. coli strains expressing homologous adhesins of the wild-type strains, neither a decrease in sucrase and DPP IV enzyme activities nor an inhibition of enzyme biosynthesis were observed. In conclusion, taken together, these data give new insights into the mechanisms by which the wild-type Afa/Dr DAEC strains induce functional injuries in polarized fully differentiated human intestinal cells. Moreover, the results revealed that other pathogenic factor(s) distinct from the Afa/Dr adhesins may play(s) a crucial role in this mechanism of pathogenicity.

  2. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  3. Hyaluronic acid capsule modulates M protein-mediated adherence and acts as a ligand for attachment of group A Streptococcus to CD44 on human keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schrager, H M; Albertí, S; Cywes, C; Dougherty, G J; Wessels, M R

    1998-01-01

    We used wild-type and isogenic mutant strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) that expressed M protein, capsule, or both to study the function of M protein and the hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide in attachment of GAS to human keratinocytes. Types 6 and 24, but not type 18, M protein were found to mediate attachment of GAS to soft palate or skin keratinocytes, but this interaction was prevented by the hyaluronic acid capsule on highly encapsulated, or mucoid, strains. Monoclonal antibody to CD44, the principal hyaluronic acid-binding receptor on keratinocytes, inhibited attachment of both highly encapsulated and poorly encapsulated wild type strains of GAS, but not the attachment of acapsular mutants. Transfection of K562 cells with cDNA encoding human CD44 conferred the capacity to bind each of six wild-type strains of GAS, but not to bind acapsular mutants. Because, in contrast to other potential adhesins, the group A streptococcal capsule is both highly conserved and surface-exposed, it may serve as a universal adhesin for attachment of diverse strains of GAS to keratinocytes of the pharyngeal mucosa and the skin. PMID:9541502

  4. Promoting medication adherence in children.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Paula; Dvorkin, Lana

    2006-09-01

    The problem of getting children to follow a treatment regimen is widespread and is frustrating for physicians. The extent to which any patient adheres to a medical regimen is an essential determinant of clinical success. Strategies to improve adherence in children include using simplified drug regimens (e.g., once-daily dosing), pleasant-tasting medicines, liquid or other nonpill formulations, regular phone contact between parents and physicians, reminders, information counseling, self-management plans, and other forms of individualized supervision or attention. Physicians also can encourage adherence by providing a dearly written explanation or patient information sheets that list generic and brand names, dosage, schedule, dur