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  1. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  2. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  3. Evaluation of Three Approaches for Assessing Adherence to Vaginal Gel Application in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    van der Straten, Ariane; Cheng, Helen; Mensch, Barbara; Friedland, Barbara; Katzen, Lauren; Littlefield, Sarah; Buckley, Niall; Espinoza, Lilia; Keller, Marla J.; Herold, Betsy C.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accurate measurement of adherence to product use is an ongoing challenge in microbicide trials. Methods: We compared adherence estimates using two applicator tests (a dye stain assay [DSA] and an ultraviolet light assay [UVA]), the Wisebag (an applicator container that electronically tracks container openings), and self-reported adherence (ability, frequency, and percent missed doses). Healthy, HIV-negative, non-pregnant US women aged 23 to 45 received a Wisebag and 32 applicators filled with placebo gel, were instructed to insert one applicator daily for 30 days, returned the Wisebag and all applicators, and completed an exit interview. Emptied applicators were tested by UVA and then DSA, and scored by two blinded readers. Positive and negative controls were randomly included in applicator batches. Results: Among 42 women enrolled, 39 completed the study. DSA and UVA yielded similar sensitivity (97% and 95%) and specificity (79% and 79%). Two participants had fully inoperable Wisebags and nine had partially inoperable Wisebags. The proportion of participants considered to have high adherence (≥80%) varied: 43% (Wisebag), 46% (UVA), 49% (DSA), and 62% to 82% (self-reports). For estimating high adherence, Wisebag had a sensitivity of 76% (95% CI, 50% to 93%) and a specificity of 85% (95% CI, 62% to 97%) compared with DSA. Although 28% of participants reported forgetting to open the Wisebag daily, 59% said it helped them remember gel use. Conclusions: DSA and UVA performed similarly. Compared with these tests, self-reports overestimated and Wisebag underestimated adherence. Although Wisebag may encourage gel use, the applicator tests currently appear more useful for measuring use in clinical trials. PMID:24220357

  4. Feasibility of a breath test for monitoring adherence to vaginal administration of antiretroviral microbicide gels.

    PubMed

    Morey, Timothy E; Wasdo, Scott; Wishin, Judith; Quinn, Brian; van der Straten, Ariane; Booth, Matthew; Gonzalez, Daniel; Derendorf, Hartmut; Melker, Richard J; Dennis, Donn M

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to microbicide gel use is critical to optimizing effectiveness in preventing human immunodeficiency virus transmission. The authors hypothesized that ester taggants added to vaginal gels would generate exhaled alcohol and ketone metabolites and provide a "breath test" for vaginal gel use. This 2-arm (vaginal and dermal), randomized, participant-blinded, pilot study tested this hypothesis. On 8 visits, healthy women (n = 8) received intravaginal taggant (2-butyl acetate, 2-pentyl acetate, isopropyl butyrate, or 2-pentyl butyrate; 30 mg) formulated in hydroxyethylcellulose or tenofovir placebo gel. A second group (n = 4) of women received the same formulations administered dermally on the forearm to determine if skin administration might confound the system. Breath samples were collected using bags before and after taggant administration for 1 hour. Samples were measured using a miniature gas chromatograph and/or gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy for ester taggant, alcohol, and ketone concentrations. After vaginal administration, 2-butyl acetate, 2-pentyl acetate, and metabolites were observed in breath, whereas isopropyl butyrate, 2-pentyl butyrate, and metabolites were not. Some women reported self-resolving, mild burning (24/64 visits) with vaginal administration or a "bubblegum" taste (7/64 visits). No taggants or metabolites were detected following dermal application. A "breath test" for adherence to antiretroviral vaginal gel application appears physiologically and technically feasible. PMID:23400750

  5. Treatment adherence in psychoses.

    PubMed

    David, Anthony S

    2010-12-01

    A well-conducted randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve treatment adherence in psychosis published in this issue shows beneficial effects on self- and observer-rated adherence and trends towards fewer hospital readmissions. Partial adherence is the single most important barrier to optimal treatment. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines on adherence need to be revised.

  6. Assessing adherence in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir gel HIV prevention trial: results of a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Weaver, Mark A; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Succop, Stacey; Majola, Nelisle; Taylor, Doug; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim Abdool

    2014-05-01

    Adherence undeniably impacts product effectiveness in microbicide trials, but the connection has proven challenging to quantify using routinely collected behavioral data. We explored this relationship using a nested case-control study in the CAPRISA 004 Tenofovir (TFV) gel HIV prevention trial. Detailed 3-month recall data on sex events, condom and gel use were collected from 72 incident cases and 205 uninfected controls. We then assessed how the relationship between self-reported adherence and HIV acquisition differed between the TFV and placebo gel groups, an interaction effect that should exist if effectiveness increases with adherence. The CAPRISA 004 trial determined that randomization to TFV gel was associated with a significant reduction in risk of HIV acquisition. In our nested case-control study, however, we did not observe a meaningful decrease in the relative odds of infection-TFV versus placebo-as self-reported adherence increased. To the contrary, exploratory sub-group analysis of the case-control data identified greater evidence for a protective effect of TFV gel among participants reporting less than 80 % adherence to the protocol-defined regimen (odds ratio (OR) 0.30; 95 % CI 0.11-0.78) than among those reporting ≥ 80 % adherence (Odds Ratio 0.81; 95 % CI 0.34-1.92). The small number of cases may have inhibited our ability to detect the hypothesized interaction between adherence and effectiveness. Nonetheless, our results re-emphasize the challenges faced by investigators when adherence may be miss-measured, miss-reported, or confounded with the risk of HIV. PMID:24647763

  7. Mechanical Restrictions on Biological Responses by Adherent Cells within Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Simon, D.D.; Horgan, C.O.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-seeded collagen and fibrin gels represent excellent assays for studying interactions between adherent interstitial cells and the three-dimensional extracellular matrix in which they reside. Over one hundred papers have employed the free-floating collagen gel assay alone since its introduction in 1979 and much has been learned about mechanobiological responses of diverse types of cells. Yet, given that mechanobiology is the study of biological responses by cells to mechanical stimuli that must respect the basic laws of mechanics, we must quantify better the mechanical conditions that are imposed on or arise in cell-seeded gels. In this paper, we suggest that cell responses and associated changes in matrix organization within the classical free-floating gel assay are highly restricted by the mechanics. In particular, many salient but heretofore unexplained or misinterpreted observations in free-floating gels can be understood in terms of apparent cell-mediated residual stress fields that satisfy quasi-static equilibria and continuity of tractions. There is a continuing need, therefore, to bring together the allied fields of mechanobiology and biomechanics as we continue to elucidate cellular function within both native connective tissues and tissue equivalents that are used in basic scientific investigations or regenerative medicine. PMID:23022259

  8. Medication adherence: WHO cares?

    PubMed

    Brown, Marie T; Bussell, Jennifer K

    2011-04-01

    The treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes the long-term use of pharmacotherapy. Although these medications are effective in combating disease, their full benefits are often not realized because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Factors contributing to poor medication adherence are myriad and include those that are related to patients (eg, suboptimal health literacy and lack of involvement in the treatment decision-making process), those that are related to physicians (eg, prescription of complex drug regimens, communication barriers, ineffective communication of information about adverse effects, and provision of care by multiple physicians), and those that are related to health care systems (eg, office visit time limitations, limited access to care, and lack of health information technology). Because barriers to medication adherence are complex and varied, solutions to improve adherence must be multifactorial. To assess general aspects of medication adherence using cardiovascular disease as an example, a MEDLINE-based literature search (January 1, 1990, through March 31, 2010) was conducted using the following search terms: cardiovascular disease, health literacy, medication adherence, and pharmacotherapy. Manual sorting of the 405 retrieved articles to exclude those that did not address cardiovascular disease, medication adherence, or health literacy in the abstract yielded 127 articles for review. Additional references were obtained from citations within the retrieved articles. This review surveys the findings of the identified articles and presents various strategies and resources for improving medication adherence.

  9. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  10. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  11. ADHERENCE TO RECTAL GEL USE AMONG MAINLY ETHNIC MINORITY YOUNG MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN DURING A 3-MONTH PLACEBO GEL TRIAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR MICROBICIDE RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Bauermeister, José; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Valladares, Juan; Frasca, Timothy; Labbett, Rita; Cranston, Ross D.; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth; McGowan, Ian

    2014-01-01

    To study adherence to product use prior to a Phase I microbicide trial, we recruited young men who have sex with men (YMSM) with a history of unprotected receptive anal intercourse (RAI) and provided them with 40 rectal applicators containing a placebo gel to use prior to RAI during a 12-week period. Ninety-five YMSM completed the trial. Based on a Computer Assisted Self Interview, 83 participants had receptive anal intercourse (RAI) (Median 12 occasions) using gel on 82.4% of occasions (SD 26.7; 0–100). Based on an interactive voice response system, 88 participants had RAI (Median 10 occasions) using gel on 87.9% of occasions (SD 20.0; 20–100). By applicator counts the median gel use was 12. Participants showed high adherence to gel use. Those who did not use the product consistently (n=40) adduced not having it with them (85%), forgetting to use it (48%), not wanting to use it (13%), partner refusal (10%) and gel messiness (10%). PMID:24719200

  12. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  13. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  14. Medication adherence: process for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mendys, Phil; Zullig, Leah L; Burkholder, Rebecca; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2014-01-01

    Improving medication adherence is a critically important, but often enigmatic objective of patients, providers, and the overall health care system. Increasing medication adherence has the potential to reduce health care costs while improving care quality, patient satisfaction and health outcomes. While there are a number of papers that describe the benefits of medication adherence in terms of cost, safety, outcomes, or quality of life, there are limited reviews that consider how best to seamlessly integrate tools and processes directed at improving medication adherence. We will address processes for implementing medication adherence interventions with the goal of better informing providers and health care systems regarding the safe and effective use of medications. PMID:25114513

  15. Materials Adherence Experiment: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Oberle, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    NASA`s Mars Pathfinder mission, launched December 4, 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. Pathfinder will demonstrate a variety of new technologies aimed at reducing the cost of Mars exploration. Chief among these will be the demonstration of a solar-powered spacecraft on the surface of Mars. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output.

  16. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  17. Improvement of health-related quality of life and adherence to treatment with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel in patients with psoriasis vulgaris*

    PubMed Central

    Kontochristopoulos, George; Kouris, Anargyros; Chantzaras, Athanasios; Petridis, Athanasios; Yfantopoulos, John

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a common, chronic, recurrent, immune-mediated disorder of the skin and joints. It can have a significant negative impact on the physical, emotional and psychosocial wellbeing of affected patients. OBJECTIVES To measure improvement in health-related QoL (HRQoL) in Greek patients with psoriasis vulgaris after a month of treatment with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel; and evaluate adherence to treatment parameters. METHODS The study included 394 psoriasis vulgaris patients from 16 private dermatological practices in Greece, all treated with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel. They were evaluated at the first visit and after 4 weeks. Moreover, they completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), while other data such as disease severity, subjective symptoms and adherence, were collected. RESULTS At week 4, the DLQI median was reduced by 3.5 points from the baseline (p<0.001; baseline and week 4 median: 4.5 and 1.0 respectively). Pruritus and sleep disorders also improved (p<0.001). Furthermore, 90.1% of the subjects fully adhered to treatment, with a 97.1% mean level of compliance. CONCLUSIONS The convincing clinical results, with a distinct improvement in HRQoL, plus the high level of adherence due to its advantageous physical properties, make the calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel formulation an important, effective and well-tolerated topical therapy to treat psoriasis. PMID:27192514

  18. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  19. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  20. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently.

  1. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  2. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  3. Adherence of Clostridium thermocellum to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, E A; Kenig, R; Lamed, R

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic, thermophilic anaerobe, to its insoluble substrate (cellulose) was studied. The adherence phenomenon was determined to be selective for cellulose. The observed adherence was not significantly affected by various parameters, including salts, pH, temperature, detergents, or soluble sugars. A spontaneous adherence-defective mutant strain (AD2) was isolated from the wild-type strain YS. Antibodies were prepared against the bacterial cell surface and rendered specific to the cellulose-binding factor (CBF) by adsorption to mutant AD2 cells. By using these CBF-specific antibodies, crossed immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts revealed a single discrete precipitation peak in the parent strain which was absent in the mutant. This difference was accompanied by an alteration in the polypeptide profile whereby sonicates of strain YS contained a 210,000-molecular-weight band which was missing in strain AD2. The CBF antigen could be removed from cell extracts by adsorption to cellulose. A combined gel-overlay--immunoelectrophoretic technique demonstrated that the cellulose-binding properties of the CBF were accompanied by carboxymethylcellulase activity. During the exponential phase of growth, a large part of the CBF antigen and related carboxymethylcellulase activity was associated with the cells of wild-type strain YS. However, the amounts decreased in stationary-phase cells. Cellobiose-grown mutant AD2 cells lacked the cell-associated CBF, but the latter was detected in the extracellular fluid. Increased levels of CBF were observed when cells were grown on cellulose. In addition, mutant AD2 regained cell-associated CBF together with the property of cellulose adherence. The presence of the CBF antigen and related adherence characteristics appeared to be a phenomenon common to other naturally occurring strains of this species. Images PMID:6630152

  4. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  5. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches.

  6. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  7. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  8. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group. PMID:27182251

  9. Does adherence therapy improve medication adherence among patients with schizophrenia? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Non-adherence to medication is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Adherence therapy aims to improve medication adherence of these patients by applying techniques of cognitive behavioural therapy, psycho-education, and motivational interviewing. Even though adherence therapy is frequently discussed and researched, its effectiveness is still uncertain. This paper aims to review the effectiveness of adherence therapy on the medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia. To this end, six electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized, controlled trials on adherence therapy from January 2002 to March 2013. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into the review. The findings suggest that adherence therapy does not improve patients' medication adherence in comparison to treatment as usual or a control intervention. However, all the studies reviewed showed high-adherence ratings at baseline. Thus, further well-designed studies that target adherence therapy to patients who are non-adherent to their medication are needed for a more profound understanding of its effectiveness. In addition, if adherence therapy is aimed not only at improving medication adherence, but also to reach an agreement whereby the patient's decision not to take his medication is accepted, the shared decision-making process needs to be assessed as well.

  10. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  11. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  12. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups. PMID:20407392

  13. Histamine increases sickle erythrocyte adherence to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthew C; Eckman, James R; Wick, Timothy M

    2006-02-01

    Complications of sickle cell anaemia include vascular occlusion triggered by the adherence of sickle erythrocytes to endothelium in the postcapillary venules. Adherence can be promoted by inflammatory mediators that induce endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and arrest flowing erythrocytes. The present study characterised the effect of histamine stimulation on the kinetics of sickle cell adherence to large vessel and microvascular endothelium under physiological flow. Increased sickle cell adherence was observed within minutes of endothelial activation by histamine and reached a maximum value within 30 min. At steady state, sickle cell adherence to histamine-stimulated endothelium was 47 +/- 4 adherent cells/mm(2), 2.6-fold higher than sickle cell adherence to unstimulated endothelial cells. Histamine-induced sickle cell adherence occurred rapidly and transiently. Studies using histamine receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that histamine-induced sickle cell adhesion depends on simultaneous stimulation of the H(2) and H(4) histamine receptors and endothelial P-selectin expression. These data show that histamine release may promote sickle cell adherence and vaso-occlusion. In vivo histamine release should be studied to determine its role in sickle complications and whether blocking of specific histamine receptors may prevent clinical complications or adverse effects from histamine release stimulated by opiate analgesic treatment.

  14. Medication Adherence: A Call for Action

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Granger, Bradi B.; Mendys, Phil; Brindis, Ralph; Burkholder, Rebecca; Czajkowski, Susan M.; Daniel, Jodi G.; Ekman, Inger; Ho, Michael; Johnson, Mimi; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Liu, Larry Z; Musaus, John; Shrank, William H.; Buono, Elizabeth Whalley; Weiss, Karen; Granger, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to efficacious cardiovascular related medications has led to considerable morbidity, mortality, and avoidable health care costs. This paper provides results of a recent think tank meeting in which various stakeholder groups representing key experts from consumers, community health providers, the academic community, decision-making government officials (FDA, NIH, etc), and industry scientists met to evaluate the current status of medication adherence and provide recommendations for improving outcomes. Below, we review the magnitude of the problem of medication adherence, prevalence, impact, and cost. We then summarize proven effective approaches and conclude with a discussion of recommendations to address this growing and significant public health issue of medication non adherence. PMID:21884856

  15. Antihypertensive medication adherence among elderly Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Hui; Mao, Chia-Ling; Wey, Mercy

    2010-10-01

    This study explored the level of antihypertensive medication adherence and examined certain demographic attributes and influential factors in relation to antihypertensive medication nonadherence among Chinese American elders using a descriptive cross-sectional survey design. Findings revealed that 52% of the elderly Chinese Americans adhered to their antihypertensive medications. Gender, education, years of residency in the United States, years of diagnosed hypertension, and perceived safety of taking antihypertensive medications did not contribute to the differences in medication adherence. Forgetfulness, medication adverse effects, language difficulties, and cultural barriers were the influential factors that hinder antihypertensive medication adherence. Developing effective and culturally appropriate strategies for Chinese American elders is recommended.

  16. [Treatment adherence and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Tahri, Nabil

    2007-09-01

    For inflammatory bowel disease, unlike other chronic illnesses, there are sparse data available about patients' adherence to medication. The few studies vary widely, but noncompliance rates tend to be high, about 30-40%. Psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety, and poor patient-physician relationships are the most common causes of these patients' lack of adherence. Failure to adhere to prescribed medications increases risk of relapse and of colorectal cancer. Strategies that can improve adherence include establishing a partnership with the patient, simplifying the treatment regimen and increasing awareness through education and feedback.

  17. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  18. Adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G C; Young, T; Ross, R F; Rosenbusch, R F

    1990-03-01

    This work was an attempt to develop an in vitro adherence model for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, using monolayers of human and porcine lung fibroblasts and porcine kidney cells. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae grown in Friis mycoplasma broth was radiolabeled with 35[S]-methionine, washed, concentrated, and inoculated on the monolayers. After 15 minutes of centrifugation to facilitate adherence, monolayers were washed 3 times, dissolved with 0.1N NaOH, and suspended in scintillation liquid, and the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation counter. Adherence, measured as a percentage of counts added, varied according to the mycoplasma strain and the cell line used. Comparison of strains J, 144L, and 232 of M hyopneumoniae revealed 7.5 +/- 5.9, 31.9 +/- 13, and 9.6 +/- 5% adherence to porcine kidney cells, respectively. Slightly different, but proportionally the same relationships were obtained with swine or human fibroblasts. Adherence was decreased slightly by repeated washings of the mycoplasma-treated cell monolayers; however, a plateau was reached, indicating irreversibility of the adherence process. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with nonlabeled organisms substantially blocked adherence by labeled organisms. Dilution of labeled organisms resulted in an increased proportion adhering. Therefore, it appears that the adherence was a receptor-dependent event. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with trypsin prior to the inoculation of monolayers resulted in a marked reduction in adherence. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with hyperimmune swine serum against M hyopneumoniae or normal swine serum resulted in 80 to 90% reduction of adherence; however, no inhibition occurred when mycoplasmas were treated with purified IgG from the hyperimmune serum.

  19. Intent-to-adhere and adherence to malaria prevention recommendations in two travel clinics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Irit; Grefat, Rami; Ephros, Moshe; Rishpon, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    Malaria infects 30,000 travelers annually worldwide. At greatest risk are those who travel for long duration. Prevention of malaria includes chemoprophylaxis. This prospective study on 121 travelers who visited two travel clinics shows that adherence to prophylactic treatment was low, especially in long duration trips, and that adherence rate could be predicted by the much more available intent-to-adhere rate.

  20. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of the scores that they generate and the…

  1. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits.

  2. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits. PMID:25956611

  3. Adherence to guidelines in gynecologic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwenael; Martinez, Alejandra; Gladieff, Laurence; Mery, Eliane; David, Isabelle; Delannes, Martine; Montastruc, Marion; Balagué, Gisèle; Picaud, Laetitia; Querleu, Denis

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the available evidence documenting the prognostic role of adherence to guidelines in gynecologic cancers. A systematic review of the PubMed database using "guideline," "adherence," and "cancer" was carried out on February 25, 2014. Two thousand one hundred twenty-three publications were identified. Only publications addressing the question of adherence to recommendations regarding surgical care and multidisciplinary management of gynecologic cancers were selected. Six studies were identified in endometrial cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and none in cervical cancer. Adoption of guidelines is an effective tool for disease control and must consequently be considered as a process measure of quality cancer care. It is urgent to develop reliable and reproducible tools to assess adherence to guidelines based on level 1 evidence in gynecologic cancer then to carry out investigations to document the prognostic impact of compliance with guidelines. The time has come to include adherence to guidelines in quality assurance programs. PMID:25340292

  4. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  5. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = -0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = -0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = -0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  6. Adherence of oral streptococci to an immobilized antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takatsuka, T; Kato, T; Ishihara, K; Okuda, K

    1997-08-01

    An antimicrobial agent, 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyldimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride, was immobilized on silica. Interaction between the material (termed) OAIS) and various oral bacterial species were then studied. Seven species of Streptococcus and two Actinomyces were investigated for their ability to adhere to this biomaterial. Cell-surface hydrophobicity and zeta-potential were examined as well. Analysis of extracted hydrophobic proteins which adhered to OAIS revealed that the adherence of these micro-organisms was closely related to the hydrophobicity of their cell surfaces. The results of zeta-potential assays indicated that negative charge on the cell surface inhibited adherence to OAIS. Gel electrophoresis revealed that OAIS could absorb cell-surface hydrophobic proteins from all bacterial species tested. Preadsorption of hydrophobic components on the cell surface inhibited adherence of the Strep. mutans strain to OAIS in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that OAIS adsorption of these oral bacteria was dependent on the degree of hydrophobicity of their surfaces. A major component of this adherence was hydrophobic cell-surface proteins. PMID:9347116

  7. [Guideline adherence - is more always better?].

    PubMed

    Nothacker, M J

    2016-09-01

    Guidelines play an increasing role in the health system. Guidelines are intended to provide guidance in the sense of ‟corridors for action and decision", whereby in certain justified cases actions can - or even must - deviate from them. "Cookbook medicine" is not the aim of guidelines.Guideline adherence can not necessarily be equated with guideline conformity. Adherence presumes an agreed treatment goal between patient and physician and focuses the behavior of the patient. Based on current studies on guideline adherence, the use of the term in studies on urological tumors is analyzed.

  8. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  9. Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side

  10. Bayesian population modeling of drug dosing adherence.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Kelly; Stoneking, Colin J; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-10-01

    Adherence is a frequent contributing factor to variations in drug concentrations and efficacy. The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated population model to describe variation in adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence to dosing regimens. The hybrid Markov chain-von Mises method for modeling adherence in individual subjects was extended to the population setting using a Bayesian approach. Four integrated population models for overall adherence, the two-state Markov chain transition parameters, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were formulated and critically compared. The Markov chain-Monte Carlo algorithm was used for identifying distribution parameters and for simulations. The model was challenged with medication event monitoring system data for 207 hypertension patients. The four Bayesian models demonstrated good mixing and convergence characteristics. The distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence were markedly non-normal and diverse. The models varied in complexity and the method used to incorporate inter-dependence with the preceding dose in the two-state Markov chain. The model that incorporated a cooperativity term for inter-dependence and a hyperbolic parameterization of the transition matrix probabilities was identified as the preferred model over the alternatives. The simulated probability densities from the model satisfactorily fit the observed probability distributions of adherence, dose-timing deviations, overdosing and persistence parameters in the sample patients. The model also adequately described the median and observed quartiles for these parameters. The Bayesian model for adherence provides a parsimonious, yet integrated, description of adherence in populations. It may find potential applications in clinical trial simulations and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. PMID:26319548

  11. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to intraocular lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, P. G.; Elliot, T. S.; McTaggart, L.

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated, with an in vitro model, that Staphylococcus epidermidis is able to colonise intraocular lenses. Adherent organisms were quantitated by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and viable counting. Bacterial adherence was associated with production of a polysaccharide glycocalyx. Organisms which were attached to the lenses were resistant to apparently bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics, as determined by conventional testing. We speculate on the role of colonisation in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis. Images PMID:2751971

  12. Emerging technologies for electronic monitoring of adherence, inhaler competence, and true adherence.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Nicholls, Clare

    2015-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective treatments for respiratory disorders, disease control is often suboptimal, due in part to the failure of patients to adhere to prescribed regimens, or to demonstrate competence with the often complex steps in the administration of inhaled medications. The cost of poor true adherence, a combined measure of adherence and inhaler competence, is considerable, both economically and in terms of health-related impact. While patient education is recognized as essential, there exist many barriers to healthcare professional-led monitoring and promotion of true adherence. Successful intervention remains a challenging task, dependent upon understanding and addressing the distinct issues associated with poor adherence and inhaler competence, and lessening the perceived burden on healthcare professionals. Electronic monitors provide an accurate and objective indication of adherence and may also be of value in assessing inhaler competence. The information provided by such devices is a helpful aid to understanding the challenging nature of true adherence, and may be crucial to the development and assessment of true adherence promoting interventions. This article provides a background to the impact of suboptimal adherence and inhaler competence, and the challenges associated with the promotion of true adherence, with an emphasis on respiratory therapies. Contemporary electronic monitors of adherence and inhaler competence are critically reviewed, and case studies of emerging technologies are provided to illustrate the use of innovative monitoring devices in the promotion of true adherence in practice. Potential future directions, including increased targeting and individualization, enhanced coordination of care, and a greater focus on inhaler competence are considered to be important additions to currently available technologies in this rapidly evolving field.

  13. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alexander, Tiffany M; Nadkarni, Anish; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. PMID:27784999

  14. Patient Perceptions of Voice Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    van Leer, Eva; Connor, Nadine P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patient perspectives of behavioral voice therapy, including perspectives of treatment adherence, have not been formally documented. Because treatment adherence is to a large extent determined by patient beliefs, assessment of patient perspectives is integral to the study of adherence. Methods Fifteen patients who had undergone at least 2 sessions of direct voice therapy for a variety of voice disorders/complaints were interviewed about their perspectives on voice therapy, with a particular focus on adherence. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed for content according to qualitative methods. Results Three common content themes emerged from the transcripts: Voice Therapy is Hard, Make it Happen, and The Match Matters. Findings are compared to reports of patient experiences in other behavioral interventions such as diet and exercise, and related to existing theoretical models of behavior change and the therapeutic process. Conclusion This study yields information toward the development of scales to measure adherence-related constructs and strategies to improve treatment adherence in voice therapy. PMID:19775866

  15. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed.

  16. Weight loss intervention adherence and factors promoting adherence: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Bird, Yelena; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Adhering to weight loss interventions is difficult for many people. The majority of those who are overweight or obese and attempt to lose weight are simply not successful. The objectives of this study were 1) to quantify overall adherence rates for various weight loss interventions and 2) to provide pooled estimates for factors associated with improved adherence to weight loss interventions. Methods We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of all studies published between January 2004 and August 2015 that reviewed weight loss intervention adherence. Results After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and checking the methodological quality, 27 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall adherence rate was 60.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 53.6–67.2). The following three main variables were found to impact adherence: 1) supervised attendance programs had higher adherence rates than those with no supervision (rate ratio [RR] 1.65; 95% CI 1.54–1.77); 2) interventions that offered social support had higher adherence than those without social support (RR 1.29; 95% CI 1.24–1.34); and 3) dietary intervention alone had higher adherence than exercise programs alone (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19–1.35). Conclusion A substantial proportion of people do not adhere to weight loss interventions. Programs supervising attendance, offering social support, and focusing on dietary modification have better adherence than interventions not supervising attendance, not offering social support, and focusing exclusively on exercise. PMID:27574404

  17. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    PubMed

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  18. [Challenges of adolescents' adherence to therapy].

    PubMed

    Brand, P L P; Kaptein, A A; Janssens, L P F; Klok, T

    2016-01-01

    Non-adherence occurs at any age, in all chronic diseases, and has a major impact on clinical outcomes. Non-adherence is primarily determined by perceptions of illness and medication beliefs. During puberty, adolescents attain independence from their parents and attach to their peers. This complicates successful self-management of chronic illness, because the adolescents avoid standing out from their peers. Discussion of barriers hindering successful self-management in adolescents can be promoted by seeing the patient alone, without the parents being present, and by acknowledging the patient's independence and responsibilities. PMID:27581866

  19. [Supporting adherence to drug therapy in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence is an essential part of treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, but poor treatment adherence is common, impairing the treatment outcome. Improvement in the adherence to drug therapy requires a good therapeutic relationship. The patient and her/his family must be provided with information about the illness and its treatment. Drug therapy must be optimized on an individual basis. The use of long-acting antipsychotic injections should be encouraged. Regular contact with patients under long-term treatment must be maintained. The use of experts by experience is an effective supportive measure. PMID:26485936

  20. E-health strategies to support adherence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adherence to healthy behaviors and self-care strategies is a concern among clinicians. E-health applications, such as the internet, personal communication devices, electronic health records and web portals, and electronic games, may be a way to provide health information in a way that is reliable, c...

  1. Adherence to Sports-Injury Rehabilitation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of 41 injured college athletes' responses to a questionnaire revealed that those athletes who adhered to their rehabilitation program were more self-motivated, tolerated pain better, perceived that they worked harder at their rehabilitation, and were less bothered by scheduling of sessions and athletic training environmental conditions.…

  2. Adherence to Exercise and Physical Activity: Preface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, William P.; Dishman, Rod K.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a collection of papers on adherence to exercise programs and physical activity from the 2000 American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education conference, which included research on middle school boys and girls, college men and women, and men and women in the later years, as well as on the more traditional subject of middle aged…

  3. Factors affecting medication adherence in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyekyung; Kim, Yeonhee; Rhie, Sandy Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the functional health literacy (FHL) associated with medication adherence in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine the FHL among older adults and identify influencing factors that can predict medication adherence. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey. Participants (n=160) aged 65 years and older were selected from outpatient clinics of 3 tertiary care hospitals, 6 community pharmacies, and 2 senior centers between November 1 and 30, 2014. The participants’ FHL was measured using the Korean Functional Health Literacy Test, which consists of 15 items including 8 numeracy and 7 reading comprehension items. Medication adherence was measured by the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results The mean score of the total FHL was 7.72±3.51 (range 0–15). The percentage of the total number of correct answers for the reading comprehension subtest and numeracy subtest were 48.1% and 54.4%, respectively. Among 160 participants, 52.5% showed low adherence to medication. The factors affecting medication adherence included the patient’s degree of satisfaction with the service (β=−0.215, P=0.022), sufficient explanation of medication counseling (β=−0.335, P=0.000), education level (β=−0.153, P=0.045), health-related problems (β=−0.239, P=0.004), and dosing frequency (β=0.189, P=0.018). Conclusion In this study, we found medication adherence of elderly patients was associated with education level, health-related problems, dosing frequency, satisfaction with patient counseling, and explanation of medication, but no association was found with FHL. Pharmacists should consider elderly patients’ individual characteristics such as educational background and specific patient-related health problems, provide sufficient information and explanation of medication, and ensure patient

  4. Bacterial adherence to anodized titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jorge Peremarch, C.; Pérez Tanoira, R.; Arenas, M. A.; Matykina, E.; Conde, A.; De Damborenea, J. J.; Gómez Barrena, E.; Esteban, J.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Staphylococcus sp adhesion to modified surfaces of anodized titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Surface modification involved generation of fluoride-containing titanium oxide nanotube films. Specimens of Ti-6Al-4V alloy 6-4 ELI-grade 23- meets the requirements of ASTM F136 2002A (AMS 2631B class A1) were anodized in a mixture of sulphuric/hydrofluoric acid at 20 V for 5 and 60 min to form a 100 nm-thick porous film of 20 nm pore diameter and 230 nm-thick nanotube films of 100 nm in diameter. The amount of fluorine in the oxide films was of 6% and of 4%, respectively. Collection strains and six clinical strains each of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were studied. The adherence study was performed using a previously published protocol by Kinnari et al. The experiments were performed in triplicates. As a result, lower adherence was detected for collection strains in modified materials than in unmodified controls. Differences between clinical strains were detected for both species (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test), although global data showed similar results to that of collection strains (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Adherence of bacteria to modified surfaces was decreased for both species. The results also reflect a difference in the adherence between S. aureus and S. epidermidis to the modified material. As a conclusion, not only we were able to confirm the decrease of adherence in the modified surface, but also the need to test multiple clinical strains to obtain more realistic microbiological results due to intraspecies differences.

  5. A Temperature-Monitoring Vaginal Ring for Measuring Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Peter; Desjardins, Delphine; Kumar, Sandeep; Fetherston, Susan M.; Le-Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Helgadóttir, Berglind; Bjarnason, Ásgeir; Narasimhan, Manjula; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Product adherence is a pivotal issue in the development of effective vaginal microbicides to reduce sexual transmission of HIV. To date, the six Phase III studies of vaginal gel products have relied primarily on self-reporting of adherence. Accurate and reliable methods for monitoring user adherence to microbicide-releasing vaginal rings have yet to be established. Methods A silicone elastomer vaginal ring prototype containing an embedded, miniature temperature logger has been developed and tested in vitro and in cynomolgus macaques for its potential to continuously monitor environmental temperature and accurately determine episodes of ring insertion and removal. Results In vitro studies demonstrated that DST nano-T temperature loggers encapsulated in medical grade silicone elastomer were able to accurately and continuously measure environmental temperature. The devices responded quickly to temperature changes despite being embedded in different thickness of silicone elastomer. Prototype vaginal rings measured higher temperatures compared with a subcutaneously implanted device, showed high sensitivity to diurnal fluctuations in vaginal temperature, and accurately detected periods of ring removal when tested in macaques. Conclusions Vaginal rings containing embedded temperature loggers may be useful in the assessment of product adherence in late-stage clinical trials. PMID:25965956

  6. Eikenella corrodens adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Y; Ebisu, S; Okada, H

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of Eikenella corrodens adherence to human buccal epithelial cells in vitro was studied. Initial experiments to determine the optimal conditions for adherence of E. corrodens to buccal epithelial cells showed that adherence was dependent on time, temperature, bacterial concentration, and pH. Different strains of E. corrodens varied in their ability to adhere, and strain 1073 showed the greatest ability in adherence. Strain 1073 was selected for studies of adherence mechanisms. Trypsin treatment or heating (100 degrees C, 10 min) of the bacterial cells abolished their capacity to adhere to buccal epithelial cells. Treatment of buccal epithelial cells with trypsin also abolished adherence of E. corrodens 1073, whereas neuraminidase treatment of buccal epithelial cells enhanced the adherence. The adherence was inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and restored by adding Ca2+. The adherence was remarkably inhibited by sugars containing D-galactose and n-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Treatment of neuraminidase-treated epithelial cells with sodium metaperiodate or alpha- and beta-galactosidase did not decrease the adherence. These data suggest that adherence of E. corrodens 1073 to human buccal epithelial cells may require the interaction of lectin-like proteins on the bacterial surface with galactose-like receptors on the surface of epithelial cells. PMID:6260661

  7. Using communication skills to improve adherence in children with chronic disease: the adherence equation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to maintenance medication is common in paediatric chronic conditions. Despite the common belief that nonadherence is therapy-resistant, and the apparent lack of evidence for successful interventions to improve adherence, there is, in fact, a considerable body of evidence suggesting that adherence can be improved by applying specific communicative consultation skills. These can be summarized as the adherence equation: adherence=follow-up+dialogue+barriers and beliefs+empathy and education => concordance. Close follow-up of children with a chronic condition is needed to establish a therapeutic partnership with the family. Teaching self management skills is not a unidirectional process of providing information, but requires a constructive and collaborative dialogue between the medical team and the family. Identifying barriers to adherence can be achieved in a non-confrontational manner, by showing a genuine interest what the patient's views and preferences are. In particular, parental illness perceptions and medication beliefs should be identified, because they are strong drivers of nonadherence. Through empathic evidence-based education, such perceptions and beliefs can be modified. By applying these strategies, concordance between the child's family and the medical team can be achieved, resulting in optimal adherence to the jointly created treatment plan.

  8. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  9. Treatment Adherence in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Collective Impact of Barriers to Adherence and Anxiety/Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents’ ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Methods Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Results Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers–adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. Conclusions In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment. PMID:22080456

  10. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Prabhpreet; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those factors that might be modifiable to improve adherence, and the measures the health care provider can take to optimize adherence to therapy and thereby improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27350744

  11. Improved assay for quantitating adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, M A; White, B A; Hespell, R B

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative technique suitable for the determination of adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose was developed. This technique employs adherence of cells to cellulose disks and alleviates the problem of nonspecific cell entrapment within cellulose particles. By using this technique, it was demonstrated that the adherence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 to cellulose was inhibited by formaldehyde, methylcellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose. Adherence was unaffected by acid hydrolysates of methylcellulose, glucose, and cellobiose. PMID:2782879

  12. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95%) of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80%) of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs) about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures) and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis). Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i) the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise behaviours over and above

  13. Measuring adherence to treatment of paediatric HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Naar-King, S; Frey, M; Harris, M; Arfken, C

    2005-04-01

    Parent, child, physician report and pill counts were used to measure adherence in paediatric HIV. Relationships to viral load were assessed. Pill counts were considered invalid. Adherence measures did not correlate with one another. Physicians reported lower adherence than parents, but parent and physician report correlated with viral load. The clinical and research utility of the various measures are discussed.

  14. A Matter of Trust: Patient Barriers to Primary Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinski, J. M.; Kesselheim, A. S.; Frolkis, J. P.; Wescott, P.; Allen-Coleman, C.; Fischer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary medication adherence occurs when a patient properly fills the first prescription for a new medication. Primary adherence only occurs about three-quarters of the time for antihypertensive medications. We assessed patients' barriers to primary adherence and attributes of patient-provider discussions that might improve primary adherence…

  15. Medication Adherence in Psychopharmacologically Treated Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Duran, Petra; Yovel, Iftah; Perlman, Carol A.; Sprich, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: One of the potential causes of residual symptoms of ADHD in adults can be difficulties with consistent adherence to medications. Method: This formative study examined self-reported medication adherence in adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms despite medication treatment. Results: Mean adherence for the two-week period…

  16. Medication Adherence among Older Adults with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Leutwyler, Heather C.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wallhagen, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with schizophrenia are a growing segment of the population yet their physical and mental health status is extremely poor. The paper presents findings from a qualitative study that explored the understanding older adults with schizophrenia have of their physical health status. The study was conducted among 28 older adults with schizophrenia from a variety of settings using semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Self-management of psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications and its affect on their health status was one of the central themes that emerged from the study. Different styles of medication adherence were identified and factors associated with each style are presented. The findings provide insights into the design of clinical interventions aimed at promoting medication adherence among older adults with schizophrenia. PMID:23327119

  17. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  18. Medication adherence among older adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leutwyler, Heather C; Fox, Patrick J; Wallhagen, Margaret

    2013-02-01

    Older adults with schizophrenia are a growing segment of the population, yet their physical and mental health status is extremely poor. This article presents findings from a qualitative study that explored the understanding older adults with schizophrenia have of their physical health status. The study was conducted among 28 older adults with schizophrenia from a variety of settings using semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Self-management of psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications and its effect on participants' health status was one of the central themes that emerged from the study. Different styles of medication adherence were identified and factors associated with each style are presented. The findings provide insights into the design of clinical interventions aimed at promoting medication adherence among older adults with schizophrenia.

  19. Ethics in adherence promotion and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rand, C S; Sevick, M A

    2000-10-01

    In evaluating and intervening to increase adherence to medical treatments, clinicians and researchers must address ethical issues pertaining to best interest, autonomy, and privacy. "Best interest" refers to the notion that health-care practitioners act in a manner that produces benefits or good outcomes for the patients in their care. "Autonomy" refers to the patient's right to determine whether or not they will accept medical treatment or participate in a clinical study. "Nonmaleficence" refers to the clinician's or researcher's responsibility to "do no harm." "Privacy" refers to the notion that researchers and clinicians promise not to divulge personal information about the patients in their care. Adherence monitoring and promotion pose ethical challenges to researchers and clinicians, which are the topic of this paper. Control Clin Trials 2000;21:241S-247S

  20. Elasticity of adherent active cells on a compliant substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Mertz, Aaron F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2012-02-01

    We present a continuum mechanical model of rigidity sensing by livings cells adhering to a compliant substrate. The cell or cell colony is modeled as an elastic active gel, adapting recently developed continuum theories of active viscoelastic fluids. The coupling to the substrate enters as a boundary condition that relates the cell's deformation field to local stress gradients. In the presence of activity, the substrate induces spatially inhomogeneous contractile stresses and deformations, with a power law dependence of the total traction forces on cell or colony size. This is in agreement with recent experiments on keratinocyte colonies adhered to fibronectin coated surfaces. In the presence of acto-myosin activity, the substrate also enhances the cell polarization, breaking the cell's front-rear symmetry. Maximal polarization is observed when the substrate stiffness matches that of the cell, in agreement with experiments on stem cells.

  1. Concordance of adherence measurement using self-reported adherence questionnaires and medication monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Koleva, Yordanka; Fonseca, Vivian; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to identify and examine the literature on the association between medication adherence self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and medication monitoring devices. The primary literature search was performed for 1980-2009 using PubMed, PubMed In Process and Non-Indexed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), Ovid HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier) and Cochrane Databases and using the following search terms: 'patient compliance', 'medication adherence', 'treatment compliance', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'drugs', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance' and 'medications'. We identified studies that included SRQs and electronic monitoring devices to measure adherence and focused on the SRQs that were found to be moderately to highly correlated with the monitoring devices. Of the 1679 citations found via the primary search, 41 full-text articles were reviewed for correlation between monitoring devices and SRQs. A majority (68%) of articles reported high (27%), moderate (29%) or significant (12%) correlation between monitoring devices (37 using Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS®] and four using other devices) and SRQs (11 identified and numerous other unnamed SRQs). The most commonly used SRQs were the Adult/Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG/PACTG; 24.4%, 10/41) followed by the 4-item Morisky (9.8%, 4/41), Brief Medication Questionnaire (9.8%, 4/41) and visual analogue scale (VAS; 7.3%, 3/41). Although study designs differed across the articles, SRQs appeared to report a higher rate of medication adherence (+14.9%) than monitoring devices. In conclusion, several medication adherence SRQs were validated using electronic monitoring devices. A majority of them showed high or moderate correlation with medication adherence measured using monitoring devices, and could be considered for measuring patient

  2. Adherence with drug therapy in the rheumatic diseases Part one: a review of adherence rates.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Drug therapy plays a major role in the management of many rheumatic diseases and is particularly important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because of the significant rates of morbidity and mortality (Pincus, 1995). Understanding of the pathogenesis of RA has led to the development of new and more effective drugs (Emery et al., 1999), but the ultimate efficacy of any drug therapy depends upon the patient's decision to take it. There is widespread agreement that many people with rheumatic disease do not adhere to their medication regimens (Deyo et al., 1981; Belcon et al., 1984; Pullar et al., 1988; Hill et al., 2001). Research has demonstrated that 50% of women taking hormone replacement therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis discontinue treatment after a year (Fordham, 2000) and similar rates of discontinuation are found in other chronic diseases (Haynes et al., 1996, 2000). This is bewildering as, in asymptomatic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes, the expectation is that levels of adherence would be lower than in diseases where pain and stiffness are present. The picture becomes even more confusing when we consider the findings from a recent multi-country study of RA, which found no association between adherence and disease severity, nor with the treatment prescribed (Viller et al., 1999). In chronic disease poor adherence is commonplace. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes this and has recently stated that 'poor adherence to treatment of chronic diseases is a worldwide problem of striking magnitude' and cites adherence to long-term therapy for chronic illnesses in developed countries averaging just 50% (WHO, 2003). The first part of this two part review focuses on adherence with drug therapy, and the second part discusses different methods of measuring it. PMID:17041995

  3. Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kidong; Millet, Larry J.; Kim, Namjung; Li, Huan; Jin, Xiaozhong; Popescu, Gabriel; Aluru, N. R.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of physical properties of cells such as their mass and stiffness has been of great interest and can have profound implications in cell biology, tissue engineering, cancer, and disease research. For example, the direct dependence of cell growth rate on cell mass for individual adherent human cells can elucidate the mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression. Here we develop an array of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) resonant mass sensors that can be used to directly measure the biophysical properties, mass, and growth rate of single adherent cells. Unlike conventional cantilever mass sensors, our sensors retain a uniform mass sensitivity over the cell attachment surface. By measuring the frequency shift of the mass sensors with growing (soft) cells and fixed (stiff) cells, and through analytical modeling, we derive the Young’s modulus of the unfixed cell and unravel the dependence of the cell mass measurement on cell stiffness. Finally, we grew individual cells on the mass sensors and measured their mass for 50+ hours. Our results demonstrate that adherent human colon epithelial cells have increased growth rates with a larger cell mass, and the average growth rate increases linearly with the cell mass, at 3.25%/hr. Our sensitive mass sensors with a position-independent mass sensitivity can be coupled with microscopy for simultaneous monitoring of cell growth and status, and provide an ideal method to study cell growth, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:21068372

  4. Adherence to asthma guidelines in general practices.

    PubMed

    Roghmann, M C; Sexton, M

    1999-06-01

    Adherence to asthma practice guidelines is low. Improved compliance could potentially improve care of patients with asthma. The purpose of this study was to determine if patients managed in a general practice with an associated asthma clinic are more likely to use asthma medications according to clinical practice guidelines than patients managed in the general surgery of the practice. A cross-sectional study of adult asthmatics, aged 18-55 years, was conducted in six British general practices. Prescription data on all asthma medication was collected for a 6-month period. Information on asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, and how patients used their inhaled beta2-agonist was collected through questionnaire. The prescription data for asthma medication and patient use of inhaled beta2-agonist were compared to the British Thoracic Society's (BTS) Guidelines for Management of Asthma in Adults to determine if the patient's asthma medication regimen was appropriate. There was no significant association found between appropriate asthma medication and asthma clinic attendance or other patient characteristics. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low. Fifty-eight percent of the asthma patients used asthma medication regimens that were not consistent with the BTS guidelines published 1 year earlier. Adherence to the BTS guidelines was low regardless of patient characteristics, including asthma clinic attendance, age, sex, employment status, other medical illness, or individual practice. These findings underscore the need to document the utility of clinical practice guidelines which may improve physician compliance.

  5. Adherent Raindrop Modeling, Detectionand Removal in Video.

    PubMed

    You, Shaodi; Tan, Robby T; Kawakami, Rei; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    Raindrops adhered to a windscreen or window glass can significantly degrade the visibility of a scene. Modeling, detecting and removing raindrops will, therefore, benefit many computer vision applications, particularly outdoor surveillance systems and intelligent vehicle systems. In this paper, a method that automatically detects and removes adherent raindrops is introduced. The core idea is to exploit the local spatio-temporal derivatives of raindrops. To accomplish the idea, we first model adherent raindrops using law of physics, and detect raindrops based on these models in combination with motion and intensity temporal derivatives of the input video. Having detected the raindrops, we remove them and restore the images based on an analysis that some areas of raindrops completely occludes the scene, and some other areas occlude only partially. For partially occluding areas, we restore them by retrieving as much as possible information of the scene, namely, by solving a blending function on the detected partially occluding areas using the temporal intensity derivative. For completely occluding areas, we recover them by using a video completion technique. Experimental results using various real videos show the effectiveness of our method.

  6. [Adherence to chronic medication: also a frequent problem in Belgium!].

    PubMed

    Liekens, S; Hulshagen, L; Dethier, M; Laekeman, G; Foulon, V

    2013-12-01

    Medication adherence in chronic conditions such as asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer appears to be a frequent problem. However, the literature on adherence in patients who use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), oral hypoglycemic agents, drugs for heart failure, antiretrovirals or oral chemotherapy, contains little or no relevant data for Belgium. In the context of a Master thesis in Pharmaceutical care at KU Leuven, a quantitative study was performed to determine the prevalence of adherence to chronic medication in Belgium. This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a database containing refill data of a regional pharmacists' association (KLAV). Out of the 603 pharmacies affiliated with this association, all 50 pharmacies where HIV medication was delivered, were selected. Dispensing data from the selected pharmacies were collected from 01/07/2008 to 31/12/2009 for five pathologies, i.e.; asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, HIV and cancer. Adherence (TT) was calculated with the Medication Refill Adherence (MRA) method. In order to determine whether there were associations between age, gender, drug class and adherence, Chi-square tests were used. Compared with the other patients, cancer patients were the most adherent in taking their drugs (median adherence rate = 88%). In addition, this was the only group in which the median adherence rate was above the set limit of 80%. The patients who were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were the least adherent (median adherence rate = 38%). More than 50% of patients with asthma/COPD, heart failure and diabetes were classified as "under-users". Furthermore, the results showed a significant association within asthma patients between gender and adherence. In asthma, type 2 diabetes, heart failure and HIV patients there was a significant relationship between age and adherence and drug class and adherence. As the current study has some limitations, the results should be handled with caution. Nevertheless

  7. Promoting adherence to nebulized therapy in cystic fibrosis: poster development and a qualitative exploration of adherence

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen; Babiker, Nathan; Gardner, Emma; Royle, Jane; Curley, Rachael; Hoo, Zhe Hui; Wildman, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) health care professionals recognize the need to motivate people with CF to adhere to nebulizer treatments, yet little is known about how best to achieve this. We aimed to produce motivational posters to support nebulizer adherence by using social marketing involving people with CF in the development of those posters. Methods The Sheffield CF multidisciplinary team produced preliminary ideas that were elaborated upon with semi-structured interviews among people with CF to explore barriers and facilitators to the use of nebulized therapy. Initial themes and poster designs were refined using an online focus group to finalize the poster designs. Results People with CF preferred aspirational posters describing what could be achieved through adherence in contrast to posters that highlighted the adverse consequences of nonadherence. A total of 14 posters were produced through this process. Conclusion People with CF can be engaged to develop promotional material to support adherence, providing a unique perspective differing from that of the CF multidisciplinary team. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these posters to support nebulizer adherence. PMID:26346635

  8. The old problem of adherence: research on treatment adherence and its relevance for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wright, M T

    2000-12-01

    The international published research on patient adherence was selectively reviewed with the goal of determining its relevance for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Results show that not adhering to treatment regimes is so widespread that no combination of sociodemographic variables is reliably predictive of patients' not following doctors' orders. Achieving 100% adherence for any treatment or patient group does not appear to be realistic. Characteristics of the patient's situation, of the given therapy, and of the disease itself affect adherence. In addition, the patient-doctor relationship and the context of the treatment are important. Often overlooked are the existential dimensions of meaning, self-determination and quality of life which are particularly important for the chronically ill. Treatment needs to be negotiated individually with each patient on the basis of an open therapeutic relationship and with the help of multidimensional interventions. Lessons from the discourse on safer sex can steer adherence research and practice away from a behavioural and reductionist approach toward the context and meaning of treatment. PMID:11177448

  9. Adherence to diabetes medication in individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Paul; Patel, Hiren; Ganguli, Rohan

    2014-02-01

    Introduction: Despite the importance of medication adherence for the effective treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), little research has examined adherence with diabetes medication treatment in schizophrenia. The purpose of this systematic review was to 1) evaluate rates of adherence and determinants of adherence with medication for T2DM in individuals with schizophrenia, and, where possible, 2) examine the relationship between medication adherence and glycemic control. Methods: Studies were included if they presented information on dosing regimens and adherence or compliance rates for T2DM and included samples where at least 50% of the participants were individuals with schizophrenia. Results: Six studies were included in this review that predominantly examined men over the age of 50 years. Studies confirmed that many individuals with schizophrenia were not adhering to their diabetes medication as adherence rates ranged from 51-85%. Two studies that compared medication adherence in individuals with and without schizophrenia found those with the mental illness had higher rates of adherence. One study reported that blood glucose control levels were not statistically different between those who did and did not adhere to their medication, indicating more research is necessary in this area. Factors that improved adherence included disease and medical service and medication related factors. Conclusions: Interventions to increase diabetes medication adherence in schizophrenia need to address disease and medical service and medication related factors. Further research needs to examine diabetes medication adherence in women, younger individuals, and those recently diagnosed with diabetes as these individuals have been underrepresented in the literature.

  10. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  11. Adherence and receptor relationships of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, R A; Braun, P C

    1991-01-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is composed of a variety of polysaccharides such as glucan, chitin, and mannan. The first two components primarily provide structure, while the mannan, often covalently linked to protein, constitutes the major antigen of the organism. Mannoproteins also have enzymatic activity (acid protease) and ligand-receptor functions. The complement receptors of C. albicans appear to be mannoproteins that are required for the adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. This is certainly true of the CR3-like protein of C. albicans. Proof that the CR3 is the Candida receptor for endothelial cells is derived from two observations. First, mutants lacking CR3 activity are less adherent in vitro and, in fact, less virulent. Second, the ligand recognized by the CR3 receptor (C3bi) as well as anti-CR3 antibodies blocks adherence of the organism to endothelial cells. The CR2 of C. albicans appears to promote the adherence of the organism to plastic substrates. Unlike the CR2 of mammalian cells, the Candida CR2 recognizes ligands containing the RGD sequence of amino acids in addition to the C3d ligand, which does not contain the RGD sequence. There is uncertainty as to whether the Candida CR2 and CR3 are, in fact, different proteins. A mannoprotein has also been described as the adhesin for epithelial cells. In this case, the receptor has a lectinlike activity and recognizes fucose- or glucosamine-containing glycoproteins of epithelial cells, depending on the strain of C. albicans. The oligosaccharide component of the receptor is probably not involved in ligand recognition and may serve to stabilize the receptor. However, the oligosaccharide factor 6 epitope of mannan may also provide adhesin activity in the recognition of epithelial cells. Mannoproteins can be extracted from cells by a number of reagents. Zymolyase, for instance, tends to remove structural mannoproteins, which contain relatively little protein and are linked to glucan. Reagents

  12. The use of incentives to reinforce medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    DeFulio, Anthony; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Objective Poor medication adherence is a longstanding problem, and is especially pertinent for individuals with chronic conditions or diseases. Adherence to medications can improve patient outcomes and greatly reduce the cost of care. The purpose of the present review is to describe the literature on the use of incentives as applied to the problem of medication adherence. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed empirical evaluations of incentives provided to patients contingent upon medication adherence. Results This review suggests that incentive-based medication adherence interventions can be very effective, but there are few controlled studies. The studies on incentive-based medication adherence interventions most commonly feature patients taking medication for drug or alcohol dependence, HIV, or latent tuberculosis. Across studies that reported percent adherence comparisons, incentives increased adherence by a mean of 20 percentage points, but effects varied widely. Cross-study comparisons indicate a positive relationship between the value of the incentive and the impact of the intervention. Post-intervention evaluations were rare, but tended to find that adherence effects diminish after the interventions are discontinued. Conclusions Incentive-based medication adherence interventions are promising but understudied. A significant challenge for research in this area is the development of sustainable and cost-effective long-term interventions. PMID:22580095

  13. Determinants of methotrexate adherence in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Ellen; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan; Van Camp, Yoleen; De Clerck, Luc S

    2016-05-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, weekly intake of methotrexate (MTX) is the basic drug treatment. This observational study aims to investigate how many RA patients are adherent in terms of MTX intake and to identify determinants of non-adherence. Intake of MTX (orally or via injection) was recorded in 129 RA patients with an electronic monitoring system (MEMS(®)) during 16 weeks. In addition, two adherence questionnaires, the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) and the Compliance-Questionnaire-Rheumatology (CQR) as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS) measuring MTX adherence, were administered to these patients. As possible determinants of adherence, data on demographics, disease and treatment characteristics, depression, illness cognitions, motivation, and social support were collected. Of all participants, 58 % were fully adherent and 75 % skipped at most one dose during 16 weeks. A better mental health status and suffering from comorbidities had a positive effect on adherence, while living alone had a negative effect. These three predictors explained 30 % of the variance in MTX adherence. Of the three self-report medication adherence measures, the VAS correlated the highest with the results of the electronic monitoring system (r = 0.552, p = 0.01). A relatively high adherence rate was observed in RA patients treated with MTX. The determinants identified by this study could be used to screen patients at risk for non-adherence. A simple VAS scale seems to be an acceptable way for a preliminary screening of MTX adherence. PMID:26781783

  14. Medication adherence among transgender women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Baguso, Glenda N; Gay, Caryl L; Lee, Kathryn A

    2016-08-01

    Medication adherence is linked to health outcomes among adults with HIV infection. Transgender women living with HIV (TWLWH) in the US report suboptimal adherence to medications and are found to have difficulty integrating HIV medication into their daily routine, but few studies explore the factors associated with medication adherence among transgender women. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine demographic and clinical factors related to self-reported medication adherence among transgender women. This secondary analysis is based on data collected from the Symptom and Genetic Study that included a convenience sample of 22 self-identified transgender women, 201 non-transgender men, and 72 non-transgender women recruited in northern California. Self-reported medication adherence was assessed using the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Adherence Questionnaire. Gender differences in demographic and clinical variables were assessed, as were differences between transgender women reporting high and low adherence. Transgender women had lower adherence to medications compared to non-transgender males and non-transgender females (p = .028) and were less likely to achieve viral suppression (p = .039). Within the transgender group, Black/African-Americans reported better adherence than participants who were Whites/Caucasian or other races (p = .009). Adherence among transgender women was unrelated to medication count and estrogen therapy, but consistent with other reports on the HIV population as a whole; transgender women with high adherence were more likely to achieve viral suppression compared to the transgender women with low adherence. Despite the high incidence of HIV infection in the transgender population, few studies focus on TWLWH, either in regard to their adherence to antiretroviral therapies or to their healthcare in general. To address ongoing health disparities, more studies are needed focusing on the transgender population's continuum of care in

  15. Patient adherence to medical treatment: a review of reviews

    PubMed Central

    van Dulmen, Sandra; Sluijs, Emmy; van Dijk, Liset; de Ridder, Denise; Heerdink, Rob; Bensing, Jozien

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the existing reviews of adherence to interventions and identify the underlying theories for effective interventions. That is the aim of our study. Methods The study is a review of 38 systematic reviews of the effectiveness of adherence interventions published between 1990 and 2005. Electronic literature searches were conducted in Medline, Psychinfo, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The scope of the study is patient adherence to medical treatment in the cure and care sector. Results Significant differences in the effectiveness of adherence interventions were found in 23 of the 38 systematic reviews. Effective interventions were found in each of four theoretical approaches to adherence interventions: technical, behavioural, educational and multi-faceted or complex interventions. Technical solutions, such as a simplification of the regimen, were often found to be effective, although that does not count for every therapeutic regimen. Overall, our results show that, firstly, there are effective adherence interventions without an explicit theoretical explanation of the operating mechanisms, for example technical solutions. Secondly, there are effective adherence interventions, which clearly stem from the behavioural theories, for example incentives and reminders. Thirdly, there are other theoretical models that seem plausible for explaining non-adherence, but not very effective in improving adherence behaviour. Fourthly, effective components within promising theories could not be identified because of the complexity of many adherence interventions and the lack of studies that explicitly compare theoretical components

  16. Automated microinjection system for adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youoku, Sachihiro; Suto, Yoshinori; Ando, Moritoshi; Ito, Akio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an automated microinjection system that can handle more than 500 cells an hour. Microinjection injects foreign agents directly into cells using a micro-capillary. It can randomly introduce agents such as DNA, proteins and drugs into various types of cells. However, conventional methods require a skilled operator and suffer from low throughput. The new automated microinjection techniques we have developed consist of a Petri dish height measuring method and a capillary apex position measuring method. The dish surface height is measured by analyzing the images of cells that adhere to the dish surface. The contrast between the cell images is minimized when the focus plane of an object lens coincides with the dish surface. We have developed an optimized focus searching method with a height accuracy of +/-0.2 um. The capillary apex position detection method consists of three steps: rough, middle, and precise. These steps are employed sequentially to cover capillary displacements of up to +/-2 mm, and to ultimately accomplish an alignment accuracy of less than one micron. Experimental results using this system we developed show that it can introduce fluorescent material (Alexa488) into adherent cells, HEK293, with a success rate of 88.5%.

  17. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence.

  18. Challenges in measuring medication adherence: experiences from a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Kay; Mc Namara, Kevin P; George, Johnson

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of adherence is complex and many methods, both direct and indirect are used; there is no universal gold standard. In this article, we share our experiences in a randomised controlled study, the Hypertension Adherence Program in Pharmacy trial, evaluating a community pharmacy-based intervention for improving adherence to antihypertensive medication. Several objective and subjective measures of adherence (Morisky score, TABS score, MedsIndex, Medicines Possession Ratio) were used, but produced varying results, limiting confidence in the conclusions that could be drawn. Despite using a specifically designed data mining software program to identify potentially nonadherent patients from dispensing records, many participants were found to be adherent by the self reported Morisky scale. A lesson to be learned when targeting people for interventions to improve adherence is that information from dispensing records should be supplemented by other methods in order to identify patients most in need of assistance.

  19. [e-Health interventions and improvement in treatment adherence].

    PubMed

    Sieben, Angelien; Bredie, S J H Bas; van Laarhoven, C J H M Kees; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Burger, David M; van Onzenoort, Hein A W

    2014-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication is one of the most important determinants in the treatment of patients with chronic disorders. e-Health-based interventions may be able to improve treatment adherence. This article gives an overview of the available e-Health interventions and the extent to which they can improve adherence. We searched in the PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, and Embase databases for e-Health interventions that aimed at improving adherence to treatment. Of the 16 included studies, 15 used a website and one used an app. Ten studies showed a significant improvement in treatment adherence by using the intervention. e-Health interventions were generally complex. Simple interventions were the most successful in improving treatment adherence.

  20. [Strategies for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Huang, Zhiping; Xu, Dong; Gong, Wenjie; Tang, Yuan; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Long-term therapy should be administrated for patients with schizophrenia and the medication adherence is very important for the prognosis and outcome in these patients. In this study, we screened the literatures from various databases in accordance with our search criteria. A total of 11 literatures with the results of reliability and validity regarding the measurement of schizophrenia medication adherence were enrolled in our analysis. Based on the measurements, they were classified into subjective methods and objective ones. The objective methods include blood plasma and urine concentrations, pharmacy records, pill counts and Medication Event Monitoring System. The subjective methods include Drug Attitude Inventory, Rating of Medication Influences Scale, Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs, the Brief Adherence Rating Scale, Medication Adherence Rating Scale, and Morisky scales. In general, single method for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia is limited. We recommend researchers to use 2 or more methods when measuring the medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

  1. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Job F M; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients' adherence, the vast majority do not incorporate confirmation of the actual inhalation, dose and inhalation technique. Moreover, most current measures lack detailed information on the individual consequences of non-adherence and on when and how to take action if non-adherence is identified. Notably, one has to realise there are several forms of non-adherence (erratic non-adherence, intelligent non-adherence and unwitting non-adherence), each requiring a different approach. To improve asthma management, more accurate methods are needed that integrate measures of non-adherence, asthma disease control and patient preferences. Integrating information from the latest inhaler devices and patient-reported outcomes using mobile monitoring- and feedback systems ('mHealth') is considered a promising strategy, but requires careful implementation. Key issues to be considered before large-scale implementation include patient preferences, large heterogeneity in patient and disease characteristics, economic consequences, and long-term persistence with new digital technologies.

  2. HIV Treatment Adherence, Drug Resistance, Virologic Failure: Evolving Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Marconi, Vincent C.; van Zyl, Gert U.; Gardner, Edward M.; Preiser, Wolfgang; Hong, Steven Y.; Mills, Edward J.; Gross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been shown to be a major determinant of virologic failure, emergence of drug resistant virus, disease progression, hospitalizations, mortality, and health care costs. While high adherence levels can be achieved in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings following initiation of cART, long-term adherence remains a challenge regardless of available resources. Barriers to optimal adherence may originate from individual (biological, socio-cultural, behavioral), pharmacological, and societal factors. Although patients and providers should continuously strive for maximum adherence to cART, there is accumulating evidence that each class of antiretroviral therapy has specific adherence-drug resistance relationship characteristics allowing certain regimens more flexibility than others. There is not a universally accepted measure for cART adherence, since each method has distinct advantages and disadvantages including cost, complexity, accuracy, precision, intrusiveness and bias. Development of a real-time cART adherence monitoring tool will enable the development of novel, pre-emptive adherence-improving strategies. The application of these strategies may ultimately prove to be the most cost-effective method to reduce morbidity and mortality for the individual and decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission and emergence of resistance in the community. PMID:21406048

  3. Towards tailored and targeted adherence assessment to optimise asthma management

    PubMed Central

    van Boven, Job FM; Trappenburg, Jaap CA; van der Molen, Thys; Chavannes, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to emphasise the need for a more comprehensive and tailored approach to manage the broad nature of non-adherence, to personalise current asthma management. Although currently several methods are available to measure the extent of asthma patients’ adherence, the vast majority do not incorporate confirmation of the actual inhalation, dose and inhalation technique. Moreover, most current measures lack detailed information on the individual consequences of non-adherence and on when and how to take action if non-adherence is identified. Notably, one has to realise there are several forms of non-adherence (erratic non-adherence, intelligent non-adherence and unwitting non-adherence), each requiring a different approach. To improve asthma management, more accurate methods are needed that integrate measures of non-adherence, asthma disease control and patient preferences. Integrating information from the latest inhaler devices and patient-reported outcomes using mobile monitoring- and feedback systems (‘mHealth’) is considered a promising strategy, but requires careful implementation. Key issues to be considered before large-scale implementation include patient preferences, large heterogeneity in patient and disease characteristics, economic consequences, and long-term persistence with new digital technologies. PMID:26181850

  4. Heart failure patient adherence: epidemiology, cause, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Corotto, Paul S; McCarey, Melissa M; Adams, Suzanne; Khazanie, Prateeti; Whellan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to therapeutic regimens is a significant impediment to improving clinical outcomes in the HF population. Typical rates of adherence to prescribed medications, low-sodium diets, and aerobic exercise programs remain lower than that needed to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with HF. Factors contributing to poor adherence include multiple comorbidities, clinical depression, and decreased cognitive functioning. HF education and programs to enhance self-management skills have improved patient quality of life but have yet to decrease mortality or rehospitalization rates significantly. Telemonitoring to improve adherence behaviors and self-management interventions within broader HF management programs have demonstrated significant clinical improvements in this population.

  5. Mechanism of the Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Smooth Surfaces III. Purification and Properties of the Enzyme Complex Responsible for Adherence.

    PubMed

    Mukasa, H; Slade, H D

    1974-11-01

    Enzymes which possess the ability to cause the adherence of Streptococcus mutans cells to a smooth glass surface were purified 1,100 times by chromatography on agarose gel followed by hydroxylapatite gel. During the purification procedures, the enzymes from strain HS6 (group a) were examined for the synthesis of water-soluble and water-insoluble polysaccharide and the ability to produce adherence. The enzyme preparations producing adherence of the S. mutans cells in the presence of sucrose possessed a molecular size of about 400,000 to 2,000,000 and were composed of approximately equivalent amounts of dextran and levan sucrases and 5 to 30% polysaccharide. The most highly purified preparation contained a negligible amount of contaminating protein as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, and gel diffusion. In these three tests, the location of the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of insoluble polymer was detected by embedding or covering the enzyme-containing gel with a layer of sucrose-containing agarose gel and observing the formation of insoluble polymer. During purification the ability of all fractions to produce adherence was parallel with the enzyme activity responsible for the synthesis of insoluble polysaccharide from sucrose. About two-thirds of the sucrase enzyme complex in the S. mutans culture fluid synthesized water-soluble polymer. This complex, obtained by filtration through agarose gel, was smaller in molecular size, lower in sugar content, and did not produce adherence, in contrast to the enzyme complex which possessed adherence activity. The inhibition of the enzyme complex synthesizing soluble polymer required more anti-synthetase serum than that required to inhibit the synthesis of water-insoluble polymer. It is not known whether the lack of adherence activity in this enzyme was due to its smaller size and lower sugar content or the absence of unknown factors which are essential for its activity. The

  6. Pulling long tubes from firmly adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvelier, D.; Chiaruttini, N.; Bassereau, P.; Nassoy, P.

    2005-09-01

    We used optical tweezers to measure the force-extension curve for the elongation of nanotubes from adhered giant vesicles. We show that the force increases significantly with the length of the tube, which is drastically different from what is observed when the membrane tension is kept constant, e.g. by pipette aspiration. The absence of any force plateau is quantitatively analysed in the framework of the material model of membranes. In particular, we rationalize a counter-intuitive weaker force rise for long tubes and demonstrate that the measured force-length trace allows us to probe both the entropic regime (characterised by the bending rigidity) and the elastic regime (characterised by the area expansion modulus) of the lipid membrane.

  7. Quantification of dandruff adherence to hair.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Uhoda, E; Piérard, G E

    2005-10-01

    Dandruff adherence to hair shafts is a visible annoying phenomenon. The aspect can be recorded by different means including the ultraviolet light-enhanced visualization (ULEV) method and microscopy. We present another quantitative method. Hairs were clipped from the parietal scalp area of 25 volunteers complaining of dandruff. They were firmly applied onto cyanoacrylate-coated microscopic slides. Hairs were lifted up after 15-20 s leaving a cast in the adhesive coat. Dandruff were thus harvested from the hair shafts and remained attached to the cyanoacrylate coat. After staining, the material was submitted to image analysis to derive the dandruff density per unit length of hairs. In 11/25 subjects, a correlation was found between the width of the hair casts and the dandruff density. This method does not collect all dandruff along hair shafts, but data are likely representative of the whole corneocyte load. PMID:18492209

  8. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. Methods A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004–2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Results Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Conclusion Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the

  9. Adherence to a Strength Training Intervention in Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Arikawa, Andrea Y.; O’Dougherty, Maureen; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Background The factors influencing exercise adherence are not well characterized in women in their premenopausal years. Methods The purpose of this report is to provide an analysis of demographic factors contributing to women’s adherence to a two-year twice-weekly weight training intervention. Overweight and obese premenopausal women were randomized to a control or intervention group. Results During the supervised period of the intervention (months 1–4), adherence was significantly lower among those with a higher level of education and among unmarried women with children aged six to twelve compared to married women without children (F = 4.83, p = 0.004). Overall adherence during the supervised and unsupervised periods was 95.4% and 64.5%, respectively (unadjusted mean). During year 1, white women were significantly more adherent to the intervention (70.3%) than women of color (48.6%). Non-married women with children 13 years or older were significantly less adherent than married women with children 5 years or younger (36.3% vs 75.4%, respectively, p < 0.007). Overall adherence was 51.4% in year 2. Conclusions Interventions and public health recommendations need to further consider how to engage communities to provide effective support for long-term adherence to fitness center based exercise of all women, regardless of demographics. PMID:21297191

  10. Improving Adherence to Hand Hygiene among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maskerine, Courtney; Loeb, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Increased adherence to hand hygiene is widely acknowledged to be the most important way of reducing infections in health care facilities. Despite evidence of benefit, adherence to hand hygiene among health care professionals remains low. Several behavioral and organizational theories have been proposed to explain this. As a whole, the success of…

  11. 29 CFR 1608.8 - Adherence to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.8 Adherence to court order. Parties are entitled to rely on orders of courts of competent jurisdiction. If adherence to an Order of a United States District Court or other court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered by consent...

  12. 29 CFR 1608.8 - Adherence to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.8 Adherence to court order. Parties are entitled to rely on orders of courts of competent jurisdiction. If adherence to an Order of a United States District Court or other court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered by consent...

  13. 29 CFR 1608.8 - Adherence to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.8 Adherence to court order. Parties are entitled to rely on orders of courts of competent jurisdiction. If adherence to an Order of a United States District Court or other court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered by consent...

  14. 29 CFR 1608.8 - Adherence to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.8 Adherence to court order. Parties are entitled to rely on orders of courts of competent jurisdiction. If adherence to an Order of a United States District Court or other court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered by consent...

  15. 29 CFR 1608.8 - Adherence to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.8 Adherence to court order. Parties are entitled to rely on orders of courts of competent jurisdiction. If adherence to an Order of a United States District Court or other court of competent jurisdiction, whether entered by consent...

  16. Methodologies for medication adherence evaluation: Focus on psoriasis topical treatment.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana; Teixeira, Maribel; Almeida, Vera; Torres, Tiago; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Almeida, Isabel Filipa

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to topical treatment has been less studied in comparison with systemic therapeutic regimens and is poorly understood. High-quality research on this area is essential to outline a strategy to increase medication adherence and clinical outcomes. For a more comprehensive understanding of this issue, a systematic review of the methodologies for topical treatment adherence evaluation in psoriasis was undertaken. Twenty one studies were selected from the literature which used six different adherence methodologies. Merely three studies used multiple adherence measurement methods. The most used method was questionnaire (44%) which was also associated with higher variability of the adherence results. One possible explanation is the lack of a validated questionnaire designed specifically for the evaluation of adherence to topical treatment. Only one method (medication weight) takes into consideration the applied dose. However, the estimation of the expected weight is complex, which renders this method, as used presently, less effective. The use of a dosing device could improve its accuracy and be helpful to clearly instruct the patients about the correct dose. As there is no single method that allows an accurate and complete assessment of adherence it is recommended to use a combination of methods, including self-report and medicines' weight measurements.

  17. Adherence to Pharmacological Treatment for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drotar, Dennis; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Demeter, Christine A.; McNamara, Nora K.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Stange, Jonathan; Vijay, Priya; Findling, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of adherence to divalproex sodium (DVPX) and lithium carbonate (Li) combination treatment during the initial stabilization treatment phase. Method: Adherence to Li/DVPX combination therapy was measured by the presence or absence of minimum serum concentrations of…

  18. Medication Adherence in a Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Louisa G.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Leon, Andrew C.; Kansky, Christine I.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ketter, Terence A.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Thase, Michael E.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Keyes, Michelle; Rabideau, Dustin; Nierenberg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopharmacology remains the foundation of treatment for bipolar disorder, but medication adherence in this population is low (Range = 20% to 64%). We examined medication adherence in a multi-site, comparative effectiveness study of lithium. Method The Lithium Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS) was a six-month, six-site, randomized effectiveness trial of adjunctive moderate dose lithium therapy compared to optimized treatment in adult outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder (N=283). Medication adherence was measured at each study visit with the Tablet Routine Questionnaire. Results We found that 4.50% of participants reported missing at least 30% of their medications in the past week at baseline and non-adherence remained low throughout the trial (< 7%). Poor medication adherence was associated with more manic symptoms and side effects as well as lower lithium serum levels at mid- and post-treatment, but not with poor quality of life, overall severity of illness, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion Participants in LiTMUS were highly adherent with taking their medications. The lack of association with possible predictors of adherence, such as depression and quality of life, could be explained by the limited variance or other factors as well as by not using an objective measure of adherence. PMID:24117232

  19. 14 CFR 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates. (a) Although NASA assumes no responsibility for budget overruns, the recipient may spend grant funds without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adherence to original budget...

  20. 14 CFR 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates. (a) Although NASA assumes no responsibility for budget overruns, the recipient may spend grant funds without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Adherence to original budget estimates....

  1. 14 CFR 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates. (a) Although NASA assumes no responsibility for budget overruns, the recipient may spend grant funds without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adherence to original budget...

  2. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-06-16

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface. 3 figs.

  3. Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Dana E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated commitment-based intervention for improvement of adherence to 10-day antibiotic regimen. Subjects were 60 college students. Experimental subjects made verbal and written commitments for adherence and completed tasks designed to increase their investment in medication regimen. Controls performed similarly structured tasks unrelated to…

  4. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This nonexperimental study used mixed-effects regression models to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youths with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., multisystemic therapy [MST]) 1 year…

  5. Thirty-Three Years of Aerobic Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasch, Frederick W.

    2001-01-01

    Followed 15 middle-aged men for 25-33 years while they participated in an aerobic exercise program. Adherence in the sample was 100 percent. Possible explanations for the adherence include program leadership, peer support, written evaluations and progress reports, emphasis on health, early and continued interest in sport and exercise, recognition…

  6. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth W.; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and of approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n = 25) in a diverse population of older adults with…

  7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  8. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James H.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface.

  9. Teaching Medication Adherence in US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Linda Garrelts; Hess, Karl; Farmer, Kevin C.; Yurkon, Afton M.; Ha, Carolyn C.; Schwartzman, Emmanuelle; Law, Anandi V.; Milani, Paul A.; Trotta, Katie; Labella, Sara R.; Designor, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine and describe the nature and extent of medication adherence education in US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods. A mixed-methods research study was conducted that included a national survey of pharmacy faculty members, a national survey of pharmacy students, and phone interviews of 3 faculty members and 6 preceptors. Results. The majority of faculty members and students agreed that background concepts in medication adherence are well covered in pharmacy curricula. Approximately 40% to 65% of the students sampled were not familiar with several adherence interventions. The 6 preceptors who were interviewed felt they were not well-informed on adherence interventions, unclear on what students knew about adherence, and challenged to provide adherence-related activities for students during practice experiences because of practice time constraints. Conclusions. Intermediate and advanced concepts in medication adherence, such as conducting interventions, are not adequately covered in pharmacy curriculums; therefore stakeholders in pharmacy education must develop national standards and tools to ensure consistent and adequate medication adherence education. PMID:22761520

  10. Treatment Adherence among Latina Female Adolescent Suicide Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Piacentini, John; Van Rossem, Ronan; Graae, Flemming; Cantwell, Coleen; Castro-Blanco, David; Feldman, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Disenfranchised Latina adolescents (N=140) and their mothers presenting at a large urban emergency room after a suicide attempt by the adolescent were assessed to examine treatment adherence. Predictor variables for treatment adherence were established. Results are discussed in relation to treatment session attendance. Implications for the…

  11. Ultrastructural study of Helicobacter pylori adherence properties in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Rudmann, D G; Eaton, K A; Krakowka, S

    1992-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected gnotobiotic piglets identified four general adherence patterns comparable to those observed in human patients. Intimate associations between the bacterial and mucosal cell membranes, including cuplike invaginations and adherence pedestals, were present and were accompanied by alterations to microvilli and cell membrane morphology. Images PMID:1563801

  12. Component Analysis of Adherence in a Family Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Laura G.; Owens, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Most studies of adherence use a single global measure to examine the relation of adherence to outcomes. These studies inform us about effects of overall implementation but not about importance of specific program elements. Previous research on the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 has shown that outcomes were unrelated to global…

  13. Adherence, shared decision-making and patient autonomy.

    PubMed

    Sandman, Lars; Granger, Bradi B; Ekman, Inger; Munthe, Christian

    2012-05-01

    In recent years the formerly quite strong interest in patient compliance has been questioned for being too paternalistic and oriented towards overly narrow biomedical goals as the basis for treatment recommendations. In line with this there has been a shift towards using the notion of adherence to signal an increased weight for patients' preferences and autonomy in decision making around treatments. This 'adherence-paradigm' thus encompasses shared decision-making as an ideal and patient perspective and autonomy as guiding goals of care. What this implies in terms of the importance that we have reason to attach to (non-)adherence and how has, however, not been explained. In this article, we explore the relationship between different forms of shared decision-making, patient autonomy and adherence. Distinguishing between dynamically and statically framed adherence we show how the version of shared decision-making advocated will have consequences for whether one should be interested in a dynamically or statically framed adherence and in what way patient adherence should be assessed. In contrast to the former compliance paradigm (where non-compliance was necessarily seen as a problem), using observations about (non-)adherence to assess the success of health care decision making and professional-patient interaction turns out to be a much less straightforward matter.

  14. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence.

  15. Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to cultured human embryonic intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerardo, S H; Garcia, M M; Wexler, H M; Finegold, S M

    1998-02-01

    Adherence of Bilophila wadsworthia to the cultured human embryonic intestinal cell line, Intestine 407 (Int 407), varied among the strains tested from strongly adherent (76-100% cells positive for one or more adherent bacteria) to non- or weakly adherent (0-25% positive cells). Although negative staining revealed that infrequent cells of an adherent strain, WAL 9077, the adherent type-strain, WAL 7959, and a non-adherent strain, WAL 8448, expressed loosely associated fimbrial structures, a role for these structures in adhesion could not be confirmed with either scanning or thin-section electron micrography. Ruthenium red staining of thin-section preparations and subsequent electron microscopy failed to reveal an extensive extracellular polysaccharide layer. SDS-PAGE analysis of crude outer membrane fractions of WAL 9077 and WAL 8448 demonstrated clear differences in their major and minor outer membrane protein components. Thus, we postulate that the adherence of B. wadsworthia to Int 407 cells is mediated by an outer membrane or cell wall component. PMID:16887620

  16. 14 CFR 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adherence to original budget estimates. 1260.72 Section 1260.72 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates....

  17. The Influence of Goal Setting on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Lawrence E.; Stone, William J.; Anonsen, Lori J.; Klein, Diane A.

    2000-01-01

    Assessed the influence of fitness- and health-related goal setting on exercise adherence. Students in a college fitness program participated in goal setting, reading, or control groups. No significant differences in exercise adherence were found. Students enrolled for letter grades had more fitness center visits and hours of activity than students…

  18. ENHANCE—(Electronic Hydroxyurea Adherence): A Protocol to Increase Hydroxyurea Adherence in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chisolm, Deena J; O’Brien, Sarah H

    2016-01-01

    Background Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only disease-modifying medication for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). HU can reduce SCD-related complications but only 35% to 50% of pediatric patients adhere to HU at the rates achieved in clinical trials and this limits its clinical effectiveness. Mobile Directly Observed Therapy (Mobile DOT) is a pilot-tested, electronic, multidimensional, HU adherence intervention that targets many components of the Health Behavior Model. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of Mobile DOT on HU adherence in children with SCD. The objective of our study is to inform the development of future adherence interventions and pediatric SCD protocols. Methods This is a single-arm crossover study of pediatric patients with SCD. Participants self-record videos of their daily HU administrations and receive text message alerts to take HU, feedback on their HU adherence, and incentives when they achieve adherence goals during the 6-month Mobile DOT phase. Participants’ HU adherence during the Mobile DOT phase is compared with their baseline HU adherence (6 months prior to study entry) and to their HU adherence 6 months after completing the Mobile DOT phase. The primary outcome of this study is HU adherence measured by medication possession ratio. Results The trial is ongoing. Preliminary review of participant satisfaction results suggest that most participants can complete Mobile DOT in less than 5 minutes per day and are satisfied with the intervention. Conclusions If effective, the Mobile DOT strategy will increase HU adherence and this could improve patients’ clinical outcomes and reduce costs of care. PMID:27697749

  19. Quantification of the Forgiveness of Drugs to Imperfect Adherence.

    PubMed

    Assawasuwannakit, P; Braund, R; Duffull, S B

    2015-03-01

    The circumstance of how sensitive therapeutic success is under imperfect adherence is driven by the property known as forgiveness. To date, no studies have considered variability in the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic process in conjunction with imperfect adherence patterns in order to develop a comparative criterion to determine the forgiveness of a drug. In this study, we have proposed a criterion to quantify forgiveness; illustrated the criterion for a theoretical example and evaluated the forgiveness of a motivating example, namely warfarin. A forgiveness criterion, relative forgiveness, is defined as the number of times more likely that a target is successfully attained under perfect adherence compared to imperfect adherence; or when comparing two drugs under a standard setting of imperfect adherence. The relative forgiveness criterion may have important implications for both drug development and clinical practice since the choice of drug can account for the likely influence of its forgiveness. PMID:26225235

  20. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  1. Adherence and the Lie in a HIV Prevention Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Jonathan; Scorgie, Fiona; van der Straten, Ariane; Saethre, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    The lie has been presented as a performance that protects identities against moral judgment in the context of power imbalances. We explore this assertion from the perspective of a pre-exposure prophylaxis trial to prevent HIV for African women in South Africa, in which context biological evidence of widespread lying about product adherence was produced, resulting in a moral discourse that opposed altruistic and selfish motivations. In this article, we seek to understand the meaning of the lie from the perspective of women trial participants. Seeing the trial as representing a hopeful future, and perfect adherence as sustaining their investment in this, participants recited scripted accounts of adherence and performed the role of the perfect adherer, while identifying other participants as dishonest. Given that clinical trials create moral orders and adherence is key to this, we argue that women embraced the apparatus of the clinical trial to assert their moral subjectivities. PMID:26575611

  2. What Time is it? Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tiruneh, Yordanos M.; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia and explored the sociocultural context in which they relate to their regimen requirements. Data were collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews with 105 patients on ART and observations held at the study clinic. We analyzed data using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Our findings indicate that study participants are highly adherent to dose but less adherent to dose schedule. Strict dose time instructions were reported as stressful and unrealistic. The discrepancy between adherence to dose and dose schedule could be explained by time perception, difficulty with the strictness of medication regimens, or beliefs about dose timing adherence. Care providers should acknowledge the complexities of medication practices and engage in shared decision-making to incorporate patients’ perspectives and identify effective interventions. PMID:26873491

  3. Improving adherence to oral cancer therapy in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    McCue, Debbie A; Lohr, Lisa K; Pick, Amy M

    2014-05-01

    Adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens maximizes their effectiveness and minimizes any potential toxicities. Factors specifically related to the treatment, patient, and health care provider may influence medication adherence. Treatment-related factors include the complexity of the regimen, the cost of therapy, the possibility of side effects, and the delay in treatment benefits. Meanwhile, patients may not have an adequate support system or an understanding of the need for the medication, and providers may not fully succeed in communicating the importance of adherence and the types of side effects that may occur. Nonadherence may lead to an increased risk of toxicity, decreased effectiveness, and increased utilization of health care resources. Although various methods for measuring adherence are available, self-reporting is the most widely used. Studies describing adherence in a broad range of cancers are reviewed. Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia has been revolutionized by the development of oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are highly effective in managing the disease when taken consistently. However, nonadherence is relatively common and can lead to reduced rates of response and increased medical costs. Similar effects of nonadherence on outcome and cost have also been observed in patients with various other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Interventions to improve adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens include communication about the importance of adherence and the potential consequences of nonadherence, simplification of the patient's medication schedule (if possible), and inclusion of a caregiver or family member in the conversation. Written materials should always be provided to accompany verbal instructions. This review summarizes factors influencing medication adherence, impact of nonadherence on patient outcomes, methods for measuring adherence, previous studies of nonadherence in patients with cancer, common barriers to access, and

  4. Determinants of patient adherence: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Matyjaszczyk, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A number of potential determinants of medication non-adherence have been described so far. However, the heterogenic quality of existing publications poses the need for the use of a rigorous methodology in building a list of such determinants. The purpose of this study was a systematic review of current research on determinants of patient adherence on the basis of a recently agreed European consensus taxonomy and terminology. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, IPA, and PsycINFO were systematically searched for systematic reviews published between 2000/01/01 and 2009/12/31 that provided determinants on non-adherence to medication. The searches were limited to reviews having adherence to medication prescribed by health professionals for outpatient as a major topic. Results: Fifty-one reviews were included in this review, covering 19 different disease categories. In these reviews, exclusively assessing non-adherence to chronic therapies, 771 individual factor items were identified, of which most were determinants of implementation, and only 47—determinants of persistence with medication. Factors with an unambiguous effect on adherence were further grouped into 8 clusters of socio-economic-related factors, 6 of healthcare team- and system-related factors, 6 of condition-related factors, 6 of therapy-related factors, and 14 of patient-related factors. The lack of standardized definitions and use of poor measurement methods resulted in many inconsistencies. Conclusions: This study provides clear evidence that medication non-adherence is affected by multiple determinants. Therefore, the prediction of non-adherence of individual patients is difficult, and suitable measurement and multifaceted interventions may be the most effective answer toward unsatisfactory adherence. The limited number of publications assessing determinants of persistence with medication, and lack of those providing determinants of adherence to short-term treatment identify

  5. Treatment adherence in multiple sclerosis: a survey of Belgian neurologists

    PubMed Central

    Decoo, Danny; Vokaer, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor treatment adherence is common among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This survey evaluated neurologists’ perception of treatment adherence among MS patients. Materials and methods This questionnaire-based survey of Belgian neurologists treating MS patients was conducted between June and July 2014. Face-to-face interviews with the neurologists were based on a semistructured questionnaire containing questions regarding the perception of the treatment-adherence level. Results A total of 41 neurologists participated in the survey. Of these, 88% indicated frequent discussions about treatment adherence as beneficial for treatment efficacy. The mean time spent on the treatment-adherence discussion during the initial consultation was 11 minutes, with 24% of doctors spending 5 minutes and 24% of doctors spending 10 minutes discussing this issue. The majority of neurologists (56%) perceived the adherence level in MS as good, and 12% perceived it as excellent. The majority of neurologists (64%) indicated intolerance as a main cause of poor adherence, and all neurologists reported insufficient efficacy as a consequence of nonadherence. The importance of adherence in the neurologists’ practice was evaluated on a scale of 1–10, with 1= “not very important” and 10= “very important”: 44% of doctors indicated a score of 10, and the mean score was 9.0. Conclusion Belgian neurologists consider treatment adherence in MS as essential for the benefits of therapies. However, although neurologists are aware of the consequences of nonadherence, they generally spend limited time discussing the importance of treatment adherence with their patients. PMID:26640373

  6. Maximizing patient adherence for optimal outcomes in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bewley, A; Page, B

    2011-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, disabling disease in which adherence to treatment is often poor. The aim of this article is to highlight the problem of adherence to long-term treatment in psoriasis and the factors that contribute to it, and to discuss how adherence, and thus outcomes, can be improved. This article is based on a presentation given by the authors at a satellite symposium held during the 19th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 6-10 October, 2010, in Gothenburg, Sweden. Adherence to topical medication is a major problem in psoriasis. Not only are prescriptions not being filled by patients (primary adherence) but topical medications are not being used as recommended (secondary adherence). The issue is complex due to the many factors which affect adherence, including efficacy, ease of use and convenience of application, and the healthcare professional-patient relationship. Due to the nature of the disease, patients suffer poor self-image and feel stigmatized, particularly when psoriasis is present on a visible part of the body. Consequently, the negative impact of psoriasis on patient quality of life underlies many adherence issues. It is therefore important for treatment to address the psychological aspects as well as the physical symptoms of psoriasis. Improvements in several areas of disease management may lead to benefits in medication adherence and hence clinical benefit. Prescribing therapy in line with patient preference for treatment vehicle and improving the healthcare professional-patient relationship may be key factors. Nurses have an important role in educating patients and delivering long-term care. This individualized, personal, approach may help improve treatment adherence, outcomes, and the quality of life for patients with psoriasis. PMID:21507078

  7. Micromolded Arrays for Separation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Xu, Wei; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient, yet inexpensive, approach for isolating viable single cells or colonies from a mixed population. This cell microarray platform possesses innovations in both the array manufacture and the manner of target cell release. Arrays of microwells with bases composed of detachable concave elements, termed microrafts, were fabricated by a dip-coating process using a polydimethylsiloxane mold as the template and the array substrate. This manufacturing approach enabled the use of materials other than photoresists to create the array elements. Thus microrafts possessing low autofluorescence could be fabricated for fluorescence-based identification of cells. Cells plated on the microarray settled and attached at the center of the wells due to the microrafts’ concavity. Individual microrafts were readily dislodged by the action of a needle inserted through the compliant polymer substrate. The hard polymer material (polystyrene or epoxy resin) of which the microrafts were composed protected the cells from damage by the needle. For cell analysis and isolation, cells of interest were identified using a standard inverted microscope and microrafts carrying target cells were dislodged with the needle. The released cells/microrafts could be efficiently collected, cultured and clonally expanded. During the separation and collection procedures, the cells remained adherent and provided a measure of protection during manipulation, thus providing an extremely high single-cell cloning rate (>95%). Generation of a transfected cell line based on expression of a fluorescent protein demonstrated an important application for performing on-chip cell separations. PMID:20838672

  8. Family behavior, adaptation, and treatment adherence of pediatric nephrology patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, M C; Tucker, C M; Fennell, R S

    1996-04-01

    In this exploratory study we investigated the relationships among family behavior variables (e.g., family expressiveness), adaptive functioning skills, maladaptive behavior, and adherence to treatment in pediatric renal failure patients. The study included 22 pediatric outpatients with renal failure who had not yet received dialysis or transplantation (RF) and their parents, and 12 pediatric outpatients with kidney transplants (TX) and their parents. For the RF patients, significant correlations were found between some of their adaptive functioning skills and measures of their medication adherence, diet adherence, and clinic appointment adherence; however, for the TX patients significant correlations were found only between some of their adaptive functioning skills and measures of their medication adherence. For the RF patients only, some measures of their family behavior were significantly correlated with measures of their medication adherence and diet adherence. Additionally, some measures of the RF patients' family behavior were significantly related to their communication skills, socialization skills, overall adaptive functioning skills, and maladaptive behavior. For the TX patients, only their socialization skill level was significantly correlated with one measure of their family behavior. It is concluded that facilitation of adaptive and physical functioning among renal pediatric patients likely requires multidimensional training and/or counselling interventions with the children and their families, and that some of the content and/or emphasis of this training likely needs to differ for RF patients versus TX patients.

  9. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet.

    PubMed

    Link, Lilli B; Jacobson, Judith S

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be 80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (beta=0.95), severity of disease (beta=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (beta=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence.

  10. Two character traits associated with adherence to long term therapies.

    PubMed

    Reach, Gérard

    2012-10-01

    Adherence is defined as the adequacy between the behaviours of patients and their medical prescriptions. Adherence is a general behaviour, which can explain why patients in the placebo arm of randomised clinical trials have a lower mortality rate when they are adherent. We propose that this behaviour is related to two character traits: patience (capacity to give priority to the future) and, more provocatively, obedience. To support this claim, we bring arguments from the literature and from two published personal studies. We previously showed that type 2 diabetic patients who respond as non-adherers to a questionnaire on adherence to medication and to whom one proposes a fictitious monetary choice between receiving 500 euros today or waiting one year to receive 1500 euros never make the remote choice. We also showed that obese diabetic patients who declare that they do not fasten their seat belt when they are seated in the rear of a car are more often non-adherent concerning medication than those patients who claim that they follow this road safety recommendation. Thus, one of the roles of empowerment and patient education could be to encourage the patients, if they wish it, to replace passive adherence behaviours with conscious active choices.

  11. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  12. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet

    PubMed Central

    Link, Lilli B.; Jacobson, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be ≥80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (β=0.95), severity of disease (β=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (β=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence. PMID:18243943

  13. Unravelling adherence to prophylaxis in haemophilia: a patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, L H; Kars, M C; Beijlevelt-van der Zande, M; Peters, M; Schuurmans, M J; Fischer, K

    2015-09-01

    Given the lifelong therapy in haemophilia patients, insight in non-adherence behaviour from a patient perspective is important to understand patients' difficulties with the following treatment recommendations. The aim of this study was to clarify the process underlying adherence (behaviour) to prophylactic treatment, from a patients' perspective. To develop a grounded theory, a qualitative study using individual in-depth interviews was performed to understand experiences, perceptions and beliefs concerning adherence to prophylaxis. From two Dutch treatment centres, 21 adults with haemophilia using prophylaxis were interviewed. Patients were asked how they experience their task to administer prophylaxis and how they adhere to this. The interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed in an iterative process, leading to the development of the grounded theory. Adherence was determined by the position of prophylaxis in life. The position of prophylaxis was determined by the perception of prophylaxis and the ability to exert prophylaxis. Patients' perception was influenced by two main factors: acceptance of haemophilia and feeling/fearing symptoms. The ability to exert prophylaxis was influenced by understanding haemophilia and prophylaxis and planning/infusion skills. The combination of different perceptions and skills led to four main positions of prophylaxis in life: (i) prophylaxis integrated in life, (ii) prophylaxis according to doctors' advice, struggling with irregular situations, (iii) prophylaxis is too much to handle, (iv) prophylaxis is a confrontation with illness. The adherence level gradually decreased from position 1 to 4. This information can be used to design tailored interventions to promote adherence.

  14. Performance of an automated solid-phase red cell adherence system compared with that of a manual gel microcolumn assay for the identification of antibodies eluted from red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Finck, R H; Davis, R J; Teng, S; Goldfinger, D; Ziman, A F; Lu, Q; Yuan, S

    2011-01-01

    IgG antibodies coating red blood cells (RBCs) can be removed by elution procedures and their specificity determined by antibody identification studies. Although such testing is traditionally performed using the tube agglutination assay, prior studies have shown that the gel microcolumn (GMC) assay may also be used with comparable results. The purpose of this study was to compare an automated solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) system with a GMC assay for the detection of antibodies eluted from RBCs. Acid eluates from 51 peripheral blood (PB) and 7 cord blood (CB) samples were evaluated by both an automated SPRCA instrument and a manual GMC assay. The concordance rate between the two systems for peripheral RBC samples was 88.2 percent (45 of 51), including cases with alloantibodies (n = 8), warm autoantibodies (n = 12), antibodies with no identifiable specificity (n = 2), and negative results (n = 23). There were six discordant cases, of which four had alloantibodies (including anti-Jka, -E, and -e) demonstrable by the SPRCA system only. In the remaining 2 cases, anti-Fya and antibodies with no identifiable specificity were demonstrable by the GMC assay only. All seven CB specimens produced concordant results, showing anti-A (n = 3), -B (n = 1), maternal anti-Jka (n = 2), or a negative result (n = 1). Automated SPRCA technology has a performance that is comparable with that of a manual GMC assay for identifying antibodies eluted from PB and CB RBCs.

  15. Adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Teklu, T.; Desalegn, F.; Tesfay, M.; Klinkenberg, E.; Mulugeta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Tuberculosis (TB) patients in Mekelle Zone, Tigray Region, in Ethiopia. Objective: To investigate adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Design: A cross-sectional study in health facilities providing anti-tuberculosis treatment was conducted. Adherence was measured in three ways: through self-reported missed doses, by visual analogue scale whereby patients rate their own adherence and by record review. A patient was considered to be adherent if 90% or more of the prescribed medication was taken. Result: Of 278 TB patients included, 101 were in the intensive and 177 in the continuation phase. Respectively 67 (24.1%), 130 (46.8%) and 80 (28.8%) patients had smear-positive, smear-negative and extra-pulmonary TB. Self-report of missed doses and record review indicated adherence of respectively 273 (97.3%) and 271 (97.5%) patients. By visual analogue scale, 250 (91.6%) patients rated themselves as adherent. History of drug side effects (aOR 0.25, 95%CI 0.08–0.77) and knowledge about TB prevention (aOR 0.19, 95%CI 0.05–0.8) were independently associated with being adherent in this setting. Conclusion: Adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment was high in our study. Adherence support should be given to the poor, the elderly, patients co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, alcohol abusers and smokers. Health education on TB prevention should be given to all TB patients regularly. PMID:26478511

  16. Pharmacists’ perspectives on promoting medication adherence among patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kibicho, Jennifer W.; Owczarzak, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To provide pharmacists’ perspectives on medication adherence barriers for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to describe pharmacists’ strategies for promoting adherence to antiretroviral medications. Design Multisite, qualitative, descriptive study. Setting Four midwestern U.S. states, from August through October 2009. Participants 19 pharmacists at 10 pharmacies providing services to patients with HIV. Intervention Pharmacists were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Main outcome measures Barriers to medication adherence, pharmacist interventions, challenges to promoting adherence. Results Pharmacists reported a range of adherence barriers that were patient specific (e.g., cognitive factors, lack of social support), therapy related (e.g., adverse effects, intolerable medications), and structural level (e.g., strained provider relationships). They used a combination of individually tailored, patient-specific interventions that identified and resolved adherence barriers and actively anticipated and addressed potential adherence barriers. Pharmacist interventions included medication-specific education to enhance patient self-efficacy, follow-up calls to monitor adherence, practical and social support to motivate adherence, and patient referrals to other health care providers. However, the pharmacists faced internal (e.g., lack of time, lack of trained personnel) and external (e.g., insurance policies that disallowed patient enrollment in automatic prescription refill program) challenges. Conclusion Pharmacists in community settings went beyond prescription drug counseling mandated by law to provide additional pharmacy services that were tailored to the needs of patients with HIV. Given that many individuals with HIV are living longer, more research is needed on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of pharmacists’ interventions in clinical practice, in order to inform insurance reimbursement policies. PMID

  17. Investigating Reasons for CPAP Adherence in Adolescents: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prashad, Priya S.; Marcus, Carole L.; Maggs, Jill; Stettler, Nicolas; Cornaglia, Mary A.; Costa, Priscilla; Puzino, Kristina; Xanthopoulos, Melissa; Bradford, Ruth; Barg, Frances K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) represent an important but understudied subgroup of long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) users. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors related to adherence from the perspective of adolescents and their caregivers. Methods: Individual open-ended, semi-structured interviews were conducted with adolescents (n = 21) and caregivers (n = 20). Objective adherence data from the adolescents' CPAP machines during the previous month was obtained. Adolescents with different adherence levels and their caregivers were asked their views on CPAP. Using a modified grounded theory approach, we identified themes and developed theories that explained the adolescents' adherence patterns. Results: Adolescent participants (n = 21) were aged 12-18 years, predominantly male (n = 15), African American (n = 16), users of CPAP for at least one month. Caregivers were mainly mothers (n = 17). Seven adolescents had high use (mean use 381 ± 80 min per night), 7 had low use (mean use 30 ± 24 min per night), and 7 had no use during the month prior to being interviewed. Degree of structure in the home, social reactions, mode of communication among family members, and perception of benefits were issues that played a role in CPAP adherence. Conclusions: Understanding the adolescent and family experience of using CPAP may be key to increasing adolescent CPAP adherence. As a result of our findings, we speculate that health education, peer support groups, and developmentally appropriate individualized support strategies may be important in promoting adherence. Future studies should examine these theories of CPAP adherence. Citation: Prashad PS; Marcus CL; Maggs J; Stettler N; Cornaglia MA; Costa P; Puzino K; Xanthopoulos M; Bradford R; Barg FK. Investigating reasons for CPAP adherence in adolescents: a qualitative approach. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(12):1303-1313. PMID:24340293

  18. Interventions to improve adherence to lipid lowering medication

    PubMed Central

    Schedlbauer, Angela; Schroeder, Knut; Peters, Tim; Fahey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid lowering drugs are still widely underused, despite compelling evidence about their effectiveness in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Poor patient adherence to medication regimen is a major factor in the lack of success in treating hyperlipidaemia. In this review we focus on interventions, which encourage patients at risk of heart disease or stroke to take lipid lowering medication regularly. Objectives To assess the effect of interventions aiming at improved adherence to lipid lowering drugs, focusing on measures of adherence and clinical outcomes. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and CINAHL. Date of most recent search was in February 2003. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions to lipid lowering medication in adults for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in an ambulatory setting. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers extracted data independently and assessed studies according to criteria outlined by the Cochrane Reviewers’ Handbook. Main results The eight studies found contained data on 5943 patients. Interventions could be stratified into four categories: 1. simplification of drug regimen, 2. patient information/education, 3. intensified patient care such as reminding and 4. complex behavioural interventions such as group sessions. Change in adherence ranged from −3% to 25% (decrease in adherence by 3% to increase in adherence by 25%). Three studies reported significantly improved adherence through simplification of drug regimen (category 1), improved patient information/education (category 2) and reminding (category 3). The fact that the successful interventions were evenly spread across the categories, does not suggest any advantage of one particular type of intervention. The methodological and analytical quality was

  19. Life events, coping, and antihypertensive medication adherence among older adults: the cohort study of medication adherence among older adults.

    PubMed

    Holt, Elizabeth W; Muntner, Paul; Joyce, C; Morisky, Donald E; Webber, Larry S; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2012-10-01

    The authors examined the association between life events and antihypertensive medication adherence in older adults and the moderating role of coping. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted by using data (n = 1,817) from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults (recruitment conducted from August 2006 through September 2007). Life events occurring in the 12 months preceding the study interview were assessed via the Holmes Rahe Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS), and coping levels were assessed via an adapted version of the John Henry Active Coping Scale. Low adherence to antihypertensive medication was defined as scores less than 6 on the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (known as "MMAS-8"). Of study participants, 13.2% had low adherence, and 27.2% and 5.0% had medium (150-299) and high (≥300) SRRS scores, respectively. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratios for low adherence associated with medium and high, versus low, SRRS were 1.50 (95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.02) and 2.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.24, 3.58), respectively. When multivariable models were stratified by coping level, the association between life events and adherence was evident only among participants with low coping levels. PMID:23035146

  20. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kolewe, Kristopher W.; Peyton, Shelly R.; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were twenty times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Young’s moduli. Soft (44.05 – 308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495 – 2877 kPa), and stiff (5152 – 6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 hr incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 hr incubation period, there were 52% and 82% less E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels, than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62% and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 hr incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that, potentially, could be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion, and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26291308

  1. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Peyton, Shelly R; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2015-09-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were 20 times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Young's moduli. Soft (44.05-308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495-2877 kPa), and stiff (5152-6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 h incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 h incubation period, there were 52 and 82% fewer E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62 and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 h incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that could potentially be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections.

  2. Sol-gel spin coated well adhered MoO3 thin films as an alternative counter electrode for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutta, Geeta R.; Popuri, Srinivasa R.; Wilson, John I. B.; Bennett, Nick S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we aim to develop a viable, inexpensive and non-toxic material for counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We employed an ultra-simple synthesis process to deposit MoO3 thin films at low temperature by sol-gel spin coating technique. These MoO3 films showed good transparency. It is predicted that there will be 150 times reduction of precursors cost by realizing MoO3 thin films as a counter electrode in DSSCs compared to commercial Pt. We achieved a device efficiency of about 20 times higher than that of the previous reported values. In summary we develop a simple low cost preparation of MoO3 films with an easily scaled up process along with good device efficiency. This work encourages the development of novel and relatively new materials and paves the way for massive reduction of industrial costs which is a prime step for commercialization of DSSCs.

  3. Adherence to Behavioral Interventions for Urge Incontinence When Combined With Drug Therapy: Adherence Rates, Barriers, and Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Burgio, Kathryn L.; Goode, Patricia S.; Markland, Alayne D.; Kenton, Kimberly; Balasubramanyam, Aarthi; Stoddard, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Behavioral intervention outcomes for urinary incontinence (UI) depend on active patient participation. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe adherence to behavioral interventions (pelvic-floor muscle [PFM] exercises, UI prevention strategies, and delayed voiding), patient-perceived exercise barriers, and predictors of exercise adherence in women with urge-predominant UI. Design This was a prospectively planned secondary data analysis from a 2-stage, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients and Intervention Three hundred seven women with urge-predominant UI were randomly assigned to receive either 10 weeks of drug therapy only or 10 weeks of drug therapy combined with a behavioral intervention for UI. One hundred fifty-four participants who received the combined intervention were included in this analysis. Measurements Pelvic-floor muscle exercise adherence and exercise barriers were assessed during the intervention phase and 1 year afterward. Adherence to UI prevention strategies and delayed voiding were assessed during the intervention only. Results During intervention, 81% of women exercised at least 5 to 6 days per week, and 87% performed at least 30 PFM contractions per day. Ninety-two percent of the women used the urge suppression strategy successfully. At the 12-month follow-up, only 32% of the women exercised at least 5 to 6 days per week, and 56% performed 15 or more PFM contractions on the days they exercised. The most persistent PFM exercise barriers were difficulty remembering to exercise and finding time to exercise. Similarly, difficulty finding time to exercise persisted as a predictor of PFM exercise adherence over time. Limitations Co-administration of medication for UI may have influenced adherence. Conclusions Most women adhered to exercise during supervised intervention; however, adherence declined over the long term. Interventions to help women remember to exercise and to integrate PFM exercises and UI prevention

  4. Building adherence-competent communities: Factors promoting children's adherence to anti-retroviral HIV/AIDS treatment in rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine; Skovdal, Morten; Mupambireyi, Zivai; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Given relatively high levels of adherence to HIV treatment in Africa, we explore factors facilitating children's adherence, despite poverty, social disruption and limited health infrastructure. Using interviews with 25 nurses and 40 guardians in Zimbabwe, we develop our conceptualisation of an ‘adherence competent community’, showing how members of five networks (children, guardians, community members, health workers and NGOs) have taken advantage of the gradual public normalisation of HIV/AIDS and improved drug and service availability to construct new norms of solidarity with HIV and AIDS sufferers, recognition of HIV-infected children's social worth, an ethic of care/assistance and a supporting atmosphere of enablement/empowerment. PMID:21975285

  5. Impact of Motivational Interviewing on Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vanderwaal, Faith Marie

    2015-01-01

    This literature review addresses the question of whether motivational interviewing (MI) is effective at improving medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. The databases PsycINFO, OVID Medline, and PubMed were searched using the keywords "schizophrenia," "medication adherence," and one of the following: "motivational interviewing," "adherence therapy," or "compliance therapy." Relevant studies from the last ten years were included, resulting in six studies being included in this literature review. One study presented evidence for a direct relationship between motivational interviewing and medication adherence. Most studies did not support this relationship. Some studies found evidence for a relationship between motivational interviewing and other outcomes such as improved psychotic symptoms and decreased re-hospitalization rates. Motivational interviewing may be beneficial for some patients with schizophrenia but should not be considered a first line therapy. Clinicians not already using motivational interviewing in providing care to their patients with schizophrenia should not implement it for this population.

  6. Copper and nickel adherently electroplated on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.

    1967-01-01

    Anodic treatment of titanium alloy enables electroplating of tightly adherent coatings of copper and nickel on the alloy. The alloy is treated in a solution of hydrofluoric and acetic acids, followed by the electroplating process.

  7. Older Adults' Uptake and Adherence to Exercise Classes: Instructors' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hawley-Hague, Helen; Horne, Maria; Skelton, Dawn A; Todd, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Exercise classes provide a range of benefits for older adults, but adherence levels are poor. We know little of instructors' experiences of delivering exercise classes to older adults. Semistructured interviews, informed by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), were conducted with instructors (n = 19) delivering multicomponent exercise classes to establish their perspectives on older adults' uptake and adherence to exercise classes. Analysis revealed 'barriers' to uptake related to identity, choice/control, cost, and venue, and 'solutions' included providing choice/control, relating exercise to identity, a personal touch, and social support. Barriers to adherence included unrealistic expectations and social influences, and solutions identified were encouraging commitment, creating social cohesion, and an emphasis on achieving outcomes. Older adults' attitudes were an underlying theme, which related to all barriers and solutions. The instructor plays an important, but not isolated, role in older adults' uptake and adherence to classes. Instructors' perspectives help us to further understand how we can design successful exercise classes.

  8. Always Adhere to Chairman Mao's Policy for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsin, Yeh

    1976-01-01

    Must adhere to Mao's policy that education must serve proletarian politics, be combined with productive labor, enable everyone to develop fully, and enable workers to have both socialist consciousness and culture. (Author/ND)

  9. Human plasma fibronectin inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Ofek, I; Simpson, W A; Whitnack, E; Beachey, E H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of human plasma fibronectin on the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane droplets was investigated. Fibronectin blocked the adherence of streptococci to hexadecane in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect resulted from the binding of fibronectin to the streptococcal cells; radiolabeled fibronectin failed to bind to the hexadecane but bound readily to untreated streptococci. Chemical treatments of streptococci that decreased streptococcal binding of fibronectin also decreased their binding to hexadecane. Pretreatment of fibronectin with lipoteichoic acid blocked the binding of fibronectin to streptococci and abolished its ability to inhibit streptococcal adherence to hexadecane in a dose-related manner. In contrast, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine on the surface of S. pyogenes cells, failed to alter hexadecane adherence. The data suggest that fibronectin binds to lipoteichoic acid on the surface of the streptococci, thereby preventing lipoteichoic acid from interacting with the hexadecane phase. PMID:3880729

  10. Adherence to nutritional therapy in obese adolescents; a review.

    PubMed

    França, Silvana Lima Guimarães; Sahade, Viviane; Nunes, Mônica; Adan, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Considering the controversies existent on the subject, the aim of this review is to discuss adherence to diet in obese adolescents. The selection of articles was made in the SCOPUS, COCHRANE, APA Psyc Net, SciELO, LILACS, CAPES Journals, PUBMED/MEDLINE and GOOGLE ACADEMIC databases. Studies published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. There was lack of evidence of conceptual discussion about adherence to diet in obesity in the child-youth context, in addition to scarcity of data on adherence to diet itself in obese adolescents and the methods of evaluating this. Lastly, multiple interdependent factors were found which both facilitated and made the process of adherence to diet difficult for obese youngsters. The majority of these (factors) belong to the socioeconomic and cultural dimension, in addition to pointing out cognitive and psychological factors and those associated with health services and professionals.

  11. Older Adults' Uptake and Adherence to Exercise Classes: Instructors' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hawley-Hague, Helen; Horne, Maria; Skelton, Dawn A; Todd, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Exercise classes provide a range of benefits for older adults, but adherence levels are poor. We know little of instructors' experiences of delivering exercise classes to older adults. Semistructured interviews, informed by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), were conducted with instructors (n = 19) delivering multicomponent exercise classes to establish their perspectives on older adults' uptake and adherence to exercise classes. Analysis revealed 'barriers' to uptake related to identity, choice/control, cost, and venue, and 'solutions' included providing choice/control, relating exercise to identity, a personal touch, and social support. Barriers to adherence included unrealistic expectations and social influences, and solutions identified were encouraging commitment, creating social cohesion, and an emphasis on achieving outcomes. Older adults' attitudes were an underlying theme, which related to all barriers and solutions. The instructor plays an important, but not isolated, role in older adults' uptake and adherence to classes. Instructors' perspectives help us to further understand how we can design successful exercise classes. PMID:26214265

  12. Attrition and adherence in the online treatment of chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Elizabeth A; Vincent, Norah; Lewycky, Samantha; Walsh, Kaitlyn

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the ability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985) and the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (TTM; Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983) to explain adherence and attrition in an online treatment program for chronic insomnia. Responses to questionnaire measures of the TPB and TTM were used to predict adherence and dropout over the subsequent 5 weeks of treatment. Results showed that there was a 17% dropout rate and that perceived behavioral control, social support, and intention to complete the program were significantly associated with adherence to sleep hygiene homework. Attrition was predicted only by symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidity. Implications are that these models should be considered to maximize adherence. PMID:20582757

  13. Allopurinol use in a New Zealand population: prevalence and adherence.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, Simon; Norris, Pauline; Becket, Gordon; Arroll, Bruce; Crampton, Peter; Cumming, Jacqueline; Keown, Shirley; Herbison, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Allopurinol is effective for the control of gout and its long-term complications when taken consistently. There is evidence that adherence to allopurinol therapy varies across population groups. This may exacerbate differences in the burden of gout on population groups and needs to be accurately assessed. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of allopurinol use in a region of New Zealand using community pharmacy dispensing data and to examine the levels of suboptimal adherence in various population groups. Data from all community pharmacy dispensing databases in a New Zealand region were collected for a year covering 2005/2006 giving a near complete picture of dispensings to area residents. Prevalence of allopurinol use in the region by age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic position was calculated. Adherence was assessed using the medication possession ratio (MPR), with a MPR of 0.80 indicative of suboptimal adherence. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore variations in suboptimal adherence across population groups. A total of 953 people received allopurinol in the study year (prevalence 3%). Prevalence was higher in males (6%) than in females (1%) and Māori (5%) than non-Māori (3%). The overall MPR during the study was 0.88, with 161 (22%) of patients using allopurinol having suboptimal adherence. Non-Māori were 54% less likely to have suboptimal allopurinol adherence compared to Māori (95% CI 0.30-0.72, p = 0.001). These findings are consistent with those from other studies nationally and internationally and point to the important role for health professionals in improving patient adherence to an effective gout treatment.

  14. Treatment non-adherence in pseudo-refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brodtkorb, Eylert; Samsonsen, Christian; Sund, Janne Kutschera; Bråthen, Geir; Helde, Grethe; Reimers, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Non-adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment strongly affects the outcome of epilepsy and is frequently clinically unrecognized. This review addresses current knowledge on medication-taking behavior in people with epilepsy, as well as the importance of tailoring interventions to the individual patterns of non-adherence. Non-adherence can be categorized as non-initiation, poor execution (accidental or intentional) or non-persistence and are related to clinical characteristics and health care barriers. All available methods to assess adherence are hampered by shortcomings. Self-reports are indirect and subjective. Pill-counts, electronic bottle-tops and pharmacy records are objective, but indirect measures of drug ingestion. Therapeutic drug monitoring is both direct and objective, but pharmacokinetic and diurnal variability must be taken into account. Young adults with generalized epilepsy may be particularly vulnerable to non-adherence. The drug burden in the form of polytherapy, multiple dosing and side effects are obvious obstacles. Poor understanding of the principles of prophylactic treatment as well as drug costs may be important in people with low socioeconomic status. Depression is also associated with low adherence. In people with multihandicaps, failed oral intake may be due to behavioral or physical problems, as well as insufficient education of the caregivers. Non-adherence often results in seizure breakthrough and hospital admissions, but the consequences may be more dramatic. It is the leading cause of status epilepticus in people with epilepsy, and the association with sudden death (SUDEP) is clear. The management of poor drug-taking behavior should be based on the identification of the specific causes in each individual and corresponding multiprofessional interventions. Non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs needs more clinical and scientific attention. PMID:26897547

  15. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication in Older Adults With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Suzanne H. S.; Chau, Janita P. C.; Woo, Jean; Thompson, David R.; Choi, Kai Chow

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in people with hypertension requires optimal control of blood pressure. Despite advances in management, poor adherence to antihypertensive medications is often reported as the major reason attenuating treatment efficacy. Research has provided limited evidence of associations between illness perceptions, satisfaction with consultations, and medication adherence. The aim of this study is to identify factors significantly associated with medication adherence in a group of Chinese older adults with essential hypertension. Design/Setting/Participants: A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted. Data were collected from 195 older adults (mean [SD] age, 76 [6.6] years) recruited from 12 community centers. Measurements: The Illness Perception Questionnaire–Revised was used to measure illness perceptions, and the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale was used to measure satisfaction with individual consultations. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used to measure the extent of adherence to antihypertensive medications. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine factors, including illness perceptions, consultation satisfaction, and demographic and clinical characteristics, that were significantly associated with medication adherence. Results: More than half of the respondents (55.9%) acknowledged some degree of medication nonadherence. Older age, living alone, and perception related to treatment control were independently associated with increased odds of medication adherence, with odds ratios ranging from 1.14 to 1.92 (P < .05). Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of cultivating positive beliefs that hypertension is amenable to control by treatment. Furthermore, the adherence behavior of those of younger individuals and living with family should be closely monitored. PMID:25774846

  16. Program Spending to Increase Adherence: South African Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Denny, Lynette A.; De Souza, Michelle; Kuhn, Louise; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence is crucial for public health program effectiveness, though the benefits of increasing adherence must ultimately be weighed against the associated costs. We sought to determine the relationship between investment in community health worker (CHW) home visits and increased attendance at cervical cancer screening appointments in Cape Town, South Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an observational study of 5,258 CHW home visits made in 2003–4 as part of a community-based screening program. We estimated the functional relationship between spending on these visits and increased appointment attendance (adherence). Increased adherence was noted after each subsequent CHW visit. The costs of making the CHW visits was based on resource use including both personnel time and vehicle-related expenses valued in 2004 Rand. The CHW program cost R194,018, with 1,576 additional appointments attended. Adherence increased from 74% to 90%; 55% to 87%; 48% to 77%; and 56% to 80% for 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-month appointments. Average per-woman costs increased by R14–R47. The majority of this increase occurred with the first 2 CHW visits (90%, 83%, 74%, and 77%; additional cost: R12–R26). Conclusions/Significance We found that study data can be used for program planning, identifying spending levels that achieve adherence targets given budgetary constraints. The results, derived from a single disease program, are retrospective, and should be prospectively replicated. PMID:19492097

  17. A Synchronized Prescription Refill Program Improved Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Lim, Raymond; Li, Pengxiang; Young, Peinie P; Lawnicki, Victor F; State, Joseph J; Troxel, Andrea B; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-08-01

    Synchronizing medication refills-renewing all medications at the same time from the same pharmacy-is an increasingly popular strategy to improve adherence to medication regimens, but there has been little research regarding its effectiveness. In light of increasing policy interest, we evaluated the impact of a pilot refill synchronization program implemented by a large national insurer. A random sample of Medicare Advantage patients receiving mail-order refills for common maintenance medications (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, or antidiabetic agents) were invited to join the program and followed for twelve months. On average, the absolute increase in the proportion of patients deemed adherent during follow-up was 3-10 percentage points for the intervention group, compared to 1-5 percentage points for the control group. Patients with poorer baseline adherence showed larger increases in the absolute proportion deemed adherent in intervention (23-26 percentage points) compared to a control group (13-15 percentage points). Synchronizing refills might be a promising intervention to improve adherence to maintenance medications, especially among Medicare patients with low baseline adherence. PMID:27503977

  18. Adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following liver transplantation: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ramon Antônio; Turrini, Ruth Natália Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the evidence available in the literature on non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy among patients undergoing liver transplantation. Method: integrative literature review, including research whose sample consisted of patients aged over 18 years undergoing liver transplantation. It excluded those containing patients undergoing multiple organ transplants. For the selection of articles, Medline / Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Embase were searched. The search period corresponded to the initial date of indexation of different bases, up to the deadline of February 10, 2015, using controlled and uncontrolled descriptors: liver transplantation, hepatic transplantation, liver orthotopic transplantation, medication adherence, medication non-adherence, medication compliance and patient compliance. Results: were located 191 investigations, 10 of which met the objectives of the study and were grouped into four categories, namely: educational process and non-adherence; non-adherence related to the number of daily doses of immunosuppressive medications; detection methods for non-adherence and side effects of therapy. Conclusion: there were risk factors related to the health service, such as control and reduction of the number of doses; related to the individual, such as being male, divorced, alcohol or other substances user, exposed to low social support and being mentally ill. PMID:27579933

  19. In vitro adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, A.R.; Stromberg, B.V. )

    1990-02-01

    Adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting material is thought to play an important role in the ultimate development of prosthetic infections. To evaluate the role of bacterial adherence in the initiation and colonization of prosthetic materials, Proplast II, Gore-Tex, and silicone were evaluated for adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Bacteria were radiolabeled and incubated with the study material. Adherence was determined by scintillation. Adherence to Proplast II and Gore-Tex reached a maximum at approximately 45 minutes of incubation and demonstrated a detachment phenomenon with E. coli. Similar results were noted with S. aureus, but with a maximal attachment at approximately 30 minutes. Interestingly, bacterial attachment to silicone continued to increase throughout the time of the incubation. In addition, adherence of S. aureus was at a faster rate than E. coli. Attachment of bacteria is a multifactorial process. However, the PTFE graft demonstrates a slower rate of attachment, lower total number of attached bacteria, and faster detachment. The importance of this phenomenon may help explain the foreign body effect of increased susceptibility to infection of foreign materials.

  20. [Treatment adherence, access and AIDS assistance quality in Brazil. ].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Maria Inês Batistella; Castanheira, Elen Rose Lodeiro; Helena, Ernani Tiaraju de Santa; Melchior, Regina; Caraciolo, Joselita Magalhães; Basso, Cáritas Relva; Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto E; Alencar, Tatianna Meireles Dantas de; Ferraz, Dulce Aurélia de Souza

    2009-01-01

    The patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a crucial matter to AIDS treatment effectiveness and its' impact. This article aims to discuss the association between adherence and quality of health service providing care to people living with AIDS (PLWA), highlighting quality of the services as a central point to adherence and access. It is based on results of our previous studies about the health care to PLWA in Brazil. Our studies point out that the groups of patients who are followed-up in health services providing care for less than 100 patients presented greater estimated risk of non-adherence than services following more than 500 patients. Also, smaller health services showed greater estimated risk to be ranged in the worst quality of services groups. This is related to the low complexity of smaller health care services, such as: lack of minimum human resources and material structures, poor organization on work process, medical-centered care and poor technical management. New studies in adherence and quality of services are needed. Nevertheless, the existent findings have already pointed out the need to review the current distribution of AIDS care services as well as to make the quality of services more homogenous thorough the country. These are high priorities in order to keep acceptable levels of adherence to HAART in Brazil.

  1. A Systematic Review Comparing Antiretroviral Adherence Descriptive and Intervention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Chang, Yunkyung; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    We examined the extent to which studies aimed at testing interventions to improve antiretroviral adherence have targeted the facilitators of and barriers known to affect adherence. Of the 88 reports reviewed, 41 were reports of descriptive studies conducted with U.S. HIV-positive women and 47 were reports of intervention studies conducted with U.S. HIV-positive persons. We extracted from the descriptive studies all findings addressing any factor linked to antiretroviral adherence and from the intervention studies, information on the nature of the intervention, the adherence problem targeted, the persons targeted for the intervention, and the intervention outcomes desired. We discerned congruence between the prominence of substance abuse as a factor identified in the descriptive studies as a barrier to adherence and its prominence as the problem most addressed in those reports of intervention studies that specified the problems targeted for intervention. We also discerned congruence between the prominence of family and provider support as factors identified in the descriptive studies as facilitators of adherence and the presence of social support as an intervention component and outcome variable. Less discernible in the reports of intervention studies was specific attention to other factors prominent in the descriptive studies, which may be due to the complex nature of the problem, individualistic and rationalist slant of interventions, or simply the ways interventions were presented. Our review raises issues about niche standardization and intervention tailoring, targeting, and fidelity. PMID:20024751

  2. Electronic Monitoring and Feedback to Improve Adherence in Pediatric Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Scott A.; Devine, Katie A.; Wilson, Nevin W.; Hogan, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of electronic monitoring and feedback to improve adherence in children taking daily asthma controller medications. Method Five patients with asthma and considered nonadherent participated. Inhalers were electronically monitored with the MDILogIITM device, and feedback was given by medical staff. Using a nonconcurrent multiple-baseline design, patients and their parents received bimonthly feedback regarding medication use. Following treatment, feedback was withdrawn and effects of monitoring alone were observed. Results Three participants showed improvements in adherence following treatment, with more notable increases when baseline adherence was low. Improvements in the inhaler technique occurred for all patients. Some patients demonstrated improvements in lung functioning and functional severity. When feedback was withdrawn, adherence decreased for some participants, but technique improvements maintained. Conclusions Results support the use of objective monitoring devices for assessing pediatric asthma patients’ adherence and indicate that feedback from medical staff may improve and maintain medication adherence for some patients. PMID:21852340

  3. Common mental health problems and antiretroviral therapy adherence.

    PubMed

    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2011-11-01

    This paper reviews the literature on various mental health problems and their impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Depression, anxiety disorders, and disorders related to substance abuse were identified as key role-players influencing adherence. The severity of symptoms related to these disorders was found to be inversely related to ART adherence, with the possible exception of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD was found to have both positive and negative implications for adherence, with severity of symptoms ranging from health-protective concern to disabling distress. Possible solutions aimed at addressing the adverse effects of mental health problems on adherence are discussed. Routine screening in ART settings is suggested in settings where follow-up of positive screen scores are possible, along with the necessary interventions to resolve the disorder of concern. Suggested interventions include utilising psychotherapeutic treatment, both in isolation and in conjunction with medication, to address mental health problems. Furthermore, finding effective ways of marshalling social support is recommended for ensuring optimal adherence, and possibly mitigating the adverse effects of mental health problems. Further research is needed to find feasible ways of identifying, assessing and treating patients with mental health problems in resource-constrained settings where HIV prevalence is highest.

  4. Adherence of human basophils to cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, B S; Peachell, P T; Brown, K E; Schleimer, R P

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which circulating human basophils adhere to vascular endothelium and migrate to sites of allergic reactions is unknown. Agents have been identified which stimulate the adherence of purified basophils to cultured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HuVEC). Treatment of HuVEC with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), bacterial endotoxin, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in time and dose-dependent increases of adhesiveness for basophils. Coincubation of basophils and HuVEC for 10 min with C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the calcium ionophore A23187, platelet-activating factor, TNF, and TPA also resulted in significant dose-dependent increases in basophil adherence; this effect resulted from activation of the basophil. Adherence of basophils to HuVEC was time and temperature dependent, required divalent cations, and was unaffected by glucocorticoids. Monoclonal antibody 60.3, directed against the beta-subunit of the leukocyte adherence complex CD18, inhibited the binding of basophils to HuVEC. Adherence of basophils to vascular endothelium may be important in initiating basophil infiltrates in vivo. PMID:3130394

  5. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  6. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998–2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  7. Impact of an exercise program on adherence and fitness indicators.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Roger; Gilleland, Diana

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to exercise is one of the most problematic health behaviors. This pilot study describes the impact of an exercise program on adherence to exercise and fitness indicators for overweight and obese adults enrolled in an insurance reimbursed exercise plan. Chart reviews were conducted retrospectively in a convenience sample of 77 subjects from a human performance lab (HPL) at a large southern university. Charts from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed for health history, fitness indicators (fitness level, weight, BMI, hip/waist ratio, % body fat, BP, HR, cholesterol), and adherence (number of exercise sessions/month). Exercise supervision was operationalized in two phases over 12 months: Phase I (3 months supervised exercise) and Phase II (9 months unsupervised exercise). Fifty-eight participants completed Phase I, and 8 completed Phase II. Six-nine percent of those completing Phase I visited the gym at least 8 times/month with significant (α=.05) improvement in all fitness indicators. Those visiting <8 times/month had improvement in fitness level, weight, BMI, and % body fat. Twenty-four subjects continued into Phase II, with only eight completing Phase II. Of those eight, only one subject visited the HPL at least 8 times/month. Health history data including co-morbidities, symptoms, habits, perceived tension, job stress, and fitness level were not associated with adherence. Symptoms of swollen, stiff, painful joints, and swollen ankles and legs were associated with decreased adherence to exercise. Supervised exercise was positively related to adherence and improved fitness indicators. Adults with joint symptoms may require more support. Based on these pilot data, designing a study with a larger sample and the inclusion of barriers and facilitators for adherence to self-directed exercise would allow additional analysis. Innovative interventions are needed that mimic the supervised environment, shifting responsibility for the exercise plan from the supervisor to

  8. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998-2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  9. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Morojele, Neo K

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics in Tshwane, South Africa. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients’ alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument). Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted. Results About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an alcohol-focused adherence counseling program that employs motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy-type approaches. Conclusion The association between alcohol use and ART nonadherence points to a

  10. Psychosocial adjustment and adherence to dialysis treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Brownbridge, G; Fielding, D M

    1994-12-01

    Sixty children and adolescents in end-stage renal failure who were undergoing either haemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis at one of five United Kingdom dialysis centres were assessed on psychosocial adjustment and adherence to their fluid intake, diet and medication regimes. Parental adjustment was also measured and data on sociodemographic and treatment history variables collected. A structured family interview and standardised questionnaire measures of anxiety, depression and behavioural disturbance were used. Multiple measures of treatment adherence were obtained, utilising children's and parents' self-reports, weight gain between dialysis, blood pressure, serum potassium level, blood urea level, dietitians' surveys and consultants' ratings. Correlational analyses showed that low treatment adherence was associated with poor adjustment to diagnosis and dialysis by children and parents (P < 0.01), self-ratings of anxiety and depression in children and parents (P < 0.001), age (adolescents tended to show poorer adherence than younger children, P < 0.001), duration of dialysis (P < 0.05), low family socioeconomic status (P < 0.05) and family structure (P < 0.01). These findings demonstrate the importance of psychosocial care in the treatment of this group of children. Future research should develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions aimed at improving treatment adherence.

  11. Adherence issues related to sublingual immunotherapy as perceived by allergists

    PubMed Central

    Scurati, Silvia; Frati, Franco; Passalacqua, Gianni; Puccinelli, Paola; Hilaire, Cecile; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a viable alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy to treat allergic rhinitis and asthma, and is widely used in clinical practice in many European countries. The clinical efficacy of SLIT has been established in a number of clinical trials and meta-analyses. However, because SLIT is self-administered by patients without medical supervision, the degree of patient adherence with treatment is still a concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception by allergists of issues related to SLIT adherence. Methods: We performed a questionnaire-based survey of 296 Italian allergists, based on the adherence issues known from previous studies. The perception of importance of each item was assessed by a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10. Results: Patient perception of clinical efficacy was considered the most important factor (ranked 1 by 54% of allergists), followed by the possibility of reimbursement (ranked 1 by 34%), and by the absence of side effects (ranked 1 by 21%). Patient education, regular follow-up, and ease of use of SLIT were ranked first by less than 20% of allergists. Conclusion: These findings indicate that clinical efficacy, cost, and side effects are perceived as the major issues influencing patient adherence to SLIT, and that further improvement of adherence is likely to be achieved by improving the patient information provided by prescribers. PMID:20622914

  12. Pharmacist Intervention for Blood Pressure Control: Medication Intensification and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Gums, Tyler; Uribe, Liz; Vander Weg, Mark W.; James, Paul; Coffey, Christopher; Carter, Barry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe medication adherence and medication intensification in a physician-pharmacist collaborative management (PPCM) model compared to usual care. Design Prospective, cluster, randomized study in 32 primary care offices from 15 states. The primary outcomes were medication adherence and anti-hypertensive medication changes during the first nine months of the intervention. The nine month visit was completed by 539 patients, 345 of which received the intervention. Results There was no significant difference between intervention and usual care patients in regards to medication adherence at 9 months. Intervention patients received significantly more medication changes (4.9 vs.1.1; p=0.0003) and had significantly increased use of diuretics and aldosterone antagonists when compared to usual care (p=0.01). Conclusions The PPCM model increased medication intensification, however no significant change in medication adherence was detected. PPCM models will need to develop non-adherence identification and intervention methods to further improve the potency of the care team. PMID:26077795

  13. Adherence With Therapeutic Regimens: Behavioral and Pharmacoeconomic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Vincent J; Kamal, Khalid M

    2016-04-01

    There is an extensive literature regarding nonadherence with both therapeutic regimens and medication. This literature includes reviews of empirical research regarding the factors associated with nonadherence. Health care system, provider, and patient factors as well as the nature of the illness and therapeutic regimen all effect adherence rates. Different behavioral models for adherence counseling such as the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Medication Interest Model, and Motivational Interviewing have also been reported in the research literature. This article will discuss the development of a brief model for patient counseling with specific techniques illustrated for pharmacists based on empirical findings that have demonstrated effectiveness in the adherence research literature. In addition, the article will address the measurement of the economic impact of medication nonadherence and propose a framework for assessing the cost-effectiveness of pharmacist counseling to increase adherence. The problem of nonadherence has significant effects upon health care expenditures through increase in physician's visits, emergency department incidents, rehospitalizations, and nursing home readmissions. Thus, the overall goal is to assist the pharmacist in developing a brief adherence counseling program in community pharmacy and evaluating the economic feasibility of the intervention demonstrating the value-added proposition of pharmacist intervention. PMID:25292442

  14. Real-time adherence monitoring for HIV antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Kahane, Josh; Kigozi, Isaac; Emenyonu, Nneka; Hunt, Peter; Martin, Jeffrey; Bangsberg, David R

    2010-12-01

    Current adherence assessments typically detect missed doses long after they occur. Real-time, wireless monitoring strategies for antiretroviral therapy may provide novel opportunities to proactively prevent virologic rebound and treatment failure. Wisepill, a wireless pill container that transmits a cellular signal when opened, was pilot tested in ten Ugandan individuals for 6 months. Adherence levels measured by Wisepill, unannounced pill counts, and self-report were compared with each other, prior standard electronic monitoring, and HIV RNA. Wisepill data was initially limited by battery life and signal transmission interruptions. Following device improvements, continuous data was achieved with median (interquartile range) adherence levels of 93% (87-97%) by Wisepill, 100% (99-100%) by unannounced pill count, 100% (100-100%) by self-report, and 92% (79-98%) by prior standard electronic monitoring. Four individuals developed transient, low-level viremia. After overcoming technical challenges, real-time adherence monitoring is feasible for resource-limited settings and may detect suboptimal adherence prior to viral rebound.

  15. Medication Routines and Adherence Among Hypertensive African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Abida; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Seixas, Azizi; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Lai, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to prescribed medication regimens remains an important challenge preventing successful treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. While studies have documented differences in the time of day or weekday vs weekend on medication adherence, no study has examined whether having a medication-taking routine contributes to increased medication adherence. The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify patients’ sociodemographic factors associated with consistent medication-taking routine; (2) examine associations between medication-taking consistency, medication adherence, and blood pressure (BP) control. The study included black patients with hypertension (n = 190; 22 men and 168 women; age, mean±standard deviation 54 ± 12.08 years) who completed a practice-based randomized controlled trial. Findings showed that medication-taking consistency was significantly associated with better medication adherence (F = 9.54, P = .002). Associations with the consistency index were not statistically significant for diastolic BP control (odds ratio, 1.319; 95% confidence interval, 0.410–4.246; P = .642) and systolic BP control (odds ratio, 0.621; 95% confidence interval, 0.195–1.974; P = .419). PMID:25952495

  16. Under-prescribing and non-adherence to medications after coronary bypass surgery in older adults: strategies to improve adherence.

    PubMed

    Sengstock, David; Vaitkevicius, Peter; Salama, Ahmed; Mentzer, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The focus for this clinical review is under-prescribing and non-adherence to medication guidelines in older adults after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Non-adherence occurs in all age groups, but older adults have a unique set of challenges including difficulty hearing, comprehending, and remembering instructions; acquiring and managing multiple medications; and tolerating drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Still, non-adherence leads to increased morbidity, mortality, and costs to the healthcare system. Factors contributing to non-adherence include failure to initiate therapy before hospital discharge; poor education about the importance of each medication by hospital staff; poor education about medication side effects; polypharmacy; multiple daily dosing; excessive cost; and the physician's lack of knowledge of clinical indicators for use of medications. To improve adherence, healthcare systems must ensure that (i) all patients are prescribed the appropriate medications at discharge; (ii) patients fill and take these medications post-operatively; and (iii) patients continue long-term use of these medications. Interventions must target central administrative policies within healthcare institutions, the difficulties facing providers, as well as the concerns of patients. Corrective efforts need to be started early during the hospitalization and involve practitioners who can follow patients after the date on which surgical care is no longer needed. A solid, ongoing relationship between patients and their primary-care physicians and cardiologists is essential. This review summarizes the post-operative medication guidelines for CABG surgery, describes barriers that limit the adherence to these guidelines, and suggests possible avenues to improve medication adherence in older cardiac surgery patients. PMID:22239673

  17. Value-based insurance design yields near- and long-term improvements in medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Collado, Megan

    2013-03-01

    Key findings. (1) Value-based insurance design (VBID) improves medication adherence by 1 to 3 percent in the first year after implementation; (2) Improvements in adherence were sustained and amplified in the second year post-implementation, ranging from 2 to 5 percent; (3) Adherence improvements varied ac­cording to VBID participants' baseline adherence, with greatest improve­ments evident in those with poorer baseline adherence

  18. Factors influencing adherence to an emergency department national protocol.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Remco H A; Vloet, Lilian C M; de Groot, Joke Mintjes; van Achterberg, Theo

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that influence emergency nurses' adherence to an emergency department national protocol (EDNP). A survey of emergency nurses (n=200) and physicians with medical end responsibility on an emergency department (n=103) was carried out. Emergency nurses' self-reported adherence to the EDNP was 38%, 55% of the nurses and 44% of the physicians were aware of the protocol. Interference with professional autonomy, insufficient organizational support and the EDNP's applicability were indicated as barriers for adherence. The main influencing factor seems awareness. Other factors related to the individual, the organization and to protocol characteristics. Solely disseminating the EDNP is not enough to get the protocol used in clinical practice. PMID:21552130

  19. Literacy, education and adherence to antiretroviral therapy in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, A; Bailey, R L; Ahadzie, B; Alabi, A; Peterson, K

    2010-11-01

    We examined the relationship of patients' literacy and education to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence in an urban treatment centre in The Gambia. Information on education and literacy systematically collected before ART initiation was compared against selected adherence outcomes. Formally educated patients were significantly more likely to achieve virological suppression at both six and 12 months (87% vs. 67%, OR=3.13, P=0.03; 88% vs. 63%, OR=4.49, P=0.007, respectively). Literate patients had similar benefit at 12 months (OR=3.39 P=0.03), with improved virological outcomes associated with degree of literacy (P=0.003). A trend towards similar results was seen at 6 months for Koranically educated patients; however, this was no longer apparent at 12 months. No significant correlation was seen between socio-demographic characteristics and missed appointments. Our study suggests that literacy, formal education and possibly Koranic education may impact favourably on adherence to ART.

  20. Ferromagnetic Micropallets for Magnetic Capture of Single Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Nicholas M.; Chang, Ruth; Westerhof, Trisha; Li, Guann-Pyng; Bachman, Mark; Nelson, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a magnetic micropallet array and demonstration of its capacity to recover specific, individual adherent cells from large populations and deliver them for downstream single cell analysis. A ferromagnetic photopolymer was formulated, characterized, and used to fabricate magnetic micropallets, which are microscale pedestals that provide demarcated cell growth surfaces, with preservation of biophysical properties including photopatternability, biocompatibility, and optical clarity. Each micropallet holds a single adherent cell in culture and hundreds of thousands of micropallets compose a single micropallet array. Any micropallet in the array can be recovered on demand, carrying the adhered cell with it. We used this platform to selectively recover single cells, which were subsequently analyzed using single cell RT-qPCR. PMID:20968293

  1. Antimicrobial Postexposure Prophylaxis for Anthrax: Adverse Events and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Gabarro, Montse; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Hayslett, James; Lukacs, Susan; Goldstein, Susan; Factor, Stephanie; Jones, Joshua; Ridzon, Renee; Williams, Ian; Rosenstein, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    We collected data during postexposure antimicrobial prophylaxis campaigns and from a prophylaxis program evaluation 60 days after start of antimicrobial prophylaxis involving persons from six U.S. sites where Bacillus anthracis exposures occurred. Adverse events associated with antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent anthrax were commonly reported, but hospitalizations and serious adverse events as defined by Food and Drug Administration criteria were rare. Overall adherence during 60 days of antimicrobial prophylaxis was poor (44%), ranging from 21% of persons exposed in the Morgan postal facility in New York City to 64% of persons exposed at the Brentwood postal facility in Washington, D.C. Adherence was highest among participants in an investigational new drug protocol to receive additional antibiotics with or without anthrax vaccine—a likely surrogate for anthrax risk perception. Adherence of <60 days was not consistently associated with adverse events. PMID:12396927

  2. Variety support and exercise adherence behavior: experimental and mediating effects.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Benjamin D; Standage, Martyn; McEwan, Desmond; Wolf, Svenja A; Lubans, David R; Eather, Narelle; Kaulius, Megan; Ruissen, Geralyn R; Crocker, Peter R E; Zumbo, Bruno D; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the provision of variety (i.e., variety support) is related to exercise behavior among physically inactive adults and the extent to which the 'experience of variety' mediates those effects. One hundred and twenty one inactive university students were randomly assigned to follow a high or low variety support exercise program for 6 weeks. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3- and 6-weeks. Participants in the high variety support condition displayed higher levels of adherence to the exercise program than those in the low variety support condition [F(1, 116) = 5.55, p = .02, η(p)(2) = .05] and the relationship between variety support and adherence was mediated by perceived variety (β = .16, p < .01). Exercise-related variety support holds potential to be an efficacious method for facilitating greater exercise adherence behaviors of previously inactive people by fostering perceptions of variety.

  3. [Adherence and fidelity in patients treated with intragastric balloon].

    PubMed

    Mazure, R A; Cancer, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; De Castro, M L; Abilés, V; Abilés, J; Bretón, I; Álvarez, V; Peláez, N; Culebras, J M

    2014-01-01

    A correct treatment of obesity needs a program of habits modification regardless of the selected technique, especially if it is minimally invasive as the intragastric balloon (BIG). The adherence of the obese patients with regard to recommended drugs measures to medium- and long-term is less than 50%. Given that the results obtained using the technique of gastric balloon must be seen influenced by adherence to the modification of habits program and its fulfillment, we reviewed series published in attention to the program proposed with the BIG. The series published to date provide few details about the used Therapeutic Programs as well as the adherence of patients to them, and even less concerning the Monitoring Plan and the loyalty of the patient can be seen. We conclude the convenience to agree on a follow-up strategy, at least the 6 months during which the BIG remain in the stomach. PMID:24483961

  4. Method for adhering a coating to a substrate structure

    DOEpatents

    Taxacher, Glenn Curtis; Crespo, Andres Garcia; Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey

    2015-02-17

    A method for adhering a coating to a substrate structure comprises selecting a substrate structure having an outer surface oriented substantially parallel to a direction of radial stress, modifying the outer surface to provide a textured region having steps to adhere a coating thereto, and applying a coating to extend over at least a portion of the textured region, wherein the steps are oriented substantially perpendicular to the direction of radial stress to resist deformation of the coating relative to the substrate structure. A rotating component comprises a substrate structure having an outer surface oriented substantially parallel to a direction of radial stress. The outer surface defines a textured region having steps to adhere a coating thereto, and a coating extends over at least a portion of the textured region. The steps are oriented substantially perpendicular to the direction of radial stress to resist creep.

  5. Bacterial adherence to urothelium following bladder irrigation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Iversen, P; Madsen, P O

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the effects of bladder irrigation with various irrigation fluids at various temperatures and irrigation pressures on the adherence of 3H-labeled Escherichia coli O6 to bladder urothelium in a rat model. Sixty-four control and 108 experimental animals were studied. The latter were divided into five groups according to type of irrigation fluid (glycine 1.5%, sorbitol 2.7%, mannitol 0.54%, and H2O), fluid temperature, and intravesical pressure during irrigation. Only rats undergoing high pressure (60 cm H2O) bladder irrigation demonstrated significant increases in bacterial adherence compared to controls. No differences were found with the different irrigation fluids. This study suggests that high intravesical pressure during transurethral surgery might enhance bacterial adherence to urothelium and thereby increase the risk of manifest infection in the postoperative course. PMID:6807847

  6. Biomarkers and biometric measures of adherence to use of ARV-based vaginal rings

    PubMed Central

    Stalter, Randy M; Moench, Thomas R; MacQueen, Kathleen M; Tolley, Elizabeth E; Owen, Derek H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Poor adherence to product use has been observed in recent trials of antiretroviral (ARV)-based oral and vaginal gel HIV prevention products, resulting in an inability to determine product efficacy. The delivery of microbicides through vaginal rings is widely perceived as a way to achieve better adherence but vaginal rings do not eliminate the adherence challenges exhibited in clinical trials. Improved objective measures of adherence are needed as new ARV-based vaginal ring products enter the clinical trial stage. Methods To identify technologies that have potential future application for vaginal ring adherence measurement, a comprehensive literature search was conducted that covered a number of biomedical and public health databases, including PubMed, Embase, POPLINE and the Web of Science. Published patents and patent applications were also searched. Technical experts were also consulted to gather more information and help evaluate identified technologies. Approaches were evaluated as to feasibility of development and clinical trial implementation, cost and technical strength. Results Numerous approaches were identified through our landscape analysis and classified as either point measures or cumulative measures of vaginal ring adherence. Point measurements are those that give a measure of adherence at a particular point in time. Cumulative measures attempt to measure ring adherence over a period of time. Discussion Approaches that require modifications to an existing ring product are at a significant disadvantage, as this will likely introduce additional regulatory barriers to the development process and increase manufacturing costs. From the point of view of clinical trial implementation, desirable attributes would be high acceptance by trial participants, and little or no additional time or training requirements on the part of participants or clinic staff. We have identified four promising approaches as being high priority for further development

  7. Adherence to GOLD guideline treatment recommendations among pulmonologists in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Elif; Guclu, Salih Zeki; Kibar, Isil; Ocal, Ulku; Yilmaz, Veysel; Celik, Onur; Cimen, Filiz; Topcu, Fusun; Orhun, Meltem; Tereci, Hikmet; Konya, Aylin; Ar, Idilhan; Saryal, Sevgi

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guideline recommendations has been reported worldwide. There has been no study on the adherence to GOLD guidelines for COPD treatment in Turkey. Objectives To investigate the rates of adherence to GOLD 2010 guidelines for COPD treatment among pulmonologists. Design A multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study was carried out in eleven pulmonary outpatient clinics across Turkey. Adherence to GOLD was evaluated through hospital records. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. Results Study included 719 patients (mean age: 62.9±9.7 years; males 85.4%) of whom 16 was classified as GOLD Stage I, 238 as II, 346 as III, and 119 as IV, and only 59.5% received appropriate treatment. Rates of guideline adherence varied across GOLD stages (I, 6.3%; II, 14.7%; III, 84.4%; and IV, 84%). Causes of inappropriate therapies were overtreatment (Stage I, 100% and Stage II, 91.1%), undertreatment (Stage III, 3.3% and Stage IV, 10.9%) and lack of treatment (Stage II, 3.8%; Stage III, 2.3%; and Stage IV, 5.9%). The most preferred regimen (43.4%) was long-acting β2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid-long-acting muscarinic antagonist. Overall, 614 patients (89%) received treatment containing inhaled corticosteroid. Conclusion Pulmonologists in Turkey have low rates of adherence to GOLD guidelines in COPD treatment. Inappropriateness of therapies was due to overtreatment in early stages and excessive use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in all disease stages. PMID:26715844

  8. Glaucoma Medication Adherence among African Americans: Program Development

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Campbell, Lisa; Wood, Andy; Gao, Liyan; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among African Americans (AA) with glaucoma and to elicit input from a community-based participatory research team in order to guide the development of a culturally informed, health promotion program for improving glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s. Methods The nominal group technique (NGT), a highly structured focus group methodology, was implemented with 12 separate groups of AA’s patients with glaucoma (N = 89) to identify barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication usage. Participant rank-ordering votes were summed across groups and categorized into themes. Next, an individually and culturally targeted health promotion program promoting appropriate medication adherence was developed based on focus group results and input from a community-based participatory research team. Results The top five barriers included problems with 1) forgetfulness, 2) side effects, 3) cost/affordability, 4) eye drop administration, and 5) the eye drop schedule. The most salient top five facilitators were 1) fear or thoughts about the consequences of not taking eye drops, 2) use of memory aids, cues, or strategies, 3) maintaining a regular routine or schedule for eye drop administration, 4) ability to afford eye drops, and 5) keeping eye drops in the same area. The resulting health promotion program was based on a multi-component empowerment framework that included glaucoma education, motivational interviewing, and problem-solving training to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s are multifactorial. Based on the NGT themes and input from the community-based participatory research team, a culturally informed, health promotion program was designed and holds great promise for improving medication adherence among this vulnerable population. PMID:23873033

  9. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Warren, James R.; Falster, Michael O.; Tran, Bich; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins. Research Design We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR) and usual provider continuity index (UPI) for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample. Results 36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04–1.06) for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15–1.54). Conclusions Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. PMID:26448561

  10. Adherence to therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Luis-Emilio; Alvarez, María; Dilla, Tatiana; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo

    2013-12-01

    Adherence to therapy is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior in taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a healthcare provider. Patients presenting with type 2 diabetes mellitus are initially encouraged to maintain a healthy diet and exercise regimen, followed by early medication that generally includes one or more oral hypoglycemic agents and later may include an injectable treatment. To prevent the complications associated with type 2 diabetes, therapy frequently also includes medications for control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and other disorders, since patients often have more than three or four chronic conditions. Despite the benefits of therapy, studies have indicated that recommended glycemic goals are achieved by less than 50% of patients, which may be associated with decreased adherence to therapies. As a result, hyperglycemia and long-term complications increase morbidity and premature mortality, and lead to increased costs to health services. Reasons for nonadherence are multifactorial and difficult to identify. They include age, information, perception and duration of disease, complexity of dosing regimen, polytherapy, psychological factors, safety, tolerability and cost. Various measures to increase patient satisfaction and increase adherence in type 2 diabetes have been investigated. These include reducing the complexity of therapy by fixed-dose combination pills and less frequent dosing regimens, using medications that are associated with fewer adverse events (hypoglycemia or weight gain), educational initiatives with improved patient-healthcare provider communication, reminder systems and social support to help reduce costs. In the current narrative review, factors that influence adherence to different therapies for type 2 diabetes are discussed, along with outcomes of poor adherence, the economic impact of nonadherence, and strategies aimed at improving

  11. SP 03-1 POLYPILL STRATEGY TO IMPROVED ADHERENCE.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2016-09-01

    Among individuals with established CVD, multiple medications (aspirin, blood pressure lowering drugs and statins) are required to manage CVD and it is well established that non adherence to prescribed treatments is substantial in the long term. Such discontinuation of CV-preventive medications and low adherence rates has been shown to affect the success of CVD prevention efforts. In low- and middle income countries only less than 20% patients receive recommended therapy for CVD prevention, but even in high-income countries treatment coverage in the community is only about 50% in those with heart disease and 35% in those with stroke. Patients adherence to CV drugs is likely to be adversely affected by a number of factors including patients' beliefs, complexity of medication regime, lack of understanding of their condition or medication, and medication cost and associated clinic visits cost. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) polypill therapy may reduce these treatment gaps by reducing cost, complexity, therapeutic inertia, and low adherence. There are several mechanisms whereby an FDC strategy may enhance adherence. These encompass ease of prescription, overcoming physician inertia, patient acceptability, packaged delivery, and ease of taking. Recent evidence from well-designed randomized controlled trials (UMPIRE, Kanyini-GAP, IMPACT) and meta-analysis (SPACE collaboration) of RCTs have shown that access to FDC polypill in patients with CVD or similarly high risk improved adherence, BP, and cholesterol levels. These trials have shown that physicians are willing to prescribe polypill to this group of patients by involving them in the trial, and at the end of the study more patients were taking the FDC treatment. In order to achieve substantial reduction of CVD burden, immediate use of FDC/polypill in secondary prevention is indicated; however, the evidence in primary prevention needs to be adjudicated. PMID:27642921

  12. Irreversible aggregation of flexible chainlike walkers without adherence.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    The flexible chainlike walker (FCW) model is proposed as a minimal model of a deformable moving object and as an extension of the regular random-walk model. The many-body system of FCWs is studied by numerical simulations on a square lattice. It is shown that FCWs aggregate spontaneously and irreversibly where no adherence is assumed, in contrast to the established aggregation models, where adherence is indispensable for their occurrence and irreversibility. This type of aggregation is enabled by and demonstrates the significance of the deformability of moving objects.

  13. Promoting patient uptake and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Philippa; Taylor, Fiona; Beswick, Andrew; Wise, Frances; Moxham, Tiffany; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation is an important component of recovery from coronary events but uptake and adherence to such programmes are below the recommended levels. This aim is to update a previous non-Cochrane systematic review which examined interventions that may potentially improve cardiac patient uptake and adherence in rehabilitation or its components and concluded that there is insufficient evidence to make specific recommendations. Objectives To determine the effects of interventions to increase patient uptake of, and adherence to, cardiac rehabilitation. Search methods A previous systematic review identified studies published prior to June 2001. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (Issue 4 2007), MEDLINE (2001 to January 2008), EMBASE (2001 to January 2008), CINAHL (2001 to January 2008), PsycINFO (2001 to January 2008), Web of Science: ISI Proceedings (2001 to April 2008), and NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) databases (Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)) from 2001 to January 2008. Reference lists of identified systematic reviews and randomised control trials (RCTs) were also checked for additional studies. Selection criteria Adults with myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, heart failure, angina, or coronary heart disease eligible for cardiac rehabilitation and randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions to increase uptake or adherence to cardiac rehabilitation or any of its component parts. Only studies reporting a measure of adherence were included. Data collection and analysis Titles and abstracts of all identified references were screened for eligibility by two reviewers independently and full papers of potentially relevant trials were obtained and checked. Included studies were assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers. Main results Ten

  14. Relationship of cell surface morphology and composition of Streptococcus salivarius K+ to adherence and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; van der Mei, H C; Slot, J W

    1987-01-01

    The cell surfaces of a range of variants of Streptococcus salivarius HB, altered in cell wall antigen composition, were compared with those of the parent with respect to adherence, ability to adsorb to hexadecane, morphology, and exposure of lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Adherence to host surfaces was measured by using both saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads and tissue-cultured HeLa cells, and interbacterial adherence was measured by using Veillonella alcalescens V1 cells. Progressive loss of the protease-sensitive fibril classes was generally associated with decreasing ability to adsorb to hexadecane. However, increased exposure of protein antigen C (AgC) increased the apparent hydrophobicity of the cell. This correlated with the finding that AgC was the most hydrophobic of the solubilized fibrillar cell wall antigens. Collectively, this demonstrates that adsorption to hydrophobic ligands is directly related to the density of the fibrillar layer on the cells and the properties and surface exposure of specific fibril classes. The involvement of hydrophobic interactions in AgC-associated attachment was suggested by its sensitivity to low levels of the hydrophobic bond-breaking agent tetramethyl urea, although the reduction was not to the level of adherence observed with strains lacking AgC. However, hydrophobicity was less essential to other adherence reactions. Circumstantial evidence, including immunoelectron microscopy, showing that LTA was virtually absent from the fibrillar layer, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that surface exposure of LTA related inversely to the density of the fibrillar layer, and agarose gel electrophoresis, showing that LTA was not specifically associated with protein fibrillar antigens, strongly suggested that LTA does not confer hydrophobic properties to these cells and is not involved in adherence reactions associated with the cell wall protein antigens. Images PMID:3804445

  15. The Effects of Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Factors Influencing Drug Adherence in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of knee osteoarthritis patients according to drug adherence; and to find out the factors the affecting those outcomes. We analyzed the drug adherence and clinical outcomes in 1,334 primary knee osteoarthritis patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes of Pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EQ-5D were compared at baseline and 3 weeks’ follow-up between the two groups of adherent group and non-adherent group (1,167 vs. 167 patients). Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors affecting the adherence, and the reasons for the non-adherence were asked. The follow-up clinical outcomes of NRS and KOOS symptom, pain and activity of daily life were significantly higher in the adherence group (P = 0.003, P = 0.048, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003, respectively). The adherence was better in the elderly and in the male group (P = 0.042 and P = 0.034, respectively) and the top reason for no strict adherence was “symptom improved” (21.5%) followed by side effects. In this study, the patients with better adherence to NSAIDs showed better outcomes compared to those with poor adherence. This study can contribute to the patient education for the pharmacological treatment in knee OA patients. PMID:27134504

  16. The Validity of Self-Reported Medication Adherence as an Outcome in Clinical Trials of Adherence-Promotion Interventions: Findings from the MACH14 Study

    PubMed Central

    Huh, David; Wang, Yan; Wilson, Ira B.; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Remien, Robert H.; Goggin, Kathy; Gross, Robert; Rosen, Marc I.; Schneiderman, Neil; Arnsten, Julia; Golin, Carol E.; Erlen, Judith A.; Bangsberg, David R.; Liu, Honghu

    2014-01-01

    In medication adherence-promotion trials, participants in the intervention arm are often cognizant of the researcher’s aim to improve adherence; this may lead to their inflating reports of their own adherence compared to control arm participants. Using data from 1,247 HIV-positive participants across eight U.S. Studies in the Multisite Adherence Collaboration on HIV (MACH14) collaboration, we evaluated the validity of self-reported adherence by examining whether its association with two more objective outcomes [1], electronically monitored adherence and [2] viral load, varied by study arm. After adjusting for potential confounders, there was no evidence of greater overestimation of self-reported adherence among intervention arm participants, supporting its potential as a trial outcome indicator. PMID:25280447

  17. 42 CFR 447.304 - Adherence to upper limits; FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adherence to upper limits; FFP. 447.304 Section 447.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... experiments conducted under section 402 of Pub. L. 90-428, Incentives for Economy Experimentation, as...

  18. Paradigm Adherence and Personality Correlates across Mental Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauscher, Laura Anne

    2012-01-01

    Paradigm adherence has been developed as a meta-theoretical approach to organize and to classify the multitude of different theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Four paradigms have been identified in the literature: The Organic-Medical, The Psychological, The Systemic-Relational, and the Social Constructivist paradigms. Only one other study…

  19. Drug Attitude and Adherence to Anti-Glaucoma Medication

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Samin; Kang, Sung Yong; Yoon, Jong Uk; Kang, Uicheon; Seong, Gong Je

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess patient attitudes towards anti-glaucoma medication and their association with adherence, visual quality of life, and personality traits. Materials and Methods One hundred and forty-seven glaucoma patients were enrolled this study. The participants were divided into 'pharmacophobic' and 'pharmacophilic' groups according to their scores on the Modified Glaucoma Drug Attitude Inventory (MG-DAI). To establish a correlation with patient drug attitude, each group had their subjective drug adherence, visual quality of life, and personality traits examined. For personality traits, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was used to sub-classify each group. Results Among the patients analyzed, 91 (72.80%) patients showed a 'pharmacophobic' attitude and 34 (27.20%) patients showed a 'pharmacophilic' attitude. The pharmacophobic group tended to have worse adherence than the pharmacophilic group. Personality dichotomies from the MBTI also showed different patterns for each group. Conclusion In glaucoma patients, pharmacological adherence was influenced by their attitude towards drugs; an association might exist between drug attitude and underlying personality traits. PMID:20191020

  20. Alcohol use and antiretroviral adherence: Review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hendershot, Christian S.; Stoner, Susan A.; Pantalone, David W.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alcohol use is frequently implicated as a factor in nonadherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). There have not been efforts to systematically evaluate findings across studies. This meta-analysis provides a quantitative evaluation of the alcohol-adherence association by aggregating findings across studies and examining potential moderators. Methods Literature searches identified 40 qualifying studies totaling over 25,000 participants. Studies were coded on several methodological variables. Results In the combined analysis, alcohol drinkers were approximately 50–60% as likely to be classified as adherent [OR = 0.548, 95% CI: 0.490–0.612] compared to abstainers (or those who drank relatively less). Effect sizes for problem drinking, defined as meeting the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) criteria for at-risk drinking or criteria for an alcohol use disorder, were greater [OR = 0.474, 95% CI = 0.408–0.550] than those reflecting any or global drinking [OR = 0.604, 95% CI = 0.531–0.687]. Several variables moderated the alcohol-adherence association. Conclusions Results support a significant and reliable association of alcohol use and medication nonadherence. Methodological variables appear to moderate this association and could contribute to inconsistencies across studies. Future research would benefit from efforts to characterize theoretical mechanisms as well as mediators and moderators of the alcohol-adherence association. PMID:19668086

  1. Adherence to Scientific Method while Advancing Exposure Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paul Lioy was simultaneously a staunch adherent to the scientific method and an innovator of new ways to conduct science, particularly related to human exposure. Current challenges to science and the application of the scientific method are presented as they relate the approaches...

  2. Attitudes, Beliefs, and Models in Adherence to Exercise and Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabert, Trent E.

    The general purpose of the symposium was to connect several factors which have been studied in the psychological domain to the exercise and sport behavior domain. The assumption that factors related to adherence are facilitated through the psychological connection have been widely discussed in literature. Models allow for the development of an…

  3. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  4. Teacher Burnout Factors as Predictors of Adherence to Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaitan, Peggy E.

    2009-01-01

    It is hypothesized that factors related to teacher burnout influence treatment adherence. This study examines the relation of teacher burnout to the frequency and quality of behavioral intervention implementation. A sample of 45 general and special education teachers were trained to implement the Good Behavior Game, an intervention designed to…

  5. Behavioral economics strategies for promoting adherence to sleep interventions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia and continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnea are among the most efficacious sleep interventions. Unfortunately, adherence levels are disappointingly low for these interventions. Behavioral economics offers a promising framework for promoting adherence, often through relatively brief and straightforward strategies. The assumptions, goals, and key strategies of behavioral economics will be introduced. These strategies include providing social norms information, changing defaults, using the compromise effect, utilizing commitment devices, and establishing lottery-based systems. Then, this review will highlight specific behavioral economic approaches to promote patient adherence for three major sleep interventions: 1) behavioral treatment for pediatric insomnia, 2) cognitive-behavioral treatment for adult insomnia, and 3) continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea. Next, behavioral economic strategies will be discussed as ways to improve health care provider adherence to clinical practice guidelines regarding appropriate prescribing of hypnotics and ordering sleep-promoting practices for hospitalized inpatients. Finally, possible concerns that readers may have about behavioral economics strategies, including their efficacy, feasibility, and sustainability, will be addressed.

  6. Medication Adherence and Readmission In Medicare Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuting; Kaplan, Cameron M.; Baik, Seo Hyon; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Lave, Judith R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between 6-month medication adherence and 1-year down-stream heart-disease related readmission among patients who survived a myocardial infarction (MI). Study Design Retrospective, nested case-control analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were discharged alive post-MI in 2008 (n = 168,882). Methods Patients in the case group had their first heart-disease related readmission post-MI discharge during 6-9 months and/or 9-12 months. We then used propensity score matching mechanism to identify patients in the control group who had similar characteristics, but did not have a readmission in the same time window. Adherence was defined as the average 6-month medication possession ratio (MPR) prior to the first date of the time-window of defining readmission. Results After controlling for demographic, insurance coverage and clinical characteristics, patients who had a heart-disease related readmission had worse adherence, with MPR of 0.70 and 0.74 in the case and control groups. Odds ratio of MPR ≥0.75 was 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.83) among those with a readmission relative to those without. Conclusion Our study shows that better 6-month medication adherence may reduce heart-disease related readmissions within a year after an MI. PMID:25651604

  7. Meaning of Adherence in Hepatitis C-Infected Military Veterans.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Frances H; Barnes, Donelle M

    2016-01-01

    Among United States (U.S.) veterans, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C infection is three times that of the general U.S. population. Treatment success is proportionate to the degree of treatment adherence. There has been little research dedicated to the systematic exploration of issues related to treatment adherence. The purpose of this study was to describe factors that influenced adherence in infected military veterans. Phenomenological research emphasizes a rich description. A convenience sample of 21 veterans was recruited from a clinic in north Texas. One-time in-depth interviews explored reasons for remaining in treatment despite difficult side effects. Analysis included immersion, data transformation, thematic analysis, and summary. Cognitive strategies to stay on medication include making a commitment to treatment, "not ready to leave this world," conserving energy and staying busy, looking forward, and starting over. Veterans utilize previously learned military discipline to stay on medications and follow providers' orders. They are not ready to die and have plans for life after treatment. Patient education should focus on side effect management, rather than on genotypes or viral load. Treatment teams should include substance abuse specialists and gastroenterology providers. Future studies need to develop a measurement tool for adherence during antiviral treatment. PMID:26825560

  8. Treatment adherence redefined: a critical analysis of technotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marilou; Jacob, Jean Daniel; Guta, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    GAGNON M, JACOB JD and GUTA A. Nursing Inquiry 2013; 20: 60–70 Treatment adherence redefined: a critical analysis of technotherapeutics Treatment adherence issues in the context of chronic illnesses have become an important concern worldwide and a top priority in the field of health-care. The development of devices that will allow healthcare providers to track treatment adherence and monitor physiological parameters with exact precision raises important questions and concerns. The aim of this study is to interrogate the use of these new technological devices which allow for previously unavailable data to be recorded on an ongoing basis and transmitted via a tiny microchip inserted into the body. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault, we analyze how this anatomo-political and bio-political instrument serves to discipline chronically ill individuals and govern the health of entire populations who suffer from chronic conditions. To support our analysis, this article comprises three sections. First, we provide an overview of treatment adherence and technotherapeutics. Then, we explain how technotherapeutics concern the government of bodies and conducts at the individual level and population level more generally. Lastly, we provide an example of how this analysis can be connected to routine nursing practice in the field of HIV. PMID:22381079

  9. Self-reported factors influencing exercise adherence in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Gillett, P A

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of intensity-controlled, graded dance exercise and selected components of behavior modification on exercise adherence in overweight middle-aged women. Thirty-eight moderately overweight women, aged 35 to 58, participated in a 16 1/2 week dance exercise program. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 20) that received intensity-controlled, graded exercise and individual and group reinforcement, or to a control group (n = 18) that exercised at a moderate intensity typical of commercial fitness classes and received no special reinforcement. Before exercise training began and at the completion of 16 1/2 weeks, a structured, open-ended interview was conducted. Ninety-four percent of the women in both groups adhered to the program, an exceptionally high adherence rate for this population. Eight participant-identified factors seemed to have influenced exercise adherence: group homogeneity, carpooling and social networks, pleasurable feelings associated with increased energy and fitness, leader with a health-related background, time limitation of exercise program, commitment to an established goal, desire to change body image, and desire to change health status and improve physical health.

  10. Elder and Caregiver Solutions to Improve Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Quin, K. E.; Semalulu, T.; Orom, H.

    2015-01-01

    Medication mismanagement is a growing public health concern, especially among elders. Annually, it is a major contributor to emergency hospitalization and nursing home placement. Elders and their caregivers, as healthcare consumers and stakeholders in this issue, are uniquely qualified to inform strategies to improve medication adherence. We…

  11. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health... the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Request for information. SUMMARY: The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health is seeking information about causes, impact...

  12. Apparatus for recovering matter adhered to a host surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, W. W.; Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of an apparatus for removing and recovering matter adhered to a host surface is described. The device consists of a pickup head with an ultrasonic transducer adapted to deliver ultrasonic pressure waves against the material. The ultrasonic waves agitate the material and cause its separation from the surface. A vacuum system recovers the material and delivers it to suitable storage containers.

  13. Importance of Quality of Life for Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nonperception of efficacy ranks among the most commonly cited causes for nonadherence to sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Quality of life (QoL) in patients is a determining factor influencing adherence. We investigated QoL and adherence separately in SLIT patients at one pediatric practice in Germany. Methods. We conducted a noninterventional, cross-sectional, retrospective, quality-of-life survey among pediatric patients treated with SLIT. QoL was assessed using the generic SF-12 health survey in German. The items contained in the SF-12 health survey are weighted, added up, and converted to obtain a physical component score (PCS) and a mental component score (MCS). Each component score ranges from 0 to 100; the higher the score, the better the QoL perceived. Results. 201 surveyed patients who had undergone SLIT showed PCS-12 of 49.3 (± 7.0) and MCS-12 of 52.6 (± 7.2). These figures correlate strongly with those reported for the German general population (n = 2453): PCS-12 of 49.6 (± 8.7) and MCS-12 of 52.3 (± 8.0). 70.2% (73) of 104 patients were adherent at this practice. Conclusions. QoL in the SLIT patients surveyed here appears as good as that of the general population. Adherence to SLIT at this practice was remarkably better than that reported elsewhere. PMID:27504453

  14. 42 CFR 447.304 - Adherence to upper limits; FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adherence to upper limits; FFP. 447.304 Section 447.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional...

  15. 42 CFR 447.304 - Adherence to upper limits; FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adherence to upper limits; FFP. 447.304 Section 447.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional...

  16. 42 CFR 447.304 - Adherence to upper limits; FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adherence to upper limits; FFP. 447.304 Section 447.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services §...

  17. 42 CFR 447.304 - Adherence to upper limits; FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adherence to upper limits; FFP. 447.304 Section 447.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional...

  18. Mental Health, Binge Drinking, and Antihypertension Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Jim E.; Haskard, Kelly B.; Haviland, Mark G.; Williams, Summer L.; Werner, Leonard S.; Anderson, Donald L.; DiMatteo, M. Robin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between self-reported mental health and binge drinking, as well as health status, sociodemographic, social support, economic resource, and health care access indicators to antihypertension medication adherence. Method: Analysis of 2003 California Health Interview Survey data. Results: Having poor mental…

  19. Adherence to RIASEC Structure as a Key Career Decision Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between individual cognitive structure and several key career decision variables. Specifically, in a sample of college students enrolled in a career development class, the usage of the RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional) circumplex (adherence) was examined as…

  20. Adherence Process Research on Developmental Interventions: Filling in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron

    2002-01-01

    Presents a framework and some practical examples for using rigorous implementation research to inform program outcomes and foster program development for developmental interventions. Focuses on: (1) role of process research, specifically developing developmental interventions; (2) characteristics of adherence process research; and (3)…

  1. Psychosocial factors in maternal phenylketonuria: women's adherence to medical recommendations.

    PubMed Central

    Waisbren, S E; Hamilton, B D; St James, P J; Shiloh, S; Levy, H L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study identified factors predicting adherence to medical recommendations in maternal phenylketonuria, which can result in severe fetal damage. METHODS. Sixty-nine women with phenylketonuria, 68 of their acquaintances, and 69 women with diabetes mellitus were interviewed annually for 5 years. A model in which each stage in the maternal phenylketonuria life cycle represented a treatment-related goal provided a means to assess adherence. RESULTS. At the stages of prevention of unplanned pregnancy, treatment initiation, and diet continuation throughout pregnancy, attitudes and social support were associated with adherence to medical recommendations. No specific variables were associated with outcome at reproductive decision making, but women with phenylketonuria were more likely to delay making a decision, resulting in unplanned and, hence, untreated or late-treated pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS. Women with phenylketonuria differed from their acquaintances and diabetic women in many respects, suggesting that special programs are needed. Greater emphasis on reproductive decision making is especially needed. Interventions that focus on improving social support networks and attitudes about treatment may increase adherence to recommendations. PMID:7503337

  2. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  3. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  4. Health Beliefs and Regimen Adherence of the American Indian Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Patricia; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines compliance with a medical and behavioral regimen by 60 American Indian diabetics, as it relates to demographic and medical variables, attitudes, perceived beliefs of others, and coping strategies. Concludes that the patient's perceptions of significant others' belief is the best predictor of overall adherence. Contains 29 references. (SV)

  5. relA Enhances the Adherence of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Spira, Beny; Ferreira, Gerson Moura; de Almeida, Luiz Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a known causative agent of diarrhea in children. In the process of colonization of the small intestine, EPEC synthesizes two types of adhesins, the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) and intimin. The BFP pilus is an adhesin associated with the initial stages of adherence of EPEC to epithelial cells, while the outer membrane protein intimin carries out the intimate adherence that takes place at the third stage of infection. BFP is encoded by the bfp operon located in plasmid EAF, present only in typical EPEC isolates, while eae, the gene that encodes intimin is situated in the LEE, a chromosomal pathogenicity island. Transcription of bfp and eae is regulated by the products of the perABC operon, also present in plasmid EAF. Here we show that deletion of relA, that encodes a guanosine penta and tetraphosphate synthetase impairs EPEC adherence to epithelial cells in vitro. In the absence of relA, the transcription of the regulatory operon perABC is reduced, resulting in lower levels of BFP and intimin. Bacterial adherence, BFP and intimin synthesis and perABC expression are restored upon complementation with the wild-type relA allele. PMID:24643076

  6. Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Catsburg, Chelsea; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2014-11-15

    Healthy eating patterns and keeping physically active are potentially more important for chronic disease prevention than intake or exclusion of specific food items or nutrients. To this end, many health organizations routinely publish dietary and lifestyle recommendations aimed at preventing chronic disease. Using data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and adherence to two sets of guidelines specific for cancer prevention, namely the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Recommendations. At baseline, 49,613 women completed dietary and lifestyle questionnaires and height and weight measurements were taken. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, 2,503 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of meeting each guideline, and number of guidelines met, with breast cancer risk. The two sets of guidelines yielded similar results. Specifically, adherence to all six ACS guidelines was associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk when compared to subjects adhering to at most one guideline (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.49-0.97); similarly, adherence to six or seven of the WCRF/AICR guidelines was also associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.47-1.00). Under either classification, meeting each additional guideline was associated with a 4-6% reduction in breast cancer risk. These results suggest that adherence to cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer.

  7. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  8. Cancer Screening in Women: BMI and Adherence to Physician Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Jeanne M.; Chen, Ping-Hsin; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Reasons obese women are less likely to obtain mammograms and Pap smears are poorly understood. This study evaluated associations between body mass index (BMI) and receipt of and adherence to physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smear. Methods Data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey (8289 women aged 40-74 years) were analyzed in 2006 using logistic regression. Women with prior hysterectomy were excluded from Pap smear analyses (n=5521). Outcome measures were being up-to-date with screening, receipt of physician recommendations, and women's adherence to physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smear. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, health care access, health behaviors, and comorbidity, severely obese women (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2) were less likely to have mammography within 2 years (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.37, 0.68) and Pap smear within 3 years (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.27,0.70). Obese women were as likely as normal weight women to receive physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smear. Severely obese women were less likely to adhere to physician recommendation for mammography (OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.32-0.76). Women in all obese categories (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) were less likely to adhere to physician recommendation for Pap smear (OR's ranged 0.17-0.28; p<0.001). Conclusions Obese women are less likely to adhere to physician recommendations for breast and cervical cancer screening. Interventions focusing solely on increasing physician recommendations for mammography and Pap smears will probably be insufficient for obese women. Additional strategies are needed to make cancer screening more acceptable for this high-risk group. PMID:17533069

  9. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    PubMed Central

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005–2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  10. Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence among Older Adults: Meta-Analysis of Adherence Outcomes among Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Cooper, Pamela S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Mehr, David R.; Russell, Cynthia L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the effectiveness of interventions to improve medication adherence (MA) in older adults. Design and Methods: Meta-analysis was used to synthesize results of 33 published and unpublished randomized controlled trials. Random-effects models were used to estimate overall mean effect sizes (ESs) for MA, knowledge,…

  11. Improving adherence to glaucoma medication: a randomised controlled trial of a patient-centred intervention (The Norwich Adherence Glaucoma Study)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving adherence to ocular hypertension (OH)/glaucoma therapy is highly likely to prevent or reduce progression of optic nerve damage. The present study used a behaviour change counselling intervention to determine whether education and support was beneficial and cost-effective in improving adherence with glaucoma therapy. Methods A randomised controlled trial with a 13-month recruitment and 8-month follow-up period was conducted. Patients with OH/glaucoma attending a glaucoma clinic and starting treatment with travoprost were approached. Participants were randomised into two groups and adherence was measured over 8 months, using an electronic monitoring device (Travalert® dosing aid, TDA). The control group received standard clinical care, and the intervention group received a novel glaucoma education and motivational support package using behaviour change counselling. Cost-effectiveness framework analysis was used to estimate any potential cost benefit of improving adherence. Results Two hundred and eight patients were recruited (102 intervention, 106 control). No significant difference in mean adherence over the monitoring period was identified with 77.2% (CI, 73.0, 81.4) for the control group and 74.8% (CI, 69.7, 79.9) for the intervention group (p = 0.47). Similarly, there was no significant difference in percentage intraocular pressure reduction; 27.6% (CI, 23.5, 31.7) for the control group and 25.3% (CI, 21.06, 29.54) for the intervention group (p = 0.45). Participants in the intervention group were more satisfied with information about glaucoma medication with a mean score of 14.47/17 (CI, 13.85, 15.0) compared with control group which was 8.51 (CI, 7.72, 9.30). The mean intervention cost per patient was GB£10.35 (Adherence with travoprost was high and not further increased by the intervention. Nevertheless, the study demonstrated that provision of information, tailored to the individual

  12. Financial incentives to improve adherence to antipsychotic maintenance medication in non-adherent patients: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Stefan; Bremner, Stephen A; Lauber, Christoph; Henderson, Catherine; Burns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to long-term antipsychotic injectable (LAI) medication in patients with psychotic disorders is associated with a range of negative outcomes. No psychosocial intervention has been found to be consistently effective in improving adherence. OBJECTIVES: To test whether or not offering financial incentives is effective and cost-effective in improving adherence and to explore patient and clinician experiences with such incentives. DESIGN: A cluster randomised controlled trial with economic and nested qualitative evaluation. The intervention period lasted for 12 months with 24 months' follow-up. The unit of randomisation was mental health teams in the community. SETTING: Community teams in secondary mental health care. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis or bipolar illness, receiving ≤ 75% of their prescribed LAI medication. In total, 73 teams with 141 patients (intervention n = 78 and control n = 63) were included. INTERVENTIONS: Participants in the intervention group received £15 for each LAI medication. Patients in the control group received treatment as usual. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: PRIMARY OUTCOME: adherence to LAI medication (the percentage of received out of those prescribed). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: percentage of patients with at least 95% adherence; clinical global improvement; subjective quality of life; satisfaction with medication; hospitalisation; adverse events; and costs. Qualitative evaluation: semistructured interviews with patients in the intervention group and their clinicians. RESULTS: PRIMARY OUTCOME: outcome data were available for 131 patients. Baseline adherence was 69% in the intervention group and 67% in the control group. During the intervention period, adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (85% vs. 71%) [adjusted mean difference 11.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.9% to 19.0%; p = 0.003]. Secondary outcome

  13. Medication adherence and the use of new pharmaceutical formulations: the case of levothyroxine.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Cristina; Sportiello, Liberata; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Sullo, Maria G; Vitelli, Bonaventura; Rafaniello, Concetta; Fossati, Tiziano; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    According to World Health Organization, medication adherence refers not only to pharmacological treatment, but also extends to all behaviors which guarantee patient's health. Poor medication adherence is the main cause of low efficacy of pharmacological therapy and it is more common in chronic diseases. For example, among hypothyroid patients, it was estimated that after 5 years of levothyroxine therapy 21.5% of patients still have a TSH level >5.0 mU/L due to poor medication adherence. Moreover, it was found that almost 40% of pediatric patients had at least one episode of non-compliance following thyroidectomia. Several strategies can be adopted in order to improve medication adherence. These include self-monitoring drug therapy and self-management programs, simplified dosing regimens, directly involving pharmacists in drug therapy management, use of pharmaceutical formulations more attractive to the patient and through the therapeutic drug monitoring. The effects mediated by the thyroid gland, the clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism and the main characteristics of levothyroxine therapy have been discussed. In order to give an overview of interactions with food and drinks, pharmacokinetic characteristics, efficacy/safety profile, as well as the impact on medication adherence of levothyroxine in oral solution and soft gel capsule formulations, a literature search was performed. The results of 21 clinical studies were reviewed. Levothyroxine oral solution and soft gel capsule formulations showed irrelevant interactions with food and drinks, with a dissolution profile minimally influenced by pH variations. According to pharmacokinetic study results, bioequivalence between these formulations and levothyroxine tablets was confirmed. Regarding the efficacy/safety profile, while some studies did not detect any difference between levothyroxine formulations, other studies suggested that oral solution and soft gel capsule were associated to a higher efficacy compared to

  14. [Prevalence of anti-hypertensive treatment adherence in patients with resistant hypertension and validation of three indirect methods for assessing treatment adherence].

    PubMed

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Melo, André Nascimento de; Nogueira, Armando R

    2008-12-01

    This study estimated adherence to anti-hypertensive medication using three indirect methods and their combinations in a cohort of patients with resistant hypertension in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2005. The methods used were: self-reported adherence; physicians' adherence evaluation; and the Morisky-Green test (MGT) translated into Portuguese. The predictive validation was performed comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, measured on two different occasions, from patients classified as adherent or not. The means were compared using non-parametric tests. Two hundred patients were interviewed. Mean age was 63 years (SD = 10.3), and 73.5% were female. Adherence prevalence was 51% using MGT, 52% according to the physician, and 80.5% according to the patient. Adherent patients showed a reduction in both office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure, while non-adherent patients did not. The use of more than one method to evaluate adherence showed that non-adherent individuals according to the three methods (11.9%) had the worst evolution in blood pressure levels. This finding suggests that resistant hypertension cannot be attributed exclusively to low adherence. PMID:19082292

  15. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gregory A; Rosales, A Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6-12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50-79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1-79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point. PMID:27579326

  16. Adherence to a Yoga Program in Older Women with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Corjena; Wyman, Jean F; Savik, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Yoga is beneficial for osteoarthritis (OA) management in older adults; however, adherence to yoga practice is unknown. The purposes of this secondary analysis were to examine: (1) yoga adherence during the intervention and follow-up periods; (2) the relationship between social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs and adherence; and (3) the impact of adherence on OA-related symptoms in 36 community-dwelling older women with knee OA. SCT was used as a framework to promote adherence to a yoga intervention program that included both group/homebased practices. Adherence to yoga was high during the intervention period but decreased over time. Although SCT was a useful framework for reducing attrition during the intervention, self-efficacy was the only construct that correlated with class attendance. Higher yoga adherence was correlated with improved symptoms, physical function, sleep quality, and quality of life. Yoga adherers were likely to be older, less educated, and had a lower body mass index than nonadherers.

  17. Predictors of medication non-adherence in Bulgarian outpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Iglika; Milanova, Vihra; Asan, Turan

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the adherence status and to identify the risk factors for medication non-adherence in Bulgarian outpatients with schizophrenia. Variables with possible impact on adherence behaviour were assessed via a set of pre-determined clinical interviews and self-rating scales in a total of 226 patients with schizophrenia. As non-adherent were classified 55.8% of the participants. Differences between adherent and non-adherent patients were identified. A multiple regression analysis revealed three variables predictive for the medication adherence--attitudes toward medication, severity of positive symptoms and the ability to recognize psychotic symptoms. Interventions focusing on the identified predictive variables might be useful when aiming at improvement of medication adherence and outcome in schizophrenia.

  18. Can the common-sense model predict adherence in chronically ill patients? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Kim; Mullan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore whether mental representations, derived from the common-sense model of illness representations (CSM), were able to predict adherence in chronically ill patients. Electronic databases were searched for studies that used the CSM and measured adherence behaviour in chronically ill patients. Correlations from the included articles were meta-analysed using a random-size effect model. A moderation analysis was conducted for the type of adherence behaviour. The effect sizes for the different mental representations and adherence constructs ranged from -0.02 to 0.12. Further analyses showed that the relationship between the mental representations and adherence did not differ by the type of adherence behaviour. The low-effect sizes indicate that the relationships between the different mental representations of the CSM and adherence are very weak. Therefore, the CSM may not be the most appropriate model to use in predictive studies of adherence.

  19. Managed Problem Solving for Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Robert; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Chapman, Jennifer; Han, Xiaoyan; O’Duor, Jacqueline; Palmer, Steven C.; Houts, Peter S.; Coyne, James C.; Strom, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is critical to successful treatment of HIV. Few interventions have been demonstrated to improve both adherence and virological outcomes. We sought to determine whether an intervention derived from problem solving theory, Managed Problem Solving (MAPS), would improve antiretroviral outcomes. Methods We conducted a randomized investigator blind trial of MAPS compared with usual care in HIV-1 infected individuals at three HIV clinics in Philadelphia, PA. Eligible patients had plasma HIV-1 viral loads >1000 copies/ml and were initiating or changing therapy. MAPS consists of four in-person and 12 telephone-based meetings with a trained interventionist, then monthly follow-up calls for a year. Primary outcome was medication adherence measured using electronic monitors, summarized as fraction of doses taken quarterly over one year. Secondary outcome was undetectable HIV viral load over one year. We assessed 218 for eligibility, with 190 eligible and 180 enrolled, 91 randomized to MAPS and 89 to usual care. 56 participants were lost to follow-up: 33 in MAPS and 23 in usual care. Results In primary intention-to-treat analyses, the odds of being in a higher adherence category was 1.78 (95% CI:1.07–2.96) times greater for MAPS than usual care. In secondary analyses, the odds of an undetectable viral load was 1.48 (95% CI: 0.94–2.31) times greater for MAPS than usual care. In as-treated analyses, the effect of MAPS was stronger for both outcomes. There was neither a difference by prior treatment status nor change in effect over time. Conclusions MAPS is an effective antiretroviral adherence intervention over the first year with a new regimen. It was equally effective at improving adherence in treatment experienced and naïve patients and did not lose effect over time. Implementation of MAPS should be strongly considered where resources are available. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00130273 PMID:23358784

  20. Moving cystic fibrosis care from rescue to prevention by embedding adherence measurement in routine care.

    PubMed

    Wildman, Martin J; Hoo, Zhe Hui

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis [CF] is a chronic disease in which preventative treatment with nebulised antibiotics can reduce pulmonary exacerbations that otherwise require rescue therapy. However, adherence is low. Making adherence to maintenance treatment visible is a crucial step towards improving adherence. In this article, we discuss how adherence data can be used to support Quality Improvement in CF through behaviour change in both people with cystic fibrosis and their clinical teams. PMID:24835307

  1. Cognitive function and adherence to anticoagulation treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Katarzyna, Lomper; Lidia, Alberska; Joanna, Jaroch; Dudek, Krzysztof; Izabella, Uchmanowicz

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is an integral part of the comprehensive care of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) receiving oral anticoagulations (OACs) therapy. Many patients with AF are elderly and may suffer from some form of cognitive impairment. This study was conducted to investigate whether cognitive impairment affects the level of adherence to anticoagulation treatment in AF patients. Methods The study involved 111 AF patients (mean age, 73.5 ± 8.3 years) treated with OACs. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). The level of adherence was assessed by the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Scores on the MMAS-8 range from 0 to 8, with scores < 6 reflecting low adherence, 6 to < 8 medium adherence, and 8 high adherence. Results 46.9% of AF patients had low adherence, 18.8% had moderate adherence, and 33.3% had high adherence to OACs. Patients with lower adherence were older than those with moderate or high adherence (76.6 ± 8.7 vs. 71.3 ± 6.4 vs. 71.1 ± 6.7 years) and obtained low MMSE scores, indicating cognitive disorders or dementia (MMSE = 22.3 ± 4.2). Patients with moderate or high adherence obtained high MMSE test results (27.5 ± 1.7 and 27.5 ± 3.6). According to Spearman's rank correlation, worse adherence to treatment with OACs was determined by older age (rS = −0.372) and lower MMSE scores (rS = 0.717). According to multivariate regression analysis, the level of cognitive function was a significant independent predictor of adherence (b = 1.139). Conclusions Cognitive impairment is an independent determinant of compliance with pharmacological therapy in elderly patients with AF. Lower adherence, beyond the assessment of cognitive function, is related to the age of patients. PMID:27605935

  2. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; Petri, W A; Murphy, C F; Smith, R D

    1986-01-01

    Adherence by axenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells is mediated by an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-inhibitable adhesin on the surface of the parasite. We isolated 35 hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to E. histolytica as indicated by ELISA with sonicated amebic protein or by immunofluorescence assay with fixed whole trophozoites. Tissue culture supernatants were further screened for subcloning by the ability to bind to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells which were first exposed to a partially purified soluble preparation of the amebic GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. Eight tissue culture supernatants were positive in this assay. Antibodies from four subcloned cell lines (D3-14, H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence to CHO cells (P less than 0.01). Of the original 35 tissue culture supernatants, 3 also inhibited amebic adherence (P less than 0.01; F1, F14, and J10); monoclonal antibodies in these supernatants did not bind to lectin-exposed CHO cells. Three purified monoclonal antibodies (H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence at greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/10(4) amebae (P less than 0.05). None of these inhibitory monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated with a soluble amebic protein preparation following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. Monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence by E. histolytica will be useful in purification of the GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. PMID:2873102

  3. Rates and Predictors of Adherence to Psychotropic Medications in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Sarah L.; Carpenter, Laura; Leslie, R. Scott; Hunt, Kelly S.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Charles, Jane; Nicholas, Joyce S.

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence in children is poor, particularly among those with chronic or mental health disorders. However, adherence has not been fully assessed in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The validated proportion of days covered method was used to quantify adherence to psychotropic medication in Medicaid-eligible children who met diagnostic…

  4. Non-Adherence to Study Time Management Strategies among NOUN Students and Implications for Academic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okopi, Fidel O.

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the NOUN students' non-adherence to their time management strategies (TMS) during the course of their studies. The researcher also wanted to find out whether their gender, age, marital and employment statuses have influence on their adherence/non-adherence to the plan or not. The researcher also examined the…

  5. pH changes during in vitro adherence of Escherichia coli to HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, K; Mann, M D; Bowie, M D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli-induced acidic pH conditions were observed during the in vitro adherence of E. coli to HeLa cells. No pH changes occurred in the absence of adherence. This suggests that adherence affects the function or interaction of HeLa cells and E. coli. PMID:7927801

  6. Factors Associated with the Accuracy of Physicians’ Predictions of Patient Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. Alison; Leventhal, Elaine A.; Leventhal, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Objective Physicians are inaccurate in predicting non-adherence in patients, a problem that interferes with physicians’: 1) appropriate prescribing decisions and 2) effective prevention/intervention of non-adherence. The purpose of the current study is to investigate potential reasons for the poor accuracy of physicians’ adherence-predictions and conditions under which their predictions may be more accurate. Methods After the medical encounter, predictions of patient-adherence and other ratings from primary-care physicians (n=24) regarding patient-factors that may have influenced their predictions were collected. Patients (n=288) rated their agreement regarding the prescribed treatment after the encounter and reported adherence one month later. Results Several factors were related to physicians’ adherence-predictions, including physicians’ perceptions of patient-agreement regarding treatment. However, some factors were not related to adherence and agreement-perceptions were inaccurate overall, potentially contributing to the poor accuracy of adherence-predictions. The degree to which physicians discussed treatment-specifics with the patient moderated agreement-perception accuracy but not adherence-prediction accuracy. Conclusions Training providers to discuss certain treatment-specifics with patients may improve their ability to perceive patient-agreement regarding treatment and may directly improve patient-adherence. Practice Implications Discussing treatment-specifics with patients may directly improve adherence, but providers should not rely on these discussions to give them accurate estimates of the patients’ likely adherence. PMID:21501943

  7. Impact of Treatment Adherence Intervention on a Social Skills Program Targeting Criticism Behaviours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinin, Serge; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated effect of cognitive-behavioral treatment adherence intervention in course of criticism skill group training program. Assigned 86 participants to treatment condition with or without adherence intervention or to control. Results suggest that adherence activities facilitated arousal optimal to greater program attendance and outcome gains…

  8. Baseline Adherence as a Predictor of Dropout in a Children's Weight-Reduction Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Allen C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined relationship between baseline adherence and attrition among families involved in a children's weight-loss program. Evaluated overall baseline adherence by the degree of families' completion of food intake and activity records. Anything but high adherence during baseline was predictive of dropout, suggesting that this is a useful index for…

  9. Improving medication adherence in hypercholesterolemia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gatwood, Justin; Bailey, James E

    2014-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is a prevalent public health issue that contributes to significant medical costs and detrimental health outcomes. This is especially true in patients with hypercholesterolemia, a condition affecting millions of American adults and one that is associated with increased risk for coronary and cerebrovascular events. Considering the magnitude of outcomes related to this disease, the medical community has placed significant emphasis on addressing the treatment for high cholesterol, and progress has been made in recent years. However, poor adherence to therapy continues to plague health outcomes and more must be understood and done to address suboptimal medication taking. Here we provide an overview of the reasons for poor medication adherence in patients with hypercholesterolemia and describe recent efforts to curb nonadherence. Suggested approaches for improving medication taking in patients with high cholesterol are also provided to guide practitioners, patients, and payers. PMID:25395859

  10. [Adherence to oral hygiene and dental self-care].

    PubMed

    Poplinger, A

    2010-04-01

    Nearly every person will be in need of dental treatment in his lifetime, whether purely for health causes or alternately for esthetic issues. Yet the main reasons of seeking dental treatment are in fact Caries, Gingivitis and Periodontitis. In spite of the fact that these pathologies occur due to the accumulation of Plaque around the oral cavity and teeth, they are fairly easy to prevent. Using simple techniques such as oral rinsing, flossing and brushing of the teeth, are normally sufficient for obtaining good oral health. If this is actually the case, than how is it that we are witnessing a massive spread of dental problems? How come there are so many incidents of people suffering from dental problems if the preventative care is that easy to manage? The answer lies in the concept of Adherence, referring to the cooperation of an individual with the demands of his treatment regime and the dental staff. The idea of promoting health adherence aims mainly for using medication, attending the periodic inspections and examination, and making lifestyle changes such as preventive care illustrated above. This article exemplifies how one of the current trends in Medical Psychology discipline is to enhance adherence by establishing a secure therapeutic alliance which is based upon a positive relationship between the patient and his doctor, increasing patient's confidence and sense of self-efficacy, and recruiting family members and friends to the patient's process of change. A distinctive emphasis is put on expanding the patient's knowledge about his condition, and raising awareness to the linkage between his medical (to be more specific-dental) problem and its symptoms to the implications. The most modish and putative intervention nowadays is Patient Centered, where the guiding principles used are urging the patient to be responsible for implying the treatment regime, taking active participation, and make decisions regarding his current and future status. This article

  11. Control and adherence: living with diabetes in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Naemiratch, Bhensri; Manderson, Lenore

    2006-09-01

    Diabetes is managed via a regimen of control. Physicians advise adults living with type 2 diabetes to control blood sugar levels by controlling diet, maintaining regular exercise, and complying with medication. The extent to which individuals are able to adhere to such recommendations varies. In this article, we explore lay perceptions of diabetes and its control, drawing on data from an ethnographic study conducted in Bangkok, Thailand. Between August 2001 and February 2003 the first author spent time with twelve man and women living with type 2 diabetes, their spouses, children and health providers. An additional 21 people were interviewed to extend the data and test for generalisibility. It was found that individual explanations of control, and adherence or resistance to medical advice, are interpreted and adapted in ways consistent with Buddhist philosophy and Thai norms that govern everyday life. Notions of moderation and cultural values of being and behaving, and ideals of interaction, provide a philosophical basis and practical guidelines for control.

  12. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  13. Intelligent mobile support for therapy adherence and behavior change.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michel; Mogles, Nataliya; van Wissen, Arlette

    2014-10-01

    Mobile applications have proven to be promising tools for supporting people in adhering to their health goals. Although coaching and reminder apps abound, few of them are based on established theories of behavior change. In the present work, a behavior change support system is presented that uses a computational model based on multiple psychological theories of behavior change. The system determines the user's reason for non-adherence using a mobile phone app and an online lifestyle diary. The user automatically receives generated messages with persuasive, tailored content. The system was designed to support chronic patients with type 2 diabetes, HIV, and cardiovascular disease, but can be applied to many health and lifestyle domains. The main focus of this work is the development of the model and the underlying reasoning method. Furthermore, the implementation of the system and some preliminary results of its functioning will be discussed.

  14. Automated adherent human cell culture (mesenchymal stem cells).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Human cell culture processes developed at research laboratory scale need to be translated to large-scale production processes to achieve commercial application to a large market. To allow this transition of scale with consistent process performance and control of costs, it will be necessary to reduce manual processing and increase automation. There are a number of commercially available platforms that will reduce manual process intervention and improve process control for different culture formats. However, in many human cell-based applications, there is currently a need to remain close to the development format, usually adherent culture on cell culture plastic or matrix-coated wells or flasks due to deterioration of cell quality in other environments, such as suspension. This chapter presents an example method for adherent automated human stem cell culture using a specific automated flask handling platform, the CompacT SelecT.

  15. Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface.

    PubMed

    Lissandrello, C; Inci, F; Francom, M; Paul, M R; Demirci, U; Ekinci, K L

    2014-09-15

    Nanomechanical motion of bacteria adhered to a chemically functionalized silicon surface is studied by means of a microcantilever. A non-specific binding agent is used to attach Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the surface of a silicon microcantilever. The microcantilever is kept in a liquid medium, and its nanomechanical fluctuations are monitored using an optical displacement transducer. The motion of the bacteria couples efficiently to the microcantilever well below its resonance frequency, causing a measurable increase in the microcantilever fluctuations. In the time domain, the fluctuations exhibit large-amplitude low-frequency oscillations. In corresponding frequency-domain measurements, it is observed that the mechanical energy is focused at low frequencies with a 1/f(α) -type power law. A basic physical model is used for explaining the observed spectral distribution of the mechanical energy. These results lay the groundwork for understanding the motion of microorganisms adhered to surfaces and for developing micromechanical sensors for bacteria.

  16. [The role of dermatologist in adherence to treatment].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is often partial in the course of chronic cutaneous disease but can be improved by the dermatologist. Patient participation in the therapeutic decision is indispensable. Dialogue between patient and dermatologist should provide an understanding of the patient's expectations of the treatment, his or her preferences, and which treatment can be integrated into the patient's lifestyle, and should also provide the patient with an understanding of what the treatment can provide and what its disadvantages may be. The approach to poor compliance differs depending on whether or not it is intentional, with all points between obviously possible. Repeated consultations can maintain and enhance the relation between physician and patient, each visit stimulating adherence to the treatment.The language used by the dermatologist should be clear and simple, adapted to each patient. The simplest, most effective, and best tolerated treatments are followed best.

  17. Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrello, C.; Inci, F.; Francom, M.; Paul, M. R.; Demirci, U.; Ekinci, K. L.

    2014-09-01

    Nanomechanical motion of bacteria adhered to a chemically functionalized silicon surface is studied by means of a microcantilever. A non-specific binding agent is used to attach Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the surface of a silicon microcantilever. The microcantilever is kept in a liquid medium, and its nanomechanical fluctuations are monitored using an optical displacement transducer. The motion of the bacteria couples efficiently to the microcantilever well below its resonance frequency, causing a measurable increase in the microcantilever fluctuations. In the time domain, the fluctuations exhibit large-amplitude low-frequency oscillations. In corresponding frequency-domain measurements, it is observed that the mechanical energy is focused at low frequencies with a 1/fα-type power law. A basic physical model is used for explaining the observed spectral distribution of the mechanical energy. These results lay the groundwork for understanding the motion of microorganisms adhered to surfaces and for developing micromechanical sensors for bacteria.

  18. Understanding young children's health beliefs and diabetes regimen adherence.

    PubMed

    Charron-Prochownik, D; Becker, M H; Brown, M B; Liang, W M; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies of chronic illness management in children have focused mainly on parents' health beliefs. However, children's health beliefs also can be an important factor in predicting adherence. Indeed, children 6 to 10 years old spend most waking hours away from home, are under less parental supervision, and are becoming more responsible for their own care. The purpose of this study was to develop a pictorial, multi-item instrument to measure dimensions of the Health Belief Model (HBM) and self-efficacy (SE), designed specifically for children with diabetes, thus making it possible to examine both the parent's and child's health beliefs; to explore the relationship between their beliefs; and to examine the extent to which these beliefs are predictors of adherence and metabolic control. PMID:7511090

  19. Patterns of Glaucoma Medication Adherence over Four Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Blachley, Taylor; Lee, Paul P.; Heisler, Michele; Farris, Karen B.; Stein, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess longer-term patterns of glaucoma medication adherence and identify whether patterns of adherence established during the first year of medication use persist during three subsequent years of follow-up. Design Retrospective longitudinal cohort analysis. Participants Beneficiaries ≥40 years old enrolled in a U.S. managed care plan for ≥7 years between 2001-2012 newly diagnosed and treated for open-angle glaucoma. Methods For each enrollee, we quantified medication adherence using the medication possession ratio. Group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) was applied to all enrollees to look for similar patterns of adherence for groups of enrollees. These patterns were described for 1 and 4 years of follow-up and analyses were performed to identify persons who experienced similar adherence patterns at 1 and 4 years and others who had dissimilar patterns. Factors impacting adherence at 1 and 4 years were identified using regression analyses. Main Outcome Measure Patterns of glaucoma medication adherence. Results Of the 1,234 eligible beneficiaries, GBTM identified five distinct glaucoma medication adherence patterns in both the one-year and four-year follow-up periods. These groups were: 1) Never adherent after their index prescription fill (7.5%,15.6% of persons in the one and four-year models, respectively); 2) Persistently very poor adherence (14.9%, 23.4%); 3) Declining adherence (9.5%, 9.1%); 4) Persistently moderate adherence (48.1%, 37.0%); and 5) Persistently good adherence (20.0%, 15.0%). Over 90% of beneficiaries in the 4 groups with the worst and best adherence patterns (Groups 1, 2, 3, 5) maintained their patterns from their first year throughout their 4 years of follow-up while those with Persistently moderate adherence (Group 4) – the largest sized group-were most likely to change groups from 1 to 4 years of follow-up. Persons with the best adherence over 4 years were more likely to be white, older age, earn >$60,000/year, and have more

  20. Ensuring patient adherence to clean intermittent self-catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Jai H; Haslam, Collette; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2014-01-01

    Patient performance of clean intermittent self-catheterization is a crucial component of the management of incomplete bladder emptying, which can arise from a variety of conditions. This allows patients to have more control over their bladder emptying, and avoids the inconveniences that come with an indwelling urethral catheter. There are, however, barriers that patients face when performing this task which may ultimately limit adherence. In this article, these barriers are discussed in more detail with potential solutions to counter them. PMID:24611001

  1. Materials Adherence Experiment on Mars Pathfinder: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hunter, G.

    1997-12-31

    The Materials Adherence Experiment (MAE) on the Pathfinder Sojourner rover will measure the dust deposition rate. By August, the Sojourner Rover on Mars Pathfinder will have completed its primary mission, and the experiment will have data on dust deposition during the first three weeks of operation on Mars. This paper will present the initial data from the experiment. This will be the first presentation of the results from the Pathfinder MAE experiment.

  2. Adherence of Model Molecules to Silica Surfaces: First Principle Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, Matías; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    The adherence of "model molecules" methylene blue and eosine Y ("positive" and "negatively" charged respectively) to crystal SiO2 surfaces is studied from first principle calculations at the DFT level. Adsorption energies are calculated which follow the experimental threads obtained elsewhere (Rivera et al., 2013). We study the quantum nature of the electronic charge transfer between the surface and the molecules, showing the localized and delocalized patterns associated to the repulsive and attractive case respectively.

  3. Ordered, adherent layers of nanofibers enabled by supramolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Highley, Christopher B.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Kim, Iris L.; Wade, Ryan J.; Burdick, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aligned nanofibrous substrates can be created by electrospinning, but methods for creating multilamellar structures of aligned fibers are limited. Here, apposed nanofibrous scaffolds with pendant β-cyclodextrin (CD) were adhered together by adamantane (Ad) modified hyaluronic acid, exploiting the guest-host interactions of CD and Ad for macroscopic assembly. Stable user-defined multi-layered scaffolds were formed for cell culture or tissue engineering. PMID:25408916

  4. Adhering grains and surface features on two Itokawa particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrică, E.; Ogliore, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the surface texture and chemical compositions of two ~40-μm particles returned from the surface regolith of asteroid Itokawa (RB-DQ04-0062 and RB-DQ04-0091) by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa mission. We identified splash melts, surface blistering, and many small adhering particles. Seven focused ion beam sections were extracted from both Itokawa particles, targeting one splash melt and ten adhering particles to investigate their composition and provenance and the role of micrometeoroid impacts on Itokawa's surface. Based on the particle's structure, mineralogy, and interface between the adhering particle and host grain, we identified lithic fragments and particles deposited by impact. These have morphologies and compositions consistent with impact-generated deposits: two have morphologies and compositions that are consistent with impact-generated silica glass, and one was a Ni-free, metallic Fe, and S-rich assemblage that was likely generated by vapor recondensation during a micrometeoroid impact. This study shows that, even though its regolith is young, micrometeoroid impacts have altered the regolith of asteroid Itokawa.

  5. Role of gelsolin in actin depolymerization of adherent human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J S; Coburn, J P; Tauber, A I; Zaner, K S

    1997-01-01

    Human neutrophils generally function adherent to an extracellular matrix. We have previously reported that upon adhesion to laminin- or fibronectin-coated, but not uncoated, plastic there is a depolymerization of actin in neutrophils. This phenomenon was not affected by inhibitors of the more well-studied components of the signal transduction pathway, specifically, pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G-proteins, H-7 or staurosporine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, or herbimycin A, an inhibitor of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. We therefore focused our attention on actin-binding proteins and measured the changes in the partitioning of gelsolin between the Triton X-100-soluble and -insoluble cellular fractions which occur upon neutrophil adhesion by means of quantitating anti-gelsolin antibody binding to aliquots of these fractions. It was found that approximately 90% of the total cellular gelsolin was found in the Triton X-100-soluble fraction in suspended cells, but that upon adherence to either fibronectin- or laminin-coated plastic about 40% of the soluble gelsolin could be detected in the insoluble fraction. This effect was not observed in cells adherent to uncoated plastic, wherein more than 90% of the gelsolin was found in the soluble fraction. Results of immunofluorescence microscopy of these cell preparations was consistent with this data. A gelsolin translocation to the insoluble cellular actin network may account for a part of the observed actin depolymerization. Images PMID:9017600

  6. Effect of ultrasound on adherent microbubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Jonathan; Sennoga, Charles; J Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2012-11-01

    An investigation into the effect of clinical ultrasound exposure on adherent microbubbles is described. A flow phantom was constructed in which targeted microbubbles were attached using biotin-streptavidin linkages. Microbubbles were insonated by broadband imaging pulses (centred at 2.25 MHz) over a range of pressures (peak negative pressure (PNP) = 60-375 kPa). Individual adherent bubbles were observed optically and classified as either being isolated or with a single neighbouring bubble. It is found that bubble detachment and deflation are two significant effects, even during low amplitude ultrasound exposure. Specifically, while at very low acoustic pressure (PNP < 75 kPa) 95% of the bubbles were not affected, at medium pressure (151 kPa < P < 225 kPa) 53% of the bubbles detached and at higher pressures (301 kPa < P < 375 kPa) 96% of the bubbles detached. In addition, more than 50% of the bubbles underwent deflation at pressures between 301 and 375 kPa. At pressures between 226 and 300 kPa, more adherent bubbles detached when there was a neighbouring bubble, suggesting the role of multiple scattering and secondary Bjerknes force on bubble detachment. The flow shear, primary and secondary Bjerknes forces exerted on each bubble were calculated and compared to the estimated forces acting on the bubble due to oscillations. The oscillation force is shown to be much higher than other forces. The mechanisms of bubble detachment are discussed.

  7. Adherence to treatment and monitoring tools: what's new?

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Maria; Baiardini, Ilaria; Solidoro, Paolo; Braido, Fulvio

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a serious global health problem affecting all age groups, with global prevalence. Although controller medications are usually highly-effective asthma treatments, patient adherence remains poor, and under-use is associated with greater health resource use, morbidity, and mortality. Up to 70-80% of patients cannot use their inhaler correctly, and similar proportions of health professionals are unable to demonstrate its correct use. A recent paper by Foster et al. explored the effectiveness of two briefs GPs' delivered intervention in improving adherence to asthma treatment and diseases control in patients with uncontrolled moderate/severe persistent asthma, in real-community setting. The results suggested that inhaler reminders may represent an effective strategy for improving adherence in primary care compared with a behavioral intervention or usual care, although this may not be reflected in differences in levels of asthma control. Studies in larger population are needed in order to test the efficacy of available technology on asthma outcomes in all age stages. PMID:27427393

  8. Adherence to pressure garment therapy in adult burn patients.

    PubMed

    Ripper, S; Renneberg, B; Landmann, C; Weigel, G; Germann, G

    2009-08-01

    Pressure garment therapy (PGT) is a generally accepted procedure to prevent hypertrophic scarring after severe burns. Wearing pressure garments is uncomfortable and challenging for the patient and, consequently adherence is low. In order to improve adherence, precise knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of PGT is necessary. In this study we investigated specific aspects which inhibit or reinforce the application of PGT on the patients' part. Twenty-one patients participated in a semi-structured interview concerning their experiences with PGT. The complaints most frequently mentioned were 'physical and functional limitations' caused by the garments, 'additional effort' created by the need to care for garments and 'perceived deficiencies' of the treatment. At the same time, most of the patients reported coping strategies used to persevere with the therapy. Coping can be categorised into 'behavioural' and 'cognitive coping strategies'. Besides the 'expectation of success', 'emotional' as well as 'practical support' and experiencing 'good outcome' were motivating factors for the patients. Based on the analyses of limitations and resources, recommendations for future interventions enhancing adherence are outlined.

  9. Namibian prisoners describe barriers to HIV antiretroviral therapy adherence.

    PubMed

    Shalihu, Nauyele; Pretorius, Louise; van Dyk, Agnes; Vander Stoep, Ann; Hagopian, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Little is available in scholarly literature about how HIV-positive prisoners, especially in low-income countries, access antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication. We interviewed 18 prisoners at a large prison in Namibia to identify barriers to medication adherence. The lead nurse researcher was a long-standing clinic employee at the prison, which afforded her access to the population. We identified six significant barriers to adherence, including (1) the desire for privacy and anonymity in a setting where HIV is strongly stigmatized; (2) the lack of simple supports for adherence, such as availability of clocks; (3) insufficient access to food to support the toll on the body of ingesting taxing ART medications; (4) commodification of ART medication; (5) the brutality and despair in the prison setting, generally leading to discouragement and a lack of motivation to strive for optimum health; and (6) the lack of understanding about HIV, how it is transmitted, and how it is best managed. Because most prisoners eventually transition back to communitysettings when their sentences are served, investments in prison health represent important investments in public health. PMID:24499371

  10. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  11. Psychosocial interventions and medication adherence in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A.; Moore, David J.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Lebowitz, Barry D.; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that psychosocial interventions can have a valuable role in reducing the substantial psychosocial disability associated with bipolar disorder. Randomized controlled trials of these interventions indicate that improvements are seen in symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and treatment adherence. These interventions systematically presented in the form of standardized treatment manuals, vary in format, duration, and theoretical basis. All are meant to augment pharmacotherapy, which represents the standard of treatment in the field. Modalities that have gathered the most empirical support include cognitive-behavioral therapy, familyfo-cused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythms therapy, and psychoeducation. The enhancement of adherence to pharmacotherapy is a common therapeutic target, due to the association of nonadherence with higher relapse rates, hospitalization, and health care costs among people with bipolar disorder. Given the complexity of nonadherence behavior, multicomponent interventions are often required. In this review, we provide an overview of the rationale, evidence base, and major psychotherapeutic approaches in bipolar disorder, focusing on the assessment and enhancement of medication adherence. PMID:18689293

  12. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks 'outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  13. Non-communicable diseases and adherence to Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Caretto, Antonio; Lagattolla, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) also known as chronic diseases last for a long time and progress generally slow. Major non-communicable diseases are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. Unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours play an important role for determining such diseases. The change in unhealthy behaviours or the maintenance of healthy lifestyles has enormous value in the reduction of diseases and longer life expectancy not only on an individual level but for the community as a whole. Recent meta-analyses reported Mediterranean diet to be an optimal diet when adopted as a whole, in order to preserve and maintain a good health status. A greater adherence score to the Mediterranean diet (2-point increase) was related to induce an 8% reduction in overall mortality, a 10% reduced risk of CVD and a 4% reduction in neoplastic diseases. However, there is no direct method in quantifying and evaluating adherence, therefore a large number of indirect indices in several studies have been proposed, with a last unifying score. Recently more and more e-health techniques such as web communication or desktop publishing (DVDs and so on) are being used, obtaining good results in the Mediterranean diet adherence. For successfully changing the unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours of the population, interventions at all levels are needed with the cooperation of Institutions, mass media, agricultural and food industry and healthcare professionals guided by expert scientific societies.

  14. Monitoring progress after lung transplantation from home-patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, S M; Snyder, M; Edin-Stibbe, C; Chlan, L; Prasad, B; Dutta, P; Lindgren, B; Wielinski, C; Hertz, M I

    1996-01-01

    A paperless electronic spirometer/diary instrument has been employed in a home monitoring programme for lung and heart-lung transplant patients at the University of Minnesota. The monitoring programme is part of a long term study to develop a system which will detect the earliest signs of developing rejection or infection in the transplanted organs. It is based on patient daily self-measurements of standard spirometry, vital signs, and symptoms recorded at home and transmitted weekly to the study data center over the telephone using a modern built into the instrument. This report summarizes adherence behaviour for 41 subjects enrolled in the study over a 12 month period. The number of subjects from whom home data has been received each week was used to measure adherence at the subject level. The number of records received each week measured adherence at the daily recording level. A data record consists of a daily set of spirometry, vital signs, and symptom values from a given subject. Approximately 82% of subjects transmitted records each week, over the 52 week review period. There was an average of 4.5 records received each week from each subject. Transmitted records had missing vital sign or symptom items in less than 2% of cases, spirometry data was always present. This evaluation showed than lung transplant recipients are willing and able to use a home-monitoring instrument, and that basic spirometry, data entry, and data transmission can be performed satisfactorily.

  15. Religious Beliefs in Schizophrenia: Their Relevance for Adherence to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Borras, L; Mohr, S; Brandt, P-Y; Gilliéron, C; Eytan, A; Huguelet, P

    2007-01-01

    The study examined how religious beliefs and practices impact upon medication and illness representations in chronic schizophrenia. One hundred three stabilized patients were included in Geneva's outpatient public psychiatric facility in Switzerland. Interviews were conducted to investigate spiritual and religious beliefs and religious practices and religious coping. Medication adherence was assessed through questions to patients and to their psychiatrists and by a systematic blood drug monitoring. Thirty-two percent of patients were partially or totally nonadherent to oral medication. Fifty-eight percent of patients were Christians, 2% Jewish, 3% Muslim, 4% Buddhist, 14% belonged to various minority or syncretic religious movements, and 19% had no religious affiliation. Two thirds of the total sample considered spirituality as very important or even essential in everyday life. Fifty-seven percent of patients had a representation of their illness directly influenced by their spiritual beliefs (positively in 31% and negatively in 26%). Religious representations of illness were prominent in nonadherent patients. Thirty-one percent of nonadherent patients and 27% of partially adherent patients underlined an incompatibility or contradiction between their religion and taking medication, versus 8% of adherent patients. Religion and spirituality contribute to shaping representations of disease and attitudes toward medical treatment in patients with schizophrenia. This dimension should be on the agenda of psychiatrists working with patients with schizophrenia. PMID:17213479

  16. Do weight loss and adherence cluster within behavioral treatment groups?

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.; Leahey, Tricia; Jeffery, Robert; Johnson, Karen C.; Hill, James O.; Coday, Mace; Espeland, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Weight loss programs are often conducted in a group format, but it is unclear whether weight losses or adherence cluster within treatment group and whether characteristics of the group (e.g. size or homogeneity) affect outcomes. We examined these questions within Look AHEAD, a multicenter study of the effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Design and Methods Weight losses and adherence (attendance, use of meal replacement products, and minutes of activity) were examined over one year of intervention in 2329 ILI participants in 209 treatment groups, which all received the same weight loss program. Results Weight losses did not cluster among members of a treatment group (intra-class correlation [ICC] of .007), whereas measures of adherence had small/moderate clustering (ICCs of .05–.11). The 209 groups varied in weight losses, with a mean of 8.64 % (SD=2.35 %, interquartile range=6.82%, 10.32%), but neither size nor baseline homogeneity of members affected the outcome. Conclusions Although these findings suggest that it may not be necessary to control for clustering in behavioral weight loss studies, they also indicate that merely treating individuals in groups is not sufficient to harness social influences on weight loss. PMID:23804576

  17. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  18. Change in Medication Adherence and Beliefs in Medicines Over Time in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Unni, Elizabeth J; Shiyanbola, Olayinka O; Farris, Karen B

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The temporal component of medication adherence is important while designing interventions to improve medication adherence. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine how medication adherence and beliefs in medicines change over time in older adults. Methods: A two-year longitudinal internet-based survey among adults 65+ years was used to collect data on medication adherence (Morisky 4-item scale) and beliefs in medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Paired t-test and one-way ANOVA determined if a change in beliefs in medicines and medication adherence over time was significant. A multiple linear regression was used to determine the significant predictors of change in medication adherence over time. Results: 436 respondents answered both baseline and follow-up surveys. Among all respondents, there was no significant change in adherence (0.58 ± 0.84 vs. 0.59 ± 0.84; p > 0.05), necessity beliefs (17.13 ± 4.31 vs. 17.10 ± 4.29; p > 0.05), or concern beliefs (11.70 ± 3.73 vs. 11.68 ± 3.77; p > 0.05) over time. For older adults with lower baseline adherence, there was a statistically significant improvement in adherence (1.45 ± 0.70 vs. 0.99 ± 0.97; p < 0.05); but no change in beliefs in medicines over time. The significant predictors of change in medication adherence over time were baseline adherence and baseline concern beliefs in medicines. Conclusion: With baseline adherence and baseline concern beliefs in medicines playing a significant role in determining change in adherence behavior over time, especially in individuals with lower adherence, it is important to alleviate medication concerns at the beginning of therapy for better adherence. PMID:26652095

  19. How Patients Take Malaria Treatment: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Adherence to Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S. Patrick; Schellenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Background High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. Objective We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. Results The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90–100%) and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. Conclusion Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report. PMID:24465418

  20. Relationship of adherence determinants and parental spirituality in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; VanDyke, Rhonda; Thurmond, Sophia; Seid, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The course of cystic fibrosis (CF) progression in children is affected by parent adherence to treatment plans. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) posits that intentions are the best behavioral predictors and that intentions reasonably follow from beliefs ("determinants"). Determinants are affected by multiple "background factors," including spirituality. This study's purpose was to understand whether two parental adherence determinants (attitude towards treatment and self-efficacy) were associated with spirituality (religious coping and sanctification of the body). We hypothesized that parents' attitudes toward treatment adherence are associated with these spiritual constructs. A convenience sample of parents of children with CF aged 3-12 years (n = 28) participated by completing surveys of adherence and spirituality during a regular outpatient clinic visit. Type and degree of religious coping was examined using principal component analysis. Adherence measures were compared based on religious coping styles and sanctification of the body using unpaired t-tests. Collaborative religious coping was associated with higher self-efficacy for completing airway clearance (M = 1070.8; SD = 35.8; P = 0.012), for completing aerosolized medication administration (M = 1077.1; SD = 37.4; P = 0.018), and for attitude towards treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.36; P = 0.038). Parents who attributed sacred qualities to their child's body (e.g., "blessed" or "miraculous") had higher mean scores for self-efficacy (airway clearance, M = 1058.6; SD = 37.7; P = 0.023; aerosols M = 1070.8; SD = 41.6; P = 0.020). Parents for whom God was manifested in their child's body (e.g., "My child's body is created in God's image") had higher mean scores for self-efficacy for airway clearance (M = 1056.4; SD = 59.0; P = 0.039), aerosolized medications (M = 1068.8; SD = 42.6; P = 0.033) and treatment utility (M

  1. Characterization of the adherence properties of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    The adherence and aggregation properties of 46 human oral Streptococcus salivarius isolates were examined. A total of 41% of the isolates aggregated with whole human saliva, 50% aggregated with human erythrocytes, and 85% adhered to human buccal epithelial cells. Strains that aggregated with saliva and erythrocytes usually reacted with Streptococcus group K typing serum whereas the non-hemagglutinating strains did not. K+ strains also adhered more strongly to human buccal epithelial cells than K- strains. All isolates coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum LF and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus 2D, 91% coaggregated with Veillonella alcalescens V1, and 50% coaggregated with Veillonella parvula V4. S. salivarius HB aggregated with saliva from 15 different human donors and aggregated with human erythrocytes irrespective of the blood group. This strain only weakly aggregated with rat saliva or rat erythrocytes. We isolated mutants which concomitantly lost the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes, aggregate with saliva, and bind to buccal epithelial cells, but retained their interbacterial aggregation properties. A second class of mutants lost the ability to coaggregate with Veillonella, but these mutants retained all of the other aggregation properties. Treatment of S. salivarius HB cells with pronase or subtilisin destroyed their ability to aggregate with saliva and erythrocytes and to bind to buccal epithelial cells. The unique characteristics of the aggregation and adherence reactions were suggested by differences in the rate of loss of activity during protease treatment and in the response to chemical modification. The presence of saliva did not affect hemagglutination and adherence to buccal epithelial cells. Binding of the salivary aggregating factor to the bacteria could be distinguished from aggregation on the basis that the latter required divalent cations. The factor involved in coaggregation with F. nucleatum LF was physicochemically different from the other

  2. Relationship of Adherence Determinants and Parental Spirituality in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; VanDyke, Rhonda; Thurmond, Sophia; Seid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary The course of cystic fibrosis (CF) progression in children is affected by parent adherence to treatment plans. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) posits that intentions are the best behavioral predictors and that intentions reasonably follow from beliefs (“determinants”). Determinants are affected by multiple “background factors,” including spirituality. This study’s purpose was to understand whether two parental adherence determinants (attitude towards treatment and self-efficacy) were associated with spirituality (religious coping and sanctification of the body). We hypothesized that parents’ attitudes toward treatment adherence are associated with these spiritual constructs. A convenience sample of parents of children with CF aged 3–12 years (n = 28) participated by completing surveys of adherence and spirituality during a regular outpatient clinic visit. Type and degree of religious coping was examined using principal component analysis. Adherence measures were compared based on religious coping styles and sanctification of the body using unpaired t-tests. Collaborative religious coping was associated with higher self-efficacy for completing airway clearance (M = 1070.8; SD = 35.8; P = 0.012), for completing aerosolized medication administration (M = 1077.1; SD = 37.4; P = 0.018), and for attitude towards treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.36; P = 0.038). Parents who attributed sacred qualities to their child’s body (e.g., “blessed” or “miraculous”) had higher mean scores for self-efficacy (airway clearance, M = 1058.6; SD = 37.7; P = 0.023; aerosols M = 1070.8; SD = 41.6; P = 0.020). Parents for whom God was manifested in their child’s body (e.g., “My child’s body is created in God’s image”) had higher mean scores for self-efficacy for airway clearance (M = 1056.4; SD = 59.0; P = 0.039), aerosolized medications (M = 1068.8; SD = 42.6; P = 0.033) and treatment utility (M = 38.8; SD = 2.4; P = 0.025). Spiritual

  3. Does Quality of Healthcare Service Determine Patient Adherence? Evidence from the Primary Healthcare Sector in India.

    PubMed

    Mekoth, Nandakumar; Dalvi, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Patient adherence is extremely important to achieve positive outcome. While quality of healthcare service has been studied as a determinant of patient satisfaction and loyalty, its impact on patient adherence has not been examined. The authors attempt to determine dimensions of quality and their impact on patient adherence in primary healthcare in India. Exploratory factor analysis resulted into seven factors. Factor scores were used for regression to identify the influence of dimensions of service quality on patient adherence. Quality of healthcare emerged as a determinant of patient adherence. PMID:26652042

  4. Adherence as therapeutic citizenship: impact of the history of access to antiretroviral drugs on adherence to treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh-Kim; Ako, Cyriaque Yapo; Niamba, Pascal; Sylla, Aliou; Tiendrébéogo, Issoufou

    2007-10-01

    A dramatic increase in the use of antiretroviral drugs in Africa has increased focus on adherence to treatment, which has so far been equivalent if not superior to that in northern contexts. The reasons for this exceptional adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we examine adherence in the historical and ethnographic context of access to treatment in Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire and Mali. Living where there is no social security and minimal, if any, medical care, individuals diagnosed with HIV are faced with the threat of illness, death, ostracism and destitution, and were obliged to negotiate conflicting networks of obligation, reciprocity, and value. HIV and AIDS programmes value efforts to address social, and indeed biological, vulnerability. In contrast, kinship-based social relationships may value individuals in other ways. These conflicting moral economies often intersect in the worlds of people living with HIV. HIV status can be used to claim resources from the public or non-governmental organization programmes. This may interfere with social networks that are the most stable source of material and emotional support. Self-help and empowerment techniques provided effective tools for people living with HIV to fashion themselves into effective advocates. In the early years of the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), access to treatment was thus mediated by confessional practices and forms of social triage. We introduce the term 'therapeutic citizenship' to describe the way in which people living with HIV appropriate ART as a set of rights and responsibilities to negotiate these at times conflicting moral economies. Exemplary adherence should be viewed through the lens of therapeutic citizenship. PMID:18090265

  5. Predictors of adherence to a brief behavioral insomnia intervention: daily process analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiter Petrov, Megan E; Lichstein, Kenneth L; Huisingh, Carrie E; Bradley, Laurence A

    2014-05-01

    Behavioral interventions for insomnia are effective in improving sleep, yet adherence is variable, and predictors of adherence have not been consistently replicated. The relationships between daily variations in state factors at the initiation of treatment and adherence have not been investigated. Using 2-week, self-report online logs, this study determined, among 53 college students with probable insomnia, the associations of pretreatment factors and daily factors during treatment on daily variations in adherence to one session of behavioral treatments for insomnia. These treatments included stimulus control therapy (SCT), sleep restriction therapy (SRT), and sleep hygiene (SH). Low self-efficacy was associated with poorer SCT and SH adherence. Participants with a "bed partner or pet" at least some of the time had better SCT adherence. Greater total sleep time and poorer sleep quality were associated with poor SCT and SRT adherence the following night. Greater sleep efficiency was related to greater next night SCT and SRT adherence. Alcohol consumption was related to poorer SRT and SH adherence the following night. Future studies should test the replicability of these findings. Adherence trials may want to test whether discouraging alcohol intake, enhancing treatment-related self-efficacy, and monitoring and providing feedback on sleep, early in treatment, affects adherence. PMID:24680236

  6. Treatment adherence in heart failure patients followed up by nurses in two specialized clinics

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andressa Freitas; Cavalcanti, Ana Carla Dantas; Malta, Mauricio; Arruda, Cristina Silva; Gandin, Thamires; da Fé, Adriana; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze treatment adherence in heart failure (HF) patients followed up by the nursing staff at specialized clinics and its association with patients' characteristics such as number of previous appointments, family structure, and comorbidities. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted at two reference clinics for the treatment of HF patients (center 1 and center 2). Data were obtained using a 10-item questionnaire with scores ranging from 0 to 26 points; adherence was considered adequate if the score was ≥ 18 points, or 70% of adherence. Results: a total of 340 patients were included. Mean adherence score was 16 (±4) points. Additionally, 124 (36.5%) patients showed an adherence rate ≥ 70%. It was demonstrated that patients who lived with their family had higher adherence scores, that three or more previous nursing appointments was significantly associated with higher adherence (p<0.001), and that hypertension was associated with low adherence (p=0.023). Conclusions: treatment adherence was considered satisfactory in less than a half of the patients followed up at the two clinics specialized in HF. Living with the family and attending to a great number of nursing appointments improved adherence, while the presence of hypertension led to worse adherence. PMID:26487139

  7. Relations between cognitive status and medication adherence in patients treated for memory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Raymond L.; Hertzog, Christopher; Czaja, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in elderly persons' health. Various studies have shown that medication non-adherence is associated with poor health status in this population. As part of a study of the effects of two interventions to promote medication adherence in patients treated for memory problems, information on medication adherence and cognitive status was collected at 3-month intervals. Twenty-seven participants (16 men, 11 women, age 71–92 years) were assigned to control or treatment conditions and adherence was evaluated with an electronic monitoring device. Cognitive status was evaluated at 3-month intervals beginning in April of 2003 and continuing through September of 2006. We have previously reported on the effectiveness of these interventions to promote adherence. In this paper, we examine the relations of cognitive status and adherence over time using a partial least squares path model in order to evaluate the extent to which adherence to cholinesterase medications was related to cognitive status. Adherence predicted cognitive status at later time points while cognition did not, in general, predict adherence. Results thus suggest that interventions to ensure high levels of medication adherence may be important for maintaining cognitive function in affected elderly people. PMID:24575293

  8. Factors associated with medication adherence in school-aged children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alistair W.; Foster, Juliet M.; Mitchell, Edwin A.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Harrison, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to preventive asthma treatment is poor, particularly in children, yet the factors associated with adherence in this age group are not well understood. Adherence was monitored electronically over 6 months in school-aged children who attended a regional emergency department in New Zealand for an asthma exacerbation and were prescribed twice-daily inhaled corticosteroids. Participants completed questionnaires including assessment of family demographics, asthma responsibility and learning style. Multivariable analysis of factors associated with adherence was conducted. 101 children (mean (range) age 8.9 (6–15) years, 51% male) participated. Median (interquartile range) preventer adherence was 30% (17–48%) of prescribed. Four explanatory factors were identified: female sex (+12% adherence), Asian ethnicity (+19% adherence), living in a smaller household (−3.0% adherence per person in the household), and younger age at diagnosis (+2.7% for every younger year of diagnosis) (all p<0.02). In school-aged children attending the emergency department for asthma, males and non-Asian ethnic groups were at high risk for poor inhaled corticosteroid adherence and may benefit most from intervention. Four factors explained a small proportion of adherence behaviour indicating the difficulty in identifying adherence barriers. Further research is recommended in other similar populations. PMID:27730181

  9. A Social Problem-Solving Model of Adherence to HIV Medications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Elliott, Timothy R.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Morin, Stephen F.; Chesney, Margaret A.

    2008-01-01

    HIV medication adherence remains a challenge and limits the degree to which treatment benefit can be maximized. The purpose of this paper is to test an explanatory model of HIV medication adherence using a social problem-solving (SPS) framework. Associations of SPS with adherence are hypothesized to be direct and/or indirect via psychological health. HIV+ adults were interviewed using validated measures of SPS, psychological health, and antiretroviral (ART) medication adherence. Structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques were employed to test hypothesized relationships and to evaluate overall fit of the model to the data. SEM supported an indirect association (but not direct) of SPS on adherence via psychological health among the 545 HIV+ adults included in the analyses. Overall, the findings resulted in a model of adherence that offered very good fit to the data and correctly classified 97% of the cases as adherent versus non-adherent. Results support the use of SPS as a conceptual framework for understanding adherence to ART. Findings offer rationale and direction for SPS interventions to enhance adherence by improving psychological health. Such approaches, if effective, have the potential to positively impact psychological well being and adherence, thereby maximizing clinical benefit from treatment, which is linked to lower mortality from AIDS. PMID:16719607

  10. Incomplete medication adherence of chronically ill patients in German primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hüther, Jakob; von Wolff, Alessa; Stange, Dorit; Härter, Martin; Baehr, Michael; Dartsch, Dorothee C; Kriston, Levente

    2013-01-01

    Background Incomplete medication adherence is a major problem in health care worldwide. Patients who adhere to medical treatment have a better prognosis and create fewer costs. Objective To assess the degree of incomplete adherence of chronically ill routine primary care patients in a German setting and analyze the association between incomplete medication adherence, as well as clinical and sociodemographic patient characteristics. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, chronically ill patients were asked to assess their adherence in primary care retrospectively using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-D) questionnaire. To investigate the association of incomplete adherence with sociodemographic and clinical data, univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results In total, 62.1% of 190 patients were categorized as incompletely adherent. The mean MARS-D score was 23.5 (standard deviation = 2.7). Analyses revealed no statistically significant associations at P < 0.05 between degree of adherence and patient characteristics. The total explained variance amounted to 11.8% (Nagelkerke’s R2 = 0.118) in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Previously reported results regarding associations of sociodemographic and clinical data with incomplete medication adherence could not be confirmed for this sample of chronically ill patients. In order to be able to provide guidelines for the reduction of incomplete medication adherence in German primary care, further research is needed. PMID:23569363

  11. The Meanings in the messages: how SMS reminders and real-time adherence monitoring improve antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Norma C.; Pisarski, Emily E.; Tam, Melanie; Wyatt, Monique A.; Atukunda, Esther; Musiimenta, Angella; Bangsberg, David R.; Haberer, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand how a pilot intervention combining SMS reminders with real-time adherence monitoring improved adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) for adults initiating treatment in rural Uganda. Design: Qualitative study, conducted with a pilot randomized controlled trial. Methods: Sixty-two pilot intervention study participants took part in qualitative interviews on: preferences for content; frequency and timing of SMS adherence reminders; understandings and experiences of SMS reminders; and understandings and experiences of real-time adherence monitoring. Analysis of interview data was inductive and derived categories describing how participants experienced the intervention, and what it meant to them. Results: SMS reminders prompted taking individual doses of antiretroviral therapy, and helped to develop a ‘habit’ of adherence. Real-time adherence monitoring was experienced as ‘being seen’; participants interpreted ‘being seen’ as an opportunity to demonstrate seriousness of commitment to treatment and ‘taking responsibility’ for adherence. Both SMS reminders and real-time monitoring were interpreted as signs of ‘caring’ by the healthcare system. Feeling ‘cared about’ offset depressed mood and invigorated adherence. Conclusion: Although serving as reminders, SMS messages and real-time adherence monitoring also had larger emotional and moral meanings for participants that they felt improved their adherence. Understanding the larger ‘meanings in the messages,’ as well as their more literal content and function, will be central in delineating how SMS reminders and other adherence interventions using cellular technology work or do not work in varying contexts. PMID:26807967

  12. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Existing Users: Self-Efficacy Enhances the Association between Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Wallace, Douglas M.; Wohlgemuth, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep disorder associated with a myriad of sequelae. OSAHS is effectively treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, fewer than 50% of patients are compliant with their CPAP therapy prescriptions. The current study sought to explore an integrated, biopsychological approach to CPAP adherence among experienced CPAP users. Methods: We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of veterans with a diagnosis of OSAHS (n = 191) who were prescribed CPAP therapy and returned for adherence download at the Miami VA Sleep Clinic. The relationships between biomedical characteristics (e.g., CPAP pressure, self-reported sleepiness, and change in sleep efficiency) and psychological factors (e.g., self-efficacy beliefs and psychological diagnoses) and objectively measured CPAP use were examined to determine whether psychological factors moderated the relationships between biomedical characteristics and CPAP adherence. Results: Hierarchical regression analyses predicting CPAP adherence (adjusting for time since CPAP prescription, age, education, prescribed CPAP pressure, daytime sleepiness, changes in sleep efficiency with CPAP, and psychiatric conditions) revealed the following: (1) CPAP self-efficacy and CPAP pressure were positively related to adherence, and (2) CPAP self-efficacy moderates the relationship between CPAP pressure and CPAP adherence. Conclusions: There was no relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence in individuals with low self-efficacy beliefs. However, for individuals with high self-efficacy beliefs, there was a significant positive relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence. Self-efficacy beliefs appear to be a prime target for focused interventions aimed at improving CPAP adherence among those individuals with higher pressure prescriptions. Citation: Dzierzewski JM, Wallace DM, Wohlgemuth WK. Adherence to continuous

  13. Satisfaction with the Health Care Provider and Regimen Adherence in Minority Youth with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Cortney J; La Greca, Annette; Valenzuela, Jessica M; Hsin, Olivia; Delamater, Alan M

    2016-09-01

    To assess whether satisfaction with the health-care provider is related to regimen adherence among primarily minority youth with type 1 diabetes. Youth with type 1 diabetes (n = 169; M age = 13.88; 52 % female; 70 % Hispanic) and their parents completed questionnaires that assessed their own satisfaction with the health-care provider and youths' adherence to diabetes self-care behaviors. Higher youth and parent patient-provider relationship satisfaction was associated with higher regimen adherence. Gender affected the relationship between satisfaction and regimen adherence, such that for girls, greater satisfaction was associated with better adherence; this was not the case for boys. Patient satisfaction with the health care provider is important for regimen adherence among primarily minority youth with type 1 diabetes, particularly for girls. Future research might focus on improving youths' relationships with their health care providers as a potential pathway to improve regimen adherence. PMID:27365095

  14. Perceived Symptom Targets of Antidepressants, Anxiolytics, and Sedatives: The Search for Modifiable Factors that Improve Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Melissa M.; Boockvar, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Expectations about treatment and beliefs about illness influence adherence in physical disorders, but the extent to which this occurs in mood disorders is unknown. Identifying modifiable factors, such as beliefs, may improve adherence to mood disorder medications. Data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys were used to examine relationships among perceived symptom targets of medication (mood only, non-mood only, mood and non-mood) and self-reported adherence to antidepressants, anxiolytics, and sedatives. The sample included 807 community-dwelling individuals with and without depression and anxiety who regularly took one of these medications in the year before the survey. Slightly over half (53.2%) of respondents were adherent. Perceived medication purpose was only significantly related to adherence among Latino respondents. Latino respondents who viewed their symptom target as non-mood only were the most adherent. Perceived symptom targets of medications were not associated with most patients’ adherence behaviors for antidepressants, anxiolytics, and sedatives. PMID:23702612

  15. Health literacy and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected youth.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Neu, Natalie; Toussi, Sima; Nelson, John; Larson, Elaine L

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy has been associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults, but this association has not been demonstrated in HIV-infected adolescents. Using an expanded health literacy model, we examined the relationship between health literacy, functional literacy, beliefs about ART, media use, and adherence to ART. A convenience sample of HIV-infected adolescents (n = 50) was recruited for this cross-sectional study. The primary outcome of adherence was measured with 3-day self-reports. Health literacy as measured by the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) was not predictive of adherence (p = .15). Participants with higher positive outcome expectancy scores regarding ART were more likely to report 100% adherence, and participants with below-grade-level reading were less likely to report 100% adherence (p < .05). Our findings highlight the importance of assessing both health beliefs and reading skills as part of adherence support for HIV-infected youth.

  16. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli on cotton, polyester and their blends.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y L; Merry, J

    1986-06-01

    The adherent behaviour of the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli on cotton, polyester and their blends through contact in aqueous suspensions was studied. Staphylococcus epidermidis was found to adhere to fabrics much more so than Staph. aureus. The adherence of both Staph. epidermidis and Staph. aureus to fabrics increased as the content of polyester fibres in the fabrics increased. The attachment of E. coli to all fabrics was very low and was not affected by the fibre contents. Total numbers of adherent bacteria on cotton and polyester fabrics were related directly to the concentrations of the bacterial suspensions. The extents of adherence, expressed by the percentage of adherent bacteria from the suspension, however, were independent of the concentration. The length of contact with bacteria was also found to affect the adherence of bacteria on fabrics studied.

  17. Substance use, medication adherence and outcome one year following a first episode of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Colizzi, Marco; Carra, Elena; Fraietta, Sara; Lally, John; Quattrone, Diego; Bonaccorso, Stefania; Mondelli, Valeria; Ajnakina, Olesya; Dazzan, Paola; Trotta, Antonella; Sideli, Lucia; Kolliakou, Anna; Gaughran, Fiona; Khondoker, Mizanur; David, Anthony S; Murray, Robin M; MacCabe, James H; Di Forti, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Both substance use and poor medication adherence are associated with poor outcome in psychosis. To clarify the contributions of substance use and poor medication adherence to poor outcome in the year following a first episode of psychosis, 205 patients were evaluated for use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and stimulants at their psychosis onset, and in a 1-year follow-up. Data on medication adherence and symptom remission were also collected. Patients had high rates of overall substance use before (37-65%) and after psychosis onset (45-66%). 44% showed poor medication adherence and 55% did not reach remission from psychosis. Nicotine dependence and cannabis use after psychosis onset significantly predicted both poor medication adherence and non-remission, and poor medication adherence mediated the effects of these substances on non-remission. In conclusion, medication adherence lies on the causal pathway between nicotine dependence and cannabis on the one hand and non-remission on the other. PMID:26718334

  18. Adherence to preventive recommendations: experience of a cohort presenting for executive health care.

    PubMed

    Shippee, Nathan D; Mullan, Rebecca J; Nabhan, Mohammed; Kermott, Cindy A; Hagen, Philip T; Rhodes, Deborah J; Montori, Victor M; Murad, M Hassan

    2012-04-01

    Adherence to recommended preventive services and immunizations in adults is suboptimal and often associated with socioeconomic status, race, and access to care. The aim of this study is to evaluate adherence in a cohort without these barriers to ascertain realistically optimal adherence rates and to examine remaining barriers among relatively advantaged individuals. Specifically, it employed a sample of 6889 patients presenting for executive health care from 2005 to 2009. Adherence varied across colorectal cancer screening (79%), mammography (89%), cervical cancer screening (91%), tetanus immunization (82%), and pneumococcal vaccination (62%). Multivariate logistic regressions revealed that age, education, alcohol use concerns, and being married were positively associated with adherence to certain services. Individuals without the usual barriers to care have variable, less-than-ideal rates of adherence to preventive services, which correlate with some health behaviors and demographics. Understanding the predictors of adherence may inform quality improvement processes aimed at optimizing disease prevention.

  19. Adherence to antidepressant treatment: what the doctor thinks and what the patient says.

    PubMed

    Loayza, N; Crettol, S; Riquier, F; Eap, C B

    2012-07-01

    Adherence to antidepressant treatment has been shown to range from 30 to 70%. The aim of this study was to compare the patient's self-report of adherence with the doctors' estimation of adherence and therapeutic alliance in 104 outpatients with mood and/or anxiety disorder treated with antidepressants. The adherence scores estimated by the patients and the doctors were significantly different, the doctors underestimating adherence in 29% of cases and overestimating it in 31% of cases compared to the patients' evaluation. Adherence measured by drug plasma concentration, despite being higher than expected from previously published reports, was in line with the patients' self-reported score but not the doctors' estimation. Finally, the patients' and the doctors' Helping Alliance scores were not related to adherence self-report.

  20. Stressors May Compromise Medication Adherence among Adults with Diabetes and Low Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Mayberry, Lindsay S.; Wagner, Julie A.; Welch, Garry W.

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the impact of stressors on diabetes self-care have been limited by focusing on a single stressor or have been largely qualitative. Therefore, we assessed the stressors experienced by a high-risk population with type 2 diabetes, and tested whether having more stressors was associated with less adherence to multiple self-care behaviors. Participants were recruited from a Federally Qualified Health Center and 192 completed a stressors checklist. Experiencing more stressors was associated with less adherence to diet recommendations and medications among participants who were trying to be adherent, but was not associated with adherence to other self-care behaviors. Because having more stressors was also associated with more depressive symptoms, we further adjusted for depressive symptoms; stressors remained associated with less adherence to medications, but not to diet recommendations. For adults engaged in adherence, experiencing numerous chronic stressors presents barriers to adherence that are distinct from associated depressive symptoms. PMID:24569697

  1. Self-Efficacy and Depression as Mediators of the Relationship between Pain and Antiretroviral Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Karina M.; Cooperman, Nina A.; Newville, Howard; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the association between pain and antiretroviral adherence, and to estimate the mediating effect of adherence self-efficacy and depression symptom severity. Surveys using audio computer-assisted self-interview were conducted among 70 HIV-infected current and former drug users enrolled in a methadone program. We assessed antiretroviral adherence and adherence self-efficacy using questions from the Adult Clinical Trials Group survey. We considered participants adherent if they reported taking at least 95% of prescribed antiretrovirals over the past seven days. We assessed depression symptom severity using the depression subscale of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Participants reported pain of any duration in response to a question from the Brief Pain Inventory. Participants reporting pain were 87% less likely to be classified as adherent compared to those without pain [ORunadj = 0.13 (95%CI 0.03–0.52)]. When we examined adherence self-efficacy as a mediator of the relationship between pain and adherence, criteria for partial mediation were met. Adjusting for self-efficacy, the beta coefficient for pain decreased by 23% but the independent relationship between pain and antiretroviral adherence was maintained. Mediation criteria were not met when we examined the mediating effect of depression symptom severity on the relationship between pain and adherence. Adjusting for depression symptom severity, the beta coefficient for pain decreased by 9% and the relationship between pain and antiretroviral adherence remained significant. Our results indicate that neither adherence self-efficacy nor depression symptom severity fully mediated the relationship between pain and adherence. HIV providers should recognize the potential impact of pain on antiretroviral adherence among current and former drug users. PMID:19229695

  2. Adherence to Technology-Mediated Insomnia Treatment: A Meta-Analysis, Interviews, and Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Lancee, Jaap; Beun, Robbert Jan; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment as a solid base for improving those adherence rates by applying adherence-enhancing strategies. Methods Adherence to technology-mediated sleep products was studied in three ways. First, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate adherence rates in technology-mediated insomnia therapy. Several databases were queried for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. After inclusion and exclusion steps, data from 18 studies were retrieved and aggregated to find an average adherence rate. Next, 15 semistructured interviews about sleep-support technologies were conducted to investigate perceived adherence. Lastly, several scenarios were written about the usage of a virtual sleep coach that could support adherence rates. The scenarios were discussed in six different focus groups consisting of potential users (n=15), sleep experts (n=7), and coaches (n=9). Results From the meta-analysis, average treatment adherence appeared to be approximately 52% (95% CI 43%-61%) for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. This means that, on average, half of the treatment exercises were not executed, suggesting there is a substantial need for adherence and room for improvement in this area. However, the users in the interviews believed they adhered quite well to their sleep products. Users mentioned relying on personal commitment (ie, willpower) for therapy adherence. Participants of the focus groups reconfirmed their belief in the effectiveness of personal commitment, which they regarded as more effective than adherence-enhancing strategies. Conclusions Although adherence rates for insomnia interventions indicate extensive room for improvement, users might not consider adherence to

  3. Statin adherence and risk of acute cardiovascular events among women: a cohort study accounting for time-dependent confounding affected by previous adherence

    PubMed Central

    Lavikainen, Piia; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Eerola, Mervi; Fang, Gang; Hartikainen, Juha; Huupponen, Risto; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies on the effect of statin adherence on cardiovascular events in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease have adjusted for time-dependent confounding, but potentially introduced bias into their estimates as adherence and confounders were measured simultaneously. We aimed to evaluate the effect when accounting for time-dependent confounding affected by previous adherence as well as time sequence between factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Finnish healthcare registers. Participants Women aged 45–64 years initiating statin use for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in 2001–2004 (n=42 807). Outcomes Acute cardiovascular event defined as a composite of acute coronary syndrome and acute ischaemic stroke was our primary outcome. Low-energy fractures were used as a negative control outcome to evaluate the healthy-adherer effect. Results During the 3-year follow-up, 474 women experienced the primary outcome event and 557 suffered a low-energy fracture. The causal HR estimated with marginal structural model for acute cardiovascular events for all the women who remained adherent (proportion of days covered ≥80%) to statin therapy during the previous adherence assessment year was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.94) when compared with everybody remaining non-adherent (proportion of days covered <80%). The result was robust against alternative model specifications. Statin adherers had a potentially reduced risk of experiencing low-energy fractures compared with non-adherers (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.07). Conclusions Our study, which took into account the time dependence of adherence and confounders, as well as temporal order between these factors, is support for the concept that adherence to statins in women in primary prevention decreases the risk of acute cardiovascular events by about one-fifth in comparison to non-adherence. However, part of the observed effect of statin adherence on acute cardiovascular events

  4. Medication adherence in the asthmatic child and adolescent.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mauli; Oppenheimer, John J

    2011-12-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory condition affecting more than 7 million children in the United States alone, and tens of millions more globally. Despite effective preventive medications, medication nonadherence in children and adolescents is alarmingly high. Nonadherence can result in poor asthma control, which leads to decreased quality of life, lost productivity, increased health care utilization, and even the risk of death. Nonadherence in children and adolescents deserves special attention because they face unique barriers to adherence that change with age. Young children depend on adults for the delivery of asthma care, and their care is strongly influenced by parental motivation and attitudes and the home environment. As these children enter adolescence, they typically assume responsibility for their asthma care at the same time that they are claiming their independence and possibly experimenting with high-risk behaviors. Morbidity and mortality, as well as nonadherence, appear to be greatest among adolescents and minority children. Although no perfect tool for measuring adherence exists, objective methods, such as electronic monitoring, can provide valuable information to health care providers. Beyond asthma self-management and education, no specific resource-heavy adherence interventions have proven consistently helpful. However, large-scale, well-designed studies on this subject are lacking. In light of the fact that nonadherence is a potentially modifiable factor that impacts on morbidity and mortality, it is worth pursuing further research to determine better interventions. It is likely, however, that no one answer exists, and interventions will need to be tailored to specific at-risk populations. PMID:21968618

  5. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  6. [Adherence to cardioprotective medications in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Mazzone, Carmine; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease relies on evidence-based medications such as beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers, aspirin and statins, which are considered cornerstones to control symptoms, improve quality of life, reduce future events, and prolong survival. In spite of the clear benefits of therapy, previous studies have shown differences between the large randomized populations and the "real world" about long-term treatment in terms of efficacy, tolerability, costs, side effects and drug interactions. Moreover, a different awareness of the patient's compliance has been highlighted in relation to the setting (hospital, family doctor, etc.). The analysis and assessment of the prescription and efficacy of therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease represent one of the most important challenges for the healthcare system, because reliable data are necessary to verify usefulness and results of therapy, prescribed at discharge after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery bypass graft, but above all the actual application of treatments should be pursued in every clinical setting. The Cardiology School of the Trieste University has constituted a working group of cardiology students that during the year 2009 will enroll and follow for 1 year all patients with coronary artery disease discharged from the Cardiovascular Department and Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Trieste to assess: (1) if evidence-based medicine for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease is applied in the Trieste area; (2) adherence to prescribed treatment; (3) factors that are associated with non-adherence and consequences of non-adherence. PMID:19475879

  7. Long-range attraction of particles adhered to lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric R

    2016-07-01

    Many biological systems fold thin sheets of lipid membrane into complex three-dimensional structures. This microscopic origami is often mediated by the adsorption and self-assembly of proteins on a membrane. As a model system to study adsorption-mediated interactions, we study the collective behavior of micrometric particles adhered to a lipid vesicle. We estimate the colloidal interactions using a maximum likelihood analysis of particle trajectories. When the particles are highly wrapped by a tense membrane, we observe strong long-range attractions with a typical binding energy of 150k_{B}T and significant forces extending a few microns. PMID:27575176

  8. Surgical Strategy for Thoracic Aortic Pseudoaneurysm with Sternal Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Sachiko; Iida, Yasunori; Misumi, Takahiko; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    A thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a life-threatening complication following thoracic aortic surgery. We describe a surgical strategy for this pseudoaneurysm with a high risk for rupture during median sternotomy. The pseudoaneurysm was distended and widely adherent to the posterior sternum. Elective cardiopulmonary bypass and moderate hypothermia were established, and sternotomy was performed without left ventricle distention or brain ischemia. Total arch replacement was successful and the patient was discharged on post operative day (POD) 18. A key surgical strategy was to avoid ventricular fibrillation before sternotomy. Appropriate sternotomy timing and perfusion strategy are crucial for successful treatment.

  9. Improving adherence to hand hygiene practice: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, D.

    2001-01-01

    Hand hygiene prevents cross-infection in hospitals, but health-care workers' adherence to guidelines is poor. Easy, timely access to both hand hygiene and skin protection is necessary for satisfactory hand hygiene behavior. Alcohol- based hand rubs may be better than traditional handwashing as they require less time, act faster, are less irritating, and contribute to sustained improvement in compliance associated with decreased infection rates. This article reviews barriers to appropriate hand hygiene and risk factors for noncompliance and proposes strategies for promoting hand hygiene. PMID:11294714

  10. Electroporation chip for adherent cells on photochemically modified polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrich, Michael; Rebollar, Esther; Heitz, Johannes; Frischauf, Irene; Romanin, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    We present a polytetrafluoroethylene electroporation microchip with integrated electrodes for transfection of adherent biological cells. For fabrication, UV-surface modification was employed in combination with metal deposition. UV irradiation in reactive atmosphere resulted in introduction of polar chemical groups into the polytetrafluoroethylene surface for significant adhesion enhancement of both biological cells as well as metal electrodes thereon. Electroporation was demonstrated by transfection of human embryonic kidney cells with the enhanced green fluorescent protein. Transparent, working at low voltages, and easy to handle, this chip yields the potential to reduce the amount of sequential working steps necessary for transfection.

  11. Long-range attraction of particles adhered to lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2016-07-01

    Many biological systems fold thin sheets of lipid membrane into complex three-dimensional structures. This microscopic origami is often mediated by the adsorption and self-assembly of proteins on a membrane. As a model system to study adsorption-mediated interactions, we study the collective behavior of micrometric particles adhered to a lipid vesicle. We estimate the colloidal interactions using a maximum likelihood analysis of particle trajectories. When the particles are highly wrapped by a tense membrane, we observe strong long-range attractions with a typical binding energy of 150 kBT and significant forces extending a few microns.

  12. Adherence and Persistence With Oral Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer in CALGB 49907: Adherence Companion Study 60104

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Ann H.; Archer, Laura; Kornblith, Alice B.; Gralow, Julie; Grenier, Debjani; Perez, Edith; Wolff, Antonio C.; Wang, Xiaofei; Kastrissios, Helen; Berry, Donald; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric; Muss, Hyman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patient adherence is critical in evaluating the effectiveness of an oral therapy. We sought to measure adherence among women randomly assigned to capecitabine in a preplanned substudy of a multicenter clinical trial. Patients and Methods Cancer and Leukemia Group B study CALGB 49907 was a randomly assigned trial comparing standard chemotherapy versus oral chemotherapy with capecitabine in patients age 65 years or older with early-stage breast cancer. We used microelectronic monitoring system (MEMS) caps on participants' capecitabine bottles to record pill bottle openings. Capecitabine was given in two divided daily doses for 14 consecutive days of a 21-day cycle for six cycles. Adherence was calculated as the number of doses taken divided by doses expected, taking into account toxicity-related dosing changes. A participant was defined as adherent if 80% or more of expected doses were recorded by MEMS. Results Overall, 161 patients were enrolled. Median age was 71 years (range, 65 to 89 years); 124 patients (83%) persisted with capecitabine to completion of planned protocol therapy. Adherence was 78% across all cycles, and adherence did not vary by cycle (P = .32). Twenty-five percent of participants took fewer than 80% of expected doses and were nonadherent. In a logistic regression model, participants with node-negative disease (P = .01) and mastectomy (P = .01) were more likely to be nonadherent. Adherence was not related to age, tumor stage, or hormone receptor status. Adherence was not significantly associated with relapse-free survival or grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Conclusion Most older women with early-stage breast cancer were adherent to short-term oral chemotherapy in a randomized clinical trial. Age was not associated with adherence. PMID:20368559

  13. FEM-PrEP: Adherence Patterns and Factors Associated With Adherence to a Daily Oral Study Product for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Deese, Jennifer; Wang, Meng; Taylor, Doug; Ahmed, Khatija; Agot, Kawango; Lombaard, Johan; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Kashuba, Angela; Van Damme, Lut

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several clinical trials have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), with or without emtricitabine (FTC), as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for reducing the risk of HIV acquisition. Adherence to the study product was insufficient to demonstrate the effectiveness of FTC/TDF in 2 PrEP clinical trials conducted among women (FEM-PrEP and the Vaginal and Oral Interventions to Control the Epidemic study), but further analyses of adherence in these studies may inform PrEP demonstration projects and future HIV prevention clinical trials. Methods: We randomly selected a subcohort of 150 participants randomized to FTC/TDF in 3 FEM-PrEP sites (Bondo, Kenya; Bloemfontein, South Africa; and Pretoria, South Africa) to examine adherence levels over time and to assess factors associated with adherence, based on plasma tenofovir and intracellular tenofovir diphosphate drug concentrations in specimens collected at 4-week visit intervals. Results: We observed drug concentrations consistent with good adherence in 28.5% of all visit intervals when drug was available to use, but only 12% of participants achieved good adherence throughout their study participation. In multivariate analysis, the Bloemfontein site [odds ratio (OR): 2.43; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 4.48] and liking the pill color (OR: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.18 to 7.27) were positively associated with good adherence, whereas using oral contraceptive pills at enrollment was negatively associated with good adherence (OR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.74). Conclusions: Most participants did not regularly adhere to the study product throughout their trial participation, although a small minority did. Few factors associated with good adherence to the study product were identified in FEM-PrEP. PMID:25157647

  14. Cohort Study of Medication Adherence in Older Adults (CoSMO): Extended effects of Hurricane Katrina on medication adherence among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Islam, T; Muntner, P; Webber, LS; Morisky, DE; Krousel-Wood, MA

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that many patients with hypertension ran out of medications and had difficulties getting refills immediately after Hurricane Katrina. The extended effect of Hurricane Katrina on antihypertensive medication adherence is not well characterized. Methods Data were analyzed for 2194 participants who completed the baseline survey for the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults between August 2006 and September 2007. Based on pre-Katrina zip codes, the study population was categorized into high and low affected areas. Low medication adherence was defined as a score less than 6 on the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Results Prevalence of low adherence was similar among participants living in high and low affected areas. Low medication adherence was similar for participants with greater than or less than 25% of the residence damaged by Hurricane Katrina and for participants with and without symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. In high affected areas, non-significant associations were present for those who had moved since the storm and those with a friend or immediate family member who had died in the month following the storm. These factors were not associated with low medication adherence in low affected areas. In both high and low affected areas, lower scores on the hurricane coping self-efficacy scale were associated with low medication adherence (p <0.05). Conclusions The effect of Hurricane Katrina on patient adherence to antihypertensive medication was limited in the second year following the storm. Intrinsic patient factors, such as low coping self-efficacy, remain important factors associated with low adherence. PMID:18703902

  15. Adherence to Interferon β-1b Treatment in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Oscar; Agüera, Javier; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Millán-Pascual, Javier; Ramió i Torrentà, Lluis; Oliva, Pedro; Argente, Javier; Berdei, Yasmina; Soler, Jose Maria; Carmona, Olga; Errea, Jose Maria; Farrés, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to interferon β-1b (INFβ-1b) therapy is essential to maximize the beneficial effects of treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS). For that reason, the main objectives of this study are to assess adherence to INFβ-1b in patients suffering from MS in Spain, and to identify the factors responsible for adherence in routine clinical practice. Methodology/Principal Findings This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study including 120 Spanish patients with MS under INFβ-1b treatment. Therapeutic adherence was assessed with Morisky-Green test and with the percentage of doses received. The proportion of adherent patients assessed by Morisky-Green test was 68.3%, being indicative of poor adherence. Nevertheless, the percentage of doses received, which was based on the number of injected medication, was 94.3%. The main reason for missing INFβ-1b injections was forgetting some of the administrations (64%). Therefore, interventions that diminish forgetfulness might have a positive effect in the proportion of adherent patients and in the percentage of doses received. In addition, age and comorbidities had a significant effect in the number of doses injected per month, and should be considered in the management of adherence in MS patients. Conclusion/Significance Among all the available methods for assessing adherence, the overall consumption of the intended dose has to be considered when addressing adherence. PMID:22615737

  16. Adherence is a multi-dimensional construct in the POUNDS LOST trial.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Anton, Stephen D; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Allen, Ray; LeBlanc, Eric; Ryan, Donna H; McManus, Katherine; Laranjo, Nancy; Carey, Vincent J; Loria, Catherine M; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M

    2010-02-01

    Research on the conceptualization of adherence to treatment has not addressed a key question: Is adherence best defined as being a uni-dimensional or multi-dimensional behavioral construct? The primary aim of this study was to test which of these conceptual models best described adherence to a weight management program. This ancillary study was conducted as a part of the POUNDS LOST trial that tested the efficacy of four dietary macronutrient compositions for promoting weight loss. A sample of 811 overweight/obese adults was recruited across two clinical sites, and each participant was randomly assigned to one of four macronutrient prescriptions: (1) Low fat (20% of energy), average protein (15% of energy); (2) High fat (40%), average protein (15%); (3) Low fat (20%), high protein (25%); (4) High fat (40%), high protein (25%). Throughout the first 6 months of the study, a computer tracking system collected data on eight indicators of adherence. Computer tracking data from the initial 6 months of the intervention were analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory analyses. Two factors (accounting for 66% of the variance) were identified and confirmed: (1) behavioral adherence and (2) dietary adherence. Behavioral adherence did not differ across the four interventions, but prescription of a high fat diet (vs. a low fat diet) was found to be associated with higher levels of dietary adherence. The findings of this study indicated that adherence to a weight management program was best conceptualized as being multi-dimensional, with two dimensions: behavioral and dietary adherence.

  17. Language use and adherence to multiple cancer preventive health behaviors among Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Oh, April; Dodd, Kevin; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Perna, Frank M; Berrigan, David

    2011-10-01

    Hispanics have lower cancer mortality rates than non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks, despite demographic profiles previously associated with higher cancer mortality. Differences in adherence to multiple cancer-preventive behaviors by acculturation may offer one explanation for this "Hispanic paradox," but the relationship is not well understood. We examined this relationship using the 2000 National Health Interview Survey, which provides cross-sectional data on a nationally representative sample of US Hispanics. Multinomial logistic regression models estimated relationships between language use (a measure of acculturation) and patterns of adherence, by gender, to multiple cancer-preventive health behaviors using adherence scores. Hispanics had greater odds of adherence to multiple behaviors compared to Non-Hispanics (OR = 2.76 [2.27, 3.36]). Hispanics with greater English language use had lower odds of adherence (OR = 0.45 [0.29, 0.69]). Women were more adherent than men (P < 0.01) and their language use was associated with patterns of behavioral adherence more so than among men. Differences by gender and language use were identified in patterns of adherence to behavioral recommendations among the Hispanic population. Greater English language use was negatively associated with tobacco, alcohol, fruit and vegetable recommendation adherence but not with exercise. Study findings support evidence behaviors occur in combination and contributes to understanding of the role of language use in patterns of behavioral adherence.

  18. Suboptimal inhaler medication adherence and incorrect technique are common among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna B; Percival, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are routinely prescribed one or more inhaled medications. Adherence to inhaler medications and correct inhaler device technique are crucial to successful COPD management. The goals of this study were to estimate adherence and inhaler technique in a cohort of COPD patients. This was an observational study conducted on a sample of 150 COPD patients. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Inhaler technique was assessed using standardized checklists. Clinical data were collected using a proforma. Of the 150 patients (mean age 70.3 years, 52% male), 58% reported suboptimal adherence (MARS ≤ 24). High adherence to therapy (MARS = 25) was associated with older age (p = 0.001), but not any of the other studied variables. Medication non-adherence was not associated with COPD exacerbations. Errors (≥ 1) in inhaler technique were common across all of the types of inhaler devices reportedly used by patients, with the highest proportion of errors among Turbuhaler users (83%) and the least proportion of errors among Handihaler users (50%). No clinical variables were associated with errors in inhaler technique. Suboptimal adherence and errors in inhaler technique are common among COPD patients. No clinical variables to assist in the prediction of medication non-adherence and poor inhaler technique were identifiable. Consequently, regular assessment of medication adherence and inhaler technique should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to facilitate improved health outcomes among patients with COPD. PMID:26396159

  19. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life. PMID:27698597

  20. Predictors and Correlates of Follow-up Visit Adherence among Adolescents Receiving Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom B.; Kaplan, Simona; Brewer, Stephanie K.; Zitsman, Jeffrey L.; Devlin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence behaviors have not been examined among adolescents undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). In addition, studies of youth receiving bariatric surgery have not considered the influence of psychopathology on postoperative adherence. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate predictors and correlates of adherence to post-surgery visits among a sample of adolescents undergoing LAGB. Setting Psychiatry Department, University Medical Center, United States. Methods Postoperative visits with surgical staff were analyzed over the two years following surgery (n= 101 adolescents). Growth mixture modeling examined trends in adherence. Results A three-class solution provided the best fit to the data. The classes from the final model were characterized by class 1 (61.6%) demonstrating high levels of adherence over the 24 months following LAGB, class 2 (28.5%) showing a more gradual decline in adherence, and class 3 (9.9%) with an accelerated decline in adherence. Higher levels of preoperative depressive symptoms and more preoperative episodes of loss of control over eating decreased the likelihood of adherence. Class 3 adolescents had significantly higher estimated 24-month body mass indices than Classes 1 or 2. Conclusions Variable patterns of follow-up visit adherence were identified among adolescents receiving LAGB, which were predicted by depressive symptoms and loss of control over eating. The trajectory characterized by a rapid decline in adherence to follow-up visits was also associated with less weight loss. PMID:25066443

  1. Behavioral Predictors of Medication Adherence Trajectories among Youth with Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Kristin; Rausch, Joseph R.; Modi, Avani C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to identify psychosocial predictors of two-year antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence trajectories among youth with newly diagnosed epilepsy, controlling for known demographic and medical factors. Method This study is part of a large, prospective, longitudinal observational study of AED adherence and medical outcomes in youth with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Parents completed questionnaires of psychosocial and family functioning at one-month and one-year following diagnosis. Chart review and questionnaires were used to collect medical variables and seizure outcomes. Previously established two-year AED adherence trajectories (Severe Early Non-Adherence, Variable Non-Adherence, Moderate Non-Adherence, High Adherence) were used as the outcome variable. Results Participants were 91 parents of youth with epilepsy (7.3 ± 2.8 years of age; 60% male) and their families. Early (one-month following diagnosis) predictors of two-year adherence trajectories included socioeconomic status, epilepsy knowledge, family problem-solving, and family communication. Significant predictors one-year following diagnosis included socioeconomic status, parent fears and concerns, and parent life stress. Conclusion There are modifiable parent and family variables that predict two-year adherence trajectories above and beyond known medical (e.g., seizures, side effects) factors. Psychosocial interventions delivered at key points during the course of epilepsy treatment could have a positive impact on adherence outcomes. PMID:26209946

  2. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life.

  3. Ethnic Disparities in Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Medicare Part D Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Holly M.; Luo, Ruili; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Elting, Linda S.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria; Goodwin, James S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nonadherence to antihypertensive medication is common and leads to adverse health outcomes. The Medicare Part D prescription drug program has decreased cost and increased access to medications, thus potentially improving medication adherence. OBJECTIVES To determine the level of adherence and characteristics of Part D beneficiaries associated with higher levels of antihypertensive medication adherence. DESIGN Retrospective analysis using Medicare claims and Part D event files for 2007. PARTICIPANTS Medicare Part D enrollees with prevalent uncomplicated hypertension who filled at least one antihypertensive prescription in 2006 and two prescriptions in 2007. MEASUREMENTS Medication adherence was defined by an average Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) of 80% or greater. Potential factors associated with adherence evaluated included age, sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic factors, comorbidity, medication use, copay, being in the coverage gap, and number of unique prescribers. RESULTS Among 168,522 Medicare Part D enrollees with prevalent uncomplicated hypertension receiving antihypertensive medicines in 2007, overall adherence was 79.5%. In univariate analysis, adherence varied significantly by most patient factors. In multivariable analysis, decreased odds of adherence persisted for blacks (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.51–0.55), Hispanics (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.55–0.61) and other non-white races (OR 0.80 95% CI 0.75–0.85) compared to whites. Increased comorbidity and concurrent medication use were also associated with reduced adherence. Adherence was significantly different across several geographic regions. CONCLUSION We identified a number of associations with patient factors and medication adherence to antihypertensive drugs, with significant differences in adherence by ethnicity. Improving adherence could have significant public health implications and could improve outcomes specific to hypertension as well as improved cost and healthcare utilization. PMID

  4. Heparin-mediated inhibition of Chlamydia psittaci adherence to HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martín, C B; Ojcius, D M; Hsia, R; Hellio, R; Bavoil, P M; Dautry-Varsat, A

    1997-01-01

    The adherence of human strains of Chlamydia trachomatis has been recently shown to be inhibitable by heparin and heparitinase, leading to the proposal that Chlamydia binding to host cells may be mediated by a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent mechanism. We here describe the adherence of the guinea-pig pathogen, Chlamydia psittaci GPIC, to HeLa cells, which was measured by cytofluorometry with chlamydiae whose DNA was fluorescently labelled. Adherence could be inhibited by heat or trypsin pretreatment of the bacteria, and binding was much faster at 37 degrees C (reaching a plateau within 1 h) than 4 degrees C. Little binding remained when host cells were pre-fixed with paraformaldehyde, suggesting that host cell receptor mobility may be required for effective adherence. Visualization by confocal microscopy confirmed that the bacteria were at or near the host cell surface during the entire time-course of these experiments. Adherence increased as a function of pH between pH 6 and pH 8.0-8.5. Both adherence and infection of HeLa cells could be inhibited with heparin when the adherence step was performed at 4 degrees C, but only infection was inhibited when the adherence step was performed at 37 degrees C, even though heparitinase could block adherence at either 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Even at 4 degrees C, heparin-mediated inhibition was significantly lower at pH 8 than pH 7.4, suggesting that GAG-independent mechanisms may play a role in the higher adherence observed at basic pH. These results therefore demonstrate that a GAG-dependent adherence step may be operative in C. psittaci, and raise the possibility that other adherence mechanisms may also contribute to binding by this chlamydial strain. Furthermore, they suggest that there may not be a strict correlation between C. psittaci adherence and the ability to cause productive infections.

  5. Adherence to guidelines and protocols in the prehospital and emergency care setting: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Remco H A; Vloet, Lilian C M; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Meijer, Sanne; Mintjes-de Groot, Joke A J; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    A gap between guidelines or protocols and clinical practice often exists, which may result in patients not receiving appropriate care. Therefore, the objectives of this systematic review were (1) to give an overview of professionals' adherence to (inter)national guidelines and protocols in the emergency medical dispatch, prehospital and emergency department (ED) settings, and (2) to explore which factors influencing adherence were described in studies reporting on adherence. PubMed (including MEDLINE), CINAHL, EMBASE and the Cochrane database for systematic reviews were systematically searched. Reference lists of included studies were also searched for eligible studies. Identified articles were screened on title, abstract and year of publication (≥1990) and were included when reporting on adherence in the eligible settings. Following the initial selection, articles were screened full text and included if they concerned adherence to a (inter)national guideline or protocol, and if the time interval between data collection and publication date was <10 years. Finally, articles were assessed on reporting quality. Each step was undertaken by two independent researchers. Thirty-five articles met the criteria, none of these addressed the emergency medical dispatch setting or protocols. Median adherence ranged from 7.8-95% in the prehospital setting, and from 0-98% in the ED setting. In the prehospital setting, recommendations on monitoring came with higher median adherence percentages than treatment recommendations. For both settings, cardiology treatment recommendations came with relatively low median adherence percentages. Eight studies identified patient and organisational factors influencing adherence. The results showed that professionals' adherence to (inter)national prehospital and emergency department guidelines shows a wide variation, while adherence in the emergency medical dispatch setting is not reported. As insight in influencing factors for adherence in the

  6. Adherence Determinants in Cystic Fibrosis: Cluster Analysis of Parental Psychosocial, Religious, and/or Spiritual Factors

    PubMed Central

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Britton, LaCrecia L.; Siracusa, Christopher M.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Chini, Barbara A.; Dimitriou, Sophia M.; Seid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Cystic fibrosis is a progressive disease requiring a complex, time-consuming treatment regimen. Nonadherence may contribute to an acceleration of the disease process. Spirituality influences some parental healthcare behaviors and medical decision-making. Objectives: We hypothesized that parents of children with cystic fibrosis, when classified into groups based on adherence rates, would share certain psychosocial and religious and/or spiritual variables distinguishing them from other adherence groups. Methods: We conducted a multisite, prospective, observational study focused on parents of children younger than 13 years old at two cystic fibrosis center sites (Site 1, n = 83; Site 2, n = 59). Religious and/or spiritual constructs, depression, and marital adjustment were measured by using previously validated questionnaires. Determinants of adherence included parental attitude toward treatment, perceived behavioral norms, motivation, and self-efficacy. Adherence patterns were measured with the Daily Phone Diary, a validated instrument used to collect adherence data. Cluster analysis identified discrete adherence patterns, including parents’ completion of more treatments than prescribed. Measurements and Main Results: For airway clearance therapy, four adherence groups were identified: median adherence rates of 23%, 52%, 77%, and 120%. These four groups differed significantly for parental depression, sanctification of their child’s body, and self-efficacy. Three adherence groups were identified for nebulized medications: median adherence rates of 35%, 82%, and 130%. These three groups differed significantly for sanctification of their child’s body and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Our results indicated that parents in each group shared psychosocial and religious and/or spiritual factors that differentiated them. Therefore, conversations about adherence likely should be tailored to baseline adherence patterns. Development of efficacious

  7. Adherence of Streptococcus sanguis clinical isolates to smooth surfaces and interactions of the isolates with Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, S; Torii, M; Kotani, S; Tsuchitani, Y

    1981-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguis isolated from human dental plaque were grown in Todd-Hewitt broth. Cells were collected by centrifugation and lyophilized after extensive washing with water. The cell-associated glucosyltransferase (GTase) activities of S. sanguis strains were assayed with [14C]sucrose. Strain differences in GTase activity were significant within the same serotype or biotype or both. The ability of S. sanguis cells to adhere to smooth glass surfaces was generally weak, irrespective of significant cell-associated GTase activity synthesizing water-insoluble, gel-like glucans. Resting cells of most S. sanguis strains bound extracellular GTase from Streptococcus mutans strain B13 (serotype d), resulting in the strong adherence of the S. sanguis cells to smooth glass surfaces in the presence of sucrose. Conversely, S. mutans B13 cells also could bind extracellular GTase from some strains of S. sanguis examined. The sucrose-dependent adherence of S. mutans cells was not altered, although S. sanguis strains from which the extracellular GTases were obtained did not produce significant adherence in the presence of sucrose. In view of these findings, it was suggested that S. mutans GTase could affect the adherence of S. sanguis to smooth tooth surfaces in the oral cavity. Images PMID:6452415

  8. Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications among Persons who Inject Drugs in Transitional, Low and Middle Income Countries: An International Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Feelemyer, Jonathan; Jarlais, Don Des; Arasteh, Kamyar; Uuskula, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication is vital to reducing morbidity and mortality among HIV positive persons. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for HIV infection in transitional/low/middle income countries (TLMIC). We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting adherence to ARTs among persons with active injection drug use and/or histories of injection drug use in TLMIC. Meta-regression was performed to examine relationships between location, adherence measurements, and follow-up period. Fifteen studies were included from seven countries. Adherence levels ranged from 33% to 97%; mean weighted adherence was 72%. ART adherence was associated with different methods of measuring adherence and studies conducted in Eastern Europe and East Asia. The great heterogeneity observed precludes generalization to TLMIC as a whole. Given the critical importance of ART adherence more research is needed on ART adherence among PWID in TLMIC, including the use of standardized methods for reporting adherence to ARTs. PMID:25331268

  9. Biogenic selenium nanoparticles inhibit Staphylococcus aureus adherence on different surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sonkusre, Praveen; Singh Cameotra, Swaranjit

    2015-12-01

    The global issue of nosocomial infection is owing to bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on medical devices which primarily affects critically ill and/or immuno-compromised patients and also leads to malfunctioning of the devices. Therefore, it is desirable to prevent bacterial colonization on these devices by coating with a non toxic antimicrobial agent or bacterial adherence inhibitor. Here we have shown Bacillus licheniformis JS2 derived selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) inhibit Staphylococcus aureus adherence and micro-colony formation on polystyrene, glass, and catheter surface. Results indicated that, the coating of these non toxic biogenic SeNPs, at a concentration of 0.5 mgSe/ml, prohibits bacterial load to more than 60% on glass and catheter surface, when incubated at 4 °C for 24h in phosphate buffered saline. Furthermore, confocal and electron microscopic observations strongly suggested the inhibition of biofilm and micro-colony formation on SeNP coated glass and catheter surfaces when cultured at 37 °C for 72 h in a nutrient rich medium. The study suggests that coating of biogenic SeNPs on medical devices could be an alternative approach for prevention of biofilm related infections. PMID:26590898

  10. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  11. Facilitating exercise adherence for patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Elizabeth Ann; Hall-Barrow, Julie; Coon, Sharon; Stewart, Carol Beth

    2003-01-01

    Physical exercise is becoming an accepted part of therapy for many patients with cancer. Exercise may alleviate patients' fatigue and improve physical performance and psychological outlook. Much of the research is limited to women with breast cancer and excludes patients with bone metastases. This article reports on the authors' work in facilitating exercise adherence for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and bone lesions while they were enrolled in a feasibility/pilot exercise study as they were receiving treatment for their disease in an outpatient treatment program. The exercise program for these patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation consisted of aerobic and strength-building components. The program was home based, and patients performed exercises without direct supervision. On average, the patients completed the six-month exercise prescription 75% of the time. Overall trends showed that all 14 patients in the exercise group improved in several areas of testing, and the test results of all 10 patients in the usual-care group declined. Flexibility and simplicity are essential when designing exercise programs for patients, and encouragement and support also are needed to help patients adhere to prescribed exercise.

  12. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27074696

  13. Dynamic mechanical measurement of the viscoelasticity of single adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Elise A.; Adeniba, Olaoluwa O.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-02-01

    Many recent studies on the viscoelasticity of individual cells link mechanics with cellular function and health. Here, we introduce a measurement of the viscoelastic properties of individual human colon cancer cells (HT-29) using silicon pedestal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors. We demonstrate that the viscoelastic properties of single adherent cells can be extracted by measuring a difference in vibrational amplitude of our resonant sensor platform. The magnitude of vibration of the pedestal sensor is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A change in amplitude of the sensor, compared with the driving amplitude (amplitude ratio), is influenced by the mechanical properties of the adhered cells. The amplitude ratio of the fixed cells was greater than the live cells, with a p-value <0.0001. By combining the amplitude shift with the resonant frequency shift measure, we determined the elastic modulus and viscosity values of 100 Pa and 0.0031 Pa s, respectively. Our method using the change in amplitude of resonant MEMS devices can enable the determination of a refined solution space and could improve measuring the stiffness of cells.

  14. [Adherence to oral hygiene and dental self-care].

    PubMed

    Poplinger, A

    2010-04-01

    Nearly every person will be in need of dental treatment in his lifetime, whether purely for health causes or alternately for esthetic issues. Yet the main reasons of seeking dental treatment are in fact Caries, Gingivitis and Periodontitis. In spite of the fact that these pathologies occur due to the accumulation of Plaque around the oral cavity and teeth, they are fairly easy to prevent. Using simple techniques such as oral rinsing, flossing and brushing of the teeth, are normally sufficient for obtaining good oral health. If this is actually the case, than how is it that we are witnessing a massive spread of dental problems? How come there are so many incidents of people suffering from dental problems if the preventative care is that easy to manage? The answer lies in the concept of Adherence, referring to the cooperation of an individual with the demands of his treatment regime and the dental staff. The idea of promoting health adherence aims mainly for using medication, attending the periodic inspections and examination, and making lifestyle changes such as preventive care illustrated above. This article exemplifies how one of the current trends in Medical Psychology discipline is to enhance adherence by establishing a secure therapeutic alliance which is based upon a positive relationship between the patient and his doctor, increasing patient's confidence and sense of self-efficacy, and recruiting family members and friends to the patient's process of change. A distinctive emphasis is put on expanding the patient's knowledge about his condition, and raising awareness to the linkage between his medical (to be more specific-dental) problem and its symptoms to the implications. The most modish and putative intervention nowadays is Patient Centered, where the guiding principles used are urging the patient to be responsible for implying the treatment regime, taking active participation, and make decisions regarding his current and future status. This article

  15. Tunable Leuko-polymersomes that Adhere Specifically to Inflammatory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory P.; Saunders, Randi L.; Haun, Jered B.; Rawson, Jeff; Therien, Michael J.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The polymersome, a fully synthetic cell mimetic, is a tunable platform for drug delivery vehicles to detect and treat disease (theranostics). Here, we design a leuko-polymersome, a polymersome with the adhesive properties of leukocytes, which can effectively bind to inflammatory sites under flow. We hypothesize that optimal leukocyte adhesion can be recreated with ligands that mimic receptors of the two major leukocyte molecular adhesion pathways, the selectins and the integrins. Polymersomes functionalized with sialyl Lewis X and an antibody against ICAM-1 adhere avidly and selectively to surfaces coated with inflammatory adhesion molecules P-selectin and ICAM-1 under flow. We find that maximal adhesion occurs at intermediate densities of both sialyl Lewis X and anti-ICAM-1, owing to synergistic binding effects between the two ligands. Leuko-polymersomes bearing these two receptor mimetics adhere under physiological shear rates to inflamed endothelium in an in vitro flow chamber at rate 7.5 times higher than to uninflamed endothelium. This work clearly demonstrates that polymersomes bearing only a single ligand bind less avidly and with lower selectivity, thus suggesting proper mimicry of leukocyte adhesion requires contributions from both pathways. This work establishes a basis for the design of polymersomes for targeted drug delivery in inflammation. PMID:20704280

  16. Bacterial adherence and biofilm formation on medical implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Veerachamy, Suganthan; Yarlagadda, Tejasri; Manivasagam, Geetha; Yarlagadda, Prasad Kdv

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are a complex group of microbial cells that adhere to the exopolysaccharide matrix present on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections in the medical devices pose a serious problem to the public health and adversely affect the function of the device. Medical implants used in oral and orthopedic surgery are fabricated using alloys such as stainless steel and titanium. The biological behavior, such as osseointegration and its antibacterial activity, essentially depends on both the chemical composition and the morphology of the surface of the device. Surface treatment of medical implants by various physical and chemical techniques are attempted in order to improve their surface properties so as to facilitate bio-integration and prevent bacterial adhesion. The potential source of infection of the surrounding tissue and antimicrobial strategies are from bacteria adherent to or in a biofilm on the implant which should prevent both biofilm formation and tissue colonization. This article provides an overview of bacterial biofilm formation and methods adopted for the inhibition of bacterial adhesion on medical implants.

  17. Washing and changing uniforms: is guidance being adhered to?

    PubMed

    Potter, Yvonne Camilla; Justham, David

    To allay public apprehension regarding the risk of nurses' uniforms transmitting healthcare-associated infections (HCAI), national and local guidelines have been issued to control use, laundry and storage. This paper aims to measure the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs) and healthcare assistants (HCAs) working within a rural NHS foundation Trust and their adherence to the local infection prevention and control (IPC) standard regarding uniforms through a Trust-wide audit. Stratified random sampling selected 597 nursing staff and 399 responded (67%) by completing a short questionnaire based on the local standard. Responses were coded and transferred to SPSS (v. 17) for analysis. The audit found that nursing staff generally adhere to the guidelines, changing their uniforms daily and immediately upon accidental soiling, and wearing plastic aprons where indicated. At home, staff normally machine-wash and then iron their uniforms at the hottest setting. Nevertheless, few observe the local direction to place their newly-laundered uniforms in protective covers. This paper recommends a re-audit to compare compliance rates with baseline figures and further research into the reasons why compliance is lacking to sanction interventions for improvement, such as providing relevant staff education and re-introducing appropriate changing facilities. PMID:22875349

  18. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes.

  19. Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions.

  20. Evidence-based Assessment of Adherence to Medical Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Avani C.; Lemanek, Kathleen L.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Rapoff, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to medical regimens for children and adolescents with chronic conditions is generally below 50% and is considered the single, greatest cause of treatment failure. As the prevalence of chronic illnesses in pediatric populations increases and awareness of the negative consequences of poor adherence become clearer, the need for reliable and valid measures of adherence has grown. Methods This review evaluated empirical evidence for 18 measures utilizing three assessment methods: (a) self-report or structured interviews, (b) daily diary methods, and (c) electronic monitors. Results Ten measures met the “well-established” evidence-based (EBA) criteria. Conclusions Several recommendations for improving adherence assessment were made. In particular, consideration should be given to the use of innovative technologies that provide a window into the “real time” behaviors of patients and families. Providing written treatment plans, identifying barriers to good adherence, and examining racial and ethnic differences in attitudes, beliefs and behaviors affecting adherence were strongly recommended. PMID:17846042

  1. Adherence in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: strategies and considerations for assessment in research and practice

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Kajal; Vu, Bach-Mai K; Eshtehardi, Sahar S; Wasserman, Rachel M; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal adherence remains a significant concern for adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, the treatment regimen for which is complex and includes numerous behaviors. Accurate assessment of adherence is critical for effective healthcare and to measure trial outcomes. Without a valid biomarker of adherence, assessment strategies must rely on measuring management behaviors. This paper provides an overview of approaches to measure adherence, with an emphasis on contemporary, validated measures that are appropriate for current diabetes care. Objective measures include electronic data from diabetes management devices. Subjective measures include self/parent-report questionnaires, structured interviews and diaries/logbooks. Practical strategies for selecting measurement approaches for clinical and research purposes are reviewed, and implications of adherence assessment for clinical care delivery and adherence-promotion are discussed. PMID:27066110

  2. The patient's duty to adhere to prescribed treatment: an ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2005-04-01

    This article examines the ethical basis for the patient's duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions. The article argues that patients have a moral duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions, once they have accepted treatment. Since patients still retain the right to refuse medical treatment, their duty to adhere to treatment prescriptions is a prima facie duty, which can be overridden by their other ethical duties. However, patients do not have the right to refuse to adhere to treatment prescriptions if their non-adherence poses a significant threat to other people. This paper also discusses the use of written agreements between physicians and patients as a strategy for promoting patient adherence.

  3. Predictors of adherence to antihypertensive medication in northern United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Bader, R J K; Koprulu, F; Hassan, N A G M; Ali, A A A; Elnour, A A

    2015-08-27

    This study aimed to assess the predictors of non-adherence to antihypertensive medications in northern United Arab Emirates. In a cross-sectional, multicentre study in Ajman Emirate, 250 patients with hypertension were randomly selected from outpatient clinics. Participants answered an interview questionnaire about sociodemographic and clinical data and completed the Morisky medication adherence scale. Non-adherence to antihypertensive medication was reported by 45.6% of patients. Sociodemographic predictors of non-adherence were sex and number of children. Therapy-related predictors of adherence were hospital admissions, number and cost of medications, medication perceived effectiveness and use of traditional remedies. Patient-related predictors of non-adherence were forgetfulness, method of identifying medication and poor awareness of hypertension complications. Health-care-related predictors were regular follow up at clinics, education and counselling, frequency of changing medication by physicians and awareness of physicians' instructions.

  4. Measuring the adherence to medication of elderly patients with heart failure: is there a gold standard?

    PubMed

    Smith, Helen; Hankins, Matthew; Hodson, Andrew; George, Charles

    2010-11-01

    ACE inhibitors and loop diuretics are treatments of first choice for heart failure, but patients must take their medications regularly to achieve maximum benefit. Adherence is commonly assessed using pill counts, self-report or electronic monitoring, with the latter widely considered the 'gold standard'. We assessed the concordance of these three methods in a sample of 52 elderly patients with heart failure over a six-week period. Substantial differences in adherence were found between the three methods. Adherence by self-report was very high for both ACE-I and diuretic, with little between-person variation. This was, however, uncorroborated by pill count and electronic monitoring. Closer examination of the electronic record suggested that the mean level of adherence overlooked patterns of openings more consistent with adherent behaviour. There seems to be no gold standard for measurement of adherence in this population.

  5. A proposal for quality standards for measuring medication adherence in research.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann Bartley; Amico, K Rivet; Bova, Carol; Womack, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    A decade after widespread recognition that adherence to medication regimens is key to antiretroviral effectiveness, considerable controversy remains regarding a "gold standard" for adherence measurement. Each adherence measurement approach has strengths and weaknesses and each rests on specific assumptions. The range of assumptions regarding adherence measurement and the diversity with which each approach is implemented strongly suggest that the evaluation of a particular measure outside of the context in which it was used (e.g. the study's operational protocol) may result in undeserved confidence or lack of confidence in study results. The purpose of this paper is to propose a set of best practices across commonly used measurement methods. Recommendations regarding what information should be included in published reports regarding how adherence was measured are provided to promote improvement in the quality of measurement of medication adherence in research.

  6. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  7. Does the association between prescription copayment increases and medication adherence differ by race?

    PubMed

    Wong, Edwin S; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have shown prescription copayment increases are associated with decreases in adherence to diabetes and hypertension medications, but have not investigated whether these associations differ by race. Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data were used to analyze medication adherence before and after an increase in prescription copayments from $2 to $7 for a 30-day supply in February 2002. Applying a difference-in-difference approach, we compared adherence changes among White and Black veterans who were exempt from or required to pay medication copayments. The likelihood patients were adherent to diabetes or hypertension medications decreased after the copayment increase for both White and Black veterans. However, differences in medication adherence reductions between White and Black veterans were small and statistically insignificant. Despite barriers faced by minority patients related to lower perceived value of medications, the impact of a copayment increase on adherence was similar across the two largest racial groups in the VA. PMID:23974401

  8. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  9. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen's d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were non-adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p < 0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p = 0.001), to have reported low income (p = 0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p = 0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p = 0.011; Cohen's d = 0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p = 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications.

  10. Determinants of Breast, Cervical and Colorectal Cancer Screening Adherence in Mexican American Women

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Patricia; Castaneda, Sheila F.; Mills, Paul J.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Elder, John P.; Gallo, Linda C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of cancer screening procedures, its utilization among Latinas remains low. Guided, in part, by the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examined the associations between predisposing, enabling, and need factors with self-reported breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening adherence. Participants were 319 Mexican American women, from a range of socioeconomic (SES) backgrounds, living near the United States-Mexico border. Women were adherent with breast cancer (BC) screening (≥42 years) if they had received at least one mammogram within the last two years, with cervical cancer (CC) screening (≥40 years) if they had received at least one Pap exam in the last three years, and with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (≥52 years) if they had undergone one or more of the following: Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) within the last year, or sigmoidoscopy in the last 5 years, or colonoscopy within the last 10 years. BC and CC screenings were higher in the current sample compared to national and state figures: 82% with mammography and 86% adherent with Pap exam screening. However, only 43% were adherent with CRC screening recommendations. Characteristics associated with mammography adherence included CC adherence and usual source of care. BC adherence was associated to CC adherence. Characteristics associated with CRC adherence included BC adherence, being premenopausal, and insurance coverage. A key correlate of cancer screening adherence was adherence to other preventive services. Results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that Latinas of all SES levels obtain regular and timely cancer screenings. PMID:21874364

  11. Association between patients’ beliefs and oral antidiabetic medication adherence in a Chinese type 2 diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Naifeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to identify, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), patients’ beliefs about taking oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) as prescribed, and to measure the correlations between beliefs and medication adherence. Patients and methods We performed a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients using structured questionnaires in a Chinese tertiary hospital. A total of 130 patients were enrolled to be interviewed about TPB variables (behavioral, normative, and control beliefs) relevant to medication adherence. Medication adherence was assessed using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Spearman’s rank correlation was used to assess the association between TPB and MMAS-8. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between different variables and MMAS-8, with statistical significance determined at P<0.05. Results From 130 eligible Chinese patients with an average age of 60.6 years and a male proportion of 50.8%, a nonsignificant relationship between behavioral, normative, and the most facilitating control beliefs and OAD adherence was found in our study. Having the OADs on hand (P=0.037) was the only facilitating control belief associated with adherence behavior. Being away from home or eating out (P=0.000), not accepting the disease (P=0.000), ignorance of life-long drug adherence (P=0.038), being busy (P=0.001), or poor memory (P=0.008) were control belief barriers found to be correlated with poor adherence. TPB is the only important determinant influencing OAD adherence among all the factors (P=0.011). Conclusion The results indicate that the TPB model could be used to examine adherence to OADs. One facilitating control belief, and most of the barrier control beliefs of TPB were related to medication adherence among Chinese type 2 diabetes inpatients. It will be helpful to understand patients’ self-medication and provide methods to develop instruments for identifying

  12. The Influence of Cognition, Anxiety and Psychiatric Disorders over Treatment Adherence in Uncontrolled Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Úrsula; De Castro, Mauro S.; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor adherence is estimated to cause 125 thousand deaths per year and is linked to 10% of all hospital stays in the U.S. Up to one third of elderly hypertensive patients don't have adherence, which is responsible for high proportion of hospitalizations. Hypertension is also related to poor performance in tests that assess cognitive functions. On the other hand, poor cognitive performance is associated with low adherence to treatment. Objective To assess the association between cognitive function, anxiety and psychiatric disorders with adherence to drug treatment in patients with hypertension. Methodology and Principal Findings This a cohort studies with 56 adult patients with uncontrolled hypertension who participated of all meetings of a pharmaceutical intervention in a randomized clinical trial of pharmaceutical care. Cognitive function was measured by the Mini Mental State Examination (Mini-mental). The memory was measured by digit and word spans, tower and church shadow test, short story test and metamemory. Anxiety and psychiatric disorders were evaluated by the State Trace Anxiety Inventory and the Self-Report Questionnaire, respectively. The participants were classified as adherent or non-adherent to the drug treatment, according to the identification of plasma levels of hydrochlorothiazide. All non-adherent patients (n = 12) and 35 out 44 (79.5%) patients with adherence to treatment had at least one memory test with an altered score (P = 0.180). Participants with an unsatisfactory score in the Mini-mental had six-fold higher risk of non-adherence to treatment when compared to those with a normal score (RR = 5.8; CI 95%: 1.6–20.8; P = 0.007). The scores of anxiety and psychiatric disorders were not associated with adherence to the pharmacological treatment. Conclusion Cognitive deficit impairs adherence to drug therapy and should be screened as part of a program of pharmaceutical care to improve adherence to treatment. PMID

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O’Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen’s d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p<0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p=0.001), to have reported low income (p=0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p=0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p=0.011; Cohen’s d=0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p=0.001; Cohen’s d=0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36–0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications. PMID:24960306

  14. Determinants of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening adherence in Mexican-American women.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Patricia; Castaneda, Sheila F; Mills, Paul J; Talavera, Gregory A; Elder, John P; Gallo, Linda C

    2012-04-01

    Despite the effectiveness of cancer screening procedures, its utilization among Latinas remains low. Guided, in part, by the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examined the associations between predisposing, enabling, and need factors with self-reported breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening adherence. Participants were 319 Mexican-American women, from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds, living near the United States-Mexico border. Women were adherent with breast cancer (BC) screening (≥42 years) if they had received at least one mammogram within the last 2 years, with cervical cancer (CC) screening (≥40 years) if they had received at least one Pap exam in the last 3 years, and with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (≥52 years) if they had undergone one or more of the following: Fecal Occult Blood Test within the last year, or sigmoidoscopy in the last 5 years, or colonoscopy within the last 10 years. BC and CC screenings were higher in the current sample compared to national and state figures: 82% with mammography and 86% adherent with Pap exam screening. However, only 43% were adherent with CRC screening recommendations. Characteristics associated with mammography adherence included CC adherence and usual source of care. BC adherence was associated to CC adherence. Characteristics associated with CRC adherence included BC adherence, being premenopausal, and insurance coverage. A key correlate of cancer screening adherence was adherence to other preventive services. Results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that Latinas of all SES levels obtain regular and timely cancer screenings.

  15. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  16. Adherence to Treatment and Factors Affecting Adherence of Epileptic Patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasiso, Temesgen Yohannes; Desse, Tigestu Alemu

    2016-01-01

    Background Non adherence of epileptic patients to antiepileptic medication often leads to an increased risk of seizures and worsening of disease, death and increased health care costs. Objective to assess adherence to treatment and factors affecting adherence of epileptic patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. Methods and Materials We conducted a cross-sectional study on epileptic patients from February 9 to 22, 2015. Data were collected from patients ≥18 years old. Adherence was measured using the eight-item Morisky’s medication adherence scale. All consecutive patients coming to epilepsy clinic during the study period were interviewed until the calculated sample size (210) was obtained. We collected patient demographics, perception about epilepsy and adherence to medication(s). We used chi-square tests and a binary logistic regression model for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered at P<0.05. Results out of a total of 210 participants, 194 were willing to participate and were studied. Of the 194 participants, 109 (56.2%) were males. The mean age of the participants was 33.62±11.44 years; range 18 to 66 years. The majority, 123(63.41%), of the participants were taking two antiepileptic medications. Sixty two (32%) of the participants were adherent to their treatment. The most common reported reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness 49(75.4%) and run out of pills 7(10.8%). Factors that affect medication adherence are epilepsy treatment for <1 year (P = 0.011), epilepsy treatment for 1–3 years (P = 0.002), epilepsy treatment for 3–5 years (P = 0.007), being married (P = 0.006), grade 9–12 education (P = 0.028), college or university education (P = 0.002) and absence of co-morbidity (P = 0.008). Conclusions The rate of adherence observed in this study was low. The most common reason for non- adherence was forgetfulness. Therefore, the hospital should devise strategies to improve adherence of epileptic patients

  17. Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?

    PubMed Central

    Hedna, Khedidja; Hakkarainen, Katja M.; Gyllensten, Hanna; Jönsson, Anna K.; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Petzold, Max; Hägg, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Background Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and elevated blood pressure (BP) has been advocated. Objective Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP. Methods A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC≥80%): (1) Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2) adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income), clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities) and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement) and elevated BP was investigated. Results Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons < 65 years (Odds Ratio, OR 2.75 [95% CI, 1.18–6.43]) and with the lowest income (OR 2.05 [95% CI, 1.01–4.16]). Non-adherence to the full AHT regimen was higher among new users (OR 2.04 [95% CI, 1.32–3.15]), persons using specialized healthcare (OR 1.63, [95% CI, 1.14–2.32]), and having multiple antihypertensive medications (OR 1.85 [95% CI, 1.25–2.75] and OR 5.22 [95% CI, 3.48–7.83], for 2 and ≥3 antihypertensive medications, respectively). Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication a month prior to healthcare visit was associated with elevated BP. Conclusion Sociodemographic factors were associated with non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication while clinical

  18. Assessing Medication Adherence as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Pai, Ahna L H; McGrady, Meghan E

    2015-12-01

    Poor adherence to pediatric cancer treatment protocols may prevent children and adolescents from realizing the potential benefits of therapy. This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for supporting medication adherence. Databases were reviewed for articles examining adherence and including children and/or adolescents with cancer. Fourteen articles (i.e., qualitative, quantitative, review, and randomized clinical trials) were evaluated for rigor. There is moderate-quality evidence to support a strong recommendation for adherence to be assessed routinely and monitored throughout the treatment. Integrating the proposed clinical procedures into standard clinical care may improve outcomes for children and adolescents with cancer.

  19. Reduced in vitro adherence of Staphylococcus species to feline corneocytes compared to canine and human corneocytes.

    PubMed

    Woolley, K L; Kelly, R F; Fazakerley, J; Williams, N J; Nuttall, T J; McEwan, N A

    2008-02-01

    It is apparent that in-contact humans and animals exchange commensal staphylococci. Previous in vitro studies, however, indicate that staphylococci preferentially adhere to corneocytes from host species. This study compared adherence of meticillin-sensitive and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA), S. intermedius, S. felis and S. hominis to feline, canine and human corneocytes acquired from 10 healthy subjects using adhesive tape discs. Adherent bacteria were counted using an image processing and analysis programme. Mean adherence of MSSA (P = 0.0009), MRSA (P = 0.0162) and S. intermedius (P = 0.0117), but not S. felis or S. hominis, to feline corneocytes was significantly lower than that to canine and human corneocytes. All the isolates had similar adherence to both human and canine corneocytes. S. felis was the most adherent species to feline corneocytes followed by S. intermedius, and then MSSA, MRSA and S. hominis. For dogs and humans, S. intermedius and S. felis were the most adherent, followed by MRSA and MSSA, and then S. hominis. These results do not reveal any preferential adherence of staphylococci to canine or human corneocytes. Poor adherence to feline corneocytes could suggest that cats are relatively resistant to pyoderma and cross-species transmission of staphylococci.

  20. Association between Spirituality and Adherence to Management in Outpatients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Juglans Souto; Goldraich, Livia Adams; Nunes, Alice Hoefel; Zandavalli, Mônica Cristina Brugalli; Zandavalli, Rafaela Brugalli; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Rocha, Neusa Sica; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Clausell, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Background Spirituality may influence how patients cope with their illness. Objectives We assessed whether spirituality may influence adherence to management of outpatients with heart failure. Methods Cross sectional study enrolling consecutive ambulatory heart failure patients in whom adherence to multidisciplinary treatment was evaluated. Patients were assessed for quality of life, depression, religiosity and spirituality utilizing validated questionnaires. Correlations between adherence and psychosocial variables of interest were obtained. Logistic regression models explored independent predictors of adherence. Results One hundred and thirty patients (age 60 ± 13 years; 67% male) were interviewed. Adequate adherence score was observed in 38.5% of the patients. Neither depression nor religiosity was correlated to adherence, when assessed separately. Interestingly, spirituality, when assessed by both total score sum (r = 0.26; p = 0.003) and by all specific domains, was positively correlated to adherence. Finally, the combination of spirituality, religiosity and personal beliefs was an independent predictor of adherence when adjusted for demographics, clinical characteristics and psychosocial instruments. Conclusion Spirituality, religiosity and personal beliefs were the only variables consistently associated with compliance to medication in a cohort of outpatients with heart failure. Our data suggest that adequately addressing these aspects on patient’s care may lead to an improvement in adherence patterns in the complex heart failure management. PMID:27192385

  1. A large-scale validation study of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS).

    PubMed

    Fialko, Laura; Garety, Philippa A; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Dunn, Graham; Bebbington, Paul E; Fowler, David; Freeman, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    Adherence to medication is an important predictor of illness course and outcome in psychosis. The Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) is a ten-item self-report measure of medication adherence in psychosis [Thompson, K., Kulkarni, J., Sergejew, A.A., 2000. Reliability and validity of a new Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) for the psychoses. Schizophrenia Research. 42. 241-247]. Although initial results suggested that the scale has good reliability and validity, the development sample was small. The current study aimed to establish the psychometric properties of the MARS in a sample over four times larger. The scale was administered to 277 individuals with psychosis, along with measures of insight and psychopathology. Medication adherence was independently rated by each individual's keyworker. Results showed the internal consistency of the MARS to be lower than in the original sample, though adequate. MARS total score correlated weakly with keyworker-rated adherence, hence concurrent validity of the scale appeared only moderate to weak. The three factor structure of the MARS was replicated. Examination of the factor scores suggested that the factor 1 total score, which corresponds to the Medication Adherence Questionnaire [Morisky,D.E., Green,L.W. and Levine,D.M., 1986. Concurrent and predictive validity of a self-reported measure of medication adherence. Medical Care. 24, 67-74] may be a preferable measure of medication adherence behaviour to the total scale score.

  2. Antiretroviral concentrations in small hair samples as a feasible marker of adherence in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Matthew D; Salmen, Charles R; Tessler, Robert A; Omollo, Dan; Bacchetti, Peter; Magerenge, Richard; Mattah, Brian; Salmen, Marcus R; Zoughbie, Daniel; Fiorella, Kathryn J; Geng, Elvin; Njoroge, Betty; Jin, Chengshi; Huang, Yong; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Antiretroviral hair levels objectively quantify drug exposure over time and predict virologic responses. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of collecting small hair samples in a rural Kenyan cohort. Ninety-five percentage of participants (354/373) donated hair. Although median self-reported adherence was 100% (interquartile range, 96%-100%), a wide range of hair concentrations likely indicates overestimation of self-reported adherence and the advantages of a pharmacologic adherence measure. Higher nevirapine hair concentrations observed in women and older adults require further study to unravel behavioral versus pharmacokinetic contributors. In resource-limited settings, hair antiretroviral levels may serve as a low-cost quantitative biomarker of adherence.

  3. Similarities and differences between asthma health care professional and patient views regarding medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Sandra; Bacon, Simon L; Aulls, Mark W; Lacoste, Guillaume; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature has reported disparate views between patients and health care professionals regarding the roles of various factors affecting medication adherence. OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of asthma patients, physicians and allied health professionals regarding adherence to asthma medication. METHODOLOGY: A qualitative, multiple, collective case study design with six focus-group interviews including 38 participants (13 asthma patients, 13 pulmonologist physicians and 12 allied health professionals involved in treating asthma patients) was conducted. RESULTS: Patients, physicians and allied health professionals understood adherence to be an active process. In addition, all participants believed they had a role in treatment adherence, and agreed that the cost of medication was high and that access to the health care system was restricted. Major disagreements regarding patient-related barriers to medication adherence were identified among the groups. For example, all groups referred to side effects; however, while patients expressed their legitimate concerns, health care professionals believed that patients’ opinions of medication side effects were based on inadequate perceptions. CONCLUSION: Differences regarding medication adherence and barriers to adherence among the groups examined in the present study will provide insight into how disagreements may be translated to overcome barriers to optimal asthma adherence. Furthermore, when designing an intervention to enhance medication adherence, it is important to acknowledge that perceptual gaps exist and must be addressed. PMID:24712015

  4. Cultural Beliefs Underlying Medication Adherence in People of Chinese Descent in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lan; Acharya, Lalatendu

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the meanings, practices, and cultural beliefs underlying medication adherence in people of Chinese descent living in the United States. The narratives were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology, resulting in the following themes that influenced the communication and behaviors around medication adherence of the participants: (a) cultural concepts of yin yang balance and "qi," (b) understandings of Western and Chinese medicine's efficacy profiles, (c) importance of family and social support, and (d) level of acculturation. This article discusses the influence of these themes on medication adherence and proposes that health communication campaigns, interventions, and doctor-patient communication about increasing medication adherence with people of Chinese descent should engage these understandings.

  5. The Team Education and Adherence Monitoring (TEAM) trial: pharmacy interventions to improve hypertension control in blacks.

    PubMed

    Svarstad, Bonnie L; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Shireman, Theresa I; Crawford, Stephanie Y; Palmer, Pamela A; Vivian, Eva M; Brown, Roger L

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that involving pharmacists is an effective strategy for improving patient adherence and blood pressure (BP) control. To date, few controlled studies have tested the cost-effectiveness of specific models for improving patient adherence and BP control in community pharmacies, where most Americans obtain prescriptions. We hypothesized that a team model of adherence monitoring and intervention in corporately owned community pharmacies can improve patient adherence, prescribing, and BP control among hypertensive black patients. The Team Education and Adherence Monitoring (TEAM) Trial is a randomized controlled trial testing a multistep intervention for improving adherence monitoring and intervention in 28 corporately owned community pharmacies. Patients in the 14 control pharmacies received "usual care," and patients in the 14 intervention pharmacies received TEAM Care by trained pharmacists and pharmacy technicians working with patients and physicians. Data collectors screened 1250 patients and enrolled 597 hypertensive black patients. The primary end points were the proportion of patients achieving BP control and reductions in systolic and diastolic BP measured after 6 and 12 months. Secondary end points were changes in adherence monitoring and intervention, patient adherence and barriers to adherence, prescribing, and cost-effectiveness. Researchers also will examine potential covariates and barriers to change. Involving pharmacists is a potentially powerful means of improving BP control in blacks. Pharmacists are in an excellent position to monitor patients between clinic visits and to provide useful information to patients and physicians. PMID:20031847

  6. Patients' mental models and adherence to outpatient physical therapy home exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Within physical therapy, patient adherence usually relates to attending appointments, following advice, and/or undertaking prescribed exercise. Similar to findings for general medical adherence, patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs (HEP) is estimated between 35 and 72%. Adherence to HEPs is a multifactorial and poorly understood phenomenon, with no consensus regarding a common theoretical framework that best guides empirical or clinical efforts. Mental models, a construct used to explain behavior and decision-making in the social sciences, may serve as this framework. Mental models comprise an individual's tacit thoughts about how the world works. They include assumptions about new experiences and expectations for the future based on implicit comparisons between current and past experiences. Mental models play an important role in decision-making and guiding actions. This professional theoretical article discusses empirical research demonstrating relationships among mental models, prior experience, and adherence decisions in medical and physical therapy contexts. Specific issues related to mental models and physical therapy patient adherence are discussed, including the importance of articulation of patients' mental models, assessment of patients' mental models that relate to exercise program adherence, discrepancy between patient and provider mental models, and revision of patients' mental models in ways that enhance adherence. The article concludes with practical implications for physical therapists and recommendations for further research to better understand the role of mental models in physical therapy patient adherence behavior. PMID:25585516

  7. Examining Adherence Among Challenging Patients in Public and Private HIV Care in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah; Cook, Ryan; Cecchini, Diego; Sued, Omar; Bofill, Lina; Weiss, Stephen; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Lopez, Maria R; Spence, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Treatment engagement, retention and adherence to care are required for optimal HIV outcomes. Yet, patients may fall below the treatment recommendations for achieving undetectable viral load or not be retained in care. This study examined the most challenging patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina, those non-adherent to HIV care. Men (n = 61) and women (n = 59) prescribed antiretrovirals (ARVs) and non-adherent to treatment in the prior 3-6 months were enrolled and assessed regarding adherence, knowledge, motivation and attitudes regarding treatment. Private clinic patients had lower viral load and higher self-reported adherence than public clinic patients. Motivations to be adherent and positive beliefs regarding ARVs were associated with increased adherence in public clinic participants. Increased self-efficacy was associated with increased adherence among participants from both clinics. Results support patient and provider interventions that strengthen the characteristics supporting adherence, engagement and retention in public and private clinic settings. PMID:25777507

  8. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth surfaces in the presence of artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Linke, H A

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth glass surfaces was studied in the presence of the artificial sweeteners, saccharin, acesulfame K and aspartame. The cells were grown aerobically in 2% yeast extract, 1% sucrose medium with artificial sweetener added in concentrations from 0.02 to 20.00 mg/ml. The artificial sweeteners tested reduced overall growth (adherent plus suspended cells), but observed growth was in favour of the adherent cells. As compared to the control optimum adherence was obtained using 2 mg/ml sodium saccharin, 2 to 20 mg/ml acesulfame K and 4 mg/ml aspartame.

  9. A Profile of Mexican-born Women Who Adhere to National Cervical Cancer Screening Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Christina M.; Wallace, Debra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Mexican-born women’s utilization and adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines. Ninety-seven women in southeastern U.S. participated. Data was collected in Spanish. The majority of women met adherence guidelines for the Pap exam. Marital status, educational attainment, marianismo, blood pressure knowledge, fatalism, cultural cancer beliefs, trust in provider, and perceived provider communication abilities were not associated with utilization or adherence to screening guidelines. This study had higher than expected adherence to screening guidelines. Nearly all women received screenings through safety net services indicating the need to advocate for continued public health funding. PMID:25051321

  10. Improving adherence to medication regimens for children with asthma and its effect on clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    da Costa, I G; Rapoff, M A; Lemanek, K; Goldstein, G L

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of a combined education and token system intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids for an 8-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy with asthma. Adherence was measured by an electronic chronolog monitor, and disease outcome was assessed by repeated pulmonary function testing. A withdrawal design demonstrated improved adherence and, for 1 child, an associated improvement in pulmonary function occurred. Methodological and clinical implications are discussed, including variables other than adherence that may affect disease outcome.

  11. Mode of administration of dulaglutide: implications for treatment adherence

    PubMed Central

    Amblee, Ambika

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication complexity/burden can be associated with nonadherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients’ satisfaction with their treatment is an important consideration for physicians. Strategies like using longer acting efficacious agents with less frequent dosing may help adherence. Objective To explore the mode of administration of dulaglutide and its implications for treatment adherence in T2DM. Methods PubMed search using the term “Dulaglutide” through October 31, 2015 was conducted. Published articles, press releases, and abstracts presented at national/international meetings were considered. Results/conclusion Dulaglutide is a once-weekly glucagon like peptide-1 analog with a low intraindividual variability. Phase III trials demonstrated significant improvements in glycemia and weight, with a low hypoglycemia risk similar to liraglutide/exenatide, but with substantially fewer injections. A significant improvement was observed in the total Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire score, Impact of Weight on Self-Perception, and perceived frequency of hyperglycemia with dulaglutide when compared with placebo, exenatide, liraglutide, or metformin. Treatment satisfaction scores showed an improvement with dulaglutide (34%–39%) when compared with exenatide (31%). A positive experience with a high initial (97.2%) and final (99.1%) injection success rate along with a significant reduction in patients’ fear of self-injecting, as measured by the modified self-injecting subscale of the Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-Testing Questionnaire and Medication Delivery Device Assessment Battery, was found. Its acceptance was high (>96%) among a variety of patients including patients who fear injections and injection-naïve users. Dulaglutide is available as a single-dose automatic self-injecting device, which has a low volume, does not need reconstitution, and avoids patient handling of the needle. Dose adjustment based on

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Enteroaggregative and Diffusely Adherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Czeczulin, John R.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Henderson, Ian R.; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetics of the various pathotypes of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are not completely understood. In this study, we identified several plasmid and chromosomal genes in the pathogenic enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) prototype strain 042 and determined the prevalence of these loci among EAEC and diffusely adherent E. coli strains. The distribution of these genes is analyzed within an evolutionary framework provided by the characterization of allelic variation in housekeeping genes via multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Our data reveal that EAEC strains are heterogeneous with respect to chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes but that the majority harbor a member of a conserved family of virulence plasmids. Comparison of plasmid and chromosomal relatedness of strains suggests clonality of chromosomal markers and a limited transfer model of plasmid distribution. PMID:10338471

  13. Drug delivery systems improve pharmaceutical profile and facilitate medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Santella, Thomas M; Finestone, Albert J; Levy, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Innovations in dosage forms and dose delivery systems across a wide range of medications offer substantial clinical advantages, including reduced dosing frequency and improved patient adherence; minimized fluctuation of drug concentrations and maintenance of blood levels within a desired range; localized drug delivery; and the potential for reduced adverse effects and increased safety. The advent of new large-molecule drugs for previously untreatable or only partially treatable diseases is stimulating the development of suitable delivery systems for these agents. Although advanced formulations may be more expensive than conventional dosage forms, they often have a more favorable pharmacologic profile and can be cost-effective. Inclusion of these dosage forms on drug formulary lists may help patients remain on therapy and reduce the economic and social burden of care.

  14. Recent advances in adherence and invasion of pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Anjana; Hu, Jia; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Colonization of the host epithelia by pathogenic Escherichia coli is influenced by the ability of the bacteria to interact with host surfaces. Because the initial step of an E. coli infection is to adhere, invade, and persist within host cells, some strategies used by intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli to infect host cell are presented. Recent findings This review highlights recent progress understanding how extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains express specific adhesins/invasins that allow colonization of the urinary tract or the meninges, while intestinal E. coli strains are able to colonize different regions of the intestinal tract using other specialized adhesins/invasins. Finally, evaluation of, different diets and environmental conditions regulating the colonization of these pathogens is discussed. Summary Discovery of new interactions between pathogenic E. coli and the host epithelial cells unravels the need of more mechanistic studies that can provide new clues in how to combat these infections. PMID:25023740

  15. Interaction of adhered metallic dust with transient plasma heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Bykov, I.; Rudakov, D.; De Angeli, M.; Vignitchouk, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bardin, S.; van der Meiden, H.; Vernimmen, J.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-06-01

    The first study of the interaction of metallic dust (tungsten, aluminum) adhered on tungsten substrates with transient plasma heat loads is presented. Experiments were carried out in the Pilot-PSI linear device with transient heat fluxes up to 550 MW m-2 and in the DIII-D divertor tokamak. The central role of the dust-substrate contact area in heat conduction is highlighted and confirmed by heat transfer simulations. The experiments provide evidence of the occurrence of wetting-induced coagulation, a novel growth mechanism where cluster melting accompanied by droplet wetting leads to the formation of larger grains. The physical processes behind this mechanism are elucidated. The remobilization activity of the newly formed dust and the survivability of tungsten dust on hot surfaces are documented and discussed in the light of implications for ITER.

  16. A vapor-assisted method for adhering polydimethylsiloxane and glass.

    PubMed

    Sofla, Aarash Y N; Martin, Cristina

    2010-01-21

    A straightforward and inexpensive method to increase the adhesion strength of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glass is described. In this method the targeted PDMS-glass sample is exposed to a fluoroalkyl trichlorosilane vapor in an enclosed container for a certain time. It is experimentally shown that the adhesion strength of the resulted interface depends on the exposure duration. Permanently bonded PDMS-glass interfaces were reliably achieved upon sufficient exposure to the vapor. This vapor-assisted method for adhering PDMS and glass does not require any special skill or equipment and therefore can be implemented at any laboratory. This method can be used for the simultaneous bonding of components and is suitable for the mass production of microfluidic devices.

  17. Contractile Film Model for Polymorphism in Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Giomi, Luca

    2013-03-01

    The optimal shapes attained by contractile cells on elastic substrates are determined by the crosstalk between intracellular forces and extracellular forces of adhesion. We model an adherent stationary cell as a contractile film bounded by an elastic cortex and connected to the substrate via elastic links. When the adhesion sites are continuously distributed, optimal cell shape is constrained by the adhesion geometry, with a spread area sensitively dependent on the substrate stiffness and contractile tension. For discrete adhesion sites, equilibrium cell shape is convex at weak contractility, while developing local concavities at intermediate values of contractility. Increasing contractility beyond a critical value, controlled by substrate stiffness, cell contour undergoes a discontinuous transition to a star-shaped configuration with cusps and protrusions, accompanied by a region of bistability and hysteresis.

  18. Interaction of adhered metallic dust with transient plasma heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Bykov, I.; Rudakov, D.; De Angeli, M.; Vignitchouk, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bardin, S.; van der Meiden, H.; Vernimmen, J.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-06-01

    The first study of the interaction of metallic dust (tungsten, aluminum) adhered on tungsten substrates with transient plasma heat loads is presented. Experiments were carried out in the Pilot-PSI linear device with transient heat fluxes up to 550 MW m‑2 and in the DIII-D divertor tokamak. The central role of the dust-substrate contact area in heat conduction is highlighted and confirmed by heat transfer simulations. The experiments provide evidence of the occurrence of wetting-induced coagulation, a novel growth mechanism where cluster melting accompanied by droplet wetting leads to the formation of larger grains. The physical processes behind this mechanism are elucidated. The remobilization activity of the newly formed dust and the survivability of tungsten dust on hot surfaces are documented and discussed in the light of implications for ITER.

  19. Dust on Mars: Materials Adherence Experiment results from Mars Pathfinder

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.

    1997-12-31

    Mars Pathfinder is the first solar-powered probe to operate on the surface of Mars. Pathfinder consists of a lander and a small, autonomous, six-wheel solar-powered rover, Sojourner. The Pathfinder spacecraft reflects NASA`s new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output. The MAE measurements indicate steady dust accumulation at a rate of about 0.28% per day. This value is consistent with the performance of the solar arrays, which have decreased in power at an estimated rate of 0.29% per day.

  20. Protocol Development, Treatment Fidelity, Adherence to Treatment, and Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy leaders have emphasized the importance of intervention effectiveness research. The CONSORT and TREND checklists have been suggested as useful tools for reporting the results of randomized and nonrandomized studies, respectively. Despite such recommendations, research protocols and reports continue to underutilize the available tools, a situation reflecting limited resources for and experience with the conduct of effectiveness research. To address this issue, and using the CONSORT statement to structure the analysis, this article discusses strategies for optimization of protocol development, treatment fidelity, adherence to treatment, and quality control. We recommend several approaches to increase the quality of research throughout these various processes. Examples of implementation from our laboratory provide evidence of the utility of these strategies. PMID:23433268

  1. Roll, adhere, spread and contract: structural mechanics of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Simona; Studt, Jan-Dirk; Medalia, Ohad; Tanuj Sapra, K

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are involved in life-sustaining processes such as hemostasis, wound healing, atherothrombosis and angiogenesis. Mechanical trauma to blood vessels causes platelet activation resulting in their adherence and clot formation at the damaged site, culminating in clot retraction and tissue repair. Two of the major players underlying this process are the cytoskeleton, i.e., actin and microtubules, and the membrane integrin receptors. Rare congenital bleeding disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia and Bernard-Soulier syndrome are associated with genetic alterations of platelet surface receptors, also affecting the platelet cytoskeletal structure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about platelet structure and adhesion, and delve into the mechanical aspects of platelet function. Platelets lack a nucleus, and can thus provide a minimal model of a biological cell. New biophysical tools may help to scrutinize platelets anew and to extend the existing knowledge on cell biology. PMID:25655000

  2. Prokaryotic peptides that block leukocyte adherence to selectins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Pertussis toxin binds target cells through the carbohydrate recognition properties of two subunits, S2 and S3, which share amino acid sequence similarity with the lectin domains of the eukaryotic selectin family. Selectins appear on inflamed endothelial cells and promote rolling of leukocytes by reversibly binding carbohydrates. S2, S3, and synthetic peptides representing their carbohydrate recognition domains competitively inhibited adherence of neutrophils to selectin-coated surfaces and to endothelial cells in vitro. These proteins and peptides also rapidly upregulated the function of the leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18. These findings implicate mimicry of eukaryotic selectins by prokaryotic adhesive ligands and link the mechanisms underlying leukocyte trafficking to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:7688793

  3. The Exercise-Affect-Adherence Pathway: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, Harold H; Emerson, Jessica A; Williams, David M

    2016-01-01

    The low rates of regular exercise and overall physical activity (PA) in the general population represent a significant public health challenge. Previous research suggests that, for many people, exercise leads to a negative affective response and, in turn, reduced likelihood of future exercise. The purpose of this paper is to examine this exercise-affect-adherence relationship from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically, we argue that low rates of physical exercise in the general population are a function of the evolved human tendency to avoid unnecessary physical exertion. This innate tendency evolved because it allowed our evolutionary ancestors to conserve energy for physical activities that had immediate adaptive utility such as pursuing prey, escaping predators, and engaging in social and reproductive behaviors. The commonly observed negative affective response to exercise is an evolved proximate psychological mechanism through which humans avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. The fact that the human tendencies toward negative affective response to and avoidance of unnecessary physical activities are innate does not mean that they are unchangeable. Indeed, it is only because of human-engineered changes in our environmental conditions (i.e., it is no longer necessary for us to work for our food) that our predisposition to avoid unnecessary physical exertion has become a liability. Thus, it is well within our capabilities to reengineer our environments to once again make PA necessary or, at least, to serve an immediate functional purpose. We propose a two-pronged approach to PA promotion based on this evolutionary functional perspective: first, to promote exercise and other physical activities that are perceived to have an immediate purpose, and second, to instill greater perceived purpose for a wider range of physical activities. We posit that these strategies are more likely to result in more positive (or less negative) affective responses to exercise

  4. Novel aggregative adherence fimbria variant of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jønsson, Rie; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Santiago, Araceli E; Jenssen, Håvard; Nataro, James P; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) organisms belong to a diarrheagenic pathotype known to cause diarrhea and can be characterized by distinct aggregative adherence (AA) in a stacked-brick pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated 118 EAEC strains isolated from the stools of Danish adults with traveler's diarrhea. We evaluated the presence of the aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs) by a multiplex PCR, targeting the four known major subunit variants as well as their usher-encoding genes. Almost one-half (49/118) of the clinical isolates did not possess any known AAF major fimbrial subunit, despite the presence of other AggR-related loci. Further investigation revealed the presence of an AAF-related gene encoding a yet-uncharacterized adhesin, termed agg5A. The sequence of the agg5DCBA gene cluster shared fimbrial accessory genes (usher, chaperone, and minor pilin subunit genes) with AAF/III, as well as the signal peptide present in the beginning of the agg3A gene. The complete agg5DCBA gene cluster from a clinical isolate, EAEC strain C338-14, with the typical stacked-brick binding pattern was cloned, and deletion of the cluster was performed. Transformation to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 and complementation of the nonadherent C338-14 mutant with the complete gene cluster restored the AA adhesion. Overall, we found the agg5A gene in 12% of the 118 strains isolated from Denmark, suggesting that this novel adhesin represents an important variant.

  5. The Exercise–Affect–Adherence Pathway: An Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Harold H.; Emerson, Jessica A.; Williams, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The low rates of regular exercise and overall physical activity (PA) in the general population represent a significant public health challenge. Previous research suggests that, for many people, exercise leads to a negative affective response and, in turn, reduced likelihood of future exercise. The purpose of this paper is to examine this exercise–affect–adherence relationship from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically, we argue that low rates of physical exercise in the general population are a function of the evolved human tendency to avoid unnecessary physical exertion. This innate tendency evolved because it allowed our evolutionary ancestors to conserve energy for physical activities that had immediate adaptive utility such as pursuing prey, escaping predators, and engaging in social and reproductive behaviors. The commonly observed negative affective response to exercise is an evolved proximate psychological mechanism through which humans avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. The fact that the human tendencies toward negative affective response to and avoidance of unnecessary physical activities are innate does not mean that they are unchangeable. Indeed, it is only because of human-engineered changes in our environmental conditions (i.e., it is no longer necessary for us to work for our food) that our predisposition to avoid unnecessary physical exertion has become a liability. Thus, it is well within our capabilities to reengineer our environments to once again make PA necessary or, at least, to serve an immediate functional purpose. We propose a two-pronged approach to PA promotion based on this evolutionary functional perspective: first, to promote exercise and other physical activities that are perceived to have an immediate purpose, and second, to instill greater perceived purpose for a wider range of physical activities. We posit that these strategies are more likely to result in more positive (or less negative) affective responses to exercise

  6. Measurement Adherence in the Blood Pressure Self-Measurement Room

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Niels Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Ahrendt, Peter; Bertelsen, Olav W.; Toftegaard, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with hypertension or receiving blood pressure (BP)-lowering treatment are often required to self-measure their BP in a dedicated self-measurement room before consultation. Current praxis does not guarantee valid measurements, possibly leading to misdiagnoses or inappropriate antihypertensive medication. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' ability to correctly self-report and follow recommendations. Patients and Methods: We used a context-aware system to gather information on BP measurements and relevant context parameters. Patients were not informed that the system automatically collected behavior data and were instructed to self-report their measurements on a paper sheet as usual. We then compared the automatically recorded data with the self-reported data in order to detect any nonadherent reporting behavior. Also, we investigated the patients' ability to adhere to the measurement recommendations. Results: We found that (1) a third of all 113 participating patients failed to self-report measured BP data correctly and (2) none of the 642 measurements obtained adhered fully to the recommendations. Conclusions: Results indicate that context-aware technology may be useful for accurately modeling aspects of nonadherent patient behavior. This may be used to inform staff of the validity of the measurement and pinpoint patients in need of additional training or to design better aids to assist the patients. The developed system is generally applicable to other self-measurement environments, including the home setting and remote outpatient clinics, as it is built using telemedicine technology and thus well suited for remote monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:23631589

  7. The Exercise–Affect–Adherence Pathway: An Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Harold H.; Emerson, Jessica A.; Williams, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The low rates of regular exercise and overall physical activity (PA) in the general population represent a significant public health challenge. Previous research suggests that, for many people, exercise leads to a negative affective response and, in turn, reduced likelihood of future exercise. The purpose of this paper is to examine this exercise–affect–adherence relationship from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically, we argue that low rates of physical exercise in the general population are a function of the evolved human tendency to avoid unnecessary physical exertion. This innate tendency evolved because it allowed our evolutionary ancestors to conserve energy for physical activities that had immediate adaptive utility such as pursuing prey, escaping predators, and engaging in social and reproductive behaviors. The commonly observed negative affective response to exercise is an evolved proximate psychological mechanism through which humans avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. The fact that the human tendencies toward negative affective response to and avoidance of unnecessary physical activities are innate does not mean that they are unchangeable. Indeed, it is only because of human-engineered changes in our environmental conditions (i.e., it is no longer necessary for us to work for our food) that our predisposition to avoid unnecessary physical exertion has become a liability. Thus, it is well within our capabilities to reengineer our environments to once again make PA necessary or, at least, to serve an immediate functional purpose. We propose a two-pronged approach to PA promotion based on this evolutionary functional perspective: first, to promote exercise and other physical activities that are perceived to have an immediate purpose, and second, to instill greater perceived purpose for a wider range of physical activities. We posit that these strategies are more likely to result in more positive (or less negative) affective responses to exercise

  8. Computational Tension Mapping of Adherent Cells Based on Actin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manifacier, Ian; Milan, Jean-Louis; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Chmilewsky, Fanny; Chabrand, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Forces transiting through the cytoskeleton are known to play a role in adherent cell activity. Up to now few approaches haves been able to determine theses intracellular forces. We thus developed a computational mechanical model based on a reconstruction of the cytoskeleton of an adherent cell from fluorescence staining of the actin network and focal adhesions (FA). Our custom made algorithm converted the 2D image of an actin network into a map of contractile interactions inside a 2D node grid, each node representing a group of pixels. We assumed that actin filaments observed under fluorescence microscopy, appear brighter when thicker, we thus presumed that nodes corresponding to pixels with higher actin density were linked by stiffer interactions. This enabled us to create a system of heterogeneous interactions which represent the spatial organization of the contractile actin network. The contractility of this interaction system was then adapted to match the level of force the cell truly exerted on focal adhesions; forces on focal adhesions were estimated from their vinculin expressed size. This enabled the model to compute consistent mechanical forces transiting throughout the cell. After computation, we applied a graphical approach on the original actin image, which enabled us to calculate tension forces throughout the cell, or in a particular region or even in single stress fibers. It also enabled us to study different scenarios which may indicate the mechanical role of other cytoskeletal components such as microtubules. For instance, our results stated that the ratio between intra and extra cellular compression is inversely proportional to intracellular tension. PMID:26812601

  9. Measuring beliefs about gluten free diet adherence in adult coeliac disease using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to elicit the salient beliefs about gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in adults with coeliac disease (CD) and to design a TPB questionnaire to predict adherence levels. This questionnaire was administered to 265 CD participants with adherence and quality of life (QOL) measures, a GFD knowledge test, and self-reported psychiatric history. Regression analyses were used to test the fit of the TPB in predicting adherence, and to determine the nature of the relationships between adherence, QOL, knowledge, and psychiatric history. The TPB combined with self-reported depression and anxiety, and QOL explained significant variance in intention (41.0%) and adherence (33.7%). Poorer dietary adherence and psychiatric history were also associated with lower QOL. Findings suggest that the TPB provides an adequate model for predicting GFD adherence in CD, and the presence of psychiatric conditions represents a potential intervention target to improve adherence and QOL.

  10. Measuring beliefs about gluten free diet adherence in adult coeliac disease using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to elicit the salient beliefs about gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in adults with coeliac disease (CD) and to design a TPB questionnaire to predict adherence levels. This questionnaire was administered to 265 CD participants with adherence and quality of life (QOL) measures, a GFD knowledge test, and self-reported psychiatric history. Regression analyses were used to test the fit of the TPB in predicting adherence, and to determine the nature of the relationships between adherence, QOL, knowledge, and psychiatric history. The TPB combined with self-reported depression and anxiety, and QOL explained significant variance in intention (41.0%) and adherence (33.7%). Poorer dietary adherence and psychiatric history were also associated with lower QOL. Findings suggest that the TPB provides an adequate model for predicting GFD adherence in CD, and the presence of psychiatric conditions represents a potential intervention target to improve adherence and QOL. PMID:21277925

  11. Inhibition of Pneumococcal Adherence to Human Nasopharyngeal Epithelial Cells by Anti-PsaA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Pilishvili, Tamar; Sampson, Jacquelyn S.; Johnson, Scott E.; Stinson, Annie; Carlone, George M.; Ades, Edwin W.

    2003-01-01

    The role of pneumococcal (Pnc) surface adhesin A (PsaA) in the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) to host cells is not well defined. We examined the effect of anti-PsaA antibodies in an inhibition of adherence assay using Detroit 562 nasopharyngeal human epithelial cells. Rabbit polyclonal (Pab) anti-recombinant PsaA (rPsaA) sera, a purified mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) (MAb 6F62G8E12), and 22 healthy adult sera with known anti-PsaA IgG levels (obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit Pnc adherence to confluent monolayers (measured as percent reduction in CFU counts compared to those of uninhibited controls). Pnc adherence was dependent on capsular phenotype (no or low adherence for opaque strains). With an inoculum of 104 to 105 bacteria/well, the mean ± standard deviation count in controls was 163 ± 32 CFU/well for transparent strains. Low adherence was observed for a PsaA-minus mutant even at higher inoculum doses. Mean percent inhibitions of adherence with Pab and MAb were 54 and 50%, respectively. Adult sera showed inhibition in a dose-response fashion with a range of 98 to 8%, depending on the serum anti-PsaA antibody concentration. Absorption of Pab with rPsaA restored Pnc adherence to control levels. Absorption of sera with a PsaA-minus mutant did not result in a significant decrease (P >0.05) of inhibition of adherence activity. Additionally, nearly 100% of Pnc adherence was inhibited by lipidated rPsaA at 2.5 μg/ml. Our data support the argument that PsaA is an adhesin that mediates Pnc adherence to human nasopharyngeal cells. This functional assay may be useful in evaluating antibodies elicited in response to PsaA vaccination. PMID:12626450

  12. Practice what you preach? An exploratory multilevel study on rheumatoid arthritis guideline adherence by rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Lesuis, N; den Broeder, A A; Hulscher, M E J L; van Vollenhoven, R F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess variation in and determinants of rheumatologist guideline adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in daily practice. Methods In this retrospective observational study, guideline adherence in the first year of treatment was assessed for 7 predefined parameters on diagnostics, treatment and follow-up in all adult patients with RA with a first outpatient clinic visit at the study centre, from September 2009 to March 2011. Variation in guideline adherence was assessed on parameter and rheumatologist level. Determinants for guideline adherence were assessed in patients (demographic characteristics, rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (aCCP) positivity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, erosive disease, comorbidity and the number of available disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment options) and rheumatologists (demographic and practice characteristics, guideline knowledge and agreement, outcome expectancy, cognitive bias, thinking style, numeracy and personality). Results A total of 994 visits in 137 patients with RA were reviewed. Variation in guideline adherence among parameters was present (adherence between 21% and 72%), with referral to the physician assistant as lowest scoring and referral to a specialised nurse as highest scoring parameter. Variation in guideline adherence among rheumatologists was also present (adherence between 22% and 100%). Patient sex, the number of DMARD options, presence of erosions, comorbidity, RF/aCCP positivity, type of patient and the rheumatologists' scientific education status were associated with adherence to 1 or more guideline parameters. Conclusions Guideline adherence varied considerably among the guideline parameters and rheumatologists, showing that there is room for improvement. Guideline adherence in our sample was related to several patient and rheumatologist determinants. PMID:27252892

  13. Patterns of analgesic adherence predict health care utilization among outpatients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies in chronic noncancer pain settings have found that opioid use increases health care utilization. Despite the key role of analgesics, specifically opioids, in the setting of cancer pain, there is no literature to our knowledge about the relationship between adherence to prescribed around-the-clock (ATC) analgesics and acute health care utilization (hospitalization) among patients with cancer pain. Purpose To identify adherence patterns over time for cancer patients taking ATC analgesics for pain, cluster these patterns into adherence types, combine the types into an adherence risk factor for hospitalization, identify other risk factors for hospitalization, and identify risk factors for inconsistent analgesic adherence. Materials and methods Data from a 3-month prospective observational study of patients diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myeloma, having cancer-related pain, and having at least one prescription of oral ATC analgesics were collected. Adherence data were collected electronically using the medication event-monitoring system. Analyses were conducted using adaptive modeling methods based on heuristic search through alternative models controlled by likelihood cross-validation scores. Results Six adherence types were identified and combined into the risk factor for hospitalization of inconsistent versus consistent adherence over time. Twenty other individually significant risk factors for hospitalization were identified, but inconsistent analgesic adherence was the strongest of these predictors (ie, generating the largest likelihood cross-validation score). These risk factors were adaptively combined into a model for hospitalization based on six pairwise interaction risk factors with exceptional discrimination (ie, area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.91). Patients had from zero to five of these risk factors, with an odds ratio of 5.44 (95% confidence interval 3.09–9.58) for hospitalization, with a unit

  14. The Association Between Patient-Reported and Objective Oral Anticancer Medication Adherence Measures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Thomas M.; Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Gordon, Mallorie; Avildsen, Isabelle K.; Emanu, Jessica C.; Jewell, Sarah T.; Anselmi, Kimberly A.; Ginex, Pamela K.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Identification Oral anticancer medication (OAM) use has been steadily increasing, leading to several patient benefits. A notable challenge for nurses is accurate monitoring of patient OAM regimens because nonadherence is associated with poor health outcomes and decreased survival. Currently, no gold standard measure of OAM adherence exists. The authors conducted a systematic review of the association between objective and patient-reported measures of OAM adherence. Literature Search A systematic electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, PsycINFO®, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL® databases through November 2014. Data Evaluation Articles were independently reviewed to determine whether they included an original characterization of the level of association between objective and patient-reported measures of OAM adherence. Synthesis From a total of 11,135 articles retrieved, eight studies met inclusion criteria. Objective adherence was primarily assessed using pill counts or Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMSCap™). Patient-reported adherence was most commonly assessed using study-specific questionnaires. Significant positive correlations were observed between objective and patient-reported adherence across most studies, with three studies reporting higher rates of adherence via patient reporting. Conclusions Despite variation in the OAMs and measures used, patient-reported adherence rates were equal to or higher than objective adherence measures across studies. Social desirability bias may be a concern; however, given the significant concordance observed, using patient-reported methods in future studies of OAM adherence may be justified. Implications for Nursing This review provides evidence to support nursing use of patient-reported measures to accurately monitor OAM adherence and potentially improve the quality of patient–provider communication. PMID:27541550

  15. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test. PMID:27695297

  16. Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections

    PubMed Central

    Jarl, Gustav; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor. Aim The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field. Methods We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes. Results Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies) that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies) or conflicting. Conclusion There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications. PMID:27540284

  17. Explaining Adherence Success in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Ethnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Norma C; Idoko, John; Kaaya, Sylvia; Biraro, Irene Andia; Wyatt, Monique A; Agbaji, Oche; Chalamilla, Guerino; Bangsberg, David R

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa generally take more than 90% of prescribed doses of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This number exceeds the levels of adherence observed in North America and dispels early scale-up concerns that adherence would be inadequate in settings of extreme poverty. This paper offers an explanation and theoretical model of ART adherence success based on the results of an ethnographic study in three sub-Saharan African countries. Methods and Findings Determinants of ART adherence for HIV-infected persons in sub-Saharan Africa were examined with ethnographic research methods. 414 in-person interviews were carried out with 252 persons taking ART, their treatment partners, and health care professionals at HIV treatment sites in Jos, Nigeria; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Mbarara, Uganda. 136 field observations of clinic activities were also conducted. Data were examined using category construction and interpretive approaches to analysis. Findings indicate that individuals taking ART routinely overcome economic obstacles to ART adherence through a number of deliberate strategies aimed at prioritizing adherence: borrowing and “begging” transport funds, making “impossible choices” to allocate resources in favor of treatment, and “doing without.” Prioritization of adherence is accomplished through resources and help made available by treatment partners, other family members and friends, and health care providers. Helpers expect adherence and make their expectations known, creating a responsibility on the part of patients to adhere. Patients adhere to promote good will on the part of helpers, thereby ensuring help will be available when future needs arise. Conclusion Adherence success in sub-Saharan Africa can be explained as a means of fulfilling social responsibilities and thus preserving social capital in essential relationships. PMID:19175285

  18. Evaluation of adherence to oral antiviral hepatitis B treatment using structured questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Leesa; Selinger, Christian P; Lee, Alice Unah

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess adherence rates to nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUCs) therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection and determine factors associated with adherence. METHODS: The questionnaire study was conducted in the liver clinics at Concord Repatriation General Hospital. All patients who were currently taking one or more NUCs were asked to complete a structured, self-administered 32-item questionnaire. Adherence was measured using visual analogue scales. The patient’s treating clinician was also asked to assess their patient’s adherence via a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients completed the questionnaire. Sixty six percent of the patients (n = 49) reported optimal adherence whilst 25 (33.8%) graded their adherence to NUCs as suboptimal. Thirty four (43%) patients reported to have omitted taking their NUCs sometime in the past. Recent non-adherence was uncommon. Amongst the patients who reported skipping medications, the most common reason cited was ”forgetfulness“ (n = 27, 56.25%). Other common reasons included: ran out of medications (n = 5, 10.42%), being too busy (n = 4, 8.33%) and due to a change in daily routine (n = 5, 10.42%). Patients who reported low adherence to other prescription pills were also more likely to miss taking NUCs (P = 0.04). Patients who were under the care of a language-discordant clinician were also more likely to report suboptimal adherence to NUCs (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Adherence rates were much less than that expected by the physician and has potential adverse affect on long term outcome. Communication and education appear central and strategies need to be implemented to improve ongoing adherence. PMID:22400085

  19. Potential Interventions to Support Adherence to HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Julia L.; Buisker, Timothy; Horvath, Tara; Amico, K. Rivet; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Grant, Robert M.; Liu, Albert Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Adherence is critical for maximizing the effectiveness of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in preventing HIV infection. Strategies for promoting adherence to HIV treatment, and their potential application to PrEP adherence, have received considerable attention. However, adherence promotion strategies for prevention medications have not been well characterized and may be more applicable to PrEP. We aimed to identify adherence support interventions that have been effective in other prevention fields and could be applied in the HIV prevention context to support pill taking among PrEP users. Methods To identify adherence support interventions that could be evaluated and applied in the PrEP context, we conducted a systematic review across the following prevention fields: hypertension, latent tuberculosis infection, hyperlipidemia, oral contraceptives, osteoporosis, malaria prophylaxis, and post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the efficacy of interventions to improve adherence to daily oral medications prescribed for primary prevention in healthy individuals or for secondary prevention in asymptomatic individuals. Results Our searches identified 585 studies, of which 48 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the review; nine evaluated multiple strategies, yielding 64 separately tested interventions. Interventions with the strongest evidence for improving adherence included complex, resource-intensive interventions, which combined multiple adherence support approaches, and low-cost, low-intensity interventions that provided education or telephone calls for adherence support. Conclusions Our review identified adherence interventions with strong evidence of efficacy across prevention fields and provides recommendations for evaluating these interventions in upcoming PrEP studies. PMID:24580813

  20. Patient Characteristics and Variability in Adherence and Competence in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, James F.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E.; Bullis, Jacqueline; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Although associations with outcome have been inconsistent, therapist adherence and competence continues to garner attention, particularly within the context of increasing interest in the dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based treatments. To date, research on therapist adherence and competence has focused on average levels across therapists. With a few exceptions, research has failed to address multiple sources of variability in adherence and competence, identify important factors that might account for variability, or take these sources of variability into account when examining associations with symptom change. Objective (a) statistically demonstrate between- and within-therapist variability in adherence and competence ratings and examine patient characteristics as predictors of this variability and (b) examine the relationship between adherence/competence and symptom change. Method Randomly selected audiotaped sessions from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder were rated for therapist adherence and competence. Patients completed a self-report measure of panic symptom severity prior to each session and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Personality Disorder Scale prior to the start of treatment. Results Significant between- and within-therapist variability in adherence and competence were observed. Adherence and competence deteriorated significantly over the course of treatment. Higher patient interpersonal aggression was associated with decrements in both adherence and competence. Neither adherence nor competence predicted subsequent panic severity. Conclusions Variability and “drift” in adherence and competence can be observed in controlled trials. Training and implementation efforts should involve continued consultation over multiple cases in order to account for relevant patient factors and promote sustainability across sessions and patients. PMID:23339537

  1. Treatment non-adherence in teenage and young adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kondryn, Helena J; Edmondson, Claire L; Hill, Jonathan; Eden, Tim O B

    2011-01-01

    Adhering to treatment can be a significant issue for many patients diagnosed with chronic health conditions and this has been reported to be greater during the adolescent years. However, little is known about treatment adherence in teenage and young adult (TYA) patients with cancer. To increase awareness of the adherence challenges faced by these patients, we have reviewed the published work. The available evidence suggests that a substantial proportion of TYA patients with cancer do have difficulties, with reports that up to 63% of patients do not adhere to their treatment regimens. However, with inconsistent findings across studies, the true extent of non-adherence for these young patients is still unclear. Furthermore, it is apparent that there are many components of the cancer treatment regimen that have yet to be assessed in relation to patient adherence. Factors that have been shown to affect treatment adherence in TYA patients include patient emotional functioning (depression and self-esteem), patient health beliefs (perceived illness severity and vulnerability), and family environment (parental support and parent-child concordance). Strategies that foster greater patient adherence are also identified. These strategies are multifactorial, targeting not only the patient, but the health professional, family, and treatment regimen. This review highlights the lack of interventional studies addressing treatment adherence in TYA patients with cancer, with only one such intervention being identified: a video game intervention focusing on behavioural issues related to cancer treatment and care. Methodological issues in measuring adherence are addressed and suggestions for improving the design of future adherence studies highlighted, of which there is a great need.

  2. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test.

  3. Adherence: a review of education, research, practice and policy in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fikri-Benbrahim, Narjis; García-Cárdenas, Victoria; Sáez-Benito, Loreto; Gastelurrutia, Miguel A.; Faus, María P.; Schneider, Marie P.; Aslani, Parisa

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To describe medication adherence education, practice, research and policy efforts carried out by pharmacists in Spain in the last decade. Methods: A literature review using Medline and Embase was conducted covering the last ten years. Additional pharmaceutical bibliographic sources in Spain were consulted to retrieve articles of interest from the last decade. Articles were included if a pharmacist was involved and if medication adherence was measured or there was any direct or indirect pharmacist intervention in monitoring and/or improving adherence. Articles focusing on the development of tools for adherence assessment were collected. Pre- and post-graduate pharmacy training programs were also reviewed through the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science website. Information regarding policy issues was gathered from the Spanish and Autonomous Communities of Education and Health Ministries websites. Results: Pharmacists receive no specific training focused on adherence. There is no specific government policies for pharmacists in Spain related to medication adherence regardless of their practice setting. A total of 24 research studies met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 10 involved pharmacist intervention in monitoring and/or improving adherence and 14 assessed only adherence. Ten studies involved hospital pharmacists working in collaboration with another healthcare professional. Conclusions: At present in Spain, the investigative role of the pharmacist is not well developed in the area of medication adherence. Adherence improvement services provided to patients by pharmacists are not implemented in a systematic way. However, recent efforts to implement new initiatives in this area may provide the basis for offering new cognitive services aimed at improving patient adherence in the near future. PMID:25143789

  4. Collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists to enhance adherence to chronic medications

    PubMed Central

    Laubscher, Tessa; Evans, Charity; Blackburn, Dave; Taylor, Jeff; McKay, Shari

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To ascertain the opinions of family physicians about medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases and the role of community pharmacists in improving adherence to chronic medications, as well as their opinions on increased collaboration with pharmacists to enhance medication adherence. DESIGN A self-administered postal survey of 19 questions, with opinions collected by ordinal (5-point Likert scale) and open responses. SETTING Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred and eighty-six family physicians working in Saskatchewan in January 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Descriptive statistics of physicians’ opinions on the following: medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases; their current interaction with community pharmacists; and potential collaborative strategies to promote medication adherence. RESULTS The response rate was 39.4%. Approximately 75% of the physicians acknowledged that nonadherence to chronic medications was a problem among their patients. Medication costs and side effects were identified as the 2 most common reasons for medication nonadherence. Only one-quarter of physicians communicated regularly with community pharmacists about adherence issues; most of these physicians were rural physicians. Most physicians agreed that increased collaboration with pharmacists would improve adherence, although support for potential interactions with pharmacists varied. Concerns were expressed about time required by physicians and financial reimbursement. Physicians in practice for less than 10 years and those practising in rural areas were more willing to share clinical information and communicate with pharmacists to promote medication adherence. CONCLUSION Saskatchewan family physicians appreciate the importance of medication nonadherence but currently seldom interact with community pharmacists on this issue. They believe that pharmacists have a role in supporting patients with medication adherence and indicate a willingness

  5. Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay: a tubeless method for pretransfusion testing and other applications in transfusion science.

    PubMed

    Ching, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay (SPRCA) is one of the two tubeless methods developed to improve sensitivity and specificity in blood group serology. The SPRCA (solid phase) and the column agglutination (gel) technology have gained wide acceptance following successful adaptation to fully automated platforms, The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development, principle, procedures as well as laboratory and clinical applications of the SPRCA in transfusion medicine.

  6. Studies of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of adherent platelets. Paradoxical loss of luminal receptors when platelets adhere to high density fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B S; Kutok, J L; Scudder, L E; Galanakis, D K; West, S M; Rudomen, G S; Springer, K T

    1993-01-01

    The accessibility of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to damaged blood vessels or atherosclerotic plaques is likely to play a crucial role in subsequent platelet recruitment. To define better the factors involved in this process, we developed a functional assay to assess the presence of activated, luminal GPIIb/IIIa receptors, based on their ability to bind erythrocytes containing a high density of covalently coupled RGD-containing peptides (thromboerythrocytes). Platelets readily adhered to wells coated with purified type I rat skin collagen and the adherent platelets bound a dense lawn of thromboerythrocytes. With fibrinogen-coated wells, platelet adhesion increased as the fibrinogen-coating concentration increased, reaching a plateau at about 11 micrograms/ml. Thromboerythrocyte binding to the platelets adherent to fibrinogen showed a paradoxical response, increasing at fibrinogen coating concentrations up to approximately 4-6 micrograms/ml and then dramatically decreasing at higher fibrinogen-coating concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the morphology of platelets adherent to collagen was similar to that of platelets adherent to low density fibrinogen, with extensive filopodia formation and ruffling. In contrast, platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen showed a bland, flattened appearance. Immunogold staining of GPIIb/IIIa receptors demonstrated concentration of the receptors on the filopodia, and depletion of receptors on the flattened portion of the platelets. Thus, there is a paradoxical loss of accessible, activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen. Two factors may contribute to this result: engagement of GPIIb/IIIa receptors with fibrinogen on the abluminal surface leading to the loss of luminal receptors, and loss of luminal filopodia that interact with thromboerythrocytes. These data provide insight into the differences

  7. Patient adherence and treatment outcome with exposure and response prevention for OCD: Which components of adherence matter and who becomes well?

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Michael G; Galfalvy, Hanga; Steinman, Shari A; Wall, Melanie M; Foa, Edna B; Simpson, H Blair

    2016-10-01

    Exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) is an evidence-based treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet not all patients achieve wellness with EX/RP. The degree to which patients adhere to EX/RP procedures outside of sessions has been found to predict therapy outcomes, including who achieves post-treatment wellness. We sought to investigate which components of treatment adherence most relate to outcome and to develop adherence benchmarks to identify who does and does not become well to provide clinicians with prognostic tools. Adherence data came from 37 adult patients with DSM-IV OCD who received 17 sessions of EX/RP as part of a randomized controlled trial of augmentation strategies for incomplete response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Therapists rated between-session patient adherence at each exposure session by quantifying: 1) the quantity of homework exposures attempted; 2) the quality of attempted exposures; and 3) the degree of success with response prevention. Each adherence item significantly correlated with post-treatment OCD severity. Success with response prevention proved particularly strongly linked to therapy outcome. Time course analysis of this item accurately identified, relatively early in treatment, who would achieve post-treatment wellness. These data provide an efficient method for differentiating between those patients who will and will not achieve wellness after EX/RP augmentation of SRIs. Limitations and clinical implications of the current findings are discussed. PMID:27497840

  8. A systematic review of patient self-reported barriers of adherence to antihypertensive medications using the world health organization multidimensional adherence model.

    PubMed

    AlGhurair, Suliman A; Hughes, Christine A; Simpson, Scot H; Guirguis, Lisa M

    2012-12-01

    Multiple barriers can influence adherence to antihypertensive medications. The aim of this systematic review was to determine what adherence barriers were included in each instrument and to describe the psychometric properties of the identified surveys. Barriers were characterized using the World Health Organization (WHO) Multidimensional Adherence Model with patient, condition, therapy, socioeconomic, and health care system/team-related barriers. Five databases (Medline, Embase, Health and Psychological Instruments, CINHAL, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts [IPA]) were searched from 1980 to September 2011. Our search identified 1712 citations; 74 articles met inclusion criteria and 51 unique surveys were identified. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was the most commonly used survey. Only 20 surveys (39%) have established reliability and validity evidence. According to the WHO Adherence Model domains, patient-related barriers were most commonly addressed, while condition, therapy, and socioeconomic barriers were underrepresented. The complexity of adherence behavior requires robust self-report measurements and the inclusion of barriers relevant to each unique patient population and intervention.

  9. Effects of penicillin and erythromycin on adherence of invasive and noninvasive isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes to laminin.

    PubMed

    Šmitran, Aleksandra; Vuković, Dragana; Gajić, Ina; Marinković, Jelena; Ranin, Lazar

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the possible relationship between the invasiveness of group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains and their abilities to adhere to laminin and assessed the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of penicillin and erythromycin on the ability of GAS to adhere to laminin. The adherence of noninvasive and highly invasive isolates of GAS to laminin was significantly higher than the adherence displayed by isolates of low invasiveness. Antibiotic treatment caused significant reductions in adherence to laminin in all three groups of strains. Penicillin was more successful in reducing the adherence abilities of the tested GAS strains than erythromycin.

  10. The Importance of Adhering to Details of the Total Design Method (TDM) for Mail Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillman, Don A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The empirical effects of adherence of details of the Total Design Method (TDM) approach to the design of mail surveys is discussed, based on the implementation of a common survey in 11 different states. The results suggest that greater adherence results in higher response, especially in the later stages of the TDM. (BW)

  11. Body Consciousness, Illness-Related Impairment, and Patient Adherence in Hemodialysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the joint effects of private body consciousness (PBC) and degree of illness-related physical impairment on treatment regimen adherence in a sample of 52 hemodialysis patients. Predicted the effect of PBC on adherence would vary as a function of patients' level of illness-related physical impairment. Results are discussed in terms of…

  12. Coping with Treatment-Related Stress: Effects on Patient Adherence in Hemodialysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the relation of coping to adherence among 57 hemodialysis patients. As predicted, coping efforts involving planful problem solving were associated with more favorable adherence when used in response to stressors involving a relatively controllable aspect of the hemodialysis context. For less controllable stressors, coping efforts…

  13. Dietary Adherence Monitoring Tool for Free-living, Controlled Feeding Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To devise a dietary adherence monitoring tool for use in controlled human feeding trials involving free-living study participants. Methods: A scoring tool was devised to measure and track dietary adherence for an 8-wk randomized trial evaluating the effects of two different dietary patter...

  14. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients…

  15. A Patient Education Program to Improve Adherence Rates with Antituberculosis Drug Regimens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An incentive scheme to reward positive health behaviors (adherence to antituberculosis drug regimens) was tested with 88 active and 117 preventive patients randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Preventive patients who received incentives were significantly more likely to continue care and had higher adherence levels. Actives showed…

  16. Motivational Interviewing (MINT) Improves Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Acceptance and Adherence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Sara; Smith, Simon S.; Oei, Tian P. S.; Douglas, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with…

  17. Is inconsistent pre-treatment bedtime related to CPAP non-adherence?

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Amy M; King, Tonya S; Sawyer, Douglas A; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-12-01

    Lack of adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) limits the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that an irregular bedtime would be negatively related to regular use of CPAP treatment. If so, modifying bedtime schedule may address the persistent problem of inconsistent CPAP use in adults with OSA. In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether inconsistent self-reported bedtime before initiation of CPAP treatment, operationalized as bedtime variability, was (1) different among those adherent (≥4 hours per night) and non-adherent to CPAP treatment at 1 week and 1 month; and/or (2) was related to 1-week and 1-month CPAP use when other variables were accounted for. Consecutively recruited newly diagnosed OSA adults (n = 79) completed sleep diaries prior to CPAP treatment. One-week and 1-month objective CPAP use data were collected. Pre-treatment bedtime variability was different among CPAP non-adherers and adherers at 1 month and was a significant predictor of non-adherence at 1 month in multi-variable analyses. The odds of 1-month CPAP non-adherence were 3.5 times greater in those whose pre-treatment bedtimes varied by >75 minutes. Addressing sleep schedule prior to CPAP initiation may be an opportunity to improve CPAP adherence.

  18. Patient Attitudinal and Behavioral Factors Associated with Warfarin Non-adherence at Outpatient Anticoagulation Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Localio, A. Russell; Platt, Alec B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Christie, Jason D.; Gross, Robert; Parker, Catherine S.; Price, Maureen; Metlay, Joshua P.; Cohen, Abigail; Newcomb, Craig W.; Strom, Brian L.; Kimmel, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Warfarin is an anticoagulant effective in preventing stroke, but it has a narrow therapeutic range requiring optimal adherence to achieve the most favorable effects. Purpose The goal of this study was to examine specific patient factors that might help explain warfarin non-adherence at outpatient anticoagulation clinics. Method In a prospective cohort study of 156 adults, we utilized logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between the five Treatment Prognostics scales from the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD), as well as three additional MBMD scales (Depression, Future Pessimism, and Social Isolation), and daily warfarin non-adherence assessed using electronic medication event monitoring systems caps over a median of 139 days. Results Four of the five Treatment Prognostic scales and greater social isolation were associated with warfarin non-adherence. When controlling for pertinent demographic and medical variables, the Information Discomfort scale remained significantly associated with warfarin non-adherence over time. Conclusion Although several factors were related to warfarin non-adherence, patients reporting a lack of receptivity to details regarding their medical illness seemed most at risk for warfarin non-adherence. This information might aid in the development of interventions to enhance warfarin adherence and perhaps reduce adverse medical events. PMID:19579066

  19. Report: trends in adherence to secondary prevention medications in post-acute coronary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Yaman Walid; Hassan, Yahaya; Aziz, Noorizan Abd; Zulkifly, Hanis Hanum; Iqbal, Muhammad Shahid

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate patients' adherence to evidence-based therapies at an average of 2 years after discharge for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and to identify factors associated with non-adherence. This study was conducted at Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. A random sample of ACS patients (n=190) who had discharged on a regimen of secondary preventive medications were included and followed up over a three follow-up appointments at 8, 16, and 23 months post discharge. At each appointment, patients were interviewed and given Morisky questioner to complete in order to compare their level of adherence to the prescribed regimens across the three consecutive time periods. Majority of patients reported either medium or low adherence across the three time periods with only small portion reported high adherence. Furthermore, there was a significant downward trend in the level of adherence to cardio protective medications during the study period (p<0.001). This study also identified 6 factors-age, gender, employment status, ACS subtype, number of co morbidities and number of prescription medications per day that may influence Patients' adherence to their medications. Our findings suggest that long-term adherence to secondary prevention therapies among patients with ACS in Malaysia is sub optimal and influenced by many demographic, social as well as clinical factors.

  20. The effect of conflicting medication information and physician support on medication adherence for chronically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Delesha M.; DeVellis, Robert F.; Fisher, Edwin B.; DeVellis, Brenda M.; Hogan, Susan L.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This article explores the effect of conflicting information, defined as contradictory information about medication topics from different sources, on medication adherence in a sample of chronically ill patients. We specifically investigate whether conflicting information and physician support directly affect medication adherence or whether the effect is mediated by adherence self-efficacy and outcome expectations for medications. Methods Vasculitis patients (n=228) completed two on-line questionnaires which contained measures of conflicting information, adherence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, physician support, and medication adherence. We conducted a mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach to generate point estimates and 95% confidence intervals to test the significance of each mediated effect. Results A majority of patients (51.3%) received conflicting medication information. Conflicting information had a direct negative effect on medication adherence, which was not mediated by self-efficacy or outcome expectations. Alternatively, self-efficacy mediated the positive effect of physician support on medication adherence. Conclusion Patients who encounter conflicting medication information are less adherent to their medications. The presence of a supportive physician may counteract the negative effect of conflicting medication information. Practice Implications Physicians should initiate conversations about conflicting medication information with their patients. Consensus-based guidelines that address medication discrepancies may also reduce the availability of conflicting information. PMID:20044230

  1. An Application of School-Based Intervention Implementation Adherence Monitoring and Performance Feedback Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Julia Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the application of implementation adherence monitoring and group feedback procedures with teachers implementing the Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI; Fountas & Pinnell, 2008a). Using a repeated measures design across time, changes in implementation adherence levels were examined as teachers participated in…

  2. Assessment of Adherence to Eating Habit and Exercise Components in a Behavioral Weight Control Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zegman, Marilyn A.

    Although the augmental value of exercise to behavioral weight control programs has been suggested, demonstration of this value is dependent upon an assessment of adherence to change in eating habits and activity patterns. Self-report measures of adherence were obtained from overweight college women undergoing treatment that involved either dietary…

  3. Patient Characteristics and Variability in Adherence and Competence in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, James F.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E.; Bullis, Jacqueline; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Although associations with outcome have been inconsistent, therapist adherence and competence continues to garner attention, particularly within the context of increasing interest in the dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based treatments. To date, research on therapist adherence and competence has focused on average…

  4. 14 CFR § 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates. (a) Although NASA assumes no responsibility for budget overruns, the recipient may spend grant... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adherence to original budget estimates....

  5. The Problem of Exercise Adherence: Fighting Sloth in Nations with Market Economies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses physical activity and exercise adherence, describing five conundrums that retard advances in knowledge about causal determinants of physical activity and successful interventions that increase physical activity and exercise adherence: adoption versus maintenance; social marketing versus product marketing; mediators of physical activity;…

  6. 76 FR 12969 - Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... goal of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research is to raise consumers' awareness of the ] importance of good medication adherence, a vital first step toward improved adherence behavior and better... National Consumers League (NCL) to develop and lead a groundbreaking national campaign to raise...

  7. TIME PERSPECTIVE AND MEDICATION ADHERENCE AMONG INDIVIDUALS WITH HYPERTENSION OR DIABETES MELLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brittany; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Guthrie, Lori; Ward, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The study determined if time perspective was associated with medication adherence among people with hypertension and diabetes. Methods Using the Health Beliefs Model, we used path analysis to test direct and indirect effects of time perspective and health beliefs on adherence among 178 people who participated in a community-based survey near Washington, D. C. We measured three time perspectives (future, present fatalistic, and present hedonistic) with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and medication adherence by self-report. Results The total model demonstrated a good fit (RMSEA = 0.17, 90% CI [0.10, 0.28], p = 0.003; comparative fit index = 0.91). Future time perspective and age showed direct effects on increased medication adherence; an increase by a single unit in future time perspective was associated with a 0.32 standard deviation increase in reported adherence. There were no significant indirect effects of time perspective with reported medication adherence through health beliefs. Conclusion The findings provide the first evidence that time perspective plays an under-recognized role as a psychological motivator in medication adherence. Practice Implications Patient counseling for medication adherence may be enhanced if clinicians incorporate consideration of the patient’s time perspective. PMID:24480361

  8. Adherence to Self-Care Interventions for Depression or Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Russell; McCusker, Jane; Sewitch, Maida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to synthesise and describe adherence to intervention in published studies of supported self-care for depression or anxiety, and to identify participant characteristics associated with higher adherence. Methods: We searched the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCINFO for the period from January…

  9. Prospective study of vaginal dilator use adherence and efficacy following radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ethel; Kelvin, Joanne F.; Thom, Bridgette; Riedel, Elyn; Tom, Ashlyn; Carter, Jeanne; Alektiar, Kaled; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Vaginal stenosis (VS) after pelvic radiotherapy can impair long-term quality of life. We prospectively assessed adherence and efficacy of VD use as the primary and secondary objectives, respectively. Material and methods Women with gastrointestinal (n=63) and gynecologic (n=46) cancers self-reported use and VD size in monthly diaries for 12 months after radiotherapy. Adherence was measured as actual VD use out of recommended times over 12 months (3×/week × 52 weeks = 156). Results Among 109 participants, aged 28–81 years (median, 58 years), mean percent adherence over 12 months was 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%–48%). Adherence was highest in the first quarter (56%), but fell to 25% by the fourth. Disease type, treatment sequence, and chemotherapy were predictors of adherence (all P<.05). Eighty-two percent maintained pre-RT VD size at 12 months; of 49% with decrease in VD size at 1 month post-RT, 71% returned to pre-RT VD size at 12 months. Disease type, younger age, and increased adherence at 6 months were associated with maintaining or returning to pre-RT size at 12 months (all P≤.05). Conclusions VD use is effective in minimizing VS, but adherence at 12 months was poor. Studies evaluating methods of improving adherence and determining the optimal frequency and duration of use are needed. PMID:26164775

  10. Standardizing Terminology and Definitions of Medication Adherence and Persistence in Research employing Electronic Databases

    PubMed Central

    Raebel, Marsha A.; Schmittdiel, Julie; Karter, Andrew J.; Konieczny, Jennifer L.; Steiner, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To propose a unifying set of definitions for prescription adherence research utilizing electronic health record prescribing databases, prescription dispensing databases, and pharmacy claims databases and to provide a conceptual framework to operationalize these definitions consistently across studies. Methods We reviewed recent literature to identify definitions in electronic database studies of prescription-filling patterns for chronic oral medications. We then develop a conceptual model and propose standardized terminology and definitions to describe prescription-filling behavior from electronic databases. Results The conceptual model we propose defines two separate constructs: medication adherence and persistence. We define primary and secondary adherence as distinct sub-types of adherence. Metrics for estimating secondary adherence are discussed and critiqued, including a newer metric (New Prescription Medication Gap measure) that enables estimation of both primary and secondary adherence. Discussion Terminology currently used in prescription adherence research employing electronic databases lacks consistency. We propose a clear, consistent, broadly applicable conceptual model and terminology for such studies. The model and definitions facilitate research utilizing electronic medication prescribing, dispensing, and/or claims databases and encompasses the entire continuum of prescription-filling behavior. Conclusion Employing conceptually clear and consistent terminology to define medication adherence and persistence will facilitate future comparative effectiveness research and meta-analytic studies that utilize electronic prescription and dispensing records. PMID:23774515

  11. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  12. What We Mean When We Talk About Adherence in Respiratory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vrijens, Bernard; Dima, Alexandra L; Van Ganse, Eric; van Boven, Job F M; Eakin, Michelle N; Foster, Juliet M; de Bruin, Marijn; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Adequate medication adherence is key for optimal benefit of pharmacological treatments. A wealth of research has been conducted to understand and identify opportunities to intervene to improve medication adherence, but variations in adherence definitions within prior research have led to ambiguity in study findings. The lack of a standard taxonomy hinders the development of cumulative science in adherence research. This article reviews the newly established Ascertaining Barriers to Compliance (ABC) taxonomy for medication adherence with a particular focus on its relevance and applicability within the context of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management. Building on traditional definitions and concepts within medication adherence, the ABC taxonomy considers the temporal sequence of steps a patient must undertake to be defined as "adherent to treatment": (A) initiation, (B) implementation, and (C) persistence. We explain the clinical and research relevance of differentiating between these phases, point to differences in its applicability in observational and experimental research, review strengths and limitations of available measures, and highlight recent findings on specific determinants of these behaviors. Finally, we provide recommendations for research and practice with a view to supporting and sign posting opportunities to improve future respiratory medication adherence and associated research. PMID:27587314

  13. Treatment Adherence in a Lay Health Adviser Intervention to Treat Tobacco Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, N. E.; Ferketich, A. K.; Paskett, E. D.; Wewers, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Lay health advisers (LHAs) are increasingly used to deliver tobacco dependence treatment, especially with low-socioeconomic status (SES) populations. More information is needed about treatment adherence to help interpret mixed evidence of LHA intervention effectiveness. This study examined adherence to behavioral counseling and nicotine patches in…

  14. Neighborhood Environment and Adherence to a Walking Intervention in African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenk, Shannon N.; Wilbur, JoEllen; Wang, Edward; McDevitt, Judith; Oh, April; Block, Richard; McNeil, Sue; Savar, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This secondary analysis examined relationships between the environment and adherence to a walking intervention among 252 urban and suburban, midlife African American women. Participants received an enhanced or minimal behavioral intervention. Walking adherence was measured as the percentage of prescribed walks completed. Objective measures of the…

  15. Cultural Rationales Guiding Medication Adherence Among African American with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Stewart; Berry, Rico; Luborsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract To date, only modest gains have been achieved in explaining adherence to medical regimens, limiting effective interventions. This is a particularly important issue for African Americans who are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Few studies have focused on intragroup variation among African Americans in adherence to ART. The aim of this study was to identify and describe the cultural rationales guiding African American patients' formulation and evaluation of adherence. Rationales are key features of purposeful human action. In-depth interviews with 80 seropositive African Americans were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Participant CD4, viral load and medical histories were collected at each data point. Analysis of four waves of panel data identified three types of adherence rationales: Authoritative Knowledge Rationale (AKR; n=29, 36.3%), Following Doctors' Orders Rationale (DOR; n=24, 30.0%) and Individualized Adherence Rationale (IAR; n=27, 33.8%). Differences in mean reported adherence between the rationale groups did not achieve statistical significance. However, the fraction reporting low adherence (<70%), although not different by rationale group at the first interview (T1), was significantly higher for the IAR group by the fourth interview (T4). Objective clinical markers (CD4 and viral load) improved over time (from T1 to T4) for AKR and DOR groups, but remained unchanged for the IAR group, yet self-reported adherence declined for all groups over the course of the four interviews. PMID:21777141

  16. Relationship between buprenorphine adherence and health service utilization and costs among opioid dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Joseph; Volpicelli, Joseph; Un, Hyong; Ruetsch, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Buprenorphine-medication assisted therapy (B-MAT) is an effective treatment for opioid dependence, but may be considered cost-prohibitive based on ingredient cost alone. The purpose of this study was to use medical and pharmacy claims data to estimate the healthcare service utilization and costs associated with B-MAT adherence among a sample of opioid dependent members. Members were placed into two adherence groups based on 1-year medication possession ratio (≥ 0.80 vs. <0.80). The B-MAT adherent group incurred significantly higher pharmacy charges (adjusted means; $6,156 vs. $3,581), but lower outpatient ($9,288 vs. $14,570), inpatient ($10,982 vs. $26,470), ER ($1,891 vs. $4,439), and total healthcare charges ($28,458 vs. $49,051; p<0.01) compared to non-adherent members. Adherence effects were confirmed in general linear models. Though B-MAT adherence requires increased pharmacy utilization, adherent individuals were shown to use fewer expensive health care services, resulting in overall reduced healthcare expenditure compared to non-adherent patients.

  17. Enhancing Adherence among Older African American Men Enrolled in a Longitudinal Cancer Screening Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Marvella E.; Havstad, Suzanne; Vernon, Sally W.; Davis, Shawna D.; Kroll, David; Lamerato, Lois; Swanson, G. Marie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to enhance adherence among older (aged 55 years and older) African American men enrolled in a cancer screening trial for prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer. For this study, we defined "adherence" as completing the trial screenings. Design and Methods: We used a randomized trial design. Case managers…

  18. Patient Related Factors Affecting Adherence to Antimalarial Medication in an Urban Estate in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amponsah, Alexandria O.; Vosper, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the adherence to Artemisinin based Combination Therapy and to determine patient related factors that affect adherence. Three hundred (300) patients receiving ACT treatment dispensed from the community pharmacy were randomly selected and followed up on the fourth day after the start of their three-day therapy to assess adherence. Adherence was measured by pill count. Quantitative interviews using a semistructured questionnaire were used to assess patients' knowledge and beliefs on malaria and its treatment. Adherence levels to the ACTs were 57.3%. Patient related factors that affected adherence to ACTs were patients' knowledge on the dosage (P = 0.007; v = 0.457), efficacy (P = 0.009; v = 0.377), and side effects (P = 0.000; v = 0.403) of the ACTs used for the management of malaria, patients' awareness of the consequences of not completing the doses of antimalarial dispensed (P = 0.001; v = 0.309), and patients' belief that “natural remedies are safer than medicines” and “prescribers place too much trust in medicines.” There was no significant relationship between adherence and patients' knowledge on the causes, signs, and symptoms of malaria. There is the need for pharmacy staff to stress on these variables when counseling patients on antimalarials as these affect adherence levels. PMID:25767736

  19. Adherence to Eating and Drinking Guidelines for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet

    2003-01-01

    The extent to which 40 individuals with intellectual disorders and dysphagia and their caregivers adhered to speech and language pathology dysphagia guidelines was evaluated across four settings. Although adherence was generally high, there were significant differences across settings, type of guidelines, and between people who were fed by…

  20. A Multifaceted Prospective Memory Intervention to Improve Medication Adherence: Design of a Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Kathie C.; Einstein, Gilles O.; Morrow, Daniel G.; Hepworth, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive agents is critical because control of elevated blood pressure is the single most important way to prevent stroke and other end organ damage. Unfortunately, nonadherence remains a significant problem. Previous interventions designed to improve adherence have demonstrated only small benefits of strategies that target single facets such as understanding medication directions. The intervention described here is informed by prospective memory theory and performance of older adults in laboratory-based paradigms and uses a comprehensive, multifaceted approach to improve adherence. It incorporates multiple strategies designed to support key components of prospective remembering involved in taking medication. The intervention is delivered by nurses in the home with an education control group for comparison. Differences between groups in overall adherence following the intervention and 6 months later will be tested. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels also will be examined between groups and as it relates to adherence. Intra-individual regression is planned to examine change in adherence over time and its predictors. Finally, we will examine the association between executive function/working memory and adherence, predicting that adherence will be related to executive/working memory in the control group but not in the intervention group. PMID:23010608

  1. Adherence to Behavioral and Medical Treatment Recommendations by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy R.; Symons, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which parents of children with intellectual or developmental disabilities are adherent to prescribed treatments has not been investigated. In this treatment adherence study, parents (n = 220) of children with autism spectrum disorders were surveyed regarding implementation of recommended treatments to manage problem behavior of their…

  2. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  3. A multifaceted prospective memory intervention to improve medication adherence: design of a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Insel, Kathleen C; Einstein, Gilles O; Morrow, Daniel G; Hepworth, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive agents is critical because control of elevated blood pressure is the single most important way to prevent stroke and other end organ damage. Unfortunately, nonadherence remains a significant problem. Previous interventions designed to improve adherence have demonstrated only small benefits of strategies that target single facets such as understanding medication directions. The intervention described here is informed by prospective memory theory and performance of older adults in laboratory-based paradigms and uses a comprehensive, multifaceted approach to improve adherence. It incorporates multiple strategies designed to support key components of prospective remembering involved in taking medication. The intervention is delivered by nurses in the home with an education control group for comparison. Differences between groups in overall adherence following the intervention and 6 months later will be tested. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels also will be examined between groups and as they relate to adherence. Intra-individual regression is planned to examine change in adherence over time and its predictors. Finally, we will examine the association between executive function/working memory and adherence, predicting that adherence will be related to executive/working memory in the control group but not in the intervention group. PMID:23010608

  4. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS) exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6), with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02) and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03), were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients. PMID:27326380

  5. Impact of oral antipsychotic medication adherence on healthcare resource utilization among schizophrenia patients with Medicare coverage.

    PubMed

    Offord, Steve; Lin, Jay; Wong, Bruce; Mirski, Dario; Baker, Ross A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to antipsychotic medications is widespread and compromises the outcome of patients with schizophrenia. Using the MarketScan Medicare claims database, this study examined the impact of medication adherence on healthcare utilization among Medicare insured schizophrenia patients. The study population was separated into two cohorts defined by medication adherence, one with a medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥0.7 (high adherence) and the other with a MPR <0.7(low adherence). Of the 354 patients identified, 126 (36 %) had high adherence (mean ± SD MPR 0.94 ± 0.09) and 228 (64 %) had low adherence (MPR 0.24 ± 0.19). All cause hospitalizations (0.68 vs. 0.44; p = 0.015) and length of stay (LOS) (7.0 vs. 2.6 days; p = 0.005), and relapse hospitalizations (0.22 vs. 0.11; p = 0.028) and LOS (3.2 vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.027) were greater among patients with low adherence. Low adherent Medicare insured patients with schizophrenia require significantly more inpatient care and represent a patient population in which effective interventions are needed to improve disease management.

  6. Barriers to treatment adherence in physiotherapy outpatient clinics: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Kirsten; McLean, Sionnadh Mairi; Moffett, Jennifer Klaber; Gardiner, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment can have negative effects on outcomes and healthcare cost. However, little is known about the barriers to treatment adherence within physiotherapy. The aim of this systematic review was to identify barriers to treatment adherence in patients typically managed in musculoskeletal physiotherapy outpatient settings and suggest strategies for reducing their impact. The review included twenty high quality studies investigating barriers to treatment adherence in musculoskeletal populations. There was strong evidence that poor treatment adherence was associated with low levels of physical activity at baseline or in previous weeks, low in-treatment adherence with exercise, low self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, helplessness, poor social support/activity, greater perceived number of barriers to exercise and increased pain levels during exercise. Strategies to overcome these barriers and improve adherence are considered. We found limited evidence for many factors and further high quality research is required to investigate the predictive validity of these potential barriers. Much of the available research has focussed on patient factors and additional research is required to investigate the barriers introduced by health professionals or health organisations, since these factors are also likely to influence patient adherence with treatment. PMID:20163979

  7. Role of sulfated glycans in adherence of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon intestinalis to host cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hayman, J Russell; Southern, Timothy R; Nash, Theodore E

    2005-02-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular opportunistic protists that infect a wide variety of animals, including humans, via environmentally resistant spores. Infection requires that spores be in close proximity to host cells so that the hollow polar tube can pierce the cell membrane and inject the spore contents into the cell cytoplasm. Like other eukaryotic microbes, microsporidia may use specific mechanisms for adherence in order to achieve target cell proximity and increase the likelihood of successful infection. Our data show that Encephalitozoon intestinalis exploits sulfated glycans such as the cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in selection of and attachment to host cells. When exogenous sulfated glycans are used as inhibitors in spore adherence assays, E. intestinalis spore adherence is reduced by as much as 88%. However, there is no inhibition when nonsulfated glycans are used, suggesting that E. intestinalis spores utilize sulfated host cell glycans in adherence. These studies were confirmed by exposure of host cells to xylopyranoside, which limits host cell surface GAGs, and sodium chlorate, which decreases surface sulfation. Spore adherence studies with CHO mutant cell lines that are deficient in either surface GAGs or surface heparan sulfate also confirmed the necessity of sulfated glycans. Furthermore, when spore adherence is inhibited, host cell infection is reduced, indicating a direct association between spore adherence and infectivity. These data show that E. intestinalis specifically adheres to target cells by way of sulfated host cell surface GAGs and that this mechanism serves to enhance infectivity.

  8. The Influence of Parental Factors on Therapist Adherence in Multi-Systemic Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mesha L.; Weiss, Bahr; Han, Susan; Gallop, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Therapist treatment adherence has received a great deal of attention in recent years, in part because of its relation to treatment outcomes. Although certain therapist behaviors have been found to be associated with treatment outcomes, little is known about client factors impacting on therapists' ability to adhere to treatment protocols. In this…

  9. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    PubMed

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology.

  10. Therapist Adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Puccinelli, Marc J.; Henderson, Craig; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Therapist adherence has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in family therapy. In prior studies, adherence has been represented broadly by core principles and a consistent family (vs. individual) focus. To date, these studies have not captured the range of clinical skills that are represented in complex family-based approaches or…

  11. Psychotropic Medication Adherence among Community-Based Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D.; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Patel, Isha; Chang, Jongwha; Erickson, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are a common treatment for mental illness in people with developmental disabilities. Medication adherence is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of psychotropic drugs, but psychotropic medication adherence research specific to this population remains limited. This retrospective study analyzed Marketscan®…

  12. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  13. Improving Adherence to Medication Regimens for Children with Asthma and Its Effect on Clinical Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Costa, Irene G.; Rapoff, Michael A.; Lemanek, Kathleen; Goldstein, Gerald L.

    1997-01-01

    A study examined the effects of a combined education and token system intervention to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids for an 8-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy with asthma. A withdrawal design demonstrated improved adherence and, for one child, an associated improvement in pulmonary function occurred. (Author/CR)

  14. Medication Adherence among Adolescents in a School-Based Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Cynthia J.; Charlebois, Nicole M.; Holl, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    School-based health centers are an integral part of the health care delivery system for low-income children. Medication adherence for these patients may be challenging because the student is often responsible for bringing home the prescription and receiving the instructions. This study assesses medication fill, initiation, and adherence rates…

  15. Caregiver Resources and Facilitation of Elderly Care Recipient Adherence to Health Regimens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Haya; Litwin, Howard

    2003-01-01

    We studied the relationship between caregivers' personal and social resources and facilitation of adherence by elderly care recipients to a prescribed health regimen. Adherence facilitation was measured among 240 caregivers on a 45-item instrument constructed for this research. The facilitation score was regressed on caregivers' role-specific…

  16. MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN ELDERLY WITH POLYPHARMACY LIVING AT HOME: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF EXISTING STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Zelko, Erika; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Tusek-Bunc, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    Background: We wanted to systematically review the available evidence to evaluate the drug adherence in elderly with polypharmacy living at home. Methods: We performed a literature search using MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, ProQuest, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Springer Link, Sage Journals and CINAHL. We used the following terms: Medication Adherence, Medication Compliance, Polypharmacy, and Elderly. The search was limited to English-language articles. We included only clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and cross-sectional studies. Results: A total of seven articles were included in this systematic review after applying the search strategy. Six studies dealt with the prevalence of medication adherence and its correlates in patients aged 65 years or more with polypharmacy. Two studies dealt with the effect of various interventions on medication adherence in patients aged 65 years or more with polypharmacy. Conclusion: The available literature on the polypharmacy and drug adherence in elderly living at home is scarce and further studies are needed. PMID:27147920

  17. Neighborhood Environment and Adherence to a Walking Intervention in African-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Zenk, Shannon N.; Wilbur, JoEllen; Wang, Edward; McDevitt, Judith; Oh, April; Block, Richard; McNeil, Sue; Savar, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This secondary analysis examined relationships between the environment and adherence to a walking intervention among 252 urban and suburban midlife African-American women. Participants received an enhanced or minimal behavioral intervention. Walking adherence was measured as the percentage of prescribed walks completed. Objective measures of the women’s neighborhoods included: walkability (land use mix, street intersection density, housing unit density, public transit stop density), aesthetics (physical deterioration, industrial land use), availability of outdoor (recreational open space) and indoor (recreation centers, shopping malls) walking facilities/spaces, and safety (violent crime incidents). Ordinary least squares regression estimated relationships. We found presence of one and especially both types of indoor walking facilities were associated with greater adherence. No associations were found between adherence and the other environmental variables. The effect of the enhanced intervention on adherence did not differ by environmental characteristics. Aspects of the environment may influence African-American women who want to be more active. PMID:18669878

  18. Early behavioral adherence predicts short and long-term weight loss in the POUNDS LOST study.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Anton, Stephen D; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Allen, Ray; Leblanc, Eric; Ryan, Donna H; Rood, Jennifer; McManus, Katherine; Laranjo, Nancy; Carey, Vincent J; Loria, Catherine M; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M

    2010-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to test the association of early (first 6 months) adherence related to diet, self-monitoring, and attendance with changes in adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors. This study used data from the 24-month POUNDS LOST trial that tested the efficacy of four dietary macronutrient compositions for short-and long-term weight loss. A computer tracking system was used to record data on eight indicator variables related to adherence. Using canonical correlations at the 6 and 24 month measurement periods, early behavioral adherence was associated with changes in percent weight loss and waist circumference at 6 months (R = 0.52) and 24 months (R = 0.37), but was not associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels. Early dietary adherence was associated with changes in insulin at 6 months (R = 0.19), but not at 24 months (R = 0.08, ns). Early dietary adherence was not associated with changes in adiposity.

  19. Strategies to improve medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia: the role of support services

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallakh, Peggy; Findlay, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe research over the past 10 years on the role of support services in promoting medication adherence in mental health consumers diagnosed with schizophrenia. A literature search was conducted using the terms “medication adherence,” “schizophrenia,” and “support services,” using Medline, PubMed, and CINAHL. Reference lists from published studies were also reviewed to identify additional research studies. Twenty-two articles focused on support-service intervention studies, and these were selected for review. Available support-service interventions include adherence therapy, electronic reminders via text messages and telephones, cognitive–behavioral and motivational strategies, and financial incentives. Support-service intervention strategies need to be tailored to the specific needs of mental health consumers with schizophrenia. More research is needed to investigate effective support services to enhance long-term adherence and adherence to medications for medical illnesses in this population. PMID:25931823

  20. [Modifying habits and treatment adherence, essential for controlling the chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Pisano González, Marta M; González Pisano, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic adherence is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior (taking medications, following a diet and changes in lifestyle) coincides with health recommendations (WHO, 2004). We can deduce that is a multiple, complex and changing phenomenon, that there can be total or partial adherence to a treatment, and depending on timing and circumstances. Lack of adherence is a worrying problem; due to its great magnitude and complexity (over two hundred factors) it is responsible for the increased morbid-mortality, complications, hospital admissions, health costs, and dissatisfaction of the user and health professionals. In this paper we develop effective interventions in changing habits and improving adherence: cognitive (education and improved communication), behavior and motivation. Interventions areas include pharmacological treatments, habits and life style, as well as social and family support. The most effective model emphasizes self-care and self-responsibility of the user to manage their disease and increase adherence. PMID:24369770

  1. Adherence to HEp-2 cells and enteropathogenic potential of Aeromonas spp.

    PubMed

    Grey, P A; Kirov, S M

    1993-04-01

    Aeromonas strains (total = 60) of clinical, water and food origin were tested for adherence to HEp-2 cells. Environmental strains were selected (except for A. caviae) to include primarily those expressing other virulence-associated properties. Adhesion was markedly species-dependent (A. veronii biotype sobria, 15 of 26 [58%]. A caviae, 4 of 12 [33%] and A. hydrophila, 2 of 8 [11%]). A. veronii biotype sobria were adhesive, irrespective of source (62 and 54% for clinical and environmental strains, respectively). Adherent strains of this species were enterotoxin-positive and most (13 of 15) grew at 43 degrees C. A. caviae isolated from clinical specimens contained a higher proportion (75%) of adherent strains than environmental strains (13%). Virulent subsets of A. veronii biotype sobria and A. caviae are adherent to HEp-2 cells. The HEp-2 assay is a useful model for investigating mechanisms of adherence and enteropathogenicity of virulent Aeromonas species.

  2. Antiretroviral regimen and suboptimal medication adherence are associated with low-level human immunodeficiency virus viremia.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Christina; Ribaudo, Heather; Ragland, Kathleen; Bangsberg, David R; Li, Jonathan Z

    2015-01-01

    Episodes of human immunodeficiency virus low-level viremia (LLV) are common in the clinical setting, but its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen and adherence remains unclear. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was evaluated in participants of the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless cohort by unannounced pill counts. Factors associated with increased risk of LLV include treatment with a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen (ritonavir-boosted PI vs nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor: adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.1; P = .01) and lower ART adherence over the past 3 months (HR, 1.1 per 5% decreased adherence, adjusted; P = .050). Patients with LLV may benefit from ART adherence counseling and potentially regimen modification. PMID:25884007

  3. Therapist adherence and organizational effects on change in youth behavior problems one year after multisystemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, Sonja K; Carter, Rickey E; Chapman, Jason E; Sheidow, Ashli J

    2008-09-01

    The current study investigated the relations among therapist adherence to an evidence-based treatment for youth with serious antisocial behavior (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), organizational climate and structure, and improvement in youth behavior problems one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 therapists across 45 provider organizations in North America. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) results showed therapist adherence predicted improvement in youth behavior. Two structure variables and one climate variable predicted changes in youth behavior, and the climate variable also predicted therapist adherence. No statistical support for formal mediation of organizational effects through adherence was found, though examination of changes in parameter estimates suggest a possible interplay of organizational climate with adherence and youth behavior change.

  4. Predictors of adherence in a community-based tai chi program.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suhayb; Ardern, Chris; Tamim, Hala

    2015-06-01

    This study examined factors affecting adherence in a 16-week tai chi program among multi-ethnic middle-aged and older adults living in a low socioeconomic environment in Toronto. Analysis was based on data collected from three tai chi program cohorts that took place from August 2009 to March 2012. The main outcome variable, adherence, was measured by the total number of sessions attended by each of the participants. Total sample size was 210 participants with a mean age of 68.1 ± 8.6. Based on the regression model, greater adherence was significantly associated with older age, greater perceived stress, higher education, and higher mental and physical scores of Short Form-36 components. Conversely, lower adherence was significantly associated with higher baseline weekly physical activity. Our findings suggest that we target less-educated individuals with poor mental and physical health to optimize adherence for future community-based tai chi programs.

  5. A cost analysis of an internet based medication adherence intervention for people living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Page, Timothy F.; Horvath, Keith J.; Danilenko, Gene P.; Williams, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document development costs and estimate implementation costs of an internet based medication adherence intervention for people living with HIV in the US. Participants (n=61) were enrolled in the 8 week study in 2011 and entered the intervention website remotely in the setting of their choice. Development costs were obtained from a feasibility and acceptability study of an internet based medication adherence intervention. Implementation costs were estimated based on an 8 week trial period during the feasibility and acceptability study. Results indicated that although developing an internet based medication adherence intervention is expensive, the monthly cost of implementing and delivering the intervention is low. If the efficacy of similar interventions can be established, these results suggest the internet could be an effective method for delivering medication adherence interventions to persons residing in areas with limited access to in-person adherence services. PMID:22362156

  6. The Role of Depression in Medication Adherence Among Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Yi (Jean); Sayers, Steven L.; Weissinger, Guy; Riegel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the association between depression and medication adherence in heart failure (HF) patients. Studies have shown that people with depression are likely to be nonadherent to their prescribed medication treatment. But other studies suggest that nonadherence may be overestimated by people with depression. A total of 244 adults with Stage C HF completed the study. Self-reported medication adherence was obtained using the Basel Assessment of Adherence Scale (BAAS); objective data on medication adherence were collected using the electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Depression was measured via self-report with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). There was a significant difference between depressed and nondepressed participants in self-reported medication nonadherence (p = .008), but not in objectively measured medication nonadherence (p = .72). The depressed sample was 2.3 times more likely to self-report poor medication adherence than those who were nondepressed (p = .006). PMID:23548500

  7. Health behavior predictors of medication adherence among low health literacy people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Pellowski, Jennifer A; Kalichman, Seth C

    2016-09-01

    One particularly vulnerable population for HIV treatment non-adherence is persons with poor health literacy skills. For these individuals, it is important to simplify medication taking as much as possible by integrating medication adherence into other routine health behaviors. This study aims to ascertain the relationship between medication adherence and other health behaviors. Adults living with HIV (N = 422) completed intake measures and 3 months of unannounced pill counts. Endorsement of diet and exercise behaviors at intake predicted higher medication adherence, over and above other known predictors of medication adherence such as HIV symptoms, depression, social support, and stress. These results support integrating strategies for medication management into a constellation of routine health practices. PMID:25706334

  8. Anxiety and depression symptoms as risk factors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Remien, Robert H

    2010-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common among HIV-infected people and rank among the strongest predictors of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This longitudinal study aimed to assess whether symptoms of anxiety and depression are predictors of non-adherence among patients initiating ART at two public referral centers (n = 293) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Prevalence of severe anxiety and depression symptoms before starting ART was 12.6% and 5.8%, respectively. Severe anxiety was a predictor of non-adherence to ART during follow-up period (RH = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.14-3.06) adjusted for low education, unemployment, alcohol use in the last month and symptoms of AIDS; while a history of injection drug use had borderline statistical significance with non-adherence. These findings suggest that using a brief screening procedure to assess anxiety and depression symptoms before initiating ART help identify individuals for interventions to improve adherence and quality of life.

  9. The influence of parental factors on therapist adherence in multi-systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Mesha L; Weiss, Bahr; Han, Susan; Gallop, Robert

    2010-08-01

    Therapist treatment adherence has received a great deal of attention in recent years, in part because of its relation to treatment outcomes. Although certain therapist behaviors have been found to be associated with treatment outcomes, little is known about client factors impacting on therapists' ability to adhere to treatment protocols. In this study, we evaluated effects of parental beliefs, psychopathology, and interaction styles on therapists' adherence to Multi-systemic Therapy (MST) principles. Eighty-two parents participating in a clinical trial of MST completed baseline measures assessing psychopathology, family functioning, and treatment expectations. Analyses indicated that parental perceptions of therapist adherence were established within the first 4 weeks of treatment, and that parental psychopathology, motivation, expectations, and child rearing practices were related to parental ratings of therapist adherence. Results were essentially unchanged when controlling for parental positive response style. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Slime production is essential for the adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis in implant-related infections.

    PubMed

    Nayak, N; Satpathy, G; Nag, H L; Venkatesh, P; Ramakrishnan, S; Nag, T C; Prasad, S

    2011-02-01

    A total of 32 Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from indwelling device-related infections such as endophthalmitis following intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, intravenous catheter-related sepsis and orthopaedic implant infections, were studied for slime production and adherence to artificial surfaces. Of these, 21 (65.6%) isolates were slime positive by the Congo Red agar method and 24 (75%) were adherent to artificial surfaces by the quantitative slime test. The majority (19 out of 24; 79.1%) of the adherent bacteria were slime producers. Antibody to slime raised in rabbits was able to inhibit the adherence of all 24 bacteria designated as adherent by our quantitative test. It seems that slime is indispensable for the sessile mode of attachment, leading further to the development of biofilms on the indwelling devices.

  11. The Influence of Parental Factors on Therapist Adherence in Multi-systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Mesha; Weiss, Bahr; Han, Susan; Gallop, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Therapist treatment adherence has received a great deal of attention in recent years, in part because of its relation to treatment outcomes. Although certain therapist behaviors have been found to be associated with treatment outcomes, little is known about client factors impacting on therapists’ ability to adhere to treatment protocols. In this study, we evaluated effects of parental beliefs, psychopathology, and interaction styles on therapists’ adherence to Multi-systemic Therapy (MST) principles. Eighty-two parents participating in a clinical trial of MST completed baseline measures assessing psychopathology, family functioning, and treatment expectations. Analyses indicated that parental perceptions of therapist adherence were established within the first 4 weeks of treatment, and that parental psychopathology, motivation, expectations, and child rearing practices were related to parental ratings of therapist adherence. Results were essentially unchanged when controlling for parental positive response style. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:20369379

  12. Depression, substance abuse and other contextual predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among Haitians.

    PubMed

    Malow, Robert; Dévieux, Jessy G; Stein, Judith A; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Jean-Gilles, Michele; Attonito, Jennifer; Koenig, Serena P; Raviola, Giuseppe; Sévère, Patrice; Pape, Jean W

    2013-05-01

    Haiti has the highest number of individuals living with HIV in the Caribbean. Due to Haiti's resource-poor environment and inadequate mental health and substance abuse services, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) may be especially difficult. This study examined associations among demographics, maladaptive coping, partner conflict, alcohol problems, depression, and negative attitudes about medications and their impact on adherence among 194 HIV-positive Haitians. In a mediated directional structural equation model, depression and negative attitudes about ART directly predicted poorer adherence. Greater partner conflict, maladaptive coping and alcohol problems predicted more depression. Maladaptive coping predicted a negative attitude about ART. Alcohol problems predicted partner conflict and maladaptive coping. Significant indirect effects on adherence mediated through both depression and negative attitudes about ART include negative effects of female gender, alcohol problems and maladaptive coping. Results highlight the importance of integrated care for depression, alcohol use and other psychosocial problems to increase ART adherence.

  13. Perceptions about the acceptability of assessments of HIV medication adherence in Lilongwe, Malawi and Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Safren, Steven A; Kumarasamy, N; Hosseinipour, Mina; Harwood, Meaghan M; Hoffman, Irving; McCauley, Marybeth; Jumbe, Allan; Nyirenda, Christina; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Solomon, Suniti; Celentano, David; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2006-07-01

    Little research exists on acceptability issues related to assessments of adherence to ART in resource-poor settings. To help prepare for two large-scale, multisite ART intervention trials, this qualitative study of individuals in Chennai, India (49 men, 11 women; 33 taking ART, 27 not) and Lilongwe, Malawi (5 men, 5 women, all taking ART) examined potential limitations of different types of adherence assessments: an adherence questionnaire, a pill diary, a pillbox, an electronic pill cap, and a medication punch card. Many participants reported that the various assessments would be acceptable. Potential limitations included issues surrounding literacy, the desire to appease one's medical provider, privacy and stigma, and "cheating." These potential limitations are similar to the limitations of these assessments in Western settings. However, the data highlight the need to consider individual patient level concerns when assessing ART adherence in different cultural settings. Innovative ways of monitoring adherence while maintaining standardization across sites are required in multisite trials.

  14. Predictors of adherence in a community-based tai chi program.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suhayb; Ardern, Chris; Tamim, Hala

    2015-06-01

    This study examined factors affecting adherence in a 16-week tai chi program among multi-ethnic middle-aged and older adults living in a low socioeconomic environment in Toronto. Analysis was based on data collected from three tai chi program cohorts that took place from August 2009 to March 2012. The main outcome variable, adherence, was measured by the total number of sessions attended by each of the participants. Total sample size was 210 participants with a mean age of 68.1 ± 8.6. Based on the regression model, greater adherence was significantly associated with older age, greater perceived stress, higher education, and higher mental and physical scores of Short Form-36 components. Conversely, lower adherence was significantly associated with higher baseline weekly physical activity. Our findings suggest that we target less-educated individuals with poor mental and physical health to optimize adherence for future community-based tai chi programs. PMID:25917603

  15. Inhibitory effects of bovine lactoferrin on the adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to host cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Tazume, S; Shimizu, K; Matsuzawa, H; Dosako, S; Isoda, H; Tsukiji, M; Fujimura, R; Muranaka, Y; Isihida, H

    2000-02-01

    Adherence is an essential and prerequisite step for the colonization of mucosal surfaces by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). We studied the effect of bovine lactoferrin (BLF) on the adherence of ETEC to human epithelial cells in vitro, and to intestinal mucosa of ICR germfree mice in vivo. In the in vitro study, BLF was found to inhibit the adherence of ETEC. This adhesion-inhibiting activity of BLF was found to lessen with decreasing BLF concentration, but the data obtained suggest a positive inhibitory effect of BLF against the adhesion of ETEC cells. In the in vivo study, the counts of adherent bacteria in various sections of the intestinal tract (duodenum, jejunoileum, and large intestine) were lower in the BLF group than in the control group, suggesting the possible action of BLF as an intestinal tract adherence-blocking agent with regards to ETEC.

  16. Strategies of adherence promotion in the management of pediatric chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Drotar, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Children and families often have difficulty following prescribed medical treatment for chronic pediatric conditions. Such nonadherence has a significant impact on children's health care outcomes and the costs of their care. This review describes a comprehensive approach to increase treatment adherence in chronic pediatric illnesses and lessen its impact. Key elements of this proposed model of adherence promotion include the following: (1) a core approach to adherence promotion to be implemented by pediatric health care providers; (2) follow-up and ongoing management; and (3) tailoring and targeting specific more intensive family-centered interventions to children and adolescents who demonstrate clinically significant treatment nonadherence or risk for nonadherence. Behavioral specialists have important roles in conducting research on adherence promotion, training health care providers, and delivering services to children and adolescents with clinically significant adherence problems.

  17. The Scale of Self-Efficacy Expectations of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment: A Tool for Identifying Risk for Non-Adherence to Treatment for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Drachler, Carlos Wietzke; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; de Carvalho Leite, José Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of risk for non-adherence to treatment is a challenge for personalized care for people living with HIV. Standardized questionnaires of patients’ expectations of their capability to overcome obstacles for treatment adherence may be used as a pre-screening for risk identification. A scale of self-efficacy expectations of adherence to antiretroviral treatment (SEA-ART scale) was previously developed. This study assesses the scale validity in predicting non-adherence to ART in adults living with HIV. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort study applied a 21-item SEA-ART scale to 275 adults in ART treatment at an outpatient public service for HIV in Southern Brazil. ART medications taken were assessed at one-month follow-up; ART adherence was devised as an intake of 95% and more of the prescribed medication. A SEA-ART score was calculated by adding up the scores of all items. Multivariable logistic regression and the Area Under the Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Curve (AUROC) were applied to examine the ability of the SEA-ART score to predict non-adherence at follow-up. The SEA-ART score varied from 21 to 105; mean 93.9; median 103.0. Non-adherence was 30.3% (n = 81/267). The odds of non-adherence was 8% lower for each unit increase of the SEA-ART score; after adjustment for age, sex, formal education and time in treatment (OR = 0.92; 95%CI 0.90–0.95; LRT for linear trend, p = 0.002). The AUROC was 0.80 (95%CI 0.73–0.87; p<0.001). The SEA-ART optimal cut-off value was 101, providing a sensitivity of 76.5%, a specificity of 73.1%, a positive predictive value of 55.4% and a negative predictive value of 87.7%. There was no evidence of difference in sensitivity, and specificity among groups organized by age, gender, formal education and time in treatment. Conclusions The SEA-ART scale appears to have a good capacity to discriminate between adherents and non-adherents at one-month follow-up. Further studies should confirm these results

  18. Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to rat and human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; John, J E; Johnston, L I; Innes, D J; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) to in vitro preparations of rat and human colonic mucosa. Studies were performed with fixed or unfixed rat colonic mucosa, unfixed rat mucosa exposed to trypsin, unfixed rat submucosa, and fixed human colonic mucosa. Twenty percent of the amebae adhered to fixed rat colonic mucosa; adherence was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), galactose, and asialofetuin. The adherence of amebae to fixed human colonic mucosa was also GalNAc inhibitable. Greater adherence was found with unfixed rat colonic mucosa (40.9%) and was not GalNAc inhibitable unless the tissue was first exposed to trypsin. However, GalNAc did inhibit the adherence of amebae to unfixed rat submucosa. Glutaraldehyde fixation of amebae inactivates known amebic adhesion proteins; there was a markedly decreased adherence of fixed amebae to trypsin-exposed mucosa or fixed rat colonic mucosa. However, fixed or viable amebae had equal levels of adherence to unfixed rat colonic mucosa, suggesting the presence of a host adhesion protein that binds to receptors on amebae. Human (10%) and rabbit (5%) immune sera reduced the adherence of viable amebae to fixed rat colonic mucosa. We concluded that the GalNAc-inhibitable adhesion protein on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites mediated adherence to fixed rat mucosa, fixed human colonic mucosa, trypsin-exposed unfixed rat mucosa, and unfixed rat submucosa. The surface of unfixed rat colonic mucosa contained a glutaraldehyde- and trypsin-sensitive host adhesion protein, perhaps in the overlying mucus blanket, which bound viable or fixed E. histolytica trophozoites. Images PMID:2580787

  19. ART Adherence Measurement in Non-Clinical Settings in South India

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Nora J.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Mohanraj, Rani; Kumar, Shuba; Jeyaseelan, L.; Rao, Deepa; Simoni, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is key to viral suppression, but may be impeded by psychosocial consequences of HIV-infection such as stigma and depression. Measures of adherence in India have been examined in clinic populations, but little is known about the performance of these measures outside clinical settings. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 151 Tamil-speaking people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) in India recruited through HIV support networks and compared single item measures from the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG) scale, a visual analog scale (VAS), and a question on timing of last missed dose. Depression was measured using the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and HIV-related stigma was measured using an adaptation of the Berger Stigma Scale. Mean age was 35.6 years (SD±5.9); 55.6% were male; mean MDI score was 11.9 (SD±9.1); and mean stigma score was 67.3 (SD±12.0). Self-reported perfect adherence (no missed doses) was 93.3% using the AACTG item, 87.1% using last missed dose, and 83.8% using the VAS. The measures had moderate agreement with each other (kappa 0.45 - 0.57). Depression was associated with lower adherence irrespective of adherence measure used, and remained significantly associated in multivariable analyses adjusting for age and marital status. Stigma was not associated with adherence irrespective of the measure used. The VAS captured the greatest number of potentially non-adherent individuals and may be useful for identifying PLHA in need of adherence support. Given the consistent and strong association between poorer adherence and depression, programs that jointly address adherence and mental health for PLHA in India may be more effective than programs targeting only one. PMID:25119585

  20. SALT-OVERLY SENSITIVE5 Mediates Arabidopsis Seed Coat Mucilage Adherence and Organization through Pectins.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jonathan S; Tsai, Allen Yi-Lun; Xue, Hui; Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Sola, Krešimir; Seifert, Georg J; Mansfield, Shawn D; Haughn, George W

    2014-05-01

    Interactions between cell wall polymers are critical for establishing cell wall integrity and cell-cell adhesion. Here, we exploit the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat mucilage system to examine cell wall polymer interactions. On hydration, seeds release an adherent mucilage layer strongly attached to the seed in addition to a nonadherent layer that can be removed by gentle agitation. Rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I) is the primary component of adherent mucilage, with homogalacturonan, cellulose, and xyloglucan constituting minor components. Adherent mucilage contains rays composed of cellulose and pectin that extend above the center of each epidermal cell. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) and the arabinogalactan protein SALT-OVERLY SENSITIVE5 (SOS5) are required for mucilage adherence through unknown mechanisms. SOS5 has been suggested to mediate adherence by influencing cellulose biosynthesis. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between SOS5 and CESA5. cesa5-1 seeds show reduced cellulose, RG I, and ray size in adherent mucilage. In contrast, sos5-2 seeds have wild-type levels of cellulose but completely lack adherent RG I and rays. Thus, relative to each other, cesa5-1 has a greater effect on cellulose, whereas sos5-2 mainly affects pectin. The double mutant cesa5-1 sos5-2 has a much more severe loss of mucilage adherence, suggesting that SOS5 and CESA5 function independently. Double-mutant analyses with mutations in MUCILAGE MODIFIED2 and FLYING SAUCER1 that reduce mucilage release through pectin modification suggest that only SOS5 influences pectin-mediated adherence. Together, these findings suggest that SOS5 mediates adherence through pectins and does so independently of but in concert with cellulose synthesized by CESA5.