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Sample records for adhesin protein p1

  1. Binding Forces of Streptococcus mutans P1 Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Li, James K.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive oral bacterium that is a primary etiological agent associated with human dental caries. In the oral cavity, S. mutans adheres to immobilized salivary agglutinin (SAG) contained within the salivary pellicle on the tooth surface. Binding to SAG is mediated by cell surface P1, a multifunctional adhesin that is also capable of interacting with extracellular matrix proteins. This may be of particular importance outside of the oral cavity as S. mutans has been associated with infective endocarditis and detected in atherosclerotic plaque. Despite the biomedical importance of P1, its binding mechanisms are not completely understood. In this work, we use atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule and single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify the nanoscale forces driving P1-mediated adhesion. Single-molecule experiments show that full-length P1, as well as fragments containing only the P1 globular head or C-terminal region, binds to SAG with relatively weak forces (~50 pN). In contrast, single-cell analyses reveal that adhesion of a single S. mutans cell to SAG is mediated by strong (~500 pN) and long-range (up to 6000 nm) forces. This is likely due to the binding of multiple P1 adhesins to self-associated gp340 glycoproteins. Such a cooperative, long-range character of the S. mutans–SAG interaction would therefore dramatically increase the strength and duration of cell adhesion. We also demonstrate, at single-molecule and single-cell levels, the interaction of P1 with fibronectin and collagen, as well as with hydrophobic, but not hydrophilic, substrates. The binding mechanism (strong forces, cooperativity, broad specificity) of P1 provides a molecular basis for its multifunctional adhesion properties. Our methodology represents a valuable approach to probe the binding forces of bacterial adhesins and offers a tractable methodology to assess anti-adhesion therapy. PMID:25671413

  2. MAAP: malarial adhesins and adhesin-like proteins predictor.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Faraz Alam; Kumar, Naveen; Bala Subramanyam, Mekapati; Gnanamani, Muthiah; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2008-02-15

    Malaria caused by protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium is a dreaded disease, second only to tuberculosis. The emergence of parasites resistant to commonly used drugs and the lack of availability of vaccines aggravates the problem. One of the preventive approaches targets adhesion of parasites to host cells and tissues. Adhesion of parasites is mediated by proteins called adhesins. Abrogation of adhesion by either immunizing the host with adhesins or inhibiting the interaction using structural analogs of host cell receptors holds the potential to develop novel preventive strategies. The availability of complete genome sequence offers new opportunities for identifying adhesin and adhesin-like proteins. Development of computational algorithms can simplify this task and accelerate experimental characterization of the predicted adhesins from complete genomes. A curated positive dataset of experimentally known adhesins from Plasmodium species was prepared by careful examination of literature reports. "Controversial" or "hypothetical" adhesins were excluded. The negative dataset consisted of proteins representing various intracellular functions including information processing, metabolism, and interface (transporters). We did not include proteins likely to be on the surface with unknown adhesin properties or which are linked even indirectly to the adhesion process in either of the training sets. A nonhomology-based approach using 420 compositional properties of amino acid dipeptide and multiplet frequencies was used to develop MAAP Web server with Support Vector Machine (SVM) model classifier as its engine for the prediction of malarial adhesins and adhesin-like proteins. The MAAP engine has six SVM classifier models identified through an exhaustive search from 728 kernel parameters set. These models displayed an efficiency (Mathews correlation coefficient) of 0.860-0.967. The final prediction P(maap) score is the maximum score attained by a given

  3. FaaPred: A SVM-Based Prediction Method for Fungal Adhesins and Adhesin-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, Jayashree; Gupta, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion constitutes one of the initial stages of infection in microbial diseases and is mediated by adhesins. Hence, identification and comprehensive knowledge of adhesins and adhesin-like proteins is essential to understand adhesin mediated pathogenesis and how to exploit its therapeutic potential. However, the knowledge about fungal adhesins is rudimentary compared to that of bacterial adhesins. In addition to host cell attachment and mating, the fungal adhesins play a significant role in homotypic and xenotypic aggregation, foraging and biofilm formation. Experimental identification of fungal adhesins is labor- as well as time-intensive. In this work, we present a Support Vector Machine (SVM) based method for the prediction of fungal adhesins and adhesin-like proteins. The SVM models were trained with different compositional features, namely, amino acid, dipeptide, multiplet fractions, charge and hydrophobic compositions, as well as PSI-BLAST derived PSSM matrices. The best classifiers are based on compositional properties as well as PSSM and yield an overall accuracy of 86%. The prediction method based on best classifiers is freely accessible as a world wide web based server at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/faap. This work will aid rapid and rational identification of fungal adhesins, expedite the pace of experimental characterization of novel fungal adhesins and enhance our knowledge about role of adhesins in fungal infections. PMID:20300572

  4. EHEC Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Brian D.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are discussed in depth, especially regarding their role in the development of attaching and effacing lesions and in EHEC virulence. Further, a series of fimbrial proteins (Lpf1, Lpf2, curli, ECP, F9, ELF, Sfp, HCP, and type 1 fimbriae) are also described, emphasizing their various contributions to adherence and colonization of different surfaces and their potential use as genetic markers in detection and classification of different EHEC serotypes. This review also discusses the role of several autotransporter proteins (EhaA-D, EspP, Saa and Sab, and Cah), as well as other proteins associated with adherence, such as flagella, EibG, Iha, and OmpA. While these proteins have all been studied to varying degrees, all of the adhesins summarized in this chapter have been linked to different stages of the EHEC life cycle, making them good targets for the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25635238

  5. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Suraya A; Martin, Stephen R; Howell, Steven A; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  6. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Suraya A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  7. Blastomyces Virulence Adhesin-1 Protein Binding to Glycosaminoglycans Is Enhanced by Protein Disulfide Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beaussart, Audrey; Brandhorst, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blastomyces adhesin-1 (BAD-1) protein mediates the virulence of the yeast Blastomyces dermatitidis, in part by binding host lung tissue, the extracellular matrix, and cellular receptors via glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparan sulfate. The tandem repeats that make up over 90% of BAD-1 appear in their native state to be tightly folded into an inactive conformation, but recent work has shown that they become activated and adhesive upon reduction of a disulfide linkage. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) of a single BAD-1 molecule interacting with immobilized heparin revealed that binding is enhanced upon treatment with protein disulfide isomerase and dithiothreitol (PDI/DTT). PDI/DTT treatment of BAD-1 induced a plateau effect in atomic force signatures that was consistent with sequential rupture of tandem binding domains. Inhibition of PDI in murine macrophages blunted BAD-1 binding to heparin in vitro. Based on AFM, we found that a short Cardin-Weintraub sequence paired with a WxxWxxW sequence in the first, degenerate repeat at the N terminus of BAD-1 was sufficient to initiate heparin binding. Removal of half of the 41 BAD-1 tandem repeats led to weaker adhesion, illustrating their role in enhanced binding. Mass spectroscopy of the tandem repeat revealed that the PDI-induced interaction with heparin is characterized by ruptured disulfide bonds and that cysteine thiols remain reduced. Further binding studies showed direct involvement of thiols in heparin ligation. Thus, we propose that the N-terminal domain of BAD-1 governs the initial association with host GAGs and that proximity to GAG-associated host PDI catalyzes activation of additional binding motifs conserved within the tandem repeats, leading to enhanced avidity and availability of reduced thiols. PMID:26396244

  8. Re-Evaluation of a Bacterial Antifreeze Protein as an Adhesin with Ice-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuaiqi; Garnham, Christopher P.; Whitney, John C.; Graham, Laurie A.; Davies, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII) and region IV (RIV), divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX)-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2) server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice. PMID:23144980

  9. Structure of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Surface Protein and Adhesin PfbA

    PubMed Central

    Suits, Michael D.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2013-01-01

    PfbA (plasmin- and fibronectin-binding protein A) is an extracellular Streptococcus pneumoniae cell-wall attached surface protein that binds to fibronectin, plasmin, and plasminogen. Here we present a structural analysis of the surface exposed domains of PfbA using a combined approach of X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The crystal structure of the PfbA core domain, here called PfbAβ, determined to 2.28 Å resolution revealed an elongated 12-stranded parallel β-helix fold, which structure-based comparisons reveal is most similar to proteins with carbohydrate modifying activity. A notable feature of the PfbAβ is an extensive cleft on one face of the protein with electrochemical and spatial features that are analogous to structurally similar carbohydrate-active enzymes utilizing this feature for substrate accommodation. Though this cleft displays a combination of basic amino acid residues and solvent exposed aromatic amino acids that are distinct features for recognition of carbohydrates, no obvious arrangement of amino acid side chains that would constitute catalytic machinery is evident. The pseudo-atomic SAXS model of a larger fragment of PfbA suggests that it has a relatively well-ordered structure with the N-terminal and core domains of PfbA adopting an extend organization and reveals a novel structural class of surface exposed pneumococcal matrix molecule adhesins. PMID:23894284

  10. Adhesins of Bartonella spp.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Fiona; Schmidgen, Thomas; Kaiser, Patrick O; Linke, Dirk; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells represents the first step in the infection process and one of the decisive features in the pathogenicity of Bartonella spp. B. henselae and B. quintana are considered to be the most important human pathogenic species, responsible for cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, trench fever and other diseases. The ability to cause vasculoproliferative disorders and intraerythrocytic bacteraemia are unique features of the genus Bartonella. Consequently, the interaction with endothelial cells and erythrocytes is a focus in Bartonella research. The genus harbours a variety of trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) such as the Bartonella adhesin A (BadA) of B. henselae and the variably expressed outer-membrane proteins (Vomps) of B. quintana, which display remarkable variations in length and modular construction. These adhesins mediate many of the biologically-important properties of Bartonella spp. such as adherence to endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins and induction of angiogenic gene programming. There is also significant evidence that the laterally acquired Trw-conjugation systems of Bartonella spp. mediate host-specific adherence to erythrocytes. Other potential adhesins are the filamentous haemagglutinins and several outer membrane proteins. The exact molecular functions of these adhesins and their interplay with other pathogenicity factors (e.g., the VirB/D4 type 4 secretion system) need to be analysed in detail to understand how these pathogens adapt to their mammalian hosts.

  11. VirB2 and VirB5 proteins: specialized adhesins in bacterial type-IV secretion systems?

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Fronzes, Remi; Waksman, Gabriel

    2008-09-01

    Many type-IV secretion systems (T4SSs) of plant and human pathogens assemble a pilus used to inject virulence molecules (effectors) into host target cells. The T4SS of Agrobacterium tumefaciens consists of VirB1-VirB11 and VirD4 proteins. Whether targeting of T4SSs to the host requires a T4SS-adhesin that specifically engages host receptors for delivery of effectors has, until recently, remained unclear. Recent data of Agrobacterium and Helicobacter indicate that two classes of T4SS components, VirB2 and VirB5, might function as adhesins that mediate host-cell targeting through binding to specific host receptors. Here, we discuss this important issue and recent progress in the field. PMID:18706815

  12. [Adhesins of oral streptococci].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Oral streptococci comprise a numerically prominent group of oral bacteria that occur primarily on the human tooth surface as members of the biofilm community, commonly referred to as dental plaque. These streptococci are not only causative of dental caries and are primers for colonization of periodontopathic bacteria, but also well known for their ability to colonize damaged heart valves, identified most frequently as primary etiological agents of infective endocarditis. A number of streptococcal cell surface components are known to contribute to colonization of the tooth surface including putative adhesins recognizing host sialic acid (sialic acid-binding adhesins). Interactions mediated by these adhesins include the attachment of these bacteria to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and their adhesion to erythrocytes, both of which are abolished or reduced by sialidase pretreatment of the corresponding host sialoglycoconjugate receptors. The sialic acid-binding adhesin on Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer on the tooth surface, has been molecularly analyzed. The adhesin, Hsa (203-kDa protein), consists of an N-terminal non repetitive region (NR1) including a signal sequence, a relatively short serine-rich region (SR1), a second non repetitive region (NR2), a long serine-rich region (SR2) containing 113 dodecapeptide repeats accounting for 75% of the whole protein, and a C-terminal cell wall anchoring domain. Therefore, it has been suggested that NR2, the putative sialic acid-binding domain of Hsa, is presented on the bacterial surface at the end of a long molecular stalk formed by SR2. The present review deals with the function and pathogenicity of oral streptococcal adhesins. PMID:23727707

  13. Protection of gerbils from amebic liver abscess by immunization with a recombinant protein derived from the 170-kilodalton surface adhesin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T; Stanley, S L

    1994-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide through intestinal infection and amebic liver abscess. Here we show that vaccination of gerbils, a standard model for amebic liver abscess, with recombinant proteins derived from the 170-kDa galactose-binding adhesin of E. histolytica and the serine-rich E. histolytica protein or a combination of the two recombinant antigens provides excellent protection against subsequent hepatic challenge with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. PMID:8188384

  14. A novel lily anther-specific gene encodes adhesin-like proteins associated with exine formation during anther development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Yang, Cheng-Shou; Wang, Co-Shine

    2014-01-01

    The anther-specific gene LLA1271 isolated from lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) anthers is novel and exists in two forms. The protein encoded by LLA1271 may represent an adhesin-like protein first found in higher plants. The protein contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide followed by a highly conserved repeat domain. The LLA1271 gene is temporally expressed at the phase of microspore development. RNA blot and RNA in situ hybridization analyses demonstrated that the gene was expressed both in the tapetum and in the microspore. The gene is endo- and exogenously induced by gibberellin. Studies with the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor uniconazole and an inhibitor of ethylene activity, 2,5-norbornadien (NBD), revealed that LLA1271 is negatively regulated by ethylene, and a cross-talk of regulation between gibberellin and ethylene occurs in young anthers. The treatment with NBD caused the tapetum to become densely cytoplasmic and highly polarized, whereas uniconazole arrested tapetal development in a state close to that of a tapetum without treatment. The LLA1271 protein is heat stable and heterogeneous. An immunoblot of separated protein fractions of the anther revealed that the LLA1271 protein was detected in protein fraction of the microspore released from the cell wall by treatment with either 0.5% or 2% Triton X-100. Ectopic expression of LLA1271 resulted in impaired stamen and low pollen germination. Scanning electron microscopy of TAP::LLA1271 pollen showed distorted exine formation and patterning. The LLA1271 protein once synthesized in both the tapetum and microspore is secreted and deposited on the surface of microspores, moderately affecting exine formation and patterning. PMID:24591055

  15. Heterologous production, purification and characterization of enzymatically active Sindbis virus nonstructural protein nsP1.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Shailly; Narwal, Manju; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L; Kuhn, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    Alphavirus nonstructural protein nsP1 possesses distinct methyltransferase (MTase) and guanylyltransferase (GTase) activities involved in the capping of viral RNAs. In alphaviruses, the methylation of GTP occurs before RNA transguanylation and nsP1 forms a covalent complex with m(7)GMP unlike the host mRNA guanylyltransferase which forms GMP-enzyme complex. In this study, full length SINV nsP1 was expressed in a soluble form with an N-terminal histidine tag in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein is enzymatically active and contains both MTase and GTase activity indicating that SINV nsP1 does not require membrane association for its enzymatic function. Biochemical analysis shows that detergents abolish nsP1 GTase activity, whereas nonionic detergents do not affect MTase activity. Furthermore, SINV nsP1 contains the metal-ion dependent GTase, whereas MTase does not require a metal ion. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis of purified protein indicate that nsP1 has a mixed α/β structure and is in the folded native conformation. PMID:21693190

  16. Discovery of a novel periplasmic protein that forms a complex with a trimeric autotransporter adhesin and peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masahito; Yoshimoto, Shogo; Hayashi, Ayumi; Kanie, Junichi; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-08-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), fibrous proteins on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria, have attracted attention as virulence factors. However, little is known about the mechanism of their biogenesis. AtaA, a TAA of Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5, confers nonspecific, high adhesiveness to bacterial cells. We identified a new gene, tpgA, which forms a single operon with ataA and encodes a protein comprising two conserved protein domains identified by Pfam: an N-terminal SmpA/OmlA domain and a C-terminal OmpA_C-like domain with a peptidoglycan (PGN)-binding motif. Cell fractionation and a pull-down assay showed that TpgA forms a complex with AtaA, anchoring it to the outer membrane (OM). Isolation of total PGN-associated proteins showed TpgA binding to PGN. Disruption of tpgA significantly decreased the adhesiveness of Tol 5 because of a decrease in surface-displayed AtaA, suggesting TpgA involvement in AtaA secretion. This is reminiscent of SadB, which functions as a specific chaperone for SadA, a TAA in Salmonella species; however, SadB anchors to the inner membrane, whereas TpgA anchors to the OM through AtaA. The genetic organization encoding the TAA-TpgA-like protein cassette can be found in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, suggesting a common contribution of TpgA homologues to TAA biogenesis. PMID:27074146

  17. Identification of adhesin-like protein ALP41 from Spiroplasma eriocheiris and induction immune response of Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingguo; Li, Wenjie; Liang, Tingming; Jiang, Xuejiao; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen

    2010-10-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a causative agent of the tremor disease (TD) of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis which is a novel pathogen of aquatic animals found in recent years. A gene, adhesin-like protein (ALP41), of S. eriocheiris from E. sinensis was identified and its characteristics were analyzed in present paper. The role of this pathogen's host-binding protein in promoting immune responses was characterized through analyzing the interaction between S. eriocheiris and E. sinensis. The full-length DNA of ALP41 is 1074 bp and encodes 357 amino acid residues. The theoretical molecular weight and isoelectric point for the ALP41 are 40.94 kDa and 4.79, respectively. Since UGA is read as a tryptophan codon and not as a termination signal in most Mollicute species, the ALP41 gene was site-mutated from TGA to TGG and transcribed in Escherichia coli to full expression; the titer of rabbits anti-ALP41 serum was about 1:6000. A specific immunoreactive band was identified when rabbits anti-S. eriocheiris serum was opposed to the recombinant protein. The ALP41 band was detected using anti-ALP41 serum and the total proteins of S. eriocheiris. Realtime-PCR was used for detection of expression levels of the immune genes in E. sinensis. Among the examined genes, the mRNA expression of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF), prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) and pacifastin light chain (PLC) in E. sinensis were significantly induced after ALP41 treatment. PMID:20538062

  18. Structural mechanisms underlying sequence-dependent variations in GAG affinities of decorin binding protein A, a Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli M; Wang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Decorin-binding protein A (DBPA) is an important surface adhesin of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates the bacteria's colonization of human tissue by adhering to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), a sulfated polysaccharide. Interestingly, DBPA sequence variation among different strains of Borrelia spirochetes is high, resulting in significant differences in their GAG affinities. However, the structural mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. We determined the solution structures of DBPAs from strain N40 of B. burgdorferi and strain PBr of Borrelia garinii, two DBPA variants whose GAG affinities deviate significantly from strain B31, the best characterized version of DBPA. Our structures revealed that significant differences exist between PBr DBPA and B31/N40 DBPAs. In particular, the C-terminus of PBr DBPA, unlike C-termini from B31 and N40 DBPAs, is positioned away from the GAG-binding pocket and the linker between helices one and two of PBr DBPA is highly structured and retracted from the GAG-binding pocket. The repositioning of the C-terminus allowed the formation of an extra GAG-binding epitope in PBr DBPA and the retracted linker gave GAG ligands more access to the GAG-binding epitopes than other DBPAs. Characterization of GAG ligands' interactions with wild-type (WT) PBr and mutants confirmed the importance of the second major GAG-binding epitope and established the fact that the two epitopes are independent of one another and the new epitope is as important to GAG binding as the traditional epitope.

  19. OmpA family proteins and Pmp-like autotransporter: new adhesins of Waddlia chondrophila.

    PubMed

    Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Domröse, Andreas; Becker, Elisabeth; Cisse, Ousmane H; Hegemann, Johannes H; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-08-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, a clade that also includes the well-known classical Chlamydia responsible for a number of severe human and animal diseases. Waddlia is an emerging pathogen associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and abortion in ruminants. Adhesion to the host cell is an essential prerequisite for survival of every strict intracellular bacteria and, in classical Chlamydia, this step is partially mediated by polymorphic outer membrane proteins (Pmps), a family of highly diverse autotransporters that represent about 15% of the bacterial coding capacity. Waddlia chondrophila genome however only encodes one putative Pmp-like protein. Using a proteomic approach, we identified several bacterial proteins potentially implicated in the adhesion process and we characterized their expression during the replication cycle of the bacteria. In addition, we demonstrated that the Waddlia Pmp-like autotransporter as well as OmpA2 and OmpA3, two members of the extended Waddlia OmpA protein family, exhibit adhesive properties on epithelial cells. We hypothesize that the large diversity of the OmpA protein family is linked to the wide host range of these bacteria that are able to enter and multiply in various host cells ranging from protozoa to mammalian and fish cells.

  20. The Bfp60 surface adhesin is an extracellular matrix and plasminogen protein interacting in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Eliane; Teixeira, Felipe; Cordeiro, Fabiana; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Rocha, Edson R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen (Plg) is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by several pathogenic species of bacteria to manipulate the host plasminogen system and facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of Plg at their surface. Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated Gram-negative obligate anaerobe from human clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and anaerobic bacteraemia. The ability of B. fragilis to convert plasminogen (Plg) into plasmin has been associated with an outer membrane protein named Bfp60. In this study, we characterized the function of Bfp60 protein in B. fragilis 638R by constructing the bfp60 defective strain and comparing its with that of the wild type regarding binding to laminin-1 (LMN-1) and activation of Plg into plasmin. Although the results showed in this study indicate that Bfp60 surface protein of B. fragilis is important for the recognition of LMN-1 and Plg activation, a significant slow activation of Plg into plasmin was observed in the mutant strain. For that reason, the possibility of another unidentified mechanism activating Plg is also present in B. fragilis can not be discarded. The results demonstrate that Bfp60 protein is responsible for the recognition of laminin and Plg-plasmin activation. Although the importance of this protein is still unclear in the pathogenicity of the species, it is accepted that since other pathogenic bacteria use this mechanism to disseminate through the extracellular matrix during the infection, it should also contribute to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:23850366

  1. Prokaryotic High-Level Expression System in Producing Adhesin Recombinant Protein E of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Minoo; Bouzari, Saeed; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Jafari, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adhesion protein E (PE) of Haemophilus influenzae is a 16 - 18 kDa protein with 160 amino acids which causes adhesion to epithelial cells and acts as a major factor in pathogenesis. Objectives: In this study, we performed cloning, expression and purification of PE as a candidate antigen for vaccine design upon further study. Materials and Methods: At first, the pe gene of NTHi ATCC 49766 strain (483 bp) was amplified by PCR. Then, to sequence the resulted amplicon, it was cloned into TA vector (pTZ57R/T). In the next step, the sequenced gene was sub-cloned in pBAD/gIII A vector and transformed into competent Escherichia coli TOP10. For overexpression, the recombinant bacteria were grown in broth medium containing arabinose and the recombinant protein was purified using metal affinity chromatography (Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid) (Ni-NTA agarose). Finally, the protein was detected using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophores (SDS-PAG) and confirmed by western blotting. Results: The cloned gene was confirmed by PCR, restriction digestion and sequencing. The sequenced gene was searched for homology in GenBank and 99% similarity was found to the already deposited genes in GenBank. Then we obtained PE using Ni-NTA agarose with up to 7 mg/mL concentration. Conclusions: The pe gene was successfully cloned and confirmed by sequencing. Finally, PE was obtained with high concentration. Due to high homology and similarity among the pe gene from NTHi ATCC 49766 and other NTHi strains in GenBank, we believe that the protein is a universal antigen to be used as a vaccine design candidate and further studies to evaluate its immunogenicity is underway. PMID:26034537

  2. P1 plasmid replication: measurement of initiator protein concentration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Swack, J A; Pal, S K; Mason, R J; Abeles, A L; Chattoraj, D K

    1987-01-01

    To study the functions of the mini-P1 replication initiation protein RepA quantitatively, we have developed a method to measure RepA concentration by using immunoblotting. In vivo, there are about 20 RepA dimers per unit-copy plasmid DNA. RepA was deduced to be a dimer from gel filtration of the purified protein. Since there are 14 binding sites of the protein per replicon, the physiological concentration of the protein appears to be sufficiently low to be a rate-limiting factor for replication. Autoregulation is apparently responsible for the low protein level; at the physiological concentration of the protein, the repA promoter retains only 0.1% of its full activity as determined by gene fusions to lacZ. When the concentration is further decreased by a factor of 3 or increased by a factor of 40, replication is no longer detectable. Images PMID:3611028

  3. Delineation of immunodominant and cytadherence segment(s) of Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adhesion of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) to host epithelial cells requires several adhesin proteins like P1, P30 and P116. Among these proteins, P1 protein has been inedited as one of the major adhesin and immunogenic protein present on the attachment organelle of M. pneumoniae. In the present study, we scanned the entire sequence of M. pneumoniae P1 protein to identify the immunodominant and cytadherence region(s). M. pneumoniae P1 gene was synthesized in four segments replacing all the UGA codons to UGG codons. Each of the four purified P1 protein fragment was analyzed for its immunogenicity with anti-M. pneumoniae M129 antibodies (Pab M129) and sera of M. pneumoniae infected patients by western blotting and ELISA. Antibodies were produced against all the P1 protein fragments and these antibodies were used for M. pneumoniae adhesion, M. pneumoniae adhesion inhibition and M. pneumoniae surface exposure assays using HEp-2 cells lines. Results Our results show that the immunodominant regions are distributed throughout the entire length of P1 protein, while only the N- and C- terminal region(s) of P1 protein are surface exposed and block cytadhesion to HEp-2 cells, while antibodies to two middle fragments failed to block cytadhesion. Conclusions These results have important implications in designing strategies to block the attachment of M. pneumoniae to epithelial cells, thus preventing the development of atypical pneumonia. PMID:24774062

  4. A conserved domain of previously unknown function in Gap1 mediates protein-protein interaction and is required for biogenesis of a serine-rich streptococcal adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yirong; Chen, Yabing; Huang, Xiang; Zhou, Meixian; Wu, Ren; Dong, Shengli; Pritchard, David G.; Fives-Taylor, Paula; Wu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Summary Fap1-like serine-rich proteins are a new family of bacterial adhesins found in a variety of streptococci and staphylococci that have been implicated in bacterial pathogenesis. A gene cluster encoding glycosyltransferases and accessory Sec components is required for Fap1 glycosylation and biogenesis in Streptococcus parasanguinis. Here we report that the glycosylation-associated protein, Gap1, contributes to glycosylation and biogenesis of Fap1 by interacting with another glycosylation-associated protein, Gap3. Gap1 shares structural homology with glycosyltransferases. The gap1 mutant, like the gap3 mutant, produced an aberrantly-glycosylated Fap1 precursor and failed to produce mature Fap1, suggesting that Gap1 and Gap3 might function in concert in the Fap1 glycosylation and biogenesis. Indeed, Gap1 interacted with Gap3 in vitro and in vivo. A Gap1 amino-terminal motif, within a highly conserved domain of unknown function (DUF1975) identified in many bacterial glycosyltrasnferases, was required for the Gap1-Gap3 interaction. Deletion of one, four, and nine amino acids within the conserved motif gradually inhibited the Gap1-Gap3 interaction and diminished production of mature Fap1 and concurrently increased production of the Fap1 precursor. Consequently, bacterial adhesion to an in vitro tooth model was also reduced. These data demonstrate that the Gap1-Gap3 interaction is required for Fap1 biogenesis and Fap1-dependent bacterial adhesion. PMID:18826412

  5. A Trichomonas vaginalis 120 kDa protein with identity to hydrogenosome pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase is a surface adhesin induced by iron.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Brito, Verónica; Yáñez-Gómez, Carmina; Meza-Cervantez, Patricia; Avila-González, Leticia; Rodríguez, Mario Alberto; Ortega-López, Jaime; González-Robles, Arturo; Arroyo, Rossana

    2005-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a human sexually transmitted protozoan, relies on adherence to the vaginal epithelium for colonization and maintenance of infection in the host. Thus, adherence molecules play a fundamental role in the trichomonal infection. Here, we show the identification and characterization of a 120 kDa surface glycoprotein (AP120) induced by iron, which participates in cytoadherence. AP120 is synthesized by the parasite when grown in 250 microM iron medium. Antibodies to AP120 and the electro-eluted AP120 inhibited parasite adherence in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating its participation in cytoadherence. In addition, a protein of 130 kDa was detected on the surface of HeLa cells as the putative receptor for AP120. By peptide matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), the AP120 adhesin showed homology with a hydrogenosomal enzyme, the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) encoded by the pfoa gene. This homology was confirmed by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence assays with an antibody to the carboxy-terminus region of the Entamoeba histolytica PFO. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays showed that a pfoa-like gene was better transcribed in trichomonads grown in iron-rich medium. In conclusion, the homology of AP120 to PFO suggests that this novel adhesin induced by iron could be an example of moonlighting protein in T. vaginalis.

  6. Phylogeny of replication initiator protein TrfA reveals a highly divergent clade of incompatibility group P1 plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incompatibility group P-1 (incP-1) includes broad host range plasmids of Gram negative bacteria and are classified into five subgroups (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon). The incP-1 replication module consists of the trfA gene, encoding the replication initiator protein TrfA, and the origin o...

  7. Purification of the Escherichia coli type 1 pilin and minor pilus proteins and partial characterization of the adhesin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M S; Hempel, J; Brinton, C C

    1988-01-01

    Type 1 pili of Escherichia coli contain three integral minor proteins with apparent molecular weights (Mr) of 28,000 (28K protein), 16,500, and 14,500 attached to rods composed of Mr-17,000 pilin subunits (Hanson and Brinton, Nature [London] 322:265-268). We describe here an improvement on our earlier method of pilus purification, which gives higher yields and higher purity. Also reported are methods allowing fractionation of intact type 1 pili into rods of pure pilin and free minor proteins, as well as fractionation of the 28K tip adhesion protein from the 16.5K and 14.5K proteins. We have determined the amino acid composition and amino-terminal sequence of the adhesion protein. This sequence shows limited homology with the amino-terminal sequences of several E. coli pilins, including type 1. Images PMID:2900235

  8. An adhesin-like protein, Lam29, from Lactobacillus mucosae ME-340 binds to histone H3 and blood group antigens in human colonic mucus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masamichi; Kinoshita, Hideki; Huang, I-Nung; Eguchi, Kei; Tsurumi, Takuya; Kawai, Yasushi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Kimura, Katsunori; Taketomo, Naoki; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Sase, Tomohiko; Miura, Koh; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Shibata, Chikashi; Horii, Akira; Saito, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    A cell-surface 29-kDa protein (Lam29, cysteine-binding protein of the ABC transporter) from Lactobacillus mucosae ME-340 showed an adhesin-like property for human ABO blood group antigens expressed on the gastrointestinal mucosa. In addition, here we report that Lam29 also bound to an 18-kDa protein on human colonic mucus. By ligand blot assay and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, it was identified as human histone H3. By ligand blot and microplate binding assays with recombinant histone H3, binding between Lam29 and histone H3 was confirmed. The adhesion of ME-340 cells to histone H3 was significantly inhibited by 26% after the addition of 2.5 mg/mL Lam29 as compared to the absence of Lam29 (p<0.01). By GHCl extraction and transcription attenuation of ME-340 cells, binding reduction of ME340 cells against histone H3 was detected at 12% and 13% respectively, as compared to control cells by the BIACORE assay (p<0.01). These data indicate that Lam29 shows multiple binding activities to blood group antigens and histone H3 in human colonic mucus. This is the first report to indicate that lactobacilli expressing Lam29 adhere to histone H3 on gastrointestinal mucosa.

  9. Characterization of an Acidic-pH-Inducible Stress Protein (hsp70), a Putative Sulfatide Binding Adhesin, from Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Huesca, Mario; Goodwin, Avery; Bhagwansingh, Arianna; Hoffman, Paul; Lingwood, Clifford A.

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro glycolipid binding specificity of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is altered to include sulfated glycolipids (sulfatides) following brief exposure of the organism to acid pH typical of the stomach. This change is prevented by anti-hsp70 antibodies, suggesting that hsp70 may be a stress-induced surface adhesin, mediating sulfatide recognition. To facilitate investigation of the role of hsp70 in attachment, we have cloned and sequenced the H. pylori hsp70 gene (dnaK). The hsp70 gene was identified by probing a cosmid DNA library made from H. pylori 439 with a PCR amplicon generated with oligonucleotides synthesized to highly conserved regions of dnaK. The 1.9-kb H. pylori hsp70 gene encodes a product of 616 amino acids. Primer extension analysis revealed a single transcription start site, while Northern blot analysis established that hsp70 was preferentially induced by low pH rather than by heat shock. The ability of H. pylori to alter its glycolipid binding specificity following exposure to low pH by upregulating hsp70 and by expressing hsp70 on the bacterial surface may provide a survival advantage during periods of high acid stress. PMID:9712748

  10. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  11. A Collagen-Binding Adhesin, Acb, and Ten Other Putative MSCRAMM and Pilus Family Proteins of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (Streptococcus bovis Group, Biotype I)▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Jouko; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Qin, Xiang; Singh, Kavindra V.; Muzny, Donna M.; Kovar, Christie L.; Nazareth, Lynne V.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Ferraro, Mary J.; Steckelberg, James M.; Weinstock, George M.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Streptococcus bovis group are important causes of endocarditis. However, factors associated with their pathogenicity, such as adhesins, remain uncharacterized. We recently demonstrated that endocarditis-derived Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates frequently adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Here, we generated a draft genome sequence of an ECM protein-adherent S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus strain and found, by genome-wide analyses, 11 predicted LPXTG-type cell wall-anchored proteins with characteristics of MSCRAMMs, including a modular architecture of domains predicted to adopt immunoglobulin (Ig)-like folding. A recombinant segment of one of these, Acb, showed high-affinity binding to immobilized collagen, and cell surface expression of Acb correlated with the presence of acb and collagen adherence of isolates. Three of the 11 proteins have similarities to major pilus subunits and are organized in separate clusters, each including a second Ig-fold-containing MSCRAMM and a class C sortase, suggesting that the sequenced strain encodes three distinct types of pili. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that all three genes of one cluster, acb-sbs7-srtC1, are cotranscribed, consistent with pilus operons of other gram-positive bacteria. Further analysis detected expression of all 11 genes in cells grown to mid to late exponential growth phases. Wide distribution of 9 of the 11 genes was observed among S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates with fewer genes present in other S. bovis group species/subspecies. The high prevalence of genes encoding putative MSCRAMMs and pili, including a collagen-binding MSCRAMM, among S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates may play an important role in the predominance of this subspecies in S. bovis endocarditis. PMID:19717590

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae Cell-Wall-Localized Phosphoenolpyruvate Protein Phosphotransferase Can Function as an Adhesin: Identification of Its Host Target Molecules and Evaluation of Its Potential as a Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa; Blau, Karin; Kushnir, Tatyana; Shagan, Marilou; Portnoi, Maxim; Cohen, Aviad; Azriel, Shalhevet; Malka, Itai; Adawi, Asad; Kafka, Daniel; Dotan, Shahar; Guterman, Gali; Troib, Shany; Fishilevich, Tali; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Braiman, Alex; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Porat, Nurith; Goliand, Inna; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Swiatlo, Edwin; Tal, Michael; Ellis, Ronald; Elia, Natalie; Dagan, Ron

    2016-01-01

    In Streptococcus pneumonia, phosphoenolpyruvate protein phosphotransferase (PtsA) is an intracellular protein of the monosaccharide phosphotransferase systems. Biochemical and immunostaining methods were applied to show that PtsA also localizes to the bacterial cell-wall. Thus, it was suspected that PtsA has functions other than its main cytoplasmic enzymatic role. Indeed, recombinant PtsA and anti-rPtsA antiserum were shown to inhibit adhesion of S. pneumoniae to cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Screening of a combinatorial peptide library expressed in a filamentous phage with rPtsA identified epitopes that were capable of inhibiting S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptides in the phages were sequenced, and homologous sequences were found in human BMPER, multimerin1, protocadherin19, integrinβ4, epsin1 and collagen type VIIα1 proteins, all of which can be found in A549 cells except the latter. Six peptides, synthesized according to the homologous sequences in the human proteins, specifically bound rPtsA in the micromolar range and significantly inhibited pneumococcal adhesion in vitro to lung- and tracheal-derived cell lines. In addition, the tested peptides inhibited lung colonization after intranasal inoculation of mice with S. pneumoniae. Immunization with rPtsA protected the mice against a sublethal intranasal and a lethal intravenous pneumococcal challenge. In addition, mouse anti rPtsA antiserum reduced bacterial virulence in the intravenous inoculation mouse model. These findings showed that the surface-localized PtsA functions as an adhesin, PtsA binding peptides derived from its putative target molecules can be considered for future development of therapeutics, and rPtsA should be regarded as a candidate for vaccine development.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Cell-Wall-Localized Phosphoenolpyruvate Protein Phosphotransferase Can Function as an Adhesin: Identification of Its Host Target Molecules and Evaluation of Its Potential as a Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa; Blau, Karin; Kushnir, Tatyana; Shagan, Marilou; Portnoi, Maxim; Cohen, Aviad; Azriel, Shalhevet; Malka, Itai; Adawi, Asad; Kafka, Daniel; Dotan, Shahar; Guterman, Gali; Troib, Shany; Fishilevich, Tali; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Braiman, Alex; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Porat, Nurith; Goliand, Inna; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Swiatlo, Edwin; Tal, Michael; Ellis, Ronald; Elia, Natalie; Dagan, Ron

    2016-01-01

    In Streptococcus pneumonia, phosphoenolpyruvate protein phosphotransferase (PtsA) is an intracellular protein of the monosaccharide phosphotransferase systems. Biochemical and immunostaining methods were applied to show that PtsA also localizes to the bacterial cell-wall. Thus, it was suspected that PtsA has functions other than its main cytoplasmic enzymatic role. Indeed, recombinant PtsA and anti-rPtsA antiserum were shown to inhibit adhesion of S. pneumoniae to cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Screening of a combinatorial peptide library expressed in a filamentous phage with rPtsA identified epitopes that were capable of inhibiting S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptides in the phages were sequenced, and homologous sequences were found in human BMPER, multimerin1, protocadherin19, integrinβ4, epsin1 and collagen type VIIα1 proteins, all of which can be found in A549 cells except the latter. Six peptides, synthesized according to the homologous sequences in the human proteins, specifically bound rPtsA in the micromolar range and significantly inhibited pneumococcal adhesion in vitro to lung- and tracheal-derived cell lines. In addition, the tested peptides inhibited lung colonization after intranasal inoculation of mice with S. pneumoniae. Immunization with rPtsA protected the mice against a sublethal intranasal and a lethal intravenous pneumococcal challenge. In addition, mouse anti rPtsA antiserum reduced bacterial virulence in the intravenous inoculation mouse model. These findings showed that the surface-localized PtsA functions as an adhesin, PtsA binding peptides derived from its putative target molecules can be considered for future development of therapeutics, and rPtsA should be regarded as a candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26990554

  14. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  15. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  16. Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Bhatia, S.; Watson, D.; Munger, C.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is unusual among bacteria in possessing a eukaryotic-like system for N-linked protein glycosylation at Asn residues in sequons of the type Asp/Glu-Xaa-Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr. However, little is known about the structural context of the glycosylated sequons, limiting the design of novel recombinant glycoproteins. To obtain more information on sequon structure, we have determined the crystal structure of the PEB3 (Cj0289c) dimer. PEB3 has the class II periplasmic-binding protein fold, with each monomer having two domains with a ligand-binding site containing citrate located between them, and overall resembles molybdate- and sulfate-binding proteins. The sequon around Asn90 is located within a surface-exposed loop joining two structural elements. The three key residues are well exposed on the surface; hence, they may be accessible to the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase in the folded state.

  17. The multifunctional LigB adhesin binds homeostatic proteins with potential roles in cutaneous infection by pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Choy, Henry A; Kelley, Melissa M; Croda, Julio; Matsunaga, James; Babbitt, Jane T; Ko, Albert I; Picardeau, Mathieu; Haake, David A

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9-11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis patient antibodies react

  18. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA.

  19. The apicomplexan glideosome and adhesins -- structures and function

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Lauren E.; Bosch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The apicomplexan family of pathogens, which includes Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, are primarily obligate intracellular parasites and invade multiple cell types. These parasites express extracellular membrane protein receptors, adhesins, to form specific pathogen-host cell interaction complexes. Various adhesins are used to invade a variety of cell types. The receptors are linked to an actomyosin motor, which is part of a complex comprised of many proteins known as the invasion machinery or glideosome. To date, reviews on invasion have focused primarily on the molecular pathways and signals of invasion, with little or no structural information presented. Over 75 structures of parasite receptors and glideosome proteins have been deposited with the Protein Data Bank. These structures include adhesins, motor proteins, bridging proteins, inner membrane complex and cytoskeletal proteins, as well as co-crystal structures with peptides and antibodies. These structures provide information regarding key interactions necessary for target receptor engagement, machinery complex formation, how force is transmitted, and the basis of inhibitory antibodies. Additionally, these structures can provide starting points for the development of antibodies and inhibitory molecules targeting protein-protein interactions, with the aim to inhibit invasion. This review provides an overview of the parasite adhesin protein families, the glideosome components, glideosome architecture, and discuss recent work regarding alternative models. PMID:25764948

  20. The apicomplexan glideosome and adhesins - Structures and function.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Lauren E; Bosch, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The apicomplexan family of pathogens, which includes Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, are primarily obligate intracellular parasites and invade multiple cell types. These parasites express extracellular membrane protein receptors, adhesins, to form specific pathogen-host cell interaction complexes. Various adhesins are used to invade a variety of cell types. The receptors are linked to an actomyosin motor, which is part of a complex comprised of many proteins known as the invasion machinery or glideosome. To date, reviews on invasion have focused primarily on the molecular pathways and signals of invasion, with little or no structural information presented. Over 75 structures of parasite receptors and glideosome proteins have been deposited with the Protein Data Bank. These structures include adhesins, motor proteins, bridging proteins, inner membrane complex and cytoskeletal proteins, as well as co-crystal structures with peptides and antibodies. These structures provide information regarding key interactions necessary for target receptor engagement, machinery complex formation, how force is transmitted, and the basis of inhibitory antibodies. Additionally, these structures can provide starting points for the development of antibodies and inhibitory molecules targeting protein-protein interactions, with the aim to inhibit invasion. This review provides an overview of the parasite adhesin protein families, the glideosome components, glideosome architecture, and discuss recent work regarding alternative models.

  1. Comparative analysis of the structures of the outer membrane protein P1 genes from major clones of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Grass, S; Einhorn, M; Bailey, C; Newell, C

    1989-01-01

    P1 outer membrane proteins from Haemophilus influenzae type b are heterogeneous antigenically and with respect to apparent molecular weight in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For determination of the molecular basis for the differences in the P1 proteins, the genes for the P1 proteins from strain 1613, representative of outer membrane protein subtype 3L, and strain 8358, representative of outer membrane protein subtype 6U, were cloned, sequenced, and compared with the previously reported gene for the P1 protein from strain MinnA, a strain with the outer membrane protein subtype 1H. These prototype strains are representatives of the three major clonal families of H. influenzae type b responsible for invasive disease in diverse areas of the world. The nucleotide sequences of the P1 genes from strains 1613 and 8358 were 94 and 90% identical to the MinnA sequence, respectively. The derived amino acid sequences were 91 and 86% identical, respectively. Heterogeneity between the MinnA and 1613 proteins was largely localized to two short variable regions; the protein from strain 8538 contained a third variable region not observed in the other P1 proteins. Thus, the outer membrane protein P1 genes are highly conserved; the variable regions may code for the previously demonstrated strain-specific antigenic determinants. Images PMID:2572549

  2. Low-Level Expression of the E1B 20-Kilodalton Protein by Adenovirus 14p1 Enhances Viral Immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Radke, Jay R; Yong, Sherri L; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus 14p1 (Ad14p1) is an emergent variant of Ad serotype 14 (Ad14) that has caused increased severity of respiratory illnesses during globally distributed outbreaks, including cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome and death. We found that human cell infection with Ad14p1 results in markedly decreased expression of the E1B 20-kilodalton (20K) protein compared to that with infection with wild-type (wt) Ad14. This reduced Ad14p1 E1B 20K expression caused a loss-of-function phenotype of Ad-infected cell corpses that, in contrast to cells infected with wt Ad14, either failed to repress or increased NF-κB-dependent, proinflammatory cytokine responses of responder human alveolar macrophages. A small-animal model of Ad14-induced lung infection was used to test the translational relevance of these in vitro observations. Intratracheal infection of Syrian hamsters with Ad14p1 caused a marked, patchy bronchopneumonia, whereas hamster infection with wt Ad14 caused minimal peribronchial inflammation. These results suggest that this difference in E1B 20K gene expression during Ad14p1 infection and its modulating effect on the interactions between Ad14-infected cells and the host innate immune response could explain the increased immunopathogenic potential and associated increase in clinical illness in some people infected with the Ad14p1 outbreak strain.IMPORTANCE We previously reported that Ad-infected human cells exhibit E1B 19K-dependent repression of virally induced, NF-κB-dependent macrophage cytokine responses (J. R. Radke, F. Grigera, D. S. Ucker, and J. L. Cook, J Virol 88:2658-2669, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02372-13). The more virulent, emergent strain of Ad14, Ad14p1, causes increased cytopathology in vitro, which suggested a possible E1B 20K defect. Whether there is a linkage between these observations was unknown. We show that there is markedly reduced expression of E1B 20K in Ad14p1-infected human cells and that this causes an increased

  3. Low-Level Expression of the E1B 20-Kilodalton Protein by Adenovirus 14p1 Enhances Viral Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Sherri L.; Cook, James L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus 14p1 (Ad14p1) is an emergent variant of Ad serotype 14 (Ad14) that has caused increased severity of respiratory illnesses during globally distributed outbreaks, including cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome and death. We found that human cell infection with Ad14p1 results in markedly decreased expression of the E1B 20-kilodalton (20K) protein compared to that with infection with wild-type (wt) Ad14. This reduced Ad14p1 E1B 20K expression caused a loss-of-function phenotype of Ad-infected cell corpses that, in contrast to cells infected with wt Ad14, either failed to repress or increased NF-κB-dependent, proinflammatory cytokine responses of responder human alveolar macrophages. A small-animal model of Ad14-induced lung infection was used to test the translational relevance of these in vitro observations. Intratracheal infection of Syrian hamsters with Ad14p1 caused a marked, patchy bronchopneumonia, whereas hamster infection with wt Ad14 caused minimal peribronchial inflammation. These results suggest that this difference in E1B 20K gene expression during Ad14p1 infection and its modulating effect on the interactions between Ad14-infected cells and the host innate immune response could explain the increased immunopathogenic potential and associated increase in clinical illness in some people infected with the Ad14p1 outbreak strain. IMPORTANCE We previously reported that Ad-infected human cells exhibit E1B 19K-dependent repression of virally induced, NF-κB-dependent macrophage cytokine responses (J. R. Radke, F. Grigera, D. S. Ucker, and J. L. Cook, J Virol 88:2658–2669, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02372-13). The more virulent, emergent strain of Ad14, Ad14p1, causes increased cytopathology in vitro, which suggested a possible E1B 20K defect. Whether there is a linkage between these observations was unknown. We show that there is markedly reduced expression of E1B 20K in Ad14p1-infected human cells and that this causes an

  4. Importance of adhesins in virulence of Paracoccidioides spp.

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Scorzoni, Liliana; Marcos, Caroline M.; Rossi, Suelen A.; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Assato, Patrícia A.; da Silva, Rosângela A. M.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Paracoccidioides genus are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). This genus is composed of two species: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. The correct molecular taxonomic classification of these fungi has created new opportunities for studying and understanding their relationships with their hosts. Paracoccidioides spp. have features that permit their growth under adverse conditions, enable them to adhere to and invade host tissues and may contribute to disease development. Cell wall proteins called adhesins facilitate adhesion and are capable of mediating fungi-host interactions during infection. This study aimed to evaluate the adhesion profile of two species of the genus Paracoccidioides, to analyze the expression of adhesin-encoding genes by real-time PCR and to relate these results to the virulence of the species, as assessed using a survival curve in mice and in Galleria mellonella after blocking the adhesins. A high level of heterogeneity was observed in adhesion and adhesin expression, showing that the 14-3-3 and enolase molecules are the most highly expressed adhesins during pathogen-host interaction. Additionally, a survival curve revealed a correlation between the adhesion rate and survival, with P. brasiliensis showing higher adhesion and adhesin expression levels and greater virulence when compared with P. lutzii. After blocking 14-3-3 and enolase adhesins, we observed modifications in the virulence of these two species, revealing the importance of these molecules during the pathogenesis of members of the Paracoccidioides genus. These results revealed new insights into the host-pathogen interaction of this genus and may enhance our understanding of different isolates that could be useful for the treatment of this mycosis. PMID:25914695

  5. Evaluation of Cell Binding Activities of Leptospira ECM Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory T.; Hahn, Beth L.; Evangelista, Karen V.; Padmore, Lavinia; Aranda, Patrick S.; Coburn, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic infection that occurs globally. The bacteria colonize the renal proximal tubules of many animals and are shed in the urine. Contact with the urine, or with water contaminated with the urine of infected animals can cause infection of new host animals, including humans. Mechanisms of colonization of the proximal tubule and other tissues are not known, but specific interactions between bacterial adhesins and host substrates are likely to be critical in this process. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesins have been previously identified, but more recently, it has been shown that Leptospira bind more efficiently to cells than ECM. In this work, recombinant forms of five putative Leptospira ECM adhesins, namely LipL32, Loa22, OmpL1, p31/LipL45, and LenA were evaluated for binding to cells as well as an expanded variety of ECM components. Reproducible and significant adhesin activity was demonstrated only for OmpL1, which bound to both mammalian cell lines tested and to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). While determination of biologically significant bacterial adhesion activity will require generation of site-directed mutant strains, our results suggest that OmpL1 is a strong candidate for future evaluation regarding the roles of the adhesin activity of the protein during L. interrogans infection. PMID:25875373

  6. Adhesins in Human Fungal Pathogens: Glue with Plenty of Stick

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Piet W. J.; Bader, Oliver; de Boer, Albert D.; Weig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of an infectious disease is critical for developing new methods to prevent infection and diagnose or cure disease. Adherence of microorganisms to host tissue is a prerequisite for tissue invasion and infection. Fungal cell wall adhesins involved in adherence to host tissue or abiotic medical devices are critical for colonization leading to invasion and damage of host tissue. Here, with a main focus on pathogenic Candida species, we summarize recent progress made in the field of adhesins in human fungal pathogens and underscore the importance of these proteins in establishment of fungal diseases. PMID:23397570

  7. Encapsidation of poliovirus replicons encoding the complete human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene by using a complementation system which provides the P1 capsid protein in trans.

    PubMed

    Porter, D C; Ansardi, D C; Morrow, C D

    1995-03-01

    Poliovirus genomes which contain small regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag, pol, and env genes substituted in frame for the P1 capsid region replicate and express HIV-1 proteins as fusion proteins with the P1 capsid precursor protein upon transfection into cells (W. S. Choi, R. Pal-Ghosh, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 65:2875-2883, 1991). Since these genomes, referred to as replicons, do not express capsid proteins, a complementation system was developed to encapsidate the genomes by providing P1 capsid proteins in trans from a recombinant vaccinia virus, VV-P1. Virus stocks of encapsidated replicons were generated after serial passage of the replicon genomes into cells previously infected with VV-P1 (D. C. Porter, D. C. Ansardi, W. S. Choi, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:3712-3719, 1993). Using this system, we have further defined the role of the P1 region in viral protein expression and RNA encapsidation. In the present study, we constructed poliovirus replicons which contain the complete 1,492-bp gag gene of HIV-1 substituted for the entire P1 region of poliovirus. To investigate whether the VP4 coding region was required for the replication and encapsidation of poliovirus RNA, a second replicon in which the complete gag gene was substituted for the VP2, VP3, and VP1 capsid sequences was constructed. Transfection of replicon RNA with and without the VP4 coding region into cells resulted in similar levels of expression of the HIV-1 Gag protein and poliovirus 3CD protein, as indicated by immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from transfected cells demonstrated comparable levels of RNA replication for each replicon. Transfection of the replicon genomes into cells infected with VV-P1 resulted in the encapsidation of the genomes; serial passage in the presence of VV-P1 resulted in the generation of virus stocks of encapsidated replicons. Analysis of the levels of protein expression and encapsidated

  8. Identification of novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv using integrated approach of multiple computational algorithms and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria interacting with eukaryotic host express adhesins on their surface. These adhesins aid in bacterial attachment to the host cell receptors during colonization. A few adhesins such as Heparin binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA), Apa, Malate Synthase of M. tuberculosis have been identified using specific experimental interaction models based on the biological knowledge of the pathogen. In the present work, we carried out computational screening for adhesins of M. tuberculosis. We used an integrated computational approach using SPAAN for predicting adhesins, PSORTb, SubLoc and LocTree for extracellular localization, and BLAST for verifying non-similarity to human proteins. These steps are among the first of reverse vaccinology. Multiple claims and attacks from different algorithms were processed through argumentative approach. Additional filtration criteria included selection for proteins with low molecular weights and absence of literature reports. We examined binding potential of the selected proteins using an image based ELISA. The protein Rv2599 (membrane protein) binds to human fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Rv3717 (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) and Rv0309 (L,D-transpeptidase) bind to fibronectin and laminin. We report Rv2599 (membrane protein), Rv0309 and Rv3717 as novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our results expand the number of known adhesins of M. tuberculosis and suggest their regulated expression in different stages.

  9. DNA polymerase alpha associated protein P1, a murine homolog of yeast MCM3, changes its intranuclear distribution during the DNA synthetic period.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, H; Nozaki, N; Sugimoto, K

    1994-01-01

    We isolated a murine gene for the DNA polymerase alpha associated protein P1, which shares high homology with the budding yeast MCM3 protein, which is a member of a protein family involved in the early event of DNA replication having a putative DNA-dependent ATPase motif. Using a polyclonal anti-P1 antibody raised against a beta-galactosidase-P1 fusion protein, we identified at least two forms of P1 protein in the nucleus of a mouse cell line, an underphosphorylated form that was associated with a particular nuclear structure and a hyperphosphorylated form loosely bound to the nucleus. During progression through S phase, P1 disappeared, first from the euchromatic region, then from the heterochromatic region, apparently in parallel with temporally ordered DNA replication. Thus, it is likely that the underphosphorylated P1 is dissociated from the nuclear structure after DNA replication by cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation. This is the first direct observation of a protein whose behavior is consistent with that of a hypothetical factor which restricts the chromatin to replicate once per cell cycle in higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:7925275

  10. Function analysis of proteins encoded by ORFs 1 to 8 of porcine circovirus-like virus P1 by microarray assay.

    PubMed

    Wen, Libin; Wang, Fengzhi; Zhang, Dan; He, Kongwang

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus-like agent P1 is a newly discovered virus containing a single-strand circular genome. The genome of P1 is a DNA molecule of 648 nucleotides which contains eight open reading frames (ORFs) that probably encode potential proteins or polypeptides. Thus it is very important to clarify these proteins' function. Here we provide the methods and analysis of microarray data in detail to characterize the transcriptome profile of P1 with and without the ORF. The relevant microarray data sets have been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE71945. PMID:26697373

  11. Iron and contact with host cells induce expression of adhesins on surface of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ana F.; Chang, Te-Hung; Benchimol, Marlene; Klumpp, David Jichael; Lehker, Michael W.; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The proteins AP65, AP51, AP33 and AP23 synthesized by Trichomonas vaginalis organisms in high iron play a role in adherence. Multigene families encode enzymes of the hydrogenosome organelles, which have identity to adhesins. This fact raises questions regarding the compartmentalization of the proteins outside the organelle and about the interactions of adhesins with host cells. Data here demonstrate the presence of the proteins outside the organelle under high-iron conditions. Fluorescence and immunocytochemical experiments show that high-iron-grown organisms coexpressed adhesins on the surface and intracellularly in contrast with low-iron parasites. Furthermore, the AP65 epitopes seen by rabbit anti-AP65 serum that blocks adherence and detects surface proteins were identified, and a mAb reacting to those epitopes recognized the trichomonal surface. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot of adhesins from surface-labelled parasites provided evidence that all members of the multigene family were co-ordinately expressed and placed on the trichomonal surface. Similar two-dimensional analysis of proteins from purified hydrogenosomes obtained from iodinated trichomonads confirmed the specific surface labelling of proteins. Contact of trichomonads with vaginal epithelial cells increased the amount of surface-expressed adhesins. Moreover, we found a direct relationship between the levels of adherence and amount of adhesins bound to immortalized vaginal and ureter epithelial cells, further reinforcing specific associations. Finally, trichomonads of MR100, a drug-resistant isolate absent in hydrogenosome proteins and adhesins, were non-adherent. Overall, the results confirm an important role for iron and contact in the surface expression of adhesins of T. vaginalis organisms. PMID:12603729

  12. A domain dictionary of trimeric autotransporter adhesins.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Jens; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte; Hartmann, Marcus D; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-02-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are modular, highly repetitive outer membrane proteins that mediate adhesion to external surfaces in many Gram-negative bacteria. In recent years, several TAAs have been investigated in considerable detail, also at the structural level. However, in their vast majority, putative TAAs in prokaryotic genomes remain poorly annotated, due to their sequence diversity and changeable domain architecture. In order to achieve an automated annotation of these proteins that is both detailed and accurate we have taken a domain dictionary approach, in which we identify recurrent domains by sequence comparisons, produce bioinformatic descriptors for each domain type, and connect these to structural information where available. We implemented this approach in a web-based platform, daTAA, in 2008 and demonstrated its applicability by reconstructing the complete fiber structure of a TAA conserved in enterobacteria. Here we review current knowledge on the domain structure of TAAs.

  13. Evidence against the Bm1P1 protein as a positive transcription factor for barbiturate-mediated induction of cytochrome P450BM-1 in bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G C; Sung, C C; Liu, C H; Lin, C H

    1998-04-01

    The Bm1P1 protein was previously proposed to act as a positive transcription factor involved in barbiturate-mediated induction of cytochrome P450BM-1 in Bacillus megaterium. We now report that the bm1P1 gene encodes a protein of 217 amino acids, rather than the 98 amino acids as reported previously. In vitro gel shift assays indicate that the Bm1P1 protein did not interact with probes comprising the regulatory regions of the P450BM-1 gene. Moreover, disruption of the bm1P1 gene did not markedly affect barbiturate induction of P450BM-1 expression. A multicopy plasmid harboring only the P450BM-1 promoter region could increase expression of the chromosome-encoded P450BM-1. The level of expression is comparable with that shown by a multicopy plasmid harboring the P450BM-1 promoter region along with the bm1P1 gene. These results strongly suggest that the Bm1P1 protein is unlikely to act as a positive regulator for barbiturate induction of P450BM-1 expression. Finally, deletion of the Barbie box did not markedly diminish the effect of pentobarbital on expression of a reporter gene transcriptionally fused to the P450BM-1 promoter. This suggests that the Barbie box is unlikely to be a key element in barbiturate-mediated induction of P450BM-1. PMID:9525898

  14. Potential use of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vector carrying the C-terminal portion of the P97 adhesin protein as a vaccine against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in swine.

    PubMed

    Okamba, Faust René; Arella, Maximilien; Music, Nedzad; Jia, Jian Jun; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Gagnon, Carl A

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae causes severe economic losses to the swine industry worldwide and the prevention of its related disease, enzootic porcine pneumonia, remains a challenge. The P97 adhesin protein of M. hyopneumoniae should be a good candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine because antibodies produced against P97 could prevent the adhesion of the pathogen to the respiratory epithelial cells in vitro. In the present study, a P97 recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (rAdP97c) subunit vaccine efficiency was evaluated in pigs. The rAdP97c vaccine was found to induce both strong P97 specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The rAdP97c vaccinated pigs developed a lower amount of macroscopic lung lesions (18.5 + or - 9.6%) compared to the unvaccinated and challenged animals (45.8 + or - 11.5%). rAdP97c vaccine reduced significantly the severity of inflammatory response and the amount of M. hyopneumoniae in the respiratory tract. Furthermore, the average daily weight gain was slightly improved in the rAdP97c vaccinated pigs (0.672 + or - 0.068 kg/day) compared to the unvaccinated and challenged animals (0.568 + or - 0.104 kg/day). A bacterin-based commercial vaccine (Suvaxyn MH-one) was more efficient to induce a protective immune response than rAdP97c even if it did not evoke a P97 specific immune response. These results suggest that immunodominant antigens other than P97 adhesin are also important in the induction of a protective immune response and should be taken into account in the future development of M. hyopneumoniae subunit vaccines. PMID:20472025

  15. The Biology of Neisseria Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Christodoulides, Myron

    2013-01-01

    Members of the genus Neisseria include pathogens causing important human diseases such as meningitis, septicaemia, gonorrhoea and pelvic inflammatory disease syndrome. Neisseriae are found on the exposed epithelia of the upper respiratory tract and the urogenital tract. Colonisation of these exposed epithelia is dependent on a repertoire of diverse bacterial molecules, extending not only from the surface of the bacteria but also found within the outer membrane. During invasive disease, pathogenic Neisseriae also interact with immune effector cells, vascular endothelia and the meninges. Neisseria adhesion involves the interplay of these multiple surface factors and in this review we discuss the structure and function of these important molecules and the nature of the host cell receptors and mechanisms involved in their recognition. We also describe the current status for recently identified Neisseria adhesins. Understanding the biology of Neisseria adhesins has an impact not only on the development of new vaccines but also in revealing fundamental knowledge about human biology. PMID:24833056

  16. Localization of adhesins on the surface of a pathogenic bacterial envelope through atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnal, L; Longo, G; Stupar, P; Castez, M F; Cattelan, N; Salvarezza, R C; Yantorno, O M; Kasas, S; Vela, M E

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first and a significant step in establishing infection. This adhesion normally occurs in the presence of flow of fluids. Therefore, bacterial adhesins must be able to provide high strength interactions with their target surface in order to maintain the adhered bacteria under hydromechanical stressing conditions. In the case of B. pertussis, a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for pertussis, a highly contagious human respiratory tract infection, an important protein participating in the adhesion process is a 220 kDa adhesin named filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), an outer membrane and also secreted protein that contains recognition domains to adhere to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages. In this work, we obtained information on the cell-surface localization and distribution of the B. pertussis adhesin FHA using an antibody-functionalized AFM tip. Through the analysis of specific molecular recognition events we built a map of the spatial distribution of the adhesin which revealed a non-homogeneous pattern. Moreover, our experiments showed a force induced reorganization of the adhesin on the surface of the cells, which could explain a reinforced adhesive response under external forces. This single-molecule information contributes to the understanding of basic molecular mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to cause infectious disease and to gain insights into the structural features by which adhesins can act as force sensors under mechanical shear conditions. PMID:26446736

  17. The giant adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Barlag, Britta; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative, food-borne pathogen, which colonizes the intestinal tract and invades enterocytes. Invasion of polarized cells depends on the SPI1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and the SPI4-encoded type I secretion system (T1SS). The substrate of this T1SS is the non-fimbrial giant adhesin SiiE. With a size of 595 kDa, SiiE is the largest protein of the Salmonella proteome and consists of 53 repetitive bacterial immunoglobulin (BIg) domains, each containing several conserved residues. As known for other T1SS substrates, such as E. coli HlyA, Ca2+ ions bound by conserved D residues within the BIg domains stabilize the protein and facilitate secretion. The adhesin SiiE mediates the first contact to the host cell and thereby positions the SPI1-T3SS to initiate the translocation of a cocktail of effector proteins. This leads to actin remodeling, membrane ruffle formation and bacterial internalization. SiiE binds to host cell apical membranes in a lectin-like manner. GlcNAc and α2-3 linked sialic acid-containing structures are ligands of SiiE. Since SiiE shows repetitive domain architecture, we propose a zipper-like binding mediated by each individual BIg domain. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the SPI4-T1SS and the giant adhesin SiiE. PMID:25587788

  18. The giant adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Barlag, Britta; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-12

    Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative, food-borne pathogen, which colonizes the intestinal tract and invades enterocytes. Invasion of polarized cells depends on the SPI1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and the SPI4-encoded type I secretion system (T1SS). The substrate of this T1SS is the non-fimbrial giant adhesin SiiE. With a size of 595 kDa, SiiE is the largest protein of the Salmonella proteome and consists of 53 repetitive bacterial immunoglobulin (BIg) domains, each containing several conserved residues. As known for other T1SS substrates, such as E. coli HlyA, Ca2+ ions bound by conserved D residues within the BIg domains stabilize the protein and facilitate secretion. The adhesin SiiE mediates the first contact to the host cell and thereby positions the SPI1-T3SS to initiate the translocation of a cocktail of effector proteins. This leads to actin remodeling, membrane ruffle formation and bacterial internalization. SiiE binds to host cell apical membranes in a lectin-like manner. GlcNAc and α2-3 linked sialic acid-containing structures are ligands of SiiE. Since SiiE shows repetitive domain architecture, we propose a zipper-like binding mediated by each individual BIg domain. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the SPI4-T1SS and the giant adhesin SiiE.

  19. [Construction and expression of six deletion mutants of human astrovirus C-terminal nsP1a/4 protein].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Ke; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-ming; Sui, Ting-ting; Wang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the leading causes of actue virual diarrhea in infants. HAstV-induced epithdlial cell apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HAstV infection. Our previous study indicated that HAstV non-structural protein nsPla C-terminal protein nsPla/4 was the major apoptosis functional protein and probably contained the main apoptosis domains. In order to screen for astrovirus encoded apoptotic protien, nsPla/4 and six turncated proteins, which possessed nsPla/4 protein different function domain ,were cloned into green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector pEG-FP-N3. After 24-72 h transfection, the fusion protein expression in BHK21 cells, was analysis by fluorescence microscope and Western blot. The results indicated seven fusion proteins were observed successfully in BHK21 cell after transfected for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that the level of fusion protein expressed in BHK21 cells was increased significantly at 72h compared to 48h in transfected cells. The successful expression of deletion mutants of nsPla/4 protein was an important foundation to gain further insights into the function of apoptosis domains of nsPla/4 protein and it would also provide research platform to further confirm the molecule pathogenic mechanism of human astrovirus.

  20. Nitric oxide storage and transport in cells are mediated by glutathione S-transferase P1-1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 via dinitrosyl iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Lok, Hiu Chuen; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Hawkins, Clare L; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Morrow, Charles S; Townsend, Alan J; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen monoxide (NO) plays a role in the cytotoxic mechanisms of activated macrophages against tumor cells by inducing iron release. We showed that NO-mediated iron efflux from cells required glutathione (GSH) (Watts, R. N., and Richardson, D. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 4724-4732) and that the GSH-conjugate transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), mediates this release potentially as a dinitrosyl-dithiol iron complex (DNIC; Watts, R. N., Hawkins, C., Ponka, P., and Richardson, D. R. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 7670-7675). Recently, glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GST P1-1) was shown to bind DNICs as dinitrosyl-diglutathionyl iron complexes. Considering this and that GSTs and MRP1 form an integrated detoxification unit with chemotherapeutics, we assessed whether these proteins coordinately regulate storage and transport of DNICs as long lived NO intermediates. Cells transfected with GSTP1 (but not GSTA1 or GSTM1) significantly decreased NO-mediated 59Fe release from cells. This NO-mediated 59Fe efflux and the effect of GST P1-1 on preventing this were observed with NO-generating agents and also in cells transfected with inducible nitric oxide synthase. Notably, 59Fe accumulated in cells within GST P1-1-containing fractions, indicating an alteration in intracellular 59Fe distribution. Furthermore, electron paramagnetic resonance studies showed that MCF7-VP cells transfected with GSTP1 contain significantly greater levels of a unique DNIC signal. These investigations indicate that GST P1-1 acts to sequester NO as DNICs, reducing their transport out of the cell by MRP1. Cell proliferation studies demonstrated the importance of the combined effect of GST P1-1 and MRP1 in protecting cells from the cytotoxic effects of NO. Thus, the DNIC storage function of GST P1-1 and ability of MRP1 to efflux DNICs are vital in protection against NO cytotoxicity.

  1. Identification of Novel Laminin- and Fibronectin-binding Proteins by Far-Western Blot: Capturing the Adhesins of Streptococcus suis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Liu, Hanze; Du, Dechao; Yu, Yanfei; Ma, Caifeng; Jiao, Fangfang; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cell wall (CW) and extracellular (EC) proteins are often involved in interactions with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN), which play important roles in adhesion and invasion. In this study, an efficient method combining proteomic analysis and Far-Western blotting assays was developed to screen directly for bacterial surface proteins with LN- and FN-binding capacity. With this approach, fifteen potential LN-binding proteins and five potential FN-binding proteins were identified from Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) CW and EC proteins. Nine newly identified proteins, including oligopeptide-binding protein OppA precursor (OppA), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), enolase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), 3-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (KAR), Gly ceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), and amino acid ABC transporter permease (ABC) were cloned, expressed, purified and further confirmed by Far-Western blotting and ELISA. Five proteins (OppA, EF-Tu, enolase, LDH, and FBA) exhibited specifically binding activity to both human LN and human FN. Furthermore, seven important recombinant proteins were selected and identified to have the ability to bind Hep-2 cells by the indirect immunofluorescent assay. In addition, four recombinant proteins, and their corresponding polyclonal antibodies, were observed to decrease SS2 adhesion to Hep-2 cells, which indicates that these proteins contribute to the adherence of SS2 to host cell surface. Collectively, these results show that the approach described here represents a useful tool for investigating the host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26636044

  2. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a Novel Adhesin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J.; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.; Levine, Myron M.; Stine, O. Colin; Pop, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  3. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  4. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains.

  5. A multifaceted study of stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA)-like Arabidopsis lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) suggests diversified roles for these LTPs in plant growth and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Chae, Keun; Gonong, Benedict J; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kieslich, Chris A; Morikis, Dimitrios; Balasubramanian, Shruthi; Lord, Elizabeth M

    2010-10-01

    Lily stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA), a plant lipid transfer protein (LTP) which is secreted into the extracellular matrix, functions in pollen tube guidance in fertilization. A gain-of-function mutant (ltp5-1) for Arabidopsis LTP5, an SCA-like molecule, was recently shown to display defects in sexual reproduction. In the current study, it is reported that ltp5-1 plants have dwarfed primary shoots, delayed hypocotyl elongation, various abnormal tissue fusions, and display multibranching. These mutant phenotypes in vegetative growth are recessive. No abnormality was found in ltp5-1/+ plants. In a phylogenetic analysis of plant LTPs, SCA-like Arabidopsis LTPs were classified with conventional plant LTPs. Homology modelling-based electrostatic similarity index (ESI) clustering was used to show diversity in spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials of SCA-like LTPs, suggestive of their various roles in interaction in the extracellular matrix space. β-Glucuronidase (GUS) analysis showed that SCA-like Arabidopsis LTP genes are diversely present in various tissues. LTP4 was found specifically in the guard cells and LTP6 in trichomes as well as in other tissues. LTP1 levels were specifically abundant in the stigma, and both LTP3 and LTP6 in the ovules. LTP2 and LTP4 gene levels were up-regulated in whole seedlings with 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 300 mM NaCl treatments, respectively. LTP5 was up-regulated in the hypocotyl with 3 d dark growth conditions. LTP6 was specifically expressed in the tip of the cotyledon under drought stress conditions. The results suggest that SCA-like Arabidopsis LTPs are multifunctional, with diversified roles in plant growth and reproduction.

  6. A multifaceted study of stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA)-like Arabidopsis lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) suggests diversified roles for these LTPs in plant growth and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Keun; Gonong, Benedict J.; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Balasubramanian, Shruthi; Lord, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Lily stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA), a plant lipid transfer protein (LTP) which is secreted into the extracellular matrix, functions in pollen tube guidance in fertilization. A gain-of-function mutant (ltp5-1) for Arabidopsis LTP5, an SCA-like molecule, was recently shown to display defects in sexual reproduction. In the current study, it is reported that ltp5-1 plants have dwarfed primary shoots, delayed hypocotyl elongation, various abnormal tissue fusions, and display multibranching. These mutant phenotypes in vegetative growth are recessive. No abnormality was found in ltp5-1/+ plants. In a phylogenetic analysis of plant LTPs, SCA-like Arabidopsis LTPs were classified with conventional plant LTPs. Homology modelling-based electrostatic similarity index (ESI) clustering was used to show diversity in spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials of SCA-like LTPs, suggestive of their various roles in interaction in the extracellular matrix space. β-Glucuronidase (GUS) analysis showed that SCA-like Arabidopsis LTP genes are diversely present in various tissues. LTP4 was found specifically in the guard cells and LTP6 in trichomes as well as in other tissues. LTP1 levels were specifically abundant in the stigma, and both LTP3 and LTP6 in the ovules. LTP2 and LTP4 gene levels were up-regulated in whole seedlings with 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 300 mM NaCl treatments, respectively. LTP5 was up-regulated in the hypocotyl with 3 d dark growth conditions. LTP6 was specifically expressed in the tip of the cotyledon under drought stress conditions. The results suggest that SCA-like Arabidopsis LTPs are multifunctional, with diversified roles in plant growth and reproduction. PMID:20667964

  7. Proteomic analysis of hyperadhesive Candida glabrata clinical isolates reveals a core wall proteome and differential incorporation of adhesins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Molero, Emilia; de Boer, Albert D; Dekker, Henk L; Moreno-Martínez, Ana; Kraneveld, Eef A; Ichsan; Chauhan, Neeraj; Weig, Michael; de Soet, Johannes J; de Koster, Chris G; Bader, Oliver; de Groot, Piet W J

    2015-12-01

    Attachment to human host tissues or abiotic medical devices is a key step in the development of infections by Candida glabrata. The genome of this pathogenic yeast codes for a large number of adhesins, but proteomic work using reference strains has shown incorporation of only few adhesins in the cell wall. By making inventories of the wall proteomes of hyperadhesive clinical isolates and reference strain CBS138 using mass spectrometry, we describe the cell wall proteome of C. glabrata and tested the hypothesis that hyperadhesive isolates display differential incorporation of adhesins. Two clinical strains (PEU382 and PEU427) were selected, which both were hyperadhesive to polystyrene and showed high surface hydrophobicity. Cell wall proteome analysis under biofilm-forming conditions identified a core proteome of about 20 proteins present in all C. glabrata strains. In addition, 12 adhesin-like wall proteins were identified in the hyperadherent strains, including six novel adhesins (Awp8-13) of which only Awp12 was also present in CBS138. We conclude that the hyperadhesive capacity of these two clinical C. glabrata isolates is correlated with increased and differential incorporation of cell wall adhesins. Future studies should elucidate the role of the identified proteins in the establishment of C. glabrata infections. PMID:26546455

  8. FungalRV: adhesin prediction and immunoinformatics portal for human fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of sequence data of human pathogenic fungi generates opportunities to develop Bioinformatics tools and resources for vaccine development towards benefitting at-risk patients. Description We have developed a fungal adhesin predictor and an immunoinformatics database with predicted adhesins. Based on literature search and domain analysis, we prepared a positive dataset comprising adhesin protein sequences from human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Coccidioides immitis, Coccidioides posadasii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The negative dataset consisted of proteins with high probability to function intracellularly. We have used 3945 compositional properties including frequencies of mono, doublet, triplet, and multiplets of amino acids and hydrophobic properties as input features of protein sequences to Support Vector Machine. Best classifiers were identified through an exhaustive search of 588 parameters and meeting the criteria of best Mathews Correlation Coefficient and lowest coefficient of variation among the 3 fold cross validation datasets. The "FungalRV adhesin predictor" was built on three models whose average Mathews Correlation Coefficient was in the range 0.89-0.90 and its coefficient of variation across three fold cross validation datasets in the range 1.2% - 2.74% at threshold score of 0. We obtained an overall MCC value of 0.8702 considering all 8 pathogens, namely, C. albicans, C. glabrata, A. fumigatus, B. dermatitidis, C. immitis, C. posadasii, H. capsulatum and P. brasiliensis thus showing high sensitivity and specificity at a threshold of 0.511. In case of P. brasiliensis the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 66.67%. A total of 307 fungal adhesins and adhesin like proteins were predicted from the entire proteomes of eight human pathogenic fungal species. The immunoinformatics

  9. Distribution and degree of heterogeneity of the afimbrial-adhesin-encoding operon (afa) among uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Labigne-Roussel, A; Falkow, S

    1988-03-01

    The afimbrial adhesin (AFA-I) from a pyelonephritic Escherichia coli isolate (KS52) is a mannose-resistant, P-independent, X-binding adhesin, expressed by the afa-1 operon. It is distinct from the E. coli X-binding adhesins with M and S specificity. A total of 138 E. coli isolates belonging to various serotypes, mostly from urinary tract infections, were screened for the presence of DNA sequences related to the afa operon and for the expression of an X-adhesin able to mediate mannose-resistant hemagglutination (MRHA) and adhesion to uroepithelial cells. Fifteen strains were shown to harbor DNA sequences related to the AFA-I-encoding operon, and 13 of them expressed an X-adhesin. Using as probes different DNA segments of the AFA-I-encoding operon in Southern experiments, we demonstrated that only three of these clinical isolates contained genetic determinants closely related to those identified in the original afa prototype strain (KS52): presence of the afaA, afaB, afaC, afaD, and afaE genes associated with the expression of a 16,000-dalton hemagglutinin-adhesin which strongly cross-reacted with AFA-I-specific antibodies. The other E. coli isolates harbored DNA sequences homologous to the afaA, afaB, afaC, and afaD genes, but lacked the sequence corresponding to the adhesin-producing gene afaE; Western blots allowed the detection of polypeptides (15,000, 15,500, or 16,000 daltons) in these strains which cross-reacted with variable intensity with antibodies raised against the denatured AFA-I protein, but did not cross-react with native AFA-I-specific antibodies. Following DNA cloning experiments from chromosomal DNA of two of those strains (A22 and A30), we demonstrated that although the AFA-related operon in A22 and A30 strains lacked the AFA-I adhesin-encoding gene, they synthesized a functional X-adhesin. Thus, strains A22 and A30 encode adhesins designated AFA-II and AFA-III, which were cloned on recombinant plasmids pILL72 and pILL61, respectively. Southern

  10. Giant multilevel cation channels formed by Alzheimer disease amyloid beta-protein [A beta P-(1-40)] in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Arispe, N; Pollard, H B; Rojas, E

    1993-01-01

    We have recently shown that the Alzheimer disease 40-residue amyloid beta-protein [A beta P-(1-40)] can form cation-selective channels when incorporated into planar lipid bilayers by fusion of liposomes containing the peptide. Since A beta P-(1-40) comprises portions of the putative extracellular and membrane-spanning domains of the amyloid precursor protein (APP751), we suggested that the channel-forming property could be the underlying cause of amyloid neurotoxicity. The peptide has been proposed to occur in vivo in both membrane-bound and soluble forms, and we now report that soluble A beta P-(1-40) can also form similar channels in solvent-free lipid bilayers formed at the tip of a patch pipet, as well as in the planar lipid bilayer system. As in the case of liposome-mediated incorporation, the amyloid channel activity in the patch pipet exhibits multiple conductance levels between 40 and 400 pS, cation selectivity, and sensitivity to tromethamine (Tris). Further studies with A beta P channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers from the liposome complex have also revealed that the channel activity can express spontaneous transitions to a much higher range of conductances between 400 and 4000 pS. Under these conditions, the amyloid channel continues to be cation selective. Amyloid channels were insensitive to nitrendipine at either conductance range. We calculate that if such channels were expressed in cells, the ensuing ion fluxes down their electrochemical potential gradients would be homeostatically dissipative. We therefore interpret these data as providing further support for the concept that cell death in Alzheimer disease may be due to amyloid ion-channel activity. PMID:7504270

  11. Localization of adhesins on the surface of a pathogenic bacterial envelope through atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, L.; Longo, G.; Stupar, P.; Castez, M. F.; Cattelan, N.; Salvarezza, R. C.; Yantorno, O. M.; Kasas, S.; Vela, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first and a significant step in establishing infection. This adhesion normally occurs in the presence of flow of fluids. Therefore, bacterial adhesins must be able to provide high strength interactions with their target surface in order to maintain the adhered bacteria under hydromechanical stressing conditions. In the case of B. pertussis, a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for pertussis, a highly contagious human respiratory tract infection, an important protein participating in the adhesion process is a 220 kDa adhesin named filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), an outer membrane and also secreted protein that contains recognition domains to adhere to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages. In this work, we obtained information on the cell-surface localization and distribution of the B. pertussis adhesin FHA using an antibody-functionalized AFM tip. Through the analysis of specific molecular recognition events we built a map of the spatial distribution of the adhesin which revealed a non-homogeneous pattern. Moreover, our experiments showed a force induced reorganization of the adhesin on the surface of the cells, which could explain a reinforced adhesive response under external forces. This single-molecule information contributes to the understanding of basic molecular mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to cause infectious disease and to gain insights into the structural features by which adhesins can act as force sensors under mechanical shear conditions.Bacterial adhesion is the first and a significant step in establishing infection. This adhesion normally occurs in the presence of flow of fluids. Therefore, bacterial adhesins must be able to provide high strength interactions with their target surface in order to maintain the adhered bacteria under hydromechanical stressing conditions. In the case of B. pertussis, a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for pertussis, a highly contagious human respiratory tract

  12. FimH adhesin of Escherichia coli K1 type 1 fimbriae activates BV-2 microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jongseok; Shin, Sooan; Teng, C.-H.; Hong, Suk Jin; Kim, Kwang Sik . E-mail: kwangkim@jhmi.edu

    2005-09-02

    The generation of intense inflammation in the subarachnoid space in response to meningitis-causing bacteria contributes to brain dysfunction and neuronal injury in bacterial meningitis. Microglia, the major immune effector cells in the central nervous system (CNS), become activated by bacterial components to produce proinflammatory immune mediators. In this study, we showed that FimH adhesin, a tip component of type 1 fimbriae of meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1, activated the murine microglial cell line, BV-2, which resulted in the production of nitric oxide and the release of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}. Mitogen-activated protein kinases, ERK and p-38, and nuclear factor-{kappa}B were involved in FimH adhesin-mediated microglial activation. These findings suggest that FimH adhesin contributes to the CNS inflammatory response by virtue of activating microglia in E. coli meningitis.

  13. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  14. Creating directed double-strand breaks with the Ref protein: a novel RecA-dependent nuclease from bacteriophage P1.

    PubMed

    Gruenig, Marielle C; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L; Manlick, Angela J; Keck, James L; Cox, Michael M

    2011-03-11

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 Å resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded β-hairpin that is sandwiched between several α-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  15. Analysis of protein adduction kinetics by quantitative mass spectrometry: competing adduction reactions of glutathione-S-transferase P1-1 with electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Orton, Christopher R; Liebler, Daniel C

    2007-06-30

    Defining the mechanisms and consequences of protein adduction is crucial to understanding the toxicity of reactive electrophiles. Application of tandem mass spectrometry and data analysis algorithms enables detection and mapping of chemical adducts at the level of amino acid sequence. Nevertheless, detection of adducts does not indicate relative reactivity of different sites. Here, we describe a method to measure the kinetics of competing adduction reactions at different sites on the same protein. Adducts are formed by electrophiles at Cys14 and Cys47 on the metabolic enzyme glutathione-S-transferase P1-1 and modification is accompanied by a loss of enzymatic activity. Relative quantitation of protein adducts was done by tagging N-termini of peptide digests with isotopically labeled phenyl isocyanate and tracking the ratio of light-tagged peptide adducts to heavy-tagged reference samples in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses using a multiple reaction monitoring method. This approach was used to measure rate constants for adduction at both positions with two different model electrophiles, N-iodoacetyl-N-biotinylhexylenediamine and 1-biotinamido-4-(4'-[maleimidoethyl-cyclohexane]-carboxamido)butane. The results indicate that Cys47 was approximately two- to three-fold more reactive toward both electrophiles than was Cys14. This result was consistent with the relative reactivity of these electrophiles in a complex proteome system and with previously reported trends in reactivity of these sites. Kinetic analyses of protein modification reactions provide a means of evaluating the selectivity of reactive mediators of chemical toxicity.

  16. Glutathione S-transferase P1 suppresses iNOS protein stability in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells after LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang; Kong, Xiuqin; Zhou, Yi; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) is a ubiquitous expressed protein which plays an important role in the detoxification and xenobiotics metabolism. Previous studies showed that GSTP1 was upregulated by the LPS stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells and GSTP1 overexpression downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Here we show that GSTP1 physically associates with the oxygenase domain of iNOS by the G-site domain and decreases the protein level of iNOS dimer. Both overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicate that GSTP1 downregulates iNOS protein level and increases S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination of iNOS. The Y7F mutant type of GSTP1 physically associates with iNOS, but shows no effect on iNOS protein content, iNOS S-nitrosylation, and changes in iNOS from dimer to monomer, suggesting the importance of enzyme activity of GSTP1 in regulating iNOS S-nitrosylation and stability. GSTM1, another member of GSTs shows no significant effect on regulation of iNOS. In conclusion, our study reveals the novel role of GSTP1 in regulation of iNOS by affecting S-nitrosylation, dimerization, and stability, which provides a new insight for analyzing the regulation of iNOS and the anti-inflammatory effects of GSTP1. PMID:26361746

  17. Surfactant Protein A (SP-A)-mediated Clearance of Staphylococcus aureus Involves Binding of SP-A to the Staphylococcal Adhesin Eap and the Macrophage Receptors SP-A Receptor 210 and Scavenger Receptor Class A*

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Krupa, Agnieszka; Davis, Jeremy; Hasan, Misbah; Yang, Ching-Hui; Szeliga, Jacek; Herrmann, Mathias; Hussain, Muzafar; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Kobzik, Lester; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening pneumonia in hospitals and deadly superinfection during viral influenza. The current study investigated the role of surfactant protein A (SP-A) in opsonization and clearance of S. aureus. Previous studies showed that SP-A mediates phagocytosis via the SP-A receptor 210 (SP-R210). Here, we show that SP-R210 mediates binding and control of SP-A-opsonized S. aureus by macrophages. We determined that SP-A binds S. aureus through the extracellular adhesin Eap. Consequently, SP-A enhanced macrophage uptake of Eap-expressing (Eap+) but not Eap-deficient (Eap−) S. aureus. In a reciprocal fashion, SP-A failed to enhance uptake of Eap+ S. aureus in peritoneal Raw264.7 macrophages with a dominant negative mutation (SP-R210(DN)) blocking surface expression of SP-R210. Accordingly, WT mice cleared infection with Eap+ but succumbed to sublethal infection with Eap- S. aureus. However, SP-R210(DN) cells compensated by increasing non-opsonic phagocytosis of Eap+ S. aureus via the scavenger receptor scavenger receptor class A (SR-A), while non-opsonic uptake of Eap− S. aureus was impaired. Macrophages express two isoforms: SP-R210L and SP-R210S. The results show that WT alveolar macrophages are distinguished by expression of SP-R210L, whereas SR-A−/− alveolar macrophages are deficient in SP-R210L expressing only SP-R210S. Accordingly, SR-A−/− mice were highly susceptible to both Eap+ and Eap− S. aureus. The lungs of susceptible mice generated abnormal inflammatory responses that were associated with impaired killing and persistence of S. aureus infection in the lung. In conclusion, alveolar macrophage SP-R210L mediates recognition and killing of SP-A-opsonized S. aureus in vivo, coordinating inflammatory responses and resolution of S. aureus pneumonia through interaction with SR-A. PMID:21123169

  18. The gp38 Adhesins of the T4 Superfamily: A Complex Modular Determinant of the Phage’s Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Trojet, Sabrina N.; Caumont-Sarcos, Anne; Perrody, Elsa; Comeau, André M.; Krisch, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    The tail fiber adhesins are the primary determinants of host range in the T4-type bacteriophages. Among the indispensable virion components, the sequences of the long tail fiber genes and their associated adhesins are among the most variable. The predominant form of the adhesin in the T4-type phages is not even the version of the gene encoded by T4, the archetype of the superfamily, but rather a small unrelated protein (gp38) encoded by closely related phages such as T2 and T6. This gp38 adhesin has a modular design: its N-terminal attachment domain binds at the tip of the tail fiber, whereas the C-terminal specificity domain determines its host receptor affinity. This specificity domain has a series of four hypervariable segments (HVSs) that are separated by a set of highly conserved glycine-rich motifs (GRMs) that apparently form the domain’s conserved structural core. The role of gp38’s various components was examined by a comparative analysis of a large series of gp38 adhesins from T-even superfamily phages with differing host specificities. A deletion analysis revealed that the individual HVSs and GRMs are essential to the T6 adhesin’s function and suggests that these different components all act in synergy to mediate adsorption. The evolutionary advantages of the modular design of the adhesin involving both conserved structural elements and multiple independent and easily interchanged specificity determinants are discussed. PMID:21746838

  19. Structural and functional studies of ReP1-NCXSQ, a protein regulating the squid nerve Na+/Ca2+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ayoub, Daniel; Berberián, Graciela; Bollo, Mariana; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Debaene, François; DiPolo, Reinaldo; Petrova, Tatiana; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Olieric, Vincent; Esteves, Adriana; Mitschler, André; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Beaugé, Luis; Podjarny, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    The protein ReP1-NCXSQ was isolated from the cytosol of squid nerves and has been shown to be required for MgATP stimulation of the squid nerve Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger NCXSQ1. In order to determine its mode of action and the corresponding biologically active ligand, sequence analysis, crystal structures and mass-spectrometric studies of this protein and its Tyr128Phe mutant are reported. Sequence analysis suggests that it belongs to the CRABP family in the FABP superfamily. The X-ray structure at 1.28 Å resolution shows the FABP β-barrel fold, with a fatty acid inside the barrel that makes a relatively short hydrogen bond to Tyr128 and shows a double bond between C9 and C10 but that is disordered beyond C12. Mass-spectrometric studies identified this fatty acid as palmitoleic acid, confirming the double bond between C9 and C10 and establishing a length of 16 C atoms in the aliphatic chain. This acid was caught inside during the culture in Escherichia coli and therefore is not necessarily linked to the biological activity. The Tyr128Phe mutant was unable to activate the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and the corresponding crystal structure showed that without the hydrogen bond to Tyr128 the palmitoleic acid inside the barrel becomes disordered. Native mass-spectrometric analysis confirmed a lower occupancy of the fatty acid in the Tyr128Phe mutant. The correlation between (i) the lack of activity of the Tyr128Phe mutant, (ii) the lower occupancy/disorder of the bound palmitoleic acid and (iii) the mass-spectrometric studies of ReP1-NCXSQ suggests that the transport of a fatty acid is involved in regulation of the NCXSQ1 exchanger, providing a novel insight into the mechanism of its regulation. In order to identify the biologically active ligand, additional high-resolution mass-spectrometric studies of the ligands bound to ReP1-NCXSQ were performed after incubation with squid nerve vesicles both with and without MgATP. These studies clearly identified palmitic acid as the

  20. Characterization of the binding activities of proteinase-adhesin complexes from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, R N; Potempa, J; McGraw, W; Coetzer, T H; Travis, J

    1996-01-01

    Adhesins from oral bacteria perform an important function in colonizing target tissues within the dentogingival cavity. In Porphyromonas gingivalis certain of these adhesion proteins exist as a complex with either of two major proteinases referred to as gingipain R (arginine-specific gingipain) and gingipain K (lysine-specific gingipain) (R. N. Pike, W. T. McGraw, J. Potempa, and J. Travis, J. Biol. Chem. 269:406-411, 1994). With specific proteinase inhibitors, it was shown that hemagglutination by either proteinase-adhesin complex could occur independently of proteinase activity. Significantly, low concentrations of fibrinogen, fibronectin, and laminin inhibited hemagglutination, indicating that adherence to these proteins and not the hemagglutination activity was a primary property of the adhesin activity component of complexes. Binding studies with gingipain K and gingipain R suggest that interaction with fibrinogen is a major function of the adhesin domain, with dissociation constants for binding to fibrinogen being 4 and 8.5 nM, respectively. Specific association with fibronectin and laminin was also found. All bound proteins were degraded by the functional proteinase domain, with gingipain R being more active on laminin and fibronectin and gingipain K being more effective in the digestion of fibrinogen. Cumulatively, these data suggest that gingipain R and gingipain K, acting as proteinase-adhesin complexes, progressively attach to, degrade, and detach from target proteins. Since such complexes appear to be present on the surfaces of both vesicles and membranes of P. gingivalis, they may play an important role in the attachment of this bacterium to host cell surfaces. PMID:8631676

  1. The influence of cis-acting P1 protein and translational elements on the expression of Potato virus Y helper-component proteinase (HCPro) in heterologous systems and its suppression of silencing activity.

    PubMed

    Tena Fernández, Fátima; González, Inmaculada; Doblas, Paula; Rodríguez, César; Sahana, Nandita; Kaur, Harpreet; Tenllado, Francisco; Praveen, Shelly; Canto, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    In the Potyvirus genus, the P1 protein is the first N-terminal product processed from the viral polyprotein, followed by the helper-component proteinase (HCPro). In silencing suppression patch assays, we found that Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro expressed from a P1-HCPro sequence increased the accumulation of a reporter gene, whereas protein expressed from an HCPro sequence did not, even with P1 supplied in trans. This enhancing effect of P1 has been noted in other potyviruses, but has remained unexplained. We analysed the accumulation of PVY HCPro in infiltrated tissues and found that it was higher when expressed from P1-HCPro than from HCPro sequences. Co-expression of heterologous suppressors increased the steady-state level of mRNA expressed from the HCPro sequence, but not that of protein. This suggests that, in the absence of P1 upstream, either HCPro acquires a conformation that affects negatively its activity or stability, or that its translation is reduced. To test these options, we purified HCPro expressed in the presence or absence of upstream P1, and found no difference in purification pattern and final soluble state. By contrast, alteration of the Kozak context in the HCPro mRNA sequence to favour translation increased partially suppressor accumulation and activity. Furthermore, protein activity was not lower than in protein expressed from P1-HCPro sequences. Thus, a direct role for P1 on HCPro suppressor activity or stability, by influencing its conformation during translation, can be excluded. However, P1 could still have an indirect effect favouring HCPro accumulation. Our data highlight the relevance of cis-acting translational elements in the heterologous expression of HCPro.

  2. A two-plasmid Escherichia coli system for expression of Dr adhesins.

    PubMed

    Kur, Marta; Piatek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a very efficient expression system for production of Dr adhesins. The system consists of two plasmids. One is the pACYCpBAD-DraC-C-His, which contains the draC gene under the control of the arabinose promoter (pBAD), encoding the DraC usher. The second is the pET30b-syg-DraBE, which contains the draB and draE genes under the control of the T7lac promoter, encoding the DraB chaperone and the DraE adhesin, respectively. Those plasmids have different origin of replication and can therefore coexist in one cell. Since different promoters are present, the protein expression can be controlled. The Dr adhesion expression system constructed opens up a lot of possibilities, and could be very useful in experiments focusing on understanding the biogenesis of Gram-negative bacteria adhesins. For this purpose we showed that the AfaE-III adhesin (98.1% identity between the DraE and the AfaE-III adhesins, with three divergent amino acids within the sequences) was able to pass through the DraC channel in the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. Immunoblotting analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy showed the presence of AfaE-III on the bacterial cell surface. In addition, the system described can be useful for displaying the immune-relevant sectors of foreign proteins on the bacterial cell. The heterologous epitope sequence of the HSV1 glycoprotein D was inserted into the draE gene in place of the N-terminal region of surface exposed domain 2. Chimeric proteins were exposed on the bacterial surface as evidenced by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. The effective display of peptide segments on Dr fimbriae expressed at the bacterial cell surface, can be used for the development of a fimbrial vaccine.

  3. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role.

  4. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role. PMID:26979064

  5. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Śmietana, Mateusz; Koba, Marcin; Górska, Sabina; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we present a new type of highly sensitive label-free sensor based on long-period gratings (LPG) coated with T4 bacteriophage (phage) adhesin. The adhesin (gp37) binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by recognizing its bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPG biofunctionalization methodology is based on coating LPG surface with nickel ions capable of gp37 histidine tag reversible binding. For the first time recombinant adhesive phage protein has been used as a receptor molecule in biosensing scheme. The specificity of LPS binding by adhesin has been tested with LPG-based device and confirmed using Western blot, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and BIACORE methods. The LPG-based sensor can measure bacterial contamination in real time and with a high accuracy. We show that T4 phage adhesin binds E. coli B LPS in its native or denatured form. The binding is highly specific and irreversible. The applied procedure allows for obtaining reusable biosensors. PMID:25067838

  6. Neisseria meningitidis adhesin NadA targets beta1 integrins: functional similarity to Yersinia invasin.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Virginie; Heesemann, Jürgen; Schielke, Stephanie; Jiménez-Soto, Luisa F; Kurzai, Oliver; Ackermann, Nikolaus

    2011-06-10

    Meningococci are facultative-pathogenic bacteria endowed with a set of adhesins allowing colonization of the human upper respiratory tract, leading to fulminant meningitis and septicemia. The Neisseria adhesin NadA was identified in about 50% of N. meningitidis isolates and is closely related to the Yersinia adhesin YadA, the prototype of the oligomeric coiled-coil adhesin (Oca) family. NadA is known to be involved in cell adhesion, invasion, and induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Because of the enormous diversity of neisserial cell adhesins the analysis of the specific contribution of NadA in meningococcal host interactions is limited. Therefore, we used a non-invasive Y. enterocolitica mutant as carrier to study the role of NadA in host cell interaction. NadA was shown to be efficiently produced and localized in its oligomeric form on the bacterial surface of Y. enterocolitica. Additionally, NadA mediated a β1 integrin-dependent adherence with subsequent internalization of yersiniae by a β1 integrin-positive cell line. Using recombinant NadA(24-210) protein and human and murine β1 integrin-expressing cell lines we could demonstrate the role of the β1 integrin subunit as putative receptor for NadA. Subsequent inhibition assays revealed specific interaction of NadA(24-210) with the human β1 integrin subunit. Cumulatively, these results indicate that Y. enterocolitica is a suitable toolbox system for analysis of the adhesive properties of NadA, revealing strong evidence that β1 integrins are important receptors for NadA. Thus, this study demonstrated for the first time a direct interaction between the Oca-family member NadA and human β1 integrins.

  7. Cloning of an Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis antigen: homology with adhesins from some oral streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, A M; Lambert, P A; Smith, A W

    1995-01-01

    Serum from a patient with Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis was used to identify the gene efaA cloned in Lambda ZapII in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed a 924-bp open reading frame encoding a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 34,768. The amino acid sequence of EfaA shows 55 to 60% homology to a group of streptococcal proteins, FimA from Streptococcus parasanguis, SsaB from Streptococcus sanguis, ScaA from Streptococcus gordonii, and PsaA from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Members of this group have been shown to be adhesins, and we hypothesize that EfaA may function as an adhesin in endocarditis. PMID:7822045

  8. Functional characterization of a mucus-specific LPXTG surface adhesin from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Satokari, Reetta; Reunanen, Justus; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; de Vos, Willem M; Palva, Airi

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological niche as a comparatively less stringent allochthonous intestine-dwelling bacterium. To uncover additional surface proteins involved in mucosal adhesion, we investigated the adherence properties of the only predicted protein (LGG_02337) in L. rhamnosus GG that exhibits homology with a known mucus-binding domain. We cloned a recombinant form of the gene for this putative mucus adhesin and established that the purified protein readily adheres to human intestinal mucus. We also showed that this mucus adhesin is visibly distributed throughout the cell surface and participates in the adhesive interaction between L. rhamnosus GG and mucus, although less prominently than the mucus-binding pili in this strain. Based on primary structural comparisons, we concluded that the current annotation of the LGG_02337 protein likely does not accurately reflect its predicted properties, and we propose that this mucus-specific adhesin be called the mucus-binding factor (MBF). Finally, we interpret our results to mean that L. rhamnosus GG MBF, as an active mucus-specific surface adhesin with a presumed ancillary involvement in pilus-mediated mucosal adhesion, plays a part in the adherent mechanisms during intestinal colonization by this probiotic.

  9. Functional characterization of a mucus-specific LPXTG surface adhesin from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Satokari, Reetta; Reunanen, Justus; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; de Vos, Willem M; Palva, Airi

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological niche as a comparatively less stringent allochthonous intestine-dwelling bacterium. To uncover additional surface proteins involved in mucosal adhesion, we investigated the adherence properties of the only predicted protein (LGG_02337) in L. rhamnosus GG that exhibits homology with a known mucus-binding domain. We cloned a recombinant form of the gene for this putative mucus adhesin and established that the purified protein readily adheres to human intestinal mucus. We also showed that this mucus adhesin is visibly distributed throughout the cell surface and participates in the adhesive interaction between L. rhamnosus GG and mucus, although less prominently than the mucus-binding pili in this strain. Based on primary structural comparisons, we concluded that the current annotation of the LGG_02337 protein likely does not accurately reflect its predicted properties, and we propose that this mucus-specific adhesin be called the mucus-binding factor (MBF). Finally, we interpret our results to mean that L. rhamnosus GG MBF, as an active mucus-specific surface adhesin with a presumed ancillary involvement in pilus-mediated mucosal adhesion, plays a part in the adherent mechanisms during intestinal colonization by this probiotic. PMID:21602388

  10. Description of a Novel Adhesin of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding. PMID:25136616

  11. Description of a novel adhesin of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding. PMID:25136616

  12. Heterologous expression in Tritrichomonas foetus of functional Trichomonas vaginalis AP65 adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, JF

    2005-01-01

    Background Trichomonosis, caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, is the number one, nonviral sexually transmitted infection that has adverse consequences for the health of women and children. The interaction of T. vaginalis with vaginal epithelial cells (VECs), a step preparatory to infection, is mediated in part by the prominent surface protein AP65. The bovine trichomonad, Tritrichomonas foetus, adheres poorly to human VECs. Thus, we established a transfection system for heterologous expression of the T. vaginalis AP65 in T. foetus, as an alternative approach to confirm adhesin function for this virulence factor. Results In this study, we show stable transfection and expression of the T. vaginalis ap65 gene in T. foetus from an episomal pBS-ap65-neo plasmid. Expression of the gene and protein was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunoblots, respectively. AP65 in transformed T. foetus bound to host cells. Specific mAbs revealed episomally-expressed AP65 targeted to the parasite surface and hydrogenosome organelles. Importantly, surface-expression of AP65 in T. foetus paralleled increased levels of adherence of transfected bovine trichomonads to human VECs. Conclusion The T. vaginalis AP65 adhesin was stably expressed in T. foetus, and the data obtained using this heterologous system strongly supports the role of AP65 as a prominent adhesin for T. vaginalis. In addition, the heterologous expression in T. foetus of a T. vaginalis gene offers an important, new approach for confirming and characterizing virulence factors. PMID:15748280

  13. A combination vaccine for allergy and rhinovirus infections based on rhinovirus-derived surface protein VP1 and a nonallergenic peptide of the major timothy grass pollen allergen Phl p 1.

    PubMed

    Edlmayr, Johanna; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Linhart, Birgit; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Westritschnig, Kerstin; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Stoecklinger, Angelika; Kneidinger, Michael; Valent, Peter; Campana, Raffaela; Thalhamer, Josef; Popow-Kraupp, Theresia; Valenta, Rudolf

    2009-05-15

    Allergens and rhinovirus infections are among the most common elicitors of respiratory diseases. We report the construction of a recombinant combination vaccine for allergy and rhinovirus infections based on rhinovirus-derived VP1, the surface protein which is critically involved in infection of respiratory cells, and a nonallergenic peptide of the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 1. Recombinant hybrid molecules consisting of VP1 and a Phl p 1-derived peptide of 31 aa were expressed in Escherichia coli. The hybrid molecules did not react with IgE Abs from grass pollen allergic patients and lacked allergenic activity when exposed to basophils from allergic patients. Upon immunization of mice and rabbits, the hybrids did not sensitize against Phl p 1 but induced protective IgG Abs that cross-reacted with group 1 allergens from different grass species and blocked allergic patients' IgE reactivity to Phl p 1 as well as Phl p 1-induced basophil degranulation. Moreover, hybrid-induced IgG Abs inhibited rhinovirus infection of cultured human epithelial cells. The principle of fusing nonallergenic allergen-derived peptides onto viral carrier proteins may be used for the engineering of safe allergy vaccines which also protect against viral infections.

  14. FimH adhesin from host unrestricted Salmonella Enteritidis binds to different glycoprotein ligands expressed by enterocytes from sheep, pig and cattle than FimH adhesins from host restricted Salmonella Abortus-ovis, Salmonella Choleraesuis and Salmonella Dublin.

    PubMed

    Grzymajło, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej; Kolenda, Rafał; Kędzierska, Anna; Kuźmińska-Bajor, Marta; Wieliczko, Alina

    2013-10-25

    Adhesion to gut tissues and colonization of the alimentary tract, two important stages in the pathogenesis of Salmonella, are mediated by FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae. It was suggested that minor differences in the structure of FimH are most likely associated with differences in adhesion specificities, and may determine the tropism of various Salmonella serovars to different species and tissues. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing the binding properties of FimH proteins from three Salmonella enterica serovars with limited (Choleraesuis, Dublin) or restricted (Abortusovis) host ranges to FimH from broad host range S. Enteritidis and mannose inactive FimH from S. Gallinarum. Although all active variants of FimH protein were able to bind mannose-rich glycoproteins (RNase B, HRP and Man-BSA) with comparable affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance, there were significant differences in the binding profiles of the FimH proteins from host restricted serovars and host unrestricted serovar Enteritidis, to glycoproteins from enterocyte cell lines established in vitro and derived from sheep, pig and cattle. When low-binding FimH adhesin from S. Enteritidis was subjected to Western blot analysis, it bound to surface membrane protein of about 130 kDa, and high-binding FimH adhesins from S. Abortusovis, S. Choleraesuis and S. Dublin bound to surface membrane protein of about 55 kDa present in each cell line. Differential binding of FimH proteins from host-restricted and broad-host-range Salmonella to intestinal receptors was confirmed using mutant FimH adhesins obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the low-binding variant of FimH from S. Choleraesuis with mutation Leu57Pro lost the ability to bind protein band of 55 kDa, but instead interacted with glycoprotein of about 130 kDa. On the other hand, the high-binding variant of FimH adhesin from S. Enteritids with mutation Asn101Ser did not bind to its receptor of 130 kDa, but instead it

  15. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis adherence-mediating components: a review of key methods to confirm adhesin function

    PubMed Central

    Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-01-01

    Anti-adhesion therapy represents a potentially promising avenue for the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis in a post-antibiotic era. Adhesins are surface-exposed microbial structures or molecules that enable pathogenic organisms to adhere to host surfaces, a fundamental step towards host infection. Although several Mycobacterium tuberculosis adhesins have been identified, it is predicted that numerous additional adherence-mediating components contribute to the virulence and success of this pathogen. Significant further research to discern and characterize novel M. tuberculosis adhesins is, therefore, required to gain a holistic account of M. tuberculosis adhesion to the host. This would enable the identification of potential drug and vaccine targets for attenuating M. tuberculosis adherence and infectivity. Several methods have been successfully applied to the study and identification of M. tuberculosis adhesins. In this manuscript, we review these methods, which include adherence assays that utilize wild-type and gene knockout mutant strains, epitope masking and competitive inhibition analyses, extracellular matrix protein binding assays, microsphere adhesion assays, M. tuberculosis auto-aggregation assays, and in silico analyses. PMID:27482337

  16. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  17. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  18. The Listeria monocytogenes Fur-regulated virulence protein FrvA is an Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pi, Hualiang; Patel, Sarju J; Argüello, José M; Helmann, John D

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes FrvA (Lmo0641) is critical for virulence in the mouse model and is an ortholog of the Bacillus subtilis Fur- and PerR-regulated Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase PfeT. Previously, FrvA was suggested to protect against heme toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that an frvA mutant is sensitive to iron intoxication, but not to other metals. Expression of frvA is induced by high iron and this induction requires Fur. FrvA functions in vitro as a divalent cation specific ATPase most strongly activated by ferrous iron. When expressed in B. subtilis, FrvA increases resistance to iron both in wild-type and in a pfeT null strain. FrvA is a high affinity Fe(II) exporter and its induction imposes severe iron limitation in B. subtilis resulting in derepression of both Fur- and PerR-regulated genes. FrvA also recognizes Co(II) and Zn(II) as substrates and can complement B. subtilis strains defective in the endogenous export systems for these cations. Building on these results, we conclude that FrvA functions in the efflux of Fe(II), and not heme during listerial infection.

  19. The Listeria monocytogenes Fur-regulated virulence protein FrvA is an Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pi, Hualiang; Patel, Sarju J; Argüello, José M; Helmann, John D

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes FrvA (Lmo0641) is critical for virulence in the mouse model and is an ortholog of the Bacillus subtilis Fur- and PerR-regulated Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase PfeT. Previously, FrvA was suggested to protect against heme toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that an frvA mutant is sensitive to iron intoxication, but not to other metals. Expression of frvA is induced by high iron and this induction requires Fur. FrvA functions in vitro as a divalent cation specific ATPase most strongly activated by ferrous iron. When expressed in B. subtilis, FrvA increases resistance to iron both in wild-type and in a pfeT null strain. FrvA is a high affinity Fe(II) exporter and its induction imposes severe iron limitation in B. subtilis resulting in derepression of both Fur- and PerR-regulated genes. FrvA also recognizes Co(II) and Zn(II) as substrates and can complement B. subtilis strains defective in the endogenous export systems for these cations. Building on these results, we conclude that FrvA functions in the efflux of Fe(II), and not heme during listerial infection. PMID:26946370

  20. Structure and copy number of gene clusters related to the pap P-adhesin operon of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arthur, M; Campanelli, C; Arbeit, R D; Kim, C; Steinbach, S; Johnson, C E; Rubin, R H; Goldstein, R

    1989-02-01

    The structurally related pap and prs operons of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate J96 encode a P and an F adhesin that mediate bacterial attachment to the human P blood group antigen and the Forssman antigen, respectively. Using probes prepared from different segments of the pap operon, Southern blot hybridizations were performed to characterize pap-related sequences of 30 E. coli clinical isolates expressing different adhesin phenotypes. Gene clusters encoding P and F adhesins displayed no restriction site polymorphism in sequences homologous to the papH, papC, and papD genes that encode proteins essential to the transport and polymerization of the subunits of the P-pilus adhesin. In contrast, pap-related genetic elements associated with a null phenotype either lacked homology to the papH, papC, and papD genes or displayed a restriction site polymorphism in this region. Sequences within and surrounding the J96 papG and prsG adhesin genes that determine the binding specificities to the P and F antigens, respectively, were not conserved. However, gene clusters encoding different binding specificities could not be distinguished based on such restriction site polymorphisms. The majority of clinical isolates had more than one copy of pap-related sequences that involved gene clusters similar to the J96 pap operon, as well as genetic elements that were related only to a part of this operon. The implications of this unexpected copy number polymorphism with respect to possible recombination events involving pap-related sequences are discussed.

  1. Single-chain Fv antibody fragments retain binding properties of the monoclonal antibody raised against peptide P1 of the human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Skrlj, Nives; Serbec, Vladka Curin; Dolinar, Marko

    2010-03-01

    Prion diseases are incurable neurodegenerative diseases that affect both humans and animals. The infectious agent is a pathogenic form of the prion protein that accumulates in brain as amyloids. Currently, there is neither cure nor reliable preclinical diagnostics on the market available. The growing number of reports shows that passive immunisation is one of the most promising strategies for prion disease therapy, where antibodies against prions may prevent and even cure the infection. Since antibodies are large molecules and, thus, might not be suitable for the therapy, different antibody fragments are a good alternative. Therefore, we have designed and prepared single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) derived from the PrP(Sc)-specific murine monoclonal antibody V5B2. Using a new expression vector pMD204, we produced scFvs in two opposing chain orientations in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Both recombinant antibody fragments retained the specificity of the parent antibody and one of these exhibited binding properties comparable to the corresponding murine Fab fragments with the affinity in nM range. Our monovalent antibody fragments are of special interest in view of possible therapeutic reagents for prion diseases as well as for development of a new generation of diagnostics. PMID:19597999

  2. Polysaccharide intercellular adhesin in biofilm: structural and regulatory aspects

    PubMed Central

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Campoccia, Davide; Ravaioli, Stefano; Montanaro, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the leading etiologic agents of implant-related infections. Biofilm formation is the main pathogenetic mechanism leading to the chronicity and irreducibility of infections. The extracellular polymeric substances of staphylococcal biofilms are the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), extracellular-DNA, proteins, and amyloid fibrils. PIA is a poly-β(1-6)-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG), partially deacetylated, positively charged, whose synthesis is mediated by the icaADBC locus. DNA sequences homologous to ica locus are present in many coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, among which S. lugdunensis, however, produces a biofilm prevalently consisting of proteins. The product of icaA is an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase that synthetizes PIA oligomers from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. The product of icaD gives optimal efficiency to IcaA. The product of icaC is involved in the externalization of the nascent polysaccharide. The product of icaB is an N-deacetylase responsible for the partial deacetylation of PIA. The expression of ica locus is affected by environmental conditions. In S. aureus and S. epidermidis ica-independent alternative mechanisms of biofilm production have been described. S. epidermidis and S. aureus undergo to a phase variation for the biofilm production that has been ascribed, in turn, to the transposition of an insertion sequence in the icaC gene or to the expansion/contraction of a tandem repeat naturally harbored within icaC. A role is played by the quorum sensing system, which negatively regulates biofilm formation, favoring the dispersal phase that disseminates bacteria to new infection sites. Interfering with the QS system is a much debated strategy to combat biofilm-related infections. In the search of vaccines against staphylococcal infections deacetylated PNAG retained on the surface of S. aureus favors opsonophagocytosis and is a potential candidate for immune-protection. PMID

  3. Polysaccharide intercellular adhesin in biofilm: structural and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Campoccia, Davide; Ravaioli, Stefano; Montanaro, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the leading etiologic agents of implant-related infections. Biofilm formation is the main pathogenetic mechanism leading to the chronicity and irreducibility of infections. The extracellular polymeric substances of staphylococcal biofilms are the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), extracellular-DNA, proteins, and amyloid fibrils. PIA is a poly-β(1-6)-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG), partially deacetylated, positively charged, whose synthesis is mediated by the icaADBC locus. DNA sequences homologous to ica locus are present in many coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, among which S. lugdunensis, however, produces a biofilm prevalently consisting of proteins. The product of icaA is an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase that synthetizes PIA oligomers from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. The product of icaD gives optimal efficiency to IcaA. The product of icaC is involved in the externalization of the nascent polysaccharide. The product of icaB is an N-deacetylase responsible for the partial deacetylation of PIA. The expression of ica locus is affected by environmental conditions. In S. aureus and S. epidermidis ica-independent alternative mechanisms of biofilm production have been described. S. epidermidis and S. aureus undergo to a phase variation for the biofilm production that has been ascribed, in turn, to the transposition of an insertion sequence in the icaC gene or to the expansion/contraction of a tandem repeat naturally harbored within icaC. A role is played by the quorum sensing system, which negatively regulates biofilm formation, favoring the dispersal phase that disseminates bacteria to new infection sites. Interfering with the QS system is a much debated strategy to combat biofilm-related infections. In the search of vaccines against staphylococcal infections deacetylated PNAG retained on the surface of S. aureus favors opsonophagocytosis and is a potential candidate for immune-protection. PMID

  4. P1 plasmid replication requires methylated DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, A L; Austin, S J

    1987-01-01

    Plasmids driven by the plasmid replication origin of bacteriophage P1 cannot be established in Escherichia coli strains that are defective for the DNA adenine methylase (dam). Using a composite plasmid that has two origins, we show that the P1 origin cannot function even in a plasmid that is already established in a dam strain. An in vitro replication system for the P1 origin was developed that uses as a substrate M13 replicative-form DNA containing the minimal P1 origin. The reaction mixture contains a crude extract of E. coli and purified P1 RepA protein. In addition to being RepA dependent, synthesis was shown to be dependent on methylation of the dam methylase-sensitive sites of the substrate DNA. As the P1 origin contains five such sites in a small region known to be critical for origin function, it can be concluded that methylation of these sites is a requirement for initiation. This suggests that the postreplicational methylation of the origin may control reinitiation and contribute to the accuracy of the highly stringent copy-number control of the origin in vivo. PMID:2826133

  5. Oligosaccharide-receptor interaction of the Gal alpha 1-4Gal binding adhesin of Streptococcus suis. Combining site architecture and characterization of two variant adhesin specificities.

    PubMed

    Haataja, S; Tikkanen, K; Nilsson, U; Magnusson, G; Karlsson, K A; Finne, J

    1994-11-01

    The sugar binding specificities of two groups of Streptococcus suis, a pig pathogen that causes meningitis also in man, were determined. Both the group represented by a recently characterized strain inhibitable by galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine (type PN) and the group inhibitable by galactose (type PO) were found by hemagglutination and solid-phase binding inhibition experiments to recognize the disaccharide Gal alpha 1-4Gal of the P1 and Pk blood group antigens. Both types preferred the disaccharide in terminal position. PN showed some, whereas PO showed almost no, binding to the globoside oligosaccharide containing an additional GalNAc beta 1-3 residue. The complete hydrogen bonding patterns were determined by using deoxy and other synthetic derivatives of the receptor disaccharide, and the constructed models of the interactions were compared with that of Escherichia coli PapG396 adhesin. The essential hydroxyls for binding were the HO-4', HO-6', HO-2, and HO-3 hydroxyls on the beta' alpha-side of the Gal alpha 1-4Gal molecule. Type PO adhesin also formed weak interactions with the hydroxyls HO-6 and HO-3'. The mechanism differed from that of E. coli, which binds to a cluster of five hydroxyls (HO-6, HO-2', HO-3', HO-4', and HO-6') and thus to a different part of the receptor disaccharide. These results represent the first example of the comparison of the saccharide receptor hydrogen bonding patterns of two bacterial organisms of different origin and show that the same saccharide may be recognized by two different binding mechanisms.

  6. An adhesin from hydrogen-utilizing rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 binds a broad range of hydrogen-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Filomena; Kittelmann, Sandra; Patchett, Mark L; Attwood, Graeme T; Janssen, Peter H; Rakonjac, Jasna; Gagic, Dragana

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic associations are ubiquitous in the microbial world and have a major role in shaping the evolution of both partners. One of the most interesting mutualistic relationships exists between protozoa and methanogenic archaea in the fermentative forestomach (rumen) of ruminant animals. Methanogens reside within and on the surface of protozoa as symbionts, and interspecies hydrogen transfer is speculated to be the main driver for physical associations observed between the two groups. In silico analyses of several rumen methanogen genomes have previously shown that up to 5% of genes encode adhesin-like proteins, which may be central to rumen interspecies attachment. We hypothesized that adhesin-like proteins on methanogen cell surfaces facilitate attachment to protozoal hosts. Using phage display technology, we have identified a protein (Mru_1499) from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 as an adhesin that binds to a broad range of rumen protozoa (including the genera Epidinium and Entodinium). This unique adhesin also binds the cell surface of the bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, suggesting a broad adhesion spectrum for this protein.

  7. An adhesin from hydrogen-utilizing rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 binds a broad range of hydrogen-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Filomena; Kittelmann, Sandra; Patchett, Mark L; Attwood, Graeme T; Janssen, Peter H; Rakonjac, Jasna; Gagic, Dragana

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic associations are ubiquitous in the microbial world and have a major role in shaping the evolution of both partners. One of the most interesting mutualistic relationships exists between protozoa and methanogenic archaea in the fermentative forestomach (rumen) of ruminant animals. Methanogens reside within and on the surface of protozoa as symbionts, and interspecies hydrogen transfer is speculated to be the main driver for physical associations observed between the two groups. In silico analyses of several rumen methanogen genomes have previously shown that up to 5% of genes encode adhesin-like proteins, which may be central to rumen interspecies attachment. We hypothesized that adhesin-like proteins on methanogen cell surfaces facilitate attachment to protozoal hosts. Using phage display technology, we have identified a protein (Mru_1499) from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 as an adhesin that binds to a broad range of rumen protozoa (including the genera Epidinium and Entodinium). This unique adhesin also binds the cell surface of the bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, suggesting a broad adhesion spectrum for this protein. PMID:26643468

  8. Neisseria adhesin A variation and revised nomenclature scheme.

    PubMed

    Bambini, Stefania; De Chiara, Matteo; Muzzi, Alessandro; Mora, Marirosa; Lucidarme, Jay; Brehony, Carina; Borrow, Ray; Masignani, Vega; Comanducci, Maurizio; Maiden, Martin C J; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Jolley, Keith A

    2014-07-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), involved in the adhesion and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis into host tissues, is one of the major components of Bexsero, a novel multicomponent vaccine licensed for protection against meningococcal serogroup B in Europe, Australia, and Canada. NadA has been identified in approximately 30% of clinical isolates and in a much lower proportion of carrier isolates. Three protein variants were originally identified in invasive meningococci and named NadA-1, NadA-2, and NadA-3, whereas most carrier isolates either lacked the gene or harbored a different variant, NadA-4. Further analysis of isolates belonging to the sequence type 213 (ST-213) clonal complex identified NadA-5, which was structurally similar to NadA-4, but more distantly related to NadA-1, -2, and -3. At the time of this writing, more than 89 distinct nadA allele sequences and 43 distinct peptides have been described. Here, we present a revised nomenclature system, taking into account the complete data set, which is compatible with previous classification schemes and is expandable. The main features of this new scheme include (i) the grouping of the previously named NadA-2 and NadA-3 variants into a single NadA-2/3 variant, (ii) the grouping of the previously assigned NadA-4 and NadA-5 variants into a single NadA-4/5 variant, (iii) the introduction of an additional variant (NadA-6), and (iv) the classification of the variants into two main groups, named groups I and II. To facilitate querying of the sequences and submission of new allele sequences, the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are available at http://pubmlst.org/neisseria/NadA/.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Wu, Nan; Han, Yiping W.; Shoham, Menachem

    2006-12-01

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum.

  10. Structure of the Head of the Bartonella Adhesin BadA

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Pawel; Linke, Dirk; Ursinus, Astrid; Bär, Kerstin; Schwarz, Heinz; Riess, Tanja M.; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Lupas, Andrei N.; Martin, Jörg; Zeth, Kornelius

    2008-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are a major class of proteins by which pathogenic proteobacteria adhere to their hosts. Prominent examples include Yersinia YadA, Haemophilus Hia and Hsf, Moraxella UspA1 and A2, and Neisseria NadA. TAAs also occur in symbiotic and environmental species and presumably represent a general solution to the problem of adhesion in proteobacteria. The general structure of TAAs follows a head-stalk-anchor architecture, where the heads are the primary mediators of attachment and autoagglutination. In the major adhesin of Bartonella henselae, BadA, the head consists of three domains, the N-terminal of which shows strong sequence similarity to the head of Yersinia YadA. The two other domains were not recognizably similar to any protein of known structure. We therefore determined their crystal structure to a resolution of 1.1 Å. Both domains are β-prisms, the N-terminal one formed by interleaved, five-stranded β-meanders parallel to the trimer axis and the C-terminal one by five-stranded β-meanders orthogonal to the axis. Despite the absence of statistically significant sequence similarity, the two domains are structurally similar to domains from Haemophilus Hia, albeit in permuted order. Thus, the BadA head appears to be a chimera of domains seen in two other TAAs, YadA and Hia, highlighting the combinatorial evolutionary strategy taken by pathogens. PMID:18688279

  11. Design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with pyrrolidinones and oxazolidinones as novel P1'-ligands to enhance backbone-binding interactions with protease: synthesis, biological evaluation, and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-09-02

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1{prime}-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27{prime} carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1{prime}-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with a (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. This inhibitor maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b-bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1{prime}-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1{prime} and S2 subsites of HIV-1 protease.

  12. Differential expression of glutathione S-transferases P1-1 and A1-1 at protein and mRNA levels in hepatocytes derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Allameh, Abdolamir; Esmaeli, Shahnaz; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Soleimani, Masoud

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the profile of cellular glutathione (GSH) and GSH S-transferase (GST) in hepatocytes differentiated from adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). For this purpose, we have derived functionally active hepatocyte-like cells from normal human multipotent adult MSC. Then the differentiated cells were characterized by specific hepatic markers. The cellular GSH and GST catalytic activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) were determined in hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from MSC compared with undifferentiated MSC. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques were used to study GST-P1-1 and GST-A1-1 expression in differentiated and undifferentiated cells. The results showed that there is more than threefold increase in GST catalytic activity in hepatocytes recovered by day 14 of differentiation. GST-P1-1 mRNA expression was detected in both differentiated hepatocyte-like cells and their undifferentiated progenitors. Under similar conditions, only differentiated hepatocyte-like cells expressed GST-A1-1 mRNA. These results were further confirmed by showing that the undifferentiated cells expressed both GST-A and GST-P proteins. Unlike GST, the level of cellular GSH was declined (approximately 20%) in hepatocytes derived from MSC as compared to that of undifferentiated cells. These data may suggest that hepatogenic differentiation of human bone marrow MSC is accompanied with the regulation of factors participating in GSH conjugation pathway.

  13. Genetic analysis of the gene cluster encoding nonfimbrial adhesin I from an Escherichia coli uropathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, R; Ott, M; Ritter, A; Hoschützky, H; Bühler, T; Lottspeich, F; Boulnois, G J; Jann, K; Hacker, J

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomally encoded nonfimbrial adhesion I (NFA-I) from Escherichia coli urinary tract isolate 827 (O83:K1:H4) mediates agglutination of human erythrocytes. Subclones were constructed from an NFA-I-expressing recombinant E. coli K-12 clone, derived from a genomic library of E. coli 827. Minicell analysis and nucleotide sequencing revealed that proteins of 30.5, 9, 80, 15, and 19 kDa encoded on a stretch of approximately 6 kb are involved in the expression of NFA-I. NFA-I exhibits a polymeric structure, which disintegrates with elevated temperature into a 19-kDa monomer but with some relatively stable dimers. By using gold-conjugated monoclonal antibodies directed against NFA-I in electron microscopy, the adhesin could be localized on the outer surface of the recombinant E. coli K-12 bacteria. The nucleotide sequence of the nfaA gene encoding the monomeric structural subunit of the adhesin was determined. An open reading frame of 184 amino acids encoding the NfaA precursor, which is processed to the mature protein, was found; it consisted of 156 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 16,000. Peptide sequencing of the NFA-I subunit protein confirmed that this open reading frame corresponds to the NfaA coding locus. Furthermore, the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame termed NfaE, located at the proximal part of the DNA stretch responsible for NFA-I expression, was elaborated. NfaE consists of 247 amino acids, including a presumptive 29-amino-acid signal peptide, leading to a molecular weight of 24,000 for the mature protein. The nfaE sequence shares homology with the 27-kDa CS3 protein, which is involved in the assembly of CS3 fibrillae, and might encode the 30.5-kDa protein, detected in minicells. Images PMID:8099066

  14. The dynamics and pH-dependence of Ag43 adhesins' self-association probed by atomic force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Adrien; Sakamoto, Chizuko; Razafitianamarahavo, Angelina; Caillet, Céline; Merlin, Jenny; Fahs, Ahmad; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Duval, Jérôme F. L.; Beloin, Christophe; Francius, Grégory

    2014-10-01

    Self-associating auto-transporter (SAAT) adhesins are two-domain cell surface proteins involved in bacteria auto-aggregation and biofilm formation. Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a SAAT adhesin commonly found in Escherichia coli whose variant Ag43a has been shown to promote persistence of uropathogenic E. coli within the bladder. The recent resolution of the tri-dimensional structure of the 499 amino-acids' β-domain in Ag43a has shed light on the possible mechanism governing the self-recognition of SAAT adhesins, in particular the importance of trans-interactions between the L shaped β-helical scaffold of two α-domains of neighboring adhesins. In this study, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to unravel the dynamics of Ag43-self association under various pH and molecular elongation rate conditions that mimic the situations encountered by E. coli in its natural environment. Results evidenced an important stretchability of Ag43α with unfolding of sub-domains leading to molecular extension as long as 150 nm. Nanomechanical analysis of molecular stretching data suggested that self-association of Ag43 can lead to the formation of dimers and tetramers driven by rapid and weak cis- as well as slow but strong trans-interaction forces with a magnitude as large as 100-250 pN. The dynamics of cis- and trans-interactions were demonstrated to be strongly influenced by pH and applied shear force, thus suggesting that environmental conditions can modulate Ag43-mediated aggregation of bacteria at the molecular level.Self-associating auto-transporter (SAAT) adhesins are two-domain cell surface proteins involved in bacteria auto-aggregation and biofilm formation. Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a SAAT adhesin commonly found in Escherichia coli whose variant Ag43a has been shown to promote persistence of uropathogenic E. coli within the bladder. The recent resolution of the tri-dimensional structure of the 499 amino-acids' β-domain in Ag43a has shed

  15. Development of novel antibodies against non-structural proteins nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4 of chikungunya virus: potential use in basic research.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Abhishek; Basantray, Itishree; Bramha, Umarani; Dixit, Anshuman; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Sujay; Suryawanshi, Amol Ratnakar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Soma

    2015-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has reemerged recently as an important pathogen, causing several large epidemics worldwide. This necessitates the development of better reagents to understand its biology and to establish effective and safe control measures. The present study describes the development and characterization of polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against synthetic peptides of CHIKV non-structural proteins (nsPs; nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4). The reactivity of these pAbs was demonstrated by ELISA and Western blot. Additionally, in vitro infection studies in a mammalian system confirmed that these pAbs are highly sensitive and specific for CHIKV nsPs, as these proteins were detected very early during viral replication. Homology analysis of the selected epitope sequences revealed that they are conserved among all of the CHIKV strains of different genotypes, while comparison with other alphavirus sequences showed that none of them are 100% identical to the epitope sequences (except Onyong-nyong and Igbo Ora viruses, which show 100% identity to the nsP4 epitope). Interestingly, two different forms of CHIKV nsP1 and three different forms of nsP3 were detected in Western blot analysis during infection; however, further experimental investigations are required to confirm their identity. Also, the use of these antibodies demonstrated faster and enhanced expression profiles of all CHIKV nsPs in 2006 Indian outbreak strains when compared to the CHIKV prototype strain, suggesting the epidemic potential of the 2006 isolate. Accordingly, it can be suggested that the pAbs reported in this study can be used as sensitive and specific tools for experimental investigations of CHIKV replication and infection. PMID:26280524

  16. Development of novel antibodies against non-structural proteins nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4 of chikungunya virus: potential use in basic research.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Abhishek; Basantray, Itishree; Bramha, Umarani; Dixit, Anshuman; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Sujay; Suryawanshi, Amol Ratnakar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Soma

    2015-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has reemerged recently as an important pathogen, causing several large epidemics worldwide. This necessitates the development of better reagents to understand its biology and to establish effective and safe control measures. The present study describes the development and characterization of polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against synthetic peptides of CHIKV non-structural proteins (nsPs; nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4). The reactivity of these pAbs was demonstrated by ELISA and Western blot. Additionally, in vitro infection studies in a mammalian system confirmed that these pAbs are highly sensitive and specific for CHIKV nsPs, as these proteins were detected very early during viral replication. Homology analysis of the selected epitope sequences revealed that they are conserved among all of the CHIKV strains of different genotypes, while comparison with other alphavirus sequences showed that none of them are 100% identical to the epitope sequences (except Onyong-nyong and Igbo Ora viruses, which show 100% identity to the nsP4 epitope). Interestingly, two different forms of CHIKV nsP1 and three different forms of nsP3 were detected in Western blot analysis during infection; however, further experimental investigations are required to confirm their identity. Also, the use of these antibodies demonstrated faster and enhanced expression profiles of all CHIKV nsPs in 2006 Indian outbreak strains when compared to the CHIKV prototype strain, suggesting the epidemic potential of the 2006 isolate. Accordingly, it can be suggested that the pAbs reported in this study can be used as sensitive and specific tools for experimental investigations of CHIKV replication and infection.

  17. Human monocytes/macrophages are a target of Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA).

    PubMed

    Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Kasic, Tihana; Capecchi, Barbara; Tavano, Regina; Papini, Emanuele

    2008-05-01

    Specific surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis have been proposed to stimulate leukocytes during tissue invasion and septic shock. In this study, we demonstrate that the adhesin N. meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA) involved in the colonization of the respiratory epithelium by hypervirulent N. meningitidis B strains also binds to and activates human monocytes/macrophages. Expression of NadA on the surface on Escherichia coli does not increase bacterial-monocyte association, but a NadA-positive strain induced a significantly higher amount of TNF-alpha and IL-8 compared with the parental NadA-negative strain, suggesting that NadA has an intrinsic stimulatory action on these cells. Consistently, highly pure, soluble NadA(Delta351-405), a proposed component of an antimeningococcal vaccine, efficiently stimulates monocytes/macrophages to secrete a selected pattern of cytokines and chemotactic factors characterized by high levels of IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha and low levels of the main vasoactive mediators TNF-alpha and IL-1. NadA(Delta351-405) also inhibited monocyte apoptosis and determined its differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.

  18. Label-free Gram-negative bacteria detection using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Górska, Sabina; Janik, Monika; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel application of a highly sensitive sensor based on long-period gratings (LPGs) coated with T4 bacteriophage adhesin for Gram-negative bacteria detection. We show here, that the sensor evidently recognizes Escherichia coli K-12 (PCM2560), whereas in the reference tests - ELISA and BIAcore - the results are questionable. For LPGs sensor the resonant wavelength shift observed for E. coli K-12 was approximately half of that measured for E.coli B (positive control). The BIAcore readings (RU) for E. coli K-12 were at 10% level of the signal obtained for E .coli B. These results confirm the improved sensitivity of the LPGs sensor. Moreover, we also show that application of adhesin may allow for efficient detection of E. coli O111 (PCM418), Klebsiella pneumoniae O1 (PCM1) and Yersinia enterocolitica O1 (PCM1879). The specificity of binding bacteria by the adhesin is discussed and it is determined by a distinct region of lipopolysaccharide receptors and/or by the presence of outer-membrane protein C in an outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Label-free Gram-negative bacteria detection using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Górska, Sabina; Janik, Monika; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel application of a highly sensitive sensor based on long-period gratings (LPGs) coated with T4 bacteriophage adhesin for Gram-negative bacteria detection. We show here, that the sensor evidently recognizes Escherichia coli K-12 (PCM2560), whereas in the reference tests - ELISA and BIAcore - the results are questionable. For LPGs sensor the resonant wavelength shift observed for E. coli K-12 was approximately half of that measured for E.coli B (positive control). The BIAcore readings (RU) for E. coli K-12 were at 10% level of the signal obtained for E .coli B. These results confirm the improved sensitivity of the LPGs sensor. Moreover, we also show that application of adhesin may allow for efficient detection of E. coli O111 (PCM418), Klebsiella pneumoniae O1 (PCM1) and Yersinia enterocolitica O1 (PCM1879). The specificity of binding bacteria by the adhesin is discussed and it is determined by a distinct region of lipopolysaccharide receptors and/or by the presence of outer-membrane protein C in an outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27231592

  20. Label-free Gram-negative bacteria detection using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings

    PubMed Central

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Górska, Sabina; Janik, Monika; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel application of a highly sensitive sensor based on long-period gratings (LPGs) coated with T4 bacteriophage adhesin for Gram-negative bacteria detection. We show here, that the sensor evidently recognizes Escherichia coli K-12 (PCM2560), whereas in the reference tests – ELISA and BIAcore – the results are questionable. For LPGs sensor the resonant wavelength shift observed for E. coli K-12 was approximately half of that measured for E.coli B (positive control). The BIAcore readings (RU) for E. coli K-12 were at 10% level of the signal obtained for E .coli B. These results confirm the improved sensitivity of the LPGs sensor. Moreover, we also show that application of adhesin may allow for efficient detection of E. coli O111 (PCM418), Klebsiella pneumoniae O1 (PCM1) and Yersinia enterocolitica O1 (PCM1879). The specificity of binding bacteria by the adhesin is discussed and it is determined by a distinct region of lipopolysaccharide receptors and/or by the presence of outer-membrane protein C in an outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27231592

  1. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-surface glycoprotein apa as a potential adhesin to colonize target cells via the innate immune system pulmonary C-type lectin surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Ragas, Aude; Roussel, Lucie; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2007-02-23

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem, and understanding the mechanism by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) invades and colonizes its host target cells remains an important issue for the control of infection. The innate immune system C-type lectins (C-TLs), including the human pulmonary surfactant protein A (PSP-A), have been recently identified as determinant players in the early recognition of the invading pathogen and in mounting the host defense response. Although the antigenic lipoglycan mannosylated lipoarabinomannan is currently considered to be the major C-TL target on the mycobacterial surface, the recognition by some C-TLs of the only mycobacterial species composing the "Mtb complex" indicates that mannosylated lipoarabinomannan cannot account alone for this specificity. Thus, we searched for the mycobacterial molecules targeted by human PSP-A, focusing our attention on the Mtb surface glycoproteins. We developed an original functional proteomic approach based on a lectin blot assay using crude human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as a source of physiological PSP-A. Combined with selective cell-surface protein extraction and mass spectrometry peptide mapping, this strategy allowed us to identify the Apa (alanine- and proline-rich antigenic) glycoprotein as new potential target for PSP-A. This result was supported by direct binding of PSP-A to purified Apa. Moreover, EDTA addition or deglycosylation of purified Apa samples completely abolished the interaction, demonstrating that the interaction is calcium- and mannose-dependent, as expected. Finally, we provide convincing evidence that Apa, formerly considered as mainly secreted, is associated with the cell wall for a sufficiently long time to aid in the attachment of PSP-A. Because, to date, Apa seems to be restricted to the Mtb complex strains, we propose that it may account for the selective recognition of those strains by PSP-A and other immune system C-TLs containing homologous functional

  2. Adhesin degradation accelerates delivery of heat-labile toxin by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Kansal, Rita; Bartels, Scott R; Hamilton, David J; Shaaban, Salwa; Fleckenstein, James M

    2011-08-26

    Many enteric pathogens, including enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), produce one or more serine proteases that are secreted via the autotransporter (or type V) bacterial secretion pathway. These molecules have collectively been referred to as SPATE proteins (serine protease autotransporter of the Enterobacteriaceae). EatA, an autotransporter previously identified in ETEC, possesses a functional serine protease motif within its secreted amino-terminal passenger domain. Although this protein is expressed by many ETEC strains and is highly immunogenic, its precise function is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EatA degrades a recently characterized adhesin, EtpA, resulting in modulation of bacterial adhesion and accelerated delivery of the heat-labile toxin, a principal ETEC virulence determinant. Antibodies raised against the passenger domain of EatA impair ETEC delivery of labile toxin to epithelial cells suggesting that EatA may be an effective target for vaccine development. PMID:21757737

  3. Novel adhesin from Pasteurella multocida that binds to the integrin-binding fibronectin FnIII9-10 repeats.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lisa M; Nair, Sean P; Ward, John M; Rycroft, Andrew N; Williams, Rachel J; Robertson, Giles; Mordan, Nicky J; Henderson, Brian

    2008-03-01

    Phage display screening with fragmented genomic DNA from the animal pathogen Pasteurella multocida has identified a gene encoding a putative fibronectin binding protein (19). Homologues of this gene (PM1665) are found in all other sequenced members of the Pasteurellaceae. Gene PM1665 has been cloned, and the protein has been expressed. Recombinant PM1665 protein binds to both soluble and immobilized fibronectin and is unique in that it interacts with the integrin-binding fibronectin type III (FnIII) repeats FnIII(9-10) and not, as is the case for almost all other fibronectin adhesins, to the N-terminal type I repeats. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a complex binding mechanism with a K(D) (equilibrium dissociation constant) of 150 nM +/- 70 nM. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the PM1665 protein contains two helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motifs, and truncation mutation studies have identified the binding site in the protein as a combination of these two HhH motifs in conjunction with a conserved amino acid motif, VNINTA. We have shown that the PM1665 protein is on the cell surface and that binding of P. multocida to fibronectin is almost completely inhibited by anti-PM1665 antiserum. These results support the hypothesis that the PM1665 protein is a member of a new family of fibronectin binding adhesins that are important in the adhesion of P. multocida to fibronectin. PMID:18160478

  4. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it—an update on B. burgdorferi adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Brissette, Catherine A.; Gaultney, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion is the initial event in the establishment of any infection. Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease, possesses myriad proteins termed adhesins that facilitate contact with its vertebrate hosts. B. burgdorferi adheres to host tissues through interactions with host cells and extracellular matrix, as well as other molecules present in serum and extracellular fluids. These interactions, both general and specific, are critical in the establishment of infection. Modulation of borrelial adhesion to host tissues affects the microorganisms's ability to colonize, disseminate, and persist. In this review, we update the current knowledge on structure, function, and role in pathogenesis of these “sticky” B. burgdorferi infection-associated proteins. PMID:24772392

  5. The novel chlamydial adhesin CPn0473 mediates the lipid raft‐dependent uptake of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Fechtner, Tim; Galle, Jan N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chlamydiae are Gram‐negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. Chlamydial surface molecules are essential for host cell invasion. The first interaction with the host cell is thereby accomplished by the Outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) binding to heparan sulfate moieties on the host cell surface, followed by the interaction of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) with host cell receptors. Specifically, the interaction of the Pmp21 adhesin and invasin with its human interaction partner, the epidermal growth factor receptor, results in receptor activation, down‐stream signalling and finally internalization of the bacteria. Blocking both, the OmcB and Pmp21 adhesion pathways, did not completely abolish infection, suggesting the presence of additional factors relevant for host cell invasion. Here, we show that the novel surface protein CPn0473 of Chlamydia pneumoniae contributes to the binding and invasion of infectious chlamydial particles. CPn0473 is expressed late in the infection cycle and located on the infectious chlamydial cell surface. Soluble recombinant CPn0473 as well as rCPn0473‐coupled fluorescent latex beads adhere to human epithelial HEp‐2 cells. Interestingly, in classical infection blocking experiments pretreatment of HEp‐2 cells with rCPn0473 does not attenuate adhesion but promotes dose‐dependently internalization by C. pneumoniae suggesting an unusual mode of action for this adhesin. This CPn0473‐dependent promotion of infection by C. pneumoniae depends on two different domains within the protein and requires intact lipid rafts. Thus, inhibition of the interaction of CPn0473 with the host cell could provide a way to reduce the virulence of C. pneumoniae. PMID:26780295

  6. The novel chlamydial adhesin CPn0473 mediates the lipid raft-dependent uptake of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fechtner, Tim; Galle, Jan N; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. Chlamydial surface molecules are essential for host cell invasion. The first interaction with the host cell is thereby accomplished by the Outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) binding to heparan sulfate moieties on the host cell surface, followed by the interaction of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) with host cell receptors. Specifically, the interaction of the Pmp21 adhesin and invasin with its human interaction partner, the epidermal growth factor receptor, results in receptor activation, down-stream signalling and finally internalization of the bacteria. Blocking both, the OmcB and Pmp21 adhesion pathways, did not completely abolish infection, suggesting the presence of additional factors relevant for host cell invasion. Here, we show that the novel surface protein CPn0473 of Chlamydia pneumoniae contributes to the binding and invasion of infectious chlamydial particles. CPn0473 is expressed late in the infection cycle and located on the infectious chlamydial cell surface. Soluble recombinant CPn0473 as well as rCPn0473-coupled fluorescent latex beads adhere to human epithelial HEp-2 cells. Interestingly, in classical infection blocking experiments pretreatment of HEp-2 cells with rCPn0473 does not attenuate adhesion but promotes dose-dependently internalization by C. pneumoniae suggesting an unusual mode of action for this adhesin. This CPn0473-dependent promotion of infection by C. pneumoniae depends on two different domains within the protein and requires intact lipid rafts. Thus, inhibition of the interaction of CPn0473 with the host cell could provide a way to reduce the virulence of C. pneumoniae.

  7. Oral Streptococci Utilize a Siglec-Like Domain of Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins to Preferentially Target Platelet Sialoglycans in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lingquan; Bensing, Barbara A.; Thamadilok, Supaporn; Yu, Hai; Lau, Kam; Chen, Xi; Ruhl, Stefan; Sullam, Paul M.; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Damaged cardiac valves attract blood-borne bacteria, and infective endocarditis is often caused by viridans group streptococci. While such bacteria use multiple adhesins to maintain their normal oral commensal state, recognition of platelet sialoglycans provides an intermediary for binding to damaged valvular endocardium. We use a customized sialoglycan microarray to explore the varied binding properties of phylogenetically related serine-rich repeat adhesins, the GspB, Hsa, and SrpA homologs from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis species, which belong to a highly conserved family of glycoproteins that contribute to virulence for a broad range of Gram-positive pathogens. Binding profiles of recombinant soluble homologs containing novel sialic acid-recognizing Siglec-like domains correlate well with binding of corresponding whole bacteria to arrays. These bacteria show multiple modes of glycan, protein, or divalent cation-dependent binding to synthetic glycoconjugates and isolated glycoproteins in vitro. However, endogenous asialoglycan-recognizing clearance receptors are known to ensure that only fully sialylated glycans dominate in the endovascular system, wherein we find these particular streptococci become primarily dependent on their Siglec-like adhesins for glycan-mediated recognition events. Remarkably, despite an excess of alternate sialoglycan ligands in cellular and soluble blood components, these adhesins selectively target intact bacteria to sialylated ligands on platelets, within human whole blood. These preferred interactions are inhibited by corresponding recombinant soluble adhesins, which also preferentially recognize platelets. Our data indicate that circulating platelets may act as inadvertent Trojan horse carriers of oral streptococci to the site of damaged endocardium, and provide an explanation why it is that among innumerable microbes that gain occasional access to the bloodstream, certain viridans group streptococci have a

  8. Subtractive hybridization and identification of putative adhesins in a Shiga toxin-producing eae-negative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Maricel; Prado, Valeria; Whitlock, Gregory C; Solari, Aldo; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto M

    2008-12-01

    Adherence to epithelial cells by specific adhesins is a characteristic of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. The eae-encoded protein intimin is the main adhesin implicated in intestinal colonization in vivo. We recently showed that STEC strains isolated in Chile displayed a wide variety of adhesins; here we demonstrate that some of these STEC strains are eae-negative and still adhere to epithelial cells at a level 100-fold higher than enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157 : H7 prototype strain EDL933. This phenotype is associated with the presence of adherence factors different from the intimin protein. Subtractive hybridization between EHEC EDL933 and STEC eae-negative strain 472-1 was used to identify regions implicated in adhesion. In addition to the saa gene, we identified 18 specific genes in STEC 472-1, 16 of which had nucleotide identity to Salmonella ST46 phage genes; the two remaining ones shared identity to a gene encoding a hypothetical protein of uropathogenic E. coli. The DNA sequence of the STEC 472-1 psu-int region identified five open reading frames with homology to phage genes. We constructed mutant strains in the saa gene and the psu-int region to study the participation of these genes in the adherence to epithelial cells and our results demonstrated that STECDeltasaa and STECDeltapsu-int mutants displayed a 10-fold decrease in adherence as compared to the STEC 472-1 wild-type strain. Overall, our results suggest that STEC strain 472-1 adheres to epithelial cells in an eae-independent matter and that saa and psu-int participate in this adhesion process.

  9. Biochemical and immunological characterization of recombinant allergen Lol p 1.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, E; Faccini, S; Lidholm, J; Svensson, M; Brandazza, A; Longhi, R; Groenlund, H; Sidoli, A; Arosio, P

    1997-11-01

    Pollen from perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne), a major cause of type-I allergy worldwide, contains a complex mixture of allergenic proteins among which Lol p 1 is one of the most important. We describe the expression, purification and characterization of a recombinant Lol p 1 overproduced in Escherichia coli. The recombinant allergen, expressed in high yields and purified in milligram amounts, bound to specific IgE antibodies from human sera, induced histamine release from sensitized human basophils, and elicited rabbit antisera that recognize specifically recombinant Lol p 1 and natural Lol p 1 of pollen extract. Recombinant Lol p 1 was used to develop ImmunoCAP assays for analysis of 150 sera that were Radioallergosorbent test positive to L. perenne pollen. In 130 of them (87%) the assay detected a significant level of IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, reaching on average 37% of the level obtained with a test for IgE to the whole grass pollen extract. To map epitopes on Lol p 1, we produced three deletion mutants [des-(116-240)-Lol p 1, des-(1-88)-Lol p 1 and des-(133-189)-Lol p 1], which were efficiently expressed in bacteria. These all showed a strong reactivity with the specific rabbit IgG antibodies, but lacked most or all the allergenic properties of recombinant Lol p 1. A study of the antigenic structure of Lol p 1 was performed using the three deletion mutants and a set of 17-18-residue overlapping synthetic peptides covering the whole allergen sequence. The results indicate that human IgE and rabbit IgG antibodies bind to distinct regions of Lol p 1, and that at least some important IgE epitopes are mainly conformational. The findings suggest that recombinant allergens constitute useful reagents for further development of serological diagnosis of allergy, and that it should be possible to produce immunogenic fragments of allergenic proteins without allergenic properties.

  10. Ca2+-stabilized adhesin helps an Antarctic bacterium reach out and bind ice

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Tyler D. R.; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Campbell, Robert L.; Voets, Ilja K.; Davies, Peter L.; Guo, Shuaiqi

    2014-01-01

    The large size of a 1.5-MDa ice-binding adhesin [MpAFP (Marinomonas primoryensis antifreeze protein)] from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, M. primoryensis, is mainly due to its highly repetitive RII (Region II). MpAFP_RII contains roughly 120 tandem copies of an identical 104-residue repeat. We have previously determined that a single RII repeat folds as a Ca2+-dependent immunoglobulin-like domain. Here, we solved the crystal structure of RII tetra-tandemer (four tandem RII repeats) to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The RII tetra-tandemer reveals an extended (~190-Å × ~25-Å), rod-like structure with four RII-repeats aligned in series with each other. The inter-repeat regions of the RII tetra-tandemer are strengthened by Ca2+ bound to acidic residues. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) profiles indicate the RII tetra-tandemer is significantly rigidified upon Ca2+ binding, and that the protein's solution structure is in excellent agreement with its crystal structure. We hypothesize that >600 Ca2+ help rigidify the chain of ~120 104-residue repeats to form a ~0.6 μm rod-like structure in order to project the ice-binding domain of MpAFP away from the bacterial cell surface. The proposed extender role of RII can help the strictly aerobic, motile bacterium bind ice in the upper reaches of the Antarctic lake where oxygen and nutrients are most abundant. Ca2+-induced rigidity of tandem Ig-like repeats in large adhesins might be a general mechanism used by bacteria to bind to their substrates and help colonize specific niches. PMID:24892750

  11. Erythrocyte gangliosides act as receptors for Neisseria subflava: identification of the Sia-1 adhesin.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, G; Strömberg, N; Jonsson, A; Karlsson, K A; Normark, S

    1990-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae was recently shown to bind to a subset of lactose-containing glycolipids (N. Strömberg, C. Deal, G. Nyberg, S. Normark, M. So, and K.-A. Karlsson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:4902-4906, 1988). A number of commensal Neisseria strains were also shown to be lactose binders. In addition, Neisseria subflava bound to immobilized gangliosides, such as hematoside and sialosyl paragloboside, carrying the NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-4Glc sequence. To a lesser extent, N. gonorrhoeae also bound to this receptor in vitro. In N. subflava GN01, this binding property mediated agglutination of human erythrocytes in a neuraminidase-sensitive fashion. Nitrosoguanidine-induced nonhemagglutinative mutants of N. subflava GN01 had lost the ability to bind hematoside and sialosylparagloboside but remained able to bind lactosylceramide and gangliotetraosylceramide. These mutants fell into three classes with respect to their outer membrane protein profiles in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Class 1 mutants were identical to the parent strain save for the loss of a 27-kilodalton (kDa) protein. Class 2 mutants showed an outer membrane protein profile identical to that of the wild type, whereas mutants belonging to class 3 showed a number of changes, including the apparent absence of the 27-kDa protein. The 27-kDa protein from N. subflava GN01 was purified from the supernatant. A polyclonal antiserum to the purified Sia-1 protein as well as a Sia-1-specific monoclonal antibody inhibited hemagglutination by strain GN01. The purified Sia-1 protein in the presence of diluted anti-Sia-1 antiserum mediated a neuraminidase-sensitive hemagglutination. The purified Sia protein from a class 2 mutant was not able to hemagglutinate when cross-linked with antibodies, suggesting that it is a mutant form of Sia-1 affected in the receptor-binding site. Immunoelectron microscopy with a Sia-1-specific monoclonal antibody revealed that the adhesin was

  12. Suppression subtractive hybridization identifies an autotransporter adhesin gene of E. coli IMT5155 specifically associated with avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) represent a phylogenetically diverse group of bacteria which are implicated in a large range of infections in humans and animals. Although subgroups of different ExPEC pathotypes, including uropathogenic, newborn meningitis causing, and avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) share a number of virulence features, there still might be factors specifically contributing to the pathogenesis of a certain subset of strains or a distinct pathotype. Thus, we made use of suppression subtractive hybridization and compared APEC strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; sequence type complex 95) with human uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073 (O6:K2:H5; sequence type complex 73) to identify factors which may complete the currently existing model of APEC pathogenicity and further elucidate the position of this avian pathoype within the whole ExPEC group. Results Twenty-eight different genomic loci were identified, which are present in IMT5155 but not in CFT073. One of these loci contained a gene encoding a putative autotransporter adhesin. The open reading frame of the gene spans a 3,498 bp region leading to a putative 124-kDa adhesive protein. A specific antibody was raised against this protein and expression of the adhesin was shown under laboratory conditions. Adherence and adherence inhibition assays demonstrated a role for the corresponding protein in adhesion to DF-1 chicken fibroblasts. Sequence analyses revealed that the flanking regions of the chromosomally located gene contained sequences of mobile genetic elements, indicating a probable spread among different strains by horizontal gene transfer. In accordance with this hypothesis, the adhesin was found to be present not only in different phylogenetic groups of extraintestinal pathogenic but also of commensal E. coli strains, yielding a significant association with strains of avian origin. Conclusions We identified a chromosomally located autotransporter gene in a highly virulent APEC

  13. Comparison of Surface Proteomes of Adherence Variants of Listeria Monocytogenes Using LC-MS/MS for Identification of Potential Surface Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, Hung King; Hartson, Steven D.; Muriana, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to adhere and form biofilms leads to persistence in food processing plants and food-associated listeriosis. The role of specific surface proteins as adhesins to attach Listeria cells to various contact surfaces has not been well characterized to date. In prior research comparing different methods for surface protein extraction, the Ghost urea method revealed cleaner protein content as verified by the least cytoplasmic protein detected in surface extracts using LC-MS/MS. The same technique was utilized to extract and detect surface proteins among two surface-adherent phenotypic strains of L. monocytogenes (i.e., strongly and weakly adherent). Of 640 total proteins detected among planktonic and sessile cells, 21 protein members were exclusively detected in the sessile cells. Relative LC-MS/MS detection and quantification of surface-extracted proteins from the planktonic weakly adherent (CW35) and strongly adherent strains (99-38) were examined by protein mass normalization of proteins. We found that L. monocytogenes 99-38 exhibited a total of 22 surface proteins that were over-expressed: 11 proteins were detected in surface extracts of both sessile and planktonic 99-38 that were ≥5-fold over-expressed while another 11 proteins were detected only in planktonic 99-38 cells that were ≥10-fold over-expressed. Our results suggest that these protein members are worthy of further investigation for their involvement as surface adhesins. PMID:27196934

  14. The cis-acting CTTC-P1BS module is indicative for gene function of LjVTI12, a Qb-SNARE protein gene that is required for arbuscule formation in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Lota, Frédéric; Wegmüller, Sarah; Buer, Benjamin; Sato, Shusei; Bräutigam, Andrea; Hanf, Benjamin; Bucher, Marcel

    2013-04-01

    The majority of land plants live in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota. This symbiosis improves acquisition of phosphorus (P) by the host plant in exchange for carbohydrates, especially under low-P availability. The symbiosome, constituted by root cortex cells accommodating arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae, is the site at which bi-directional exchange of nutrients and metabolites takes place. Uptake of orthophosphate (Pi) in the symbiosome is facilitated by mycorrhiza-specific plant Pi transporters. Modifications of the potato Pi transporter 3 (StPT3) promoter were analysed in transgenic mycorrhizal roots, and it was found that the CTTC cis-regulatory element is necessary and sufficient for a transcriptional response to fungal colonization under low-Pi conditions. Phylogenetic footprinting also revealed binary combination of the CTTC element with the Pi starvation response-associated PHR1-binding site (P1BS) in the promoters of several mycorrhiza-specific Pi transporter genes. Scanning of the Lotus japonicus genome for gene promoters containing both cis-regulatory elements revealed a strong over-representation of genes involved in transport processes. One of these, LjVTI12, encoding a member of the SNARE family of proteins involved in membrane transport, exhibited enhanced transcript levels in Lotus roots colonized with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Down-regulation of LjVTI12 by RNA interference resulted in a mycorrhiza-specific phenotype characterized by distorted arbuscule morphology. The results highlight cooperative cis-regulation which integrates mycorrhiza and Pi starvation signaling with vesicle trafficking in symbiosome development.

  15. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Essential for Virulence and Modulates the Expression of Four Adhesins in Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Kakoschke, Tamara Katharina; Kakoschke, Sara Carina; Zeuzem, Catharina; Bouabe, Hicham; Adler, Kristin; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rossier, Ombeline

    2016-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of small RNAs with target mRNAs, thereby modulating transcript stability and translation. This post-transcriptional control helps bacteria adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions. Our previous mutational analysis showed that Hfq is involved in metabolism and stress survival in the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. In this study we demonstrate that Hfq is essential for virulence in mice and influences production of surface pathogenicity factors, in particular lipopolysaccharide and adhesins mediating interaction with host tissue. Hfq inhibited the production of Ail, the Ail-like protein OmpX and the MyfA pilin post-transcriptionally. In contrast Hfq promoted production of two major autotransporter adhesins YadA and InvA. While protein secretion in vitro was not affected, hfq mutants exhibited decreased protein translocation by the type III secretion system into host cells, consistent with decreased production of YadA and InvA. The influence of Hfq on YadA resulted from a complex interplay of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and likely post-translational effects. Hfq regulated invA by modulating the expression of the transcriptional regulators rovA, phoP and ompR. Therefore, Hfq is a global coordinator of surface virulence determinants in Y. enterocolitica suggesting that it constitutes an attractive target for developing new antimicrobial strategies. PMID:27387855

  16. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Essential for Virulence and Modulates the Expression of Four Adhesins in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Kakoschke, Tamara Katharina; Kakoschke, Sara Carina; Zeuzem, Catharina; Bouabe, Hicham; Adler, Kristin; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rossier, Ombeline

    2016-07-08

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of small RNAs with target mRNAs, thereby modulating transcript stability and translation. This post-transcriptional control helps bacteria adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions. Our previous mutational analysis showed that Hfq is involved in metabolism and stress survival in the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. In this study we demonstrate that Hfq is essential for virulence in mice and influences production of surface pathogenicity factors, in particular lipopolysaccharide and adhesins mediating interaction with host tissue. Hfq inhibited the production of Ail, the Ail-like protein OmpX and the MyfA pilin post-transcriptionally. In contrast Hfq promoted production of two major autotransporter adhesins YadA and InvA. While protein secretion in vitro was not affected, hfq mutants exhibited decreased protein translocation by the type III secretion system into host cells, consistent with decreased production of YadA and InvA. The influence of Hfq on YadA resulted from a complex interplay of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and likely post-translational effects. Hfq regulated invA by modulating the expression of the transcriptional regulators rovA, phoP and ompR. Therefore, Hfq is a global coordinator of surface virulence determinants in Y. enterocolitica suggesting that it constitutes an attractive target for developing new antimicrobial strategies.

  17. The Streptococcus pneumoniae adhesin PsrP binds to Keratin 10 on lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Sanchez, Carlos; Rose, Lloyd F.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2009-01-01

    Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP) is a pathogenicity island encoded adhesin that mediates attachment to lung cells. It is a member of the Serine-rich repeat protein (SRRP) family and the largest bacterial protein known. PsrP production by S. pneumoniae was confirmed by immunoblotting and a truncated version of the protein was determined to be glycosylated. Using isogenic psrP mutants complemented with various PsrP constructs and competitive inhibition assays with recombinant proteins, we determined that PsrP requires an extended SRR2 domain for function and that adhesion is mediated through amino acids 273-341 of its Basic Region (BR) domain. Affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation, ELISA, FACS, and immunofluorescent co-localization studies determined that PsrP binds to Keratin 10 (K10) on the surface of lung but not nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Unglycosylated K10 bound to wild type but not psrP deficient pneumococci; suggesting that unlike other SRRPs, PsrP-mediated adhesion was independent of lectin activity. Finally, mice immunized with recombinant (r)PsrPBR had significantly less bacteria in their blood and improved survival versus controls following intranasal challenge. We conclude that the BR domain of PsrP binds to K10 in a lectin-independent manner; that K10 is expressed on lung cells; and that vaccination with rPsrPBR is protective against pneumococcal disease. PMID:19627498

  18. BslA, the S-layer adhesin of B. anthracis, is a virulence factor for anthrax pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Justin; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microbial pathogens use adhesive surface proteins to bind to and interact with host tissues, events that are universal for the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. A surface adhesin of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, required to mediate these steps has not been discovered. Previous work identified BslA, an S-layer protein, to be necessary and sufficient for adhesion of the anthrax vaccine strain, Bacillus anthracis Sterne, to host cells. Here we asked whether encapsulated bacilli require BslA for anthrax pathogenesis in guinea pigs. Compared with the highly virulent parent strain B. anthracis Ames, bslA mutants displayed a dramatic increase in the lethal dose and in mean time-to-death. Whereas all tissues of animals infected with B. anthracis Ames contained high numbers of bacilli, only few vegetative forms could be recovered from internal organs of animals infected with the bslA mutant. Surface display of BslA occurred at the poles of encapsulated bacilli and enabled the binding of vegetative forms to host cells. Together these results suggest that BslA functions as the surface adhesin of the anthrax pathogen B. anthracis strain Ames. PMID:19906175

  19. Adhesins and host serum factors drive Yop translocation by yersinia into professional phagocytes during animal infection.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Green, Carlos; Fisher, Michael L; Paczosa, Michelle K; Mecsas, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia delivers Yops into numerous types of cultured cells, but predominantly into professional phagocytes and B cells during animal infection. The basis for this cellular tropism during animal infection is not understood. This work demonstrates that efficient and specific Yop translocation into phagocytes by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb) is a multi-factorial process requiring several adhesins and host complement. When WT Yptb or a multiple adhesin mutant strain, ΔailΔinvΔyadA, colonized tissues to comparable levels, ΔailΔinvΔyadA translocated Yops into significantly fewer cells, demonstrating that these adhesins are critical for translocation into high numbers of cells. However, phagocytes were still selectively targeted for translocation, indicating that other bacterial and/or host factors contribute to this function. Complement depletion showed that complement-restricted infection by ΔailΔinvΔyadA but not WT, indicating that adhesins disarm complement in mice either by prevention of opsonophagocytosis or by suppressing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, in the absence of the three adhesins and complement, the spectrum of cells targeted for translocation was significantly altered, indicating that Yersinia adhesins and complement direct Yop translocation into neutrophils during animal infection. In summary, these findings demonstrate that in infected tissues, Yersinia uses adhesins both to disarm complement-dependent killing and to efficiently translocate Yops into phagocytes.

  20. Adhesins involved in attachment to abiotic surfaces by Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Berne, Cécile; Ducret, Adrien; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    During the first step of biofilm formation, initial attachment is dictated by physicochemical and electrostatic interactions between the surface and the bacterial envelope. Depending upon the nature of these interactions, attachment can be transient or permanent. To achieve irreversible attachment, bacterial cells have developed a series of surface adhesins promoting specific or non-specific adhesion under various environmental conditions. This chapter will review the recent advances in our understanding of the secretion, assembly and regulation of the bacterial adhesins during biofilm formation with a particular emphasis on the fimbrial, non-fimbrial and discrete polysaccharide adhesins in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26350310

  1. [Role of Bacterial Adhesin RAPA1 in Formation of Efficient Symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum with Bean Plants].

    PubMed

    Nigmatullina, L R; Lavina, A M; Vershinina, Z R; Baimiev, Al Kh

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesins, the proteins responsible for attachment of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to plant roots, are involved in formation of stable associative symbioses. In the present work enhanced expression of the rapA1 adhesin gene in Rhizobium leguminosarum PVu5 was shown to improve the efficiency of nodulation on bean roots inoculated with the modified strain. The rapA1 gene was cloned into the pJN105Turbo plasmid, this construct was used for transformation of R. leguminosarum PVu5, bean plants were inoculated by this transgenic strain, and efficiency of root nodule formation was determined. In the plants treated with rapA1-transgenic rhizobia, the number of root nodules was on average two times higher than in the plants inoculated with the original strain. Aggregation of R. leguminosarum was achieved when the rapA1 gene expression was enhanced either in rhizobia or in the co-cultured modified strain E. coli pJN105TurboRapA1.

  2. In vitro effect of temperature on the conformational structure and collagen binding of SdrF, a Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesin.

    PubMed

    Di Poto, Antonella; Papi, Massimiliano; Trivedi, Sheetal; Maiorana, Alessandro; Gavazzo, Paola; Vassalli, Massimo; Lowy, Franklin D; De Spirito, Marco; Montanaro, Lucio; Imbriani, Marcello; Arciola, Carla Renata; Visai, Livia

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is the leading etiologic agent of device-related infections. S. epidermidis is able to bind, by means of the adhesins of its cell wall, the host matrix proteins filming the artificial surfaces. Thence, bacteria cling to biomaterials and infection develops. The effect of temperature on integrity, structure, and biological activity of the collagen-binding adhesin (SdrF) of S. epidermidis has been here investigated. By cloning in E. coli XL1-Blue, a recombinant of the SdrF binding domain B (rSdrFB), carrying an N-terminal polyhistidine, was obtained. Purification was by HiTrap(TM) Chelating HP columns. Assessment of purity, molecular weight, and integrity was by SDS-PAGE. The rSdrFB-collagen binding was investigated by ELISA. A full three-dimensional reconstruction of rSdrFB was achieved by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). At 25 °C, rSdrFB bound to type I collagen in a dose-dependent, saturable manner, with a Kd of 2.48 × 10(-7) M. When temperature increased from 25 to 37 °C, a strong conformational change occurred, together with the abolition of the rSdrFB-collagen binding. The rSdrFB integrity was not affected by temperature variation. SdrFB-collagen binding is switched on/off depending on the temperature. Implications with the infection pathogenesis are enlightened.

  3. [Role of Bacterial Adhesin RAPA1 in Formation of Efficient Symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum with Bean Plants].

    PubMed

    Nigmatullina, L R; Lavina, A M; Vershinina, Z R; Baimiev, Al Kh

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesins, the proteins responsible for attachment of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to plant roots, are involved in formation of stable associative symbioses. In the present work enhanced expression of the rapA1 adhesin gene in Rhizobium leguminosarum PVu5 was shown to improve the efficiency of nodulation on bean roots inoculated with the modified strain. The rapA1 gene was cloned into the pJN105Turbo plasmid, this construct was used for transformation of R. leguminosarum PVu5, bean plants were inoculated by this transgenic strain, and efficiency of root nodule formation was determined. In the plants treated with rapA1-transgenic rhizobia, the number of root nodules was on average two times higher than in the plants inoculated with the original strain. Aggregation of R. leguminosarum was achieved when the rapA1 gene expression was enhanced either in rhizobia or in the co-cultured modified strain E. coli pJN105TurboRapA1. PMID:26964360

  4. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans to glycosphingolipid (Asialo-GM1) receptors is achieved by a conserved receptor-binding domain present on their adhesins.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Lee, K K; Hodges, R S; Paranchych, W; Irvin, R T

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a dimorphic yeast, are evolutionarily distant microorganisms which can utilize filamentous structures termed pili and fimbriae, respectively, to mediate adherence to glycosphingolipids (asialoganglioside-GM1) receptors. The mechanism of adherence to glycosphingolipid receptors was investigated in these studies. By using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against purified pili of P. aeruginosa PAK (PK99H) and monospecific anti-peptide antibodies against the PAK pilin peptides [anti-PAK(128-144) and anti-PAK(134-140)], we demonstrated that these antibodies agglutinated C. albicans whole cells and cross-reacted with C. albicans fimbriae in immunoblots. A control MAb, PKL1, and anti-PAK(75-84) peptide antibodies failed to agglutinate C. albicans whole cells or cross-react with the fimbrial proteins. Conversely, the anti-C. albicans fimbrial MAb Fm16, but not Fm34, agglutinated P. aeruginosa PAK whole cells and Western blots (immunoblots). The interactions between PK99H and Fm16 and their respective homologous antigens were competitively inhibited by heterologous antigens; this demonstrated that the interactions between the antibodies and the heterologous antigens, i.e., PK99H with C. albicans fimbriae and Fm16 with P. aeruginosa pili, were highly specific and suggested that both adhesins share a common antigenic determinant. The immunological cross-reactivity between Fm16 and P. aeruginosa PAK pilin is localized onto the PAK(134-140) region as shown by a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The PAK(134-140) region of PAK pilin contains the epitope recognized by PK99H and also constitutes part of the receptor-binding domain of the pilus adhesin. Thus, the results from these studies suggest that common cell surface receptors are recognized by the P. aeruginosa and C. albicans adhesins because of a conserved receptor-binding domain on the adhesins. Images PMID:7525482

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the afimbrial-adhesin-encoding afa-3 gene cluster and its translocation via flanking IS1 insertion sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, M I; Labigne, A; Le Bouguenec, C

    1994-01-01

    The afa gene clusters encode afimbrial adhesins (AFAs) that are expressed by uropathogenic and diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli strains. The plasmid-borne afa-3 gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of the AFA-III adhesin that belongs to the Dr family of hemagglutinins. Reported in this work is the nucleotide sequence of the 9.2-kb insert of the recombinant plasmid pILL61, which contains the afa-3 gene cluster cloned from a cystitis-associated E. coli strain (A30). The afa-3 gene cluster was shown to contain six open reading frames, designated afaA to afaF. It was organized in two divergent transcriptional units. Five of the six Afa products showed marked homologies with proteins encoded by previously described adhesion systems that allowed us to attribute to each of them a putative function in the biogenesis of the AFA-III adhesin. AfaE was identified as the structural adhesin product, whereas AfaB and AfaC were recognized as periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane anchor proteins, respectively. The AfaA and AfaF products were shown to be homologous to the PapI-PapB transcriptional regulatory proteins. No function could be attributed to the AfaD product, the gene of which was previously shown to be dispensable for the synthesis of a functional adhesin. Upstream of the afa-3 gene cluster, a 1.2-kb region was found to be 96% identical to the RepFIB sequence of one of the enterotoxigenic E. coli plasmids (P307), suggesting a common ancestor plasmid. This region contains an integrase-like gene (int). Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an IS1 element between the int gene and the afa-3 gene cluster. Two other IS1 elements were detected and located in the vicinity of the afa-3 gene cluster by hybridization experiments. The afa-3 gene cluster was therefore found to be flanked by two IS1 elements in direct orientation and two in opposite orientations. The afa-3 gene cluster, flanked by two directly oriented IS1 elements, was shown to translocate

  6. Bile salts induce expression of the afimbrial LDA adhesin of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alfredo G; Tutt, Christopher B; Duval, Lisabeth; Popov, Vsevolod; Nasr, Abdelhakim Ben; Michalski, Jane; Scaletsky, Isabel C A

    2007-04-01

    Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains are frequently implicated in infant diarrhoea in developing countries. Not much is known about the adherence properties of aEPEC; however, it has been shown that these strains can adhere to tissue-cultured cells. A chromosomal region designated the locus for diffuse adherence (LDA) confers aEPEC strain 22 the ability to adhere to culture cells. LDA is an afimbrial adhesin that contains a major subunit, LdaG, whose expression is induced on MacConkey agar at 37 degrees C. We hypothesized that the bile salts found in this culture media induce the expression of LdaG. Strain 22 and the LdaG mutant were grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) media in the presence or absence of bile salts and heat-extracted surface-expressed proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE to determine whether expression of the 25 kDa LdaG protein was induced. Western blot analysis with anti-LdaG confirmed that bile salts enhance LdaG expression at 37 degrees C. Adhesion assays on HeLa cells revealed that adhesion in a diffuse pattern of strain 22 increased in the presence of bile salts. We also confirmed that expression of the localized adherence pattern observed in the ldaG mutant required the presence of a large cryptic plasmid found in strain 22 and that this phenotype was not induced by bile salts. At the transcriptional level, the ldaG-lacZ promoter fusion displayed maximum beta-galactosidase activity when the parent strain was grown in LB supplemented with bile salts. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting analysis, immunogold labelling electron microscopy and immunofluorescence using anti-LdaG sera confirmed that LDA is a bile salts-inducible surface-expressed afimbrial adhesin. Finally, LdaG expression was induced in presence of individual bile salts but not by other detergents. We concluded that bile salts increase expression of LDA, conferring a diffuse adherence pattern and having an impact on the adhesion properties of this aEPEC strain.

  7. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  8. Assessment of Adhesins as an Indicator of Pathovar-Associated Virulence Factors in Bovine Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valat, Charlotte; Forest, Karine; Auvray, Frédéric; Métayer, Véronique; Méheut, Thomas; Polizzi, Charlène; Gay, Emilie; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-01

    The CS31A, F17, and F5 adhesins are usually targeted by serology-based methods to detect pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with calf enteritis. However, the virulence traits of the selected isolates are still poorly described. Here, from a set of 349 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from cattle, we demonstrated a 70.8% concordance rate (Cohen's kappa, 0.599) between serology- and PCR-based approaches for the detection of adhesins under field conditions. A 79% to 82.4% correspondence between the two methods was found for fimbrial adhesins, whereas major discrepancies (33%) were observed for CS31A-type antigens. Various F17A variants were found, such as F17Ac (20K) (50%), F17Aa (FY) (18.9%), F17Ab (8.1%), and F17Ad (111K) (5.4%), including a high proportion (17.6%) of new F17A internal combinations (F17Aab, F17Aac, and F17Abc) or untypeable variants. In addition, the highest proportion of pathovar-associated virulence factor (VF) genes was observed among E. coli isolates that produced F5/F41 adhesins. A specific link between the heat-stable toxins related to the enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) pathovar and adhesins was identified. STa was significantly linked to F5/F41 and EAST1 to CS31A adhesins (P < 0.001), respectively, whereas NTEC was associated with F17 adhesin (P = 0.001). Clustering between phylogroups according to the adhesin types was also observed. Also, few Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) pathovars were identified. Finally, no statistically significant difference was observed in the occurrence of extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production according to the adhesins expressed by the isolates (P = 0.09). Altogether, this study gives new insights into the relationship between adhesins, VF, and antimicrobial resistance in calf enteritis and supports the need for further standardization of methodologies for such approaches. PMID:25217019

  9. Differential expression of insect and plant specific adhesin genes, Mad1 and Mad2, in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Barelli, Larissa; Padilla-Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Bidochka, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Metarhizium robertsii is an entomopathogenic fungus that is also plant rhizosphere competent. Two adhesin-encoding genes, Metarhizium adhesin-like protein 1 (Mad1) and Mad2, are involved in insect pathogenesis or plant root colonization, respectively. Here we examined the differential expression of the Mad genes when grown on a variety of soluble (carbohydrates and plant root exudate) and insoluble substrates (locust, tobacco hornworm, and cockroach cuticle, chitin, tomato stems, cellulose, and starch) and during insect, Plutella xylostella, infection. On insect cuticles Mad1 was up regulated, whereas bean root exudate and tomato stems resulted in the up regulation of Mad2. During the early stages of insect infection Mad1 was expressed while Mad2 was not expressed until fungal hyphae emerged and conidiated on the insect cadaver. The regulation of Mad2 was compared to that of other stress-related genes (heat shock protein (Hsp)30, Hsp70, and starvation stress gene A (ssgA)). Mad2 was generally up regulated by nutrient starvation (similar to ssgA) but not by pH, temperature, oxidative or osmotic stresses. Whereas Hsp30 and Hsp70 were generally up regulated at 37 °C or by oxidative stress even under nutrient enriched conditions. We fused the promoter of the Mad2 gene to a marker gene (green fluorescent protein (GFP)) and confirmed that Mad2 was up regulated when M. robertsii was grown in the presence of nutrient starvation. Examination of the promoter region of Mad2 revealed that it possessed two copies of a stress-response element (STRE) known to be regulated under the general stress-response pathway. PMID:22036295

  10. sae is essential for expression of the staphylococcal adhesins Eap and Emp.

    PubMed

    Harraghy, Niamh; Kormanec, Jan; Wolz, Christiane; Homerova, Dagmar; Goerke, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Qazi, Saara; Hill, Philip; Herrmann, Mathias

    2005-06-01

    Eap and Emp are two Staphylococcus aureus adhesins initially described as extracellular matrix binding proteins. Eap has since emerged as being important in adherence to and invasion of eukaryotic cells, as well as being described as an immunomodulator and virulence factor in chronic infections. This paper describes the mapping of the transcription start point of the eap and emp promoters. Moreover, using reporter-gene assays and real-time PCR in defined regulatory mutants, environmental conditions and global regulators affecting expression of eap and emp were investigated. Marked differences were found in expression of eap and emp between strain Newman and the 8325 derivatives SH1000 and 8325-4. Moreover, both genes were repressed in the presence of glucose. Analysis of expression of both genes in various regulatory mutants revealed that sarA and agr were involved in their regulation, but the data suggested that there were additional regulators of both genes. In a sae mutant, expression of both genes was severely repressed. sae expression was also reduced in the presence of glucose, suggesting that repression of eap and emp in glucose-containing medium may, in part, be a consequence of a decrease in expression of sae.

  11. Catch-bond mechanism of the bacterial adhesin FimH

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Maximilian M.; Jakob, Roman P.; Eras, Jonathan; Baday, Sefer; Eriş, Deniz; Navarra, Giulio; Bernèche, Simon; Ernst, Beat; Maier, Timm; Glockshuber, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Ligand–receptor interactions that are reinforced by mechanical stress, so-called catch-bonds, play a major role in cell–cell adhesion. They critically contribute to widespread urinary tract infections by pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. These pathogens attach to host epithelia via the adhesin FimH, a two-domain protein at the tip of type I pili recognizing terminal mannoses on epithelial glycoproteins. Here we establish peptide-complemented FimH as a model system for fimbrial FimH function. We reveal a three-state mechanism of FimH catch-bond formation based on crystal structures of all states, kinetic analysis of ligand interaction and molecular dynamics simulations. In the absence of tensile force, the FimH pilin domain allosterically accelerates spontaneous ligand dissociation from the FimH lectin domain by 100,000-fold, resulting in weak affinity. Separation of the FimH domains under stress abolishes allosteric interplay and increases the affinity of the lectin domain. Cell tracking demonstrates that rapid ligand dissociation from FimH supports motility of piliated E. coli on mannosylated surfaces in the absence of shear force. PMID:26948702

  12. Molecular epidemiology of adhesin and hemolysin virulence factors among uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arthur, M; Johnson, C E; Rubin, R H; Arbeit, R D; Campanelli, C; Kim, C; Steinbach, S; Agarwal, M; Wilkinson, R; Goldstein, R

    1989-02-01

    The pap, prs, pil, and hly operons of the pyelonephritic Escherichia coli isolate J96 code for the expression of P, F, and type 1 adhesins and the production of hemolysin, respectively; the afaI operon of the pyelonephritic E. coli KS52 encodes an X adhesin. Using different segments of these operons as probes, colony hybridizations were performed on 97 E. coli urinary tract and 40 fecal clinical isolates to determine (i) the presence in the infecting bacteria of nucleotide sequences related to virulence operons, and (ii) the phenotypic properties associated with such sequences. Coexpression of P and F adhesins encoded by pap-related sequences was detected more frequently among isolates from patients with pyelonephritis (32 of 49, 65%) than among those with cystitis (11 of 48, 23%; P less than 0.0001) or from fecal specimens (6 of 40, 15%; P less than 0.0001). Therefore, the expression of both adhesins appears to be critical in the colonization of the upper urinary tract. In contrast, afaI-related sequences were detected significantly more frequently among isolates from patients with cystitis, suggesting that this class of X adhesin may have a role in lower urinary tract infections. Urinary tract isolates differed from fecal isolates by a low incidence of type 1 adhesin expression among pil probe-positive isolates. hly-related sequences were only detected in pap probe-positive isolates. The frequency of hemolysin production among pap probe-positive isolates was not associated with a particular pattern of infection. The distribution of these virulence factors was similar in the presence or absence of reflux, indicating that structural abnormalities of the urinary tract did not facilitate colonization by adhesin-negative isolates.

  13. Enhancer of Rudimentary(p1), E(r)(p1), a Highly Conserved Enhancer of the Rudimentary Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, E.; Murphy, A. M.; Fares, H.; Dang-Vu, K.; Tsubota, S. I.

    1994-01-01

    A hybrid dysgenesis-induced mutation, enhancer of rudimentary(p1) (e(r)(p1)), is a recessive enhancer of a weak rudimentary mutant phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster. The e(r) gene was cloned using P element tagging and localized to region 8B on the X chromosome. It encodes a 1.0-kb and a 1.2-kb transcript. The 1.0-kb transcript is present in both adult males and females, while the 1.2-kb transcript is predominantly found in females. The difference in the lengths of the two e(r) transcripts is caused by two different polyadenylation sites spaced 228 bp apart. The amounts of both of these transcripts are drastically reduced in the e(r)(p1) mutant. The P element in e(r)(p1) is inserted in the 5'-untranslated leader region near the start of transcription. It may be producing its effect by suppressing transcription and/or by providing transcription termination and polyadenylation signals. The putative e(r) protein is 104 amino acids in length and bears no striking resemblance to protein sequences in GenBank or PIR. While its biochemical function is unknown at this time, sequence analysis indicates that the e(r) protein is highly conserved and, presumably, functionally very important. The amino acid sequences of the D. melanogaster and the Drosophila virilis proteins are 95% identical. PMID:7896098

  14. The Staphylococcal Biofilm: Adhesins, regulation, and host response

    PubMed Central

    Paharik, Alexandra E.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    The Staphylococci comprise a diverse genus of Gram-positive, non-motile commensal organisms that inhabit the skin and mucous membranes of humans and other mammals. In general, Staphylococci are benign members of the natural flora, but many species have the capacity to be opportunistic pathogens, mainly infecting individuals who have medical device implants or are otherwise immunocompromised. S. aureus and S. epidermidis are a major source of hospital-acquired infections and are the most common causes of surgical site infections and central line-associated bloodstream infections. The ability of Staphylococci to form biofilms in vivo makes them highly resistant to chemotherapeutics and leads to chronic diseases. These biofilm infections include osteomyelitis, endocarditis, medical device implants, and persistence in the cystic fibrosis lung. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of our current understanding of Staphylococcal biofilm formation, with an emphasis on adhesins and regulation, while also addressing how Staphylococcal biofilms interact with the immune system. On the whole, this review will provide a thorough picture of biofilm formation of the Staphylococcus genus and how this mode of growth impacts the host. PMID:27227309

  15. The Staphylococcal Biofilm: Adhesins, Regulation, and Host Response.

    PubMed

    Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    The staphylococci comprise a diverse genus of Gram-positive, nonmotile commensal organisms that inhabit the skin and mucous membranes of humans and other mammals. In general, staphylococci are benign members of the natural flora, but many species have the capacity to be opportunistic pathogens, mainly infecting individuals who have medical device implants or are otherwise immunocompromised. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are major sources of hospital-acquired infections and are the most common causes of surgical site infections and medical device-associated bloodstream infections. The ability of staphylococci to form biofilms in vivo makes them highly resistant to chemotherapeutics and leads to chronic diseases. These biofilm infections include osteomyelitis, endocarditis, medical device infections, and persistence in the cystic fibrosis lung. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of our current understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation, with an emphasis on adhesins and regulation, while also addressing how staphylococcal biofilms interact with the immune system. On the whole, this review will provide a thorough picture of biofilm formation of the staphylococcus genus and how this mode of growth impacts the host. PMID:27227309

  16. Effects of orally applied Fes p1-displaying L. plantarum WCFS1 on Fes p1 induced allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Minic, Rajna; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija; Petrusic, Vladimir; Zivkovic, Irena; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Dimitrijevic, Ljiljana; Mathiesen, Geir

    2015-04-10

    Group I grass pollen allergens are major contributors to grass pollen-related seasonal allergic rhinitis, and as such a primary target for allergen specific immunotherapy. In this study the potential therapeutic role of oral application of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, directing cell wall attachment of the recombinant Fes p1 allergen, from Festuca pratensis was tested in a mouse model of Fes p1 allergy. For surface expression of Fes p1 allergen in L. plantarum WCFS1 pSIP system with inducible expression was used. Balb/c mice were sensitized with Fes p1 protein in alum and subsequently received live recombinant L. plantarum orally. Antibody levels (IgE, total IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgA) were determined by ELISA. Differential eosinophil count in peripheral blood was performed. Reduced peripheral blood eosinophilia and increased serum IgG2A levels was detected in both groups which received live L. plantarum orally. Specific serum IgA levels were increased only in mice treated with the recombinant bacteria. Oral application of L. plantarum WCFS1 has a beneficial therapeutic effect in a mouse model of Fes p1 allergy. Cell surface expression of Fes p1 allergen potentiates this phenomenon in an allergen specific way.

  17. Role of β1 integrins and bacterial adhesins for Yop injection into leukocytes in Yersinia enterocolitica systemic mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Deuschle, Eva; Keller, Birgit; Siegfried, Alexandra; Manncke, Birgit; Spaeth, Tanja; Köberle, Martin; Drechsler-Hake, Doreen; Reber, Julia; Böttcher, Ralph T; Autenrieth, Stella E; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Bohn, Erwin; Schütz, Monika

    2016-02-01

    Injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into host cells by a type III secretion system is an important immune evasion mechanism of Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye). In this process Ye invasin (Inv) binds directly while Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) binds indirectly via extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to β1 integrins on host cells. Although leukocytes turned out to be an important target of Yop injection by Ye, it was unclear which Ye adhesins and which leukocyte receptors are required for Yop injection. To explain this, we investigated the role of YadA, Inv and β1 integrins for Yop injection into leukocytes and their impact on the course of systemic Ye infection in mice. Ex vivo infection experiments revealed that adhesion of Ye via Inv or YadA is sufficient to promote Yop injection into leukocytes as revealed by a β-lactamase reporter assay. Serum factors inhibit YadA- but not Inv-mediated Yop injection into B and T cells, shifting YadA-mediated Yop injection in the direction of neutrophils and other myeloid cells. Systemic Ye mouse infection experiments demonstrated that YadA is essential for Ye virulence and Yop injection into leukocytes, while Inv is dispensable for virulence and plays only a transient and minor role for Yop injection in the early phase of infection. Ye infection of mice with β1 integrin-depleted leukocytes demonstrated that β1 integrins are dispensable for YadA-mediated Yop injection into leukocytes, but contribute to Inv-mediated Yop injection. Despite reduced Yop injection into leukocytes, β1 integrin-deficient mice exhibited an increased susceptibility for Ye infection, suggesting an important role of β1 integrins in immune defense against Ye. This study demonstrates that Yop injection into leukocytes by Ye is largely mediated by YadA exploiting, as yet unknown, leukocyte receptors.

  18. Coliphage P1 morphogenesis: analysis of mutants by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J T; Walker, D H

    1983-01-01

    We used electron microscopy and serum blocking power tests to determine the phenotypes of 47 phage P1 amber mutants that have defects in particle morphogenesis. Eleven mutants showed head defects, 30 showed tail defects, and 6 had a defect in particle maturation (which could be either in the head or in the tail). Consideration of previous complementation test results, genetic and physical positions of the mutations, and phenotypes of the mutants allowed assignment of most of the 47 mutations to genes. Thus, a minimum of 12 tail genes, 4 head genes, and 1 particle maturation gene are now known for P1. Of the 12 tail genes, 1 (gene 19, located within the invertible C loop) codes for tail fibers, 6 (genes 3, 5, 16, 20, 21, and 26) code for baseplate components (although one of these genes could code for the tail tube), 1 (gene 22) codes for the sheath, 1 (gene 6) affects tail length, 2 (genes 7 and 25) are involved in tail stability, and 1 (gene 24) either codes for a baseplate component or is involved in tail stability. Of the four head genes, gene 9 codes for a protein required for DNA packaging. The function of head gene 4 is unclear. Head gene 8 probably codes for a minor head protein, whereas head gene 23 could code for either a minor head protein or the major head protein. Excluding the particle maturation gene (gene 1), the 12 tail genes are clustered in three regions of the P1 physical genome. The four head genes are at four separate locations. However, some P1 head genes have not yet been detected and could be located in two regions (for which there are no known genes) adjacent to genes 4 and 8. The P1 morphogenetic gene clusters are interrupted by many genes that are expressed in the prophage. Images PMID:6834479

  19. A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Bensing, Barbara A.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Ward, Nicholas J.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Oliver, Kevin M.; Cecchini, Gary; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M.

    2014-10-02

    GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIb{alpha}. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB{sub BR}), both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB{sub BR} structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: (1) an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; (2) a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; (3) a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIb{alpha}. Further examination of purified GspB{sub BR}-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspBBR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  20. Specificity of Campylobacter jejuni Adhesin PEB3 for Phosphates and Structural Differences among Its Ligand Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tongpil; Vedadi, Masoud; Watson, David C.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Munger, Christine; Cygler, Miroslaw; Matte, Allan; Young, N. Martin

    2009-04-22

    PEB3 is a glycoprotein adhesin from Campylobacter jejuni whose structure suggested a role in transport. We have investigated potential ligands for PEB3 and characterized their binding properties using biophysical methods in solution and by X-ray crystallography. A thermal aggregation assay of PEB3 with a library of physiological compounds identified three possible ligands [3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and aconitate], which stabilized wild-type PEB3 but did not stabilize either a PEB3 form containing two mutations at the ligand-binding site, T138A/S139A, or a second PEB3 mutant, K135E, at a site {approx}14 {angstrom} away. Fluorescence titration experiments and cocrystal structures with various ligands were used to characterize the binding of 3-PG, PEP, and phosphate to PEB3. Further, a C. jejuni growth experiment in minimal medium supplemented with 3-PG showed that this molecule enhances the growth of wild-type C. jejuni, but not of the PEB3 mutants. Crystallographic analysis of PEB3 complexes revealed that the Ser171-Gln180 region in the presence of 3-PG or other phosphates is helical and similar to those of other transport proteins, but it is nonhelical when citrate is bound. The K135E mutation resulted in expression of a more highly glycosylated form of PEB3 in vivo, and its crystal structure showed the conformation of the first two residues of the glycan. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that PEB3 is a transport protein that may function in utilization of 3-PG or other phosphate-containing molecules from the host.

  1. Structural Features of the Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilm Adhesin LapA Required for LapG-Dependent Cleavage, Biofilm Formation, and Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Chelsea D.; Smith, T. Jarrod; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Newell, Peter D.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of the LapA protein to the cell surface is a key step required by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to irreversibly attach to a surface and form a biofilm. LapA is a member of a diverse family of predicted bacterial adhesins, and although lacking a high degree of sequence similarity, family members do share common predicted domains. Here, using mutational analysis, we determine the significance of each domain feature of LapA in relation to its export and localization to the cell surface and function in biofilm formation. Our previous work showed that the N terminus of LapA is required for cleavage by the periplasmic cysteine protease LapG and release of the adhesin from the cell surface under conditions unfavorable for biofilm formation. We define an additional critical region of the N terminus of LapA required for LapG proteolysis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the domains within the C terminus of LapA are not absolutely required for biofilm formation, export, or localization to the cell surface, with the exception of the type I secretion signal, which is required for LapA export and cell surface localization. In contrast, deletion of the central repetitive region of LapA, consisting of 37 repeats of 100 amino acids, results in an inability to form a biofilm. We also used single-molecule atomic force microscopy to further characterize the role of these domains in biofilm formation on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These studies represent the first detailed analysis of the domains of the LapA family of biofilm adhesin proteins. PMID:24837291

  2. Immunogenicity of a prototype enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesin vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sincock, Stephanie A; Hall, Eric R; Woods, Colleen M; O'Dowd, Aisling; Poole, Steven T; McVeigh, Annette L; Nunez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Miller, Milagros; Savarino, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers. Efforts to develop an ETEC vaccine have intensified in the past decade, and intestinal colonization factors (CFs) are somatic components of most investigational vaccines. CFA/I and related Class 5 fimbrial CFs feature a major stalk-forming subunit and a minor, antigenically conserved tip adhesin. We hypothesized that the tip adhesin is critical for stimulating antibodies that specifically inhibit ETEC attachment to the small intestine. To address this, we compared the capacity of donor strand complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, and CFA/I fimbriae to elicit anti-adhesive antibodies in mice, using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) as proxy for neutralization of intestinal adhesion. When given with genetically attenuated heat-labile enterotoxin LTR192G as adjuvant by intranasal (IN) or orogastric (OG) vaccination, dscCfaE exceeded CFA/I fimbriae in eliciting serum HAI titers and anti-CfaE antibody titers. Based on these findings, we vaccinated Aotus nancymaae nonhuman primates (NHP) with dscCfaE alone or admixed with one of two adjuvants, LTR192G and cholera toxin B-subunit, by IN and OG administration. Only IN vaccination with dscCfaE with either adjuvant elicited substantial serum HAI titers and IgA and IgG anti-adhesin responses, with the latter detectable a year after vaccination. In conclusion, we have shown that dscCfaE elicits robust HAI and anti-adhesin antibody responses in both mice and NHPs when given with adjuvant by IN vaccination, encouraging further evaluation of an ETEC adhesin-based vaccine approach. PMID:26597148

  3. Immunogenicity of a prototype enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesin vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sincock, Stephanie A; Hall, Eric R; Woods, Colleen M; O'Dowd, Aisling; Poole, Steven T; McVeigh, Annette L; Nunez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Miller, Milagros; Savarino, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers. Efforts to develop an ETEC vaccine have intensified in the past decade, and intestinal colonization factors (CFs) are somatic components of most investigational vaccines. CFA/I and related Class 5 fimbrial CFs feature a major stalk-forming subunit and a minor, antigenically conserved tip adhesin. We hypothesized that the tip adhesin is critical for stimulating antibodies that specifically inhibit ETEC attachment to the small intestine. To address this, we compared the capacity of donor strand complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, and CFA/I fimbriae to elicit anti-adhesive antibodies in mice, using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) as proxy for neutralization of intestinal adhesion. When given with genetically attenuated heat-labile enterotoxin LTR192G as adjuvant by intranasal (IN) or orogastric (OG) vaccination, dscCfaE exceeded CFA/I fimbriae in eliciting serum HAI titers and anti-CfaE antibody titers. Based on these findings, we vaccinated Aotus nancymaae nonhuman primates (NHP) with dscCfaE alone or admixed with one of two adjuvants, LTR192G and cholera toxin B-subunit, by IN and OG administration. Only IN vaccination with dscCfaE with either adjuvant elicited substantial serum HAI titers and IgA and IgG anti-adhesin responses, with the latter detectable a year after vaccination. In conclusion, we have shown that dscCfaE elicits robust HAI and anti-adhesin antibody responses in both mice and NHPs when given with adjuvant by IN vaccination, encouraging further evaluation of an ETEC adhesin-based vaccine approach.

  4. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers oversee the placement of the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, onto a flatbed truck that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P- 1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  5. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the newly constructed RLV hangar (viewed here from inside the hangar) as precaution against bad weather approaching the Center (background). The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. In the background is the Super Guppy transport that brought it to KSC. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P- 1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  6. P-1 truss arrival at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, arrives inside the RLV hangar, located near the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. Approaching bad weather caused the detour as a precaution. The truss will eventually be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  7. The heat-resistant agglutinin family includes a novel adhesin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain 60A.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Justin; Weckselblatt, Brooke; Chung, Yoonjie K; Durante, Julia C; Andelman, Steven; Glaubman, Jessica; Dorff, Justin D; Bhargava, Samhita; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Unger, Katherine P; Okeke, Iruka N

    2011-09-01

    Heat-resistant agglutinin 1 (Hra1) is an accessory colonization factor of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain 042. Tia, a close homolog of Hra1, is an invasin and adhesin that has been described in enterotoxigenic E. coli. We devised a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism screen for the associated genes and found that they occur among 55 (36.7%) of the enteroaggregative E. coli isolates screened, as well as lower proportions of enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and commensal E. coli isolates. Overall, 25%, 8%, and 3% of 150 EAEC strains harbored hra1 alone, tia alone, or both genes, respectively. One EAEC isolate, 60A, produced an amplicon with a unique restriction profile, distinct from those of hra1 and tia. We cloned and sequenced the full-length agglutinin gene from strain 60A and have designated it hra2. The hra2 gene was not detected in any of 257 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates in our collection but is present in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strain SL476. The cloned hra2 gene from strain 60A, which encodes a predicted amino acid sequence that is 64% identical to that of Hra1 and 68% identical to that of Tia, was sufficient to confer adherence on E. coli K-12. We constructed an hra2 deletion mutant of EAEC strain 60A. The mutant was deficient in adherence but not autoaggregation or invasion, pointing to a functional distinction from the autoagglutinin Hra1 and the Tia invasin. Hra1, Tia, and the novel accessory adhesin Hra2 are members of a family of integral outer membrane proteins that confer different colonization-associated phenotypes. PMID:21764925

  8. Glycosaminoglycan binding by Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin BBK32 specifically and uniquely promotes joint colonization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Chen, Qiang; Ritchie, Jennifer A.; Dufour, Nicholas P.; Fischer, Joshua R.; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Microbial pathogens that colonize multiple tissues commonly produce adhesive surface proteins that mediate attachment to cells and/or extracellular matrix in target organs. Many of these ‘adhesins’ bind to multiple ligands, complicating efforts to understand the role of each ligand-binding activity. Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, produces BBK32, first identified as a fibronectin-binding adhesin that promotes skin and joint colonization. BBK32 also binds to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), which, like fibronectin is ubiquitously present on cell surfaces. To determine which binding activity is relevant for BBK32-promoted infectivity, we generated a panel of BBK32 truncation and internal deletion mutants, and identified variants specifically defective for binding to either fibronectin or GAG. These variants promoted bacterial attachment to different mammalian cell types in vitro, suggesting that fibronectin and GAG binding may play distinct roles during infection. Intravenous inoculation of mice with a high-passage non-infectious B. burgdorferi strain that produced wild type BBK32 or BBK32 mutants defective for GAG or fibronectin binding, revealed that only GAG-binding activity was required for significant localization to joints at 60 minutes post-infection. An otherwise infectious B. burgdorferi strain producing BBK32 specifically deficient in fibronectin binding was fully capable of both skin and joint colonization in the murine model, whereas a strain producing BBK32 selectively attenuated for GAG binding colonized the inoculation site but not knee or tibiotarsus joints. Thus, the BBK32 fibronectin- and GAG-binding activities are separable in vivo, and BBK32-mediated GAG binding, but not fibronectin binding, contributes to joint colonization. PMID:25486989

  9. MHJ_0125 is an M42 glutamyl aminopeptidase that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark W.; Buchtmann, Kyle A.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; To, Joyce; Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; Woolley, Lauren K.; Labbate, Maurizio; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial aminopeptidases play important roles in pathogenesis by providing a source of amino acids from exogenous proteins, destroying host immunological effector peptides and executing posttranslational modification of bacterial and host proteins. We show that MHJ_0125 from the swine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae represents a new member of the M42 class of bacterial aminopeptidases. Despite lacking a recognizable signal sequence, MHJ_0125 is detectable on the cell surface by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS/MS of (i) biotinylated surface proteins captured by avidin chromatography and (ii) peptides released by mild trypsin shaving. Furthermore, surface-associated glutamyl aminopeptidase activity was detected by incubation of live M. hyopneumoniae cells with the diagnostic substrate H-Glu-AMC. MHJ_0125 moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin, binding to both heparin and plasminogen. Native proteomics and comparative modelling studies suggest MHJ_0125 forms a dodecameric, homopolymeric structure and provide insight into the positions of key residues that are predicted to interact with heparin and plasminogen. MHJ_0125 is the first aminopeptidase shown to both bind plasminogen and facilitate its activation by tissue plasminogen activator. Plasmin cleaves host extracellular matrix proteins and activates matrix metalloproteases, generating peptide substrates for MHJ_0125 and a source of amino acids for growth of M. hyopneumoniae. This unique interaction represents a new paradigm in microbial pathogenesis. PMID:23594879

  10. Analysis of the Mycoplasma genitalium MgpB Adhesin to Predict Membrane Topology, Investigate Antibody Accessibility, Characterize Amino Acid Diversity, and Identify Functional and Immunogenic Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted pathogen and is associated with reproductive tract disease that can be chronic in nature despite the induction of a strong antibody response. Persistent infection exacerbates the likelihood of transmission, increases the risk of ascension to the upper tract, and suggests that M. genitalium may possess immune evasion mechanism(s). Antibodies from infected patients predominantly target the MgpB adhesin, which is encoded by a gene that recombines with homologous donor sequences, thereby generating sequence variation within and among strains. We have previously characterized mgpB heterogeneity over the course of persistent infection and have correlated the induction of variant-specific antibodies with the loss of that particular variant from the infected host. In the current study, we examined the membrane topology, antibody accessibility, distribution of amino acid diversity, and the location of functional and antigenic epitopes within the MgpB adhesin. Our results indicate that MgpB contains a single transmembrane domain, that the majority of the protein is surface exposed and antibody accessible, and that the attachment domain is located within the extracellular C-terminus. Not unexpectedly, amino acid diversity was concentrated within and around the three previously defined variable regions (B, EF, and G) of MgpB; while nonsynonymous mutations were twice as frequent as synonymous mutations in regions B and G, region EF had equal numbers of nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations. Interestingly, antibodies produced during persistent infection reacted predominantly with the conserved C-terminus and variable region B. In contrast, infection-induced antibodies reacted poorly with the N-terminus, variable regions EF and G, and intervening conserved regions despite the presence of predicted B cell epitopes. Overall, this study provides an important foundation to define how different segments of the MgpB adhesin contribute to

  11. Sulfated glycoconjugate receptors for the Bordetella pertussis adhesin filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and mapping of the heparin-binding domain on FHA.

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, J H; Menozzi, F D; Renauld, G; Locht, C; Brennan, M J

    1994-01-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a major adhesin present on the surface of the gram-negative respiratory pathogen Bordetella pertussis. A number of binding mechanisms have been described for the interaction of FHA with eukaryotic cells. We have focused on its function as a sulfated polysaccharide-binding protein and on identifying potential receptors for FHA on the epithelial cell surface. Using a thin-layer overlay technique, we found that FHA binds specifically to sulfated glycolipids but not to gangliosides or other neutral glycolipids. These results suggest that epithelial cell surface sulfated glycolipids function as receptors for FHA. Further studies demonstrated that a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell strain deficient in glycosaminoglycan expression exhibits greatly diminished attachment to FHA. By FHA-Affi-Gel chromatography, a putative receptor for FHA that has characteristics consistent with a heparan sulfate proteoglycan was isolated from epithelial cell extracts. In addition, by using recombinant FHA fusion proteins, a specific glycosaminoglycan-binding domain located near the N terminus of the FHA molecule was identified. Our results indicate that the B. pertussis adhesin FHA may utilize sulfated glycolipids and proteoglycans commonly found on the surface of human cells and tissues to initiate infection. Images PMID:7927782

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and its SpaC pilus adhesin modulate inflammatory responsiveness and TLR-related gene expression in the fetal human gut

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Kriston; Collado, Maria Carmen; Rautava, Jaana; Lu, Lei; Satokari, Reetta; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; de Vos, Willem M.; Palva, Airi; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo; Walker, W. Allan; Rautava, Samuli

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial contact in utero modulates fetal and neonatal immune responses. Maternal probiotic supplementation reduces the risk of immune-mediated disease in the infant. We investigated the immunomodulatory properties of live Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and its SpaC pilus adhesin in human fetal intestinal models. Methods TNF-α mRNA expression was measured by qPCR in a human fetal intestinal organ culture model exposed to live L. rhamnosus GG and proinflammatory stimuli. Binding of recombinant SpaC pilus protein to intestinal epithelial cells was assessed in human fetal intestinal organ culture and the human fetal intestinal epithelial cell line H4 by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, respectively. TLR-related gene expression in fetal ileal organ culture after exposure to recombinant SpaC was assessed by qPCR. Results Live L. rhamnosus GG significantly attenuates pathogen-induced TNF-α mRNA expression in the human fetal gut. Recombinant SpaC protein was found to adhere to the fetal gut and to modulate varying levels of TLR-related gene expression. Conclusion The human fetal gut is responsive to luminal microbes. L. rhamnosus GG significantly attenuates fetal intestinal inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria. The L. rhamnosus GG pilus adhesin SpaC binds to immature human intestinal epithelial cells and directly modulates intestinal epithelial cell innate immune gene expression. PMID:25580735

  13. P1-Marx Modulator for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A first generation prototype, P1, Marx-topology klystron modulator has been developed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. It is envisioned as a lower cost, smaller footprint, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, baseline design. The application requires 120 kV (+/-0.5%), 140 A, 1.6 ms pulses at a rate of 5 Hz. The Marx constructs the high voltage pulse by combining, in series, a number of lower voltage cells. The Marx employs solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. Active compensation of the output is used to achieve the voltage regulation while minimizing the stored energy. The P1-Marx has been integrated into a test stand with a 10 MW L-band klystron, where each is undergoing life testing. A review of the P1-Marx design and its operational history in the L-band test stand are presented.

  14. The Soluble Recombinant Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin NadAΔ351–405 Stimulates Human Monocytes by Binding to Extracellular Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Paola; Tavano, Regina; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia; Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Montanari, Paolo; Papini, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    The adhesin NadA favors cell adhesion/invasion by hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis B (MenB). Its recombinant form NadAΔ351–405, devoid of the outer membrane domain, is an immunogenic candidate for an anti-MenB vaccine able to stimulate monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism of NadAΔ351–405 cellular effects in monocytes. We show that NadAΔ351–405 (against which we obtained polyclonal antibodies in rabbits), binds to hsp90, but not to other extracellular homologous heat shock proteins grp94 and hsp70, in vitro and on the surface of monocytes, in a temperature dependent way. Pre-incubation of monocytes with the MenB soluble adhesin interfered with the binding of anti-hsp90 and anti-hsp70 antibodies to hsp90 and hsp70 at 37°C, a condition in which specific cell-binding occurs, but not at 0°C, a condition in which specific cell-binding is very diminished. Conversely, pre-incubation of monocytes with anti-hsp90 and anti-hsp70 antibodies did not affected NadAΔ351–405 cell binding in any temperature condition, indicating that it associates to another receptor on their plasma membrane and then laterally diffuses to encounter hsp90. Consistently, polymixin B interfered with NadAΔ351–405 /hsp90 association, abrogated the decrease of anti-hsp90 antibodies binding to the cell surface due to NadAΔ351–405 and inhibited adhesin-induced cytokine/chemokine secretion without affecting monocyte-adhesin binding. Co-stimulation of monocytes with anti-hsp90 antibodies and NadAΔ351–405 determined a stronger but polymixin B insensitive cell activation. This indicated that the formation of a recombinant NadA/hsp90/hsp70 complex, although essential for full monocyte stimulation, can be replaced by anti-hsp90 antibody/hsp90 binding. Finally, the activation of monocytes by NadAΔ351–405 alone or in the presence of anti-hsp90 antibodies were both inhibited by neutralizing anti-TLR4 antibodies, but not by

  15. The soluble recombinant Neisseria meningitidis adhesin NadA(Δ351-405) stimulates human monocytes by binding to extracellular Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Paola; Tavano, Regina; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia; Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Montanari, Paolo; Papini, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    The adhesin NadA favors cell adhesion/invasion by hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis B (MenB). Its recombinant form NadA(Δ351-405,) devoid of the outer membrane domain, is an immunogenic candidate for an anti-MenB vaccine able to stimulate monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism of NadA(Δ351-405) cellular effects in monocytes. We show that NadA(Δ351-405) (against which we obtained polyclonal antibodies in rabbits), binds to hsp90, but not to other extracellular homologous heat shock proteins grp94 and hsp70, in vitro and on the surface of monocytes, in a temperature dependent way. Pre-incubation of monocytes with the MenB soluble adhesin interfered with the binding of anti-hsp90 and anti-hsp70 antibodies to hsp90 and hsp70 at 37°C, a condition in which specific cell-binding occurs, but not at 0°C, a condition in which specific cell-binding is very diminished. Conversely, pre-incubation of monocytes with anti-hsp90 and anti-hsp70 antibodies did not affected NadA(Δ351-405) cell binding in any temperature condition, indicating that it associates to another receptor on their plasma membrane and then laterally diffuses to encounter hsp90. Consistently, polymixin B interfered with NadA(Δ351-405) /hsp90 association, abrogated the decrease of anti-hsp90 antibodies binding to the cell surface due to NadA(Δ351-405) and inhibited adhesin-induced cytokine/chemokine secretion without affecting monocyte-adhesin binding. Co-stimulation of monocytes with anti-hsp90 antibodies and NadA(Δ351-405) determined a stronger but polymixin B insensitive cell activation. This indicated that the formation of a recombinant NadA/hsp90/hsp70 complex, although essential for full monocyte stimulation, can be replaced by anti-hsp90 antibody/hsp90 binding. Finally, the activation of monocytes by NadA(Δ351-405) alone or in the presence of anti-hsp90 antibodies were both inhibited by neutralizing anti-TLR4 antibodies, but not by

  16. Identification of factors in human urine that inhibit the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins.

    PubMed Central

    Parkkinen, J; Virkola, R; Korhonen, T K

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies on the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins to the human urinary tract have indicated that the ability to recognize binding sites on the urinary tract epithelial cells is not a characteristic for P fimbriae only, but is also shared by some other adhesins that are not associated with pyelonephritis, especially S fimbriae. In the present study we have investigated whether human urine contains inhibitors of the binding of E. coli adhesins. Normal human urine was found to inhibit hemagglutination by S and type 1 fimbriae but not P fimbriae. The major inhibitor of S fimbriae in normal urine was identified as Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and the interaction with S fimbriae is probably mediated by its sialyloligosaccharide chains. No significant variation was observed in the inhibitory effect of T-H glycoprotein preparations originating from different individuals. In contrast to S fimbriae, the major inhibitors of type 1 fimbriae in urine were identified as low-molecular-weight compounds. Gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography and alpha-mannosidase treatment indicated that they were neutral alpha-mannosides, probably manno-oligosaccharides with three to five saccharides. Studies of urine samples collected from several individuals indicated the common occurrence of these inhibitory alpha-mannosides. Type 1 fimbriae bound to immobilized T-H glycoprotein, but, unlike S fimbriae, their binding was poorly inhibited by soluble T-H glycoprotein. Some urine samples were also found to contain low-molecular-weight inhibitors for the O75X adhesin of E. coli. These results emphasize that to function as a virulence factor in human urinary tract infections, an adhesin must evidently recognize such receptor structures at the infection sites that are not excreted in soluble form in urine. This prerequisite is filled by P fimbriae but not by type 1 or S fimbriae. PMID:2901405

  17. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  18. An Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter adhesin reaped from cells exhibits its nonspecific stickiness via a highly stable 3D structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Shogo; Nakatani, Hajime; Iwasaki, Keita; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs), cell surface proteins of Gram-negative bacteria, mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific, high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. AtaA is a homotrimer of polypeptides comprising 3,630 amino acids and forms long nanofibers; therefore, it is too large and structurally complex to be produced as a recombinant protein. In this study, we isolated AtaA’s passenger domain (AtaA PSD), which is translocated to the cell surface through the C-terminal transmembrane domain and exhibits biological functions, using a new method. We introduced a protease recognition site and reaped AtaA nanofibers 225 nm in length from the cell surface through proteolytic cleavage with a specific protease. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of the purified native AtaA PSD revealed that it has a stable structure under alkaline and acidic conditions. Temperatures above 80 °C, which disrupted AtaA’s higher-order structure but maintained the full-length AtaA polypeptide, inactivated AtaA’s nonspecific adhesiveness, suggesting that the stickiness of AtaA requires its 3D structure. This finding refutes the widespread but vague speculation that large unfolded polypeptides readily stick to various surfaces. PMID:27305955

  19. Characterization of the enterovirus 71 P1 polyprotein expressed in Pichia pastor as a candidate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Ying, Xiao-ling; Zhou, Shi-li; Han, Tao; Huang, Hao; Jin, Qi; Yang, Fan; Sun, Qi-ying; Sun, Xian-xun

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) plays an important role in hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which recently caused the death of hundreds of children in the Asia-Pacific region. However, there are no specific treatments available for EV71 infections; thus, a safe and effective vaccine is needed urgently. In this study, we developed an effective and economical method for producing EV71 polyprotein (P1 protein) in Pichia pastoris. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential of P1 protein as a candidate vaccine against EV71 virus. The data revealed that P1 protein induced persistent high cross-neutralization antibodies for different EV71 subtypes, and elicited significant splenocyte proliferation. The high levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) showed that P1 protein induced Th1 and Th2 immune responses. Interestingly, vaccinating female mice with the P1 protein conferred cross-protection against different EV71 subtypes to their neonatal offspring.Compared with heat-inactivated EV71, the P1 protein elicited improved humoral and cellular immune responses and showed good cross-protection with different EV71 subtypes. Therefore, the EV71-P1 protein produced by P. pastoris is a promising candidate vaccine against EV71.

  20. Characterization of the enterovirus 71 P1 polyprotein expressed in Pichia pastor as a candidate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue; Ying, Xiao-ling; Zhou, Shi-li; Han, Tao; Huang, Hao; Jin, Qi; Yang, Fan; Sun, Qi-ying; Sun, Xian-xun

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) plays an important role in hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which recently caused the death of hundreds of children in the Asia-Pacific region. However, there are no specific treatments available for EV71 infections; thus, a safe and effective vaccine is needed urgently. In this study, we developed an effective and economical method for producing EV71 polyprotein (P1 protein) in Pichia pastoris. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential of P1 protein as a candidate vaccine against EV71 virus. The data revealed that P1 protein induced persistent high cross-neutralization antibodies for different EV71 subtypes, and elicited significant splenocyte proliferation. The high levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) showed that P1 protein induced Th1 and Th2 immune responses. Interestingly, vaccinating female mice with the P1 protein conferred cross-protection against different EV71 subtypes to their neonatal offspring.Compared with heat-inactivated EV71, the P1 protein elicited improved humoral and cellular immune responses and showed good cross-protection with different EV71 subtypes. Therefore, the EV71-P1 protein produced by P. pastoris is a promising candidate vaccine against EV71. PMID:25424925

  1. The HMW1 and HMW2 Adhesins Enhance the Ability of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae To Colonize the Upper Respiratory Tract of Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Katherine A; Porsch, Eric A; Wilson, Jolaine M; St Geme, Joseph W

    2016-10-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) initiates infection by colonizing the upper respiratory tract and is a common cause of localized respiratory tract disease. Previous work has established that the NTHi HMW1 and HMW2 proteins are potent adhesins that mediate efficient in vitro adherence to cultured human respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we used a rhesus macaque model to assess the contributions of HMW1 and HMW2 to in vivo colonization. In experiments involving inoculation of individual isogenic derivatives of NTHi strain 12, the parent strain expressing both HMW1 and HMW2 and the mutant strains expressing either HMW1 or HMW2 were able to colonize more frequently than the double mutant strain lacking HMW1 and HMW2. In competition experiments, the parent strain efficiently outcompeted the double mutant lacking HMW1 and HMW2. Colonization with strains expressing HMW2 resulted in development of antibody against HMW2 in a number of the animals, demonstrating that colonization can stimulate an antibody response. In conclusion, we have established that the HMW1 and HMW2 adhesins play a major role in facilitating colonization of the upper respiratory tract of rhesus macaques, in some cases associated with stimulation of an immune response.

  2. Infection of human mucosal tissue by Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires sequential and mutually dependent virulence factors and a novel pilus-associated adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Heiniger, Ryan W.; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Koomey, Michael; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tissue damage predisposes humans to life-threatening disseminating infection by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial adherence to host tissue is a critical first step in this infection process. It is well established that P. aeruginosa attachment to host cells involves type IV pili (TFP), which are retractile surface fibers. The molecular details of attachment and the identity of the bacterial adhesin and host receptor remain controversial. Using a mucosal epithelium model system derived from primary human tissue, we show that the pilus-associated protein PilY1 is required for bacterial adherence. We establish that P. aeruginosa preferentially binds to exposed basolateral host cell surfaces, providing a mechanistic explanation for opportunistic infection of damaged tissue. Further, we demonstrate that invasion and fulminant infection of intact host tissue requires the coordinated and mutually dependent action of multiple bacterial factors, including pilus fiber retraction and the host cell intoxication system, termed type III secretion. Our findings offer new and important insights into the complex interactions between a pathogen and its human host and provide compelling evidence that PilY1 serves as the principal P. aeruginosa adhesin for human tissue and that it specifically recognizes a host receptor localized or enriched on basolateral epithelial cell surfaces. PMID:20331639

  3. Expression of the meningococcal adhesin NadA is controlled by a transcriptional regulator of the MarR family.

    PubMed

    Schielke, Stephanie; Huebner, Claudia; Spatz, Carolin; Nägele, Virginie; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Frosch, Matthias; Kurzai, Oliver; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra

    2009-05-01

    Two closely related pathogenic species have evolved in the genus Neisseria: N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae, which occupy different host niches and cause different clinical entities. In contrast to the pathogen N. gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis is a commensal and only rarely becomes invasive. Little is known about the genetic background of the entirely different lifestyles in these closely related species. Meningococcal NMB1843 encodes a transcriptional regulator of the MarR family. The gonococcal homologue FarR regulates expression of farAB, mediating fatty acid resistance. We show that NmFarR also directly interacts with NmfarAB. Yet, by contrast to N. gonorrhoeae, no significant sensitivity to fatty acids was observed in a DeltafarR mutant due to intrinsic resistance of meningococci. Further analyses identified an NmFarR-repressed protein absent from N. gonorrhoeae. This protein is the meningococcus-specific adhesin and vaccine component NadA that has most likely been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. NmFarR binds to a 16 base pair palindromic repeat within the nadA promoter. De-repression of nadA resulted in significantly higher association of a DeltafarR strain with epithelial cells. Hence NmFarR has gained control over a meningococcus-specific gene involved in host colonization and thus contributed to divergent niche adaptation in pathogenic Neisseriae.

  4. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion–fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways. PMID:26019234

  5. Vaccination with a recombinant fragment of collagen adhesin provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus-mediated septic death.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, I M; Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Höök, M; Tarkowski, A

    1998-06-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Morbidity and mortality due to infections such as sepsis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and invasive endocarditis remain high despite the use of antibiotics. The emergence of antibiotic resistant super bugs mandates that alternative strategies for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus infections are developed. We investigated the ability of vaccination with a recombinant fragment of the S. aureus collagen adhesin to protect mice against sepsis-induced death. Actively immunized NMRI mice were intravenously inoculated with the S. aureus clinical isolate strain Phillips. 14 d after inoculation, mortality in the collagen adhesin-vaccinated group was only 13%, compared with 87% in the control antigen immunized group (P < 0.001). To determine if the protective effect was antibody mediated, we passively immunized naive mice with collagen adhesin-specific antibodies. Similar to the active immunization strategy, passive transfer of collagen adhesin-specific antibodies protected mice against sepsis-induced death. In vitro experiments indicated that S. aureus opsonized with sera from collagen adhesin immunized mice promoted phagocytic uptake and enhanced intracellular killing compared with bacteria opsonized with sera from control animals. These results indicate that the collagen adhesin is a viable target in the development of immunotherapeutics against S. aureus.

  6. Genomic and Proteomic Analyses of the Terminally Redundant Genome of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PaP1: Establishment of Genus PaP1-Like Phages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Zhu, Junmin; Li, Ming; Rao, Xiancai; Zou, Lingyun; Li, Shu; Wang, Jing; Jin, Xiaolin; Huang, Guangtao; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Xia; Hu, Fuquan

    2013-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa myovirus named PaP1. The morphology of this phage was visualized by electron microscopy and its genome sequence and ends were determined. Finally, genomic and proteomic analyses were performed. PaP1 has an icosahedral head with an apex diameter of 68–70 nm and a contractile tail with a length of 138–140 nm. The PaP1 genome is a linear dsDNA molecule containing 91,715 base pairs (bp) with a G+C content of 49.36% and 12 tRNA genes. A strategy to identify the genome ends of PaP1 was designed. The genome has a 1190 bp terminal redundancy. PaP1 has 157 open reading frames (ORFs). Of these, 143 proteins are homologs of known proteins, but only 38 could be functionally identified. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed identification of 12 ORFs as structural protein coding genes within the PaP1 genome. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1, JG004, PAK_P1 and vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab1 share great similarity. Besides their similar biological characteristics, the phages contain 123 core genes and have very close phylogenetic relationships, which distinguish them from other known phage genera. We therefore propose that these four phages be classified as PaP1-like phages, a new phage genus of Myoviridae that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:23675441

  7. Antibodies derived from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesin tip MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) against adherence of nine ETEC adhesins: CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Ruan, Xiaosai; Duan, Qiangde; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-06-30

    Diarrhea continues to be a leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years in developing countries. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading bacterial cause of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. ETEC bacteria initiate diarrheal disease by attaching to host receptors at epithelial cells and colonizing in small intestine. Therefore, preventing ETEC attachment has been considered the first line of defense against ETEC diarrhea. However, developing vaccines effectively against ETEC bacterial attachment encounters challenge because ETEC strains produce over 23 immunologically heterogeneous adhesins. In this study, we applied MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) approach to integrate epitopes from adhesin tips or adhesive subunits of CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA adhesins and to construct an adhesin tip MEFA peptide. We then examined immunogenicity of this tip MEFA in mouse immunization, and assessed potential application of this tip MEFA for ETEC vaccine development. Data showed that mice intraperitoneally immunized with this adhesin tip MEFA developed IgG antibody responses to all nine ETEC adhesins. Moreover, ETEC and E. coli bacteria expressing these nine adhesins, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, exhibited significant reduction in attachment to Caco-2 cells. These results indicated that anti-adhesin antibodies induced by this adhesin tip MEFA blocked adherence of the most important ETEC adhesins, suggesting this multivalent tip MEFA may be useful for developing a broadly protective anti-adhesin vaccine against ETEC diarrhea. PMID:27228947

  8. Structural Basis for Sialoglycan Binding by the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA Adhesin.

    PubMed

    Bensing, Barbara A; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; McCulloch, Kathryn M; Yu, Hai; Vann, Kendra R; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Anderson, Spencer; Chen, Xi; Sullam, Paul M; Iverson, T M

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguinisis a leading cause of infective endocarditis, a life-threatening infection of the cardiovascular system. An important interaction in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is attachment of the organisms to host platelets.S. sanguinisexpresses a serine-rich repeat adhesin, SrpA, similar in sequence to platelet-binding adhesins associated with increased virulence in this disease. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the putative binding region of SrpA (SrpABR) both unliganded and in complex with a synthetic disaccharide ligand at 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. We identified a conserved Thr-Arg motif that orients the sialic acid moiety and is required for binding to platelet monolayers. Furthermore, we propose that sequence insertions in closely related family members contribute to the modulation of structural and functional properties, including the quaternary structure, the tertiary structure, and the ligand-binding site.

  9. Programming Controlled Adhesion of E. coli to Target Surfaces, Cells, and Tumors with Synthetic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report synthetic adhesins (SAs) enabling the rational design of the adhesion properties of E. coli. SAs have a modular structure comprising a stable β-domain for outer membrane anchoring and surface-exposed immunoglobulin domains with high affinity and specificity that can be selected from large repertoires. SAs are constitutively and stably expressed in an E. coli strain lacking a conserved set of natural adhesins, directing a robust, fast, and specific adhesion of bacteria to target antigenic surfaces and cells. We demonstrate the functionality of SAs in vivo, showing that, compared to wild type E. coli, lower doses of engineered E. coli are sufficient to colonize solid tumors expressing an antigen recognized by the SA. In addition, lower levels of engineered bacteria were found in non-target tissues. Therefore, SAs provide stable and specific adhesion capabilities to E. coli against target surfaces of interest for diverse applications using live bacteria. PMID:25045780

  10. Bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period gratings for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report an application of the optical fiber long-period gratings (LPGs) working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition. We show that when the LPG is functionalized with the bacteriophage adhesin, it is capable of very specific LPS detection. Thus, we compare label-free binding effect for specific to the adhesin LPS-positive and non-specific LPS-negative. The resonance wavelength shift induced by the LPS-positive reaches 2.9 nm, while for LPS-negative the shift is negligible. The LPG-based sensing structure allows for monitoring of the binding phenomenon in real time and with good accuracy.

  11. Comparison of adhesin genes and antimicrobial susceptibilities between uropathogenic and intestinal commensal Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaohua; Hu, Fupin; Wu, Shi; Ye, Xinyu; Zhu, Demei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Minggui

    2013-01-01

    The presence of adhesins is arguably an important determinant of pathogenicity for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested by agar dilution method, fifteen adhesin genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was analyzed in 70 UPEC isolates and 41 commensal E. coli strains. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) was determined with confirmatory test. The prevalence of ESBL-producers in UPEC (53%, 37/70) was higher than the commensal intestinal isolates (7%, 3/41), and 97% (36/37) of the ESBL-producing UPEC harbored bla CTX-M genes. afa was present in 36% (10/28) UPEC isolates from recurrent lower urinary tract infection (UTI), and none in the acute pyelonephritis, acute uncomplicated cystitis or commensal strains (P<0.0001). papG was detected in 28% (20/70) of UPEC isolates, while 5% (2/41) of the commensal strains were papG positive (P = 0.0025), and the prevalence of papG was significantly higher in acute pyelonephritis group (71%) than the other two UTI groups (P<0.0001). The prevalence of flu, yqi, yadN and ygiL was significantly higher in UPEC isolates than in the commensal strains. ESBL-producing UPEC showed a lower prevalence of adhesin genes compared with non-ESBL-producing strains. The MLST profiles were different between UPEC and commensal strains, with ST131 (19%, 13/70) and ST10 (20%, 8/41) being the most common MLSTs, respectively. This study demonstrated that several adhesin genes were more prevalent in UPEC isolates than in commensal E. coli, and afa may be associated with recurrent lower UTI whereas papG is more frequently associated with acute pyelonephritis.

  12. Micrococcin P1 - A bactericidal thiopeptide active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Degiacomi, Giulia; Personne, Yoann; Mondésert, Guillaume; Ge, Xueliang; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Boldrin, Francesca; Goel, Pavitra; Peisker, Kristin; Benjak, Andrej; Barrio, Maria Belén; Ventura, Marcello; Brown, Amanda C; Leblanc, Véronique; Bauer, Armin; Sanyal, Suparna; Cole, Stewart T; Lagrange, Sophie; Parish, Tanya; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    The lack of proper treatment for serious infectious diseases due to the emergence of multidrug resistance reinforces the need for the discovery of novel antibiotics. This is particularly true for tuberculosis (TB) for which 3.7% of new cases and 20% of previously treated cases are estimated to be caused by multi-drug resistant strains. In addition, in the case of TB, which claimed 1.5 million lives in 2014, the treatment of the least complicated, drug sensitive cases is lengthy and disagreeable. Therefore, new drugs with novel targets are urgently needed to control resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In this manuscript we report the characterization of the thiopeptide micrococcin P1 as an anti-tubercular agent. Our biochemical experiments show that this antibiotic inhibits the elongation step of protein synthesis in mycobacteria. We have further identified micrococcin resistant mutations in the ribosomal protein L11 (RplK); the mutations were located in the proline loop at the N-terminus. Reintroduction of the mutations into a clean genetic background, confirmed that they conferred resistance, while introduction of the wild type RplK allele into resistant strains re-established sensitivity. We also identified a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. These data, in good agreement with previous structural studies suggest that also in M. tuberculosis micrococcin P1 functions by binding to the cleft between the 23S rRNA and the L11 protein loop, thus interfering with the binding of elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G) and inhibiting protein translocation. PMID:27553416

  13. Adhesin contribution to nanomechanical properties of the virulent Bordetella pertussis envelope.

    PubMed

    Arnal, L; Serra, D O; Cattelan, N; Castez, M F; Vázquez, L; Salvarezza, R C; Yantorno, O M; Vela, M E

    2012-05-15

    Adherence to a biological surface allows bacteria to colonize and persist within the host and represents an essential first step in the pathogenesis of most bacterial diseases. Consequently, the physicochemical properties of the outer membrane in bacteria play a key role for attachment to surfaces and therefore for biofilm formation. Bordetella pertussis is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the respiratory tract of humans, producing whooping cough or pertussis, a highly infectious disease. B. pertussis uses various adhesins exposed on its surface to promote cell-surface and cell-cell interactions. The most dominant adhesin function is displayed by filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA). B. pertussis Tohama I wild-type (Vir+) strain and two defective mutants, an avirulent (Vir-) and a FHA-deficient (FHA-) B. pertussis strains were studied by AFM under physiological conditions to evaluate how the presence or absence of adhesins affects the mechanical properties of the B. pertussis cell surface. Quantitative information on the nanomechanical properties of the bacterial envelope was obtained by AFM force-volume analysis. These studies suggested that the presence of virulence factors is correlated with an increase in the average membrane rigidity, which is largely influenced by the presence of FHA. Moreover, for this system we built a nanoscale stiffness map that reveals an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of Young modulus as well as the presence of rigid nanodomains on the cell surface.

  14. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X.; Anderson, G.

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  15. Characterization and Functional Analysis of AatB, a Novel Autotransporter Adhesin and Virulence Factor of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    ZhuGe, Xiangkai; Wang, Shaohui; Fan, Hongjie; Pan, Zihao; Ren, Jianluan; Yi, Li; Meng, Qingmei; Yang, Xuqiu; Lu, Chengping

    2013-01-01

    Autotransporter (AT) proteins constitute a large family of extracellular proteins that contribute to bacterial virulence. A novel AT adhesin gene, aatB, was identified in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) DE205B via genomic analyses. The open reading frame of aatB was 1,017 bp, encoding a putative 36.3-kDa protein which contained structural motifs characteristic for AT proteins: a signal peptide, a passenger domain, and a translocator domain. The predicted three-dimensional structure of AatB consisted of two distinct domains, the C-terminal β-barrel translocator domain and an N-terminal passenger domain. The prevalence analyses of aatB in APEC indicated that aatB was detected in 26.4% (72/273) of APEC strains and was strongly associated with phylogenetic groups D and B2. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that AatB expression was increased during infection in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, AatB could elicit antibodies in infected ducks, suggesting that AatB is involved in APEC pathogenicity. Thus, APEC DE205B strains with a mutated aatB gene and mutated strains complemented with the aatB gene were constructed. Inactivation of aatB resulted in a reduced capacity to adhere to DF-1 cells, defective virulence capacity in vivo, and decreased colonization capacity in lung during systemic infection compared with the capacities of the wild-type strain. Furthermore, these capacities were restored in the complementation strains. These results indicated that AatB makes a significant contribution to APEC virulence through bacterial adherence to host tissues in vivo and in vitro. In addition, biofilm formation assays with strain AAEC189 expressing AatB indicated that AatB mediates biofilm formation. PMID:23630958

  16. The ShdA adhesin binds to the cationic cradle of the fibronectin 13FnIII repeat module: evidence for molecular mimicry of heparin binding.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Robert A; Keestra, A Marijke; de Zoete, Marcel R; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2004-04-01

    Introduction of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium into food products results from its ability to persist in the intestine of healthy livestock by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The non-fimbrial adhesin ShdA is a fibronectin binding protein required for persistent intestinal carriage of S. Typhimurium. We further investigated the molecular mechanism of ShdA-mediated intestinal persistence by determining the binding-site of this receptor in fibronectin. Analysis of ShdA binding to fibronectin proteolytic fragments and to recombinant fibronectin fusion proteins identified the (13)FnIII repeat module of the Hep-2 domain as the primary binding site for this adhesin. The (13)FnIII repeat module of fibronectin contains a cationic cradle formed by six basic residues (R6, R7, R9, R23, K25 and R54) that is a high affinity heparin-binding site conserved among fibronectin sequences from frogs to man. Binding of ShdA to the (13)FnIII repeat module of fibronectin and to a second extracellular matrix protein, Collagen I, could be inhibited by heparin. Furthermore, binding of ShdA to the Hep-2 domain was sensitive to the ionic buffer strength, suggesting that binding involved ionic interactions. We therefore determined whether amino acid substitutions of basic residues in the cationic cradle of the Hep-2 domain that inhibit heparin binding also abrogate binding of ShdA. Combined substitution of R6S and R7S strongly reduced ShdA binding to (13)FnIII. These data suggest that ShdA binds the Hep-2 domain of fibronectin by a mechanism that may mimic binding of the host polysaccharide heparin. PMID:15066025

  17. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A; Haase, Elaine M; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  18. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A.; Haase, Elaine M.; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  19. Crystal Structure of FadA Adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum Reveals a Novel Oligomerization Motif, the Leucine Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Yamada, Mitsunori; Ikegami, Akihiko; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2009-04-07

    Many bacterial appendages have filamentous structures, often composed of repeating monomers assembled in a head-to-tail manner. The mechanisms of such linkages vary. We report here a novel protein oligomerization motif identified in the FadA adhesin from the Gram-negative bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the secreted form of FadA (mFadA) reveals two antiparallel {alpha}-helices connected by an intervening 8-residue hairpin loop. Leucine-leucine contacts play a prominent dual intra- and intermolecular role in the structure and function of FadA. First, they comprise the main association between the two helical arms of the monomer; second, they mediate the head-to-tail association of monomers to form the elongated polymers. This leucine-mediated filamentous assembly of FadA molecules constitutes a novel structural motif termed the 'leucine chain.' The essential role of these residues in FadA is corroborated by mutagenesis of selected leucine residues, which leads to the abrogation of oligomerization, filament formation, and binding to host cells.

  20. Immune responses elicited in mice with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing F4 fimbrial adhesin FaeG by oral immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei; Wang, Yicheng

    2010-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major pathogenic agent causing piglet diarrhea. The major subunit and adhesin FaeG of F4(+) ETEC is an important virulence factor with strong immunogenicity. To determine whether Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) could effectively deliver FaeG to the mucosal immune system, recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG was constructed, and immune responses in mice following oral route delivery of recombinant L. lactis were explored. The production of FaeG expressed in L. lactis was up to approximately 10% of soluble whole-cell proteins, and recombinant FaeG (rFaeG) possessed good immunoreactivity by Western blot analysis. Oral immunization with recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG induced F4-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in the mice. In addition, high dose recombinant L. lactis or co-administration of high dose recombinant L. lactis with CTB enhanced the immune responses. These results suggested that L. lactis expressing FaeG was a promising candidate vaccine against ETEC. PMID:20532816

  1. Onion yellow phytoplasma P38 protein plays a role in adhesion to the hosts.

    PubMed

    Neriya, Yutaro; Maejima, Kensaku; Nijo, Takamichi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Yusa, Akira; Himeno, Misako; Netsu, Osamu; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2014-12-01

    Adhesins are microbial surface proteins that mediate the adherence of microbial pathogens to host cell surfaces. In Mollicutes, several adhesins have been reported in mycoplasmas and spiroplasmas. Adhesins P40 of Mycoplasma agalactiae and P89 of Spiroplasma citri contain a conserved amino acid sequence known as the Mollicutes adhesin motif (MAM), whose function in the host cell adhesion remains unclear. Here, we show that phytoplasmas, which are plant-pathogenic mollicutes transmitted by insect vectors, possess an adhesion-containing MAM that was identified in a putative membrane protein, PAM289 (P38), of the 'Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris,' OY strain. P38 homologs and their MAMs were highly conserved in related phytoplasma strains. While P38 protein was expressed in OY-infected insect and plant hosts, binding assays showed that P38 interacts with insect extract, and weakly with plant extract. Interestingly, the interaction of P38 with the insect extract depended on MAM. These results suggest that P38 is a phytoplasma adhesin that interacts with the hosts. In addition, the MAM of adhesins is important for the interaction between P38 protein and hosts.

  2. BibA: a novel immunogenic bacterial adhesin contributing to group B Streptococcus survival in human blood.

    PubMed

    Santi, Isabella; Scarselli, Maria; Mariani, Massimo; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Masignani, Vega; Taddei, Annarita; Grandi, Guido; Telford, John L; Soriani, Marco

    2007-02-01

    By the analysis of the recently sequenced genomes of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) we have identified a novel immunogenic adhesin with anti-phagocytic activity, named BibA. The bibA gene is present in 100% of the 24 GBS strains analysed. BibA-specific IgG were found in human sera from normal healthy donors. The putative protein product is a polypeptide of 630 amino acids containing a helix-rich N-terminal domain, a proline-rich region and a canonical LPXTG cell wall-anchoring domain. BibA is expressed on the surface of several GBS strains, but is also recovered in GBS culture supernatants. BibA specifically binds to human C4-binding protein, a regulator of the classic complement pathway. Deletion of the bibA gene severely reduced the capacity of GBS to survive in human blood and to resist opsonophagocytic killing by human neutrophils. In addition, BibA expression increased the virulence of GBS in a mouse infection model. The role of BibA in GBS adhesion was demonstrated by the impaired ability of a bibA knockout mutant strain to adhere to both human cervical and lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, we calculated that recombinant BibA bound to human epithelial cells of distinct origin with an affinity constant of approximately 10(-8) M for cervical epithelial cells. Hence BibA is a novel multifunctional protein involved in both resistance to phagocytic killing and adhesion to host cells. The identification of this potential new virulence factor represents an important step in the development of strategies to combat GBS-associated infections.

  3. Mutations in Coliphage P1 Affecting Host Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jean Tweedy; Walker, Donald H.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 103 amber mutants of coliphage P1 were tested for lysis of nonpermissive cells. Of these, 83 caused cell lysis at the normal lysis time and have defects in particle morphogenesis. Five amber mutants, with mutations in the same gene (gene 2), caused premature lysis and may have a defect in a lysis regulator. Fifteen amber mutants were unable to cause cell lysis. Artificially lysed cells infected with five of these mutants produced viable phage particles, and phage particles were seen in thin sections of unlysed, infected cells. However, phage production by these mutants was not continued after the normal lysis time. We conclude that the defect of these five mutants is in a lysis function. The five mutations were found to be in the same gene (designated gene 17). The remaining 10 amber mutants, whose mutations were found to be in the same gene (gene 10), were also unable to cause cell lysis. They differed from those in gene 17 in that no viable phage particles were produced from artificially lysed cells, and no phage particles were seen in thin sections of unlysed, infected cells. We conclude that the gene 10 mutants cannot synthesize late proteins, and it is possible that gene 10 may code for a regulator of late gene expression for P1. Images PMID:16789200

  4. Flavobacterium johnsoniae GldK, GldL, GldM, and SprA Are Required for Secretion of the Cell Surface Gliding Motility Adhesins SprB and RemA

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Johnston, Joseph J.; van Baaren, Jessica M.

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae cells move rapidly over surfaces by gliding motility. Gliding results from the movement of adhesins such as SprB and RemA along the cell surface. These adhesins are delivered to the cell surface by a Bacteroidetes-specific secretion system referred to as the type IX secretion system (T9SS). GldN, SprE, SprF, and SprT are involved in secretion by this system. Here we demonstrate that GldK, GldL, GldM, and SprA are each also involved in secretion. Nonpolar deletions of gldK, gldL, or gldM resulted in the absence of gliding motility and in T9SS defects. The mutant cells produced SprB and RemA proteins but failed to secrete them to the cell surface. The mutants were resistant to phages that use SprB or RemA as a receptor, and they failed to attach to glass, presumably because of the absence of cell surface adhesins. Deletion of sprA resulted in similar but slightly less dramatic phenotypes. sprA mutant cells failed to secrete SprB and RemA, but cells remained susceptible to some phages and retained some limited ability to glide. The phenotype of the sprA mutant was similar to those previously described for sprE and sprT mutants. SprA, SprE, and SprT are needed for secretion of SprB and RemA but may not be needed for secretion of other proteins targeted to the T9SS. Genetic and molecular experiments demonstrate that gldK, gldL, gldM, and gldN form an operon and suggest that the proteins encoded by these genes may interact to form part of the F. johnsoniae T9SS. PMID:23667240

  5. UafB is a serine-rich repeat adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus that mediates binding to fibronectin, fibrinogen and human uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    King, Nathan P; Beatson, Scott A; Totsika, Makrina; Ulett, Glen C; Alm, Richard A; Manning, Paul A; Schembri, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among young women, and is second only to uropathogenic Escherichia coli as the most frequent cause of UTI. The molecular mechanisms of urinary tract colonization by S. saprophyticus remain poorly understood. We have identified a novel 6.84 kb plasmid-located adhesin-encoding gene in S. saprophyticus strain MS1146 which we have termed uro-adherence factor B (uafB). UafB is a glycosylated serine-rich repeat protein that is expressed on the surface of S. saprophyticus MS1146. UafB also functions as a major cell surface hydrophobicity factor. To characterize the role of UafB we generated an isogenic uafB mutant in S. saprophyticus MS1146 by interruption with a group II intron. The uafB mutant had a significantly reduced ability to bind to fibronectin and fibrinogen. Furthermore, we show that a recombinant protein containing the putative binding domain of UafB binds specifically to fibronectin and fibrinogen. UafB was not involved in adhesion in a mouse model of UTI; however, we observed a striking UafB-mediated adhesion phenotype to human uroepithelial cells. We have also identified genes homologous to uafB in other staphylococci which, like uafB, appear to be located on transposable elements. Thus, our data indicate that UafB is a novel adhesin of S. saprophyticus that contributes to cell surface hydrophobicity, mediates adhesion to fibronectin and fibrinogen, and exhibits tropism for human uroepithelial cells.

  6. Expression and purification of enterovirus type 71 polyprotein P1 using Pichia pastoris system.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Ying, Xiaoling; Huang, Hao; Zhou, Shili; Huang, Qi

    2012-08-01

    Enterovirus type 71(EV71) causes severe hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) resulting in hundreds of deaths of children every year; However, currently, there is no effective treatment for EV71. In this study, the EV71 poly-protein (EV71-P1 protein) gene was processed and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9k and then expressed in Pichia pastoris strain GS115. The EV71 P1 protein with a molecular weight of 100 kD was produced and secreted into the medium. The soluble EV71 P1 protein was purified by column chromatography with a recovery efficiency of 70%. The result of the immunological analysis showed that the EV71 P1 protein had excellent immunogenicity and could stimulate the production of EV71-VP1 IgG antibody in injected rabbits. We suggest that EV71-P1 protein is an ideal candidate for an EV71 vaccine to prevent EV71 infection.

  7. Identification of a hemerythrin-like domain in a P1B-type transport ATPase†

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, Matthew E.; Subramanian, Poorna; Davydov, Roman; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    The P1B-type ATPases couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to metal ion translocation across cell membranes. Important for prokaryotic metal resistance and essential metal distribution in eukaryotes, P1B-ATPases are divided into subclasses on the basis of their metal substrate specificities. Sequence analysis of putative P1B-5-ATPases, for which the substrate has not been identified, led to the discovery of a C-terminal soluble domain homologous to hemerythrin (Hr) proteins and domains. The Hr domain from the Acidothermus cellulolyticus P1B-5-ATPase was cloned, expressed, and purified (P1B-5-Hr). P1B-5-Hr binds two iron ions per monomer and adopts a predominantly helical fold. Optical absorption features of the iron-loaded and azide-treated protein are consistent with features observed for other Hr proteins. Autooxidation to the met form is very rapid, as reported for other prokaryotic Hr domains. The presence of a diiron center was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) data. The occurrence of a Hr-like domain in a P-type ATPase is unprecedented and suggests new regulatory mechanisms as well as an expanded function for Hr proteins in biology. PMID:20672819

  8. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R.; Olsson, Johan D. M.; Weiss, Manfred S.; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M.; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcβ1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  9. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R; Olsson, Johan D M; Weiss, Manfred S; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcb1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  10. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  12. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1 Voluntary withholding agreements. (a) In...

  14. Minimum chemical requirements for adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of Candida albicans cell wall phosphomannoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, T; Cutler, J E

    1998-12-01

    This study was conducted to define adhesive characteristics of the acid-stable moiety of the Candida albicans phosphomannoprotein complex (PMPC) on adherence of this fungus to marginal zone macrophages of the mouse spleen. Complete digestion of the acid-stable moiety (Fr.IIS) of the C. albicans PMPC with an alpha-mannosidase or hydrolysis with 0.6 N sulfuric acid destroyed adhesin activity, as determined by the inability of the soluble digests to inhibit yeast cell adherence to the splenic marginal zone. Fr.IIS adhesin activity was decreased following digestion with an alpha-1,2-specific mannosidase. Oligomannosyls consisting of one to six mannose units, which were isolated from the acid-stable part of the PMPC, did not inhibit yeast cell binding and thus do not function alone as adhesin sites in the PMPC. To gain more insight into the minimum requirements for adhesin activity, PMPCs were isolated from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type strain and from mutant strains mnn1, mnn2, and mnn4; the PMPCs were designated scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, scmn2/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II, respectively. S. cerevisiae scmn2/Fr.II lacks oligomannosyl side chain branches from the outer core mannan, and scmn2/Fr.II was the only PMPC without adhesin activity. S. cerevisiae scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II showed adhesin activities less than that of C. albicans Fr.II. These three S. cerevisiae PMPCs are generally similar to Fr. IIS, except that the S. cerevisiae structure has fewer and shorter side chains. Immunofluorescence microscopy show that the acid-stable part of the PMPC is displayed homogeneously on the C. albicans yeast cell surface, which would be expected for a surface adhesin. Our results indicate that both the mannan core and the oligomannosyl side chains are responsible for the adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of the PMPC. PMID:9826359

  15. Surface contact stimulates the just-in-time deployment of bacterial adhesins.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglai; Brown, Pamela J B; Tang, Jay X; Xu, Jing; Quardokus, Ellen M; Fuqua, Clay; Brun, Yves V

    2012-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to surfaces provides advantages such as increasing nutrient access and resistance to environmental stress. Attachment begins with a reversible phase, often mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a transition to irreversible attachment, typically mediated by polysaccharides. Here we show that the interplay between pili and flagellum rotation stimulates the rapid transition between reversible and polysaccharide-mediated irreversible attachment. We found that reversible attachment of Caulobacter crescentus cells is mediated by motile cells bearing pili and that their contact with a surface results in the rapid pili-dependent arrest of flagellum rotation and concurrent stimulation of polar holdfast adhesive polysaccharide. Similar stimulation of polar adhesin production by surface contact occurs in Asticcacaulis biprosthecum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Therefore, single bacterial cells respond to their initial contact with surfaces by triggering just-in-time adhesin production. This mechanism restricts stable attachment to intimate surface interactions, thereby maximizing surface attachment, discouraging non-productive self-adherence, and preventing curing of the adhesive.

  16. In vitro Paracoccidioides brasiliensis biofilm and gene expression of adhesins and hydrolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Voltan, Aline Raquel; Braz, Jaqueline Derissi; Machado, Marcelo Pelajo; Fusco Almeida, Ana Marisa; Mendes Giannini, Maria Jose Soares

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi that initially infect the lungs but can also spread throughout the body. The spreading infection is most likely due to the formation of a biofilm that makes it difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. Biofilm formation is crucial for the development of infections and confines the pathogen to an extracellular matrix. Its presence is associated with antimicrobial resistance and avoidance of host defenses. This current study provides the first description of biofilm formation by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb18) and an analysis of gene expression, using real-time PCR, associated with 3 adhesins and 2 hydrolytic enzymes that could be associated with the virulence profile. Biofilm formation was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Metabolic activity was determined using the XTT reduction assay. P. brasiliensis was able to form mature biofilm in 144 h with a thickness of 100 μm. The presence of a biofilm was found to be associated with an increase in the expression of adhesins and enzymes. GP43, enolase, GAPDH and aspartyl proteinase genes were over-expressed, whereas phospholipase was down-regulated in biofilm. The characterization of biofilm formed by P. brasiliensis may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of paracoccidioidomycosis as well as the search for new therapeutic alternatives; while improving the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:26055497

  17. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose

    PubMed Central

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-i; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Ramos-Clamont Montfort, Gabriela; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-01-01

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10–17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections. PMID:26389896

  18. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose.

    PubMed

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-I; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Montfort, Gabriela Ramos-Clamont; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-09-16

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10-17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections.

  19. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose.

    PubMed

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-I; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Montfort, Gabriela Ramos-Clamont; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-01-01

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10-17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections. PMID:26389896

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoomi; Kang, Min-Young; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, JeeNa; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper) production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase). Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic) leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoomi; Kang, Min-Young; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, JeeNa; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper) production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase). Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum ‘Bukang’ cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic) leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection. PMID:26751216

  2. The Hypervariable Amino-Terminus of P1 Protease Modulates Potyviral Replication and Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Fabio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The replication of many RNA viruses involves the translation of polyproteins, whose processing by endopeptidases is a critical step for the release of functional subunits. P1 is the first protease encoded in plant potyvirus genomes; once activated by an as-yet-unknown host factor, it acts in cis on its own C-terminal end, hydrolyzing the P1-HCPro junction. Earlier research suggests that P1 cooperates with HCPro to inhibit host RNA silencing defenses. Using Plum pox virus as a model, we show that although P1 does not have a major direct role in RNA silencing suppression, it can indeed modulate HCPro function by its self-cleavage activity. To study P1 protease regulation, we used bioinformatic analysis and in vitro activity experiments to map the core C-terminal catalytic domain. We present evidence that the hypervariable region that precedes the protease domain is predicted as intrinsically disordered, and that it behaves as a negative regulator of P1 proteolytic activity in in vitro cleavage assays. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic regulator is associated with greater symptom severity, induction of salicylate-dependent pathogenesis-related proteins, and reduced viral loads. We suggest that fine modulation of a viral protease activity has evolved to keep viral amplification below host-detrimental levels, and thus to maintain higher long-term replicative capacity. PMID:24603811

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoomi; Kang, Min-Young; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, JeeNa; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper) production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase). Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic) leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection. PMID:26751216

  4. The knockdown of each component of the cysteine proteinase-adhesin complex of Entamoeba histolytica (EhCPADH) affects the expression of the other complex element as well as the in vitro and in vivo virulence.

    PubMed

    Ocádiz-Ruiz, Ramón; Fonseca, Wendy; Linford, Alicia S; Yoshino, Timothy P; Orozco, Esther; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite causative of human amoebiasis, disease responsible for 40 000-100 000 deaths annually. The cysteine proteinase-adhesin complex of this parasite (EhCPADH) is a heterodimeric protein formed by a cysteine protease (EhCP112) and an adhesin (EhADH) that plays an important role in the cytopathic mechanism of this parasite. The coding genes for EhCP112 and EhADH are adjacent in the E. histolytica genome, suggesting that their expression may be co-regulated, but this hypothesis has not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed the knockdown of EhCP112 and EhADH using gene-specific short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA), and the effect of these knockdowns on the expression of both complex components as well as on the in vitro and in vivo virulence was analysed. Results showed that the knockdown of one of the EhCPADH components produced a simultaneous downregulation of the other protein. Accordingly, a concomitant reduction in the overall expression of the complex was observed. The downregulation of each component also produced a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo virulence of trophozoites. These results demonstrated that the expression of EhCP112 and EhADH is co-regulated and confirmed that the EhCPADH complex plays an important role in E. histolytica virulence.

  5. Characterization of recombinant C1 inhibitor P1 variants.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Huijbregts, C C; Lubbers, Y T; Longstaff, C; Hack, C E

    1992-04-01

    Twelve human C1 inhibitor P1 variants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the codon for arginine 444 and were expressed in COS-1 cells to analyze the functional properties. The ability to bind to target proteases, as well as potential substrate-like behavior, was investigated with radioimmunoassays. The P1-Lys variant retained binding capacity toward C1s, plasmin, and kallikrein. In addition, complex formation with C1s was detected for P1-Asn and P1-His. All other P1 substitutions resulted in C1 inhibitor variants that neither complexed with nor were inactivated by C1s, kallikrein, beta-factor XIIa, or plasmin. Electrophoretic studies confirmed that P1-Lys and P1-His can form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant complexes with C1s. In contrast, the C1s-P1-Asn complex dissociated upon addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Kinetic experiments by the method of progress curves generated association rate constants (kon) with C1s of 4.2 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for recombinant wild-type C1 inhibitor and 1.7 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for P1-Lys. For P1-Asn and P1-His, kon was decreased approximately 100-fold. The results from inhibition experiments were compatible with a model of reversible inhibition, although the observed dissociation rate for wild-type C1 inhibitor is too low (1-2 x 10(-6) s-1) to be physiologically relevant. The overall inhibition constant (Ki) was estimated to be 0.03 nM. With P1-Asn, reversible inhibition could be demonstrated directly upon dilution of preformed complexes; the observed dissociation rate constant was 3.2 x 10(-4) s-1; and Ki increased to approximately 380 nM. These findings are discussed in relation to inhibitor specificity and inhibition mechanism.

  6. Phase variation and host immunity against high molecular weight (HMW) adhesins shape population dynamics of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae within human hosts.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gregg S; Marino, Simeone; Marrs, Carl F; Gilsdorf, Janet R; Dawid, Suzanne; Kirschner, Denise E

    2014-08-21

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a bacterium that resides within the human pharynx. Because NTHi is human-restricted, its long-term survival is dependent upon its ability to successfully colonize new hosts. Adherence to host epithelium, mediated by bacterial adhesins, is one of the first steps in NTHi colonization. NTHi express several adhesins, including the high molecular weight (HMW) adhesins that mediate attachment to the respiratory epithelium where they interact with the host immune system to elicit a strong humoral response. hmwA, which encodes the HMW adhesin, undergoes phase variation mediated by 7-base pair tandem repeats located within its promoter region. Repeat number affects both hmwA transcription and HMW-adhesin production such that as the number of repeats increases, adhesin production decreases. Cells expressing large amounts of HMW adhesins may be critical for the establishment and maintenance of NTHi colonization, but they might also incur greater fitness costs when faced with an adhesin-specific antibody-mediated immune response. We hypothesized that the occurrence of large deletion events within the hmwA repeat region allows NTHi cells to maintain adherence in the presence of antibody-mediated immunity. To study this, we developed a mathematical model, incorporating hmwA phase variation and antibody-mediated immunity, to explore the trade-off between bacterial adherence and immune evasion. The model predicts that antibody levels and avidity, catastrophic loss rates, and population carrying capacity all significantly affected numbers of adherent NTHi cells within a host. These results suggest that the occurrence of large, yet rare, deletion events allows for stable maintenance of a small population of adherent cells in spite of HMW adhesin specific antibody-mediated immunity. These adherent subpopulations may be important for sustaining colonization and/or maintaining transmission. PMID:24747580

  7. Staphylococcus aureus adherence to Candida albicans hyphae is mediated by the hyphal adhesin Als3p

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian M.; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Zhou, Han; Hoyer, Lois L.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus (St.) aureus and the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans are currently among the leading nosocomial pathogens, often co-infecting critically ill patients, with high morbidity and mortality. Previous investigations have demonstrated preferential adherence of St. aureus to C. albicans hyphae during mixed biofilm growth. In this study, we aimed to characterize the mechanism behind this observed interaction. C. albicans adhesin-deficient mutant strains were screened by microscopy to identify the specific receptor on C. albicans hyphae recognized by St. aureus. Furthermore, an immunoassay was developed to validate and quantify staphylococcal binding to fungal biofilms. The findings from these experiments implicated the C. albicans adhesin agglutinin-like sequence 3 (Als3p) in playing a major role in the adherence process. This association was quantitatively established using atomic force microscopy, in which the adhesion force between single cells of the two species was significantly reduced for a C. albicans mutant strain lacking als3. Confocal microscopy further confirmed these observations, as St. aureus overlaid with a purified recombinant Als3 N-terminal domain fragment (rAls3p) exhibited robust binding. Importantly, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterologously expressing Als3p was utilized to further confirm this adhesin as a receptor for St. aureus. Although the parental strain does not bind bacteria, expression of Als3p on the cell surface conferred upon the yeast the ability to strongly bind St. aureus. To elucidate the implications of these in vitro findings in a clinically relevant setting, an ex vivo murine model of co-infection was designed using murine tongue explants. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed extensive hyphal penetration of the epithelium typical of C. albicans mucosal infection. Interestingly, St. aureus bacterial cells were only seen within the epithelial tissue when associated with the invasive

  8. Inhibition and Reversal of Microbial Attachment by an Antibody with Parasteric Activity against the FimH Adhesin of Uropathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Della; Jalan, Aachal; Gupta, Shivani; Interlandi, Gianluca; Liu, Yan; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Rodriguez, Victoria B.; Sumida, John P.; Strong, Roland K.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2015-01-01

    Attachment proteins from the surface of eukaryotic cells, bacteria and viruses are critical receptors in cell adhesion or signaling and are primary targets for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. It is proposed that the ligand-binding pocket in receptor proteins can shift between inactive and active conformations with weak and strong ligand-binding capability, respectively. Here, using monoclonal antibodies against a vaccine target protein - fimbrial adhesin FimH of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that unusually strong receptor inhibition can be achieved by antibody that binds within the binding pocket and displaces the ligand in a non-competitive way. The non-competitive antibody binds to a loop that interacts with the ligand in the active conformation of the pocket but is shifted away from ligand in the inactive conformation. We refer to this as a parasteric inhibition, where the inhibitor binds adjacent to the ligand in the binding pocket. We showed that the receptor-blocking mechanism of parasteric antibody differs from that of orthosteric inhibition, where the inhibitor replaces the ligand or allosteric inhibition where the inhibitor binds at a site distant from the ligand, and is very potent in blocking bacterial adhesion, dissolving surface-adherent biofilms and protecting mice from urinary bladder infection. PMID:25974133

  9. Srr2, a multifaceted adhesin expressed by ST-17 hypervirulent Group B Streptococcus involved in binding to both fibrinogen and plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Six, Anne; Bellais, Samuel; Bouaboud, Abdelouhab; Fouet, Agnès; Gabriel, Christelle; Tazi, Asmaa; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2015-09-01

    The Group B Streptococcus (GBS) 'hypervirulent' ST-17 clone is strongly associated with invasive neonatal meningitis. Comparative genome analyses revealed that the serine-rich repeat (Srr) glycoprotein Srr2 is a cell wall-anchored protein specific for ST-17 strains, the non-ST-17 isolates expressing Srr1. Here, we unravel the binding capacity of GBS Srr proteins to relevant components of the host fibrinolysis pathway. We demonstrate that: (i) Srr2 binds plasminogen and plasmin whereas Srr1 does not; (ii) the ability of ST-17 strains to bind fibrinogen reflects a high level surface display of Srr2 combined with a higher affinity of Srr2 than Srr1 to bind this ligand; and (iii) Srr2 binding to host plasma proteins results in the formation of bacterial aggregates that are efficiently endocytosed by phagocytes. Importantly, we show that Srr2 increased bacterial survival to phagocytic killing and bacterial persistence in a murine model of meningitis. We conclude that Srr2 is a multifaceted adhesin used by the ST-17 clone to hijack ligands of the host coagulation system, thereby contributing to bacterial dissemination and invasiveness, and ultimately to meningitis. PMID:26094503

  10. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1 - Voluntary withholding agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary withholding agreements. 31.3402(p)-1 Section 31.3402(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at...

  11. Essential Functional Role of the Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Hemagglutination

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Dietrich; Riedewald, Joachim; Rohde, Holger; Magnus, Tim; Feucht, Hubert H.; Elsner, Holger-A.; Laufs, Rainer; Rupp, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    Hemagglutination of erythrocytes is a common property of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, which is related to adherence and biofilm formation and may be essential for the pathogenesis of biomaterial-associated infections caused by S. epidermidis. In three independent biofilm-producing, hemagglutination-positive S. epidermidis isolates, interruption of the icaADBC operon essential for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) synthesis by Tn917 insertions led to a hemagglutination-negative phenotype. An immunoglobulin G fraction of antiserum to PIA greatly reduced hemagglutination. Purified PIA led to a 64-fold decrease of hemagglutination titers of these strains; however, it did not mediate hemagglutination by itself. These observations define PIA as the hemagglutinin of S. epidermidis or at least as its major functional component. PMID:9916125

  12. Detection specificity studies of bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period grating-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Cusano, Andrea; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present a label-free detection specificity study of an optical fiber long-period grating (LPG) biosensor working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes. The LPG sensor functionalized with bacteriophage adhesin is tested with specific and non-specific bacteria dry weight. We show that such biosensor is able to selectively bind, thus recognize different bacteria. We use bacteria dry weights of E. coli B as positive test and E. coli K12 and Salmonella enterica as negative tests. The resonance wavelength shift induced by E. coli B reaches over 90 nm, while for E. coli K12 and Salmonella enterica approximately 40 and 20 nm, respectively.

  13. Der p 1 facilitates transepithelial allergen delivery by disruption of tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Wan, H; Winton, H L; Soeller, C; Tovey, E R; Gruenert, D C; Thompson, P J; Stewart, G A; Taylor, G W; Garrod, D R; Cannell, M B; Robinson, C

    1999-07-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens are important factors in the increasing prevalence of asthma. The lung epithelium forms a barrier that allergens must cross before they can cause sensitization. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the cysteine proteinase allergen Der p 1 from fecal pellets of the HDM Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus causes disruption of intercellular tight junctions (TJs), which are the principal components of the epithelial paracellular permeability barrier. In confluent airway epithelial cells, Der p 1 led to cleavage of the TJ adhesion protein occludin. Cleavage was attenuated by antipain, but not by inhibitors of serine, aspartic, or matrix metalloproteinases. Putative Der p 1 cleavage sites were found in peptides from an extracellular domain of occludin and in the TJ adhesion protein claudin-1. TJ breakdown nonspecifically increased epithelial permeability, allowing Der p 1 to cross the epithelial barrier. Thus, transepithelial movement of Der p 1 to dendritic antigen-presenting cells via the paracellular pathway may be promoted by the allergen's own proteolytic activity. These results suggest that opening of TJs by environmental proteinases may be the initial step in the development of asthma to a variety of allergens.

  14. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Wan, Y C Serena; Boudreau, Beth A; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence.

  15. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Wan, Y C Serena; Boudreau, Beth A; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  16. P1 Ref Endonuclease: A Molecular Mechanism for Phage-Enhanced Antibiotic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ronayne, Erin A.; Wan, Y. C. Serena; Boudreau, Beth A.; Landick, Robert; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Ref is an HNH superfamily endonuclease that only cleaves DNA to which RecA protein is bound. The enigmatic physiological function of this unusual enzyme is defined here. Lysogenization by bacteriophage P1 renders E. coli more sensitive to the DNA-damaging antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an example of a phenomenon termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). The complementary effect of phage P1 is uniquely traced to the P1-encoded gene ref. Ref is a P1 function that amplifies the lytic cycle under conditions when the bacterial SOS response is induced due to DNA damage. The effect of Ref is multifaceted. DNA binding by Ref interferes with normal DNA metabolism, and the nuclease activity of Ref enhances genome degradation. Ref also inhibits cell division independently of the SOS response. Ref gene expression is toxic to E. coli in the absence of other P1 functions, both alone and in combination with antibiotics. The RecA proteins of human pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus serve as cofactors for Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Ref is especially toxic during the bacterial SOS response and the limited growth of stationary phase cultures, targeting aspects of bacterial physiology that are closely associated with the development of bacterial pathogen persistence. PMID:26765929

  17. The P-1 truss in the O&C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Part of the P-1 truss is seen as it rests in a workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14- by 15-foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the International Space Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  18. Efficiency of Direct Microscopy of Stool Samples Using an Antigen-Specific Adhesin Test for Entamoeba Histolytica

    PubMed Central

    İrvem, Arzu; Özdil, Kamil; Çalışkan, Zuhal; Yücel, Muhterem

    2016-01-01

    Background: E. histolytica is among the common causes of acute gastroenteritis. The pathogenic species E. histolytica and the nonpathogenic species E. dispar cannot be morphologically differentiated, although correct identification of these protozoans is important for treatment and public health. In many laboratories, the screening of leukocytes, erythrocytes, amoebic cysts, trophozoites and parasite eggs is performed using Native-Lugol’s iodine for pre-diagnosis. Aims: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of E. histolytica in stool samples collected from 788 patients residing in the Anatolian region of İstanbul who presented with gastrointestinal complaints. We used the information obtained to evaluate the effectiveness of microscopic examinations when used in combination with the E. histolytica adhesin antigen test. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study Methods: Preparations of stool samples stained with Native-Lugol’s iodine were evaluated using the E. histolytica adhesin test and examined using standard light microscopy at ×40 magnification. Pearson’s Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Results: Of 788 samples, 38 (4.8%) were positive for E. histolytica adhesin antigens. When evaluated together with the presences of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cysts, and trophozoites, respectively, using logistic regression analysis, leukocyte positivity was significantly higher. The odds ratio of leukocyte positivity increased adhesin test-positivity by 2,530-fold (95% CI=1.01–6.330). Adhesin test-positivity was significant (p=0.047). Conclusion: In line with these findings, the consistency between the presence of cysts and erythrocytes and adhesin test-positivity was found to be highly significant, but that of higher levels of leukocytes was found to be discordant. It was concluded that leukocytes and trophozoites were easily misjudged

  19. O-Glycosylation of the N-terminal Region of the Serine-rich Adhesin Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae Explored by Mass Spectrometry *

    PubMed Central

    Chaze, Thibault; Guillot, Alain; Valot, Benoît; Langella, Olivier; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Mistou, Michel-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Serine-rich (Srr) proteins exposed at the surface of Gram-positive bacteria are a family of adhesins that contribute to the virulence of pathogenic staphylococci and streptococci. Lectin-binding experiments have previously shown that Srr proteins are heavily glycosylated. We report here the first mass-spectrometry analysis of the glycosylation of Streptococcus agalactiae Srr1. After Srr1 enrichment and trypsin digestion, potential glycopeptides were identified in collision induced dissociation spectra using X! Tandem. The approach was then refined using higher energy collisional dissociation fragmentation which led to the simultaneous loss of sugar residues, production of diagnostic oxonium ions and backbone fragmentation for glycopeptides. This feature was exploited in a new open source software tool (SpectrumFinder) developed for this work. By combining these approaches, 27 glycopeptides corresponding to six different segments of the N-terminal region of Srr1 [93–639] were identified. Our data unambiguously indicate that the same protein residue can be modified with different glycan combinations including N-acetylhexosamine, hexose, and a novel modification that was identified as O-acetylated-N-acetylhexosamine. Lectin binding and monosaccharide composition analysis strongly suggested that HexNAc and Hex correspond to N-acetylglucosamine and glucose, respectively. The same protein segment can be modified with a variety of glycans generating a wide structural diversity of Srr1. Electron transfer dissociation was used to assign glycosylation sites leading to the unambiguous identification of six serines and one threonine residues. Analysis of purified Srr1 produced in mutant strains lacking accessory glycosyltransferase encoding genes demonstrates that O-GlcNAcylation is an initial step in Srr1 glycosylation that is likely required for subsequent decoration with Hex. In summary, our data obtained by a combination of fragmentation mass spectrometry techniques

  20. Versatility of Biofilm Matrix Molecules in Staphylococcus epidermidis Clinical Isolates and Importance of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Expression during High Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Hoang, Tra-My N.; Sudbeck, Craig M.; Alawi, Malik; Tolo, Isaiah E.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Horswill, Alexander R.; Rohde, Holger

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of hospital-associated infections, including those of intravascular catheters, cerebrospinal fluid shunts, and orthopedic implants. Multiple biofilm matrix molecules with heterogeneous characteristics have been identified, including proteinaceous, polysaccharide, and nucleic acid factors. Two of the best-studied components in S. epidermidis include accumulation-associated protein (Aap) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), produced by the enzymatic products of the icaADBC operon. Biofilm composition varies by strain as well as environmental conditions, and strains producing PIA-mediated biofilms are more robust. Clinically, biofilm-mediated infections occur in a variety of anatomical sites with diverse physiological properties. To test the hypothesis that matrix composition exhibits niche specificity, biofilm-related genetic and physical properties were compared between S. epidermidis strains isolated from high-shear and low-shear environments. Among a collection of 105 clinical strains, significantly more isolates from high-shear environments carried the icaADBC operon than did those from low-shear settings (43.9% versus 22.9%, P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference in the presence of aap (77.2% versus 75.0%, P > 0.05). Additionally, a significantly greater number of high-shear isolates were capable of forming biofilm in vitro in a microtiter assay (82.5% versus 45.8%, P < 0.0001). However, even among high-shear clinical isolates, less than half contained the icaADBC locus; therefore, we selected for ica-negative variants with increased attachment to abiotic surfaces to examine PIA-independent biofilm mechanisms. Sequencing of selected variants identified substitutions capable of enhancing biofilm formation in multiple genes, further highlighting the heterogeneity of S. epidermidis biofilm molecules and mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading cause of

  1. The Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae HMW1C-Like Glycosyltransferase Mediates N-Linked Glycosylation of the Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Grass, Susan; Paek, Seonghee; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    The Haemophilus influenzae HMW1 adhesin is an important virulence exoprotein that is secreted via the two-partner secretion pathway and is glycosylated at multiple asparagine residues in consensus N-linked sequons. Unlike the heavily branched glycans found in eukaryotic N-linked glycoproteins, the modifying glycan structures in HMW1 are mono-hexoses or di-hexoses. Recent work demonstrated that the H. influenzae HMW1C protein is the glycosyltransferase responsible for transferring glucose and galactose to the acceptor sites of HMW1. An Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae protein designated ApHMW1C shares high-level homology with HMW1C and has been assigned to the GT41 family, which otherwise contains only O-glycosyltransferases. In this study, we demonstrated that ApHMW1C has N-glycosyltransferase activity and is able to transfer glucose and galactose to known asparagine sites in HMW1. In addition, we found that ApHMW1C is able to complement a deficiency of HMW1C and mediate HMW1 glycosylation and adhesive activity in whole bacteria. Initial structure-function studies suggested that ApHMW1C consists of two domains, including a 15-kDa N-terminal domain and a 55-kDa C-terminal domain harboring glycosyltransferase activity. These findings suggest a new subfamily of HMW1C-like glycosyltransferases distinct from other GT41 family O-glycosyltransferases. PMID:21209858

  2. O-mannosylation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis adhesin Apa is crucial for T cell antigenicity during infection but is expendable for protection.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Fang, Sunan; McDonald, Melissa A; Pohl, Jan; Birkness, Kristin; Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Ramirez, Melissa V; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Amara, Rama Rao; Sable, Suraj B

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant post-translational polypeptide chain modification in nature. Although carbohydrate modification of protein antigens from many microbial pathogens constitutes important components of B cell epitopes, the role in T cell immunity is not completely understood. Here, using ELISPOT and polychromatic flow cytometry, we show that O-mannosylation of the adhesin, Apa, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for its T cell antigenicity in humans and mice after infection. However, subunit vaccination with both mannosylated and non-mannosylated Apa induced a comparable magnitude and quality of T cell response and imparted similar levels of protection against Mtb challenge in mice. Both forms equally improved waning BCG vaccine-induced protection in elderly mice after subunit boosting. Thus, O-mannosylation of Apa is required for antigenicity but appears to be dispensable for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice. These results have implications for the development of subunit vaccines using post-translationally modified proteins such as glycoproteins against infectious diseases like tuberculosis.

  3. Regulation of Expression of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Nonfimbrial Adhesin TosA by PapB Homolog TosR in Conjunction with H-NS and Lrp.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2016-01-11

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a major burden to human health. The overwhelming majority of UTIs are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. Unlike some pathogens, UPEC strains do not have a fixed core set of virulence and fitness factors but do have a variety of adhesins and regulatory pathways. One such UPEC adhesin is the nonfimbrial adhesin TosA, which mediates adherence to the epithelium of the upper urinary tract. The tos operon is AT rich, resides on pathogenicity island aspV, and is not expressed under laboratory conditions. Because of this, we hypothesized that tosA expression is silenced by H-NS. Lrp, based on its prominent function in the regulation of other adhesins, is also hypothesized to contribute to tos operon regulation. Using a variety of in vitro techniques, we mapped both the tos operon promoter and TosR binding sites. We have now identified TosR as a dual regulator of the tos operon, which could control the tos operon in association with H-NS and Lrp. H-NS is a negative regulator of the tos operon, and Lrp positively regulates the tos operon. Exogenous leucine also inhibits Lrp-mediated tos operon positive regulation. In addition, TosR binds to the pap operon, which encodes another important UPEC adhesin, P fimbria. Induction of TosR synthesis reduces production of P fimbria. These studies advance our knowledge of regulation of adhesin expression associated with uropathogen colonization of a host.

  4. Characterization of porcine intestinal receptors for the K88ac fimbrial adhesin of Escherichia coli as mucin-type sialoglycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, A K; Baker, D R; Bosworth, B T; Casey, T A; Benfield, D A; Francis, D H

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two K88ac adhesion receptors (210 and 240 kDa) which are present in membrane preparations from adhesive but not nonadhesive porcine intestinal brush border cells; these adhesin receptors are postulated to be important determinants of the susceptibility of pigs to K88ac+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections (A.K. Erickson, J.A. Willgohs, S.Y. McFarland, D.A. Benfield, and D.F. Francis, Infect. Immun. 60:983-988, 1992). We now describe a procedure for the purification of these two receptors. Receptors were solubilized from adhesive intestinal brush border vesicles using deoxycholate and were purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and then by hydroxyapatite chromatography. Amino acid compositional analyses indicated that the two receptors have similar amino acid compositions. The most distinguishing characteristic of both receptors is a high percentage of threonine and proline residues. Neuraminidase treatment caused the K88ac adhesin receptors to migrate with a slower mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels, indicating that these receptors are sialoglycoproteins. Results from lectin-binding studies indicated that the receptors contain O-linked oligosaccharides composed of galactosyl (beta-1,3)N-acetylgalactosamine, alpha-linked fucose, galactosyl(beta-1,4)N-acetylglucosamine, sialic acid, galactose, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Collectively, these characteristics indicate that the K88ac adhesin receptors are mucin-type sialoglycoproteins. Images PMID:7960120

  5. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum is a galactose-inhibitable adhesin involved in coaggregation, cell adhesion, and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S; Sol, A; Abed, J; Naor, R; Zhang, X; Han, Y W; Bachrach, G

    2015-03-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria.

  6. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum Is a Galactose-Inhibitable Adhesin Involved in Coaggregation, Cell Adhesion, and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S.; Sol, A.; Abed, J.; Naor, R.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria. PMID:25561710

  7. A novel Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry associated adhesin mediates erythrocyte invasion through the sialic-acid dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Gaurav; Reddy, K. Sony; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Mian, Syed Yusuf; Singh, Hina; Mittal, Shivani Arora; Amlabu, Emmanuel; Bassat, Quique; Mayor, Alfredo; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is central to blood-stage infection and malaria pathogenesis. This intricate process is coordinated by multiple parasite adhesins that bind erythrocyte receptors and mediate invasion through several alternate pathways. P. falciparum expresses 2700 genes during the blood-stages, of which the identity and function of many remains unknown. Here, we have identified and characterized a novel P. falciparum rhoptry associated adhesin (PfRA) that mediates erythrocyte invasion through the sialic-acid dependent pathway. PfRA appears to play a significant functional role as it is conserved across different Plasmodium species. It is localized in the rhoptries and further translocated to the merozoite surface. Both native and recombinant PfRA specifically bound erythrocytes in a sialic-acid dependent, chymotrypsin and trypsin resistant manner, which was abrogated by PfRA antibodies confirming a role in erythrocyte invasion. PfRA antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion and in combination with antibodies against other parasite ligands produced an additive inhibitory effect, thus validating its important role in erythrocyte invasion. We have thus identified a novel P. falciparum adhesin that binds with a sialic acid containing erythrocyte receptor. Our observations substantiate the strategy to block P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion by simultaneously targeting multiple conserved merozoite antigens involved in alternate invasion pathways. PMID:27383149

  8. Expression of Sindbis virus nsP1 and methyltransferase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mi, S; Stollar, V

    1991-09-01

    We have constructed two plasmids, pSR5-42 and pSR5-Toto, which under lac control expressed the SVLM21 and the SVToto forms, respectively, of the Sindbis virus nonstructural protein, nsP1. The induced protein, which was the major protein made following induction with IPTG, had an apparent molecular weight of 60,000 and an amino terminal sequence in agreement with that expected for nsP1. Following induction with IPTG, cells carrying pSR5-42 (which contains the SVLM21 gene sequence) generated much higher RNA methyltransferase activity than cells carrying pSR5-Toto (which contains the SVToto gene sequence). This result is in agreement with what is observed when methyltransferase is measured in cells infected with SVLM21 and SVSTD (or SVToto), respectively. These results provide strong evidence that nsP1 has methyltransferase activity in the absence of any other viral nonstructural proteins. PMID:1831311

  9. Characterization of Inhibitors and Monoclonal Antibodies That Modulate the Interaction between Plasmodium falciparum Adhesin PfRh4 with Its Erythrocyte Receptor Complement Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Harder, Markus J.; Kennedy, Alexander T.; Lin, Clara S.; Weir, Christopher; Cowman, Alan F.; Call, Melissa J.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; Tham, Wai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites must invade red blood cells to survive within humans. Entry into red blood cells is governed by interactions between parasite adhesins and red blood cell receptors. Previously we identified that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein-like homologue 4 (PfRh4) binds to complement receptor 1 (CR1) to mediate entry of malaria parasites into human red blood cells. In this report we characterize a collection of anti-PfRh4 monoclonal antibodies and CR1 protein fragments that modulate the interaction between PfRh4 and CR1. We identify an anti-PfRh4 monoclonal that blocks PfRh4-CR1 interaction in vitro, inhibits PfRh4 binding to red blood cells, and as a result abolishes the PfRh4-CR1 invasion pathway in P. falciparum. Epitope mapping of anti-PfRh4 monoclonal antibodies identified distinct functional regions within PfRh4 involved in modulating its interaction with CR1. Furthermore, we designed a set of protein fragments based on extensive mutagenesis analyses of the PfRh4 binding site on CR1 and determined their interaction affinities using surface plasmon resonance. These CR1 protein fragments bind tightly to PfRh4 and also function as soluble inhibitors to block PfRh4 binding to red blood cells and to inhibit the PfRh4-CR1 invasion pathway. Our findings can aid future efforts in designing specific single epitope antibodies to block P. falciparum invasion via complement receptor 1. PMID:26324715

  10. Haemagglutination induced by Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin adhesin (FHA) is inhibited by antibodies produced against FHA(430-873) fragment expressed in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Débora; Oliveira, Maria L S; Campos, Ivana B; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martinez, Gaspar; Ho, Paulo L

    2006-12-01

    Filamentous haemagglutinin adhesin (FHA) is an important virulence factor from Bordetella pertussis related to the adhesion and spread of the bacteria through the respiratory tract. Three distinct domains have been characterized in mature FHA, and among them, the FHA(442-863) fragment was suggested to be responsible for the heparin-binding activity. In this study, we cloned the gene encoding the HEP fragment (FHA(430-873)) in a Lactobacillus casei-inducible expression vector based on the lactose operon. The recombinant bacteria, transformed with the resulting construct (L. casei-HEP), were able to express the heterologous protein depending on the sugar added to the culture. Subcutaneous inoculation of L. casei-HEP in Balb/C mice, using the cholera toxin B subunit as adjuvant, induced systemic anti-HEP antibodies that were able to inhibit in vitro erythrocyte haemagglutination induced by FHA. This is the first example of a B. pertussis antigen produced in lactic acid bacteria and opens new perspectives for alternative vaccine strategies against whooping cough. PMID:17106803

  11. Presence of fibrinogen-binding adhesin gene in Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from central venous catheters-associated and orthopaedic implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Campoccia, Davide; Gamberini, Simonetta; Donati, M Elena; Montanaro, Lucio

    2004-08-01

    Attention has recently been paid to identify and elucidate those pathogenetic mechanisms, which play a significant role in sustaining the early phases of Staphylococcus epidermidis colonisation and infection development. Several analogies with the physiology of Staphylococcus aureus, a more thoroughly investigated pathogen, have lead to carefully consider all bacterial surface components that mediate cell adhesion. This study aimed at investigating the presence of the fbe gene encoding for a fibrinogen-binding protein in a collection of 107 S. epidermidis strains isolated from orthopaedic infections and 67 from central venous catheter-associated infections. The strains isolated from orthopaedic infections were in large part associated to four different classes of orthopaedic devices, respectively: internal fixation devices, external fixation devices, knee arthroprostheses and hip arthroprostheses. The molecular epidemiology analysis performed by PCR enlightened a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of this adhesion mechanism between orthopaedic infections and catheter-related infections, respectively, of 78% and 91%. The prevalence of fbe ranged from 67% to 91%, suggesting that, even though this adhesin is not strictly necessary for the development of infection, nevertheless it represents a rather common characteristic of strains causing clinical infections, this independently on the presence or the absence of implant materials. PMID:15120529

  12. P-1 truss moved to O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers oversee the placement of the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, onto the bed of a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  13. P-1 truss moved to O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cranes place the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, on a transport vehicle that will move it to the Operations and Checkout Building for processing. The truss had been temporarily stored in the RLV hangar in the background as a precaution against approaching bad weather. The P-1 truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  14. Structure of HinP1I Endonuclease Reveals a Striking Similarity to the Monomeric Restriction Enzyme MspI

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Z.; Horton, J.; Maunus, R.; Wilson, G.; Roberts, R.; Cheng, X.

    2005-01-01

    HinP1I, a type II restriction endonuclease, recognizes and cleaves a palindromic tetranucleotide sequence (G{down_arrow}CGC) in double-stranded DNA, producing 2 nt 5' overhanging ends. Here, we report the structure of HinP1I crystallized as one protein monomer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. HinP1I displays an elongated shape, with a conserved catalytic core domain containing an active-site motif of SDX18QXK and a putative DNA-binding domain. Without significant sequence homology, HinP1I displays striking structural similarity to MspI, an endonuclease that cleaves a similar palindromic DNA sequence (C{down_arrow}CGG) and binds to that sequence crystallographically as a monomer. Almost all the structural elements of MspI can be matched in HinP1I, including both the DNA recognition and catalytic elements. Examining the protein-protein interactions in the crystal lattice, HinP1I could be dimerized through two helices located on the opposite side of the protein to the active site, generating a molecule with two active sites and two DNA-binding surfaces opposite one another on the outer surfaces of the dimer. A possible functional link between this unusual dimerization mode and the tetrameric restriction enzymes is discussed.

  15. Lithography on GaP(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Perez, Rosangelly; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-06-01

    Two types of lithographic methods were used to modify GaP(1 0 0) surfaces with commercially available alkanethiol molecules: microcontact printing (μCP) and "dip-pen" nanolithography (DPN). The patterned surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). The characterization was done in order to understand the quality of each type of pattern, its chemical composition, and the organization of the molecules on the surface. Differences between the two lithographic methods used to do lithography on the GaP(1 0 0) in this study were dependent on the chosen molecular "ink".

  16. Characterization of novel plasmid p1B146 from Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum.

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Łukasz; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Szemraj, Janusz

    2011-08-01

    Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum B146, a strain derived from healthy human skin, contains a medium copy plasmid, p1B146. This plasmid was cloned and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. As a result, p1B146 was found to be 4.2 kb in size with a 53% G+C content, plus six open reading frames (ORFs) were distinguished. According to a computer-assisted alignment, two of the ORFs exhibited significant similarities to already-known common plasmid proteins, the first being the RepA gene, responsible for plasmid replication via a rolling-circle mechanism, and the second being an FtsK-like protein, the function of which remains unclear. The presence and quantity of RNA fragments in the putative ORFs were also evaluated.

  17. Cardiomyocyte S1P1 Receptor–mediated Extracellular Signal–related Kinase Signaling and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Hoover, Holly E.; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Alano, Conrad C.; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to desensitize extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase linked to antiapoptotic responses in the heart. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, S1P (10 nM–5 μM) induced ERK phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. S1P stimulation of ERK was completely inhibited by an S1P1/3 subtype receptor antagonist (VPC23019), by a Gi protein inhibitor (pertussis toxin) and by a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059). A selective S1P3 receptor antagonist (CAY10444) had no effect on S1P-induced ERK activation. The selective S1P1 agonist SEW2871 also induced ERK phosphorylation. Activation of ERK by restimulation with 100 nM S1P was suppressed after 1 hour of preincubation with 100 nM S1P but recovered fully the next day, suggesting receptor recycling. Similar results were obtained in protein kinase Cε-null cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the nonselective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 for 1 hour also reduced phospho-ERK expression in response to subsequent S1P stimulation. In contrast to S1P, some desensitization to FTY720 persisted after overnight exposure. Cell death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation was reduced by pretreatment with exogenous S1P. This enhanced survival was abrogated by pretreatment with PD98059, VPC23019, or pertussis toxin. Thus, exogenous S1P induces rapid and reversible S1P1-mediated ERK phosphorylation. S1P-induced adult mouse cardiomyocyte survival requires ERK activation mediated via an S1P1–Gi pathway. PMID:19433984

  18. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Mallegol, Julia; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Low, Donald E; Terebeznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644) is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s) of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS). In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface. PMID:23029523

  19. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain.

  20. Targeted Gene Disruption Reveals an Adhesin Indispensable for Pathogenicity of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Tristan Brandhorst, T.; Wüthrich, Marcel; Warner, Thomas; Klein, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    Systemic fungal infections are becoming more common and difficult to treat, yet the pathogenesis of these infectious diseases remains poorly understood. In many cases, pathogenicity can be attributed to the ability of the fungi to adhere to target tissues, but the lack of tractable genetic systems has limited progress in understanding and interfering with the offending fungal products. In Blastomyces dermatitidis, the agent of blastomycosis, a respiratory and disseminated mycosis of people and animals worldwide, expression of the putative adhesin encoded by the WI-1 gene was investigated as a possible virulence factor. DNA-mediated gene transfer was used to disrupt the WI-1 locus by allelic replacement, resulting in impaired binding and entry of yeasts into macrophages, loss of adherence to lung tissue, and abolishment of virulence in mice; each of these properties was fully restored after reconstitution of WI-1 by means of gene transfer. These findings establish the pivotal role of WI-1 in adherence and virulence of B. dermatitidis yeasts. To our knowledge, they offer the first example of a genetically proven virulence determinant among systemic dimorphic fungi, and underscore the value of reverse genetics for studies of pathogenesis in these organisms. PMID:10209038

  1. Staphylococcus epidermidis Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Production Significantly Increases during Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cuong; Kidder, Joshua B.; Jacobson, Erik R.; Otto, Michael; Proctor, Richard A.; Somerville, Greg A.

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcal polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) is important for the development of a mature biofilm. PIA production is increased during growth in a nutrient-replete or iron-limited medium and under conditions of low oxygen availability. Additionally, stress-inducing stimuli such as heat, ethanol, and high concentrations of salt increase the production of PIA. These same environmental conditions are known to repress tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, leading us to hypothesize that altering TCA cycle activity would affect PIA production. Culturing Staphylococcus epidermidis with a low concentration of the TCA cycle inhibitor fluorocitrate dramatically increased PIA production without impairing glucose catabolism, the growth rate, or the growth yields. These data lead us to speculate that one mechanism by which staphylococci perceive external environmental change is through alterations in TCA cycle activity leading to changes in the intracellular levels of biosynthetic intermediates, ATP, or the redox status of the cell. These changes in the metabolic status of the bacteria result in the attenuation or augmentation of PIA production. PMID:15838022

  2. Differential Roles of Individual Domains in Selection of Secretion Route of a Streptococcus parasanguinis Serine-Rich Adhesin, Fap1▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Sun, Baiming; Wu, Hui; Peng, Zhixiang; Fives-Taylor, Paula M.

    2007-01-01

    Fimbria-associated protein 1 (Fap1) is a high-molecular-mass glycosylated surface adhesin required for fimbria biogenesis and biofilm formation in Streptococcus parasanguinis. The secretion of mature Fap1 is dependent on the presence of SecA2, a protein with some homology to, but with a different role from, SecA. The signals that direct the secretion of Fap1 to the SecA2-dependent secretion pathway rather than the SecA-dependent secretion pathway have not yet been identified. In this study, Fap1 variants containing different domains were expressed in both secA2 wild-type and mutant backgrounds and were tested for their ability to be secreted by the SecA- or SecA2-dependent pathway. The presence or absence of the cell wall anchor domain (residues 2531 to 2570) at the C terminus did not alter the selection of the Fap1 secretion route. The Fap1 signal peptide (residues 1 to 68) was sufficient to support the secretion of a heterologous protein via the SecA-dependent pathway, suggesting that the signal peptide was sufficient for recognition by the SecA-dependent pathway. The minimal sequences of Fap1 required for the SecA2-dependent pathway included the N-terminal signal peptide, nonrepetitive region I (residues 69 to 102), and part of nonrepetitive region II (residues 169 to 342). The two serine-rich repeat regions (residues 103 to 168 and 505 to 2530) were not required for Fap1 secretion. However, they were both involved in the specific inhibition of Fap1 secretion via the SecA-dependent pathway. PMID:17766425

  3. HecA, a member of a class of adhesins produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria, contributes to the attachment, aggregation, epidermal cell killing, and virulence phenotypes of Erwinia chrysanthemi EC16 on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Ham, Jong Hyun; Deng, Wen-Ling; Doyle, Jeff J.; Collmer, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is representative of a broad class of bacterial pathogens that are capable of inducing necrosis in plants. The E. chrysanthemi EC16 hecA gene predicts a 3,850-aa member of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin family of adhesins. A hecA∷Tn7 mutant was reduced in virulence on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings after inoculation without wounding. Epifluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy observations of hecA and wild-type cells expressing the green fluorescent protein revealed that the mutant is reduced in its ability to attach and then form aggregates on leaves and to cause an aggregate-associated killing of epidermal cells. Cell killing also depended on production of the major pectate lyase isozymes and the type II, but not the type III, secretion pathway in E. chrysanthemi. HecA homologs were found in bacterial pathogens of plants and animals and appear to be unique to pathogens and universal in necrogenic plant pathogens. Phylogenetic comparison of the conserved two-partner secretion domains in the proteins and the 16S rRNA sequences in respective bacteria revealed the two datasets to be fundamentally incongruent, suggesting horizontal acquisition of these genes. Furthermore, hecA and its two homologs in Yersinia pestis had a G+C content that was 10% higher than that of their genomes and similar to that of plant pathogenic Ralstonia, Xylella, and Pseudomonas spp. Our data suggest that filamentous hemagglutinin-like adhesins are broadly important virulence factors in both plant and animal pathogens. PMID:12271135

  4. A Cadmium-transporting P1B-type ATPase in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Adle, David J.; Sinani, Devis; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2014-01-01

    Detoxification and homeostatic acquisition of metal ions are vital for all living organisms. We have identified PCA1 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an overexpression suppressor of copper toxicity. PCA1 possesses signatures of a P1B-type heavy metal-transporting ATPase that is widely distributed from bacteria to humans. Copper resistance conferred by PCA1 is not dependent on catalytic activity, but it appears that a cysteine-rich region located in the N terminus sequesters copper. Unexpectedly, when compared with two independent natural isolates and an industrial S. cerevisiae strain, the PCA1 allele of the common laboratory strains we have examined possesses a missense mutation in a predicted ATP-binding residue conserved in P1B-type ATPases. Consistent with a previous report that identifies an equivalent mutation in a copper-transporting P1B-type ATPase of a Wilson disease patient, the PCA1 allele found in laboratory yeast strains is nonfunctional. Overexpression or deletion of the functional allele in yeast demonstrates that PCA1 is a cadmium efflux pump. Cadmium as well as copper and silver, but not other metals examined, dramatically increase PCA1 protein expression through post-transcriptional regulation and promote subcellular localization to the plasma membrane. Our study has revealed a novel metal detoxification mechanism in yeast mediated by a P1B-type ATPase that is unique in structure, substrate specificity, and mode of regulation. PMID:17107946

  5. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  6. Characterization of the non-sexual flocculation of fission yeast cells that results from the deletion of ribosomal protein L32.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Rongpeng; Dong, Qing; Bian, Lezhi; Li, Xuesong; Yuan, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that deleting either of the two paralogous rpl32 genes resulted in non-sexual flocculation in fission yeast. This study represents the first report that these non-sexually flocculating fission yeast cells exhibit a thicker cell wall, an increased wall protein content with smeared glycosylated wall proteins, and increased cell wall polysaccharide content and adhesin-binding sugar residues (i.e. glucose, mannose and galactose). These changes reflect the wall features of flocculating cells that mediate recognition and connections between cells. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that this non-sexual flocculation is an adhesin-mediated process: (a) the transcription levels of several members of the Mam3/Map4 family of adhesins (i.e. PFL3, PFL7 and PFL6) and a Flo11-like adhesin protein are upregulated in rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells; (b) this non-sexual flocculation of rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells was eliminated by heating or enzyme digestion; (c) this non-sexual flocculation of rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells was enhanced by Ca(2+) and some other divalent metal ions, which stabilize the active conformation of adhesins; and (d) this non-sexual flocculation of rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells was competitively inhibited by glucose, galactose or mannose rather than only by galactose, as reported previously. Although different adhesin genes are selectively expressed under particular physiological or environmental conditions, the functions of these adhesins are the same and are interchangeable.

  7. Host and Tissue Specificity of Trichomonas vaginalis Is Not Mediated by Its Known Adhesion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Addis, Maria Filippa; Rappelli, Paola; Fiori, Pier Luigi

    2000-01-01

    Adhesion of Trichomonas vaginalis is believed to be dependent on four adhesion proteins, which are thought to bind to vaginal epithelial cells in a specific manner with a ligand-receptor type of interaction. However, the specific receptors on the host cell have not yet been identified. In this work, the ability of the T. vaginalis adhesins to bind to cells of different histologic derivations and from different species has been studied. HeLa, CHO, and Vero cell lines; erythrocytes from different species; and a prokaryote without a cell wall, Mycoplasma hominis, were employed in order to investigate the cell specificity of the T. vaginalis adhesins. We observed that the T. vaginalis adhesins are able to bind to the different cell types to the same extent, suggesting that the host and tissue specificity of T. vaginalis adhesion should not be due to specificity of the parasite adhesins. Our results suggest that the data published to date on the subject are probably artifactual and that the experiments reported in the literature are not appropriate for identification of protozoan adhesins. PMID:10858260

  8. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum.

  9. Characterization and adsorption of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Xi, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Fan, M; Liu, Y; Wu, W

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophage infection of lactic acid bacteria is considered an important problem worldwide in the food fermentation industry, as it may produce low quality or unsafe foods, cause fermentation failure, and result in economic losses. To increase current knowledge on the properties of Lactobacillus virulent phages, we evaluated the effect of divalent cations, temperature, pH, and chloramphenicol on the adsorption ability of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1. Phage P1 was isolated from the abnormal fermentation liquid of Lactobacillus plantarum IMAU10120. The results showed that this phage belonged to the Siphoviridae family. The latent period of this phage was 45min, and the burst time was 90min. Burst size was 132.88±2.37 phage counts expressed per milliliter per infective center. This phage showed good tolerance at different temperatures, but incubation at 50°C only affected its adsorption. Adsorption rate reached a maximum value between 30 and 42°C. A high adsorption value of phage infectivity was obtained from pH 6 to 8. Moreover, calcium ions promoted and increased the adsorption capacity of phage P1, but magnesium ions had negative effects. Chloramphenicol had no effect on phage adsorption. This study increased current knowledge on the characterization and biological aspects of Lactobacillus virulent phages, and may provide some basic information that can be used to design successful antiphage strategies in the food industry. PMID:27372579

  10. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  11. Constitutive relations in TRAC-P1A

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Saha, P.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the basic thermal-hydraulic models and correlations that are in the TRAC-P1A code, as released in March 1979. It is divided into two parts, A and B. Part A describes the models in the three-dimensional vessel module of TRAC, whereas Part B focuses on the loop components that are treated by one-dimensional formulations. The report follows the format of the questions prepared by the Analysis Development Branch of USNRC and the questionnaire has been attached to this document for completeness. Concerted efforts have been made in understanding the present models in TRAC-P1A by going through the FORTRAN listing of the code. Some discrepancies between the code and the TRAC-P1A manual have been found. These are pointed out in this document. Efforts have also been made to check the TRAC references for the range of applicability of the models and correlations used in the code. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Streptococcus gordonii DL1 adhesin SspB V-region mediates coaggregation via receptor polysaccharide of Actinomyces oris T14V.

    PubMed

    Back, C R; Douglas, S K; Emerson, J E; Nobbs, A H; Jenkinson, H F

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB proteins, members of the antigen I/II (AgI/II) family of Streptococcus adhesins, mediate adherence to cysteine-rich scavenger glycoprotein gp340 and cells of other oral microbial species. In this article we investigated further the mechanism of coaggregation between S. gordonii DL1 and Actinomyces oris T14V. Previous mutational analysis of S. gordonii suggested that SspB was necessary for coaggregation with A. oris T14V. We have confirmed this by showing that Lactococcus lactis surrogate host cells expressing SspB coaggregated with A. oris T14V and PK606 cells, while L. lactis cells expressing SspA did not. Coaggregation occurred independently of expression of A. oris type 1 (FimP) or type 2 (FimA) fimbriae. Polysaccharide was prepared from cells of A. oris T14V and found to contain 1,4-, 4,6- and 3,4-linked glucose, 1,4-linked mannose, and 2,4-linked galactose residues. When immobilized onto plastic wells this polysaccharide supported binding of L. lactis expressing SspB, but not binding of L. lactis expressing other AgI/II family proteins. Purified recombinant NAVP region of SspB, comprising amino acid (aa) residues 41-847, bound A. oris polysaccharide but the C-domain (932-1470 aa residues) did not. A site-directed deletion of 29 aa residues (Δ691-718) close to the predicted binding cleft within the SspB V-region ablated binding of the NAVP region to polysaccharide. These results infer that the V-region head of SspB recognizes an actinomyces polysaccharide ligand, so further characterizing a lectin-like coaggregation mechanism occurring between two important primary colonizers.

  13. Strain-Specific Variation of the Decorin-Binding Adhesin DbpA Influences the Tissue Tropism of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism. PMID:25079227

  14. Strain-specific variation of the decorin-binding adhesin DbpA influences the tissue tropism of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M

    2014-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism.

  15. Repetitive sequence variations in the promoter region of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA of Helicobacter pylori affect transcription.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Vivian C; Acio, Catherine R; Bredehoft, Amy K; Zhu, Laurence; Hallinger, Daniel R; Quinlivan-Repasi, Vanessa; Harvey, Samuel E; Forsyth, Mark H

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenesis of diseases elicited by the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is partially determined by the effectiveness of adaptation to the variably acidic environment of the host stomach. Adaptation includes appropriate adherence to the gastric epithelium via outer membrane protein adhesins such as SabA. The expression of sabA is subject to regulation via phase variation in the promoter and coding regions as well as repression by the two-component system ArsRS. In this study, we investigated the role of a homopolymeric thymine [poly(T)] tract -50 to -33 relative to the sabA transcriptional start site in H. pylori strain J99. We quantified sabA expression in H. pylori J99 by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), demonstrating significant changes in sabA expression associated with experimental manipulations of poly(T) tract length. Mimicking the length increase of this tract by adding adenines instead of thymines had similar effects, while the addition of other nucleotides failed to affect sabA expression in the same manner. We hypothesize that modification of the poly(T) tract changes DNA topology, affecting regulatory protein interaction(s) or RNA polymerase binding efficiency. Additionally, we characterized the interaction between the sabA promoter region and ArsR, a response regulator affecting sabA expression. Using recombinant ArsR in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we localized binding to a sequence with partial dyad symmetry -20 and +38 relative to the sabA +1 site. The control of sabA expression by both ArsRS and phase variation at two distinct repeat regions suggests the control of sabA expression is both complex and vital to H. pylori infection.

  16. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand.

    PubMed

    Parreira, P; Shi, Q; Magalhaes, A; Reis, C A; Bugaytsova, J; Borén, T; Leckband, D; Martins, M C L

    2014-12-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Le(b)), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor-ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Le(b) structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion.

  17. Novel Mycosin Protease MycP1 Inhibitors Identified by Virtual Screening and 4D Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rise of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis lends urgency to the need for new drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The identification of a serine protease, mycosin protease-1 (MycP1), as the crucial agent in hydrolyzing the virulence factor, ESX-secretion-associated protein B (EspB), potentially opens the door to new tuberculosis treatment options. Using the crystal structure of mycobacterial MycP1 in the apo form, we performed an iterative ligand- and structure-based virtual screening (VS) strategy to identify novel, nonpeptide, small-molecule inhibitors against MycP1 protease. Screening of ∼485 000 ligands from databases at the Genomics Research Institute (GRI) at the University of Cincinnati and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) using our VS approach, which integrated a pharmacophore model and consensus molecular shape patterns of active ligands (4D fingerprints), identified 81 putative inhibitors, and in vitro testing subsequently confirmed two of them as active inhibitors. Thereafter, the lead structures of each VS round were used to generate a new 4D fingerprint that enabled virtual rescreening of the chemical libraries. Finally, the iterative process identified a number of diverse scaffolds as lead compounds that were tested and found to have micromolar IC50 values against the MycP1 target. This study validated the efficiency of the SABRE 4D fingerprints as a means of identifying novel lead compounds in each screening round of the databases. Together, these results underscored the value of using a combination of in silico iterative ligand- and structure-based virtual screening of chemical libraries with experimental validation for the identification of promising structural scaffolds, such as the MycP1 inhibitors. PMID:24628123

  18. The membrane expression of Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA) increases the proimmune effects of MenB OMVs on human macrophages, compared with NadA- OMVs, without further stimulating their proinflammatory activity on circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Regina; Franzoso, Susanna; Cecchini, Paola; Cartocci, Elena; Oriente, Francesca; Aricò, Beatrice; Papini, Emanuele

    2009-07-01

    Hypervirulent MenB causing fatal human infections frequently display the oligomeric-coiled coil adhesin NadA, a 45-kDa intrinsic outer membrane protein implicated in binding to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. A recombinant soluble mutant lacking the 10-kDa COOH terminal membrane domain (NadA(Delta351-405)) also activates human monocytes/macrophages/DCs. As NadA is physiologically released during sepsis as part of OMVs, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that NadA(+) OMVs have an enhanced or modified proinflammatory/proimmune action compared with NadA(-) OMVs. To do this we investigated the activity of purified free NadA(Delta351-405) and of OMVs from MenB and Escherichia coli strains, expressing or not full-length NadA. NadA(Delta351-405) stimulated monocytes and macrophages to secrete cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-10) and chemokines (IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, RANTES), and full-length NadA improved MenB OMV activity, preferentially on macrophages, and only increased cytokine release. NadA(Delta351-405) induced the lymphocyte costimulant CD80 in monocytes and macrophages, and NadA(+) OMVs induced a wider set of molecules supporting antigen presentation (CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and ICAM-1) more efficiently than NadA(-) OMVs only in macrophages. Moreover, membrane NadA effects, unlike NadA(Delta351-405) ones, were much less IFN-gamma-sensitive. The activity of NadA-positive E. coli OMVs was similar to that of control OMVs. NadA in MenB OMVs acted at adhesin concentrations approximately 10(6) times lower than those required to stimulate cells with free NadA(Delta351-405).

  19. Identification and phenotypic characterization of a second collagen adhesin, Scm, and genome-based identification and analysis of 13 other predicted MSCRAMMs, including four distinct pilus loci, in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Jouko; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Prakash, Vittal P.; Qin, Xiang; Hook, Magnus; Weinstock, George M.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Attention has recently been drawn to Enterococcus faecium because of an increasing number of nosocomial infections caused by this species and its resistance to multiple antibacterial agents. However, relatively little is known about pathogenic determinants of this organism. We have previously identified a cell wall anchored collagen adhesin, Acm, produced by some isolates of E. faecium, and a secreted antigen, SagA, exhibiting broad spectrum binding to extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we analyzed the draft genome of strain TX0016 for potential MSCRAMMs (microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules). Genome-based bioinformatics identified 22 predicted cell wall anchored E. faeciumsurface proteins (Fms) of which 15 (including Acm) have typical characteristics of MSCRAMMs including predicted folding into a modular architecture with multiple immunoglobulin-like domains. Functional characterization of one (Fms10, redesignated Scm for second collagen adhesin of E. faeciu m) revealed that recombinant Scm65 (A- and B-domains) and Scm36 (A-domain) bound efficiently to collagen type V in a concentration dependent manner, bound considerably less to collagen type I and fibrinogen, and differed from Acm in their binding specificities to collagen types IV and V. Results from far-UV circular dichroism of recombinant Scm36 and of Acm37 indicated that these proteins are rich in β-sheets, supporting our folding predictions. Whole-cell ELISA and FACS analyses unambiguously demonstrated surface expression of Scm in most E. faecium isolates. Strikingly, 11 of the 15 predicted MSCRAMMs clustered in four loci, each with a class C sortase gene; 9 of these showed similarity to Enterococcus faecalis Ebp pilus subunits and also contained motifs essential for pilus assembly. Antibodies against one of the predicted major pilus proteins, Fms9 (redesignated as EbpCfm), detected a “ladder” pattern of high-molecular weight protein bands in a Western blot

  20. Site-specific DNA recombination in mammalian cells by the Cre recombinase of bacteriophage P1.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, B; Henderson, N

    1988-01-01

    The Cre protein encoded by the coliphage P1 is a 38-kDa protein that efficiently promotes both intra- and intermolecular synapsis and recombination of DNA both in Escherichia coli and in vitro. Recombination occurs at a specific site, called lox, and does not require any other protein factors. The Cre protein is shown here also to be able to cause synapsis of DNA and site-specific recombination in a mammalian cell line. A stable mouse cell line was established that expresses the Cre protein under the control of the Cd2+-inducible metallothionein I gene promoter. DNA recombination was monitored with DNA substrates containing two directly repeated lox sites. One such substrate is a circular plasmid with two directly repeated lox sites (lox2) flanking a marker gene and was introduced into cells by Ca3(PO4)2 transformation. As a second substrate we used a pseudorabies virus (a herpesvirus) containing a lox2 insertion designed to provide a sensitive detection system for recombination. In both cases, site-specific recombination in vivo is dependent on the presence of the Cre protein and occurs specifically at the 34-base-pair lox sites. These results demonstrate the controlled site-specific synapsis of DNA and recombination by a prokaryotic protein in mammalian cells and suggest that Cre-mediated site-specific recombination may be a useful tool for understanding and modulating genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. Images PMID:2839833

  1. 64Cu-Labeled LyP-1-Dendrimer for PET-CT Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify macrophage accumulation can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information for atherosclerotic plaque. We have previously shown that LyP-1, a cyclic 9-amino acid peptide, binds to p32 proteins on activated macrophages, facilitating the visualization of atherosclerotic plaque with PET. Yet, the in vivo plaque accumulation of monomeric [18F]FBA-LyP-1 was low (0.31 ± 0.05%ID/g). To increase the avidity of LyP-1 constructs to p32, we synthesized a dendritic form of LyP-1 on solid phase using lysine as the core structural element. Imaging probes (FAM or 6-BAT) were conjugated to a lysine or cysteine on the dendrimer for optical and PET studies. The N-terminus of the dendrimer was further modified with an aminooxy group in order to conjugate LyP-1 and ARAL peptides bearing a ketone. Oxime ligation of peptides to both dendrimers resulted in (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimers with optical (FAM) and PET probes (6-BAT). For PET-CT studies, (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimer-6-BAT were labeled with 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 h) and intravenously injected into the atherosclerotic (ApoE–/–) mice. After two hours of circulation, PET-CT coregistered images demonstrated greater uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu in the aortic root and descending aorta. Ex vivo images and the biodistribution acquired at three hours after injection also demonstrated a significantly higher uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu (1.1 ± 0.26%ID/g) than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu (0.22 ± 0.05%ID/g) in the aorta. Similarly, subcutaneous injection of the LyP-1-dendrimeric carriers resulted in preferential accumulation in plaque-containing regions over 24 h. In the same model system, ex vivo fluorescence images within aortic plaque depict an increased accumulation and penetration of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-FAM as compared to the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-FAM. Taken together, the results suggest that the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer can be applied for in

  2. Dynamics of Agglutinin-Like Sequence (ALS) Protein Localization on the Surface of Candida Albicans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, David Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The ALS gene family encodes large cell-surface glycoproteins associated with "C. albicans" pathogenesis. Als proteins are thought to act as adhesin molecules binding to host tissues. Wide variation in expression levels among the ALS genes exists and is related to cell morphology and environmental conditions. "ALS1," "ALS3," and "ALS4" are three of…

  3. Nanowire Arrays as Cell Force Sensors To Investigate Adhesin-Enhanced Holdfast of Single Cell Bacteria and Biofilm Stability.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prasana K; Janissen, Richard; Monteiro, Moniellen P; Cavalli, Alessandro; Murillo, Duber M; Merfa, Marcus V; Cesar, Carlos L; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-07-13

    Surface attachment of a planktonic bacteria, mediated by adhesins and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), is a crucial step for biofilm formation. Some pathogens can modulate cell adhesiveness, impacting host colonization and virulence. A framework able to quantify cell-surface interaction forces and their dependence on chemical surface composition may unveil adhesiveness control mechanisms as new targets for intervention and disease control. Here we employed InP nanowire arrays to dissect factors involved in the early stage biofilm formation of the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa. Ex vivo experiments demonstrate single-cell adhesion forces up to 45 nN, depending on the cell orientation with respect to the surface. Larger adhesion forces occur at the cell poles; secreted EPS layers and filaments provide additional mechanical support. Significant adhesion force enhancements were observed for single cells anchoring a biofilm and particularly on XadA1 adhesin-coated surfaces, evidencing molecular mechanisms developed by bacterial pathogens to create a stronger holdfast to specific host tissues. PMID:27336224

  4. Induction of specific immune responses in piglets by intramuscular immunization with fimbrial adhesin FaeG expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei

    2013-08-01

    Fimbrial adhesin plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-induced piglet diarrhoea. Lactococcus lactis is an attractive food-grade host for the production of heterologous antigens. We previously demonstrated that fimbrial adhesin FaeG was expressed in L. lactis and that oral immunization in mice with recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG induced F4-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. In the present study, we explored the immune responses of piglets induced by intramuscular vaccination with recombinant L. lactis expressing rFaeG. Intramuscular vaccination resulted in significantly elevated serum IgG level and modest increases in serum IgA and IgM levels. In addition, IgG, IgA, and IgM antibody secreting cells were induced in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and jejunum. The growth performance of piglets was not influenced by intramuscular vaccination. The results suggest that L. lactis expressing FaeG is a promising candidate vaccine against ETEC. PMID:23540979

  5. Exploiting chimeric human antibodies to characterize a protective epitope of Neisseria adhesin A, one of the Bexsero vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Galli, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Liguori, Alessia; Norais, Nathalie; Santini, Laura; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is one of the antigens of Bexsero, the recently licensed multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB). NadA belongs to the class of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins and is able to mediate adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells. As a vaccine antigen, NadA has been shown to induce high levels of bactericidal antibodies; however, the domains important for protective response are still unknown. In order to further investigate its immunogenic properties, we have characterized the murine IgG1 mAb (6E3) that was able to recognize the 2 main antigenic variants of NadA on the surface of MenB strains. The epitope targeted by mAb 6E3 was mapped by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and shown to be located on the coiled-coil stalk region of NadA (aa 206-249). Although no serum bactericidal activity was observed for murine IgG1 mAb 6E3, functional activity was restored when using chimeric antibodies in which the variable regions of the murine mAb 6E3 were fused to human IgG3 constant regions, thus confirming the protective nature of the mAb 6E3 epitope. The use of chimeric antibody molecules will enable future investigations of complement-mediated antibody functionality independently of the Fc-mediated differences in complement activation.

  6. Dynamics of Lewis b Binding and Sequence Variation of the babA Adhesin Gene during Chronic Helicobacter pylori Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nell, Sandra; Kennemann, Lynn; Schwarz, Sandra; Josenhans, Christine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori undergoes rapid microevolution during chronic infection, but very little is known about how this affects host interaction factors. The best-studied adhesin of H. pylori is BabA, which mediates binding to the blood group antigen Lewis b [Le(b)]. To study the dynamics of Le(b) adherence during human infection, we analyzed paired H. pylori isolates obtained sequentially from chronically infected individuals. A complete loss or significant reduction of Le(b) binding was observed in strains from 5 out of 23 individuals, indicating that the Le(b) binding phenotype is quite stable during chronic human infection. Sequence comparisons of babA identified differences due to mutation and/or recombination in 12 out of 16 strain pairs analyzed. Most amino acid changes were found in the putative N-terminal extracellular adhesion domain. One strain pair that had changed from a Le(b) binding to a nonbinding phenotype was used to study the role of distinct sequence changes in Le(b) binding. By transformations of the nonbinding strain with a babA gene amplified from the binding strain, H. pylori strains with mosaic babA genes were generated. Recombinants were enriched for a gain of Le(b) binding by biopanning or for BabA expression on the bacterial surface by pulldown assay. With this approach, we identified several amino acid residues affecting the strength of Le(b) binding. Additionally, the data showed that the C terminus of BabA, which is predicted to encode an outer membrane β-barrel domain, plays an essential role in the biogenesis of this protein. PMID:25516619

  7. Catalytic activity of nuclease P1: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Falcone, J.M.; Shibata, M.; Box, H.C.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum is a zinc dependent glyco-enzyme that recognizes single stranded DNA and RNA as substrates and hydrolyzes the phosphate ester bond. Nuclease Pl seems to recognize particular conformations of the phosphodiester backbone and shows significant variation in the rate of hydrolytic activity depending upon which nucleosides are coupled by the phosphodiester bond. The efficiency of nuclease Pl in hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bonds of a substrate can be altered by modifications to one of the substrate bases induced by ionizing radiation or oxidative stress. Measurements have been made of the effect of several radiation induced lesions on the catalytic rate of nuclease Pl. A model of the structure of the enzyme has been constructed in order to better understand the binding and activity of this enzyme on various ssDNA substrates.

  8. Detection of pap, sfa, afa, foc, and fim Adhesin-Encoding Operons in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates Collected From Patients With Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rahdar, Masoud; Rashki, Ahmad; Miri, Hamid Reza; Rashki Ghalehnoo, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) with its virulence factors is the most prevalent cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Objectives; This study aimed to determine the occurrence of fim, pap, sfa, and afa genes among 100 UPEC isolates collected from patients diagnosed with UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 100 UPEC isolates were obtained from urine samples of patients with UTI. The prevalence of 5 virulence genes encoding type 1 fimbriae (fimH), pili associated with pyelonephritis (pap), S and F1C fimbriae (sfa and foc) and afimbrial adhesins (afa) were determined through PCR method. We also investigated the phylogenetic background of all isolates. In addition, the distribution of adhesin-encoding operons between the phylogroups was assessed. Results: The prevalence of genes encoding for fimbrial adhesive systems was 95% for fim, 57% for pap, 16% for foc, and 81% for sfa. The operons encoding for afa afimbrial adhesins were identified in 12% of isolates. The various combinations of detected genes were designated as virulence patterns. The fim gene, which occurred in strains from all phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) was evaluated and no significant differences were found among these groups. Conversely, significant differences were observed in relation to pap, afa, foc, and sfa operons. Conclusions: These results indicate that the PCR method is a powerful genotypic assay for the detection of adhesin-encoding operons. Thus, this assay can be recommended for clinical use to detect virulent urinary E. coli strains, as well as epidemiological studies. PMID:26464770

  9. Substrate delivery by the AAA+ ClpX and ClpC1 unfoldases activates the mycobacterial ClpP1P2 peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterial Clp-family proteases function via collaboration of the heteromeric ClpP1P2 peptidase with a AAA+ partner, ClpX or ClpC1. These enzymes are essential for M. tuberculosis viability and are validated antibacterial drug targets, but the requirements for assembly and regulation of functional proteolytic complexes are poorly understood. Here, we report the reconstitution of protein degradation by mycobacterial Clp proteases in vitro and describe novel features of these enzymes that distinguish them from orthologs in other bacteria. Both ClpX and ClpC1 catalyze ATP-dependent unfolding and degradation of native protein substrates in conjunction with ClpP1P2, but neither mediates protein degradation with just ClpP1 or ClpP2. ClpP1P2 alone has negligible peptidase activity, but is strongly stimulated by translocation of protein substrates into ClpP1P2 by either AAA+ partner. Interestingly, our results support a model in which both binding of a AAA+ partner and protein-substrate delivery are required to stabilize active ClpP1P2. Our model has implications for therapeutically targeting ClpP1P2 in dormant M. tuberculosis, and our reconstituted systems should facilitate identification of novel Clp protease inhibitors and activators. PMID:24976069

  10. The Shank3 Interaction Partner ProSAPiP1 Regulates Postsynaptic SPAR Levels and the Maturation of Dendritic Spines in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reim, Dominik; Weis, Tobias M.; Halbedl, Sonja; Delling, Jan Philipp; Grabrucker, Andreas M.; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Schmeisser, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The postsynaptic density or PSD is a submembranous compartment containing a wide array of proteins that contribute to both morphology and function of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. In this study, we have analyzed functional aspects of the Fezzin ProSAP-interacting protein 1 (ProSAPiP1), an interaction partner of the well-known PSD proteins Shank3 and SPAR. Using lentiviral-mediated overexpression and knockdown of ProSAPiP1, we found that this protein is dispensable for the formation of both pre- and postsynaptic specializations per se. We further show that ProSAPiP1 regulates SPAR levels at the PSD and the maturation of dendritic spines. In line with previous findings on the ProSAPiP1 homolog PSD-Zip70, we conclude that Fezzins essentially contribute to the maturation of excitatory spine synapses. PMID:27252646

  11. Mannitol promotes adherence of an outbreak strain of Burkholderia multivorans via an exopolysaccharide-independent mechanism that is associated with upregulation of newly identified fimbrial and afimbrial adhesins.

    PubMed

    Denman, Carmen C; Brown, Alan R

    2013-04-01

    Burkholderia multivorans, a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), is an important pathogen of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Mannitol, approved as an inhaled osmolyte therapy for use in CF patients, promotes exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by the Bcc. In the present study, we investigated the role of mannitol-induced EPS in the adherence of B. multivorans. We report that mannitol promoted adherence of two representative B. multivorans strains. However, whilst this enhanced adherence was largely EPS-dependent in an environmental isolate, it was EPS-independent within a CF outbreak strain, suggesting strain-to-strain variation in adhesins. Genome sequencing of the outbreak strain enabled the identification of two distinct loci encoding putative fimbrial and afimbrial adhesins. The putative fimbriae-encoding locus was found to be widely distributed amongst clinical and environmental B. multivorans. In contrast, the locus encoding the putative afimbrial adhesin (of the filamentous haemagglutinin family, FHA) was restricted to clinical isolates. Both loci contributed to biofilm formation and mucin adherence. Furthermore, we report that mannitol promoted expression of both loci, and that the locus encoding the putative FHA-family adhesin is a key determinant of the enhanced adherence observed following growth in mannitol. Our studies provide the first characterization, to our knowledge, of B. multivorans adhesins, and in so doing highlight the strain-dependent role of EPS in the Bcc and the difficulties in assigning phenotypic traits to Bcc EPS due to the wider response to mannitol. Our observations also highlight the need to monitor the microbiological effects of inhaled mannitol therapy in Bcc-infected CF patients.

  12. Oral vaccination of weaned rabbits against enteropathogenic Escherichia coli-like E. coli O103 infection: use of heterologous strains harboring lipopolysaccharide or adhesin of pathogenic strains.

    PubMed Central

    Milon, A; Esslinger, J; Camguilhem, R

    1992-01-01

    To test the importance of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and adhesin as major antigens in vaccination against rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC)-like E. coli O103 infection, we used two nonpathogenic wild-type strains to immunize rabbits at weaning. One of these strains (C127) harbors the O103 LPS but does not express the 32,000-molecular-weight adhesin that characterizes the highly pathogenic O103 strains. The other (C6) belongs to the O128 serogroup, which does not cross-react with the O103 serogroup, but expresses the adhesin. These strains were administered orally, either live or after Formalin inactivation. After vaccination, the animals were challenged with highly pathogenic O103 strain B10. Compared with rabbits vaccinated with the Formalin-killed homologous strain, rabbits vaccinated with killed C127 or C6 showed partial but significant protection. When given live, these strains colonized more or less heavily the digestive tract of the animals and provided nearly complete (C127) or complete (C6) protection against challenge. They induced a quick local immune response, as judged by fecal immunoglobulin A anti-LPS kinetics. Furthermore, strain C6 induced an ecological effect of "resistance to colonization" against challenge strain B10. This effect may have been due to the adhesin that is shared by both strains and to the production of a colicin. Strain C6 could inhibit in vitro the growth of highly pathogenic O103 strains. On the whole, our results show that adhesins and LPS are important, although probably not exclusive, protection-inducing components in rabbit EPEC-like colibacillosis and provide insight into possible protection of rabbits against EPEC-like E. coli infection with live strains. Images PMID:1351880

  13. mRNA Capping by Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus nsP1: Functional Characterization and Implications for Antiviral Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Guillén, Jaime; Rabah, Nadia; Blanjoie, Alexandre; Debart, Françoise; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alphaviruses are known to possess a unique viral mRNA capping mechanism involving the viral nonstructural protein nsP1. This enzyme harbors methyltransferase (MTase) and nsP1 guanylylation (GT) activities catalyzing the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to the N7 position of a GTP molecule followed by the formation of an m7GMP-nsP1 adduct. Subsequent transfer of m7GMP onto the 5′ end of the viral mRNA has not been demonstrated in vitro yet. Here we report the biochemical characterization of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP1. We have developed enzymatic assays uncoupling the different reactions steps catalyzed by nsP1. The MTase and GT reaction activities were followed using a nonhydrolyzable GTP (GIDP) substrate and an original Western blot assay using anti-m3G/m7G-cap monoclonal antibody, respectively. The GT reaction is stimulated by S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (Ado-Hcy), the product of the preceding MTase reaction, and metallic ions. The covalent linking between nsP1 and m7GMP involves a phosphamide bond between the nucleotide and a histidine residue. Final guanylyltransfer onto RNA was observed for the first time with an alphavirus nsP1 using a 5′-diphosphate RNA oligonucleotide whose sequence corresponds to the 5′ end of the viral genome. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of residues H37, H45, D63, E118, Y285, D354, R365, N369, and N375 revealed their respective roles in MT and GT reactions. Finally, the inhibitory effects of sinefungin, aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), and ribavirin triphosphate on MTase and capping reactions were investigated, providing possible avenues for antiviral research. IMPORTANCE Emergence or reemergence of alphaviruses represents a serious health concern, and the elucidation of their replication mechanisms is a prerequisite for the development of specific inhibitors targeting viral enzymes. In particular, alphaviruses are able, through an original reaction sequence, to add to their

  14. Redefinition of the Carbohydrate Binding Specificity of Helicobacter pylori BabA Adhesin*

    PubMed Central

    Benktander, John; Ångström, Jonas; Breimer, Michael E.; Teneberg, Susann

    2012-01-01

    Certain Helicobacter pylori strains adhere to the human gastric epithelium using the blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA). All BabA-expressing H. pylori strains bind to the blood group O determinants on type 1 core chains, i.e. to the Lewis b antigen (Fucα2Galβ3(Fucα4)GlcNAc; Leb) and the H type 1 determinant (Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAc). Recently, BabA strains have been categorized into those recognizing only Leb and H type 1 determinants (designated specialist strains) and those that also bind to A and B type 1 determinants (designated generalist strains). Here, the structural requirements for carbohydrate recognition by generalist and specialist BabA were further explored by binding of these types of strains to a panel of different glycosphingolipids. Three glycosphingolipids recognized by both specialist and generalist BabA were isolated from the small intestine of a blood group O pig and characterized by mass spectrometry and proton NMR as H type 1 pentaglycosylceramide (Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), Globo H hexaglycosylceramide (Fucα2Galβ3GalNAcβ3Galα4Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), and a mixture of three complex glycosphingolipids (Fucα2Galβ4GlcNAcβ6(Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3)Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer, Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ6(Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3)Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer, and Fucα2Galβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAcβ6(Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3)Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer). In addition to the binding of both strains to the Globo H hexaglycosylceramide, i.e. a blood group O determinant on a type 4 core chain, the generalist strain bound to the Globo A heptaglycosylceramide (GalNAcα3(Fucα2)Galβ3GalNAcβ3Galα4Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), i.e. a blood group A determinant on a type 4 core chain. The binding of BabA to the two sets of isoreceptors is due to conformational similarities of the terminal disaccharides of H type 1 and Globo H and of the terminal trisaccharides of A type 1 and Globo A. PMID:22822069

  15. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J; Pidwill, Grace R; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J; Sessions, Richard B; Jenkinson, Howard F; Race, Paul R; Nobbs, Angela H

    2016-07-29

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. PMID:27311712

  16. The Screw-Like Movement of a Gliding Bacterium Is Powered by Spiral Motion of Cell-Surface Adhesins.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Roland, Thibault; Berg, Howard C

    2016-09-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glides over surfaces at speeds of ∼2 μm/s. The propulsion of a cell-surface adhesin, SprB, is known to enable gliding. We used cephalexin to generate elongated cells with irregular shapes and followed their displacement in three dimensions. These cells rolled about their long axes as they moved forward, following a right-handed trajectory. We coated gold nanoparticles with an SprB antibody and tracked them in three dimensions in an evanescent field where the nanoparticles appeared brighter when they were closer to the glass. The nanoparticles followed a right-handed spiral trajectory on the surface of the cell. Thus, if SprB were to adhere to the glass rather than to a nanoparticle, the cell would move forward along a right-handed trajectory, as observed, but in a direction opposite to that of the nanoparticle. PMID:27602728

  17. Polarimetric studies of comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. S.; Medhi, B. J.; Wolf, S.; Bertrang, G.; Deb Roy, P.; Chakraborty, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present the optical imaging polarimetric observations of comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) at three different phase angles e.g. 28.2°, 28.1° and 21.6°. The observations were carried out using the Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera mounted on Cassegrain focus of the 2 m telescope of IGO, IUCAA, Pune, in Rcomet, R photometric bands, on 2012 March 21 and 22 and Aryabhatta Research Institute of observational sciencES (ARIES) Imaging Polarimeter mounted on Cassegrain focus of the 1.04 m Sampurnanand Telescope of ARIES, Nainital, in R photometric band, on 2012 May 23. We show the presence of a jet activity in the rotational-gradient-treated image of comet Garradd at phase angle 28.1°. These jets are mainly oriented towards the Sun and extended up to ˜5100 km from the cometary photocentre. The antisolar extension of the jet seems to be fainter, which is extended up to ˜1800 km. It is found that the comet Garradd shows negative polarization at phase angle 21.6°. The degree of polarization derived for Garradd is in good agreement with other comets at nearly similar phase angles e.g. comets 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 22P/Kopff, 1P/Halley, C/1990 K1 (Levy), 4P/Faye and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) at phase angle ˜28°, and 47P/Ashbrook-Jackson at phase angle ˜21.6°, respectively. It is also found that the degree of polarization of dusty coma of comet Garradd at phase angle ˜28° is high but not as high as in the case of comet Hale-Bopp.

  18. Maternal Vaccination with a Fimbrial Tip Adhesin and Passive Protection of Neonatal Mice against Lethal Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Wilson B.; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Crabb, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 107 bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  19. Combined inactivation and expression strategy to study gene function under physiological conditions: application to identification of new Escherichia coli adhesins.

    PubMed

    Roux, Agnès; Beloin, Christophe; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2005-02-01

    In bacteria, whereas disruption methods have been improved recently, the use of plasmid complementation strategies are still subject to limitations, such as cloning difficulties, nonphysiological levels of gene expression, or a requirement for antibiotics as plasmid selection pressure. Moreover, because of the pleiotropic modifications of cell physiology often induced by plasmid-based complementation, these strategies may introduce biases when biological process such as adhesion or biofilm formation are studied. We developed a plasmid-free approach that combines the lambda-red linear DNA recombination method with site-directed insertion of a repression and expression (RExBAD) cassette which places a functional pBAD promoter upstream of a target gene. We showed that this method permits both inactivation and modulation of most Escherichia coli gene expression, including expression of toxin and essential genes. We used this strategy to study adhesion and bacterial biofilms by placing the RExBAD cassette in front of the tra operon, encoding the DNA transfer and pilus genes on the F conjugative plasmid, and in front of flu, the antigen 43 (Ag43) autotransporter adhesin-encoding gene. In silico analysis revealed the existence of 10 genes with homology to the Ag43 gene that were good candidates for genes that encode putative new adhesins in E. coli. We used the RExBAD strategy to study these genes and demonstrated that induction of expression of four of them is associated with adhesion of E. coli to abiotic surfaces. The potential use of the RExBAD approach to study the function of cryptic or uncharacterized genes in large-scale postgenomic functional analyses is discussed.

  20. Number of positive blood cultures, biofilm formation, and adhesin genes in differentiating true coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteremia from contamination.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeri, I; Giormezis, N; Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, M; Zotou, A; Kolonitsiou, F; Koutsileou, K; Fligou, F; Marangos, M; Anastassiou, E D; Spiliopoulou, I

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the number of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS)-positive blood cultures remains obscure in regards to determining true bacteremia versus contamination. The goal of this study was to determine the predictors of real CNS bloodstream infection among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ICU patients with at least one CNS-positive blood culture were identified from the microbiology database. Biofilm formation was tested by glass tube and microtiter plate assay. mecA gene, ica operon genes (icaA, icaB, icaD), and adhesin genes (aap, bap, atlE, fbe, fnbA) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CNS were recovered from 120 septic episodes, 20 of which were true CNS bacteremias, whereas from the remaining 100 episodes, the isolated CNS were characterized as contaminants. The number of positive blood cultures was significantly associated with true CNS bacteremia. Nineteen true bacteremic Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were compared to 38 contaminants. Biofilm synthesis was documented in 37 isolates associated with the presence of the ica operon (p = 0.048). There were 39, 26, 38, 21, and 10 strains positive for the presence of atlE, bap, fbe, aap, and fnbA genes, respectively. Rifampicin resistance, absence of severe sepsis, number of S. epidermidis-positive blood cultures, and absence of the bap gene were independently associated with true S. epidermidis bacteremia as compared to contaminant strains. The number of positive blood cultures is associated with true CNS bacteremia. The presence of adhesin genes may play a role in differentiating true infection from contamination, whereas absence of the bap gene is associated with true S. epidermidis bacteremia. PMID:26490138

  1. Tight conformational coupling between the domains of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin CfaE regulates binding state transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE. PMID:23393133

  2. Maternal vaccination with a fimbrial tip adhesin and passive protection of neonatal mice against lethal human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli challenge.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Wilson B; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Crabb, Joseph H; Savarino, Stephen J; Ferreira, Luis C S

    2015-12-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 10(7) bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  3. Structural and Functional Analysis of a New Subfamily of Glycosyltransferases Required for Glycosylation of Serine-rich Streptococcal Adhesins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Fan; Erlandsen, Heidi; Ding, Lei; Li, Jingzhi; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Meixian; Liang, Xiaobo; Ma, Jinbiao; Wu, Hui

    2011-09-16

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) are a growing family of bacterial adhesins found in many streptococci and staphylococci; they play important roles in bacterial biofilm formation and pathogenesis. Glycosylation of this family of adhesins is essential for their biogenesis. A glucosyltransferase (Gtf3) catalyzes the second step of glycosylation of a SRRP (Fap1) from an oral streptococcus, Streptococcus parasanguinis. Although Gtf3 homologs are highly conserved in SRRP-containing streptococci, they share minimal homology with functionally known glycosyltransferases. We report here the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Gtf3. The structural analysis indicates that Gtf3 forms a tetramer and shares significant structural homology with glycosyltransferases from GT4, GT5, and GT20 subfamilies. Combining crystal structural analysis with site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro glycosyltransferase assays, we identified residues that are required for UDP- or UDP-glucose binding and for oligomerization of Gtf3 and determined their contribution to the enzymatic activity of Gtf3. Further in vivo studies revealed that the critical amino acid residues identified by the structural analysis are crucial for Fap1 glycosylation in S. parasanguinis in vivo. Moreover, Gtf3 homologs from other streptococci were able to rescue the gtf3 knock-out mutant of S. parasanguinis in vivo and catalyze the sugar transfer to the modified SRRP substrate in vitro, demonstrating the importance and conservation of the Gtf3 homologs in glycosylation of SRRPs. As the Gtf3 homologs only exist in SRRP-containing streptococci, we conclude that the Gtf3 homologs represent a unique subfamily of glycosyltransferases.

  4. 26 CFR 31.3402(p)-1T - Voluntary Withholding Agreements (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...). 31.3402(p)-1T Section 31.3402(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(p)-1T Voluntary Withholding Agreements (temporary). (a)-(b) For further guidance, see § 31.3402(p)-1(a) and (b). (c) Other payments....

  5. Identification of surface-exposed B-cell epitopes recognized by Haemophilus influenzae type b P1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panezutti, H; James, O; Hansen, E J; Choi, Y; Harkness, R E; Klein, M H; Chong, P

    1993-05-01

    A panel of P1 synthetic peptides was synthesized to map the surface-exposed epitopes of Haemophilus influenzae type b outer membrane protein P1 recognized by three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 7C8, 3E12, and 6B1). By using peptide-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, MAbs 6B1, 7C8, and 3E12 were shown to recognize distinct epitopes localized within residues 60 to 88, 165 to 193, and 400 to 437 of mature P1, respectively. Since MAb 7C8 was shown previously to be protective against certain H. influenzae type b subtypes in the infant rat model of bacteremia, its cognate epitope was further characterized by using truncated peptide analogs. Fine mapping of the 7C8 epitope by competitive inhibition studies revealed that it was localized within residues 184 and 193.

  6. P1 plasmid replication. Role of initiator titration in copy number control.

    PubMed

    Pal, S K; Mason, R J; Chattoraj, D K

    1986-11-20

    The copy number control locus incA of unit copy plasmid P1 maps in a region containing nine 19 base-pair repeats. Previous results from studies in vivo and in vitro indicated that incA interacts with the plasmid-encoded RepA protein, which is essential for replication. It has been proposed that the repeat sequences negatively control copy number by sequestering the RepA protein, which is rate-limiting for replication. Our results lend further support to this hypothesis. Here we show that the repeats can be deleted completely from P1 miniplasmids and the deletion results in an approximately eightfold increase in plasmid copy number. So, incA sequences are totally dispensable for replication and have only a regulatory role. The copy number of incA-deleted plasmids can be reduced if incA sequences are present in trans or are reincorporated at two different positions in the plasmid. This reduction in copy number is not due to lowered expression of the repA gene in the presence of incA. We show that one repeat sequence is sufficient to bind RepA and can reduce the copy number of incA-deleted plasmids. When part of the repeat was deleted, it lost its ability to bind as well as influence copy number. These results show a strong correlation between the capacity of incA repeats to bind RepA protein both in vivo and in vitro, and the function of incA in the control of copy number.

  7. Efficient replication of recombinant Enterovirus B types, carrying different P1 genes in the coxsackievirus B5 replicative backbone.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Nina; Sävneby, Anna; Gullberg, Maria; Evertsson, Kim; Klingel, Karin; Lindberg, A Michael

    2015-06-01

    Recombination is an important feature in the evolution of the Enterovirus genus. Phylogenetic studies of enteroviruses have revealed that the capsid genomic region (P1) is type specific, while the parts of the genome coding for the non-structural proteins (P2-P3) are species specific. Hence, the genome may be regarded as consisting of two modules that evolve independently. In this study, it was investigated whether the non-structural coding part of the genome in one type could support replication of a virus with a P1 region from another type of the same species. A cassette vector (pCas) containing a full-length cDNA copy of coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) was used as a replicative backbone. The P1 region of pCas was replaced with the corresponding part from coxsackievirus B3 Nancy (CVB3N), coxsackievirus B6 Schmitt (CVB6S), and echovirus 7 Wallace (E7W), all members of the Enterovirus B species. The replication efficiency after transfection with clone-derived in vitro transcribed RNA was studied and compared with that of pCas. All the recombinant viruses replicated with similar efficiencies and showed threshold cycle (Ct) values, tissue culture infectivity dose 50 %, and plaque-forming unit titers comparable to viruses generated from the pCas construct. In addition to this, a clone without the P1 region was also constructed, and Western Blot and immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that the viral genome could be translated and replicated despite the lack of the structural protein-coding region. To conclude, the replicative backbone of the CVB5 cassette vector supports replication of intraspecies constructs with P1 regions derived from other members of the Enterovirus B species. In addition to this, the replicative backbone can be both translated and replicated without the presence of a P1 region.

  8. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  9. Heterogeneity of VP4 neutralization epitopes among serotype P1A human rotavirus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, J F; Menchaca, G E; Padilla-Noriega, L; Tamez, R S; Greenberg, H B; López, S; Arias, C F

    1995-01-01

    We have used serotype-specific VP4 and VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (Nt-MAbs), as well as subgroup (SG)-specific MAbs, to characterize by enzyme immunoassay rotavirus strains isolated from diarrheic infants in the city of Monterrey, Mexico, from July 1993 to March 1994. Of a total of 465 children studied, 140 were rotavirus positive, including 3 patients infected with non-group A rotaviruses. The SG and VP7 (G) serotype specificities could be determined for 118 (84%) of the 140 rotavirus-positive stool specimens; 4 rotavirus strains were serotype G1 and SGII; 1 strain was serotype G2 and SGI+II; 112 strains were serotype G3 and SGII; 1 strain was serotype G3 and SGI; and none of the strains was serotype G4. Fifty-eight specimens, representing the 13 different group A rotavirus electropherotypes detected, were chosen for VP4 (P) serotyping. Of these, 48 (83%) strains reacted with the P1A serotype-specific Nt-MAb 1A10. None of the strains reacted with the serotype P2-specific Nt-MAbs tested. Not all viruses that reacted with Nt-MAb 1A10 were recognized by Nt-MAbs 2A3 and 2G1, which also recognize P1A strains, indicating heterogeneity of neutralization epitopes among serotype P1A human rotaviruses. This heterogeneity could be relevant for the specificity of the VP4-mediated neutralizing antibody immune response and indicates the need for antigenic characterization, in addition to genomic typing, of the VP4 proteins of circulating human rotavirus field strains. PMID:7583936

  10. Cleavage Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpP1P2 Protease and Identification of Novel Peptide Substrates and Boronate Inhibitors with Anti-bacterial Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Tatos; Kandror, Olga; Tsu, Christopher; Lai, Jack H.; Wu, Wengen; Liu, Yuxin; Zhao, Peng; Park, Annie; Wolf, Lisa; Dick, Lawrence R.; Rubin, Eric J.; Bachovchin, William; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2015-01-01

    The ClpP1P2 protease complex is essential for viability in Mycobacteria tuberculosis and is an attractive drug target. Using a fluorogenic tripeptide library (Ac-X3X2X1-aminomethylcoumarin) and by determining specificity constants (kcat/Km), we show that ClpP1P2 prefers Met ≫ Leu > Phe > Ala in the X1 position, basic residues or Trp in the X2 position, and Pro ≫ Ala > Trp in the X3 position. We identified peptide substrates that are hydrolyzed up to 1000 times faster than the standard ClpP substrate. These positional preferences were consistent with cleavage sites in the protein GFPssrA by ClpXP1P2. Studies of ClpP1P2 with inactive ClpP1 or ClpP2 indicated that ClpP1 was responsible for nearly all the peptidase activity, whereas both ClpP1 and ClpP2 contributed to protein degradation. Substrate-based peptide boronates were synthesized that inhibit ClpP1P2 peptidase activity in the submicromolar range. Some of them inhibited the growth of Mtb cells in the low micromolar range indicating that cleavage specificity of Mtb ClpP1P2 can be used to design novel anti-bacterial agents. PMID:25759383

  11. H-deficient Bombay and para-Bombay red blood cells are most strongly agglutinated by the galactophilic lectins of Aplysia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that detect I and P1 antigens.

    PubMed

    Gilboa-Garber, N; Sudakevitz, D; Levene, C; Rahimi-Levene, N; Yahalom, V

    2006-01-01

    The galactophilic lectins Aplysia gonad lectin (AGL) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin (PA-IL), which detect human I and P1 RBC antigens, were examined for hemagglutination of H+ (group O and B) and H-deficient (Bombay and para-Bombay phenotype) RBCs. The results were compared with those obtained using two other galactophilic lectins, Maclura pomifera lectin (MPL) and Arachis hypogaea (peanut) agglutinin (PNA), which share T-antigen affinity, and two fucose-binding H-specific lectins, Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin (PA-IIL), as well as with those achieved with anti-I serum. The results revealed that, in contrast to UEA-I and PA-IIL, which preferentially agglutinated H+ RBCs, and to MPL and PNA, which similarly agglutinated all examined RBCs, AGL, PA-IL, and the anti-I serum agglutinated the H-deficient RBCs more strongly than did the H+ RBCs. These findings could be attributed to increased levels of I and P1 antigens on those RBCs resulting from the use of the free common H-type 2 precursor for their synthesis. Since both PA-IL and PA-IIL are regarded as potential pathogen adhesins, it would be interesting to statistically compare the sensitivities of individuals of H+ and H-deficient RBC populations to P. aeruginosa infections.

  12. Protective efficacy of a Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1C DNA vaccine fused with the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cuiming; Wang, Shiping; Hu, Shihai; Yu, Minjun; Zeng, Yanhua; You, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Jinhong; Wu, Yimou

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the immunomodulatory responses of a DNA vaccine constructed by fusing Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 protein carboxy terminal region (P1C) with the Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB). BALB/c mice were immunized by intranasal inoculation with control DNAs, the P1C DNA vaccine or the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine. Levels of the anti-M. pneumoniae antibodies and levels of interferon-γ and IL-4 in mice were increased significantly upon inoculation of the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine when compared with the inoculation with P1C DNA vaccine. The LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine efficiently enhanced the M. pneumoniae-specific IgA and IgG levels. The IgG2a/IgG1 ratio was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar lavages fluid and sera from mice fusion with LTB and P1C than mice receiving P1C alone. When the mice were challenged intranasally with 10(7) CFU M. pneumoniae strain (M129), the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine conferred significantly better protection than P1C DNA vaccine (P < 0.05), as suggested by the results, such as less inflammation, lower histopathological score values, lower detectable number of M. pneumoniae strain, and lower mortality of challenging from 5 × 10(8) CFU M. pneumoniae. These results indicated that the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine efficiently improved protective efficacy against M. pneumoniae infection and effectively attenuated development of M. pneumoniae in mice.

  13. A native Zn/Cd transporting P1B ATPase from natural overexpression in a hyperaccumulator plant reveals post-translational processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TcHMA4 is a P1B-type ATPase that is highly expressed in the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi caerulescens and contains a C-terminal 9-histidine repeat. After isolation from roots, we purified TcHMA4 protein via metal affinity chromatography. The purified protein exhibited Cd- and Zn activated AT...

  14. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  15. Computer program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-0 and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, G.; Gibson, G.

    1968-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-O and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas. The equations used are based on the conditions that there is isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass coordinate system, the scattering cross section is constant, and the target nuclear velocities satisfy a Maxwellian distribution.

  16. Drug Resistance of Enteric Bacteria VI. Introduction of Bacteriophage P1CM into Salmonella typhi and Formation of P1dCM and F-CM Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Eiko; Mitsuhashi, Susumu

    1966-01-01

    Kondo, Eiko (Gunma University, Maebashi, Japan), and Susumu Mitsuhashi. Drug resistance of enteric bacteria. VI. Introduction of bacteriophage P1CM into Salmonella typhi and formation of P1dCM and F-CM elements. J. Bacteriol. 91:1787–1794. 1966.—Bacteriophage P1CM was introduced into Salmonella typhi by means of both phage infection and conjugation with Escherichia coli F+ lysogenic for the phage. Upon incubation with a P1CM phage lysate, S. typhi and S. abony yield CMr cells which are lysogenic for P1CM, but S. typhimurium LT2 does not. The P1CM phage is adsorbed slightly to S. typhi, but no infectious centers are formed when the phage is plated on this strain. Tests on P1CM-adsorbing capacity of the S. typhi P1CM+ strain and on plaque formation and transduction ability of the recovered phage from this strain indicated that the cell and the phage population did not have any special advantage over the original cell and phage population. Conjugation of S. typhi with E. coli F+ carrying P1CM+ gave three types of S. typhi CMr clones: those which carry the whole P1CM phage, those with the P1dCM element, and those with nontransferable CMr. The second type has the F factor and is sensitive to f phages in spite of its typical behavior, serologically and biochemically, as S. typhi. It can donate the P1dCM and F+ characters to E. coli F− or F−/P1 strains. As a consequence of conjugation with the E. coli F+ strain, the CMr character of the third type of S. typhi, the nontransferable CMr element, acquired conjugational transferability, owing to the formation of the element, F-CM. This element can be transferred to an E. coli F− strain at a very high frequency (ca. 100). Both the F and CMr determinants are jointly transduced with P1 phage and are jointly eliminated by acridine dye treatment. PMID:5327907

  17. A Communal Bacterial Adhesin Anchors Biofilm and Bystander Cells to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Absalon, Cedric; Van Dellen, Katrina; Watnick, Paula I.

    2011-01-01

    While the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix has been intensively studied, much less is known about matrix-associated proteins. To better understand the role of these proteins, we undertook a proteomic analysis of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix. Here we show that the two matrix-associated proteins, Bap1 and RbmA, perform distinct roles in the biofilm matrix. RbmA strengthens intercellular attachments. In contrast, Bap1 is concentrated on surfaces where it serves to anchor the biofilm and recruit cells not yet committed to the sessile lifestyle. This is the first example of a biofilm-derived, communally synthesized conditioning film that stabilizes the association of multilayer biofilms with a surface and facilitates recruitment of planktonic bystanders to the substratum. These studies define a novel paradigm for spatial and functional differentiation of proteins in the biofilm matrix and provide evidence for bacterial cooperation in maintenance and expansion of the multilayer biofilm. PMID:21901100

  18. Differential FoxP2 and FoxP1 expression in a vocal learning nucleus of the developing budgerigar.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Osceola; Voyles, Tawni; Hara, Erina; Chen, Qianqian; White, Stephanie A; Wright, Timothy F

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead domain FOXP2 and FOXP1 transcription factors are implicated in several cognitive disorders with language deficits, notably autism, and thus play a central role in learned vocal motor behavior in humans. Although a similar role for FoxP2 and FoxP1 is proposed for other vertebrate species, including songbirds, the neurodevelopmental expression of these genes are unknown in a species with lifelong vocal learning abilities. Like humans, budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) learn new vocalizations throughout their entire lifetime. Like songbirds, budgerigars have distinct brain nuclei for vocal learning, which include the magnocellular nucleus of the medial striatum (MMSt), a basal ganglia region that is considered developmentally and functionally analogous to Area X in songbirds. Here, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to investigate FoxP2 and FoxP1 expression in the MMSt of juvenile and adult budgerigars. We found FoxP2 mRNA and protein expression levels in the MMSt that were lower than the surrounding striatum throughout development and adulthood. In contrast, FoxP1 mRNA and protein had an elevated MMSt/striatum expression ratio as birds matured, regardless of their sex. These results show that life-long vocal plasticity in budgerigars is associated with persistent low-level FoxP2 expression in the budgerigar MMSt, and suggests the possibility that FoxP1 plays an organizational role in the neurodevelopment of vocal motor circuitry. Thus, developmental regulation of the FoxP2 and FoxP1 genes in the basal ganglia appears essential for vocal mimicry in a range of species that possess this relatively rare trait. PMID:25407828

  19. Differential FoxP2 and FoxP1 expression in a vocal learning nucleus of the developing budgerigar.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Osceola; Voyles, Tawni; Hara, Erina; Chen, Qianqian; White, Stephanie A; Wright, Timothy F

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead domain FOXP2 and FOXP1 transcription factors are implicated in several cognitive disorders with language deficits, notably autism, and thus play a central role in learned vocal motor behavior in humans. Although a similar role for FoxP2 and FoxP1 is proposed for other vertebrate species, including songbirds, the neurodevelopmental expression of these genes are unknown in a species with lifelong vocal learning abilities. Like humans, budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) learn new vocalizations throughout their entire lifetime. Like songbirds, budgerigars have distinct brain nuclei for vocal learning, which include the magnocellular nucleus of the medial striatum (MMSt), a basal ganglia region that is considered developmentally and functionally analogous to Area X in songbirds. Here, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to investigate FoxP2 and FoxP1 expression in the MMSt of juvenile and adult budgerigars. We found FoxP2 mRNA and protein expression levels in the MMSt that were lower than the surrounding striatum throughout development and adulthood. In contrast, FoxP1 mRNA and protein had an elevated MMSt/striatum expression ratio as birds matured, regardless of their sex. These results show that life-long vocal plasticity in budgerigars is associated with persistent low-level FoxP2 expression in the budgerigar MMSt, and suggests the possibility that FoxP1 plays an organizational role in the neurodevelopment of vocal motor circuitry. Thus, developmental regulation of the FoxP2 and FoxP1 genes in the basal ganglia appears essential for vocal mimicry in a range of species that possess this relatively rare trait.

  20. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  1. Amino Acid Features of P1B-ATPase Heavy Metal Transporters Enabling Small Numbers of Organisms to Cope with Heavy Metal Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, E.; Alemzadeh, A.; Ebrahimi, M.; Ebrahimie, E.; Dadkhodaei, N.; Ebrahimi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation refers to the use of plants for extraction and detoxification of pollutants, providing a new and powerful weapon against a polluted environment. In some plants, such as Thlaspi spp, heavy metal ATPases are involved in overall metal ion homeostasis and hyperaccumulation. P1B-ATPases pump a wide range of cations, especially heavy metals, across membranes against their electrochemical gradients. Determination of the protein characteristics of P1B-ATPases in hyperaccumulator plants provides a new opportuntity for engineering of phytoremediating plants. In this study, using diverse weighting and modeling approaches, 2644 protein characteristics of primary, secondary, and tertiary structures of P1B-ATPases in hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator plants were extracted and compared to identify differences between proteins in hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator pumps. Although the protein characteristics were variable in their weighting, tree and rule induction models; glycine count, frequency of glutamine-valine, and valine-phenylalanine count were the most important attributes highlighted by 10, five, and four models, respectively. In addition, a precise model was built to discriminate P1B-ATPases in different organisms based on their structural protein features. Moreover, reliable models for prediction of the hyperaccumulating activity of unknown P1B-ATPase pumps were developed. Uncovering important structural features of hyperaccumulator pumps in this study has provided the knowledge required for future modification and engineering of these pumps by techniques such as site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:21573033

  2. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  3. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  4. A neutralizing recombinant single chain antibody, scFv, against BaP1, A P-I hemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castro, J M A; Oliveira, T S; Silveira, C R F; Caporrino, M C; Rodriguez, D; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Ramos, O H P; Rucavado, A; Gutiérrez, J M; Magalhães, G S; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Fernandes, I

    2014-09-01

    BaP1 is a P-I class snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) relevant in the local tissue damage associated with envenomings by Bothrops asper, a medically important snake species in Central America and parts of South and North America. The main treatment for these accidents is the passive immunotherapy using antibodies raised in horses. In order to obtain more specific and batch-to-batch consistent antivenons, recombinant antibodies are considered a good option compared to animal immunization. We constructed a recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) from a monoclonal antibody against BaP1 (MABaP1) formerly secreted by a hybridoma clone. This recombinant antibody was cloned into pMST3 vector in fusion with SUMO protein and contains VH and VL domains linked by a flexible (G4S)3 polypeptide (scFvBaP1). The aim of this work was to produce scFvBaP1 and to evaluate its potential concerning the neutralization of biologically important activities of BaP1. The cytoplasmic expression of this construct was successfully achieved in C43 (DE3) bacteria. Our results showed that scFvBaP1-SUMO fusion protein presented an electrophoretic band of around 43 kDa from which SUMO alone corresponded to 13.6 kDa, and only the scFv was able to recognize BaP1 as well as the whole venom by ELISA. In contrast, neither an irrelevant scFv anti-LDL nor its MoAb partner recognized it. BaP1-induced fibrinolysis was significantly neutralized by scFvBaP1, but not by SUMO, in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, scFvBaP1, as well as MaBaP1, completely neutralized in vivo hemorrhage, muscle necrosis, and inflammation induced by the toxin. Docking analyses revealed possible modes of interaction of the recombinant antibody with BaP1. Our data showed that scFv recognized BaP1 and whole B. asper venom, and neutralized biological effects of this SVMP. This scFv antibody can be used for understanding the molecular mechanisms of neutralization of SVMPs, and for exploring the potential of

  5. Regulation of the clpP1clpP2 operon by the pleiotropic regulator AdpA in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Guyet, Aurélie; Gominet, Myriam; Benaroudj, Nadia; Mazodier, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Insertion of an apramycin resistance cassette in the clpP1clpP2 operon (encoding the ClpP1 and ClpP2 peptidase subunits) affects morphological and physiological differentiation of Streptomyces lividans. Another key factor controlling Streptomyces differentiation is the pleiotropic transcriptional regulator AdpA. We have identified a spontaneous missense mutation (-1 frameshift) in the adpA (bldH) open reading frame in a clpP1clpP2 mutant that led to the synthesis of a non-functional AdpA protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AdpA bound directly to clpP1clpP2 promoter region. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that AdpA regulated the clpP1clpP2 operon expression at specific growth times. In vitro, AdpA and ClgR, a transcriptional activator of clpP1clpP2 operon and other genes, were able to bind simultaneously to clpP1 promoter, which suggests that AdpA binding to clpP1 promoter did not affect that of ClgR. This study allowed to uncover an interplay between the ClpP peptidases and AdpA in S. lividans.

  6. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  9. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  10. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  11. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  12. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. (a) Organization of this section and definition—(1) Organization of this section. Section 409(p) applies if a...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(p)-1...

  14. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1 - Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibited allocation of securities in an S corporation. 1.409(p)-1 Section 1.409(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409(p)-1 Prohibited allocation...

  15. A food-grade fimbrial adhesin FaeG expression system in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Lu, W W; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Xin, M; Kong, J

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the major cause of diarrhea in neonatal piglets. The fimbriae as colonizing factor in the pathogenesis of ETEC constitute a primary target for vaccination against ETEC. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are attractive tools to deliver antigens at the mucosal level. With the safety of genetically modified LAB in mind, a food-grade secretion vector (pALRc or pALRb) was constructed with DNA entirely from LAB, including the replicon, promoter, signal peptide, and selection marker alanine racemase gene (alr). To evaluate the feasibility of the system, the nuclease gene (nuc) from Staphylococcus aureus was used as a reporter to be expressed in both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei. Subsequently, the extracellular secretion of the fimbrial adhesin FaeG of ETEC was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results showed that this food-grade expression system has potential as the delivery vehicle for the safe use of genetically modified LAB for the development of vaccines against ETEC infection.

  16. A food-grade fimbrial adhesin FaeG expression system in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Lu, W W; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Xin, M; Kong, J

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the major cause of diarrhea in neonatal piglets. The fimbriae as colonizing factor in the pathogenesis of ETEC constitute a primary target for vaccination against ETEC. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are attractive tools to deliver antigens at the mucosal level. With the safety of genetically modified LAB in mind, a food-grade secretion vector (pALRc or pALRb) was constructed with DNA entirely from LAB, including the replicon, promoter, signal peptide, and selection marker alanine racemase gene (alr). To evaluate the feasibility of the system, the nuclease gene (nuc) from Staphylococcus aureus was used as a reporter to be expressed in both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei. Subsequently, the extracellular secretion of the fimbrial adhesin FaeG of ETEC was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results showed that this food-grade expression system has potential as the delivery vehicle for the safe use of genetically modified LAB for the development of vaccines against ETEC infection. PMID:26825016

  17. Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes colorectal carcinogenesis by modulating E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling via its FadA adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wendy; Hao, Yujun; Cai, Guifang; Han, Yiping W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) has been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), but causality and underlying mechanisms remain to be established. We demonstrate that Fn adheres to, invades and induces oncogenic and inflammatory responses to stimulate growth of CRC cells through its unique FadA adhesin. FadA binds to E-cadherin, activates β-catenin signaling, and differentially regulates the inflammatory and oncogenic responses. The FadA-binding site on E-cadherin is mapped to an 11 amino acid region. A synthetic peptide derived from this region of E-cadherin abolishes FadA-induced CRC cell growth, and oncogenic and inflammatory responses. FadA levels in the colon tissue from patients with adenomas and adenocarcinomas is >10–100 times higher compared to normal individuals. The increased FadA expression in CRC correlates with increased expression of oncogenic and inflammatory genes. This study unveils a mechanism by which Fn can drive CRC and identifies FadA as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:23954158

  18. Inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and inflammation by peptides from a bacterial adhesin which mimic coagulation factor X.

    PubMed Central

    Rozdzinski, E; Sandros, J; van der Flier, M; Young, A; Spellerberg, B; Bhattacharyya, C; Straub, J; Musso, G; Putney, S; Starzyk, R

    1995-01-01

    Factor X (factor ten) of the coagulation cascade binds to the integrin CD11b/CD18 during inflammation, initiating procoagulant activity on the surface of leukocytes (Altieri, D.C., O.R. Etingin, D.S. Fair, T.K. Brunk, J.E. Geltosky, D.P. Hajjar, and T. S. Edgington. 1991. Science [Wash.DC]. 254:1200-1202). Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), an adhesin of Bordetella pertussis also binds to the CD11b/CD18 integrin (Relman D., E. Tuomanen, S. Falkow, D.T. Golenbock, K. Saukkonen, and S.D. Wright. 1990. Cell. 61:1375-1382). FHA and the CD11b/CD18 binding loops of Factor X share amino acid sequence similarity. FHA peptides similar to Factor X binding loops inhibited 125I-Factor X binding to human neutrophils and prolonged clotting time. In addition, ETKEVDG and its Factor X analogue prevented transendothelial migration of leukocytes in vitro and reduced leukocytosis and blood brain barrier disruption in vivo. Interference with leukocyte migration by a coagulation-based peptide suggests a novel strategy for antiinflammatory therapy. PMID:7883955

  19. Subcutaneous or oral immunization of mice with Lactococcus lactis expressing F4 fimbrial adhesin FaeG.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in neonatal and postweaning piglets. Fimbrial adhesion of ETEC has been considered an important colonization factor with antigenicity. To safely and effectively deliver the F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG to the immune system, we have previously constructed the secretory expression vector pNZ8112-faeG, and FaeG was produced in cytoplasmic form in Lactococcus lactis. In this work, BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant L. lactis to further determine the immunogenicity of recombinant FaeG (rFaeG) via the subcutaneous or oral route. Subcutaneous immunization in mice with recombinant L. lactis induced a significant increase in the F4-specific serum IgG titer and the number of antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in the spleen. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant L. lactis induced mucosal and systemic F4-specific immune responses and increased the number of ASCs in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. High-dose (2.8 × 10(11) CFU) recombinant strains and adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit enhanced specific mucosal immune responses. The results suggest the feasibility of delivering rFaeG expressed in L. lactis to the immune system in order to induce an F4-specific immune response. PMID:23386358

  20. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology.

    PubMed

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero(®) anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes. PMID:26963435

  1. Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins Play an Essential Role in Signalling and Activation of Invasion into Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Wai-Hong; Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Weiss, Greta E.; Lopaticki, Sash; Ansell, Brendan R. E.; Bird, Megan; Lucet, Isabelle; Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Doerig, Christian; Gilson, Paul R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Cowman, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of malaria in humans is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The invasive form of malaria parasites is termed a merozoite and it employs an array of parasite proteins that bind to the host cell to mediate invasion. In Plasmodium falciparum, the erythrocyte binding-like (EBL) and reticulocyte binding-like (Rh) protein families are responsible for binding to specific erythrocyte receptors for invasion and mediating signalling events that initiate active entry of the malaria parasite. Here we have addressed the role of the cytoplasmic tails of these proteins in activating merozoite invasion after receptor engagement. We show that the cytoplasmic domains of these type 1 membrane proteins are phosphorylated in vitro. Depletion of PfCK2, a kinase implicated to phosphorylate these cytoplasmic tails, blocks P. falciparum invasion of red blood cells. We identify the crucial residues within the PfRh4 cytoplasmic domain that are required for successful parasite invasion. Live cell imaging of merozoites from these transgenic mutants show they attach but do not penetrate erythrocytes implying the PfRh4 cytoplasmic tail conveys signals important for the successful completion of the invasion process. PMID:26694741

  2. Identification of Lysine Residues in the Borrelia burgdorferi DbpA Adhesin Required for Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Danielle E.; Lin, Yi-Pin; Deka, Ranjit K.; Groshong, Ashley M.; Moore, Brendan P.; Hagman, Kayla E.; Leong, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.

    2014-01-01

    Decorin-binding protein A (DbpA) of Borrelia burgdorferi mediates bacterial adhesion to heparin and dermatan sulfate associated with decorin. Lysines K82, K163, and K170 of DbpA are known to be important for in vitro interaction with decorin, and the DbpA structure, initially solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, suggests these lysine residues colocalize in a pocket near the C terminus of the protein. In the current study, we solved the structure of DbpA from B. burgdorferi strain 297 using X-ray crystallography and confirmed the existing NMR structural data. In vitro binding experiments confirmed that recombinant DbpA proteins with mutations in K82, K163, or K170 did not bind decorin, which was due to an inability to interact with dermatan sulfate. Most importantly, we determined that the in vitro binding defect observed upon mutation of K82, K163, or K170 in DbpA also led to a defect during infection. The infectivity of B. burgdorferi expressing individual dbpA lysine point mutants was assessed in mice challenged via needle inoculation. Murine infection studies showed that strains expressing dbpA with mutations in K82, K163, and K170 were significantly attenuated and could not be cultured from any tissue. Proper expression and cellular localization of the mutated DbpA proteins were examined, and NMR spectroscopy determined that the mutant DbpA proteins were structurally similar to wild-type DbpA. Taken together, these data showed that lysines K82, K163, and K170 potentiate the binding of DbpA to dermatan sulfate and that an interaction(s) mediated by these lysines is essential for B. burgdorferi murine infection. PMID:24842928

  3. The mannose-specific lectin domains of Flo1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lg-Flo1p from S. pastorianus: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the adhesin-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Ielasi, Francesco S; Goyal, Parveen; Sleutel, Mike; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2013-07-01

    Flo1p and Lg-Flo1p are two cell-wall adhesins belonging to the Flo (flocculation) protein family from the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pastorianus. The main function of these modular proteins endowed with calcium-dependent lectin activity is to mediate cell-cell adhesion events during yeast flocculation, a process which is well known at the cellular level but still not fully characterized from a molecular perspective. Recently, structural features of the N-terminal Flo lectin domains, including the N-terminal domain of Lg-Flo1p (N-Lg-Flo1p), and their interactions with carbohydrate molecules have been investigated. However, structural data concerning the N-terminal domain of Flo1p (N-Flo1p), which is the most specific among the Flo proteins, are missing and information about the N-Lg-Flo1p-carbohydrate interaction still lacks detailed structural insight. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the apo form and the mannose complex of N-Flo1p and X-ray analysis of N-Lg-Flo1p crystals soaked in α-1,2-mannobiose are reported. The N-Flo1p crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.43 Å in the case of the apo form and to 2.12 Å resolution for the mannose complex. Both crystals were orthorhombic and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The N-Lg-Flo1p-α-1,2-mannobiose complex crystal diffracted to 1.73 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P1211 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  4. Immunization with the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA with alum, CpG or imiquimod generates a persistent humoral immune response that recognizes the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Samo, Melissa; Choudhary, Neelima R; Riebe, Kristina J; Shterev, Ivo; Staats, Herman F; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2016-02-24

    The Ducreyi serum resistance A (DsrA) protein of Haemophilus ducreyi belongs to a large family of multifunctional outer membrane proteins termed trimeric autotransporter adhesins responsible for resistance to the bactericidal activity of human complement (serum resistance), agglutination and adhesion. The ability of DsrA to confer serum resistance and bind extracellular matrix proteins lies in its N-terminal passenger domain. We have previously reported that immunization with a recombinant form of the passenger domain of DsrA, rNT-DsrA, in complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant, protects against a homologous challenge in swine. We present herein the results of an immunogenicity study in mice aimed at investigating the persistence, type of immune response, and the effect of immunization route and adjuvants on surrogates of protection. Our results indicate that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with alum elicited antisera with comparable bacterial surface reactivity to that obtained with complete/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. At that dose, high titers and bacterial surface reactivity persisted for 211 days after the first immunization. Administration of rNT-DsrA with CpG or imiquimod as adjuvants elicited a humoral response with similar quantity and quality of antibodies (Abs) as seen with Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, intramuscular administration of rNT-DsrA elicited high-titer Abs with significantly higher reactivity to the bacterial surface than those obtained with subcutaneous immunization. All rNT-DsrA/adjuvant combinations tested, save CpG, elicited a Th2-type response. Taken together, these findings show that a 20 μg dose of rNT-DsrA administered with the adjuvants alum, CpG or imiquimod elicits high-quality Abs with reactivity to the bacterial surface that could protect against an H. ducreyi infection. PMID:26812077

  5. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Messias, Carolina V.; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P.; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000–10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  6. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Messias, Carolina V; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P; Moreira, Otacilio C; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000-10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  7. A native Zn/Cd pumping P(1B) ATPase from natural overexpression in a hyperaccumulator plant.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Aravind; Leitenmaier, Barbara; Yang, Mingjie; Kroneck, Peter M H; Welte, Wolfram; Lutz, Gabriela; Papoyan, Ashot; Kochian, Leon V; Küpper, Hendrik

    2007-11-01

    We report here the first purification of a P(1B) type ATPase, a group of transporters that occurs in bacteria, plants and animals incl. humans, from a eukaryotic organism in native state. TcHMA4 is a P(1B) type ATPase that is highly expressed in the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi caerulescens and contains a C-terminal 9-histidine repeat. After isolation from roots, we purified TcHMA4 protein via metal affinity chromatography. The purified protein exhibited Cd- and Zn-activated ATPase activity after reconstitution into lipid vesicles, showing that it was in its native state. Gels of crude root extract and of the purified protein revealed TcHMA4-specific bands of about 50 and 60kDa, respectively, while the TcHMA4 mRNA predicts a single protein with a size of 128kDa. This indicates the occurrence of post-translational processing; the properties of the two bands were characterised by their activity and binding properties. PMID:17826738

  8. Immunogenicity of recombinant F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG expressed in tobacco chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huifeng; Qian, Bingjun; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2010-08-01

    To test the possibility of producing the novel vaccine in plants against diarrhea normally found in neonatal and newly weaned piglets, the faeG gene, encoding a major F4ac fimbrial subunit protein, was introduced into the tobacco chloroplast genome. After two rounds of selection under spectinomycin, we obtained the transgenic plants nearly homoplasmic. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that faeG and the antibiotic selective gene aminoglycoside 3' adenylyltransferase (aadA) were highly transcribed as a dicistron, while the translational level of recombinant FaeG in transplastomic tobacco was about 0.15% of total soluble protein. The immunogenicity of recombinant FaeG produced in tobacco chloroplasts was confirmed by the observation that FaeG-specific antibodies were elicited in mice immunized with total soluble protein of transgenic plants, as well as the result that mouse sera stimulated by chloroplast-derived recombinant FaeG could neutralize F4ac enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in vivo. This study provides a new alternative for producing the ETEC vaccine using the chloroplast expression system.

  9. Adhesins and ligands involved in the interaction of Candida spp. with epithelial and endothelial surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Hostetter, M K

    1994-01-01

    Adhesion of candidal species to the epithelium of the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract stands as a critical first step in the pathogenesis of candidal infection. After colonization and replication at mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans and other pathogenic species may penetrate the mucosal barrier, enter the vascular tree, and disseminate hematogenously. The consequences of this pathogenic cascade evoke considerable morbidity and mortality, especially among immunocompromised patients. Thus, interactions of C. albicans and other candidal species with epithelium and endothelium may lead to serious consequences for the human host. This review evaluates candidate candidal adhesions for epithelial and endothelial surfaces, with emphasis on the specificity of the interaction, the inhibitors that have been employed, and the ligands that have been identified on mammalian cells or matrices. Three types of interactions are described: protein-protein interactions, lectin-like interactions, and incompletely defined interactions in which the adhesive ligand is as yet unidentified. Special attention is given to the roles of integrin-like proteins. Differences in the mechanisms of candidal attachment to epithelium and endothelium are delineated. Last, on the basis of the available literature, avenues of potentially fruitful investigation are proposed. Images PMID:8118789

  10. Immunogenicity of recombinant F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG expressed in tobacco chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huifeng; Qian, Bingjun; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2010-08-01

    To test the possibility of producing the novel vaccine in plants against diarrhea normally found in neonatal and newly weaned piglets, the faeG gene, encoding a major F4ac fimbrial subunit protein, was introduced into the tobacco chloroplast genome. After two rounds of selection under spectinomycin, we obtained the transgenic plants nearly homoplasmic. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that faeG and the antibiotic selective gene aminoglycoside 3' adenylyltransferase (aadA) were highly transcribed as a dicistron, while the translational level of recombinant FaeG in transplastomic tobacco was about 0.15% of total soluble protein. The immunogenicity of recombinant FaeG produced in tobacco chloroplasts was confirmed by the observation that FaeG-specific antibodies were elicited in mice immunized with total soluble protein of transgenic plants, as well as the result that mouse sera stimulated by chloroplast-derived recombinant FaeG could neutralize F4ac enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in vivo. This study provides a new alternative for producing the ETEC vaccine using the chloroplast expression system. PMID:20705597

  11. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  12. S1P1 Receptor Modulation with Cyclical Recovery from Lymphopenia Ameliorates Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Nguyen, Nhan; Sarkisyan, Gor; Leaf, Nora B.; Cameron, Michael D.; Kago, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies modulate T-cell autoimmunity in the central nervous system (CNS) but may exacerbate latent infections. Fingolimod, a nonselective sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist that induces sustained lymphopenia and accumulates in the CNS, represents a new treatment modality for MS. We hypothesized that sustained lymphopenia would not be required for efficacy and that a selective, CNS-penetrant, peripherally short-acting, S1P1 agonist would show full efficacy in a mouse MS model. Using daily treatment with 10 mg/kg 2-(4-(5-(3,4-diethoxyphenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl amino)ethanol (CYM-5442) at the onset of clinical signs in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG35–55- induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), we assessed clinical scores, CNS cellular infiltration, demyelination, and gliosis for 12 days with CYM-5442, vehicle, or fingolimod. CYM-5442 levels in CNS and plasma were determined at experiment termination, and blood lymphopenia was measured 3 and 24 h after the last injection. Plasma levels of cytokines were assayed at the end of the protocol. Changes in S1P1-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression on neurons and astrocytes during active EAE and upon CYM-5442 treatment were quantified with flow cytometry and Western blotting by using native-locus enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged S1P1 mice. S1P1 agonism alone reduced pathological features as did fingolimod (maximally lymphopenic throughout), despite full reversal of lymphopenia within each dosing interval. CYM-5442 levels in CNS but not in plasma were sustained. Neuronal and astrocytic S1P1 expression in EAE was suppressed by CYM-5442 treatment, relative to vehicle, and levels of key cytokines, such as interleukin 17A, were also significantly reduced in drug-treated mice. S1P1-selective agonists that induce reversible lymphopenia while persisting in the CNS may be effective MS treatments. PMID:22031473

  13. Dose of house dust mite antigen (P1) inhaled by infants aged one month

    SciTech Connect

    Carswell, F.; Clark, J.; Robinson, P.; Platts-Mills, T.A.

    1983-11-01

    A survey of the habitats occupied by 12 infants of one month of age revealed that approximately 10% of their day was spent in conditions of potential exposure to the major (P1) allergen of the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. A respiratory pump which reproduced the minute ventilation of an infant was placed in representative infant habitats. The P1 allergen trapped by the filter in this pump was measured as an estimate of infants' allergen intake. Detectable P1 intake was only present when there was active air disturbance (bed making and vacuuming). The average P1 intake was approximately 3 ng P1/24 hours. Comparison of this P1 intake with that which sensitizes in other situations suggests that it is usually inadequate to sensitize infants.

  14. Kinetics of Methylation by EcoP1I DNA Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Sistla, Srivani; Krishnamurthy, Vinita; Arathi, Sampath; Desirazu, Narasimha Rao

    2010-01-01

    EcoP1I DNA MTase (M.EcoP1I), an N6-adenine MTase from bacteriophage P1, is a part of the EcoP1I restriction-modification (R-M) system which belongs to the Type III R-M system. It recognizes the sequence 5′-AGACC-3′ and methylates the internal adenine. M.EcoP1I requires Mg2+ for the transfer of methyl groups to DNA. M.EcoP1I is shown to exist as dimer in solution, and even at high salt concentrations (0.5 M) the dimeric M.EcoP1I does not dissociate into monomers suggesting a strong interaction between the monomer subunits. Preincubation and isotope partitioning studies with M.EcoP1I indicate a kinetic mechanism where the duplex DNA binds first followed by AdoMet. Interestingly, M.EcoP1I methylates DNA substrates in the presence of Mn2+ and Ca2+ other than Mg2+ with varying affinities. Amino acid analysis and methylation assays in the presence of metal ions suggest that M.EcoP1I has indeed two metal ion-binding sites [358ID(x)n … ExK401 and 600DxDxD604 motif]. EcoP1I DNA MTase catalyzes the transfer of methyl groups using a distributive mode of methylation on DNA containing more than one recognition site. A chemical modification of EcoP1I DNA MTase using N-ethylmaleimide resulted in an irreversible inactivation of enzyme activity suggesting the possible role of cysteine residues in catalysis. PMID:21048863

  15. Application of a recombinant capsid polyprotein (P1) expressed in a prokaryotic system to detect antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Bisht, Punam; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Ranjan, Rajeev; Sanyal, Aniket; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious epidemic disease of transboundary importance. In India, the disease is endemic in nature and is controlled primarily by prophylactic bi-annual mass vaccination. In this control programme, liquid-phase blocking ELISA (LPBE) is being used widely for post vaccination seromonitoring. In order to develop an alternative assay to LPBE, the recombinant capsid polyprotein (rP1) of FMD virus (FMDV) serotype O was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as an antigen for the detection of antibodies to FMDV. The capsid polyprotein of FMDV serotype O could be expressed successfully as a recombinant 6xHis-SUMO tagged protein in soluble form. In a Western blot assay, the rP1 protein reacted strongly with anti-FMDV serotype O guinea pig and bovine serum. Further, in this study, an rP1 protein-based solid phase competitive ELISA (rP1-SPCE) was developed and evaluated with a set of serum samples representing the various epidemiological situation of the country. The performance of the rP1-SPCE was compared with the in-house LPBE, and overall, an excellent agreement (kappa = 0.95) was observed between the two tests. This report demonstrates that the recombinant capsid polyprotein-based ELISA has the potential to be an easy-to-perform, safe alternative to the conventional LPBE for the quantitative detection of antibodies to FMDV serotype O. PMID:25701759

  16. Involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate and S1P1 in angiogenesis: analyses using a new S1P1 antagonist of non-sphingosine-1-phosphate analog.

    PubMed

    Yonesu, Kiyoaki; Kawase, Yumi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Takagi, Nana; Tsuchida, Jun; Takuwa, Yoh; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Nara, Futoshi

    2009-03-15

    Chemical lead 2 (CL2) is the first non-sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) analog type antagonist of endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1/S1P(1)), which is a member of the Sph-1-P receptor family. CL2 inhibits [(3)H]Sph-1-P/S1P(1) binding and shows concentration-dependent inhibition activity against both intracellular cAMP concentration decrease and cell invasion induced by the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway. It also inhibits normal tube formation in an angiogenesis culture model, indicating that CL2 has anti-angiogenesis activity. This compound improved the disease conditions in two angiogenic models in vivo. It significantly inhibited angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit cornea model as well as the swelling of mouse feet in an anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis model. These results indicate that the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway would have an important role in disease-related angiogenesis, especially in the processes of migration/invasion and tube formation. In addition, CL2 would be a powerful tool for the pharmacological study of the mechanisms of the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway in rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes retinopathy, and solid tumor growth processes. PMID:19150609

  17. Genetic studies of coliphage P1. I. Mapping by use of prophage deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D H; Walker, J T

    1975-01-01

    One hundred and ten amber mutants of coliphage P1 were isolated and localized into groups with respect to the existing genetic map by use of nonpermissive Escherichia coli K-12 strains lysogenic for P1 with deletions. These lysogens contain one of three types of deletion prophages: P1cry and its derivatives, P1dlacs, and P1dpros. Fourteen such lysogens were tested for their ability to rescue the amber mutants which were then assigned to one of nine deletion segments of the P1 genome defined by the termini of the various prophage deletions. The relationship of the nine deletion segments with the published P1 map is described, two new segments having been added. The deletions of the 14 prophages overlapped sufficiently to indicate that the P1 genetic prophage map should be represented in circular form, which is consistent with the fact that P1 is normally a circular plasmid in the prophage state. The distribution of mutants into deletion segments is nonrandom for at least one segment. In addition, the deletion termini of the 14 defective prophages coincided in five out of nine regions separating the nine deletion segments. Various possible explanations are discussed for the nonrandom recurrence of these deletion termini, including the evidence of hot spots of recombination. PMID:1099231

  18. Biochemical characterization of three distinct polygalacturonases from Neosartorya fischeri P1.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xia; Li, Ke; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the most important industrial pectinases. To enrich the genetic resources and develop new enzyme candidates, three polygalacturonase genes (Nfpg I-III) of glycosyl hydrolase family 28 were cloned from Neosartorya fischeri P1 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins exhibited some distinguished properties. In comparison with other counterparts, NfPG I showed the highest specific activity (40, 123 U/mg), NfPG II had the highest temperature optimum (65 °C), and the pH optimum of NfPG III was the lowest (3.5). The orders of their thermostability and resistance to chemicals tested were NfPG II>NfPG III>NfPG I and NfPG II>NfPG I>NfPG III, respectively. Combinations of these enzymes showed better performance than individuals in the processing and clarification of apple and strawberry juice. These results suggest that N. fischeri polygalacturonases have great application potentials in the food industry for juice production.

  19. Biochemical characterization of three distinct polygalacturonases from Neosartorya fischeri P1.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xia; Li, Ke; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the most important industrial pectinases. To enrich the genetic resources and develop new enzyme candidates, three polygalacturonase genes (Nfpg I-III) of glycosyl hydrolase family 28 were cloned from Neosartorya fischeri P1 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins exhibited some distinguished properties. In comparison with other counterparts, NfPG I showed the highest specific activity (40, 123 U/mg), NfPG II had the highest temperature optimum (65 °C), and the pH optimum of NfPG III was the lowest (3.5). The orders of their thermostability and resistance to chemicals tested were NfPG II>NfPG III>NfPG I and NfPG II>NfPG I>NfPG III, respectively. Combinations of these enzymes showed better performance than individuals in the processing and clarification of apple and strawberry juice. These results suggest that N. fischeri polygalacturonases have great application potentials in the food industry for juice production. PMID:26041232

  20. Purification and Characterization of Three Chitosanase Activities from Bacillus megaterium P1

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, A.; Sygusch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium P1, a bacterial strain capable of hydrolyzing chitosan, was isolated from soil samples. Chitosan-degrading activity was induced by chitosan but not by its constituent d-glucosamine. Extracellular secretion of chitosanase reached levels corresponding to 1 U/ml under optimal conditions. Three chitosan-degrading proteins (chitosanases A, B, and C) were purified to homogeneity. Chitosanase A (43 kilodaltons) was highly specific for chitosan and represented the major chitosan-hydrolyzing species. Chitosanases B (39.5 kilodaltons) and C (22 kilodaltons) corresponded to minor activities and possessed comparable specific activities toward chitosan, chitin, and cellulose. Chitosanase A was active from pH 4.5 to 6.5 and was stable on the basis of activity up to 45°C. The optimum temperature for enzymatic chitosan hydrolysis was 50°C. Kinetic studies on chitosanase A suggest that the enzyme is substrate inhibited. The apparent Km and Vmax determined at 22°C and pH 5.6 were 0.8 mg/ml and 280 U/mg, respectively. End products of chitosan hydrolysis by each of the three chitosanases were identified as glucosamine oligomers, similar to those obtained for previously reported chitosanase digestions. Images PMID:16348170

  1. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Colonization following Intradermal, Sublingual, or Oral Vaccination with EtpA Adhesin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingwei; Vickers, Tim J; Fleckenstein, James M

    2016-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a common cause of diarrhea. Extraordinary antigenic diversity has prompted a search for conserved antigens to complement canonical approaches to ETEC vaccine development. EtpA, an immunogenic extracellular ETEC adhesin relatively conserved in the ETEC pathovar, has previously been shown to be a protective antigen following intranasal immunization. These studies were undertaken to explore alternative routes of EtpA vaccination that would permit use of a double mutant (R192G L211A) heat-labile toxin (dmLT) adjuvant. Here, oral vaccination with EtpA adjuvanted with dmLT afforded significant protection against small intestinal colonization, and the degree of protection correlated with fecal IgG, IgA, or total fecal antibody responses to EtpA. Sublingual vaccination yielded compartmentalized mucosal immune responses with significant increases in anti-EtpA fecal IgG and IgA, and mice vaccinated via this route were also protected against colonization. In contrast, while intradermal (i.d.) vaccination achieved high levels of both serum and fecal antibodies against both EtpA and dmLT, mice vaccinated via the i.d. route were not protected against subsequent colonization and the avidity of serum IgG and IgA EtpA-specific antibodies was significantly lower after i.d. immunization compared to other routes. Finally, we demonstrate that antiserum from vaccinated mice significantly impairs binding of LT to cognate GM1 receptors and shows near complete neutralization of toxin delivery by ETEC in vitro Collectively, these data provide further evidence that EtpA could complement future vaccine strategies but also suggest that additional effort will be required to optimize its use as a protective immunogen. PMID:27226279

  2. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Astorga, Joaquín; Pérez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio; Romero, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed (i) the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and (ii) the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog. PMID:25628606

  3. [The role of E. coli adhesins in the pathogenesis of urinary infection].

    PubMed

    Dalet Escribá, F; Segovia Talero, T; del Río Pérez, G

    1991-06-01

    One thousand five hundred strains obtained from patients suffering from different clinical forms of urinary infections (UI) and dependent glands have been studied with the aim of establishing the pathogenic responsibility of E. coli adhesion protein (ADH) in urinary infections (UI). ADH were determined using agglutination techniques with guinea pig and human red cells, C. albicans and S. cerevisiae spores and GAL-GAL sensitized latex. In non complicated UI, the presence of ADH is the main invasion mechanism for E. coli. The frequency of adherent strains is very high (569/648) in acute cases (207/247 cystitis + 69/98 recurrent cystitis + 108/114 pyelonephritis + 140/154 prostatitis + 28/35 orchyepidimitis and scarce (14/184) in asymptomatic or chronic cases (6/107 bacteriurias + 7/67 prostatitis + 1/10 orchyepidimitis). A close relationship is established between the presence of ADH and clinical symptoms. The acute cases with general symptoms are caused in 85% of cases (188/216) by strains with ADH type MR specially subtype P. The acute cases with local symptoms (only urinary syndrome) are caused in 77% of cases (297/387) by strains with ADH type Ms. In complicated UI the expression of adhesion proteins does not constitute and essential requisite in order to invade the urinary tract. It is suggested that males are significantly more resistant the females to UI both parenchymal and urinary tract. It is deduced that underlying factors are more predisposing to UI the smaller the adherence rate of isolated strains is. Thus, reflux and neurogenic bladder probes are by far more aggressive alterations than prostatic adenoma, bladder tumor and lithiasis.

  4. Problems associated with the measurement of coherence parameters - Superelastic electron scattering by laser-excited Ba-138(...6s6p1P1) atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zetner, P. W.; Trajmar, S.; Csanak, G.; Clark, R. E. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of superelastic scattering of electrons by laser-excited Ba-138(...6s6p1P1) atoms were carried out. An asymmetry observed has been explained using a model of scattering from a target with finite dimensions. This model employed coherence parameters which were calculated in the distorted-wave approximation. The results indicated that the interpretation of coherence experiments in terms of scattering from a pointlike target can lead to serious errors in the deduction of coherence parameters at low scattering angles.

  5. The viral capping enzyme nsP1: a novel target for the inhibition of chikungunya virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Delang, L.; Li, C.; Tas, A.; Quérat, G.; Albulescu, I. C.; De Burghgraeve, T.; Guerrero, N. A. Segura; Gigante, A.; Piorkowski, G.; Decroly, E.; Jochmans, D.; Canard, B.; Snijder, E. J.; Pérez-Pérez, M. J.; van Hemert, M. J.; Coutard, B.; Leyssen, P.; Neyts, J.

    2016-01-01

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has become a substantial global health threat due to its massive re-emergence, the considerable disease burden and the lack of vaccines or therapeutics. We discovered a novel class of small molecules ([1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-7(6H)-ones) with potent in vitro activity against CHIKV isolates from different geographical regions. Drug-resistant variants were selected and these carried a P34S substitution in non-structural protein 1 (nsP1), the main enzyme involved in alphavirus RNA capping. Biochemical assays using nsP1 of the related Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus revealed that the compounds specifically inhibit the guanylylation of nsP1. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that the alphavirus capping machinery is an excellent antiviral drug target. Considering the lack of options to treat CHIKV infections, this series of compounds with their unique (alphavirus-specific) target offers promise for the development of therapy for CHIKV infections. PMID:27545976

  6. The viral capping enzyme nsP1: a novel target for the inhibition of chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Delang, L; Li, C; Tas, A; Quérat, G; Albulescu, I C; De Burghgraeve, T; Guerrero, N A Segura; Gigante, A; Piorkowski, G; Decroly, E; Jochmans, D; Canard, B; Snijder, E J; Pérez-Pérez, M J; van Hemert, M J; Coutard, B; Leyssen, P; Neyts, J

    2016-01-01

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has become a substantial global health threat due to its massive re-emergence, the considerable disease burden and the lack of vaccines or therapeutics. We discovered a novel class of small molecules ([1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-7(6H)-ones) with potent in vitro activity against CHIKV isolates from different geographical regions. Drug-resistant variants were selected and these carried a P34S substitution in non-structural protein 1 (nsP1), the main enzyme involved in alphavirus RNA capping. Biochemical assays using nsP1 of the related Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus revealed that the compounds specifically inhibit the guanylylation of nsP1. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that the alphavirus capping machinery is an excellent antiviral drug target. Considering the lack of options to treat CHIKV infections, this series of compounds with their unique (alphavirus-specific) target offers promise for the development of therapy for CHIKV infections. PMID:27545976

  7. A Study of Perkins 2P1 Graduation Performance Rates at Virginia Western Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, J. Andrew.

    2006-01-01

    "2P1" is the Carl Perkins label for an institution's graduation performance rate. Systems receiving Perkins funds, like Virginia's 23 community colleges, are expected to meet a federally approved 2P1 target rate. For the 3-year period 1999-2001 Virginia Western Community College (VWCC) was one of seven community colleges in the VCCS (Virginia…

  8. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  9. 26 CFR 31.3306(p)-1 - Employees of related corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employees of related corporations. 31.3306(p)-1 Section 31.3306(p)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act...

  10. Structure determination and analysis of a haemolytic gingipain adhesin domain from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Yun, P.; Nadkarni, M.A.; Ghadikolaee, N.B.; Nguyen, K.A.; Lee, M.; Hunter, N.; Collyer, C.A.

    2010-08-27

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an obligately anaerobic bacterium recognized as an aetiological agent of adult periodontitis. P. gingivalis produces cysteine proteinases, the gingipains. The crystal structure of a domain within the haemagglutinin region of the lysine gingipain (Kgp) is reported here. The domain was named K2 as it is the second of three homologous structural modules in Kgp. The K2 domain structure is a 'jelly-roll' fold with two anti-parallel {beta}-sheets. This fold topology is shared with adhesive domains from functionally diverse receptors such as MAM domains, ephrin receptor ligand binding domains and a number of carbohydrate binding modules. Possible functions of K2 were investigated. K2 induced haemolysis of erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner that was augmented by the blocking of anion transport. Further, cysteine-activated arginine gingipain RgpB, which degrades glycophorin A, sensitized erythrocytes to the haemolytic effect of K2. Cleaved K2, similar to that found in extracted Kgp, lacks the haemolytic activity indicating that autolysis of Kgp may be a staged process which is artificially enhanced by extraction of the protein. The data indicate a functional role for K2 in the integrated capacity conferred by Kgp to enable the porphyrin auxotroph P. gingivalis to capture essential haem from erythrocytes.

  11. Biofilm formation by Psychrobacter arcticus and the role of a large adhesin in attachment to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hinsa-Leasure, Shannon M; Koid, Cassandra; Tiedje, James M; Schultzhaus, Janna N

    2013-07-01

    Psychrobacter arcticus strain 273-4, an isolate from a Siberian permafrost core, is capable of forming biofilms when grown in minimal medium under laboratory conditions. Biofilms form at 4 to 22°C when acetate is supplied as the lone carbon source and with 1 to 7% sea salt. P. arcticus is also capable of colonizing quartz sand. Transposon mutagenesis identified a gene important for biofilm formation by P. arcticus. Four transposon mutants were mapped to a 20.1-kbp gene, which is predicted to encode a protein of 6,715 amino acids (Psyc_1601). We refer to this open reading frame as cat1, for cold attachment gene 1. The cat1 mutants are unable to form biofilms at levels equivalent to that of the wild type, and there is no impact on the planktonic growth characteristics of the strains, indicating a specific role in biofilm formation. Through time course studies of the static microtiter plate assay, we determined that cat1 mutants are unable to form biofilms equivalent to that of the wild type under all conditions tested. In flow cell experiments, cat1 mutants initially are unable to attach to the surface. Over time, however, they form microcolonies, an architecture very different from that produced by wild-type biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Cat1 is involved in the initial stages of bacterial attachment to surfaces. PMID:23603675

  12. Characterization of the Interaction between the Chlamydial Adhesin OmcB and the Human Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Fechtner, Tim; Stallmann, Sonja; Moelleken, Katja; Meyer, Klaus L.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the OmcB protein from Chlamydia pneumoniae mediates adhesion of the infectious elementary body to human HEp-2 cells by interacting with heparin/heparan sulfate-like glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) via basic amino acids located in the first of a pair of XBBXBX heparin-binding motifs (K. Moelleken and J. H. Hegemann, Mol. Microbiol. 67:403–419, 2008). In the present study, we show that the basic amino acid at position 57 (arginine) in the first XBBXBX motif, the basic amino acid at position 61 (arginine) in the second motif, and another amino acid (lysine 69) C terminal to it play key roles in the interaction. In addition, we show that discrimination between heparin-dependent and -independent adhesion by C. trachomatis OmcBs is entirely dependent on three variable amino acids in the so-called variable domain C terminal to the conserved XBBXBX motif. Here, the predicted conformational change in the secondary structure induced by the proline at position 66 seems to be crucial for heparin recognition. Finally, we performed neutralization experiments using different anti-heparan sulfate antibodies to gain insight into the nature of the GAGs recognized by OmcB. The results suggest that C. trachomatis serovar L2 OmcB interacts with 6-O-sulfated domains of heparan sulfate, while C. pneumoniae OmcB apparently interacts with domains of heparan sulfate harboring a diverse subset of O-sulfations. PMID:24056107

  13. Biofilm Formation by Psychrobacter arcticus and the Role of a Large Adhesin in Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Cassandra; Tiedje, James M.; Schultzhaus, Janna N.

    2013-01-01

    Psychrobacter arcticus strain 273-4, an isolate from a Siberian permafrost core, is capable of forming biofilms when grown in minimal medium under laboratory conditions. Biofilms form at 4 to 22°C when acetate is supplied as the lone carbon source and with 1 to 7% sea salt. P. arcticus is also capable of colonizing quartz sand. Transposon mutagenesis identified a gene important for biofilm formation by P. arcticus. Four transposon mutants were mapped to a 20.1-kbp gene, which is predicted to encode a protein of 6,715 amino acids (Psyc_1601). We refer to this open reading frame as cat1, for cold attachment gene 1. The cat1 mutants are unable to form biofilms at levels equivalent to that of the wild type, and there is no impact on the planktonic growth characteristics of the strains, indicating a specific role in biofilm formation. Through time course studies of the static microtiter plate assay, we determined that cat1 mutants are unable to form biofilms equivalent to that of the wild type under all conditions tested. In flow cell experiments, cat1 mutants initially are unable to attach to the surface. Over time, however, they form microcolonies, an architecture very different from that produced by wild-type biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Cat1 is involved in the initial stages of bacterial attachment to surfaces. PMID:23603675

  14. A p1 aneurysm and diabetes insipidus caused by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lv, M; Lv, X; Jiang, C; Wu, Z

    2010-12-01

    We describe a patient with a P1 aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) with diabetes insipidus (DI) caused by traumatic brain injury. A 21-year-old woman presented with epidural hematoma, left temporal contusion and subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by head trauma. DI occurred with normal anterior hypophyseal function on the second day after admission and cerebral angiography demonstrated an aneurysm at the right P1 portion after one month. DI was treated with administration of desmopressin and the aneurysm and P1 portion of the right PCA were occluded completely. After three months, her DI recovered and decompressin was discontinued. The six month follow-up angiogram confirmed cure of the P1 aneurysm. P1 aneurysm and DI can be caused by traumatic brain injury. Cranial DI caused by head injury with perturbations in water balance may be transitory and resolve.

  15. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  16. Relationship between adhesin genes and biofilm formation in vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mirzaee, Mohsen; Najar-Peerayeh, Shahin; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Moghadam, Mahdi Forouzandeh

    2015-05-01

    The adherence ability and biofilm production are the characteristic of enhanced virulence among isolates of vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) strains. Although biofilm-forming properties have been well demonstrated in S. aureus, they still remain unclear among the recently emerged types of VISA strains. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between the distribution of genes encoding staphylococcal microbial surface components which recognise adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs), the surface protein A (Spa) types, MLST types and the ability of VISA strains to biofilm formation. Microtiter plate assay (Mtp) results showed that all eleven biofilm producer isolates were adherent at various levels. PCR experiments showed that nine MSCRAMM genes, clfA, clfB, fnbA and fib were detected in all of the strains, indicating a high prevalence. The prevalences of other MSCRAMMs and icaABCD genes were found to be variable and not equally distributed among the VISA strains. There was no direct correlation between the distribution of adhesion-related genes and biofilm formation, which indicates that the presence or absence of these genes cannot be employed as an indicator of the ability to biofilm formation. Isolates which belong to the same Spa and ST types showed similar adherence capacities in the Mtp assay, but significant differences were observed between different Spa types. The findings of this study, using quantitative methods, have shown that genotypically different strains of VISA have different capabilities to produce biofilms. This may be caused by a difference in the spa types of VISA isolates or due to their differences in the expression of MSCRAMM and icaABCD genes.

  17. Population variability of the FimH type 1 fimbrial adhesin in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Stahlhut, Steen G; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Struve, Carsten; Weissman, Scott J; Aprikian, Pavel; Libby, Stephen J; Fang, Ferric C; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2009-03-01

    FimH is an adhesive subunit of type 1 fimbriae expressed by different enterobacterial species. The enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae is an environmental organism that is also a frequent cause of sepsis, urinary tract infection (UTI), and liver abscess. Type 1 fimbriae have been shown to be critical for the ability of K. pneumoniae to cause UTI in a murine model. We show here that the K. pneumoniae fimH gene is found in 90% of strains from various environmental and clinical sources. The fimH alleles exhibit relatively low nucleotide and structural diversity but are prone to frequent horizontal-transfer events between different bacterial clones. Addition of the fimH locus to multiple-locus sequence typing significantly improved the resolution of the clonal structure of pathogenic strains, including the K1 encapsulated liver isolates. In addition, the K. pneumoniae FimH protein is targeted by adaptive point mutations, though not to the same extent as FimH from uropathogenic Escherichia coli or TonB from the same K. pneumoniae strains. Such adaptive mutations include a single amino acid deletion from the signal peptide that might affect the length of the fimbrial rod by affecting FimH translocation into the periplasm. Another FimH mutation (S62A) occurred in the course of endemic circulation of a nosocomial uropathogenic clone of K. pneumoniae. This mutation is identical to one found in a highly virulent uropathogenic strain of E. coli, suggesting that the FimH mutations are pathoadaptive in nature. Considering the abundance of type 1 fimbriae in Enterobacteriaceae, our present finding that fimH genes are subject to adaptive microevolution substantiates the importance of type 1 fimbria-mediated adhesion in K. pneumoniae.

  18. Structural basis of Lewisb antigen binding by the Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Naim; Howard, Tina; Phillips, Chris; Brassington, Claire; Overman, Ross; Debreczeni, Judit; Gellert, Paul; Stolnik, Snow; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan; Falcone, Franco H.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a leading cause of peptic ulceration and gastric cancer worldwide. To achieve colonization of the stomach, this Gram-negative bacterium adheres to Lewisb (Leb) antigens in the gastric mucosa using its outer membrane protein BabA. Structural information for BabA has been elusive, and thus, its molecular mechanism for recognizing Leb antigens remains unknown. We present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of BabA, from H. pylori strain J99, in the absence and presence of Leb at 2.0- and 2.1-Å resolutions, respectively. BabA is a predominantly α-helical molecule with a markedly kinked tertiary structure containing a single, shallow Leb binding site at its tip within a β-strand motif. No conformational change occurs in BabA upon binding of Leb, which is characterized by low affinity under acidic [KD (dissociation constant) of ~227 μM] and neutral (KD of ~252 μM) conditions. Binding is mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds between Leb Fuc1, GlcNAc3, Fuc4, and Gal5 residues and a total of eight BabA amino acids (C189, G191, N194, N206, D233, S234, S244, and T246) through both carbonyl backbone and side-chain interactions. The structural model was validated through the generation of two BabA variants containing N206A and combined D233A/S244A substitutions, which result in a reduction and complete loss of binding affinity to Leb, respectively. Knowledge of the molecular basis of Leb recognition by BabA provides a platform for the development of therapeutics targeted at inhibiting H. pylori adherence to the gastric mucosa. PMID:26601230

  19. Cooperative role of antibodies against heat-labile toxin and the EtpA Adhesin in preventing toxin delivery and intestinal colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Hamilton, David J; Fleckenstein, James M

    2012-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrheal disease in developing countries, where it is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Vaccine development for ETEC has been hindered by the heterogeneity of known molecular targets and the lack of broad-based sustained protection afforded by existing vaccine strategies. In an effort to explore the potential role of novel antigens in ETEC vaccines, we examined the ability of antibodies directed against the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and the recently described EtpA adhesin to prevent intestinal colonization in vivo and toxin delivery to epithelial cells in vitro. We demonstrate that EtpA is required for the optimal delivery of LT and that antibodies against this adhesin play at least an additive role in preventing delivery of LT to target intestinal cells when combined with antibodies against either the A or B subunits of the toxin. Moreover, vaccination with a combination of LT and EtpA significantly impaired intestinal colonization. Together, these results suggest that the incorporation of recently identified molecules such as EtpA could be used to enhance current approaches to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:22875600

  20. Backup Expression of the PhaP2 Phasin Compensates for phaP1 Deletion in Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Maintaining Fitness and PHB Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luis P. S.; Teixeira, Cícero S.; Tirapelle, Evandro F.; Donatti, Lucélia; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; de Souza, Emanuel M.; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fabio; Chubatsu, Leda S.; Müller-Santos, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Phasins are important proteins controlling poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules formation, their number into the cell and stability. The genome sequencing of the endophytic and diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 revealed two homologous phasin genes. To verify the role of the phasins on PHB accumulation in the parental strain H. seropedicae SmR1, isogenic strains defective in the expression of phaP1, phaP2 or both genes were obtained by gene deletion and characterized in this work. Despite of the high sequence similarity between PhaP1 and PhaP2, PhaP1 is the major phasin in H. seropedicae, since its deletion reduced PHB accumulation by ≈50% in comparison to the parental and ΔphaP2. Upon deletion of phaP1, the expression of phaP2 was sixfold enhanced in the ΔphaP1 strain. The responsive backup expression of phaP2 partially rescued the ΔphaP1 mutant, maintaining about 50% of the parental PHB level. The double mutant ΔphaP1.2 did not accumulate PHB in any growth stage and showed a severe reduction of growth when glucose was the carbon source, a clear demonstration of negative impact in the fitness. The co-occurrence of phaP1 and phaP2 homologous in bacteria relatives of H. seropedicae, including other endophytes, indicates that the mechanism of phasin compensation by phaP2 expression may be operating in other organisms, showing that PHB metabolism is a key factor to adaptation and efficiency of endophytic bacteria. PMID:27242754

  1. Backup Expression of the PhaP2 Phasin Compensates for phaP1 Deletion in Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Maintaining Fitness and PHB Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Alves, Luis P S; Teixeira, Cícero S; Tirapelle, Evandro F; Donatti, Lucélia; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z; Steffens, Maria B R; de Souza, Emanuel M; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fabio; Chubatsu, Leda S; Müller-Santos, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Phasins are important proteins controlling poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules formation, their number into the cell and stability. The genome sequencing of the endophytic and diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 revealed two homologous phasin genes. To verify the role of the phasins on PHB accumulation in the parental strain H. seropedicae SmR1, isogenic strains defective in the expression of phaP1, phaP2 or both genes were obtained by gene deletion and characterized in this work. Despite of the high sequence similarity between PhaP1 and PhaP2, PhaP1 is the major phasin in H. seropedicae, since its deletion reduced PHB accumulation by ≈50% in comparison to the parental and ΔphaP2. Upon deletion of phaP1, the expression of phaP2 was sixfold enhanced in the ΔphaP1 strain. The responsive backup expression of phaP2 partially rescued the ΔphaP1 mutant, maintaining about 50% of the parental PHB level. The double mutant ΔphaP1.2 did not accumulate PHB in any growth stage and showed a severe reduction of growth when glucose was the carbon source, a clear demonstration of negative impact in the fitness. The co-occurrence of phaP1 and phaP2 homologous in bacteria relatives of H. seropedicae, including other endophytes, indicates that the mechanism of phasin compensation by phaP2 expression may be operating in other organisms, showing that PHB metabolism is a key factor to adaptation and efficiency of endophytic bacteria.

  2. Structure-based design of inhibitors of coagulation factor XIa with novel P1 moieties.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Donald J P; Smallheer, Joanne M; Corte, James R; Austin, Erin J D; Wang, Cailan; Fang, Tianan; Smith, Leon M; Rossi, Karen A; Rendina, Alan R; Bozarth, Jeffrey M; Zhang, Ge; Wei, Anzhi; Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Sheriff, Steven; Myers, Joseph E; Morin, Paul E; Luettgen, Joseph M; Seiffert, Dietmar A; Quan, Mimi L; Wexler, Ruth R

    2015-04-01

    Compound 2 was previously identified as a potent inhibitor of factor XIa lacking oral bioavailability. A structure-based approach was used to design analogs of 2 with novel P1 moieties with good selectivity profiles and oral bioavailability. Further optimization of the P1 group led to the identification of a 4-chlorophenyltetrazole P1 analog, which when combined with further modifications to the linker and P2' group provided compound 32 with FXIa Ki=6.7 nM and modest oral exposure in dogs.

  3. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M

    2015-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous tissues. Host glycosaminoglycans, highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF-leader peptide (Elp) and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate and when produced on the surface of an otherwise non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to the glial but not the endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells.

  4. Features of Two New Proteins with OmpA-Like Domains Identified in the Genome Sequences of Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Aline F.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an acute febrile disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It is considered an important re-emerging infectious disease that affects humans worldwide. The knowledge about the mechanisms by which pathogenic leptospires invade and colonize the host remains limited since very few virulence factors contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease have been identified. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two new leptospiral proteins with OmpA-like domains. The recombinant proteins, which exhibit extracellular matrix-binding properties, are called Lsa46 - LIC13479 and Lsa77 - LIC10050 (Leptospiral surface adhesins of 46 and 77 kDa, respectively). Attachment of Lsa46 and Lsa77 to laminin was specific, dose dependent and saturable, with KD values of 24.3 ± 17.0 and 53.0 ± 17.5 nM, respectively. Lsa46 and Lsa77 also bind plasma fibronectin, and both adhesins are plasminogen (PLG)-interacting proteins, capable of generating plasmin (PLA) and as such, increase the proteolytic ability of leptospires. The proteins corresponding to Lsa46 and Lsa77 are present in virulent L. interrogans L1-130 and in saprophyte L. biflexa Patoc 1 strains, as detected by immunofluorescence. The adhesins are recognized by human leptospirosis serum samples at the onset and convalescent phases of the disease, suggesting that they are expressed during infection. Taken together, our data could offer valuable information to the understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:25849456

  5. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi , the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous system. Host glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF leader peptide (Elp), and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate, and when produced on the surface of an otherwise nonadherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to glial but not endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells. PMID:25864455

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium populi P-1M, Isolated from Pink-Pigmented Household Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium populi P-1M is isolated from the pink-pigmented household biofilm. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P-1M, consisting of one chromosome of 5,705,640 bp and five plasmids of 64,864 bp, 59,879 bp, 42,569 bp, 41,417 bp, and 29,506 bp. PMID:27313289

  7. Non-covalent thrombin inhibitors featuring P3-heterocycles with P1-bicyclic arginine surrogates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jingrong Jean; Araldi, Gian-Luca; Reiner, John E; Reddy, Komandla Malla; Kemp, Scott J; Ho, Jonathan Z; Siev, Daniel V; Mamedova, Lala; Gibson, Tony S; Gaudette, John A; Minami, Nathaniel K; Anderson, Susanne M; Bradbury, Annette E; Nolan, Thomas G; Semple, J Edward

    2002-10-21

    Novel, potent, and highly selective classes of thrombin inhibitors were identified, which resulted from judicious combination of P4-aromatics and P2-P3-heterocyclic dipeptide surrogates with weakly basic (calcd pKa approximately non-basic-8.6) bicyclic P1-arginine mimics. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of achiral, non-covalent, orally bioavailable inhibitors NC1-NC44 featuring P1-indazoles, benzimidazoles, indoles, benzotriazoles, and aminobenzisoxazoles is disclosed.

  8. STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria looks over the P1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria looks over the P1 Integrated Truss Structure, the primary payload for the mission. The P1 truss will be attached to the central truss segment, S0 Truss, during spacewalks. The payload also includes the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. STS-113 is scheduled to launch Oct. 6, 2002.

  9. Identification of benzoxazole analogs as novel, S1P(3) sparing S1P(1) agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guanghui; Meng, Qinghua; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xuesong; Xu, Qiongfeng; Ren, Feng; Guo, Taylor B; Lu, Hongtao; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen

    2012-06-15

    A novel series of benzoxazole-derived S1P(1) agonists were designed based on scaffold hopping molecular design strategy combined with computational approaches. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of compound 17d as a selective S1P(1) agonist (over S1P(3)) with high CNS penetration and favorable DMPK properties. 17d also demonstrated in vivo pharmacological efficacy to reduce blood lymphocyte in mice after oral administration.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium populi P-1M, Isolated from Pink-Pigmented Household Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium populi P-1M is isolated from the pink-pigmented household biofilm. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P-1M, consisting of one chromosome of 5,705,640 bp and five plasmids of 64,864 bp, 59,879 bp, 42,569 bp, 41,417 bp, and 29,506 bp. PMID:27313289

  11. Intramuscular electroporation of a P1A-encoding plasmid vaccine delays P815 mastocytoma growth.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Uyttenhove, Catherine; De Plaen, Etienne; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Préat, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to construct DNA vaccines encoding the mouse P1A tumor antigen and to generate a protective immune response against the P815 mastocytoma, as a model for vaccines against human MAGE-type tumor antigens. DNA vaccines were constructed and delivered to mice by intramuscular electroporation before tumor challenge. Immunization with a plasmid coding for the full-length P1A significantly delayed tumor growth and mice survived at least 10 days longer than untreated controls. 10% of the mice completely rejected the P815 tumors while 50% of them showed a regression phase followed by tumor regrowth. Mice immunized by electroporation of a P1A(35-43) minigene-encoding plasmid failed to reject tumor and even delay tumor growth. The P1A(35-43)-encoding plasmid was modified and helper epitope sequences were inserted. However, these modified plasmids were not able to improve the response against P815 mastocytoma. Consistent with these results, a 12-fold higher CTL activity was observed when the plasmid coding for full-length P1A was delivered as compared to the plasmid encoding the P1A(35-43) epitope. Our results demonstrated that electroporation is an efficient method to deliver DNA vaccines against P815 and suggested the superiority of full-length as compared to minigene constructs for DNA vaccines.

  12. MHC Class II-Restricted Presentation of the Major House Dust Mite Allergen Der p 1 Is GILT-Dependent: Implications for Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    West, Laura Ciaccia; Grotzke, Jeff E.; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is known to reduce disulfide bonds present in proteins internalized by antigen presenting cells, facilitating optimal processing and presentation of peptides on Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules, as well as the subsequent activation of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. Here, we show that GILT is required for class II-restricted processing and presentation of immunodominant epitopes from the major house dust mite allergen Der p 1. In the absence of GILT, CD4-positive T cell responses to Der p 1 are significantly reduced, resulting in mitigated allergic airway inflammation in response to Der p 1 and house dust mite extracts in a murine model of asthma. PMID:23326313

  13. Functional dissection of the ParB homologue (KorB) from IncP-1 plasmid RK2

    PubMed Central

    Lukaszewicz, M.; Kostelidou, K.; Bartosik, A. A.; Cooke, G. D.; Thomas, C. M.; Jagura-Burdzy, G.

    2002-01-01

    Active partitioning of low-copy number plasmids requires two proteins belonging to the ParA and ParB families and a cis-acting site which ParB acts upon. Active separation of clusters of plasmid molecules to the defined locations in the cell before cell division ensures stable inheritance of the plasmids. The central control operon of IncP-1 plasmids codes for regulatory proteins involved in the global transcriptional control of operons for vegetative replication, stable maintenance and conjugative transfer. Two of these proteins, IncC and KorB, also play a role in active partitioning, as the ParA and ParB homologues, respectively. Here we describe mapping the regions in KorB responsible for four of its different functions: dimerisation, DNA binding, repression of transcription and interaction with IncC. For DNA binding, amino acids E151 to T218 are essential, while repression depends not only on DNA binding but, additionally, on the adjacent region amino acids T218 to R255. The C-terminus of KorB is the main dimerisation domain but a secondary oligomerisation region is located centrally in the region from amino acid I174 to T218. Using three different methods (potentiation of transcriptional repression, potentiation of DNA binding and activation in the yeast two-hybrid system) we identify this region as also responsible for interactions with IncC. This IncC–KorB contact differs in location from the ParA–ParB/SopA–SopB interactions in P1/F but is similar to these systems in lying close to a masked oligomerisation determinant. PMID:11842117

  14. HDL-bound sphingosine 1-phosphate acts as a biased agonist for the endothelial cell receptor S1P1 to limit vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Sylvain; Sanson, Marie; Blaho, Victoria A.; Swendeman, Steven L.; Obinata, Hideru; Conger, Heather; Dahlbäck, Björn; Kono, Mari; Proia, Richard L.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hla, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is abundant in endothelial cells, where it regulates vascular development and microvascular barrier function. In investigating the role of endothelial cell S1P1 in adult mice, we found that the endothelial S1P1 signal was enhanced in regions of the arterial vasculature experiencing inflammation. The abundance of proinflammatory adhesion proteins, such as ICAM-1, was enhanced in mice with endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 and suppressed in mice with endothelial cell–specific overexpression of S1pr1, suggesting a protective function of S1P1 in vascular disease. The chaperones ApoM+HDL (HDL) or albumin bind to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in the circulation; therefore, we tested the effects of S1P bound to each chaperone on S1P1 signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to ApoM+HDL-S1P, but not to albumin-S1P, promoted the formation of a cell surface S1P1–β-arrestin 2 complex and attenuated the ability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα to activate NF-κB and increase ICAM-1 abundance. Although S1P bound to either chaperone induced MAPK activation, albumin-S1P triggered greater Gi activation and receptor endocytosis. Endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 in the hypercholesterolemic Apoe−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in the descending aorta. We propose that the ability of ApoM+HDL to act as a biased agonist on S1P1 inhibits vascular inflammation, which may partially explain the cardiovascular protective functions of HDL. PMID:26268607

  15. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  16. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  17. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  18. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1, 2004... corporation (temporary). 1.409(p)-1T Section 1.409(p)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE,...

  19. Post-translational processing targets functionally diverse proteins in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Haynes, Paul A; Berry, Iain J; Widjaja, Michael; Bogema, Daniel R; Woolley, Lauren K; Jenkins, Cheryl; Minion, F Chris; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced, cell wall-less, bacterial pathogen with a predicted coding capacity of less than 700 proteins and is one of the smallest self-replicating pathogens. The cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae is extensively modified by processing events that target the P97 and P102 adhesin families. Here, we present analyses of the proteome of M. hyopneumoniae-type strain J using protein-centric approaches (one- and two-dimensional GeLC-MS/MS) that enabled us to focus on global processing events in this species. While these approaches only identified 52% of the predicted proteome (347 proteins), our analyses identified 35 surface-associated proteins with widely divergent functions that were targets of unusual endoproteolytic processing events, including cell adhesins, lipoproteins and proteins with canonical functions in the cytosol that moonlight on the cell surface. Affinity chromatography assays that separately used heparin, fibronectin, actin and host epithelial cell surface proteins as bait recovered cleavage products derived from these processed proteins, suggesting these fragments interact directly with the bait proteins and display previously unrecognized adhesive functions. We hypothesize that protein processing is underestimated as a post-translational modification in genome-reduced bacteria and prokaryotes more broadly, and represents an important mechanism for creating cell surface protein diversity.

  20. Post-translational processing targets functionally diverse proteins in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Haynes, Paul A.; Berry, Iain J.; Widjaja, Michael; Bogema, Daniel R.; Woolley, Lauren K.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Minion, F. Chris; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced, cell wall-less, bacterial pathogen with a predicted coding capacity of less than 700 proteins and is one of the smallest self-replicating pathogens. The cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae is extensively modified by processing events that target the P97 and P102 adhesin families. Here, we present analyses of the proteome of M. hyopneumoniae-type strain J using protein-centric approaches (one- and two-dimensional GeLC–MS/MS) that enabled us to focus on global processing events in this species. While these approaches only identified 52% of the predicted proteome (347 proteins), our analyses identified 35 surface-associated proteins with widely divergent functions that were targets of unusual endoproteolytic processing events, including cell adhesins, lipoproteins and proteins with canonical functions in the cytosol that moonlight on the cell surface. Affinity chromatography assays that separately used heparin, fibronectin, actin and host epithelial cell surface proteins as bait recovered cleavage products derived from these processed proteins, suggesting these fragments interact directly with the bait proteins and display previously unrecognized adhesive functions. We hypothesize that protein processing is underestimated as a post-translational modification in genome-reduced bacteria and prokaryotes more broadly, and represents an important mechanism for creating cell surface protein diversity. PMID:26865024

  1. Identification of lytic bacteriophage MmP1, assigned to a new member of T7-like phages infecting Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junmin; Rao, Xiancai; Tan, Yinling; Xiong, Kun; Hu, Zhen; Chen, Zhijin; Jin, Xiaolin; Li, Shu; Chen, Yao; Hu, Fuquan

    2010-09-01

    MmP1 (Morganella morganii phage 1) is a lytic bacteriophage newly isolated from the host bacterium M. morganii. The entire genome was sequenced, and final assembly yielded a 38,234bp linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a G+C content of 46.5%. In the MmP1 genome, 49 putative genes, 10 putative promoters and 2 predicted sigma-independent terminators were determined through bioinformatic analysis. A striking feature of the MmP1 genome is its high degree of similarity to the T7 group of phages. All of the 49 predicted genes exist on the same DNA strand, and functions were assigned to 35 genes based on the similarity of the homologues deposited in GenBank, which share 30-80% identity to their counterparts in T7-like phages. The analyses of MmP1 using CoreGenes, phylogenetic tree of RNA polymerase and structural proteins have demonstrated that bacteriophage MmP1 should be assigned as a new member of T7-like phages but as a relatively distant member of this family. This is the first report that a T7-like phage adaptively parasitizes in M. morganii, and this will advance our understanding of biodiversity and adaptive evolution of T7-like phages.

  2. A Sensitive and Robust High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of the Chikungunya Virus nsP1 Capping Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Bullard-Feibelman, Kristen M.; Fuller, Benjamin P.; Geiss, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus that causes severe and debilitating disease symptoms. Alarmingly, transmission rates of CHIKV have increased dramatically over the last decade resulting in 1.7 million suspected cases in the Western hemisphere alone. There are currently no antivirals for treatment of CHIKV infection and novel anti-alphaviral compounds are badly needed. nsP1 is the alphavirus protein responsible for the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for formation of the 5’ type 0 cap structure added to newly formed viral RNA. Formation of this cap depends on nsP1 binding GTP and transferring a methylated GMP to nascent viral RNA. We have developed a fluorescence polarization-based assay that monitors displacement of a fluorescently-labeled GTP analog in real time. Determining the relative affinities of 15 GTP analogs for nsP1 GTP revealed important structural aspects of GTP that will inform identification of inhibitors able to outcompete GTP for the nsP1 binding site. Validation of the assay for HTS was completed and a secondary orthogonal assay that measures guanylation activity was developed in order to evaluate hits from future drug screens. This platform provides an avenue for identification of potent nsP1 inhibitors, which would potentially provide compounds capable of treating disease caused by CHIKV infection. PMID:27427769

  3. Long intergenic non-coding RNA APOC1P1-3 inhibits apoptosis by decreasing α-tubulin acetylation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liao, X-H; Wang, J-G; Li, L-Y; Zhou, D-M; Ren, K-H; Jin, Y-T; Lv, L; Yu, J-G; Yang, J-Y; Lu, Q; Zou, Q; Yu, J; Liu, X-P; Zhou, P

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) act as important regulatory factors in tumor progression. However, their roles in breast cancer remain largely unknown. In present studies, we identified aberrantly expressed long intergenic non-coding RNA APOC1P1-3 (lincRNA-APOC1P1-3) in breast cancer by microarray, verified it by quantitative real-time PCR, and assessed methylation status in the promoter region by pyrosequencing. We also investigated the biological functions with plasmid transfection and siRNA silencing experiments, and further explored their mechanisms by RNA pull-down and RNA immunoprecipitation to identify binding proteins. We found that 224 lncRNAs were upregulated in breast cancer, whereas 324 were downregulated. The lincRNA-APOC1P1-3 was overexpressed in breast cancer, which was related to tumor size and hypomethylation in its promoter region. We also found that APOC1P1-3 could directly bind to tubulin to decrease α-tubulin acetylation, to inactivate caspase-3, and to inhibit apoptosis. This study demonstrates that overexpression of APOC1P1-3 can inhibit breast cancer apoptosis. PMID:27228351

  4. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  5. FoxP1 orchestration of ASD-relevant signaling pathways in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Daniel J.; Anderson, Ashley G.; Berto, Stefano; Runnels, Wesley; Harper, Matthew; Ammanuel, Simon; Rieger, Michael A.; Huang, Hung-Chung; Rajkovich, Kacey; Loerwald, Kristofer W.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley O.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Gibson, Jay R.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead box p1 (FOXP1) are causative for neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. However, the function of FOXP1 within the brain remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify the gene expression program regulated by FoxP1 in both human neural cells and patient-relevant heterozygous Foxp1 mouse brains. We demonstrate a role for FoxP1 in the transcriptional regulation of autism-related pathways as well as genes involved in neuronal activity. We show that Foxp1 regulates the excitability of striatal medium spiny neurons and that reduction of Foxp1 correlates with defects in ultrasonic vocalizations. Finally, we demonstrate that FoxP1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating pathways involved in striatal neuron identity through gene expression studies in human neural progenitors with altered FOXP1 levels. These data support an integral role for FoxP1 in regulating signaling pathways vulnerable in autism and the specific regulation of striatal pathways important for vocal communication. PMID:26494785

  6. Phytopathogenic bacteria phenotype conversion as a result of their lysogenisation by coliphage P1.

    PubMed

    Faidiuk, I V; Tovkach, E I

    2014-01-01

    A set of lysogenic strains of phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia "horticola" and Erwinia amylovora associated with woody plants was obtained using bacteriophage P1 Cmc1ts100. The phenotype conversion from Cm(S) to Cm(R) was shown to be connected with introducing of authentic prophage DNA of 94.8 kb as a single-copy plasmid into the cells. Prophage state is unstable: P1 plasmid is spontaneously lost with high frequency by the cells. In lysogenic cells the prophage genes of type III restriction-modification complex EcoP1I are actively expressed. The system formed by E. "horticola" 450 and 60 as well as their lysogenic derivatives and specific bacteriophages provides an opportunity to divide the latter into three groups according to the level of restriction in the course of their interaction with the enzyme EcoP1I. The difference in phage responses to the endonuclease presence in a lysogenized host presumably correlates with the number of enzyme recognition sequences and the adsorption sites availability. After the prophage plasmid DNA curing the characteristic value of phage sensitivity of cells is changed. The lysogenic strains obtained in this work allow for the exploration of EcoP1I restriction-modification gene complex interaction with polyvalent phages able to grow not only on E. coli, but also on such phytopathogens as E. "horticola" and E. amylovora. PMID:25000732

  7. STS-113 Astronauts Work on Port One (P1) Truss on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 16th American assembly flight and 112th overall American flight to the International Space Station (ISS) launched on November 23, 2002 from Kennedy's launch pad 39A aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-113. Mission objectives included the delivery of the Expedition Six Crew to the ISS, the return of Expedition Five crew back to Earth, and the installation and activation of the Port 1 Integrated Truss Assembly (P1). The first major component installed on the left side of the Station, the P1 truss provides an additional three External Thermal Control System radiators. Weighing in at 27,506 pounds, the P1 truss is 45 feet (13.7 meters) long, 15 feet (4.6 meters) wide, and 13 feet (4 meters) high. Three space walks, aided by the use of the Robotic Manipulator Systems of both the Shuttle and the Station, were performed in the installation of P1. In this photograph, astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (above) and John B. Herrington (below) work on the newly installed P1 truss during the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity. The space walk lasted 6 hours, 10 minutes. The end effector of the Canadarm2 or Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Earth's horizon are visible in the bottom of frame.

  8. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner.

  9. Modeling and estimation of C1-P1 bias in GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lahaye, F.; Héroux, P.; Liao, X.; Beck, N.; Olynik, M.

    2001-01-01

    Modern dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers are capable of providing direct measurements of both L1 C/A (C1) and P code (P1) without the use of the Y-codes under Anti-Spoofing. A discrepancy or bias between the C1 and P1 measurements from these receivers has however been of concern to operators and users of GPS reference networks. For the purpose of modeling and estimation, the nature and characteristics of the discrepancy must be investigated. The research results presented indicate that the discrepancy between the C1 and P1 measurements contains two different types of components: one is of constant type while another is time variant. A method has been developed for their modeling and estimation. The residual C1-P1 time series after a satellite-dependent bias removal agree at a few-centimeter level, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed model. This allows the C1-P1 discrepancy, both constant and non-constant components, to be removed from GPS reference network solutions. Numerical results are provided to support the analysis.

  10. The Complete Sequence of the Acacia ligulata Chloroplast Genome Reveals a Highly Divergent clpP1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna V; Boykin, Laura M; Howell, Katharine A; Nevill, Paul G; Small, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are a highly diverse angiosperm family that include many agriculturally important species. To date, 21 complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced from legume crops confined to the Papilionoideae subfamily. Here we report the first chloroplast genome from the Mimosoideae, Acacia ligulata, and compare it to the previously sequenced legume genomes. The A. ligulata chloroplast genome is 174,233 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 38,225 bp and single-copy regions of 92,798 bp and 4,985 bp [corrected]. Acacia ligulata lacks the inversion present in many of the Papilionoideae, but is not otherwise significantly different in terms of gene and repeat content. The key feature is its highly divergent clpP1 gene, normally considered essential in chloroplast genomes. In A. ligulata, although transcribed and spliced, it probably encodes a catalytically inactive protein. This study provides a significant resource for further genetic research into Acacia and the Mimosoideae. The divergent clpP1 gene suggests that Acacia will provide an interesting source of information on the evolution and functional diversity of the chloroplast Clp protease complex.

  11. PfeT, a P1B4 -type ATPase, effluxes ferrous iron and protects Bacillus subtilis against iron intoxication.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guohua; Pinochet-Barros, Azul; Gaballa, Ahmed; Patel, Sarju J; Argüello, José M; Helmann, John D

    2015-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for nearly all cells and limited iron availability often restricts growth. However, excess iron can also be deleterious, particularly when cells expressing high affinity iron uptake systems transition to iron rich environments. Bacillus subtilis expresses numerous iron importers, but iron efflux has not been reported. Here, we describe the B. subtilis PfeT protein (formerly YkvW/ZosA) as a P1B4 -type ATPase in the PerR regulon that serves as an Fe(II) efflux pump and protects cells against iron intoxication. Iron and manganese homeostasis in B. subtilis are closely intertwined: a pfeT mutant is iron sensitive, and this sensitivity can be suppressed by low levels of Mn(II). Conversely, a pfeT mutant is more resistant to Mn(II) overload. In vitro, the PfeT ATPase is activated by both Fe(II) and Co(II), although only Fe(II) efflux is physiologically relevant in wild-type cells, and null mutants accumulate elevated levels of intracellular iron. Genetic studies indicate that PfeT together with the ferric uptake repressor (Fur) cooperate to prevent iron intoxication, with iron sequestration by the MrgA mini-ferritin playing a secondary role. Protection against iron toxicity may also be a key role for related P1B4 -type ATPases previously implicated in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26261021

  12. The Complete Sequence of the Acacia ligulata Chloroplast Genome Reveals a Highly Divergent clpP1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Anna V.; Boykin, Laura M.; Howell, Katharine A.; Nevill, Paul G.; Small, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are a highly diverse angiosperm family that include many agriculturally important species. To date, 21 complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced from legume crops confined to the Papilionoideae subfamily. Here we report the first chloroplast genome from the Mimosoideae, Acacia ligulata, and compare it to the previously sequenced legume genomes. The A. ligulata chloroplast genome is 158,724 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 25,925 bp and single-copy regions of 88,576 bp and 18,298 bp. Acacia ligulata lacks the inversion present in many of the Papilionoideae, but is not otherwise significantly different in terms of gene and repeat content. The key feature is its highly divergent clpP1 gene, normally considered essential in chloroplast genomes. In A. ligulata, although transcribed and spliced, it probably encodes a catalytically inactive protein. This study provides a significant resource for further genetic research into Acacia and the Mimosoideae. The divergent clpP1 gene suggests that Acacia will provide an interesting source of information on the evolution and functional diversity of the chloroplast Clp protease complex. PMID:25955637

  13. Protective immune response of the capsid precursor polypeptide (P1) of foot and mouth disease virus type 'O' produced in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, V; Renji, R; Saha, S N; Reddy, G R; Gopalakrishna, S; Suryanarayana, V V S

    2003-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the aetiological agent of a highly contagious vesicular disease of cloven-hooved animals. The gene coding for the capsid polyprotein (P1) of FMDV from serotype 'O' vaccine strain (O75Madras) was cloned and expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed P1 protein was characterised by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western Blot analysis. Immunisation of Guinea pigs with recombinant P1 induced FMDV type O specific immune response. The humoral response to vaccine was measured by indirect ELISA and a serum neutralisation test (SNT). The Guinea pig sera showed high titres both in ELISA and SNT. Upon challenge with virulent Guinea pig adapted homologous type 'O' virus, the animals showed a protective index of 2.52. This study shows that the yeast expressed FMDV P1 could be a safe vaccine in non-endemic countries and a cost-effective vaccine in endemic countries. This is the first report on the production of FMDV structural proteins in yeast and their application as a vaccine. PMID:12686422

  14. Protective immune response of the capsid precursor polypeptide (P1) of foot and mouth disease virus type 'O' produced in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, V; Renji, R; Saha, S N; Reddy, G R; Gopalakrishna, S; Suryanarayana, V V S

    2003-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the aetiological agent of a highly contagious vesicular disease of cloven-hooved animals. The gene coding for the capsid polyprotein (P1) of FMDV from serotype 'O' vaccine strain (O75Madras) was cloned and expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed P1 protein was characterised by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western Blot analysis. Immunisation of Guinea pigs with recombinant P1 induced FMDV type O specific immune response. The humoral response to vaccine was measured by indirect ELISA and a serum neutralisation test (SNT). The Guinea pig sera showed high titres both in ELISA and SNT. Upon challenge with virulent Guinea pig adapted homologous type 'O' virus, the animals showed a protective index of 2.52. This study shows that the yeast expressed FMDV P1 could be a safe vaccine in non-endemic countries and a cost-effective vaccine in endemic countries. This is the first report on the production of FMDV structural proteins in yeast and their application as a vaccine.

  15. Electron Excitation of Argon: 4s'[1/2]_1, 4p[1/2]_1, and 4p'[1/2]_0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, D. V.; Pejčev, V.; Marinković, B.; Vušković, L.

    1999-10-01

    A broad interest in low-energy electron collisions with argon has recently led to very sophisticated calculations.footnote D. H. Madison, C. M. Maloney, and J. B. Wang, J. Phys. B 31, 873 (1998).^,footnote S. Kaur, R. Srivastava, R. P. McEachran, and A. Stauffer, J. Phys. B 31, 4833 (1998).^,footnote V. Zeman, K. Bartschat, C, Noren, and J. W. McConkey, Phys. Rev. A 58, 1275 (1998). The agreement between theoretical results and the only existing full set of experimentally obtained absolute differential cross sectionsfootnote A. Chutjian and D. C. Cartwright, Phys. Rev. A 23, 2178 (1981). is not satisfactory. We have performed a set of experiments to resolve existing discrepancies between available data. At the conference we will present absolute differential cross sections for argon excited in 4s'[1/2]_1, 4p[1/2]_1, and 4p'[1/2]0 states by electron collision. The incident electron energies were in the range of 16 to 80 eV and overall energy resolution was 40 meV. The angular range covered in our experiments was 5^circ to 150^circ. Data were extrapolated to 0^circ and to 180^circ and numerically integrated to yield integral, momentum transfer, and viscosity cross sections.

  16. Heterogeneous and hyperfine interactions between valence states of molecular iodine correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) dissociation limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturo, Vera V.; Cherepanov, Igor N.; Lukashov, Sergey S.; Poretsky, Sergey A.; Pravilov, Anatoly M.; Zhironkin, Anatoly I.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed analysis of interactions between all 0g + , 1u, and 0u - weakly bound states of iodine molecule correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) (bb) dissociation limit has been performed. For this purpose, the 0u - (bb) state has been described using analysis of rotationally resolved excitation spectra of luminescence from the g 0g - state populated in a three-step three-color perturbation facilitated excitation scheme via the 0u - state. Energies of 41 rovibrational levels, molecular constants, and potential energy curve have been determined. Energy gaps between closest rovibrational levels of the 0u - and 0g + , 1u (bb) states are found to be large, ˜6 cm-1. However, interaction of all three 0g + , 1u, and 0u - (bb) states has been observed. It has been found that the 0u - and 1u electronic states are mixed by heterogeneous interactions, while their mixing with the 0g + one is due to hyperfine interactions predominantly. Admixture coefficients and electronic matrix elements of the coupling between the 0g + ˜1u, 0g + ˜ 0u - , and 0u - ˜1u states have been estimated.

  17. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a work stand in the Operations and Checkout Building where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  18. Visualization of bacteriophage P1 infection by cryo-electron tomography of tiny Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jun; Chen Chengyen; Shiomi, Daisuke; Niki, Hironori; Margolin, William

    2011-09-01

    Bacteriophage P1 has a contractile tail that targets the conserved lipopolysaccharide on the outer membrane surface of the host for initial adsorption. The mechanism by which P1 DNA enters the host cell is not well understood, mainly because the transient molecular interactions between bacteriophage and bacteria have been difficult to study by conventional approaches. Here, we engineered tiny E. coli host cells so that the initial stages of P1-host interactions could be captured in unprecedented detail by cryo-electron tomography. Analysis of three-dimensional reconstructions of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed three predominant configurations: an extended tail stage with DNA present in the phage head, a contracted tail stage with DNA, and a contracted tail stage without DNA. Comparative analysis of various conformations indicated that there is uniform penetration of the inner tail tube into the E. coli periplasm and a significant movement of the baseplate away from the outer membrane during tail contraction.

  19. Calculation of radiative corrections to hyperfine splitting in p1/2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K. T.

    2006-10-01

    Techniques to calculate one-loop radiative corrections to hyperfine splitting including binding corrections to all orders have been developed in the last decade for s states of atoms and ions. In this paper these methods are extended to p1/2 states for three cases. In the first case, the point-Coulomb 2p1/2 hyperfine splitting is treated for the hydrogen isoelectonic sequence, and the lowest order result, (α)/(4π)EF , is shown to have large binding corrections at high Z . In the second case, neutral alkali-metal atoms are considered. In the third case, hyperfine splitting of the 2p1/2 state of lithiumlike bismuth is treated. In the latter two cases, correlation corrections are included and, in addition, the point is stressed that uncertainties associated with nuclear structure, which complicate comparison with experiment for s states, are considerably reduced because of the smaller overlap with the nucleus.

  20. P1 and N170 components distinguish human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuwei; Luo, Wenbo; He, Weiqi; Chen, Xu; Luo, Yuejia

    2013-06-19

    This study used event-related potentials to investigate the sensitivity of P1 and N170 components to human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli, which were derived from pictures of Peking opera characters. As predicted, human-like makeup stimuli elicited larger P1 and N170 amplitudes than did animal-like makeup stimuli. Interestingly, a right hemisphere advantage was observed for human-like but not for animal-like makeup stimuli. Dipole source analyses of 130-200-ms window showed that the bilateral fusiform face area may contribute to the differential sensitivity of the N170 component in response to human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli. The present study suggests that the amplitudes of both the P1 and the N170 are sensitive for the mouth component of face-like stimuli.

  1. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station, is moved the length of the Operations and Checkout Building to its work stand where it will undergo processing. Scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, the P-1 is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by-15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  2. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65.

    PubMed

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F

    2007-11-01

    We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  3. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S.; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  4. Relationship between phylogenetic groups, antibiotic resistance and patient characteristics in terms of adhesin genes in cystitis and pyelonephritis isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Er, Doganhan Kadir; Dundar, Devrim; Uzuner, Huseyin; Osmani, Agim

    2015-12-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) is considered as the main causative agent of urinary tract infections worldwide. The relationship between antimicrobial resistance, phylogenetic groups, patient characteristics and adhesin virulence genes are complex and not fully understood. In this study, among 146 urinary isolates of E. coli, phylogenetic groups and various adhesin virulence genes were examined with multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction methods. Patient characteristics divided into sex, cystitis and pyelonephritis; community-acquired and hospital-acquired; complicated and uncomplicated infection. Antimicrobial resistance was also determined. The papAH gene was seen more often in pyelonephritis than cystitis and female than male patients. iha gene was more frequent in hospital-acquired infections than in community-acquired infections. sfa/focDE was more frequent in ampicillin, amikacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefazolin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole susceptible and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and multi-drug resistance (MDR) negative isolates. focG was seen more often in nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin susceptible and MDR negative isolates. fimH and papAH were more commonly observed in amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and cefotaxime susceptible isolates, respectively. iha and afa/draBC genes were more frequent in resistant isolates than the susceptible ones; for iha, in ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, nalidixic acid, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone resistant and ESBL and MDR positive isolates; for afa/draBC, in cefotaxime, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistant and ESBL and MDR positive isolates, this trend was observed. ST 131 E. coli virulence gene pattern has a direct effect on resistance profile. Isolates belong to that clonal group has MDR and commonly harbour afa/draBC and iha genes. Our findings may

  5. BtaE, an Adhesin That Belongs to the Trimeric Autotransporter Family, Is Required for Full Virulence and Defines a Specific Adhesive Pole of Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ranwez, Verónica; Posadas, Diana M.; Van der Henst, Charles; Estein, Silvia M.; Arocena, Gastón M.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Martín, Fernando A.; Sieira, Rodrigo; De Bolle, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Brucella is responsible for brucellosis, one of the most common zoonoses worldwide that causes important economic losses in several countries. Increasing evidence indicates that adhesion of Brucella spp. to host cells is an important step to establish infection. We have previously shown that the BmaC unipolar monomeric autotransporter mediates the binding of Brucella suis to host cells through cell-associated fibronectin. Our genome analysis shows that the B. suis genome encodes several additional potential adhesins. In this work, we characterized a predicted trimeric autotransporter that we named BtaE. By expressing btaE in a nonadherent Escherichia coli strain and by phenotypic characterization of a B. suis ΔbtaE mutant, we showed that BtaE is involved in the binding of B. suis to hyaluronic acid. The B. suis ΔbtaE mutant exhibited a reduction in the adhesion to HeLa and A549 epithelial cells compared with the wild-type strain, and it was outcompeted by the wild-type strain in the binding to HeLa cells. The knockout btaE mutant showed an attenuated phenotype in the mouse model, indicating that BtaE is required for full virulence. BtaE was immunodetected on the bacterial surface at one cell pole. Using old and new pole markers, we observed that both the BmaC and BtaE adhesins are consistently associated with the new cell pole, suggesting that, in Brucella, the new pole is functionally differentiated for adhesion. This is consistent with the inherent polarization of this bacterium, and its role in the invasion process. PMID:23319562

  6. Evoked alpha and early access to the knowledge system: The P1 inhibition timing hypothesis☆

    PubMed Central

    Klimesch, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a theory is presented which assumes that the visual P1 reflects the same cognitive and physiological functionality as alpha (with a frequency of about 10 Hz).Whereas alpha is an ongoing process, the P1 is the manifestation of an event-related process. It is suggested that alpha and the P1 reflect inhibition that is effective during early access to a complex knowledge system (KS). Most importantly, inhibition operates in two different ways. In potentially competing and task irrelevant networks, inhibition is used to block information processing. In task relevant neural networks, however, inhibition is used to increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by enabling precisely timed activity in neurons with a high level of excitation but silencing neurons with a comparatively low level of excitation. Inhibition is increased to modulate the SNR when processing complexity and network excitation increases and when certain types of attentional demands – such as top–down control, expectancy or reflexive attention – increase. A variety of findings are reviewed to demonstrate that they can well be interpreted on the basis of the suggested theory. One interesting aspect thereby is that attentional benefits (reflected e.g., by a larger P1 for attended as compared to unattended items at contralateral sites) and costs (reflected e.g., by a larger P1 at ipsilateral sites) can both be interpreted in terms of inhibition. In the former case an increased P1 is associated with a more effective processing of the presented item (due to an inhibition modulated increase in SNR), in the latter case, however, with a suppression of item processing (due to inhibition that blocks information processing). PMID:21774917

  7. New, potent P1/P2-morpholinone-based HIV-protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, Wieslaw M; Furfine, Eric; Spaltenstein, Andrew; Wright, Lois L

    2006-10-01

    We have developed efficient synthesis of morpholinone-based cyclic mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor Amprenavir. This effort led to discovery of allyl- and spiro-cyclopropyl-P2-substituted inhibitors 17 and 31, both 500 times more potent than the parent inhibitor 1. These results support morpholinones as novel mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of Amprenavir and potentially of other HIV-protease inhibitors, and thus provide a novel medicinal chemistry template for optimization toward more potent and drug-like inhibitors. PMID:16904316

  8. New fluorinated agonists for targeting the sphingosin-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)).

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Keul, Petra; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter

    2015-11-15

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P1) is involved in fundamental biological processes such as regulation of immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier function and angiogenesis. This Letter presents multistep syntheses of various fluorine substituted 12-aryl analogues of the drug fingolimod (FTY720) and a seven-steps route to 2-amino-17,17-difluoro-2-(hydroxymethyl)heptadecan-1-ol. In vitro and in vivo tests proved all these compounds as potent S1P1 receptor agonists.

  9. Capitulation in Abelian extensions of some fields ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Abdelmalek; Zekhnini, Abdelkader; Taous, Mohammed

    2016-02-01

    We study the capitulation of the 2-ideal classes of an infinite family of imaginary biquadratic number fields consisting of fields k =ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i ), where i =√{-1 } and p1 ≡ p2 ≡ -q ≡ 1 (mod 4) are different primes. For each of the three quadratic extensions K /k inside the absolute genus field k(*) of k , we compute the capitulation kernel of K /k . Then we deduce that each strongly ambiguous class of k /ℚ (i ) capitulates already in k(*), which is smaller than the relative genus field (k/ℚ (i )) *.

  10. Immunogenicity of the Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1-VarO Adhesin: Induction of Surface-Reactive and Rosette-Disrupting Antibodies to VarO Infected Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Guillotte, Micheline; Juillerat, Alexandre; Igonet, Sébastien; Hessel, Audrey; Petres, Stéphane; Crublet, Elodie; Le Scanf, Cécile; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Bentley, Graham A; Vigan-Womas, Inès; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC) to human erythrocytes (i.e. rosetting) is associated with severe malaria. Rosetting results from interactions between a subset of variant PfEMP1 (Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) adhesins and specific erythrocyte receptors. Interfering with such interactions is considered a promising intervention against severe malaria. To evaluate the feasibility of a vaccine strategy targetting rosetting, we have used here the Palo Alto 89F5 VarO rosetting model. PfEMP1-VarO consists of five Duffy-Binding Like domains (DBL1-5) and one Cysteine-rich Interdomain Region (CIDR1). The binding domain has been mapped to DBL1 and the ABO blood group was identified as the erythrocyte receptor. Here, we study the immunogenicity of all six recombinant PfEMP1-VarO domains and the DBL1- CIDR1 Head domain in BALB/c and outbred OF1 mice. Five readouts of antibody responses are explored: ELISA titres on the recombinant antigen, VarO-iRBC immunoblot reactivity, VarO-iRBC surface-reactivity, capacity to disrupt VarO rosettes and the capacity to prevent VarO rosette formation. For three domains, we explore influence of the expression system on antigenicity and immunogenicity. We show that correctly folded PfEMP1 domains elicit high antibody titres and induce a homogeneous response in outbred and BALB/c mice after three injections. High levels of rosette-disrupting and rosette-preventing antibodies are induced by DBL1 and the Head domain. Reduced-alkylated or denatured proteins fail to induce surface-reacting and rosette-disrupting antibodies, indicating that surface epitopes are conformational. We also report limited cross-reactivity between some PfEMP1 VarO domains. These results highlight the high immunogenicity of the individual domains in outbred animals and provide a strong basis for a rational vaccination strategy targeting rosetting. PMID:26222304

  11. Functional Heterogeneity of the UpaH Autotransporter Protein from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Totsika, Makrina; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTI). To cause a UTI, UPEC must adhere to the epithelial cells of the urinary tract and overcome the shear flow forces of urine. This function is mediated primarily by fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host cell receptors. Another group of adhesins that contributes to UPEC-mediated UTI is autotransporter (AT) proteins. AT proteins possess a range of virulence properties, such as adherence, aggregation, invasion, and biofilm formation. One recently characterized AT protein of UPEC is UpaH, a large adhesin-involved-in-diffuse-adherence (AIDA-I)-type AT protein that contributes to biofilm formation and bladder colonization. In this study we characterized a series of naturally occurring variants of UpaH. We demonstrate that extensive sequence variation exists within the passenger-encoding domain of UpaH variants from different UPEC strains. This sequence variation is associated with functional heterogeneity with respect to the ability of UpaH to mediate biofilm formation. In contrast, all of the UpaH variants examined retained a conserved ability to mediate binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the UpaH passenger domain identified a conserved region (UpaHCR) and a hydrophobic region (UpaHHR). Deletion of these domains reduced biofilm formation but not the binding to ECM proteins. Despite variation in the upaH sequence, the transcription of upaH was repressed by a conserved mechanism involving the global regulator H-NS, and mutation of the hns gene relieved this repression. Overall, our findings shed new light on the regulation and functions of the UpaH AT protein. PMID:22904291

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermodesulfovibrio aggregans TGE-P1T, an Obligately Anaerobic, Thermophilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium in the Phylum Nitrospirae.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Norihisa; Ohashi, Akiko; Tourlousse, Dieter M; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the type strain (TGE-P1(T)) of Thermodesulfovibrio aggregans, an obligately anaerobic, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium in the phylum Nitrospirae. The genome comprises 2.00 Mb in 16 contigs (3 scaffolds), has a G+C content of 34.5%, and contains 1,998 predicted protein-encoding genes.

  13. Mechanism of a cytosolic O-glycosyltransferase essential for the synthesis of a bacterial adhesion protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Seepersaud, Ravin; Bensing, Barbara A.; Sullam, Paul M.; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2016-01-01

    O-glycosylation of Ser and Thr residues is an important process in all organisms, which is only poorly understood. Such modification is required for the export and function of adhesin proteins that mediate the attachment of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria to host cells. Here, we have analyzed the mechanism by which the cytosolic O-glycosyltransferase GtfA/B of Streptococcus gordonii modifies the Ser/Thr-rich repeats of adhesin. The enzyme is a tetramer containing two molecules each of GtfA and GtfB. The two subunits have the same fold, but only GtfA contains an active site, whereas GtfB provides the primary binding site for adhesin. During a first phase of glycosylation, the conformation of GtfB is restrained by GtfA to bind substrate with unmodified Ser/Thr residues. In a slow second phase, GtfB recognizes residues that are already modified with N-acetylglucosamine, likely by converting into a relaxed conformation in which one interface with GtfA is broken. These results explain how the glycosyltransferase modifies a progressively changing substrate molecule. PMID:26884191

  14. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rong; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Cho, Vicky; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Gatenby, Paul A.; Perera, Chandima; Zhang, Yafei; Whittle, Belinda; Sinclair, Andrew; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Field, Matthew; Andrews, T. Daniel; Cook, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1–10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1), which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation. PMID:27227454

  15. 26 CFR 1.6050P-1 - Information reporting for discharges of indebtedness by certain entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... For purposes of reporting under this section, multiple discharges of indebtedness of less than $600... described in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, or upon the expiration of a statutory period for filing a...), the expiration of the non-payment testing period, as described in § 1.6050P-1(b)(2)(iv). (ii)...

  16. 26 CFR 1.6050P-1 - Information reporting for discharges of indebtedness by certain entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under this section, multiple discharges of indebtedness of less than $600 are not required to be... paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, or upon the expiration of a statutory period for filing a claim or... expiration of the non-payment testing period, as described in § 1.6050P-1(b)(2)(iv). (ii) Statute...

  17. 26 CFR 1.6050P-1 - Information reporting for discharges of indebtedness by certain entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... For purposes of reporting under this section, multiple discharges of indebtedness of less than $600... described in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section, or upon the expiration of a statutory period for filing a...), the expiration of the non-payment testing period, as described in § 1.6050P-1(b)(2)(iv). (ii)...

  18. Apker Award Talk: Atomic Beam Measurement of the Indium 6p1 / 2 Scalar Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenbraun, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first measurement of the scalar polarizability of the indium 6p1 / 2 -excited state using two-step laser spectroscopy in an atomic beam. This is one in a series of precise atomic structure measurements by the Majumder lab at Williams College, which serve as stringent tests of abinitio calculation methods for three-valence-electron systems. We stabilize a laser to the indium 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 410 nm transition and scan a second laser across the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 1343 nm transition. The two laser beams are overlapped and interact transversely with a collimated atomic beam of indium. Two-tone FM spectroscopy allows us to observe the small (< 1 part in 103) IR absorption, and characteristic sideband features in the RF-demodulated lineshape provide built-in frequency calibration. Application of DC electric fields up to 20 kV/cm give rise to Stark shifts of order 100 MHz. Because our group has previously measured the difference in polarizabilities within the 410 nm transition, we can determine the 6p1 / 2 polarizability with no loss of precision. Preliminary results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical calculations and can be used to infer accurate values for the indium 6 p - 5 d matrix elements.

  19. A stable shuttle vector for Xylella fastidiosa based on an endogenous incP-1 plasmid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strain RIV11 harbors a 25 kbp plasmid (pXFRIV11) belonging to the incP1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXFRIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to propagate in both Xf and Escherichia coli. Sequences required for replication i...

  20. First law of black ring thermodynamics in higher dimensional dilaton gravity with p+1 strength forms

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2006-01-15

    We derive the first law of black ring thermodynamics in n-dimensional Einstein dilaton gravity with additional (p+1)-form field strength being the simplest generalization of five-dimensional theory containing a stationary black ring solution with dipole charge. It was done by means of choosing any cross section of the event horizon to the future of the bifurcation surface.

  1. Novel S1P(1) receptor agonists--part 3: from thiophenes to pyridines.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Birker, Magdalena; Bravo, Roberto; Bur, Daniel; de Kanter, Ruben; Kohl, Christopher; Grimont, Julien; Hess, Patrick; Lescop, Cyrille; Mathys, Boris; Müller, Claus; Nayler, Oliver; Rey, Markus; Scherz, Michael; Schmidt, Gunther; Seifert, Jürgen; Steiner, Beat; Velker, Jörg; Weller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In preceding communications we summarized our medicinal chemistry efforts leading to the identification of potent, selective, and orally active S1P1 agonists such as the thiophene derivative 1. As a continuation of these efforts, we replaced the thiophene in 1 by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridine and obtained less lipophilic, potent, and selective S1P1 agonists (e.g., 2) efficiently reducing blood lymphocyte count in the rat. Structural features influencing the compounds' receptor affinity profile and pharmacokinetics are discussed. In addition, the ability to penetrate brain tissue has been studied for several compounds. As a typical example for these pyridine based S1P1 agonists, compound 53 showed EC50 values of 0.6 and 352 nM for the S1P1 and S1P3 receptor, respectively, displayed favorable PK properties, and penetrated well into brain tissue. In the rat, compound 53 maximally reduced the blood lymphocyte count for at least 24 h after oral dosing of 3 mg/kg. PMID:24367923

  2. The lytic replicon of bacteriophage P1 is controlled by an antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Riedel, H D; Rückert, B; Lurz, R; Schuster, H

    1995-01-01

    The lytic replicon of phage P1 is used for DNA replication during the lytic cycle. It comprises about 2% of the P1 genome and contains the P1 C1 repressor-controlled operator-promoter element Op53.P53 and the kilA and the repL genes, in that order. Transcription of the lytic replicon of P53 and synthesis of the product of repL, but not kilA, are required for replicon function. We have identified an additional promoter, termed P53as (antisense), at the 5'-end of the kilA gene from which a 180 base transcript is constitutively synthesized and in the opposite direction to the P53 transcript. By using a promoter probe plasmid we show that transcription from P53 is strongly repressed by the C1 repressor, whereas that of P53as remains unaffected. Accordingly, the C1 repressor inhibits binding of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase to P53, but not to P53as, as shown by electron microscopy. Under non-repressed conditions transcription from P53 appears to be inhibited by P53as activity and vice versa. An inhibitory effect of P53as on the P1 lytic replicon was revealed by the construction and characterization of a P53as promoter-down mutant. Under non-repressed conditions transcription of repL and, as a consequence, replication of the plasmid is strongly enhanced when P53as is inactive. The results suggest a regulatory role for P53as on the P1 lytic replicon. Images PMID:7784198

  3. 26 CFR 1.409(p)-1T - Prohibited allocations of securities in an S corporation (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paragraph (i)(2)(ii), § 1.409(p)-1T as in effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR... effect prior to December 17, 2004 (see § 1.409(p)-1T in 26 CFR Part 1 revised as of April 1,...

  4. Pin p 1 is a major allergen in pine nut and the first food allergen described in the plant group of gymnosperms.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Crespo, Jesus F; Maleki, Soheila J; Rodriguez, Julia; Novak, Natalija

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to report the complete sequence of a 2S albumin purified from pine nut and to analyze its allergenic properties. Individual recognition of this protein by serum IgE from pine nut-allergic patients was assessed. IgE cross-linking capacity was analyzed in a basophil activation test. Inhibition of IgE-binding and stability to heating was also assessed. The complete nucleotide sequence was obtained and a phylogenetic study was carried out. 2S albumin from pine nut (registered as Pin p 1.0101) was recognized by IgE of 75% of sera. The allergen was heat-stable and had a robust capacity to inhibit IgE-binding to whole pine nut extract. The IgE cross-linking capacity of Pin p 1 on basophils was also demonstrated. Despite the low homology of Pin p 1 sequence with other allergenic 2S albumins from angiosperms, Pin p 1 contains the typical skeleton of 8 cysteine residues, important for its α-helixes enriched structure. PMID:27211622

  5. Dormancy in Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 as a survival strategy to escape from deleterious effects of carbon starvation and temperature.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Matías; González, Karina; González, Carlos; Parra, Boris; Martínez, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Dormancy is characterized by low metabolism and absence of protein synthesis and cellular division enabling bacterial cells to survive under stress. The aim was to determine if carbon starvation and low temperature are factors that modify the proportion of dormant/active cells in Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1. By flow cytometry, RedoxSensor Green (RSG) was used to quantify metabolic activity and Propidium Iodide (PI) to evaluate membrane integrity in order to determine the percentage of dormant cells. Cell size and morphology were determined using scanning electronic microscopy. Under carbon starvation at 30°C, Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 increased its proportion of dormant cells from 0.1% to 20%, decreased the count of culturable cells and average cell volume decreased 7.1 times. At 4°C, however, the proportion of dormant cells increased only to 6%, without a change in the count of culturable cells and an average cellular volume decrease of 4.1 times and 3% of the dormant cells were able to be awakened. Results indicate a greater proportion of dormant Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 cells at 30ºC and it suggests that carbon starvation is more deleterious condition at 30ºC than 4ºC. For this reason Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 cells are more likely to enter into dormancy at higher temperature as a strategy to survive.

  6. Emerging ST121/agr4 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities: trigger for MRSA pneumonia and fatal aspiration pneumonia in an influenza-infected elderly.

    PubMed

    Wan, T-W; Tomita, Y; Saita, N; Konno, K; Iwao, Y; Hung, W-C; Teng, L-J; Yamamoto, T

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia in influenza-infected elderly individuals has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, a 92-year-old man infected with influenza developed CA-MRSA pneumonia. His CA-MRSA was an emerging type, originated in ST121/agr4 S. aureus, with diversities of Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)(-)/spat5110/SCCmecV(+) versus PVL(+)/spat159((etc.))/SCCmec (-), but with common virulence potentials of strong adhesin and cytolytic activities. Resistance to erythromycin/clindamycin (inducible-type) and gentamicin was detected. Pneumonia improved with the administration of levofloxacin, but with the subsequent development of fatal aspiration pneumonia. Hence, characteristic CA-MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities triggered influenza-related sequential complications.

  7. P-1 truss moved to work stand in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, an overhead crane lifts the top of the canister containing the P-1 truss, a component of the International Space Station. The truss, scheduled to fly in spring of 2002, is part of a total 10-truss, girder-like structure on the Station that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Astronauts will attach the 14-by- 15 foot structure to the port side of the center truss, S0, during the spring assembly flight. The 33,000-pound P-1 will house the thermal radiator rotating joint (TRRJ) that will rotate the Station's radiators away from the sun to increase their maximum cooling efficiency.

  8. Development of Quasi-3DOF upper limb rehabilitation system using ER brake: PLEMO-P1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Fukushima, K.; Furusho, J.; Ozawa, T.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. However, almost all the devices are active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices and they basically require high-cost safety system compared to passive-type (brake-based) devices. In this study, we developed a new practical haptic device 'PLEMO-P1'; this system adopted ER brakes as its force generators. In this paper, the mechanism of PLEMO-P1 and its software for a reaching rehabilitation are described.

  9. Geohydrologic data for test well UE-25p1, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, R.W.; Johnson, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the following data for test well UE-25p 1 in Nye County, Nevada: drilling operations, lithology, availability of borehole geophysical logs, water levels, future availability of core analyses, water chemistry, pumping tests, borehole-flow surveys, and packer-injection tests. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for underground storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well UE-25p 1 was the first in the Yucca Mountain area to penetrate rocks of Paleozoic age. To a depth of 1,244 meters, the rocks are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age. From 1,244 meters to a total depth of 1,805 meters, the rock is dolomite of Paleozoic age. (USGS)

  10. Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom: Lifetime of the 2p{1/2}level

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S.G.

    1995-05-01

    Corrections of order {alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 2} to the width of the 2p{1/2} level in the hydrogen atom are considered in the logarithmic approximation. The ratio of this width to the splitting of n=2 states can be measured to high accuracy. With the aid of the experimental data available for this ratio, the new value for the Lamb splitting is found to be 1057.8576(21) MHz. 17 refs.

  11. Optimization of the 8 GeV AP3-P1 Lattice for Antiproton Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    2001-01-22

    During 8 GeV antiproton transfers between the Accumulator to the Main Injector, the antiprotons must travel through four separate beam lines, AP3, AP1, P2, and P1. This note describes the optimization of a single lattice that describes these beam lines for 8 GeV antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Main Injector and 8 GeV proton transfers from the Main Injector to the Accumulator.

  12. The P1 biomarker for assessing cortical maturation in pediatric hearing loss: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anu; Glick, Hannah; Deeves, Emily; Duncan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    We review evidence for a high degree of neuroplasticity of the central auditory pathways in early childhood, citing evidence of studies of the P1 and N1 cortical auditory evoked potentials in congenitally deaf children receiving cochlear implants at different ages during childhood, children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and children with hearing loss and comorbid multiple disabilities. We discuss neuroplasticity, including cortico-cortical de-coupling and cross-modal re-organization that occurs in deafness. We provide evidence for the clinical utility of the P1 cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) as a non-invasive biomarker that can be used to objectively assess maturation of auditory cortex in clinical cases of cochlear implant patients and candidates. Finally, we present clinical case studies in which the P1 CAEP biomarker proved useful in clinical decision-making regarding intervention in cases of single-sided deafness, auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, mild hearing loss and hypoplastic auditory nerve. PMID:27688594

  13. Direct Band Gap Gallium Antimony Phosphide (GaSbxP1-x) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. B.; Andriotis, A. N.; Menon, M.; Jasinski, J. B.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Sunkara, M. K.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report direct band gap transition for Gallium Phosphide (GaP) when alloyed with just 1-2 at% antimony (Sb) utilizing both density functional theory based computations and experiments. First principles density functional theory calculations of GaSbxP1-x alloys in a 216 atom supercell configuration indicate that an indirect to direct band gap transition occurs at x = 0.0092 or higher Sb incorporation into GaSbxP1-x. Furthermore, these calculations indicate band edge straddling of the hydrogen evolution and oxygen evolution reactions for compositions ranging from x = 0.0092 Sb up to at least x = 0.065 Sb making it a candidate for use in a Schottky type photoelectrochemical water splitting device. GaSbxP1-x nanowires were synthesized by reactive transport utilizing a microwave plasma discharge with average compositions ranging from x = 0.06 to x = 0.12 Sb and direct band gaps between 2.21 eV and 1.33 eV. Photoelectrochemical experiments show that the material is photoactive with p-type conductivity. This study brings attention to a relatively uninvestigated, tunable band gap semiconductor system with tremendous potential in many fields.

  14. Direct Band Gap Gallium Antimony Phosphide (GaSbxP1−x) Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Russell, H. B.; Andriotis, A. N.; Menon, M.; Jasinski, J. B.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Sunkara, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report direct band gap transition for Gallium Phosphide (GaP) when alloyed with just 1–2 at% antimony (Sb) utilizing both density functional theory based computations and experiments. First principles density functional theory calculations of GaSbxP1−x alloys in a 216 atom supercell configuration indicate that an indirect to direct band gap transition occurs at x = 0.0092 or higher Sb incorporation into GaSbxP1−x. Furthermore, these calculations indicate band edge straddling of the hydrogen evolution and oxygen evolution reactions for compositions ranging from x = 0.0092 Sb up to at least x = 0.065 Sb making it a candidate for use in a Schottky type photoelectrochemical water splitting device. GaSbxP1−x nanowires were synthesized by reactive transport utilizing a microwave plasma discharge with average compositions ranging from x = 0.06 to x = 0.12 Sb and direct band gaps between 2.21 eV and 1.33 eV. Photoelectrochemical experiments show that the material is photoactive with p-type conductivity. This study brings attention to a relatively uninvestigated, tunable band gap semiconductor system with tremendous potential in many fields. PMID:26860470

  15. Recombination-induced suppression of cell division following P1-mediated generalized transduction in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Bender, R A; Sambucetti, L C

    1983-01-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes recombinants resulting from bacteriophage P1-mediated generalized transduction failed to increase in number for approximately six generations after transduction. Nevertheless these recombinants continued to grow and became sensitive to penicillin after a transient resistance, suggesting that the cells were growing as long, non-dividing filaments. When filamentous cells were isolated from transduced cultures by gradient centrifugation, recombinants were 1000-fold more frequent among the filaments than among the normal-sized cells. The suppression of cell-division lasted for six generations whether markers near the origin (gln, ilv) or terminus (his, trp) of chromosome replication were used, despite a 50-fold difference in transduction frequencies for these markers. The suppression of cell division was a host response to recombination rather than to P1 invasion since cells lysogenized by P1 in these same experiments showed only a short (two generation) suppression of cell division. We speculate that the suppression of cell-division is an SOS response triggered by the degraded DNA not incorporated in the final recombinant. We demonstrate that both the filamentation and the transient penicillin resistance of recombinant cells can be exploited to enrich greatly for recombinants, raising transduction frequencies to as high as 10(-3).

  16. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C.; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-01-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  17. Human antibody responses to the Anopheles salivary gSG6-P1 peptide: a novel tool for evaluating the efficacy of ITNs in malaria vector control.

    PubMed

    Drame, Papa Makhtar; Poinsignon, Anne; Besnard, Patrick; Cornelie, Sylvie; Le Mire, Jacques; Toto, Jean-Claude; Foumane, Vincent; Dos-Santos, Maria Adelaide; Sembène, Mbacké; Fortes, Filomeno; Simondon, Francois; Carnevale, Pierre; Remoue, Franck

    2010-01-01

    To optimize malaria control, WHO has prioritised the need for new indicators to evaluate the efficacy of malaria vector control strategies. The gSG6-P1 peptide from gSG6 protein of Anopheles gambiae salivary glands was previously designed as a specific salivary sequence of malaria vector species. It was shown that the quantification of human antibody (Ab) responses to Anopheles salivary proteins in general and especially to the gSG6-P1 peptide was a pertinent biomarker of human exposure to Anopheles. The present objective was to validate this indicator in the evaluation of the efficacy of Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs). A longitudinal evaluation, including parasitological, entomological and immunological assessments, was conducted on children and adults from a malaria-endemic area before and after the introduction of ITNs. Significant decrease of anti-gSG6-P1 IgG response was observed just after the efficient ITNs use. Interestingly, specific IgG Ab level was especially pertinent to evaluate a short-time period of ITNs efficacy and at individual level. However, specific IgG rose back up within four months as correct ITN use waned. IgG responses to one salivary peptide could constitute a reliable biomarker for the evaluation of ITN efficacy, at short- and long-term use, and provide a valuable tool in malaria vector control based on a real measurement of human-vector contact. PMID:21179476

  18. Human Antibody Responses to the Anopheles Salivary gSG6-P1 Peptide: A Novel Tool for Evaluating the Efficacy of ITNs in Malaria Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Papa Makhtar; Poinsignon, Anne; Besnard, Patrick; Cornelie, Sylvie; Le Mire, Jacques; Toto, Jean-Claude; Foumane, Vincent; Dos-Santos, Maria Adelaide; Sembène, Mbacké; Fortes, Filomeno; Simondon, Francois; Carnevale, Pierre; Remoue, Franck

    2010-01-01

    To optimize malaria control, WHO has prioritised the need for new indicators to evaluate the efficacy of malaria vector control strategies. The gSG6-P1 peptide from gSG6 protein of Anopheles gambiae salivary glands was previously designed as a specific salivary sequence of malaria vector species. It was shown that the quantification of human antibody (Ab) responses to Anopheles salivary proteins in general and especially to the gSG6-P1 peptide was a pertinent biomarker of human exposure to Anopheles. The present objective was to validate this indicator in the evaluation of the efficacy of Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs). A longitudinal evaluation, including parasitological, entomological and immunological assessments, was conducted on children and adults from a malaria-endemic area before and after the introduction of ITNs. Significant decrease of anti-gSG6-P1 IgG response was observed just after the efficient ITNs use. Interestingly, specific IgG Ab level was especially pertinent to evaluate a short-time period of ITNs efficacy and at individual level. However, specific IgG rose back up within four months as correct ITN use waned. IgG responses to one salivary peptide could constitute a reliable biomarker for the evaluation of ITN efficacy, at short- and long-term use, and provide a valuable tool in malaria vector control based on a real measurement of human-vector contact. PMID:21179476

  19. Cloning and functional analysis of human acyl coenzyme A: Cholesterol acyltransferase1 gene P1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing; Cheng, Bei; Qi, Benling; Peng, Wen; Wen, Hui; Bai, Lijuan; Liu, Yun; Zhai, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) catalyzes the conversion of free cholesterol (FC) to cholesterol ester. The human ACAT1 gene P1 promoter has been cloned. However, the activity and specificity of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter in diverse cell types remains unclear. The P1 promoter fragment was digested with KpnI/XhoI from a P1 promoter cloning vector, and was subcloned into the multiple cloning site of the Firefly luciferase vector pGL3‑Enhancer to obtain the construct P1E‑1. According to the analysis of biological information, the P1E‑1 plasmid was used to generate deletions of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter with varying 5' ends and an identical 3' end at +65 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the 5'‑deletion constructs of the P1 promoter were identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion mapping and DNA sequencing. The transcriptional activity of each construct was detected after transient transfection into THP‑1, HepG2, HEK293 and Hela cells using DEAE‑dextran and Lipofectamine 2000 liposome transfection reagent. Results showed that the transcriptional activity of the ACAT1 gene P1 promoter and deletions of P1 promoter in THP‑1 and HepG2 cells was higher than that in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of P1E‑9 was higher compared with those of other deletions in THP‑1, HepG2, HEK293 and HeLa cells. These findings indicate that the transcriptional activity of the P1 promoter and the effects of deletions vary with different cell lines. Thus, the P1 promoter may drive ACAT1 gene expression with cell‑type specificity. In addition, the core sequence of ACAT1 gene P1 promoter was suggested to be between -125 and +65 bp. PMID:27220725

  20. Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 functions as an estrogen receptor α signaling modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiyuan; An, Byoung Ha; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Jong Hoon; Kang, Young Sook; Chang, Minsun

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • GSTP induces the classical ERα signaling event. • The functional GSTP is a prerequisite for GSTP-induced ERα transcription activity. • The expression of RIP140, a transcription cofactor, was inhibited by GSTP protein. • We propose the novel non-enzymatic role of GSTP. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays a crucial role in estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and exerts its action as a nuclear transcription factor. Binding of the ligand-activated ERα to the estrogen response element (ERE) is a central part of ERα-associated signal transduction pathways and its aberrant modulation is associated with many disease conditions. Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP) functions as an enzyme in conjugation reactions in drug metabolism and as a regulator of kinase signaling pathways. It is overexpressed in tumors following chemotherapy and has been associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. In this study, a novel regulatory function of GSTP has been proposed in which GSTP modulates ERE-mediated ERα signaling events. Ectopic expression of GSTP was able to induce the ERα and ERE-mediated transcriptional activities in ERα-positive but GSTP-negative MCF7 human breast cancer cells. This inductive effect of GSTP on the ERE-transcription activity was diminished when the cells express a mutated form of the enzyme or are treated with a GSTP-specific chemical inhibitor. It was found that GSTP inhibited the expression of the receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140), a negative regulator of ERα transcription, at both mRNA and protein levels. Our study suggests a novel non-enzymatic role of GSTP which plays a significant role in regulating the classical ERα signaling pathways via modification of transcription cofactors such as RIP140.

  1. FTY720 Protects Cardiac Microvessels of Diabetes: A Critical Role of S1P1/3 in Diabetic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liping; Gao, Haokao; Zhang, Rongqing; Tao, Ling; Cao, Feng; Wang, Haichang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of cardiac microvascular disease. The mechanisms by which this damage occurs are unknown. However, research suggests that signaling through the sphingosine-1-phosphates receptor 1 and 3 (S1P1/3) by FTY720, a sphiongolipid drug that is structually similar to SIP, may play a role in the treatment on cardiac microvascular dysfunction in diabetes. We hypothesized that FTY720 might exert the cardioprotective effects of S1P1 and S1P3 viaprotein kinase C-beta (PKCβ II) signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings: Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to detect the change of cardiac function. Scanning and transmission electron microscope with lanthanum tracer were used to determine microvascular ultrastructure and permeability in vivo. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL and CD31 dual labeling in paraffin-embedded sections. Laser capture miscrodissection was used to assess cardiac micovascular endothelial cells (CMECs) in vivo. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to determine the mRNA levels and protein expression of S1P1, S1P3, and PKCβ II. In the diabetic rats vs. controls, cardiac capillaries showed significantly higher density; CD31 positive endothelial cells were significantly reduced; the apoptosis index of cardiac endothlial cells was significantly higher. And FTY720 could increase the expressional level of S1P1 and boost S1P3 trasnslocation from membrane to nuclear, then ameliorate cardiac microvascular barrier impairment and pathologic angiogenesis induced by diabetes. In addition, overexpression of PKCβ II significantly decreased the protective effect of FTY720. Conclusions: Our study represents that the deregulation of S1P1 and S1P3 is an important signalresponsible for cardiac microvascular dysfunction in diabetes. FTY720 might be competent to serve as a potential therapeutic approach for diabetic heart disease through ameliorating cardiac microvascular barrier impairment and

  2. Expression analysis of the speech-related genes FoxP1 and FoxP2 and their relation