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Sample records for adhesion cell migration

  1. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  2. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon.

  3. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  4. Relationship between neuronal migration and cell-substratum adhesion: laminin and merosin promote olfactory neuronal migration but are anti- adhesive

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Regulation by the extracellular matrix (ECM) of migration, motility, and adhesion of olfactory neurons and their precursors was studied in vitro. Neuronal cells of the embryonic olfactory epithelium (OE), which undergo extensive migration in the central nervous system during normal development, were shown to be highly migratory in culture as well. Migration of OE neuronal cells was strongly dependent on substratum- bound ECM molecules, being specifically stimulated and guided by laminin (or the laminin-related molecule merosin) in preference to fibronectin, type I collagen, or type IV collagen. Motility of OE neuronal cells, examined by time-lapse video microscopy, was high on laminin-containing substrata, but negligible on fibronectin substrata. Quantitative assays of adhesion of OE neuronal cells to substrata treated with different ECM molecules demonstrated no correlation, either positive or negative, between the migratory preferences of cells and the strength of cell-substratum adhesion. Moreover, measurements of cell adhesion to substrata containing combinations of ECM proteins revealed that laminin and merosin are anti-adhesive for OE neuronal cells, i.e., cause these cells to adhere poorly to substrata that would otherwise be strongly adhesive. The evidence suggests that the anti- adhesive effect of laminin is not the result of interactions between laminin and other ECM molecules, but rather an effect of laminin on cells, which alters the way in which cells adhere. Consistent with this view, laminin was found to interfere strongly with the formation of focal contacts by OE neuronal cells. PMID:1918163

  5. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  6. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  7. Live-cell migration and adhesion turnover assays.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, J; Young, K; Brown, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized the way live-cell imaging is achieved. At the same time, it is also potentially harmful to a living specimen. Therefore, the specimen must be monitored for viability and health before, during, and after imaging sessions. Methods for monitoring cell viability and health will be discussed in this chapter. Another key to successful live-cell imaging is to minimize light exposure as much as possible. A summary of strategies for minimizing light exposure including maximizing the light throughput of the microscope and the sensitivity of light detection is presented. Various fluorescence microscopy techniques are presented with a focus on how the light is delivered to the sample (i.e., light density) and pros and cons for use with living specimens. The reader is also directed to other publications that go into these topics in more detail. Methods are described on how to prepare samples for single cell migration assays, how to measure cell migration rates (e.g., bright-field, semi-automated, and automated), and how to measure focal adhesion turnover rates. Details of how to correct images for background intensity and field-illumination uniformity artifacts for quantitative imaging are also described. Overall, this chapter will be helpful to scientists who are interested in imaging live specimens using fluorescence microscopy techniques. It will be of particular interest to anyone wanting to perform quantitative fluorescence imaging, and wanting to measure cell migration rates, and focal adhesion dynamics.

  8. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  9. Laser-based microfabrication for cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.

    Mammalian cell adhesion and migration impact a multitude of cellular behaviors and tissue remodeling processes. Over the past several decades, investigators have methodically improved in vitro systems as mimics of the extracellular microenvironment to study these biologic phenomena. Experiments have progressed from early studies on bifunctional inorganic surfaces to those with purified adhesive proteins against an organic, non-adhesive background. Recently, subcellular geometric patterns of adhesive proteins have proven useful to restrict and direct focal contact formation, cell survival, lamellopodia extension, and the maturation of "supermature" focal contacts. The vast majority of recent studies have involved the construction of hydrophobic patches with adsorbed fibronectin as the adhesive constraint of choice. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which cells operate is a complex and diverse environment where numerous signals interact with a cell simultaneously; signals that the cell must integrate and that directly impact these processes. Microfabrication methods to approximate the extracellular milieu have significant limitations in their potential to be extended to pattern multiple bioactive ligands with high precision. Current techniques require multi-step processes which lose feature fidelity at every pattern transfer step, while simultaneously increasing logistical complexity and the chance of technical missteps. We have developed a family of complementary techniques using the raster-scanning laser of a confocal microscope to address a number of current challenges in improving microfabrication. For our work with thin films of self-assembled organic monolayers, we systematically removed the multi-step processing requirements of conventional photolithographic microfabrication and characterized and verified the technical advantages of our new patterning techniques. For 3D work, we developed and demonstrated micron-scale biochemical and mechanical

  10. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  11. Rocking adhesion assay system to study adhesion and transendothelial migration of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bapu, Deepashree; Khadim, Munira; Brooks, Susan A

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of metastatic cancer cells to the vascular endothelium of the target organs and their subsequent transendothelial migration is one of the critical, yet poorly understood, steps of the metastatic cascade. Conventionally, the mechanisms of this complex process have been studied using static adhesion systems or flow assay systems. Static assay systems are easy to set up and perform but do not mimic the physiological conditions of blood flow. Flow assays closely mimic physiological conditions of flow but are time consuming and require specialist equipment. In this chapter we describe the rocking adhesion system which incorporates the key advantages of both the static and flow assay systems and not only is easy to set up and perform but also mimics conditions of blood flow.

  12. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazão, Tiago F; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and have critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA-mediated interference screen, we identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We found that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via the kinases OXSR1 and STK39 and the ion co-transporter SLC12A2. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway previously known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration.

  13. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazao, Tiago F.; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V.; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and play critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA interference screen we have identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We demonstrate that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via OXSR1 and STK39 kinases and the SLC12A2 ion co-transporter. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs, and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway hitherto known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration. PMID:27400149

  14. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-C.; Su, H.-W.; Lee, C.-C.; Tang, M.-J.; Su, F.-C. . E-mail: fcsu@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level ({approx}600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration.

  15. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  16. Microfilament-coordinated adhesion dynamics drives single cell migration and shapes whole tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocio; Llorente-Gonzalez, Clara; Vicente, Carlos; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the substratum and/or other cells is a crucial step of cell migration. While essential in the case of solitary migrating cells (for example, immune cells), it becomes particularly important in collective cell migration, in which cells maintain contact with their neighbors while moving directionally. Adhesive coordination is paramount in physiological contexts (for example, during organogenesis) but also in pathology (for example, tumor metastasis). In this review, we address the need for a coordinated regulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions during collective cell migration. We emphasize the role of the actin cytoskeleton as an intracellular integrator of cadherin- and integrin-based adhesions and the emerging role of mechanics in the maintenance, reinforcement, and turnover of adhesive contacts. Recent advances in understanding the mechanical regulation of several components of cadherin and integrin adhesions allow us to revisit the adhesive clutch hypothesis that controls the degree of adhesive engagement during protrusion. Finally, we provide a brief overview of the major impact of these discoveries when using more physiological three-dimensional models of single and collective cell migration. PMID:28299195

  17. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  18. Confinement and low adhesion induce fast amoeboid migration of slow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Le Berre, Maël; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Heuzé, Mélina; Takaki, Tohru; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-02-12

    The mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) was proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to adapt their migration mode to their environment. While the molecular pathways involved in this transition are well documented, the role of the microenvironment in the MAT is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how confinement and adhesion affect this transition. We report that, in the absence of focal adhesions and under conditions of confinement, mesenchymal cells can spontaneously switch to a fast amoeboid migration phenotype. We identified two main types of fast migration--one involving a local protrusion and a second involving a myosin-II-dependent mechanical instability of the cell cortex that leads to a global cortical flow. Interestingly, transformed cells are more prone to adopt this fast migration mode. Finally, we propose a generic model that explains migration transitions and predicts a phase diagram of migration phenotypes based on three main control parameters: confinement, adhesion, and contractility.

  19. Overexpression of Selenoprotein SelK in BGC-823 Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Ben, S B; Peng, B; Wang, G C; Li, C; Gu, H F; Jiang, H; Meng, X L; Lee, B J; Chen, C L

    2015-10-01

    Effects of human selenoprotein SelK on the adhesion and migration ability of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells using Matrigel adhesion and transwell migration assays, respectively, were investigated in this study. The Matrigel adhesion ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01) compared with that of the cells not expressing the protein. The migration ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK also declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of the cells that overexpressed C-terminally truncated SelK did not decline significantly. The Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells that overexpressed SelK did not show significant change (p > 0.05) with the cells that overexpressed the C-terminally truncated protein. In addition to the effect on Matrigel adhesion and migration, the overexpression of SelK also caused a loss in cell viability (as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) and induced apoptosis as shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The cytosolic free Ca2+ level of these cells was significantly increased as detected by flow cytometry. But the overexpression of SelK in HEK-293 cells caused neither significant loss in cell viability nor apoptosis induction. Only the elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ level in these cells was significant. Taken together, the results suggest that the overexpression of SelK can inhibit human cancer cell Matrigel adhesion and migration and cause both the loss in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. The release of intracellular Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum might be a mechanism whereby the protein exerted its impact. Furthermore, only the full-length protein, but not C-terminally truncated form, was capable of producing such impact. The embryonic cells were not influenced by the

  20. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates focal adhesions at the leading edge of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Teckchandani, Anjali; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration requires the cyclical assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions. Adhesion induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins, including Cas (Crk-associated substrate/p130Cas/BCAR1). However, Cas phosphorylation stimulates adhesion turnover. This raises the question of how adhesion assembly occurs against opposition from phospho-Cas. Here we show that suppressor of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS6) and Cullin 5, two components of the CRL5SOCS6 ubiquitin ligase, inhibit Cas-dependent focal adhesion turnover at the front but not rear of migrating epithelial cells. The front focal adhesions contain phospho-Cas which recruits SOCS6. If SOCS6 cannot access focal adhesions, or if cullins or the proteasome are inhibited, adhesion disassembly is stimulated. This suggests that the localized targeting of phospho-Cas within adhesions by CRL5SOCS6 and concurrent cullin and proteasome activity provide a negative feedback loop, ensuring that adhesion assembly predominates over disassembly at the leading edge. By this mechanism, ubiquitination provides a new level of spatio-temporal control over cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17440.001 PMID:27656905

  1. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  2. Probing the mechanosensitivity in cell adhesion and migration: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bao-Hua; Huo, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are basic physiological processes in living organisms. Cells can actively probe their mechanical micro-environment and respond to the external stimuli through cell adhesion. Cells need to move to the targeting place to perform function via cell migration. For adherent cells, cell migration is mediated by cell-matrix adhesion and cell-cell adhesion. Experimental approaches, especially at early stage of investigation, are indispensable to studies of cell mechanics when even qualitative behaviors of cell as well as fundamental factors in cell behaviors are unclear. Currently, there is increasingly accumulation of experimental data of measurement, thus a quantitative formulation of cell behaviors and the relationship among these fundamental factors are highly needed. This quantitative understanding should be crucial to tissue engineering and biomedical engineering when people want to accurately regulate or control cell behaviors from single cell level to tissue level. In this review, we will elaborate recent advances in the experimental and theoretical studies on cell adhesion and migration, with particular focuses laid on recent advances in experimental techniques and theoretical modeling, through which challenging problems in the cell mechanics are suggested.

  3. Focal adhesion kinase and paxillin promote migration and adhesion to fibronectin by swine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Chun-Qi; Chen, Rong-Qiang; Jin, Cheng-Long; Li, Hai-Chang; Yan, Hui-Chao; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2016-05-24

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway contributes to the cell migration and adhesion that is critical for wound healing and regeneration of damaged muscle, but its function in skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) is less clear. We compared the migration and adhesion of SCs derived from two species of pig (Lantang and Landrace) in vitro, and explored how FAK signaling modulates the two processes. The results showed that Lantang SCs had greater ability to migrate and adhere to fibronection (P < 0.05) than Landrace SCs. Compared to Landrace SCs, Lantang SCs expressed many more focal adhesion (FA) sites, which were indicated by the presence of p-paxillin (Tyr118), and exhibited less F-actin reorganization 24 h after seeding onto fibronectin. Levels of p-FAK (Tyr397) and p-paxillin (Tyr118) were greater (P < 0.05) in Lantang SCs than Landrace SCs after migration for 24 h. Similarly, Lantang SCs showed much higher levels of p-FAK (Tyr397), p-paxillin (Tyr118) and p-Akt (Ser473) than Landrace SCs 2 h after adhesion. Treatment with the FAK inhibitor PF-573228 (5 or 10 μmol/L) inhibited Lantang SC migration and adhesion to fibronectin (P < 0.05), decreased levels of p-paxillin (Tyr118) and p-Akt (Ser473) (P < 0.05), and suppressed the formation of FA sites on migrating SCs. Thus FAK appears to play a key role in the regulation of SC migration and adhesion necessary for muscle regeneration.

  4. Filopodia in cell adhesion, 3D migration and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the role filopodia and filopodia-like structures in cell adhesion and three dimensional (3D) cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on recent advances demonstrating that filopodia are involved in substrate tethering and environment sensing in vivo. We further discuss the emerging role of filopodia and filopodial proteins in tumor dissemination as mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest that filopodia drive cancer cell invasion and highlight filopodia proteins as attractive therapeutic targets. Finally, we outline outstanding questions that remain to be addressed to elucidate the role of filopodia during 3D cell migration.

  5. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Dong, Delu; Chen, Yaoyu; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2) were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  6. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  7. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  8. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  9. Controlling cell migration and adhesion into a scaffold by external electric currents.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Leena; Vörös, Janos; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-08-01

    Fabrication of more complex tissue-engineered structures, resembling the tissues and organs in vivo requires combining more than one cell type within the same construct. This can be achieved by designing and fabricating complex scaffolds with asymmetric properties but controlled arrangement of cells within the scaffold could also be realized by using electric current. External electric currents are able to modify cell adhesion, orientation and migration and this can be used for influencing cell location within a scaffold. In this paper we studied the effect of an electric current on cell migration and adhesion into a three-dimensional scaffold through a conductive mesh.

  10. Arachidonic acid randomizes endothelial cell motion and regulates adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Ninna Struck; Hansen, Anker Jon; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are essential for the evolution, organization, and repair of living organisms. An example of a combination of these processes is the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), which is mediated by a directed migration and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs). Angiogenesis is an essential part of wound healing and a prerequisite of cancerous tumor growth. We investigated the effect of the amphiphilic compound arachidonic acid (AA) on EC adhesion and migration by combining live cell imaging with biophysical analysis methods. AA significantly influenced both EC adhesion and migration, in either a stimulating or inhibiting fashion depending on AA concentration. The temporal evolution of cell adhesion area was well described by a two-phase model. In the first phase, the spreading dynamics were independent of AA concentration. In the latter phase, the spreading dynamics increased at low AA concentrations and decreased at high AA concentrations. AA also affected EC migration; though the instantaneous speed of individual cells remained independent of AA concentration, the individual cells lost their sense of direction upon addition of AA, thus giving rise to an overall decrease in the collective motion of a confluent EC monolayer into vacant space. Addition of AA also caused ECs to become more elongated, this possibly being related to incorporation of AA in the EC membrane thus mediating a change in the viscosity of the membrane. Hence, AA is a promising non-receptor specific regulator of wound healing and angiogenesis.

  11. Anisotropic forces from spatially constrained focal adhesions mediate contact guidance directed cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arja; Lee, Oscar; Win, Zaw; Edwards, Rachel M; Alford, Patrick W; Kim, Deok-Ho; Provenzano, Paolo P

    2017-04-12

    Directed migration by contact guidance is a poorly understood yet vital phenomenon, particularly for carcinoma cell invasion on aligned collagen fibres. We demonstrate that for single cells, aligned architectures providing contact guidance cues induce constrained focal adhesion maturation and associated F-actin alignment, consequently orchestrating anisotropic traction stresses that drive cell orientation and directional migration. Consistent with this understanding, relaxing spatial constraints to adhesion maturation either through reduction in substrate alignment density or reduction in adhesion size diminishes the contact guidance response. While such interactions allow single mesenchymal-like cells to spontaneously 'sense' and follow topographic alignment, intercellular interactions within epithelial clusters temper anisotropic cell-substratum forces, resulting in substantially lower directional response. Overall, these results point to the control of contact guidance by a balance of cell-substratum and cell-cell interactions, modulated by cell phenotype-specific cytoskeletal arrangements. Thus, our findings elucidate how phenotypically diverse cells perceive ECM alignment at the molecular level.

  12. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell-protein or cell-cell contact was also demonstrated.

  13. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell–protein or cell–cell contact was also demonstrated. PMID:27994457

  14. Clathrin mediates integrin endocytosis for focal adhesion disassembly in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Ezratty, Ellen J; Bertaux, Claire; Marcantonio, Eugene E; Gundersen, Gregg G

    2009-11-30

    Focal adhesion disassembly is regulated by microtubules (MTs) through an unknown mechanism that involves dynamin. To test whether endocytosis may be involved, we interfered with the function of clathrin or its adaptors autosomal recessive hypercholesteremia (ARH) and Dab2 (Disabled-2) and found that both treatments prevented MT-induced focal adhesion disassembly. Surface labeling experiments showed that integrin was endocytosed in an extracellular matrix-, clathrin-, and ARH- and Dab2-dependent manner before entering Rab5 endosomes. Clathrin colocalized with a subset of focal adhesions in an ARH- and Dab2-dependent fashion. Direct imaging showed that clathrin rapidly accumulated on focal adhesions during MT-stimulated disassembly and departed from focal adhesions with integrin upon their disassembly. In migrating cells, depletion of clathrin or Dab2 and ARH inhibited focal adhesion disassembly and decreased the rate of migration. These results show that focal adhesion disassembly occurs through a targeted mechanism involving MTs, clathrin, and specific clathrin adaptors and that direct endocytosis of integrins from focal adhesions mediates their disassembly in migrating cells.

  15. Cell-alignment patterns in the collective migration of cells with polarized adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd) utilizes inhomogeneities in the distribution of cell-cell adhesion molecules on cell membranes for collective cell migration. A simple example of an inhomogeneity is a front-side (leading-edge) polarization in the distribution at the early streaming stage. Experiments have shown that the polarized cell-cell adhesion induces side-by-side contact between cells [Beug et al., Nature (London) 274, 445 (1978), 10.1038/274445a0]. This result is counterintuitive, as one would expect cells to align front to front in contact with each other on the basis of front-side polarization. In this work, we theoretically examine whether front-side polarization induces side-by-side contact in collective cell migration. We construct a model for expressing cells with this polarization based on the two-dimensional cellular Potts model. By a numerical simulation with this model, we find cell-cell alignment wherein cells form lateral arrays with side-by-side contacts as observed in the experiments.

  16. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  17. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  18. Biphasic functions of the kinase-defective Ephb6 receptor in cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Obama, Hiroya; Kelly, Meghan L; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Nakamoto, Masaru

    2005-08-12

    EphB6 is a unique member in the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases in that its kinase domain contains several alterations in conserved amino acids and is catalytically inactive. Although EphB6 is expressed both in a variety of embryonic and adult tissues, biological functions of this receptor are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the function of EphB6 in cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated that EphB6 exerted biphasic effects in response to different concentrations of the ephrin-B2 ligand; EphB6 promoted cell adhesion and migration when stimulated with low concentrations of ephrin-B2, whereas it induced repulsion and inhibited migration upon stimulation with high concentrations of ephrin-B2. A truncated EphB6 receptor lacking the cytoplasmic domain showed monophasic-positive effects on cell adhesion and migration, indicating that the cytoplasmic domain is essential for the negative effects. EphB6 is constitutively associated with the Src family kinase Fyn. High concentrations of ephrin-B2 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EphB6 through an Src family kinase activity. These results indicate that EphB6 can both positively and negatively regulate cell adhesion and migration, and suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor by an Src family kinase acts as the molecular switch for the functional transition.

  19. Regulation of Cell Adhesion and Migration by Kindlin-3 Cleavage by Calpain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Meller, Julia; Ma, Yi; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Bledzka, Kamila; Qin, Jun; Podrez, Eugene A.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrin activation on hematopoietic cells is essential for platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion, and transmigration through endothelium and extracellular matrix into inflamed tissues. To migrate through matrix, leukocyte integrin adhesion complexes undergo dynamic changes. Here we show that Kindlin-3, a main activator and binding partner of integrins in hematopoietic cells, can be cleaved by calpain in an activation-dependent manner. This calpain-mediated cleavage occurs in platelets and leukocytes as well as in endothelial cells. We determined the calpain I cleavage site in Kindlin-3 at tyrosine 373 in the N-terminal part of Kindlin-3 pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of the calpain-resistant Y373N mutant of Kindlin-3 promotes stronger cell adhesion to extracellular matrix under flow as well as to activated endothelium. In contrast, Y373N mutation in Kindlin-3 hinders cell migration. Mechanistically, calpain-resistant Y373N mutant of Kindlin-3 exhibited an activation-independent association with β integrin cytoplasm domain. Thus, cleavage of Kindlin-3 by calpain controls the dynamics of integrin-Kindlin-3 interaction and as a result, integrin-dependent adhesion and migration of hematopoietic cells. This represents a novel mechanism regulating reversibility of integrin adhesion complexes in leukocytes, which, in turn, is critical for their successful transmigration through the extracellular matrix. PMID:23012377

  20. Emerging role of paxillin-PKL in regulation of cell adhesion, polarity and migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    Cell adhesion and motility is of fundamental importance during development, normal physiology and pathologic conditions such as tumor metastasis. Focal adhesion proteins and their dynamic interactions play a critical role in the regulation of directed cell migration upon exposure to extracellular guidance cues. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout and knockdown cells and mutant protein expression, we recently reported that following adhesion and growth factor stimulation the dynamic interaction between paxillin and PKL(GIT2) is regulated by Src/FAK-dependent phosphorylation of PKL and that this interaction is necessary for the coordination of Rho family GTPase signaling controlling front-rear cell polarity and thus directional migration. Herein, we discuss the implications of these observations.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi apparatus regulates cell-cell adhesion and invasive cell migration in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Emi; Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Irino, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Miki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of cell-cell adhesion and upregulation of cell migration play critical roles in the conversion of benign tumors to aggressive invasive cancers. In this study, we show that changes in cell-cell adhesion and cancer cell migration/invasion capacity depend on the level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] in the Golgi apparatus in breast cancer cells. Attenuating SAC1, a PI(4)P phosphatase localized in the Golgi apparatus, resulted in decreased cell-cell adhesion and increased cell migration in weakly invasive cells. In contrast, silencing phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, which generates PI(4)P in the Golgi apparatus, increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased invasion in highly invasive cells. Furthermore, a PI(4)P effector, Golgi phosphoprotein 3, was found to be involved in the generation of these phenotypes in a manner that depends on its PI(4)P-binding ability. Our results provide a new model for breast cancer cell progression in which progression is controlled by PI(4)P levels in the Golgi apparatus.

  2. Aurora kinase A mediates epithelial ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Do, T-V; Xiao, F; Bickel, L E; Klein-Szanto, A J; Pathak, H B; Hua, X; Howe, C; O'Brien, S W; Maglaty, M; Ecsedy, J A; Litwin, S; Golemis, E A; Schilder, R J; Godwin, A K; Connolly, D C

    2014-01-30

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) localizes to centrosomes and mitotic spindles where it mediates mitotic progression and chromosomal stability. Overexpression of AURKA is common in cancer, resulting in acquisition of alternate non-mitotic functions. In the current study, we identified a novel role for AURKA in regulating ovarian cancer cell dissemination and evaluated the efficacy of an AURKA-selective small molecule inhibitor, alisertib (MLN8237), as a single agent and combined with paclitaxel using an orthotopic xenograft model of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Ovarian carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of AURKA inhibition and overexpression on migration and adhesion. Pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of AURKA significantly reduced ovarian carcinoma cell migration and adhesion and the activation-associated phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal regulatory protein SRC at tyrosine 416 (pSRC(Y416)). Conversely, enforced expression of AURKA resulted in increased migration, adhesion and activation of SRC in cultured cells. In vivo tumor growth and dissemination were inhibited by alisertib treatment as a single agent. Moreover, combination of alisertib with paclitaxel, an agent commonly used in treatment of EOC, resulted in more potent inhibition of tumor growth and dissemination compared with either drug alone. Taken together, these findings support a role for AURKA in EOC dissemination by regulating migration and adhesion. They also point to the potential utility of combining AURKA inhibitors with taxanes as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of EOC patients.

  3. MIEN1 drives breast tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal-focal adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Van Treuren, Timothy; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2016-01-01

    Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1) is an important regulator of cell migration and invasion. MIEN1 overexpression represents an oncogenic event that promotes tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. The underlying mechanism by which MIEN1 regulates migration and invasion has yet to be deciphered. Here, we demonstrate that MIEN1 acts as a cytoskeletal-signaling adapter protein to drive breast cancer cell migration. MIEN1 localization is concentrated underneath the actin-enriched protrusive structures of the migrating breast cancer cells. Depletion of MIEN1 led to the loss of actin-protrusive structures whereas the over-expression of MIEN1 resulted in rich and thick membrane extensions. Knockdown of MIEN1 also decreased the cell-substratum adhesion, suggesting a role for MIEN1 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Our results show that MIEN1 supports the transition of G-actin to F-actin polymerization and stabilizes F-actin polymers. Additionally, MIEN1 promotes cellular adhesion and actin dynamics by inducing phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 and reducing phosphorylation of cofilin at Ser-3, which results in breast cancer cell migration. Collectively, our data show that MIEN1 plays an essential role in maintaining the plasticity of the dynamic membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton, which leads to an increase in cell motility. Hence, targeting MIEN1 might represent a promising means to prevent breast tumor metastasis. PMID:27462783

  4. Osteopontin improves adhesion and migration of human primary renal cortical epithelial cells during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Zuolin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of osteopontin (OPN) on adhesion and migration in human primary renal cortical epithelial cells during wound healing and Transwell assays. MTT assay was used to examine the cell viability and western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and cell adhesion molecules. The results showed that overexpression of OPN had positive effects on the viability, proliferation, adhesion and migration of the human primary renal cortical epithelial cells. In addition, the integrity of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton of the epithelial cells was negatively affected by knockdown of OPN expression. The Transwell migration and a wound healing assays performed using OPN-knockdown cells suggested that OPN had a significant impact on cell migration (P=0.0421) and wound healing (P=0.0333). Therefore, OPN may be a potential target for the therapeutic modulation of skin repair to improve the healing rate and quality of wound healing. PMID:28101213

  5. Silencing of WWP2 inhibits adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Pan, De-Biao; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Wang, Chao-Jun; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The role and clinical implication of the WWP2 E3 ubiquitin ligase in liver cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the expression level of WWP2 and its functions in cell adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer. We used real-time PCR to detect the expression of WWP2 in liver cancer and adjacent samples from the People's Hospital of Lishui and also analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-seq data by bioinformatics. Migration and invasion were detected by transwell analysis. We detected a strong WWP2 expression in tumor tissues of the People's Hospital of Lishui, and the survival rate was significantly higher in patients with lower WWP2-expressing tumors. WWP2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus stably infected cells (shWWP2), Huh7, showed slower growth speed compared with scramble control-infected cells in a xenograft mouse model. Knockdown of WWP2 Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells demonstrated a reduction in adhesion, invasion, and migration. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that WWP2 is positively correlated to cancer-related pathways including the chemokine signaling pathway. WWP2 also regulated MMP-9, caspase-9, CXCR3, and CCR5 expression in liver cancer cells. In addition, knockdown of CXCR3 and CCR5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and migration in Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells. Our data suggest that targeting of WWP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for liver cancer treatment.

  6. Regulation of tensin-promoted cell migration by its focal adhesion binding and Src homology domain 2.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaiyang; Lo, Su Hao

    2003-01-01

    Tensin1 is an actin- and phosphotyrosine-binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. Recently, we have shown that both tensin1 and a new family member, tensin2, promote cell migration [Chen, Duncan, Bozorgchami and Lo (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 733-738]. Since localization of proteins to particular intracellular compartments often regulates their functions, and Src homology domain 2 may mediate signals related to cell migration, we hypothesize that tensin-mediated cell migration is regulated by the focal adhesion localization and the Src homology domain 2 of tensin. To test this hypothesis, we have analysed the effects of a series of tensin1 mutants on cell migration. Our results have shown that (1) tensin1 contains two focal adhesion-binding sites, (2) the wild-type tensin1 significantly promotes cell migration, (3) mutants with one focal adhesion-binding site do not promote cell migration, (4) the non-focal adhesion localized mutant suppresses cell migration and (5) the mutant that is not able to bind to phosphotyrosine-containing proteins has no effect on cell migration. These results have indicated that focal adhesion localization of tensin1 and the phosphotyrosine-binding activity are two critical factors in regulating tensin-mediated cell migration. PMID:12495434

  7. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  8. Glycogen storage disease type Ib neutrophils exhibit impaired cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Jun, Hyun Sik; Chou, Janice

    2017-01-22

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia, and neutrophil dysfunction, is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT). Neutrophils play an essential role in the defense against invading pathogens. The recruitment of neutrophils towards the inflammation sites in response to inflammatory stimuli is a tightly regulated process involving rolling, adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we investigated the role of G6PT in neutrophil adhesion and migration using in vivo and in vitro models. We showed that the GSD-Ib (G6pt(-/-)) mice manifested severe neutropenia in both blood and bone marrow, and treating G6pt(-/-) mice with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) corrected neutropenia. However, upon thioglycolate challenge, neutrophils from both untreated and G-CSF-treated G6pt(-/-)mice exhibited decreased ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity. In vitro migration and cell adhesion of G6PT-deficient neutrophils were also significantly impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to enhanced apoptosis or altered fMLP receptor expression. Remarkably, the expression of the β2 integrins CD11a and CD11b, which are critical for cell adhesion, was greatly decreased in G6PT-deficient neutrophils. This study suggests that deficiencies in G6PT cause impairment in neutrophil adhesion and migration via aberrant expression of β2 integrins, and our finding should facilitate the development of novel therapies for GSD-Ib.

  9. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology.

  10. Rutin inhibits proliferation, attenuates superoxide production and decreases adhesion and migration of human cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Mousslim, Mohamed; Ammari, Youssef; Kovacic, Hervé; Luis, José

    2016-12-01

    Lung and colorectal cancer are the principal causes of death in the world. Rutin, an active flavonoid compound, is known for possessing a wide range of biological activities. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on the viability, superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon (HT29 and Caco-2) cancer cell lines. In order to control the harmlessness of the tested concentrations of rutin, the viability of cancer cell lines was assessed using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. ROS generation was measured by lucigenin chemiluminescence detecting superoxide ions. To investigate the effect of rutin on the behavior of human lung and colon cancer cell lines, we performed adhesion assays, using various purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Finally, in vitro cell migration assays were explored using modified Boyden chambers. The viability of cancerous cells was inhibited by rutin. It also significantly attenuated the superoxide production in HT29 cells. In addition, rutin affected adhesion and migration of A549 and HT29 cell. These findings indicate that rutin, a natural molecule, might have potential as anticancer agent against lung and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  11. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G.; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J.

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology. PMID:26809067

  12. Melanoma Cell Adhesion and Migration Is Modulated by the Uronyl 2-O Sulfotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovska, Katerina; Spillmann, Dorothe; Haier, Jörg; Ladányi, Andrea; Stock, Christian; Seidler, Daniela G.

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of melanomas are characterized by a high metastatic potential, if detected early, melanoma can have a good prognostic outcome. However, once metastasised, the prognosis is bleak. We showed previously that uronyl-2-O sulfotransferase (Ust) and 2-O sulfation of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) are involved in cell migration. To demonstrate an impact of 2-O sulfation in metastasis we knocked-down Ust in mouse melanoma cells. This significantly reduced the amount of Ust protein and enzyme activity. Furthermore, in vitro cell motility and adhesion were significantly reduced correlating with the decrease of cellular Ust protein. Single cell migration of B16VshUst(16) cells showed a decreased cell movement phenotype. The adhesion of B16V cells to fibronectin depended on α5β1 but not αvβ3 integrin. Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan sulfation or blocking fibroblast growth factor receptor (FgfR) reduced α5 integrin in B16V cell lines. Interestingly, FgfR1 expression and activation was reduced in Ust knock-down cells. In vivo, pulmonary metastasis of B16VshUst cells was prevented due to a reduction of α5 integrin. As a proof of concept UST knock-down in human melanoma cells also showed a reduction in ITGa5 and adhesion. This is the first study showing that Ust, and consequently 2-O sulfation of the low affinity receptor for FgfR CS/DS, reduces Itga5 and leads to an impaired adhesion and migration of melanoma cells. PMID:28107390

  13. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  14. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells.

  15. Fluorescence-based assays for in vitro analysis of cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Spessotto, Paola; Lacrima, Katia; Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Pivetta, Eliana; Scapolan, Martina; Perris, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion and cell migration are two primary cellular phenomena for which in vitro approaches may be exploited to effectively dissect the individual events and underlying molecular mechanisms. The use of assays dedicated to the analysis of cell adhesion and migration in vitro also afford an efficient way of conducting larger basic and applied research screenings on the factors affecting these processes and are potentially exploitable in the context of routine diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tests in the biological and medical fields. Therefore, there is a longstanding continuum in the interest in devising more rationale such assays and major contributions in this direction have been provided by the advent of procedures based on fluorescence cell tagging, the design of instruments capable of detecting fluorescent signals with high sensitivity, and informatic tools allowing sophisticated elaboration of data generated through these instruments. In this report, we describe three representative fluorescence-based model assays for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of cell adhesion and cell locomotion in static and dynamic conditions. The assays are easily performed, accurate and reproducible, and can be automated for high-to-medium throughput screenings of cell behavior in vitro. Performance of the assays involves the use of certain dedicated disposable accessories, which are commercially available, and a few instruments that, due to their versatility, can be regarded as constituents of a more generic laboratory setup.

  16. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhuai; Xiang, Ru; Zhang, Xiangzhong; Chen, Yunxian

    2015-09-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix‑coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia.

  17. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  18. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  19. Biomolecular modification of carbon nanotubes for studies of cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2011-12-01

    We report a strategy for tailoring and patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for biospecific cell studies. We synthesized a new electroactive hydroquinone terminated pyrene molecule to tailor CNTs. These modified CNTs can be oxidized and chemoselectively reacted with oxyamine tethered ligands to generate various ligand tethered CNTs. A cell adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD) is immobilized to the CNTs and a new microfluidic patterning method is employed to generate multiplex patterned surfaces for biospecific cell adhesion and migration studies. This work demonstrates the integration of a new functionalization strategy to immobilize a variety of ligands to CNTs for a range of potential drug delivery, tissue imaging and cellular behavior studies and a microfluidic patterning strategy for generating complex high-throughput surfaces for biotechnological and cell based assay applications.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Kwon, Seong-Min; Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-02-01

    Odontoblasts and/or dental pulp cells are responsible for tooth repair and dentin formation. Furthermore, adhesion and migration are critical processes for tissue regeneration. This study was performed to clarify whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates adhesion and migration of the murine odontoblast-like cell line MDPC-23, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is engaged in this process. TLR4 expression in MDPC-23 cells was examined by RT-PCR. Adhesion assay was performed using type I collagen-coated plates. Migration ability was determined by a commercial assay kit. Phosphorylation of IκB-α, FAK, AKT, and ERK was examined by Western blot analysis. TLR4 was functionally expressed in MDPC-23 cells. LPS treatment enhanced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Blockade of TLR4 using its antibody restored LPS-induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells. These findings indicate that LPS, an immune activator from Gram-negative bacteria, can promote the adhesion and migration ability of MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

  1. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  2. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lautscham, Lena A; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-09-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness.

  3. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  4. Src family kinase activity regulates adhesion, spreading and migration of pancreatic endocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Alessia; Capurso, Gabriele; Milione, Massimo; Panzuto, Francesco; Geremia, Raffaele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and 'indolent' neoplasms that usually develop metastatic lesions and exhibit poor response to standard medical treatments. Few studies have investigated pathways responsible for PET cell growth and invasion and no alternative therapeutic strategies have been proposed. In a recent microarray analysis for genes up-regulated in PETs, we have described the up-regulation of soluble Src family tyrosine kinases in this neoplasia, which may represent potentially promising candidates for therapy. Herein, we have investigated the expression and function of Src family kinases in PETS and PET cell lines. Western blot analysis indicated that Src is highly abundant in the PET cell lines CM and QGP-1. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed that Src is up-regulated also in human PET lesions. Pharmacological inhibition of Src family kinases by the specific inhibitor PP2 strongly interfered with adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cell lines. Accordingly, the actin cytoskeleton was profoundly altered after inhibition of Src kinases, whereas even prolonged incubation with PP2 exerted no effect on cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis of PET cells. A transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a subset of proteins was observed in QGP-1 cells adhering to the plate, with a peak at 75 min after seeding, when approximately 80% of cells were attached. Inhibition of Src kinases caused a dramatic reduction in the phosphorylation of proteins with different molecular weight that were isolated from the cell extracts by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation or pull-down with the SH2 domain of Src. Among them, the docking protein p130Cas interacted with Src and is a major substrate of the Src kinases in QGP-1 cells undergoing adhesion. Our results suggest that Src kinases play a specific role during adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cells and may indicate therapeutical approaches directed to limiting the metastatic

  5. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  6. cAMP-induced Epac-Rap activation inhibits epithelial cell migration by modulating focal adhesion and leading edge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Karen S; Raaijmakers, Judith H; Bruinsma, Wytse; Bos, Johannes L; de Rooij, Johan

    2008-06-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a complex process crucial for embryonic development, wound healing and tumor metastasis. It depends on alterations in cell-cell adhesion and integrin-extracellular matrix interactions and on actomyosin-driven, polarized leading edge protrusion. The small GTPase Rap is a known regulator of integrins and cadherins that has also been implicated in the regulation of actin and myosin, but a direct role in cell migration has not been investigated. Here, we report that activation of endogenous Rap by cAMP results in an inhibition of HGF- and TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell migration in several model systems, irrespective of the presence of E-cadherin adhesion. We show that Rap activation slows the dynamics of focal adhesions and inhibits polarized membrane protrusion. Importantly, forced integrin activation by antibodies does not mimic these effects of Rap on cell motility, even though it does mimic Rap effects in short-term cell adhesion assays. From these results, we conclude that Rap inhibits epithelial cell migration, by modulating focal adhesion dynamics and leading edge activity. This extends beyond the effect of integrin affinity modulation and argues for an additional function of Rap in controlling the migration machinery of epithelial cells.

  7. Cryptic collagen IV promotes cell migration and adhesion in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Amanda J; Vary, Calvin P H; Brooks, Peter C; Sathyanarayana, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we showed that discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a class of collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) was highly upregulated on bone marrow (BM)-derived CD33+ leukemic blasts of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Herein as DDR1 is a class of collagen-activated RTK, we attempt to understand the role of native and remodeled collagen IV in BM microenvironment and its functional significance in leukemic cells. Exposure to denatured collagen IV significantly increased the migration and adhesion of K562 cells, which also resulted in increased activation of DDR1 and AKT. Further, levels of MMP9 were increased in conditioned media (CM) of denatured collagen IV exposed cells. Mass spectrometric liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry QSTAR proteomic analysis revealed exclusive presence of Secretogranin 3 and InaD-like protein in the denatured collagen IV CM. Importantly, BM samples of AML patients exhibited increased levels of remodeled collagen IV compared to native as analyzed via anti-HUIV26 antibody. Taken together, for the first time, we demonstrate that remodeled collagen IV is a potent activator of DDR1 and AKT that also modulates both migration and adhesion of myeloid leukemia cells. Additionally, high levels of the HUIV26 cryptic collagen IV epitope are expressed in BM of AML patients. Further understanding of this phenomenon may lead to the development of therapeutic agents that directly modulate the BM microenvironment and attenuate leukemogenesis.

  8. Dynamics of Cell Ensembles on Adhesive Micropatterns: Bridging the Gap between Single Cell Spreading and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-01-01

    The collective dynamics of multicellular systems arise from the interplay of a few fundamental elements: growth, division and apoptosis of single cells; their mechanical and adhesive interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix; and the tendency of polarized cells to move. Micropatterned substrates are increasingly used to dissect the relative roles of these fundamental processes and to control the resulting dynamics. Here we show that a unifying computational framework based on the cellular Potts model can describe the experimentally observed cell dynamics over all relevant length scales. For single cells, the model correctly predicts the statistical distribution of the orientation of the cell division axis as well as the final organisation of the two daughters on a large range of micropatterns, including those situations in which a stable configuration is not achieved and rotation ensues. Large ensembles migrating in heterogeneous environments form non-adhesive regions of inward-curved arcs like in epithelial bridge formation. Collective migration leads to swirl formation with variations in cell area as observed experimentally. In each case, we also use our model to predict cell dynamics on patterns that have not been studied before. PMID:27054883

  9. Disentangling Membrane Dynamics and Cell Migration; Differential Influences of F-actin and Cell-Matrix Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Jacob M.; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Endrias Ganebo, Bereket; Gong, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is heavily interconnected with plasma membrane protrusion and retraction (collectively termed “membrane dynamics”). This makes it difficult to distinguish regulatory mechanisms that differentially influence migration and membrane dynamics. Yet such distinctions may be valuable given evidence that cancer cell invasion in 3D may be better predicted by 2D membrane dynamics than by 2D cell migration, implying a degree of functional independence between these processes. Here, we applied multi-scale single cell imaging and a systematic statistical approach to disentangle regulatory associations underlying either migration or membrane dynamics. This revealed preferential correlations between membrane dynamics and F-actin features, contrasting with an enrichment of links between cell migration and adhesion complex properties. These correlative linkages were often non-linear and therefore context-dependent, strengthening or weakening with spontaneous heterogeneity in cell behavior. More broadly, we observed that slow moving cells tend to increase in area, while fast moving cells tend to shrink, and that the size of dynamic membrane domains is independent of cell area. Overall, we define macromolecular features preferentially associated with either cell migration or membrane dynamics, enabling more specific interrogation and targeting of these processes in future. PMID:26248038

  10. β-Catenin–regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor–dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin–mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury. PMID:24837430

  11. β-Catenin-regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A

    2014-06-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor-dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin-mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury.

  12. Apigenin Attenuates Melanoma Cell Migration by Inducing Anoikis through Integrin and Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hasnat, Md Abul; Pervin, Mehnaz; Lim, Ji Hong; Lim, Beong Ou

    2015-11-27

    Apigenin, a nonmutagenic flavonoid, has been found to have antitumor properties and is therefore particularly relevant for the development of chemotherapeutic agents for cancers. In this study, time- and dose-dependent cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed to determine the effects of apigenin on A2058 and A375 melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were pretreated with different concentrations of apigenin and analyzed for morphological changes, anoikis induction, cell migration, and levels of proteins associated with apoptosis. Apigenin reduced integrin protein levels and inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), which induce anoikis in human cutaneous melanoma cells. Apigenin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of melanoma cell migration, unlike untreated controls. Furthermore, apigenin treatment increased apoptotic factors such as caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating the metastasis of melanoma cells. Our results provide a new insight into the mechanisms by which apigenin prevents melanoma metastasis by sensitizing anoikis induced by the loss of integrin proteins in the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. These findings elucidate the related mechanisms and suggest the potential of apigenin in developing clinical treatment strategies against malignant melanoma.

  13. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  14. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inhibits adhesion and migration of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barenys, Marta; Gassmann, Kathrin; Baksmeier, Christine; Heinz, Sabrina; Reverte, Ingrid; Schmuck, Martin; Temme, Thomas; Bendt, Farina; Zschauer, Tim-Christian; Rockel, Thomas Dino; Unfried, Klaus; Wätjen, Wim; Sundaram, Sivaraj Mohana; Heuer, Heike; Colomina, Maria Teresa; Fritsche, Ellen

    2017-02-01

    Food supplements based on herbal products are widely used during pregnancy as part of a self-care approach. The idea that such supplements are safe and healthy is deeply seated in the general population, although they do not underlie the same strict safety regulations than medical drugs. We aimed to characterize the neurodevelopmental effects of the green tea catechin epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is now commercialized as high-dose food supplement. We used the "Neurosphere Assay" to study the effects and unravel underlying molecular mechanisms of EGCG treatment on human and rat neural progenitor cells (NPCs) development in vitro. EGCG alters human and rat NPC development in vitro. It disturbs migration distance, migration pattern, and nuclear density of NPCs growing as neurospheres. These functional impairments are initiated by EGCG binding to the extracellular matrix glycoprotein laminin, preventing its binding to β1-integrin subunits, thereby prohibiting cell adhesion and resulting in altered glia alignment and decreased number of migrating young neurons. Our data raise a concern on the intake of high-dose EGCG food supplements during pregnancy and highlight the need of an in vivo characterization of the effects of high-dose EGCG exposure during neurodevelopment.

  15. Rap GTPase-mediated adhesion and migration: A target for limiting the dissemination of B-cell lymphomas?

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Gold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas, which arise in lymphoid organs, can spread rapidly via the circulatory system and form solid tumors within multiple organs. Rate-limiting steps in this metastatic process may be the adhesion of lymphoma cells to vascular endothelial cells, their exit from the vasculature and their migration to tissue sites that will support tumor growth. Thus proteins that control B cell adhesion and migration are likely to be key factors in lymphoma dissemination, and hence potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The Rap GTPases are master regulators of integrin activation, cell motility and the underlying cytoskeletal, adhesion and membrane dynamics. We have recently shown that Rap activation is critical for B-lymphoma cells to undergo transendothelial migration in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, suppressing Rap activation impairs the ability of intravenously injected B-lymphoma cells to form solid tumors in the liver and other organs. We discuss this work in the context of targeting Rap, its downstream effectors, or other regulators of B cell adhesion and migration as an approach for limiting the dissemination of B-lymphoma cells and the development of secondary tumors.

  16. The use of electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic field for directed cell migration and adhesion in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christina L

    2017-01-01

    Directed cell migration and adhesion is essential to embryonic development, tissue formation and wound healing. For decades it has been reported that electric field (EF), magnetic field (MF) and electromagnetic field (EMF) can play important roles in determining cell differentiation, migration, adhesion, and evenwound healing. Combinations of these techniques have revealed new and exciting explanations for how cells move and adhere to surfaces; how the migration of multiple cells are coordinated and regulated; how cellsinteract with neighboring cells, and also to changes in their microenvironment. In some cells, speed and direction are voltage dependent. Data suggests that the use of EF, MF and EMF could advance techniques in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and wound healing. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:5-16, 2017.

  17. Triggering cell adhesion, migration or shape change with a dynamic surface coating.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Stijn F M; Maiuri, Paolo; Marie, Emmanuelle; Tribet, Christophe; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-03-25

    There's an APP for that: cell-repellent APP (azido-[polylysine-g-PEG]) is used to create substrates for spatially controlled dynamic cell adhesion. The simple addition of a functional peptide to the culture medium rapidly triggers cell adhesion. This highly accessible yet powerful technique allows diverse applications, demonstrated through tissue motility assays, patterned coculturing and triggered cell shape change.

  18. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells.

  19. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  20. A continuum approximation to an off-lattice individual-cell based model of cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Alistair M; Fleck, Christian; Grima, Ramon

    2014-10-21

    Cell-cell adhesion plays a key role in the collective migration of cells and in determining correlations in the relative cell positions and velocities. Recently, it was demonstrated that off-lattice individual cell based models (IBMs) can accurately capture the correlations observed experimentally in a migrating cell population. However, IBMs are often computationally expensive and difficult to analyse mathematically. Traditional continuum-based models, in contrast, are amenable to mathematical analysis and are computationally less demanding, but typically correspond to a mean-field approximation of cell migration and so ignore cell-cell correlations. In this work, we address this problem by using an off-lattice IBM to derive a continuum approximation which does take into account correlations. We furthermore show that a mean-field approximation of the off-lattice IBM leads to a single partial integro-differential equation of the same form as proposed by Sherratt and co-workers to model cell adhesion. The latter is found to be only effective at approximating the ensemble averaged cell number density when mechanical interactions between cells are weak. In contrast, the predictions of our novel continuum model for the time-evolution of the ensemble cell number density distribution and of the density-density correlation function are in close agreement with those obtained from the IBM for a wide range of mechanical interaction strengths. In particular, we observe 'front-like' propagation of cells in simulations using both our IBM and our continuum model, but not in the continuum model simulations obtained using the mean-field approximation.

  1. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  2. Adhesion in Mammary Development: Novel Roles for E-Cadherin in Individual and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are essential for barrier function, secretion, and regulation of fluid transport. Their function requires cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion, mediated through intercellular junctions. Conversely, disruption of adhesion and polarity is thought to drive cancer progression. The mammary gland is an important model for cell adhesion due to its postnatal hormonally regulated development; ducts undergo branching morphogenesis in response to steroid hormones during puberty. These hormonal signals induce a transition from simple to stratified architecture, initiated by asymmetric luminal cell divisions. Ductal elongation is accomplished by this multilayered, low-polarity epithelium, and polarity is reestablished as elongation ceases. The requirement for cell adhesion has been tested in 3D culture and in vivo, using gene deletion, knockdown, and misexpression in both developmental and homeostatic contexts. Attention has focused on E-cadherin, the major classical cadherin in luminal epithelial cells. Classic studies revealed a requirement for E-cadherin during lactation, and E-cadherin loss is widely posited to promote metastasis. However, recent findings demonstrated a broader requirement for E-cadherin during branching morphogenesis and homeostasis and also, surprisingly, in epithelial dissemination. These studies suggest that longstanding models of the role of adhesion in epithelial biology need to be revisited. Advances in inducible gene expression and knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and fluorescent labeling of genetically modified cells offer the opportunity to test the roles of diverse adhesion systems and to develop a mechanistic understanding of how cell adhesion regulates development and cancer. PMID:25733146

  3. Memo-RhoA-mDia1 signaling controls microtubules, the actin network, and adhesion site formation in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Kossay; Honoré, Stéphane; Isnardon, Daniel; Braguer, Diane; Badache, Ali

    2008-11-03

    Actin assembly at the cell front drives membrane protrusion and initiates the cell migration cycle. Microtubules (MTs) extend within forward protrusions to sustain cell polarity and promote adhesion site turnover. Memo is an effector of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase involved in breast carcinoma cell migration. However, its mechanism of action remained unknown. We report in this study that Memo controls ErbB2-regulated MT dynamics by altering the transition frequency between MT growth and shortening phases. Moreover, although Memo-depleted cells can assemble the Rac1-dependent actin meshwork and form lamellipodia, they show defective localization of lamellipodial markers such as alpha-actinin-1 and a reduced number of short-lived adhesion sites underlying the advancing edge of migrating cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Memo is required for the localization of the RhoA guanosine triphosphatase and its effector mDia1 to the plasma membrane and that Memo-RhoA-mDia1 signaling coordinates the organization of the lamellipodial actin network, adhesion site formation, and MT outgrowth within the cell leading edge to sustain cell motility.

  4. Cyclin D1 unbalances the redox status controlling cell adhesion, migration, and drug resistance in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustany, Sophie; Bourgeais, Jérôme; Tchakarska, Guergana; Body, Simon; Hérault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Sola, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of multiple myeloma (MM) cells with their microenvironment are crucial for pathogenesis. MM cells could interact differentially with their microenvironment depending on the type of cyclin D they express. We established several clones that constitutively express cyclin D1 from the parental RPMI8226 MM cell line and analyzed the impact of cyclin D1 expression on cell behavior. We performed a gene expression profiling study on cyclin D1-expressing vs. control cells and validated the results by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of cyclin D1 altered the transcription of genes that control adhesion and migration. We confirmed that cyclin D1 increases cell adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin, stabilizes F-actin fibers, and enhances chemotaxis and inflammatory chemokine secretion. Both control and cyclin D1-expressing cells were more resistant to acute carfilzomib treatment when cultured on stromal cells than in suspension. However, this resistance was specifically reduced in cyclin D1-expressing cells after pomalidomide pre-treatment that modifies tumor cell/microenvironment interactions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that cyclin D1 expression was also associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling metabolism. We also found that cyclin D1 expression disrupted the redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species. The resulting oxidative stress activated the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (or ERK1/2) signaling pathway, increased cell adhesion to fibronectin or stromal cells, and controlled drug sensitivity. Our results have uncovered a new function for cyclin D1 in the control of redox metabolism and interactions of cyclin D1-expressing MM cells with their bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27286258

  5. Cell Migration in the Immune System: the Evolving Inter-Related Roles of Adhesion Molecules and Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Graesser, Donnasue

    2000-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation into perivascular tissue during inflammation and lymphocyte homing to lymphoid organs involve transient adhesion to the vessel endothelium, followed by transmigration through the endothelial cell (EC) layer and establishment of residency at the tissue site for a period of time. In these processes, leukocytes undergo multiple attachments to, and detachments from, the vessel-lining endothelial cells, prior to transendothelial cell migration. Transmigrating leukocytes must traverse a subendothelial basement membrane en route to perivascular tissues and utilize enzymes known as matrix metalloproteinases to make selective clips in the extracellular matrix components of the basement membrane. This review will focus on the evidence for a link between adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, the induction of matrix metalloproteinases mediated by engagement of adhesion receptors on leukocytes, and the ability to utilize these matrix metalloproteinases to facilitate leukocyte invasion of tissues. Leukocytes with invasive phenotypes express high levels of MMPs, and expression of MMPs enhances the migratory and invasive properties of these cells. Furthermore, MMPs may be used by lymphocytes to proteolytically cleave molecules such as adhesion receptors and membrane bound cytokines, increasing their efficiency in the immune response. Engagement of leukocyte adhesion receptors may modulate adhesive (modulation of integrin affinities and expression), synthetic (proteinase induction and activation), and surface organization (clustering of proteolyric complexes) behaviors of invasive leukocytes. Elucidation of these pathways will lead to better understanding of controlling mechanisms in order to develop rational therapeutic approaches in the areas of inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:11097205

  6. Tuberin, the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 tumor suppressor gene product, regulates Rho activation, cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Cash, Timothy P; Hunter, Deborah S; Walker, Cheryl L; Chernoff, Jonathan; Henske, Elizabeth P

    2002-12-05

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, autism, and tumors of the brain, kidney, heart, retina, and skin. TSC is caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2, both of which are tumor suppressor genes. Hamartin, the protein product of TSC1, was found to interact with the ezrin-radixin-moesin family of cytoskeletal proteins and to activate the small GTPase Rho. To determine whether tuberin, the TSC2 product, can also activate Rho, we stably expressed full-length human tuberin in two cell types: MDCK cells and ELT3 cells. ELT3 cells lack endogenous tuberin expression. We found that expression of human tuberin in both MDCK and ELT3 cells was associated with an increase in the amount of Rho-GTP, but not in Rac1-GTP or cdc42-GTP. Tuberin expression increased cell adhesion in both cell types, and decreased chemotactic cell migration in ELT3 cells. In MDCK cells, there was a decrease in the amount of total Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and an increase in the fraction of phosphorylated FAK. These findings demonstrate for the first time that tuberin activates Rho and regulates cell adhesion and migration. Pathways involving Rho activation may have relevance to the clinical manifestations of TSC, including pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  7. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) modulates adhesion, migration and invasion in bone tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mak, Isabella W Y; Turcotte, Robert E; Ghert, Michelle

    2013-07-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be an important factor in osteolysis in the setting of metastatic carcinoma to the bone. However, PTHrP may also be central in the setting of primary bone tumors. Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is an aggressive osteolytic bone tumor characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that are recruited by osteoblast-like stromal cells. The stromal cells of GCT are well established as the only neoplastic element of the tumor, and we have previously shown that PTHrP is highly expressed by these cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the stromal cells exposed to a monoclonal antibody to PTHrP exhibited rapid plate detachment and quickly died in vitro. Therefore, PTHrP may serve in an autocrine manner to increase cell proliferation and promote invasive properties in GCT. The purpose of this study was to use transcriptomic microarrays and functional assays to examine the effects of PTHrP neutralization on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Microarray and proteomics data identified genes that were differentially expressed in GCT stromal cells under various PTHrP treatment conditions. Treatment of GCT stromal cells with anti-PTHrP antibodies showed a change in the expression of 13 genes from the integrin family relative to the IgG control. Neutralization of PTHrP reduced cell migration and invasion as evidenced by functional assays. Adhesion and anoikis assays demonstrated that although PTHrP neutralization inhibits cell adhesion properties, cell detachment related to PTHrP neutralization did not result in associated cell death, as expected in mesenchymal stromal cells. Based on the data presented herein, we conclude that PTHrP excreted by GCT stromal cells increases bone tumor cell local invasiveness and migration.

  8. β-eudesmol, a sesquiterpene from Teucrium ramosissimum, inhibits superoxide production, proliferation, adhesion and migration of human tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Mousslim, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Ammari, Youssef; Luis, José; Kovacic, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species are well-known mediators of various biological responses. Recently, new homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase have been discovered in non phagocytic cells. These new homologues (Nox1-Nox5) produce low levels of superoxides compared to the phagocytic homologue Nox2/gp91phox. In this study we examined the effect of β-eudesmol, a sesquiterpenoid alcohol isolated from Teucrium ramosissimum leaves, on proliferation, superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon (HT29 and Caco-2) cancer cell lines. Proliferation of tumor cells was inhibited by β-eudesmol. It also significantly inhibited superoxide production in A549 cells. Furthermore, β-eudesmol inhibited adhesion and migration of A549 and HT29 cell. These results demonstrate that β-eudesmol may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of lung and colon cancer by different ways: by inhibition of superoxide production or by blocking proliferation, adhesion and migration.

  9. Semaphorin 3A Increases FAK Phosphorylation at Focal Adhesions to Modulate MDA-MB-231 Cell Migration and Spreading on Different Substratum Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Compere, Frances V.; Miller, Alex M.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between integrin-mediated adhesions and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are important regulators of cell migration and spreading. However, mechanisms by which extracellular ligands regulate cell migration and spreading in response to changes in substratum concentration are not well understood. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) has been shown to inhibit cell motility and alter integrin signaling in various cell types. We propose that Sema3A alters focal adhesions to modulate breast carcinoma cell migration and spreading on substrata coated with different concentrations of ECM. We demonstrate that Sema3A inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell migration and spreading on substrata coated with high concentrations of collagen and fibronectin but enhances migration and spreading at lower concentrations of collagen and fibronectin. Sema3A increases focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 (pFAK397) at focal adhesions on all substratum concentrations of collagen and fibronectin but decreased pFAK397 levels on laminin. Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition blocks the Sema3A-mediated effects on cell migration, spreading, and pFAK397 at focal adhesions when cultured on all concentrations of collagen. These results suggest that Sema3A shifts the optimal level of cell-matrix adhesions to a nonoptimal ECM coating concentration, in particular collagen, to yield maximal cell migration and spreading that may be mediated through a ROCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:28182100

  10. Migration of breast cancer cells: Understanding the roles of volume exclusion and cell-to-cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Towne, Chris; McElwain, D. L. Sean; Upton, Zee

    2010-10-01

    We study MCF-7 breast cancer cell movement in a transwell apparatus. Various experimental conditions lead to a variety of monotone and nonmonotone responses which are difficult to interpret. We anticipate that the experimental results could be caused by cell-to-cell adhesion or volume exclusion. Without any modeling, it is impossible to understand the relative roles played by these two mechanisms. A lattice-based exclusion process random-walk model incorporating agent-to-agent adhesion is applied to the experimental system. Our combined experimental and modeling approach shows that a low value of cell-to-cell adhesion strength provides the best explanation of the experimental data suggesting that volume exclusion plays a more important role than cell-to-cell adhesion. This combined experimental and modeling study gives insight into the cell-level details and design of transwell assays.

  11. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  12. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  13. Translucent titanium coating altered the composition of focal adhesions and promoted migration of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells on glass.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi; Kok, Sang-Heng; Wang, Juo-Song; Lin, Li-Deh

    2014-04-01

    "TiGlass" was designed and was known to promote initial adhesion and increase migration of rat calvarial osteoblats. In this article, migration study and a series of epifluorescence microscopic studies were conducted to find out the composition of focal adhesion on titanium surface. The translucent titanium surface was applied in random migration analysis and immunofluorescence cell staining. In the immunofluorescent double staining, phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase was tested with vinculin. Various integrin subunits were then tested with vinculin to study the composition of activated focal adhesions. Integrin subunit α5 and αV were tested against β3; integrin subunits α5, αV, β3, and αVβ3 were tested with F-actin, respectively. The MG-63 cells began migration earlier and migrated faster on "TiGlass." Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that all focal adhesion kinase in the focal adhesions were activated on both the surfaces. The osteoblast was inferred to made adhesion to titanium and glass through integrins. The focal adhesions on glass were found to be composed of integrin subunits αV and β3. However, on "TiGlass," integrin subunits α5 might have supplemented the adhesion to titanium. Results from double staining of integrin subunits α5, αV, β3, and αVβ3 with F-actin also supported integrin subunits α5 might have involved in adhesion of titanium.

  14. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  15. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad H; Trapani, Linda M; Sieminski, Alisha L; Siemeski, Alisha; Mackellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-18

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and beta1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments.

  16. Androgen receptor enhances cell adhesion and decreases cell migration via modulating β1-integrin-AKT signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Lung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Liao, Pei-Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-08-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been shown to promote the initiation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the early stage of the disease process and to suppress HCC cell invasion during the later stages of the disease. The mechanisms governing these dual yet opposite roles have yet to be elucidated. Using carcinogen-induced HCC in vivo mouse models and the in vitro human HCC cell line SKhep1, we found that knockout of AR in primary HCC cells led to a decrease in HCC cell focal adhesion capacity compared to cells from wildtype mice. Similar results were obtained after adding functional AR into human HCC SKhep1 cells. Further analysis revealed that the role AR plays in adhesion of HCC cells is governed, at least in part, by its ability to up-regulate β1-integrin and activate the PI3K/AKT pathway. We also found that AR-β1-integrin-mediated cell adhesion suppresses cell migration. Those findings indicate that the AR-β1-integrin-PI3K/AKT signaling pathway might play a role in the bimodal function of AR on cell adhesion and migration at the cellular level.

  17. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  18. TRPV2 Mediates Adrenomedullin Stimulation of Prostate and Urothelial Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Lehen’kyi, V’yacheslav; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level. PMID:23741410

  19. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Kishimoto, Keishi; Kato, Ayumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Sato, Ryuichiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-03-10

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration.

  20. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase SHIP1 and PTEN coordinate to regulate cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Subhanjan; Subramanian, Kulandayan K; Sakai, Jiro; Bajrami, Besnik; Luo, Hongbo R

    2012-04-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P(3) (PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)) is formed by stimulation of various receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors and integrins. The lipid phosphatases PTEN and SHIP1 are critical in regulating the level of PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) during chemotaxis. Observations that loss of PTEN had minor and loss of SHIP1 resulted in a severe chemotaxis defect in neutrophils led to the belief that SHIP1 rather than PTEN acts as a predominant phospholipid phosphatase in establishing a PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) compass. In this study, we show that SHIP1 regulates PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) production in response to cell adhesion and plays a limited role when cells are in suspension. SHIP1((-)/(-)) neutrophils lose their polarity upon cell adhesion and are extremely adherent, which impairs chemotaxis. However, chemo-taxis can be restored by reducing adhesion. Loss of SHIP1 elevates Akt activation following cell adhesion due to increased PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) production. From our observations, we conclude that SHIP1 prevents formation of top-down PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) polarity to facilitate proper cell attachment and detachment during chemotaxis.

  1. TAT-Hsp27 promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells through beta1 integrin-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Young-Sin; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Odontoblasts are involved in tooth repair and regeneration as well as dentin formation. The aim of this study was to examine whether delivery of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) into cells using a TAT fusion protein system (TAT-Hsp27) enhances adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells. Hsp27 was delivered into cells by the TAT-fusion protein system. To examine whether TAT-Hsp27 affects the viability of MDPC-23 cells, MTT assay was performed. The effect of TAT-Hsp27 on adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells was determined using type I collagen-coated plates and a commercial kit, respectively. In addition, a precise molecular mechanism was examined by Western blot analysis and focal adhesion activity. TAT-fusion protein system delivered Hsp27 into cells successfully. Transduction of TAT-Hsp27 induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, transduction of TAT-Hsp27 increased the protein expression of beta1 integrin and focal adhesion formation, and induced phosphorylation of FAK and ERK. TAT-Hsp27-induced migration of MDPC-23 cells was restored by treatment of anti-beta1 integrin antibody. These findings suggest that TAT-Hsp27 promotes adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells via beta1 integrin-mediated signaling and is a promising candidate for therapeutic application of dental pulp regeneration.

  2. Blocking Junctional Adhesion Molecule C Enhances Dendritic Cell Migration and Boosts the Immune Responses against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Romain; Emre, Yalin; Jemelin, Stéphane; Charmoy, Mélanie; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Imhof, Beat A.

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs) from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1) response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2) response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response. PMID:25474593

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi upregulates expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and promotes transendothelial migration of neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sellati, T J; Burns, M J; Ficazzola, M A; Furie, M B

    1995-01-01

    The accumulation of leukocytic infiltrates in perivascular tissues is a key step in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. During an inflammatory response, endothelial cell adhesion molecules mediate the attachment of circulating leukocytes to the blood vessel wall and their subsequent extravasation into perivascular tissues. Using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrated that B. burgdorferi activated endothelium in a dose- and time-dependent fashion as measured by upregulation of the adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). As few as one spirochete per endothelial cell stimulated increased expression of these molecules. Expression of E-selectin peaked after spirochetes and HUVEC were coincubated for 4 h and returned to near-basal levels by 24 h. In contrast, expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 peaked at 12 h and remained elevated at 24 h. HUVEC monolayers cultured on acellular amniotic tissue were used to investigate the consequences of endothelial cell activation by spirochetes. After incubation of HUVEC-amnion cultures with B. burgdorferi, subsequently added neutrophils migrated across the endothelial monolayers. This process was mediated by E-selectin and by CD11/CD18 leukocytic integrins. The extent of migration depended on both the number of spirochetes used to stimulate the HUVEC and the length of the coincubation period. These results raise the possibility that B. burgdorferi induces a host inflammatory response and accompanying perivascular damage through activation of vascular endothelium. PMID:7591083

  4. Oxidative stress inhibits adhesion and transendothelial migration, and induces apoptosis and senescence of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Zhang, Xueqing; Kang, Xueling; Li, Ning; Wang, Rong; Hu, Tiantian; Xiang, Meng; Wang, Xinhong; Yuan, Wenjun; Chen, Alex; Meng, Dan; Chen, Sifeng

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress caused by cellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major contributor to disease and cell death. However, how induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) respond to different levels of oxidative stress is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress on iPSC function in vitro. Mouse iPSC were treated with H2 O2 (25-100 μmol/L). IPSC adhesion, migration, viability, apoptosis and senescence were analysed. Expression of adhesion-related genes, stress defence genes, and osteoblast- and adipocyte-associated genes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The present study found that H2 O2 (25-100 μmol/L) decreased iPSC adhesion to matrix proteins and endothelial cells, and downregulated gene expression levels of adhesion-related molecules, such as integrin alpha 7, cadherin 1 and 5, melanoma cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. H2 O2 (100 μmol/L) decreased iPSC viability and inhibited the capacity of iPSC migration and transendothelial migration. iPSC were sensitive to H2 O2 -induced G2/M arrest, senescence and apoptosis when exposed to H2 O2 at concentrations above 25 μmol/L. H2 O2 increased the expression of stress defence genes, including catalase, cytochrome B alpha, lactoperoxidase and thioredoxin domain containing 2. H2 O2 upregulated the expression of osteoblast- and adipocyte-associated genes in iPSC during their differentiation; however, short-term H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress did not affect the protein expression of the pluripotency markers, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 and sex-determining region Y-box 2. The present results suggest that iPSC are sensitive to H2 O2 toxicity, and inhibition of oxidative stress might be a strategy for improving their functions.

  5. MIP-1α enhances Jurkat cell transendothelial migration by up-regulating endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Ma, Ying-Huan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) in Jurkat cells and its effect on transendothelial migration. In the present study, human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells (Jurkat cells) were used as a model of T cells in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), which demonstrated significantly higher MIP-1α expression compared with that in normal T-cell controls. The ability of Jurkat cells to cross a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) monolayer was almost completely abrogated by MIP-1α siRNA. In addition, the overexpression of MIP-1α resulted in the up-regulated expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, which enhanced the migration of Jurkat cells through a monolayer of HBMEC. MIP-1α levels in Jurkat cells appeared to be an important factor for its transendothelial migration, which may provide the theoretical basis to understand the mechanisms of brain metastases of T-ALL at cellular and molecular levels.

  6. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. AML1/ETO accelerates cell migration and impairs cell-to-cell adhesion and homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Marco; Termanini, Alberto; Rizzi, Nicoletta; Mazza, Massimiliano; Barbieri, Elisa; Valli, Debora; Ciana, Paolo; Gruszka, Alicja M.; Alcalay, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The AML1/ETO fusion protein found in acute myeloid leukemias functions as a transcriptional regulator by recruiting co-repressor complexes to its DNA binding site. In order to extend the understanding of its role in preleukemia, we expressed AML1/ETO in a murine immortalized pluripotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell line, EML C1, and found that genes involved in functions such as cell-to-cell adhesion and cell motility were among the most significantly regulated as determined by RNA sequencing. In functional assays, AML1/ETO-expressing cells showed a decrease in adhesion to stromal cells, an increase of cell migration rate in vitro, and displayed an impairment in homing and engraftment in vivo upon transplantation into recipient mice. Our results suggest that AML1/ETO expression determines a more mobile and less adherent phenotype in preleukemic cells, therefore altering the interaction with the hematopoietic niche, potentially leading to the migration across the bone marrow barrier and to disease progression. PMID:27713544

  8. The Lutheran/Basal Cell Adhesion Molecule Promotes Tumor Cell Migration by Modulating Integrin-mediated Cell Attachment to Laminin-511 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Kikkawa, Yamato; Ogawa, Takaho; Sudo, Ryo; Yamada, Yuji; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-matrix interactions are critical for tumor cell migration. Lutheran (Lu), also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM), competes with integrins for binding to laminin α5, a subunit of LM-511, a major component of basement membranes. Here we show that the preferential binding of Lu/B-CAM to laminin α5 promotes tumor cell migration. The attachment of Lu/B-CAM transfectants to LM-511 was slightly weaker than that of control cells, and this was because Lu/B-CAM disturbed integrin binding to laminin α5. Lu/B-CAM induced a spindle cell shape with pseudopods and promoted cell migration on LM-511. In addition, blocking with an anti-Lu/B-CAM antibody led to a flat cell shape and inhibited migration on LM-511, similar to the effects of an activating integrin β1 antibody. We conclude that tumor cell migration on LM-511 requires that Lu/B-CAM competitively modulates cell attachment through integrins. We suggest that this competitive interaction is involved in a balance between static and migratory cell behaviors. PMID:24036115

  9. miR-24 triggers epidermal differentiation by controlling actin adhesion and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Lena, Anna Maria; Viticchiè, Giuditta; Shalom-Feuerstein, Ruby; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Dinsdale, David; Russo, Giandomenico; Fortunato, Claudia; Bonanno, Elena; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Aberdam, Daniel; Knight, Richard Austen

    2012-01-01

    During keratinocyte differentiation and stratification, cells undergo extensive remodeling of their actin cytoskeleton, which is important to control cell mobility and to coordinate and stabilize adhesive structures necessary for functional epithelia. Limited knowledge exists on how the actin cytoskeleton is remodeled in epithelial stratification and whether cell shape is a key determinant to trigger terminal differentiation. In this paper, using human keratinocytes and mouse epidermis as models, we implicate miR-24 in actin adhesion dynamics and demonstrate that miR-24 directly controls actin cable formation and cell mobility. miR-24 overexpression in proliferating cells was sufficient to trigger keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo and directly repressed cytoskeletal modulators (PAK4, Tks5, and ArhGAP19). Silencing of these targets recapitulated the effects of miR-24 overexpression. Our results uncover a new regulatory pathway involving a differentiation-promoting microribonucleic acid that regulates actin adhesion dynamics in human and mouse epidermis. PMID:23071155

  10. cAMP inhibits migration, ruffling and paxillin accumulation in focal adhesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells: effects of PKA and EPAC.

    PubMed

    Burdyga, Alex; Conant, Alan; Haynes, Lee; Zhang, Jin; Jalink, Kees; Sutton, Robert; Neoptolemos, John; Costello, Eithne; Tepikin, Alexei

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrated that increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations result in the inhibition of migration of PANC-1 and other pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell types. The rise of cAMP was accompanied by rapid and reversible cessation of ruffling, by inhibition of focal adhesion turnover and by prominent loss of paxillin from focal adhesions. All these phenomena develop rapidly suggesting that cAMP effectors have a direct influence on the cellular migratory apparatus. The role of two primary cAMP effectors, exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) and protein kinase A (PKA), in cAMP-mediated inhibition of PDAC cell migration and migration-associated processes was investigated. Experiments with selective activators of EPAC and PKA demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of cAMP on migration, ruffling, focal adhesion dynamics and paxillin localisation is mediated by PKA, whilst EPAC potentiates migration.

  11. Human T cells monitored by impedance spectrometry using field-effect transistor arrays: a novel tool for single-cell adhesion and migration studies.

    PubMed

    Law, Jessica Ka Yan; Susloparova, Anna; Vu, Xuan Thang; Zhou, Xiao; Hempel, Felix; Qu, Bin; Hoth, Markus; Ingebrandt, Sven

    2015-05-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the immune system by recognizing and eliminating pathogen-infected and tumorigenic cells. In order to achieve their function, T cells have to migrate throughout the whole body and identify the respective targets. In conventional immunology studies, interactions between CTLs and targets are usually investigated using tedious and time-consuming immunofluorescence imaging. However, there is currently no straightforward measurement tool available to examine the interaction strengths. In the present study, adhesion strengths and migration of single human CD8(+) T cells on pre-coated field-effect transistor (FET) devices (i.e. fibronectin, anti-CD3 antibody, and anti-LFA-1 antibody) were measured using impedance spectroscopy. Adhesion strengths to different protein and antibody coatings were compared. By fitting the data to an electronically equivalent circuit model, cell-related parameters (cell membrane capacitance referring to cell morphology and seal resistance referring to adhesion strength) were obtained. This electronically-assessed adhesion strength provides a novel, fast, and important index describing the interaction efficiency. Furthermore, the size of our detection transistor gates as well as their sensitivity reaches down to single cell resolution. Real-time motions of individually migrating T cells can be traced using our FET devices. The in-house fabricated FETs used in the present study are providing a novel and very efficient insight to individual cell interactions.

  12. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  13. PCTK3/CDK18 regulates cell migration and adhesion by negatively modulating FAK activity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shinya; Kawamoto, Kohei; Miyamoto, Kenji; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yuasa, Keizo

    2017-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinase 3 (PCTK3) is a member of the cyclin dependent kinase family, but its physiological function remains unknown. We previously reported that PCTK3-knockdown HEK293T cells showed actin accumulation at the leading edge, suggesting that PCTK3 is involved in the regulation of actin reorganization. In this study, we investigated the physiological function and downstream signal transduction molecules of PCTK3. PCTK3 knockdown in HEK293T cells increased cell motility and RhoA/Rho-associated kinase activity as compared with control cells. We also found that phosphorylation at residue Tyr-397 in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was increased in PCTK3-knockdown cells. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr-397 was increased in response to fibronectin stimulation, whereas its phosphorylation was suppressed by PCTK3. In addition, excessive expression of PCTK3 led to the formation of filopodia during the early stages of cell adhesion in HeLa cells. These results indicate that PCTK3 controls actin cytoskeleton dynamics by negatively regulating the FAK/Rho signaling pathway. PMID:28361970

  14. Periostin promotes migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma through the integrin/focal adhesion kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chuanyu, Sun; Yuqing, Zhu; Chong, Xu; Guowei, Xia; Xiaojun, Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Periostin (POSTN) is an extracellular matrix protein which is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and has been related to tumorigenesis of renal cell carcinoma. However, the involvement of POSTN in renal cell carcinoma migration, invasion, and their underlying mechanisms has not been established. In this study, renal cell carcinoma cell lines stably overexpressing POSTN were established using a lentiviral vector, and the effects of POSTN on renal cell carcinoma cell migration and invasion were investigated. POSTN overexpression increased the migration and invasion capabilities of renal cell carcinoma cell lines as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5 antibodies inhibited POSTN overexpression or recombinant POSTN-induced focal adhesion kinase activation, cell migration, and invasion. Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated focal adhesion kinase knockdown and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor reduced POSTN-enhanced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expressions, cell migration, and invasion. Our research thus indicates that POSTN promotes renal cell carcinoma cell migration and invasion through interaction with integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 and subsequent activation of the focal adhesion kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. These results suggest that POSTN plays a critical role in renal cell carcinoma metastasis and may represent a potential target for novel therapeutic approaches against renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Role of the actin-binding protein profilin1 in radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rust, Marco B; Kullmann, Jan A; Witke, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Profilins are small G-actin-binding proteins essential for cytoskeletal dynamics. Of the four mammalian profilin isoforms, profilin1 shows a broad expression pattern, profilin2 is abundant in the brain, and profilin3 and profilin4 are restricted to the testis. In vitro studies on cancer and epithelial cell lines suggested a role for profilins in cell migration and cell-cell adhesion. Genetic studies in mice revealed the importance of profilin1 in neuronal migration, while profilin2 has apparently acquired a specific function in synaptic physiology. We recently reported a mouse mutant line lacking profilin1 in the brain; animals display morphological defects that are typical for impaired neuronal migration. We found that during cerebellar development, profilin1 is specifically required for radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons. Profilin1 mutants showed cerebellar hypoplasia and aberrant organization of cerebellar cortex layers, with ectopically arranged granule neurons. In this commentary, we briefly introduce the profilin family and summarize the current knowledge on profilin activity in cell migration and adhesion. Employing cerebellar granule cells as a model, we shed some light on the mechanisms by which profilin1 may control radial migration and glial cell adhesion. Finally, a potential implication of profilin1 in human developmental neuropathies is discussed.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency in macrophages leads to defective p110γ PI3K signaling and impairs cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Osma-García, Inés C; Iñiguez, Miguel A; Fresno, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 dependent PGs modulate several functions in many pathophysiological processes, including migration of immune cells. In this study, we addressed the role of Cox-2 in macrophage migration by using in vivo and in vitro models. Upon thioglycolate challenge, CD11b(+) F4/80(+) macrophages showed a diminished ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity in cox-2(-/-) mice. In vivo migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages from the peritoneal cavity to lymph nodes, as well as cell adhesion to the mesothelium, was reduced in response to LPS. In vitro migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages toward MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-1β, as well as cell adhesion to ICAM-1 or fibronectin, was impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to changes in chemokine receptor expression. Remarkably, cox-2(-/-) macrophages showed a deficiency in focal adhesion formation, with reduced phosphorylation of paxillin (Tyr(188)). Interestingly, expression of the p110γ catalytic subunit of PI3K was severely reduced in the absence of Cox-2, leading to defective Akt phosphorylation, as well as cdc42 and Rac-1 activation. Our results indicate that the paxillin/p110γ-PI3K/Cdc42/Rac1 axis is defective in cox-2(-/-) macrophages, which results in impaired cell adhesion and migration.

  17. Cigarette smoke modulates PC3 prostate cancer cell migration by altering adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUPING; LONG, MINICA; TACHADO, SOUVENIR D.; SENG, SEYHA

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among American males. Studies suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with the progression of PCa; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process have not been extensively investigated. PCa progression is characterized by increased cell migration and alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM)- and cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-related gene expression. In the present study, the influence of cigarette smoke medium (SM) on cell migration and on the expression of ECM- and CAM-related genes in PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. According to a wound-healing assay, SM treatment promoted PC3 cell migration. RNA expression levels from SM-treated and control cells were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Of 84 genes analyzed, 27.38% (23/84) exhibited a ≥2-fold change in threshold cycle in PC3 cells following 0.5% SM treatment. Functional gene grouping analysis demonstrated that SM treatment modulated the RNA transcription of approximately 18.4% of CAMs and 33.93% of ECM-related genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that SM treatment led to a significant decrease in transcription levels of the following genes: Collagen 5 α-1(V), connective tissue growth factor, integrin β-2, kallmann syndrome 1, laminin α 3, matrix metallopeptidase 7 (MMP7), MMP13, secreted protein acidic cysteine-rich, thrombospondin-2 and versican; and that SM significantly increased the transcription levels of MMP2 and MMP12. Furthermore, MMP2 knockdown significantly reduced the migration of SM-treated PC3 cells. The present study provides novel insights into the association of cigarette smoking with PCa progression, via the alteration of ECM/CAM interactions. PMID:26351771

  18. Overexpression of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines: effects on apoptosis, migration and adhesion of cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghua; Mao, Lihong; Wang, Ruili; Zhu, Liqiang; Xue, Lexun

    2014-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is the sole enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in methylation reaction. Previous studies have shown that its inhibition or deficiency leads to several human disorders such as severe coagulopathy, hepatopathy and myopathy. However, the effects of SAHH on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells have not been explored so far. To determine whether SAHH is involved in carcinogenesis of the esophagus, we investigated the expression of SAHH in ESCC and normal esophageal epithelial cells and found that SAHH was downregulated in ESCC cells compared with normal esophageal epithelial cells (P < 0.05). The overexpressed SAHH in ESCC cells promoted cell apoptosis, inhibited cell migration and adhesion, but did not affect the cell proliferation and cell cycle. Furthermore, an interaction of SAHH with receptor of activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) protein was detected by coimmunoprecipitation and an increased RACK1, which is caused by overexpression of SAHH, was verified by Western blotting. The findings mentioned above demonstrate that SAHH can promote apoptosis, inhibit migration and adhesion of ESCC cells suggesting that it may be involved in carcinogenesis of the esophagus.

  19. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration.

  20. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  1. Portulacerebroside A inhibits adhesion, migration, and invasion of human leukemia HL60 cells and U937 cells through the regulation of p38/JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qidong; Liao, Xuelian; Fu, Pan; Dou, Jiaying; Chen, Kai; Jiang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly malignant hematopoietic tumor. This study aimed to explore the effect of portulacerebroside A (PCA) on the adhesion, migration, and invasion in human leukemia HL60 cells and U937 cells and clarify the possible mechanisms involved, which could provide potential strategies for the treatment of AML. By methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium analysis, it was found that PCA (1–10 μM) suppressed the cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A total of 1, 2, and 5 μM of PCA dramatically inhibited the adhesion, migration, and invasion of HL60 cells and U937 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylation level of JNK and P38 protein level was measured by Western blot. After the real-time quantification polymerase chain reaction and Western blot detection of the total RNA and protein, messenger RNA, and protein expression levels of Ras homologous C (RhoC), metastasis-associated gene 1 (MTA1) and matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 (MMP-2/9) were decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. The phosphorylation level of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38) was decreased dramatically in HL60 cells and U937 cells after PCA treatment. In conclusion, PCA significantly inhibits the adhesion, migration, and invasion of HL60 cells and U937 cells by suppressing the p38/JNK pathway and regulating the expressions of related genes. PMID:27956839

  2. Vimentin Levels and Serine 71 Phosphorylation in the Control of Cell-Matrix Adhesions, Migration Speed, and Shape of Transformed Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Terriac, Emmanuel; Coceano, Giovanna; Mavajian, Zahra; Hageman, Tijmen A. G.; Christ, Andreas F.; Testa, Ilaria; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Gad, Annica K. B.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasizing tumor cells show increased expression of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin, which has been used to diagnose invasive tumors for decades. Recent observations indicate that vimentin is not only a passive marker for carcinoma, but may also induce tumor cell invasion. To clarify how vimentin IFs control cell adhesions and migration, we analyzed the nanoscale (30–50 nm) spatial organization of vimentin IFs and cell-matrix adhesions in metastatic fibroblast cells, using three-color stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. We also studied whether wild-type and phospho-deficient or -mimicking mutants of vimentin changed the size and lifetime of focal adhesions (FAs), cell shape, and cell migration, using live-cell total internal reflection imaging and confocal microscopy. We observed that vimentin exists in fragments of different lengths. Short fragments were mostly the size of a unit-length filament and were mainly localized close to small cell-matrix adhesions. Long vimentin filaments were found in the proximity of large FAs. Vimentin expression in these cells caused a reduction in FAs size and an elongated cell shape, but did not affect FA lifetime, or the speed or directionality of cell migration. Expression of a phospho-mimicking mutant (S71D) of vimentin increased the speed of cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that in highly migratory, transformed mesenchymal cells, vimentin levels control the cell shape and FA size, but not cell migration, which instead is linked to the phosphorylation status of S71 vimentin. These observations are consistent with the possibility that not only levels, but also the assembly status of vimentin control cell migration. PMID:28117759

  3. Effect of Surface Adhesion on Individual and Collective Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; McCann, Colin; Rericha, Erin; Parent, Carole

    2011-03-01

    Cell-surface adhesion plays a critical role in amoeboid cell motion by supplying the traction allowing a cell to move itself forward.~ The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for individual and collective cell migration, naturally exhibits both cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesion during the aggregation process.~ We used both high- and low-magnification time-lapse microscopy to investigate the individual and collective migration of D. discoideum on substrates of varying adhesiveness, as well as on interfaces between surfaces.~ We find that surface adhesion can affect both individual cell migration as well as the behavior of cell groups.~ At the population scale, non-ideal surfaces slow down the initiation of aggregation and change the aggregation dynamics. At the scale of single cells, we measure both adhesion ability as well as the area of contact between cells and surface for individual cells and cells that are part of groups.~ We find that comparable forces are needed to pull cells off all surfaces, indicating that surface adhesion is actively regulated by migrating cells. Supported by NCI and NSF-PoLS.

  4. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC.

  5. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  6. Vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits migration through inhibition of PDGF signaling and enhancement of cell adhesiveness in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Eng-Thaim; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2011-10-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in normal vessel formation and in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Grape plants contain resveratrol monomer and oligomers and drinking of wine made from grape has been linked to 'French Paradox'. In this study we evaluated the effect of vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, on VSMC behaviors. Vitisin B inhibited basal and PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Strikingly, it did not inhibit VSMC proliferation but inversely enhanced cell cycle progression and proliferation. Among the tested resveratrol oligomers, vitisin B showed an excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity on PDGF signaling. The anti-migratory effect by vitisin B was due to direct inhibition on PDGF signaling but was independent of interference with PDGF binding to VSMCs. Moreover, the enhanced VSMC adhesiveness to matrix contributed to the anti-migratory effect by vitisin B. Fluorescence microscopy revealed an enhanced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and redistribution of activated focal adhesion proteins from cytosol to the peripheral edge of the cell membrane. This was confirmed by the observation that enhanced adhesiveness was repressed by the Src inhibitor. Finally, among the effects elicited by vitisin B, only the inhibitory effect toward basal migration was partially through estrogen receptor activation. We have demonstrated here that a resveratrol tetramer exhibited dual but opposite actions on VSMCs, one is to inhibit VSMC migration and the other is to promote VSMC proliferation. The anti-migratory effect was through a potent inhibition on PDGF signaling and novel enhancement on cell adhesion. - Highlights: > Several resveratrol oligomers from grape plants are examined on VSMC behaviors. > Tetraoligomer vitisin B shows excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity. > It exerts dual but opposing actions: anti-migratory and pro-proliferative effects. > The anti-migratory effect results from anti-PDGF signaling

  7. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  8. Effects of the knockdown of death-associated protein 3 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ahmad M A; Ye, Lin; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-05-01

    The death-associated protein 3 (DAP3) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP3 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we intended to determine the role of DAP3 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, and performed growth, adhesion, invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of post-wound migration of the cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, death ligand signal enhancer (DELE), IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS1), cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sub-lines. The knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 had significantly increased adhesion and decreased growth when compared to the controls. Furthermore, invasion and migration were significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231DAP3kd cells vs. the controls. The expression of caspase 9 and IPS1, known components of the apoptosis pathway, were significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP3kd cells (p=0.05 and p=0.003, respectively). We conclude that DAP3 silencing contributes to breast carcinogenesis by increasing cell adhesion, migration and invasion. It is possible that this may be due to the activity of focal adhesion kinase further downstream of the anoikis pathway. Further research in this direction would be beneficial in increasing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying human breast cancer.

  9. Laminin-511: a multi-functional adhesion protein regulating cell migration, tumor invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Normand; Kusuma, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Laminins are major constituents of basement membranes. At least 16 isoforms have now been described, each with distinct spatio-temporal expression patterns and functions. The laminin-511 heterotrimer (α5β1γ1) is one of the more recent isoforms to be identified and a potent adhesive and pro-migratory substrate for a variety of normal and tumor cell lines in vitro. As our understanding of its precise function in normal tissues and in pathologies is rapidly unraveling, current evidence suggests an important regulatory role in cancer. This review describes published data on laminin-511 expression in several malignancies and experimental evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies supporting its functional role during tumor progression. A particular emphasis is put on more recent studies from our laboratory and that of others indicating that laminin-511 contributes to tumor dissemination and metastasis in advanced breast carcinomas and other tumor types. Collectively, the experimental evidence suggests that high expression of laminin-511 has prognostic significance and that targeting tumor-laminin-511 interactions may have therapeutic potential in advanced cancer patients.

  10. Unsaturated Fatty Acids Drive Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM)-dependent Cell Adhesion, Proliferation, and Migration by Modulating Membrane Fluidity*

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Karina; Cornelsen, Isabell; Husmann, Matthias; Gimpl, Gerald; Bhakdi, Sucharit

    2011-01-01

    The disintegrin-metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 mediate the release of several cell signaling molecules and cell adhesion molecules such as vascular endothelial cadherin or L-selectin affecting endothelial permeability and leukocyte transmigration. Dysregulation of ADAM activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases, but the mechanisms underlying the control of ADAM functions are still incompletely understood. Atherosclerosis is characterized by lipid plaque formation and local accumulation of unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA). Here, we show that unsaturated FFA increase ADAM-mediated substrate cleavage. We demonstrate that these alterations are not due to genuine changes in enzyme activity, but correlate with changes in membrane fluidity as revealed by measurement of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses. ELISA and immunoblot experiments conducted with granulocytes, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes revealed rapid increase of ectodomain shedding of ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrates upon membrane fluidization. Large amounts of unsaturated FFA may be liberated from cholesteryl esters in LDL that is entrapped in atherosclerotic lesions. Incubation of cells with thus modified LDL resulted in rapid cleavage of ADAM substrates with corresponding functional consequences on cell proliferation, cell migration, and endothelial permeability, events of high significance in atherogenesis. We propose that FFA represent critical regulators of ADAM function that may assume relevance in many biological settings through their influence on mobility of enzyme and substrate in lipid bilayers. PMID:21642425

  11. Unsaturated fatty acids drive disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-dependent cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration by modulating membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Karina; Cornelsen, Isabell; Husmann, Matthias; Gimpl, Gerald; Bhakdi, Sucharit

    2011-07-29

    The disintegrin-metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 mediate the release of several cell signaling molecules and cell adhesion molecules such as vascular endothelial cadherin or L-selectin affecting endothelial permeability and leukocyte transmigration. Dysregulation of ADAM activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases, but the mechanisms underlying the control of ADAM functions are still incompletely understood. Atherosclerosis is characterized by lipid plaque formation and local accumulation of unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA). Here, we show that unsaturated FFA increase ADAM-mediated substrate cleavage. We demonstrate that these alterations are not due to genuine changes in enzyme activity, but correlate with changes in membrane fluidity as revealed by measurement of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses. ELISA and immunoblot experiments conducted with granulocytes, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes revealed rapid increase of ectodomain shedding of ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrates upon membrane fluidization. Large amounts of unsaturated FFA may be liberated from cholesteryl esters in LDL that is entrapped in atherosclerotic lesions. Incubation of cells with thus modified LDL resulted in rapid cleavage of ADAM substrates with corresponding functional consequences on cell proliferation, cell migration, and endothelial permeability, events of high significance in atherogenesis. We propose that FFA represent critical regulators of ADAM function that may assume relevance in many biological settings through their influence on mobility of enzyme and substrate in lipid bilayers.

  12. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  13. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 interacts with adhesion complexes and promotes cell migration, survival, and anchorage independent growth.

    PubMed

    Frisan, Teresa; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Dryselius, Rikard; Masucci, Maria G

    2012-12-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme of unknown function that is highly expressed in neurons and overexpressed in several human cancers. UCH-L1 has been implicated in the regulation of phenotypic properties associated with malignant cell growth but the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. By comparing cells expressing catalytically active or inactive versions of UCH-L1, we found that the active enzyme enhances cell adhesion, spreading, and migration; inhibits anoikis; and promotes anchorage independent growth. UCH-L1 accumulates at the motile edge of the cell membrane during the initial phases of adhesion, colocalizes with focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p120-catenin, and vinculin, and enhances the formation of focal adhesions, which correlates with enhanced FAK activation. The involvement of UCH-L1 in the regulation of focal adhesions and adherens junctions is supported by coimmunoprecipitation with key components of these complexes, including FAK, paxillin, p120-catenin, β-catenin, and vinculin. UCH-L1 stabilizes focal adhesion signaling in the absence of adhesion, as assessed by reduced caspase-dependent cleavage of FAK following cell detachment and sustained activity of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings offer new insights on the molecular interactions through which the deubiquitinating enzyme regulates the survival, proliferation, and metastatic potential of malignant cells.

  14. The effects of caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids on proliferation, superoxide production, adhesion and migration of human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nasr Bouzaiene, Nouha; Kilani Jaziri, Soumaya; Kovacic, Hervé; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Ghedira, Kamel; Luis, José

    2015-11-05

    Reactive oxygen species are well-known mediators of various biological responses. In this study, we examined the effect of three phenolic acids, caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids, on superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon adenocarcinoma (HT29-D4) cancer cell lines. Proliferation of both tumor cells was inhibited by phenolic acids. Caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids also significantly inhibited superoxide production in A549 and HT29-D4 cells. Superoxide anion production decreased by 92% and 77% at the highest tested concentration (200 µM) of caffeic acid in A549 and HT29-D4 cell lines respectively. Furthermore, A549 and HT29-D4 cell adhesion was reduced by 77.9% and 79.8% respectively at the higher tested concentration of ferulic acid (200 µM). Migration assay performed towards A549 cell line, revealed that tested compounds reduced significantly cell migration. At the highest concentration tested (200 µM), the covered surface was 7.7%, 9.5% and 35% for caffeic, coumaric or ferulic acids, respectively. These results demonstrate that caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids may participate as active ingredients in anticancer agents against lung and colon cancer development, at adhesion and migration steps of tumor progression.

  15. Mycobacterium ulcerans mycolactone interferes with adhesion, migration and proliferation of primary human keratinocytes and HaCaT cell line.

    PubMed

    Graziola, Francesca; Colombo, Elena; Tiberio, Rossana; Leigheb, Giorgio; Bozzo, Chiarella

    2017-04-01

    The pathogenicity of Mycobacterium ulcerans (Buruli ulcer) is closely associated with the secretion of exotoxin mycolactone. The cytotoxicity of mycolactone has been linked to its apoptogenic activity. We explored if low mycolactone concentrations, which are not able to induce apoptosis, can influence other essential activities on two primary human keratinocyte populations, keratinocyte stem cells (KSC) and transit amplifying cells (TAC), and on a human keratinocyte line, HaCaT. We demonstrated that 0.01 and 0.1 ng/ml mycolactone A/B are not able to induce apoptosis in primary human keratinocytes, but interfere with KSC wound repair. Moreover, the same toxin concentrations reduce cell proliferation of KSC and TAC and their ability to adhere to type IV collagen. HaCaT cells are more resistant to the toxin; nevertheless, they show a delayed woud repair when treated with 1 and 10 ng/ml mycolactone A/B. Moreover, these sub-apoptotic concentrations affect their ability to proliferate and adhere to collagen IV. Wound healing is a complex mechanism, which occurs "in vivo" as the outcome of many co-ordinated events. Sub-apoptotic mycolactone concentrations can affect essential mechanisms, which are required to achieve wound repair, such as adhesion, migration and proliferation of human keratinocytes.

  16. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in mechanosensing during fibroblast migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Hanks, S. K.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase localized at focal adhesions and is believed to mediate adhesion-stimulated effects. Although ablation of FAK impairs cell movement, it is not clear whether FAK might be involved in the guidance of cell migration, a role consistent with its putative regulatory function. We have transfected FAK-null fibroblasts with FAK gene under the control of the tetracycline repression system. Cells were cultured on flexible polyacrylamide substrates for the detection of traction forces and the application of mechanical stimulation. Compared with control cells expressing wild-type FAK, FAK-null cells showed a decrease in migration speed and directional persistence. In addition, whereas FAK-expressing cells responded to exerted forces by reorienting their movements and forming prominent focal adhesions, FAK-null cells failed to show such responses. Furthermore, FAK-null cells showed impaired responses to decreases in substrate flexibility, which causes control cells to generate weaker traction forces and migrate away from soft substrates. Cells expressing Y397F FAK, which cannot be phosphorylated at a key tyrosine site, showed similar defects in migration pattern and force-induced reorientation as did FAK-null cells. However, other aspects of F397-FAK cells, including the responses to substrate flexibility and the amplification of focal adhesions upon mechanical stimulation, were similar to that of control cells. Our results suggest that FAK plays an important role in the response of migrating cells to mechanical input. In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr-397 is required for some, but not all, of the functions of FAK in cell migration.

  17. wing blister, A New Drosophila Laminin α Chain Required for Cell Adhesion and Migration during Embryonic and Imaginal Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Doris; Zusman, Susan; Li, Xitong; Williams, Erin L.; Khare, Narmada; DaRocha, Sol; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Baumgartner, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    We report the molecular and functional characterization of a new α chain of laminin in Drosophila. The new laminin chain appears to be the Drosophila counterpart of both vertebrate α2 (also called merosin) and α1 chains, with a slightly higher degree of homology to α2, suggesting that this chain is an ancestral version of both α1 and α2 chains. During embryogenesis, the protein is associated with basement membranes of the digestive system and muscle attachment sites, and during larval stage it is found in a specific pattern in wing and eye discs. The gene is assigned to a locus called wing blister (wb), which is essential for embryonic viability. Embryonic phenotypes include twisted germbands and fewer pericardial cells, resulting in gaps in the presumptive heart and tracheal trunks, and myotubes detached from their target muscle attachment sites. Most phenotypes are in common with those observed in Drosophila laminin α3, 5 mutant embryos and many are in common with those observed in integrin mutations. Adult phenotypes show blisters in the wings in viable allelic combinations, similar to phenotypes observed in integrin genes. Mutation analysis in the eye demonstrates a function in rhabdomere organization. In summary, this new laminin α chain is essential for embryonic viability and is involved in processes requiring cell migration and cell adhesion. PMID:10189378

  18. Combined integrin phosphoproteomic analyses and small interfering RNA--based functional screening identify key regulators for cancer cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Lu, Bingwen; Yang, Qingkai; Fearns, Colleen; Yates, John R; Lee, Jiing-Dwan

    2009-04-15

    Integrins interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) and deliver intracellular signaling for cell proliferation, survival, and motility. During tumor metastasis, integrin-mediated cell adhesion to and migration on the ECM proteins are required for cancer cell survival and adaptation to the new microenvironment. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-mass spectrometry, we profiled the phosphoproteomic changes induced by the interactions of cell integrins with type I collagen, the most common ECM substratum. Integrin-ECM interactions modulate phosphorylation of 517 serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues in 513 peptides, corresponding to 357 proteins. Among these proteins, 33 key signaling mediators with kinase or phosphatase activity were subjected to small interfering RNA-based functional screening. Three integrin-regulated kinases, DBF4, PAK2, and GRK6, were identified for their critical role in cell adhesion and migration possibly through their regulation of actin cytoskeleton arrangement. Altogether, we not only depict an integrin-modulated phosphorylation network during cell-ECM protein interactions but also reveal novel regulators for cell adhesion and migration.

  19. Stable expression of sialyl-Tn antigen in T47-D cells induces a decrease of cell adhesion and an increase of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Julien, Sylvain; Lagadec, Chann; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Courtand, Gilles; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Delannoy, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Sialyl-Tn is a carbohydrate antigen overexpressed in several epithelial cancers including breast cancer, and usually associated with poor prognosis. Sialyl-Tn is synthesized by a CMP-Neu5Ac: GalNAc alpha2,6-sialyltransferase: ST6GalNAc I, which catalyzes the transfer of a sialic acid residue in alpha2,6-linkage to the GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr structure. The resulting disaccharide (Neu5Acalpha2-6GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr) cannot be further elongated and sialyl-Tn expression results therefore in a shortening of the O-glycan chains. However, usual breast cancer cell lines express neither ST6GalNAc I nor sialyl-Tn antigen. We have previously shown that stable transfection of MDA-MB-231 cells with the hST6GalNAc I cDNA induces the sialyl-Tn antigen expression at the cell surface and leads to a decreased cell growth and an increased cell migration. We describe herein the generation of new T47-D clones expressing sialyl-Tn antigen after hST6GalNAc I cDNA stable transfection. sialyl-Tn antigen is carried by several high molecular weight membrane bound O-glycoproteins, including MUC1. We show that sialyl-Tn expression induces a decrease of cell growth and adhesion, and an increase of cell migration in sialyl-Tn positive clones compared to mock transfected cells. These observations show that the alteration of the O-glycans pattern is sufficient to modify the biological features of cancer cells. These T47-D sialyl-Tn expressing clones might allow further in vivo investigation to determine precisely the impact of such O-glycosylation modifications on breast cancer development.

  20. PRL-3/PTP4A3 phosphatase regulates integrin β1 in adhesion structures during migration of human ocular melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Foy, Malika; Anézo, Océane; Saule, Simon; Planque, Nathalie

    2017-03-08

    In a previous transcriptomic analysis of 63 ocular melanomas of the uvea, we found that expression of the PRL-3/PTP4A3 gene, encoding a phosphatase that is anchored to the plasma membrane, was associated with the risk of metastasis, and a poor prognosis. We also showed that PRL-3 overexpression in OCM-1 ocular melanoma cells significantly increased cell migration in vitro and invasiveness in vivo, suggesting a direct role for PRL-3 in the metastatic spreading of uveal melanoma. Here, we aimed to identify PRL-3 substrates at the plasma membrane involved in adhesion to the extracellular matrix. We focused on integrin β1, which is the most highly expressed integrin in our cohort of uveal melanomas. We show that preventing PRL-3 anchorage to the plasma membrane i) abolishes PRL-3-induced migration in OCM-1 cells, ii) specifically enhances the spreading of OCM-1 cells overexpressing PRL-3, and iii) favors the maturation of large focal adhesions (FAs) containing integrin β1 on collagen I. Knockdown experiments confirmed integrin β1 involvement in PRL3-induced migration. We identified interactions between PRL-3 and integrin β1, as well as with FAK P-Y397, an auto-activated form of Focal Adhesion Kinase found in FAs. We also show that integrin β1 may be dephosphorylated by PRL-3 in its intracytoplasmic S/T region, an important motif for integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Finally, we observed that PRL-3 regulated the clustering of integrin β1 in FAs on collagen I but not on fibronectin. This work identifies PRL-3 as a new regulator of cell adhesion structures to the extracellular matrix, and further supports PRL-3 as a key actor of metastasis in uveal melanoma, of which molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood.

  1. Synaptopodin-2 induces assembly of peripheral actin bundles and immature focal adhesions to promote lamellipodia formation and prostate cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kai, FuiBoon; Fawcett, James P.; Duncan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Synaptopodin-2 (Synpo2), an actin-binding protein and invasive cancer biomarker, induces formation of complex stress fiber networks in the cell body and promotes PC3 prostate cancer cell migration in response to serum stimulation. The role of these actin networks in enhanced cancer cell migration is unknown. Using time-course analysis and live cell imaging of mock- and Synpo2-transduced PC3 cells, we now show that Synpo2 induces assembly of actin fibers near the cell periphery and Arp2/3-dependent lamellipodia formation. Lamellipodia formed in a non-directional manner or repeatedly changed direction, explaining the enhanced chemokinetic activity of PC3 cells in response to serum stimulation. Myosin contraction promotes retrograde flow of the Synpo2-associated actin filaments at the leading edge and their merger with actin networks in the cell body. Enhanced PC3 cell migration correlates with Synpo2-induced formation of lamellipodia and immature focal adhesions (FAs), but is not dependent on myosin contraction or FA maturation. The previously reported correlation between Synpo2-induced stress fiber assembly and enhanced PC3 cell migration therefore reflects the role of Synpo2 as a newly identified regulator of actin bundle formation and nascent FA assembly near the leading cell edge. PMID:25883213

  2. The Sal-like 4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration for metastasis via activation of focal adhesion dynamics in basal-like breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itou, Junji; Tanaka, Sunao; Li, Wenzhao; Iida, Atsuo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Sato, Fumiaki; Toi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, cancer cell migration is enhanced. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. Here, we addressed this issue by functionally analyzing the transcription factor Sal-like 4 (SALL4) in basal-like breast cancer cells. Loss-of-function studies of SALL4 showed that this transcription factor is required for the spindle-shaped morphology and the enhanced migration of cancer cells. SALL4 also up-regulated integrin gene expression. The impaired cell migration observed in SALL4 knockdown cells was restored by overexpression of integrin α6 and β1. In addition, we clarified that integrin α6 and β1 formed a heterodimer. At the molecular level, loss of the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network lost focal adhesion dynamics, which impairs cell migration. Over-activation of Rho is known to inhibit focal adhesion dynamics. We observed that SALL4 knockdown cells exhibited over-activation of Rho. Aberrant Rho activation was suppressed by integrin α6β1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of Rho activity restored cell migration in SALL4 knockdown cells. These results indicated that the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration via modulation of Rho activity. Moreover, our zebrafish metastasis assays demonstrated that this gene network enhances cell migration in vivo. Our findings identify a potential new therapeutic target for the prevention of metastasis, and provide an improved understanding of cancer cell migration.

  3. Focal adhesion kinases crucially regulate TGFβ-induced migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells via Src kinase and E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kong, De-Bo; Chen, Feng; Sima, Ni

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that is triggered off by special extracellular signals such as some growth factors and integrins. FAK is found in cell–matrix attachment sites and implicated in cell migration, invasion, movement, gene expression, survival and apoptosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether FAK plays a role in invasion and migration of bladder cancer cells. Using an FAK-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and an FAK inhibitor PF-228, we found that inhibition of FAK tyrosine phosphorylation or knockdown of FAK suppressed invasion and migration of bladder cancer cells. Src is an important mediator of FAK-regulated migratory and invasive activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Src and FAK is mutually dependent and plays a key role in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced invasion and migration. E-cadherin acts downstream of FAK and is a critical negative regulator in FAK-regulated invasion and migration of bladder cancer cells. These findings imply that FAK is involved in oncogenic signaling of invasion and migration, which can be a novel therapeutic target to treat patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28367061

  4. Microfluidic Platform for Studying Chemotaxis of Adhesive Cells Revealed a Gradient-Dependent Migration and Acceleration of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Heng; Yue, Wanqing; Yu, Wai-Kin; Liu, Dandan; Fong, Chi-Chun; Zhao, Jianlong; Yang, Mengsu

    2015-07-21

    Recent studies reveal that solid tumors consist of heterogeneous cells with distinct phenotypes and functions. However, it is unclear how different subtypes of cancer cells migrate under chemotaxis. Here, we developed a microfluidic device capable of generating multiple stable gradients, culturing cells on-chip, and monitoring single cell migratory behavior. The microfluidic platform was used to study gradient-induced chemotaxis of lung cancer stem cell (LCSC) and differentiated LCSC (dLCSC) in real time. Our results showed the dynamic and differential response of both LCSC and dLCSC to chemotaxis, which was regulated by the β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling pathway. The microfluidic analysis showed that LCSC and dLCSC from the same origin behaved differently in the same external stimuli, suggesting the importance of cancer cell heterogeneity. We also observed for the first time the acceleration of both LCSC and dLCSC during chemotaxis caused by increasing local concentration in different gradients, which could only be realized through the microfluidic approach. The capability to analyze single cell chemotaxis under spatially controlled conditions provides a novel analytical platform for the study of cellular microenvironments and cancer cell metastasis.

  5. Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) supports adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells through interaction with RGD-binding integrins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yueqing; Hu Xiaobo; Tian Ruiyang; Wei Wangui; Hu Wei; Chen Xia; Han Wei; Chen Huayou; Gong Yi . E-mail: ygong@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-08-18

    Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) is a newly identified member of angiopoietin-related proteins (ARPs)/angiopoietin-like proteins (Angptls). AGF has been considered as a novel growth factor in accelerating cutaneous wound healing, as it is capable of stimulating keratinocytes proliferation as well as angiogenesis. But in our paper, we demonstrate that AGF stimulates keratinocytes proliferation only at high protein concentration, however, it can potently promote adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirm that the adhesion and migration cellular events are mediated by RGD-binding integrins, most possibly the {alpha}{sub v}-containing integrins, by in vitro inhibition assays using synthetic competitive peptides. Our results strongly suggest that AGF is an integrin ligand as well as a mitogenic growth factor and theoretically participates in cutaneous wound healing in a more complex mechanism.

  6. Hyperactive RAS/PI3-K/MAPK Signaling Cascade in Migration and Adhesion of Nf1 Haploinsufficient Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; He, Yongzheng; Sharma, Richa; Xing, Wen; Estwick, Selina A; Wu, Xiaohua; Rhodes, Steven D; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene, which affect approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Patients with NF1 suffer from a range of malignant and nonmalignant manifestations such as plexiform neurofibromas and skeletal abnormalities. We previously demonstrated that Nf1 haploinsufficiency in mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) results in impaired osteoblastic differentiation, which may be associated with the skeletal manifestations in NF1 patients. Here we sought to further ascertain the role of Nf1 in modulating the migration and adhesion of MSPCs of the Nf1 haploinsufficient (Nf1(+/-)) mice. Nf1(+/-) MSPCs demonstrated increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, increased migration, and increased actin polymerization as compared to wild-type (WT) MSPCs. Additionally, Nf1(+/-) MSPCs were noted to have significantly enhanced cell adhesion to fibronectin with selective affinity for CH271 with an overexpression of its complimentary receptor, CD49e. Nf1(+/-) MSPCs also showed hyperactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways when compared to WT MSPCs, which were both significantly reduced in the presence of their pharmacologic inhibitors, LY294002 and PD0325901, respectively. Collectively, our study suggests that both PI3-K and MAPK signaling pathways play a significant role in enhanced migration and adhesion of Nf1 haploinsufficient MSPCs.

  7. Polycystin-1 Induces Cell Migration by Regulating Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent Cytoskeletal Rearrangements and GSK3β-dependent Cell–Cell Mechanical Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Boca, Manila; D'Amato, Lisa; Distefano, Gianfranco; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Germino, Gregory G.

    2007-01-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC-1) is a large plasma-membrane receptor encoded by the PKD1 gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although the disease is thought to be recessive on a molecular level, the precise mechanism of cystogenesis is unclear, although cytoarchitecture defects seem to be the most likely initiating events. Here we show that PC-1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton in renal epithelial cells (MDCK) and induces cell scattering and cell migration. All of these effects require phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) activity. Consistent with these observations Pkd1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) have reduced capabilities to migrate compared with controls. PC-1 overexpressing MDCK cells are able to polarize normally with proper adherens and tight junctions formation, but show quick reabsorption of ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin upon wounding of a monolayer and a transient epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) that favors a rapid closure of the wound and repolarization. Finally, we show that PC-1 is able to control the turnover of cytoskeletal-associated β-catenin through activation of GSK3β. Expression of a nondegradable form of β-catenin in PC-1 MDCK cells restores strong cell–cell mechanical adhesion. We propose that PC-1 might be a central regulator of epithelial plasticity and its loss results in impaired normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17671167

  8. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2-59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction.

  9. The adhesive and migratory effects of osteopontin are mediated via distinct cell surface integrins. Role of alpha v beta 3 in smooth muscle cell migration to osteopontin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, L; Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R; Cheresh, D A; Schwartz, S M; Giachelli, C M

    1995-01-01

    Osteopontin is an arginine-glycine-aspartate containing acidic glycoprotein postulated to mediate adhesion, migration, and biomineralization in diverse tissues. The mechanisms explaining this multifunctionality are not well understood, although it is known that one osteopontin receptor is the alpha v beta 3 integrin. In this work, we studied human smooth muscle cells varying in alpha v beta 3 levels to identify additional osteopontin receptors. We report that, in addition to alpha v beta 3, both alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 are osteopontin receptors. Moreover, the presence or absence of alpha v beta 3 on the cell surface altered the adhesive and migratory responses of smooth muscle cells to osteopontin. Adhesion of alpha v beta 3-deficient cell populations to osteopontin was only half that of cells containing alpha v beta 3, and migration toward an osteopontin gradient in the Boyden chamber was dependent on cell surface alpha v beta 3. Although alpha v beta 3-deficient smooth muscle cells were unable to migrate to osteopontin, they did migrate significantly in response to vitronectin and fibronectin. These findings represent the first description of alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 as osteopontin receptors and suggest that, while adhesion to osteopontin is supported by integrins containing beta 1, beta 3, and beta 5, migration in response to osteopontin appears to depend on alpha v beta 3. Thus, interaction with distinct receptors is one mechanism by which osteopontin may initiate multiple functions. Images PMID:7532190

  10. Involvement of small G protein RhoB in the regulation of proliferation, adhesion and migration by dexamethasone in osteoblastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Yidong; Xu, Weidong; Lu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Long-term exposure to therapeutic doses of glucocorticoids (GCs) results in bone remodeling, which frequently causes osteoporosis and fracture healing retardation because of the abnormality of osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation. The mechanisms of GCs’ effect on osteoblasts are largely unknown. In this present study, we found that dexamethasone (Dex) could induce the expression of the small G protein, RhoB, in mRNA and protein levels in the osteoblast-derived osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63. The up-regulation of RhoB mRNA by Dex mainly occurs at posttranscriptional level by increasing its mRNA stability through PI-3K/Akt and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Over-expression of RhoB in MG-63 cells magnified while down-regulation of RhoB level by RNA interference impaired Dex-induced growth inhibition but not differentiation. What’s more, over-expression of RhoB mimicked the effect of Dex on cell adhesion and migration. And interfering RhoB expression partially suppressed Dex-induced pro-adhesion and anti-migration in MG-63 cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that RhoB plays an important role in the pathological effect of Dex on osteoblastic growth and migration, which is a part of the mechanisms of GCs’ adverse effect on bone remodeling. PMID:28323887

  11. PP2A binds to the LIM domains of lipoma-preferred partner through its PR130/B″ subunit to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Veerle; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Rossé, Carine; Petit, Marleen M. R.; Goris, Jozef; Parker, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we identify the LIM protein lipoma-preferred partner (LPP) as a binding partner of a specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimer that is characterised by the regulatory PR130/B″α1 subunit (encoded by PPP2R3A). The PR130 subunit interacts with the LIM domains of LPP through a conserved Zn2+-finger-like motif in the differentially spliced N-terminus of PR130. Isolated LPP-associated PP2A complexes are catalytically active. PR130 colocalises with LPP at multiple locations within cells, including focal contacts, but is specifically excluded from mature focal adhesions, where LPP is still present. An LPP–PR130 fusion protein only localises to focal adhesions upon deletion of the domain of PR130 that binds to the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A/C), suggesting that PR130–LPP complex formation is dynamic and that permanent recruitment of PP2A activity might be unfavourable for focal adhesion maturation. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PR130 increases adhesion of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells onto collagen I and decreases their migration in scratch wound and Transwell assays. Complex formation with LPP is mandatory for these PR130-PP2A functions, as neither phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of a PR130 mutant that no longer binds to LPP. Our data highlight the importance of specific, locally recruited PP2A complexes in cell adhesion and migration dynamics. PMID:26945059

  12. Preparation of gelatin density gradient on poly(ε-caprolactone) membrane and its influence on adhesion and migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2015-08-01

    Directional migration of endothelial cells (ECs) can be achieved by gradient cues in vitro, which mimics the corresponding biological events in vivo. Currently, most of the gradients have been prepared on model surfaces which are too simple compared to real degradable biomaterials. In this study, the amino group density gradient was prepared on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) membrane surface by a gradient aminolysis method, which was transferred into gelatin density gradient by covalent linking with glutaraldehyde. The resulted gelatin density gradient ranged from 0.49 to 1.57μg/cm(2) on the PCL membrane. The adhesion, orientation and migration of ECs on the PCL membrane with the gelatin density gradient were studied. The ECs showed preferred orientation and directional migration toward the gradient direction with enhanced gelatin density at proper position (gelatin density), forwarding a new step toward the preparation of applicable gradient biomaterials in tissue regeneration.

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinase Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening via Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Kristin E.; Dumbauld, David W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell–ECM forces. PMID:19297531

  14. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  15. A novel monoclonal antibody to human laminin α5 chain strongly inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration on laminins 511 and 521.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Omrani, Shahin; Ishikawa, Taichi; Javed, Fawad; Oikawa, Yuko; Virtanen, Ismo; Juronen, Erkki; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα) chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1) and 521 (α5β2γ1). As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  16. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  17. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Owen L.; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  18. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin β3 via SMAD2/3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-10-13

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin βB subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin B (βB dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin β3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin β3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin β3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers.

  19. The conveyor belt hypothesis for thymocyte migration: participation of adhesion and de-adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Villa-Verde, D M; Calado, T C; Ocampo, J S; Silva-Monteiro, E; Savino, W

    1999-05-01

    Thymocyte differentiation is the process by which bone marrow-derived precursors enter the thymus, proliferate, rearrange the genes and express the corresponding T cell receptors, and undergo positive and/or negative selection, ultimately yielding mature T cells that will represent the so-called T cell repertoire. This process occurs in the context of cell migration, whose cellular and molecular basis is still poorly understood. Kinetic studies favor the idea that these cells leave the organ in an ordered pattern, as if they were moving on a conveyor belt. We have recently proposed that extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, among others, produced by non-lymphoid cells both in the cortex and in the medulla, would constitute a macromolecular arrangement allowing differentiating thymocytes to migrate. Here we discuss the participation of both molecules with adhesive and de-adhesive properties in the intrathymic T cell migration. Functional experiments demonstrated that galectin-3, a soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin secreted by thymic microenvironmental cells, is a likely candidate for de-adhesion proteins by decreasing thymocyte interaction with the thymic microenvironment.

  20. Grifolin inhibits tumor cells adhesion and migration via suppressing interplay between PGC1α and Fra-1/LSF-MMP2/CD44 axes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiangjian; Li, Namei; Zhong, Juanfang; Tan, Zheqiong; Liu, Ying; Dong, Xin; Cheng, Can; Xu, Zhijie; Li, Hongde; Yang, Lifang; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Liu, Jikai; Cao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Grifolin, a farnesyl phenolic compound isolated from the fresh fruiting bodies of the mushroom Albatrellus confluens, exhibits effective antitumor bioactivity in previous study of our group and other lab. In this study, we observed that grifolin inhibited tumor cells adhesion and migration. Moreover, grifolin reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and caused cellular ATP depletion in high-metastatic tumor cells. PGC1α (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, coactivator 1α) encodes a transcriptional co-activator involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration and play a critical role in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Interestingly, grifolin suppressed the mRNA as well as protein level of PGC1α. We further identified that MMP2 and CD44 expressions were PGC1α inducible. PGC1α can bind with metastatic-associated transcription factors: Fra-1 and LSF and the protein-protein interaction was attenuated by grifolin treatment. Overall, these findings suggest that grifolin decreased ROS generation and intracellular ATP to suppress tumor cell adhesion/migration via impeding the interplay between PGC1α and Fra-1 /LSF-MMP2/CD44 axes. Grifolin may develop as a promising lead compound for antitumor therapies by targeting energy metabolism regulator PGC1α signaling. PMID:27626695

  1. Down-regulation of the cancer/testis antigen 45 (CT45) is associated with altered tumor cell morphology, adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to their restricted expression in male germ cells and certain tumors, cancer/testis (CT) antigens are regarded as promising targets for tumor therapy. CT45 is a recently identified nuclear CT antigen that was associated with a severe disease score in Hodgkin’s lymphoma and poor prognosis in multiple myeloma. As for many CT antigens, the biological function of CT45 in developing germ cells and in tumor cells is largely unknown. Methods CT45 expression was down-regulated in CT45-positive Hodgkin’s lymphoma (L428), fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and myeloma (U266B1) cells using RNA interference. An efficient CT45 knock-down was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining and/or Western blotting. These cellular systems allowed us to analyze the impact of CT45 down-regulation on proliferation, cell cycle progression, morphology, adhesion, migration and invasive capacity of tumor cells. Results Reduced levels of CT45 did not coincide with changes in cell cycle progression or proliferation. However, we observed alterations in cell adherence, morphology and migration/invasion after CT45 down-regulation. Significant changes in the distribution of cytoskeleton-associated proteins were detected by confocal imaging. Changes in cell adherence were recorded in real-time using the xCelligence system with control and siRNA-treated cells. Altered migratory and invasive capacity of CT45 siRNA-treated cells were visualized in 3D migration and invasion assays. Moreover, we found that CT45 down-regulation altered the level of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein syncrip (hnRNP-Q1) which is known to be involved in the control of focal adhesion formation and cell motility. Conclusions Providing first evidence of a cell biological function of CT45, we suggest that this cancer/testis antigen is involved in the modulation of cell morphology, cell adherence and cell motility. Enhanced motility and/or invasiveness of CT45-positive cells could contribute to the more severe

  2. PED/PEA-15 interacts with the 67 kD laminin receptor and regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Formisano, Pietro; Ragno, Pia; Pesapane, Ada; Alfano, Daniela; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Rea, Vincenza Elena Anna; Giusto, Raffaella; Rossi, Francesca W; Beguinot, Francesco; Rossi, Guido; Montuori, Nunzia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kD (PED/PEA-15) is an anti-apoptotic protein whose expression is increased in several human cancers. In addition to apoptosis, PED/PEA-15 is involved in the regulation of other major cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and glucose metabolism. To further understand the functions of this protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening using PED/PEA-15 as a bait and identified the 67 kD high-affinity laminin receptor (67LR) as an interacting partner. 67 kD laminin receptor is a non-integrin cell-surface receptor for the extracellular matrix (ECM), derived from the dimerization of a 37 kD cytosolic precursor (37LRP). The 67LR is highly expressed in human cancers and widely recognized as a molecular marker of metastatic aggressiveness. The molecular interaction of PED/PEA-15 with 67LR was confirmed by pull-down experiments with recombinant His-tagged 37LRP on lysates of PED/PEA-15 transfected HEK-293 cells. Further, overexpressed or endogenous PED/PEA-15 was co-immunoprecipitated with 67LR in PED/PEA-15-transfected HEK-293 cells and in U-373 glioblastoma cells, respectively. PED/PEA-15 overexpression significantly increased 67LR-mediated HEK-293 cell adhesion and migration to laminin that, in turn, determined PED/PEA-15 phosphorylation both in Ser-104 and Ser-116, thus enabling cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. PED/PEA-15 ability to induce cell responses to ECM-derived signals through interaction with 67LR may be of crucial importance for tumour cell survival in a poor microenvironment, thus favouring the metastatic spread and colonization. PMID:21895963

  3. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  4. Functional Hierarchy of Simultaneously Expressed Adhesion Receptors: Integrin α2β1 but Not CD44 Mediates MV3 Melanoma Cell Migration and Matrix Reorganization within Three-dimensional Hyaluronan-containing Collagen MatricesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maaser, Kerstin; Wolf, Katarina; Klein, C. Eberhard; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Bröcker, Eva-B.; Friedl, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Haptokinetic cell migration across surfaces is mediated by adhesion receptors including β1 integrins and CD44 providing adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) ligands such as collagen and hyaluronan (HA), respectively. Little is known, however, about how such different receptor systems synergize for cell migration through three-dimensionally (3-D) interconnected ECM ligands. In highly motile human MV3 melanoma cells, both β1 integrins and CD44 are abundantly expressed, support migration across collagen and HA, respectively, and are deposited upon migration, whereas only β1 integrins but not CD44 redistribute to focal adhesions. In 3-D collagen lattices in the presence or absence of HA and cross-linking chondroitin sulfate, MV3 cell migration and associated functions such as polarization and matrix reorganization were blocked by anti-β1 and anti-α2 integrin mAbs, whereas mAbs blocking CD44, α3, α5, α6, or αv integrins showed no effect. With use of highly sensitive time-lapse videomicroscopy and computer-assisted cell tracking techniques, promigratory functions of CD44 were excluded. 1) Addition of HA did not increase the migratory cell population or its migration velocity, 2) blocking of the HA-binding Hermes-1 epitope did not affect migration, and 3) impaired migration after blocking or activation of β1 integrins was not restored via CD44. Because α2β1-mediated migration was neither synergized nor replaced by CD44–HA interactions, we conclude that the biophysical properties of 3-D multicomponent ECM impose more restricted molecular functions of adhesion receptors, thereby differing from haptokinetic migration across surfaces. PMID:10512851

  5. Dynamics of Actin Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions during Slow Migration in Swiss 3T3 Fibroblasts: Intracellular Mechanism of Cell Turning

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Hiromi; Miura, Takuya; Tanaka, Hiroto; Tsubota, Ken-ichi; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanism regulating the spontaneous change in polarity that leads to cell turning, we quantitatively analyzed the dynamics of focal adhesions (FAs) coupling with the self-assembling actin cytoskeletal structure in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. Fluorescent images were acquired from cells expressing GFP-actin and RFP-zyxin by laser confocal microscopy. On the basis of the maximum area, duration, and relocation distance of FAs extracted from the RFP-zyxin images, the cells could be divided into 3 regions: the front region, intermediate lateral region, and rear region. In the intermediate lateral region, FAs appeared close to the leading edge and were stabilized gradually as its area increased. Simultaneously, bundled actin stress fibers (SFs) were observed vertically from the positions of these FAs, and they connected to the other SFs parallel to the leading edge. Finally, these connecting SFs fused to form a single SF with matured FAs at both ends. This change in SF organization with cell retraction in the first cycle of migration followed by a newly formed protrusion in the next cycle is assumed to lead to cell turning in migrating Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. PMID:28119928

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to human laminin α4 chain globular domain inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to α4-laminins.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Taichi; Wondimu, Zenebech; Oikawa, Yuko; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Virtanen, Ismo; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    α4-Laminins, such as laminins 411 and 421, are mesenchymal laminins expressed by vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, leukocytes and other normal cell types. These laminins are recognized by α6β1 and α6β4 integrins and MCAM (CD146), and promote adhesion and migration of the cells. α4-Laminins are also expressed and secreted by some tumor cells and strongly promote tumor cell migration. Moreover, the abluminal side of blood and/or lymphatic vessels and the nerve perineurium, common tracks of tumor cell dissemination, express α4-laminins, and these laminin isoforms, when expressed in the stroma, may contribute to tumor invasion. In the present study, we examined ten mAbs to human laminin α4 chain for their reactivity with the isolated laminin α4 globular domain, their ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and their effect on the binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to both α4-laminins. Most of the mAbs reacted with the laminin α4 globular domain, but only two, mAbs FC10 and 084, significantly inhibited tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411. When used in combination, these antibodies practically abolished the cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411 and significantly reduced the cellular responses on laminin-421. Accordingly, mAbs FC10 and 084 significantly inhibited the binding of purified α6β1 integrin and MCAM to laminins 411 and 421. These results indicate that mAbs to the laminin α4 globular domain are able to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and that α6β1 integrin and MCAM bind α4-laminins at very close sites on the globular domain. These reagents contribute to a better understanding of the biology of α4-laminins and may have a therapeutic potential in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  7. ROCK-2 is associated with focal adhesion maturation during myoblast migration.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, K P; Snyman, C; Myburgh, K H; Niesler, C U

    2014-07-01

    Satellite cell migration is critical for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Controlled cell migration is dependent on the formation of mature focal adhesions between the cell and the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). These cell-ECM interactions trigger the activation of signalling events such as the Rho/ROCK pathway. We have previously identified a specific role for ROCK-2 during myoblast migration. In this study we report that ROCK inhibition with Y-27632 increases C2C12 myoblast velocity, but at the expense of directional migration. In response to Y-27632 an increased number of smaller focal adhesions were distributed across adhesion sites that in turn were clearly larger than sites in untreated cells, suggesting a reduction in focal adhesion maturation. We also confirm ROCK-2 localisation to the focal adhesion sites in migrating myoblasts and demonstrate a change in the distribution of these ROCK-2 containing adhesions in response to Y-27632. Taken together, our observations provide further proof that ROCK-2 regulates directional myoblast migration through focal adhesion formation and maturation.

  8. The phosphatase PTP-PEST/PTPN12 regulates endothelial cell migration and adhesion, but not permeability, and controls vascular development and embryonic viability.

    PubMed

    Souza, Cleiton Martins; Davidson, Dominique; Rhee, Inmoo; Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Davis, Elaine C; Veillette, André

    2012-12-14

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST (PTPN12) is ubiquitously expressed. It is essential for normal embryonic development and embryonic viability in mice. Herein we addressed the involvement of PTP-PEST in endothelial cell functions using a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches. By generating primary endothelial cells from an inducible PTP-PEST-deficient mouse, we found that PTP-PEST is not needed for endothelial cell differentiation and proliferation or for the control of endothelial cell permeability. Nevertheless, it is required for integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of endothelial cells. PTP-PEST-deficient endothelial cells displayed increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas, paxillin, and Pyk2, which were previously also implicated in integrin functions. By eliminating PTP-PEST in endothelial cells in vivo, we obtained evidence that expression of PTP-PEST in endothelial cells is required for normal vascular development and embryonic viability. Therefore, PTP-PEST is a key regulator of integrin-mediated functions in endothelial cells seemingly through its capacity to control Cas, paxillin, and Pyk2. This function explains at least in part the essential role of PTP-PEST in embryonic development and viability.

  9. Mean-field descriptions of collective migration with strong adhesion.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stuart T; Simpson, Matthew J; Baker, Ruth E

    2012-05-01

    Random walk models based on an exclusion process with contact effects are often used to represent collective migration where individual agents are affected by agent-to-agent adhesion. Traditional mean-field representations of these processes take the form of a nonlinear diffusion equation which, for strong adhesion, does not predict the averaged discrete behavior. We propose an alternative suite of mean-field representations, showing that collective migration with strong adhesion can be accurately represented using a moment closure approach.

  10. Soluble forms of NCAM and F3 neuronal cell adhesion molecules promote Schwann cell migration: identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases zeta/beta as the putative F3 receptors on Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Thomaidou, D; Coquillat, D; Meintanis, S; Noda, M; Rougon, G; Matsas, R

    2001-08-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and F3 are both axonal adhesion molecules which display homophilic (NCAM) or heterophilic (NCAM, F3) binding activities and participate in bidirectional exchange of information between neurones and glial cells. Engineered Fc chimeric molecules are fusion proteins that contain the extracellular part of NCAM or F3 and the Fc region of human IgG1. Here, we investigated the effect of NCAM-Fc and F3-Fc chimeras on Schwann cell (SC) migration. Binding sites were identified at the surface of cultured SCs by chimera coated fluorospheres. The functional effect of NCAM-Fc and F3-Fc binding was studied in two different SC migration models. In the first, migration is monitored at specific time intervals inside a 1-mm gap produced in a monolayer culture of SCs. In the second, SCs from a dorsal root ganglion explant migrate on a sciatic nerve cryosection. In both systems addition of the chimeras significantly increased the extent of SC migration and this effect could be prevented by the corresponding anti-NCAM or anti-F3 blocking antibodies. Furthermore, antiproteoglycan-type protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta/beta (RPTPzeta/beta) antibodies identified the presence of RPTPzeta/beta on SCs and prevented the enhancing effect of soluble F3 on SC motility by 95%. The F3-Fc coated Sepharose beads precipitated RPTPzeta/beta from SC lysates. Altogether these data point to RPTPzeta/beta is the putative F3 receptor on SCs. These results identify F3 and NCAM receptors on SC as potential mediators of signalling occurring between axons and glial cells during peripheral nerve development and regeneration.

  11. Contractility Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening Through Focal Adhesion Kinase and Assembly of Vinculin-Containing Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, David W.; Shin, Heungsoo; Gallant, Nathan D.; Michael, Kristin E.; Radhakrishna, Harish; García, Andrés J.

    2010-01-01

    Actin-myosin contractility modulates focal adhesion assembly, stress fiber formation, and cell migration. We analyzed the contributions of contractility to fibroblast adhesion strengthening using a hydrodynamic adhesion assay and micropatterned substrates to control cell shape and adhesive area. Serum addition resulted in adhesion strengthening to levels 30–40% higher than serum-free cultures. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase or Rho-kinase blocked phosphorylation of myosin light chain to similar extents and eliminated the serum-induced enhancements in strengthening. Blebbistatin-induced inhibition of myosin II reduced serum-induced adhesion strength to similar levels as those obtained by blocking myosin light chain phosphorylation. Reductions in adhesion strengthening by inhibitors of contractility correlated with loss of vinculin and talin from focal adhesions without changes in integrin binding. In vinculin-null cells, inhibition of contractility did not alter adhesive force, whereas controls displayed a 20% reduction in adhesion strength, indicating that the effects of contractility on adhesive force are vinculin-dependent. Furthermore, in cells expressing FAK, inhibitors of contractility reduced serum-induced adhesion strengthening as well as eliminated focal adhesion assembly. In contrast, in the absence of FAK, these inhibitors did not alter adhesion strength or focal adhesion assembly. These results indicate that contractility modulates adhesion strengthening via FAK-dependent, vinculin-containing focal adhesion assembly. PMID:20205236

  12. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene inhibits adhesion and migration of human triple-negative breast cancer cells by suppressing β1 integrin function and surface protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hua; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kung, Po-Hsiung; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibits an aggressive clinical course by high metastatic potential. It is known that integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration are important for cancer metastasis. In the present study, a synthetic compound, 3, 4-methyenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene (MNS), significantly inhibited adhesion of TNBC cell lines to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The antimetastatic capacity of MNS was also observed through reducing TNBC cells migration and invasion without affecting cell viability. Confocal microscopy revealed that MNS disrupted the formation of focal adhesion complex and actin stress fiber networks. Consistent with this finding, MNS inhibited phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin as detected by Western blot analysis. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we found that MNS inhibited phosphorylation of FAK as a result of reducing β1 integrin activation and clustering. A cell-impermeable dithiol reagent, 2, 3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid abrogated all of MNS's actions, indicating that MNS may react with thiol groups of cell surface proteins that are involved in regulation of β1 integrin function as well as cell adhesion and migration. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been reported to be essential for the affinity modulation of β integrins. We also demonstrated that MNS inhibited PDI activity both in a pure enzyme system and in intact cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that MNS inhibits in vitro metastatic properties of TNBC cells through suppression of β1 integrin activation and focal adhesion signaling. Moreover, inhibition of surface PDI may contribute, at least in part, to the actions of MNS. These results suggest that MNS has a potential to be developed as an anticancer agent for treatment of TNBC.

  13. Fps/Fes protein-tyrosine kinase regulates mast cell adhesion and migration downstream of Kit and beta1 integrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie A; Samayawardhena, Lionel A; Craig, Andrew W B

    2010-03-01

    Activation of Kit receptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) by its ligand Stem Cell Factor (SCF) is required for the development of mast cells, and for the regulation of mast cell proliferation, migration and modulation of inflammatory mediator release. Recent studies have implicated the non-receptor PTK Fps/Fes (hereafter referred to as Fes) in signaling downstream of oncogenic Kit, however, the potential role of Fes in regulating Kit signaling is not well defined. In this study, we show that SCF induces transient tyrosine phosphorylation of wild-type Fes as well as kinase-dead Fes in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The latter finding implicates an upstream kinase acting on Fes, which we identified as Fyn PTK. SCF treatment of BMMCs promoted recruitment of Fes to Kit, potentially via direct interaction of the Fes SH2 domain with phosphorylated Kit. While Fes was not required for SCF-induced signaling to Akt and Erk kinases, Fes-deficient (fes-/-) BMMCs displayed a defect in sustained p38 kinase activation, compared to control cells. SCF-treated Fes-deficient BMMCs also displayed elevated beta1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin, compared to control cells, and a reduction in cell polarization at later times of SCF treatment. Restoring Fes expression in fes-/- BMMCs by retroviral transduction was sufficient to rescue cell spreading and polarization defects. Interestingly, SCF-induced chemotaxis of BMMCs was also defective in Fes-deficient BMMCs, and restored in Fes-rescue BMMCs. Overall, these results implicate Fes in regulating cross-talk between Kit and beta1 integrins to promote cytoskeletal reorganization and motility of mast cells.

  14. Cell adhesion: integrating cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular tension

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Thomas; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration affects all morphogenetic processes and contributes to numerous diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. For most cells in most environments, movement begins with protrusion of the cell membrane followed by the formation of new adhesions at the cell front that link the actin cytoskeleton to the substratum, generation of traction forces that move the cell forwards and disassembly of adhesions at the cell rear. Adhesion formation and disassembly drive the migration cycle by activating Rho GTPases, which in turn regulate actin polymerization and myosin II activity, and therefore adhesion dynamics. PMID:20729930

  15. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  16. New Blocking Antibodies Impede Adhesion, Migration and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Cells, Highlighting MFGE8 as a Potential Therapeutic Target of Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tibaldi, Lorenzo; Notebaert, Sofie; Dewulf, Melissa; Ngo, Thu Hoa; Zuany-Amorim, Claudia; Amzallag, Nathalie; Bernard-Pierrot, Isabelle; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Théry, Clotilde

    2013-01-01

    Milk Fat Globule – EGF – factor VIII (MFGE8), also called lactadherin, is a secreted protein, which binds extracellularly to phosphatidylserine and to αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins. On human and mouse cells expressing these integrins, such as endothelial cells, phagocytes and some tumors, MFGE8/lactadherin has been shown to promote survival, epithelial to mesenchymal transition and phagocytosis. A protumoral function of MFGE8 has consequently been documented for a few types of human cancers, including melanoma, a subtype of breast cancers, and bladder carcinoma. Inhibiting the functions of MFGE8 could thus represent a new type of therapy for human cancers. Here, we show by immunohistochemistry on a collection of human ovarian cancers that MFGE8 is overexpressed in 45% of these tumors, and we confirm that it is specifically overexpressed in the triple-negative subtype of human breast cancers. We have established new in vitro assays to measure the effect of MFGE8 on survival, adhesion and migration of human ovarian and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. Using these assays, we could identify new MFGE8-specific monoclonal antibodies, which efficiently blocked these three tumor-promoting effects of MFGE8. Our results suggest future use of MFGE8-blocking antibodies as new anti-cancer therapeutics in subgroups of ovarian carcinoma, and triple-negative breast carcinoma patients. PMID:23977342

  17. SDA, a DNA aptamer inhibiting E- and P-selectin mediated adhesion of cancer and leukemia cells, the first and pivotal step in transendothelial migration during metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Faryammanesh, Rassa; Lange, Tobias; Magbanua, Eileen; Haas, Sina; Meyer, Cindy; Wicklein, Daniel; Schumacher, Udo; Hahn, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial (E-) and platelet (P-) selectin mediated adhesion of tumor cells to vascular endothelium is a pivotal step of hematogenous metastasis formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectin deficiency significantly reduces metastasis formation in vivo. We selected an E- and P-Selectin specific DNA Aptamer (SDA) via SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) with a K(d) value of approximately 100 nM and the capability of inhibiting the interaction between selectin and its ligands. Employing human colorectal cancer (HT29) and leukemia (EOL-1) cell lines we could demonstrate an anti-adhesive effect for SDA in vitro. Under physiological shear stress conditions in a laminar flow adhesion assay, SDA inhibited dynamic tumor cell adhesion to immobilized E- or P-selectin. The stability of SDA for more than two hours allowed its application in cell-cell adhesion assays in cell culture medium. When adhesion of HT29 cells to TNFα-stimulated E-selectin presenting human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was analyzed, inhibition via SDA could be demonstrated as well. In conclusion, SDA is a potential new therapeutic agent that antagonizes selectin-mediated adhesion during metastasis formation in human malignancies.

  18. MicroRNA-151 and its hosting gene FAK (focal adhesion kinase) regulate tumor cell migration and spreading of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom

    2010-09-01

    Recurrent chromosomal aberrations are often observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about the functional non-coding sequences, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), at the chromosomal breakpoints in HCC. Here we show that 22 miRNAs are often amplified or deleted in HCC. MicroRNA-151 (miR-151), a frequently amplified miRNA on 8q24.3, is correlated with intrahepatic metastasis of HCC. We further show that miR-151, which is often expressed together with its host gene FAK, encoding focal adhesion kinase, significantly increases HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo, mainly through miR-151-5p, but not through miR-151-3p. Moreover, miR-151 exerts this function by directly targeting RhoGDIA, a putative metastasis suppressor in HCC, thus leading to the activation of Rac1, Cdc42 and Rho GTPases. In addition, miR-151 can function synergistically with FAK to enhance HCC cell motility and spreading. Thus, our findings indicate that chromosome gain of miR-151 is a crucial stimulus for tumour invasion and metastasis of HCC.

  19. Single chain fragment variable antibodies developed by using as target the 3rd fibronectin type III homologous repeat fragment of human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 promote cell migration and neuritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xuan-Jun; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2015-01-15

    L1CAM plays important roles during ontogeny, including promotion of neuronal cell migration and neuritogenesis, and stimulation of axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and myelination. These functions are at least partially exerted through a 16-mer amino acid sequence in the third fibronectin type III-like repeat of L1, which associates with several interaction partners, including integrins, other adhesion molecules and growth factor receptors. Here, using the Tomlinson I library for phage display, we obtained two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs) against this peptide sequence of human L1, hereafter called H3 peptide. Both scFvs recognize the H3 peptide and the extracellular domain of L1, as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of L1 expresssing cells. Furthermore, both scFvs reduce U-87 MG cell adhesion to fibronectin, while stimulating cell migration. Application of scFvs to human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells promote process outgrowth. Similar to triggering of endogenous L1 functions at the cell surface, both scFvs activate the signal transducers Erk and Src in these cells. Our results indicate that scFvs against a functionally pivotal domain in L1 trigger its regeneration-beneficial functions in vitro, encouraging thoughts on therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in the hope to ameliorate human nervous system diseases.

  20. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Thomas, Susan N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell–cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner. PMID:26349809

  1. Cell migration, freshly squeezed.

    PubMed

    Welch, Matthew D

    2015-02-12

    Migrating cells exhibit distinct motility modes and can switch between modes based on chemical or physical cues. Liu et al. and Ruprecht et al. now describe how confinement and contractility influence motility mode plasticity and instigate a mode termed stable bleb migration in embryonic and tumor cells.

  2. Focal adhesion kinase modulates radial glia-dependent neuronal migration through connexin-26.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Manuel; Ciceri, Gabriele; Rico, Beatriz; Marín, Oscar

    2011-08-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase and scaffold protein that regulates migration in many different cellular contexts but whose function in neuronal migration remains controversial. Here, we have analyzed the function of FAK in two populations of neurons with very distinct migratory behaviors: cortical interneurons, which migrate tangentially and independently of radial glia; and pyramidal cells, which undergo glial-dependent migration. We found that FAK is dispensable for glial-independent migration but is cell-autonomously required for the normal interaction of pyramidal cells with radial glial fibers. Loss of FAK function disrupts the normal morphology of migrating pyramidal cells, delays migration, and increases the tangential dispersion of neurons arising from the same radial unit. FAK mediates this process by regulating the assembly of Connexin-26 contact points in the membrane of migrating pyramidal cells. These results indicate that FAK plays a fundamental role in the dynamic regulation of Gap-mediated adhesions during glial-guided neuronal migration in the mouse.

  3. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, osteopontin) binds to integrin alpha v beta 6 on porcine trophectoderm cells and integrin alpha v beta 3 on uterine luminal epithelial cells, and promotes trophectoderm cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Erikson, David W; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Johnson, Greg A

    2009-11-01

    Conceptus implantation involves pregnancy-specific alterations in extracellular matrix at the conceptus-maternal interface. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, osteopontin) is induced just before implantation and is present at the conceptus-maternal interface in mammals. In the present study, we investigated mechanisms by which SPP1 facilitates porcine conceptus and uterine luminal epithelial cell attachment. Native bovine milk and wild-type rat recombinant SPP1 stimulated trophectoderm cell migration. Bovine milk SPP1, ovine uterine SPP1, and recombinant wild-type, but not mutated, rat SPP1 promoted dose- and cation-dependent attachment of porcine trophectoderm and uterine luminal epithelial cells, which was markedly reduced in the presence of a linear Arg-Gly-Asp integrin-blocking peptide. Affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments revealed direct binding of alpha v beta 6 trophectoderm and alpha v beta 3 uterine epithelial cell integrins to SPP1. Immunofluorescence microscopy using SPP1-coated microspheres revealed colocalization of the alpha v integrin subunit and talin at focal adhesions as well as at the apical domain of trophectoderm cells. Similarly, immunofluorescence staining of implantation sites in frozen gravid uterine cross sections localized SPP1 and alpha v integrin to the apical surfaces of trophectoderm and luminal epithelium and beta 3 integrin to the apical surface of luminal epithelium. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate functionally that SPP1 directly binds specific integrins to promote trophectoderm cell migration and attachment to luminal epithelium that may be critical to conceptus elongation and implantation.

  4. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  5. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type. PMID:25333694

  6. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  7. Using real-time impedance-based assays to monitor the effects of fibroblast-derived media on the adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Catríona M; Herranz Ors, Carmen; Kiely, Patrick A

    2014-07-29

    Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating cell proliferation, migration and invasion are central to understanding tumour progression and metastasis. The local tumour microenvironment contributes to the transformed phenotype in cancer by providing specific environmental cues that alter the cells behaviour and promotes metastasis. Fibroblasts have a strong association with cancer and in recent times there has been some emphasis in designing novel therapeutic strategies that alter fibroblast behaviour in the tumour microenvironment. Fibroblasts produce growth factors, chemokines and many of the proteins laid down in the ECM (extracellular matrix) that promote angiogenesis, inflammation and tumour progression. In this study, we use a label-free RTCA (real-time cell analysis) platform (xCELLigence) to investigate how media derived from human fibroblasts alters cancer cell behaviour. We used a series of complimentary and novel experimental approaches to show HCT116 cells adhere, proliferate and migrate significantly faster in the presence of media from human fibroblasts. As well as this, we used the xCELLigence CIM-plates system to show that HCT116 cells invade matrigel layers aggressively when migrating towards media derived from human fibroblasts. These data strongly suggest that fibroblasts have the ability to increase the migratory and invasive properties of HCT116 cells. This is the first study that provides real-time data on fibroblast-mediated migration and invasion kinetics of colon cancer cells.

  8. Paxillin: a crossroad in pathological cell migration.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; Lee-Rivera, Irene; Benavides-Hidalgo, Regina; López, Edith

    2017-02-18

    Paxilllin is a multifunctional and multidomain focal adhesion adapter protein which serves an important scaffolding role at focal adhesions by recruiting structural and signaling molecules involved in cell movement and migration, when phosphorylated on specific Tyr and Ser residues. Upon integrin engagement with extracellular matrix, paxillin is phosphorylated at Tyr31, Tyr118, Ser188, and Ser190, activating numerous signaling cascades which promote cell migration, indicating that the regulation of adhesion dynamics is under the control of a complex display of signaling mechanisms. Among them, paxillin disassembly from focal adhesions induced by extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated phosphorylation of serines 106, 231, and 290 as well as the binding of the phosphatase PEST to paxillin have been shown to play a key role in cell migration. Paxillin also coordinates the spatiotemporal activation of signaling molecules, including Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA GTPases, by recruiting GEFs, GAPs, and GITs to focal adhesions. As a major participant in the regulation of cell movement, paxillin plays distinct roles in specific tissues and developmental stages and is involved in immune response, epithelial morphogenesis, and embryonic development. Importantly, paxillin is also an essential player in pathological conditions including oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell barrier dysfunction, and cancer development and metastasis.

  9. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  10. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  11. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  12. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; ...

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essentialmore » for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.« less

  13. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei -Jen; Chen, Shao -Yu; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essential for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.

  14. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shao-Yu; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essential for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.

  15. Fibroblast surface-associated FGF-2 promotes contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion through FGFR-SRC signaling and integrin αvβ5-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Knuchel, Sarah; Anderle, Pascale; Werfelli, Patricia; Diamantis, Eva; Rüegg, Curzio

    2015-06-10

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts were reported to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion by secreting motility factors and extracellular matrix processing enzymes. Less is known whether fibroblasts may induce CRC cancer cell motility by contact-dependent mechanisms. To address this question we characterized the interaction between fibroblasts and SW620 and HT29 colorectal cancer cells in 2D and 3D co-culture models in vitro. Here we show that fibroblasts induce contact-dependent cancer cell elongation, motility and invasiveness independently of deposited matrix or secreted factors. These effects depend on fibroblast cell surface-associated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) -2. Inhibition of FGF-2 or FGF receptors (FGFRs) signaling abolishes these effects. FGFRs activate SRC in cancer cells and inhibition or silencing of SRC in cancer cells, but not in fibroblasts, prevents fibroblasts-mediated effects. Using an RGD-based integrin antagonist and function-blocking antibodies we demonstrate that cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts requires integrin αvβ5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fibroblasts induce cell-contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D and 3D conditions in vitro through fibroblast cell surface-associated FGF-2, FGF receptor-mediated SRC activation and αvβ5 integrin-dependent cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts. The FGF-2-FGFRs-SRC-αvβ5 integrin loop might be explored as candidate therapeutic target to block colorectal cancer invasion.

  16. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  17. Mechanics of Nascent Cell Adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2009-03-01

    Cells have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical and biochemical cues from their environment. In neurons, the binding and restraint of transmembrane cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) can trigger acute periods of axon growth. Preceding growth, the cell must create a stiff mechanical linkage between the CAM and the cytoskeleton. Using holographic optical tweezers, we manipulate CAM-coated beads on the membrane of the cell. We investigate the dynamics of the mechanical properties of this linkage as a function of time, applied force, and CAM density. We find that CAM-coated beads exhibit stochastic intermittent binding to the cytoskeleton. In time, we observed that the adhesions stiffen and their mechanical properties depend on the applied force. Treatment of cells with small molecules that alter cytoskeletal dynamics are used to probe the roles of actin filament assembly and myosin motor activity in adhesion formation.

  18. RGD modified polymers: biomaterials for stimulated cell adhesion and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hersel, Ulrich; Dahmen, Claudia; Kessler, Horst

    2003-11-01

    Since RGD peptides (R: arginine; G: glycine; D: aspartic acid) have been found to promote cell adhesion in 1984 (Cell attachment activity of fibronectin can be duplicated by small synthetic fragments of the molecule, Nature 309 (1984) 30), numerous materials have been RGD functionalized for academic studies or medical applications. This review gives an overview of RGD modified polymers, that have been used for cell adhesion, and provides information about technical aspects of RGD immobilization on polymers. The impacts of RGD peptide surface density, spatial arrangement as well as integrin affinity and selectivity on cell responses like adhesion and migration are discussed.

  19. Freezing adhesion molecules in a state of high-avidity binding blocks eosinophil migration

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is mediated by multiple interactions of adhesive surface structures with ligands on endothelial cells and matrix components. The functional role of beta 1 (CD29) integrins (or very late antigen [VLA] proteins) in eosinophil migration across polycarbonate filters was examined under several in vitro conditions. Eosinophil migration induced by the chemoattractant C5a or platelet- activating factor was fully inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 8A2, a recently characterized "activating" CD29 mAb. However, inhibition by mAb 8A2 was observed only under filter conditions that best reflected the in vivo situation, i.e., when the eosinophils migrated over filters preincubated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (FN), or when the filters were covered with confluent monolayers of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). When bare untreated filters were used, mAb 8A2 had no effect, whereas the C5a- directed movement was prevented by CD18 mAb. Studies with alpha-subunit (CD49)-specific mAbs indicated that the integrins VLA-4 and -5 mediated migration across FN-preincubated filters, and VLA-2, -4, -5, and -6 were involved in eosinophil migration through filters covered with HUVEC. In contrast with the activating CD29 mAb 8A2, a combination of blocking CD49 mAbs or the nonactivating but blocking CD29 mAb AIIB2 failed to inhibit completely eosinophil migration over FN-preincubated or HUVEC-covered filters. mAb 8A2 stimulated binding to FN but not to HUVEC. Moreover, eosinophil migration over FN-preincubated or HUVEC- covered filters was significantly inhibited by anti-connecting segment 1 (CS-1) mAbs, as well as the soluble CS-1 peptide (unlike migration across bare untreated filters). Thus, inhibition of eosinophil migration by mAb 8A2 depended upon the presence of ECM proteins and not upon the presence of HUVEC per se. In conclusion, "freezing" adhesion receptors of the beta 1 integrin family into their high

  20. Cell-Cell Adhesion and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Staging of breast cancer. In: K.I. Bland and E.M. Copeland (eds.), The breast: Comprehensive management of benign and malignant diseases , pp. 313-330... desmosomes . The physical strength of adhesion between two cells is likely to be dependent upon a number of factors, including the number of adhesion

  1. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  2. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  3. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  4. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  5. α-Tubulin acetylation elevated in metastatic and basal-like breast cancer cells promotes microtentacle formation, adhesion, and invasive migration.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Amanda E; Vitolo, Michele I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Charpentier, Monica S; Goloubeva, Olga G; Ioffe, Olga B; Tuttle, Kimberly C; Slovic, Jana; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Martin, Stuart S

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cases of breast cancer pose the primary challenge in clinical management of this disease, demanding the identification of effective therapeutic strategies that remain wanting. In this study, we report that elevated levels of α-tubulin acetylation are a sufficient cause of metastatic potential in breast cancer. In suspended cell culture conditions, metastatic breast cancer cells exhibited high α-tubulin acetylation levels that extended along microtentacle (McTN) protrusions. Mutation of the acetylation site on α-tubulin and enzymatic modulation of this posttranslational modification exerted a significant impact on McTN frequency and the reattachment of suspended tumor cells. Reducing α-tubulin acetylation significantly inhibited migration but did not affect proliferation. In an analysis of more than 140 matched primary and metastatic tumors from patients, we found that acetylation was maintained and in many cases increased in lymph node metastases compared with primary tumors. Proteomic analysis of an independent cohort of more than 390 patient specimens further documented the relationship between increased α-tubulin acetylation and the aggressive behaviors of basal-like breast cancers, with a trend toward increased risk of disease progression and death in patients with high-intensity α-tubulin acetylation in primary tumors. Taken together, our results identify a tight correlation between acetylated α-tubulin levels and aggressive metastatic behavior in breast cancer, with potential implications for the definition of a simple prognostic biomarker in patients with breast cancer.

  6. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  7. The junctional adhesion molecule JAM-C regulates polarized transendothelial migration of neutrophils in vivo.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-06-26

    The migration of neutrophils into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarized migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial migration (TEM)) in a luminal-to-abluminal direction. By real-time confocal imaging, we found that neutrophils had disrupted polarized TEM ('hesitant' and 'reverse') in vivo. We noted these events in inflammation after ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterized by lower expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) at EC junctions, and they were enhanced by blockade or genetic deletion of JAM-C in ECs. Our results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarized neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM of neutrophils can contribute to the dissemination of systemic inflammation.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  9. Effects of whole cigarette smoke on human gingival fibroblast adhesion, growth, and migration.

    PubMed

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chakir, Jamila; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single exposure to whole cigarette smoke on human gingival fibroblast behavior. Normal oral mucosa fibroblasts were exposed once to whole cigarette smoke for 5, 15, or 30 min, and then were used to analyze cell adhesion, β1-integrin expression, cell growth and viability, cell capacity to contract collagen gel, and cell migration following wound infliction. Our findings showed that when gingival fibroblasts were exposed once to whole cigarette smoke, this resulted in a significant inhibition of cell adhesion, a decrease in the number of β1-integrin-positive cells, increased LDH activity in the target cells, and reduced growth. The smoke-exposed fibroblasts were also not able to contract collagen gel matrix and migrate following insult. Overall results demonstrate that a single exposure to whole cigarette smoke produced significant morphological and functional deregulation in gingival fibroblasts. This may explain the higher predisposition of tobacco users to oral infections and diseases such as cancer.

  10. Fine Tuning Cell Migration by a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is an instrumental process involved in organ development, tissue homeostasis, and various physiological processes and also in numerous pathologies. Both basic cell migration and migration towards chemotactic stimulus consist of changes in cell polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell detachment from, invasion through, and reattachment to their neighboring cells, and numerous interactions with the extracellular matrix. The different steps of immune cell, tissue cell, or cancer cell migration are tightly coordinated in time and place by growth factors, cytokines/chemokines, adhesion molecules, and receptors for these ligands. This review describes how a disintegrin and metalloproteinases interfere with several steps of cell migration, either by proteolytic cleavage of such molecules or by functions independent of proteolytic activity. PMID:28260841

  11. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  12. Cucurbitacin B purified from Ecballium elaterium (L.) A. Rich from Tunisia inhibits α5β1 integrin-mediated adhesion, migration, proliferation of human glioblastoma cell line and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Touihri-Barakati, Imen; Kallech-Ziri, Olfa; Ayadi, Wiem; Kovacic, Hervé; Hanchi, Belgacem; Hosni, Karim; Luis, José

    2017-02-15

    Integrins are essential protagonists in the complex multistep process of cancer progression and are thus attractive targets for the development of anticancer agents. Cucurbitacin B, a triterpenoid purified from the leaves of Tunisian Ecballium elaterium exhibited an anticancer effect and displayed anti-integrin activity on human glioblastoma U87 cells, without being cytotoxic at concentrations up to 500nM. Here we show that cucurbitacin B affected the adhesion and migration of U87 cells to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 86.2nM and 84.6nM, respectively. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that cucurbitacin B significantly reduced U87 cells motility and affected directional persistence. Cucurbitacin B also inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 70.1nM using Crystal Violet assay. Moreover, cucurbitacin B efficiently inhibited in vitro human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) angiogenesis with concentration up to 10nM. Interestingly, we demonstrate for the first time that this effect was specifically mediated by α5β1 integrins. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of action for cucurbitacin B, which displays a potential interest as a specific anti-integrin drug.

  13. ZF21 protein regulates cell adhesion and motility.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Makoto; Hoshino, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Kawasaki, Noritaka; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu

    2010-07-02

    Cell migration on an extracellular matrix (ECM) requires continuous formation and turnover of focal adhesions (FAs) along the direction of cell movement. However, our knowledge of the components of FAs and the mechanism of their regulation remains limited. Here, we identify ZF21, a member of a protein family characterized by the presence of a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding FYVE domain, to be a new regulator of FAs and cell movement. Knockdown of ZF21 expression in cells increased the number of FAs and suppressed cell migration. Knockdown of ZF21 expression also led to a significant delay in FA disassembly following induction of synchronous disassembly of FAs by nocodazole treatment. ZF21 bound to focal adhesion kinase, localized to FAs, and was necessary for dephosphorylation of FAK at Tyr(397), which is important for disassembly of FAs. Thus, ZF21 represents a new component of FAs, mediates disassembly of FAs, and thereby regulates cell motility.

  14. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  15. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces.

  16. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  17. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    PubMed

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  18. Impact of jamming on collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnetu, Kenechukwu David; Knorr, Melanie; Pawlizak, Steve; Fuhs, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; KäS, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-cellular migration plays an important role in physiological processes such as embryogenesis, cancer metastasis and tissue repair. During migration, single cells undergo cycles of extension, adhesion and retraction resulting in morphological changes. In a confluent monolayer, there are inter-cellular interactions and crowding, however, the impact of these interactions on the dynamics and elasticity of the monolayer at the multi-cellular and single cell level is not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of a confluent epithelial monolayer by simultaneously measuring cell motion at the multi-cellular and single cell level for various cell densities and tensile elasticity. At the multi-cellular level, the system exhibited spatial kinetic transitions from isotropic to anisotropic migration on long times and the velocity of the monolayer decreased with increasing cell density. Moreover, the dynamics was spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Interestingly, the dynamics was also heterogeneous in wound-healing assays and the correlation length was fitted by compressed exponential. On the single cell scale, we observed transient caging effects with increasing cage rearrangement times as the system age due to an increase in density. Also, the density dependent elastic modulus of the monolayer scaled as a weak power law. Together, these findings suggest that caging effects at the single cell level initiates a slow and heterogeneous dynamics at the multi-cellular level which is similar to the glassy dynamics of deformable colloidal systems.

  19. Modulation of integrin α4β1 by ADAM28 promotes lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Owen J; English, William R; Roberts, Stephanie; Ager, Ann; Newham, Peter; Murphy, Gillian

    2011-10-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are a family of type I transmembrane glycoproteins related to snake venom metalloproteases and disintegrins. They are regulatory proteins that modulate intercellular adhesion and the bioavailability of growth factors, and have been implicated in many disease states, including cancer, immunity and inflammation. One member of the ADAM family, ADAM28, has been reported to bind to the integrin α4β1 in humans; however, the distribution of ADAM28 and the biological consequences of ADAM28-α4β1 interactions are yet to be fully elucidated. The expression of ADAM28 in human and murine tissues was examined by multiple Affymetrix microarray analyses, real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. We found that ADAM28 has a relatively restricted expression pattern in mouse and human and is highly expressed in the B-lymphocyte lineage, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemic B-cells. The murine B-lymphoma line L1-2 and recombinant soluble murine ADAM28 were used to investigate ADAM28-α4β1 interactions. Our data reveal that ADAM28 binding to α4β1 is typical of integrin-ligand interactions, since it is attenuated by anti-functional integrin antibodies, and is enhanced by Mn2+ and the integrin mAb (monoclonal antibody) 9EG7. However, a key finding was that soluble ADAM28 unexpectedly enhanced α4β1-dependent cell adhesion to VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In so doing ADAM28 was able to influence lymphocyte adhesion to, and migration through, endothelial monolayers, suggesting a physiological role for ADAM28 in regulating the specific spatial and temporal transendothelial migration of lymphocytes.

  20. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  1. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility.

  2. A novel co-drug of aspirin and ursolic acid interrupts adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via regulating EMT and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways: multiple targets for cancer metastasis prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao; Liu, Yajun; Li, Tao; Yang, Xiang; Zheng, Guirong; Chen, Hongning; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis currently remains the predominant cause of breast carcinoma treatment failure. The effective targeting of metastasis-related-pathways in cancer holds promise for a new generation of therapeutics. In this study, we developed an novel Asp-UA conjugate, which was composed of classical “old drug” aspirin and low toxicity natural product ursolic acid for targeting breast cancer metastasis. Our results showed that Asp-UA could attenuate the adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a more safe and effective manner in vitro. Molecular and cellular study demonstrated that Asp-UA significantly down-regulated the expression of cell adhesion and invasion molecules including integrin α6β1, CD44, MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, EGFR and ERK proteins, and up-regulated the epithelial markers “E-cadherin” and “β-catenin”, and PTEN proteins. Furthermore, Asp-UA (80 mg/kg) reduced lung metastasis in a 4T1 murine breast cancer metastasis model more efficiently, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of CD44. More importantly, we did not detect side effects with Asp-UA in mice such as weight loss and main viscera tissues toxicity. Overall, our research suggested that co-drug Asp-UA possessed potential metastasis chemoprevention abilities via influencing EMT and EGFR-mediated pathways and could be a more promising drug candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27683033

  3. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  4. Paxillin-kinase-linker tyrosine phosphorylation regulates directional cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2009-11-01

    Directed cell migration requires the coordination of growth factor and cell adhesion signaling and is of fundamental importance during embryonic development, wound repair, and pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate that the ArfGAP, paxillin-kinase-linker (PKL/GIT2), is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, in an adhesion dependent manner and is necessary for directed cell migration. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout cells and kinase mutants, FAK, and Src family kinases were shown to mediate PDGF-dependent PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. In fibroblasts, expression of a PKL mutant lacking the principal tyrosine phosphorylation sites resulted in loss of wound-induced cell polarization as well as directional migration. PKL phosphorylation was necessary for PDGF-stimulated PKL binding to the focal adhesion protein paxillin and expression of paxillin or PKL mutants defective in their respective binding motifs recapitulated the polarization defects. RNA interference or expression of phosphorylation mutants of PKL resulted in disregulation of PDGF-stimulated Rac1 and PAK activities, reduction of Cdc42 and Erk signaling, as well as mislocalization of betaPIX. Together these studies position PKL as an integral component of growth factor and cell adhesion cross-talk signaling, controlling the development of front-rear cell polarity and directional cell migration.

  5. Flexible nanopillars to regulate cell adhesion and movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Dai, Yang-Hong; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-11-01

    Flexible polymer nanopillar substrates were used to systematically demonstrate cell alignment and migration guided by the directional formation of focal adhesions. The polymer nanopillar substrates were constructed to various height specifications to provide an extensive variation of flexibility; a rectangular arrangement created spatial confinement between adjacent nanopillars, providing less spacing in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three polymer nanopillar substrates with the diameter of 400 nm and the heights of 400, 800, and 1200 nm were fabricated. Super-resolution localization imaging and protein pair-distance analysis of vinculin proteins revealed that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells formed mature focal adhesions on 1200 nm high nanopillar substrates by bending adjacent nanopillars to link dot-like adhesions. The spacing confinement of the adjacent nanopillars enhanced the orthogonal directionality of the formation tendency of the mature focal adhesions. The directional formation of the mature focal adhesions also facilitated the organization of actin filaments in the horizontal and vertical directions. Moreover, 78% of the CHO cells were aligned in these two directions, in conformity with the flexibility and nanotopographical cues of the nanopillars. Biased cell migration was observed on the 1200 nm high nanopillar substrates.

  6. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  7. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  8. Arf proteins in cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Casalou, Cristina; Faustino, Alexandra; Barral, Duarte C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of small GTP-binding (G) proteins regulate several aspects of membrane trafficking, such as vesicle budding, tethering and cytoskeleton organization. Arf family members, including Arf-like (Arl) proteins have been implicated in several essential cellular functions, like cell spreading and migration. These functions are used by cancer cells to disseminate and invade the tissues surrounding the primary tumor, leading to the formation of metastases. Indeed, Arf and Arl proteins, as well as their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) have been found to be abnormally expressed in different cancer cell types and human cancers. Here, we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of Arf family proteins and their GEFs and GAPs in cancer progression, focusing on 3 different mechanisms: cell-cell adhesion, integrin internalization and recycling, and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:27589148

  9. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  10. N-cadherin as a key regulator of collective cell migration in a 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical step of normal developmental processes and disease progression. Often, migrating cells interact and maintain contact with neighboring cells. However, the precise roles of cell-cell adhesion in cell migration have thus far been poorly defined. Often in aggressive cancers, N-cadherin is prominently upregulated, yet, these highly motile cells have limited cell-cell adhesion when plated on a stiff 2D substrate. But, the same cells in a 3D matrix migrate as a multicellular cluster. This new observation suggests that N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion supports cell interactions between migrating cells in a more physiologically relevant 3D matrix, but not on a 2D substrate. While N-cadherin is an integral part of neural synapses, the ectopic expression of N-cadherin in transformed epithelial cells plays an equally important part in initiating pro-migratory signaling, and providing strong yet flexible cell cohesion essential for persistent cell migration in a 3D matrix. The 3D cell migration analysis for studying cell-to-cell interactions exposes the roles of N-cadherin in multicellular migration, and reveals novel insights into cell migration-dependent normal and pathological processes.

  11. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  12. RacGAP1-driven focal adhesion formation promotes melanoma transendothelial migration through mediating adherens junction disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Panying; Wu, Chengxiang; Ye, Qichao; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-27

    Melanoma cell migration across vascular endothelial cells is an essential step of tumor metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that RacGAP1, a cytokinesis-related Rho GTPase-activating protein, contributed to this process. Depletion of RacGAP1 with RacGAP1-targeting siRNA or overexpression of RacGAP1 mutant (T249A) attenuated melanoma cell transendothelial migration and concomitant changes of adherens junctions. In addition, RacGAP1 promoted the activations of RhoA, FAK, paxillin and triggered focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal rearrangement. By overexpressing FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) in endothelium, we showed that RacGAP1 mediated endothelial barrier function loss and melanoma transmigration in a focal adhesion-dependent manner. These results suggest that endothelial RacGAP1 may play critical roles in pathogenic processes of cancer by regulating endothelial permeability.

  13. Dose-dependent effects of prostaglandin E2 in macrophage adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Osma-Garcia, Inés C; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage migration to the focus of infection is a hallmark of the innate immune response. Macrophage spreading, adhesion, and migration through the extracellular matrix require dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton associated to integrin clustering in podosomes and focal adhesions. Here, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), the main prostaglandin produced by macrophages during inflammation, promote the distinctive dose-dependent formation of podosomes or focal adhesions in macrophages. Low concentrations of PGE2 increased p110γ PI3K expression, phosphorylation of actin-related protein 2, and formation of podosomes, which enhanced macrophage migration in response to chemokines. However, high doses of PGE2 increased phosphorylation of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase, the expression of serine/threonine protein kinase 1, and promoted focal adhesion formation and macrophage adhesion, reducing macrophage chemotaxis. In summary, we describe the dual role of PGE2 as a promoter of macrophage chemotaxis and adhesion, proposing a new model of macrophage migration to the inflammatory focus in the presence of a gradient of PGE2 .

  14. Cell volume regulatory ion transport in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M; Ritter, M

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is typically accomplished by the generation of protrusive mechanical forces and is achieved by repeated spatially and temporally coordinated cycles including the formation of a leading edge, the formation of new and disruption of older adhesions to the substratum, actomyosin based contractions and retraction of the trailing edge. Beside the well-described roles of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions during these processes, a growing body of evidence indicates that the precise regulation of the cell volume is an indispensable prerequisite for coordinated cell migration. On the one hand during cell migration cell volume is continuously tormented by mechanical and morphological alterations, which pose changes to the intracellular hydrostatic pressure, metabolic changes and the formation or degradation of macromolecules like actin, which distort the osmotic equilibrium and the action of chemoattractants, hormones and transmitters, which frequently alter the electrical properties of a cell and thus cause cell swelling or shrinkage, respectively. On the other hand, a migrating cell actively has to govern cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms in order to create the appropriate micro- or even nanoenvironment in the intra- and/or extracellular space, which is necessary to guarantee the correct polarity and hence direction of movement of a migrating cell. This chapter will focus on the role of the cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms as they participate in the regulation of cell migration and special emphasis is given to their interplay with the cytoskeleton, their meaning for substrate adhesion and to the polarized fashion of their subcellular distribution.

  15. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  16. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  17. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    DOE PAGES

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignmentmore » of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.« less

  18. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr–/–). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr–/– mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. KEY RESULTS Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr–/– mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on

  19. Migration of epithelial cells on laminins: RhoA antagonizes directionally persistent migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Chometon, Gretel; Wen, Tingting; Qu, Haiyan; Mauch, Cornelia; Krieg, Thomas; Aumailley, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Spatial and temporal expression of laminin isoforms is assumed to provide specific local information to neighboring cells. Here, we report the remarkably selective presence of LM-111 at the very tip of hair follicles where LM-332 is absent, suggesting that epithelial cells lining the dermal-epidermal junction at this location may receive different signals from the two laminins. This hypothesis was tested in vitro by characterizing with functional and molecular assays the comportment of keratinocytes exposed to LM-111 and LM-332. The two laminins induced morphologically distinct focal adhesions, and LM-332, but not LM-111, elicited persistent migration of keratinocytes. The different impact on cellular behavior was associated with distinct activation patterns of Rho GTPases and other signaling intermediates. In particular, while LM-111 triggered a robust activation of Cdc42, LM-332 provoked a strong and sustained activation of FAK. Interestingly, activation of Rac1 was necessary but not sufficient to promote migration because there was no directed migration on LM-111 despite Rac1 activation. In contrast, RhoA antagonized directional migration, since silencing of RhoA by RNA interference boosted unidirectional migration on LM-332. Molecular analysis of the role of RhoA strongly suggested that the mechanisms involve disassembly of cell-cell contacts, loss of the cortical actin network, mobilization of α6β4 integrin out of stable adhesions, and displacement of the integrin from its association with the insoluble pool of intermediate filaments.

  20. FLRT Structure: Balancing Repulsion and Cell Adhesion in Cortical and Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; del Toro, Daniel; Nagel, Daniel; Cop, Florian; Härtl, Ricarda; Ruff, Tobias; Seyit-Bremer, Gönül; Harlos, Karl; Border, Ellen Clare; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are broadly expressed proteins with the unique property of acting as homophilic cell adhesion molecules and as heterophilic repulsive ligands of Unc5/Netrin receptors. How these functions direct cell behavior and the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. Here we use X-ray crystallography to reveal the distinct structural bases for FLRT-mediated cell adhesion and repulsion in neurons. We apply this knowledge to elucidate FLRT functions during cortical development. We show that FLRTs regulate both the radial migration of pyramidal neurons, as well as their tangential spread. Mechanistically, radial migration is controlled by repulsive FLRT2-Unc5D interactions, while spatial organization in the tangential axis involves adhesive FLRT-FLRT interactions. Further, we show that the fundamental mechanisms of FLRT adhesion and repulsion are conserved between neurons and vascular endothelial cells. Our results reveal FLRTs as powerful guidance factors with structurally encoded repulsive and adhesive surfaces. PMID:25374360

  1. Study of cell-matrix adhesion dynamics using surface plasmon resonance imaging ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hwa; Chegal, Won; Doh, Junsang; Cho, Hyun Mo; Moon, Dae Won

    2011-04-06

    The interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, termed cell-matrix adhesions, importantly governs multiple cellular phenomena. Knowledge of the functional dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion could provide critical clues for understanding biological phenomena. We developed surface plasmon resonance imaging ellipsometry (SPRIE) to provide high contrast images of the cell-matrix interface in unlabeled living cells. To improve the contrast and sensitivity, the null-type imaging ellipsometry technique was integrated with an attenuated total reflection coupler. We verified that the imaged area of SPRIE was indeed a cell-matrix adhesion area by confocal microscopy imaging. Using SPRIE, we demonstrated that three different cell types exhibit distinct features of adhesion. SPRIE was applied to diverse biological systems, including during cell division, cell migration, and cell-cell communication. We imaged the cell-matrix anchorage of mitotic cells, providing the first label-free imaging of this interaction to our knowledge. We found that cell-cell communication can alter cell-matrix adhesion, possibly providing direct experimental evidence for cell-cell communication-mediated changes in cell adhesion. We also investigated shear-stress-induced adhesion dynamics in real time. Based on these data, we expect that SPRIE will be a useful methodology for studying the role of cell-matrix adhesion in important biological phenomena.

  2. Human fibronectin contains distinct adhesion- and motility-promoting domains for metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The active migration of tumor cells through extracellular matrices has been proposed to play a role in certain aspects of metastasis. Metastatic tumor cells migrate in vitro in response to substratum-bound adhesive glycoproteins such as fibronectin. The present studies use affinity-purified proteolytic fragments of fibronectin to determine the nature of adhesion- and/or motility-promoting domains within the protein. Two distinct fragments were identified with cell adhesion- promoting activities. By a number of criteria, the adhesive activity promoted by these two fragments was distinct. One fragment, a 75-kD tryptic fragment purified by monoclonal antibody chromatography, promoted the adhesion, spreading, and haptotactic motility of melanoma cells. Experiments using a synthetic cell attachment peptide in solution indicated that at least part of the attachment activity exhibited by the 75-kD fragment is mediated by the sequence arg-gly-asp- ser. It was not possible to demonstrate migration-stimulating activity using a small (11.5 kD) peptic fragment containing this sequence (Pierschbacher, M.D., E. G. Hayman, and E. Ruoslahti, 1981, Cell, 26:259-267) suggesting that another cell-binding activity within the 75 kD fragment distinct from arg-gly-asp-ser might be required for motility. The second fragment that stimulated melanoma adhesion was a 33-kD tryptic/catheptic carboxyl-terminal heparin-binding fragment, which is localized to the A chain of fibronectin. This fragment promotes adhesion and spreading but not the motility of these cells. Melanoma adhesion to this heparin-binding fragment was sensitive to the effects of cycloheximide, which contrasted adhesion to the haptotaxis- promoting fragment. Importantly, these studies illustrate that haptotaxis in response to fibronectin is not due to simple adhesion gradients of this protein. The results are discussed in light of a model for multiple distinct cell surface constituents mediating cell adhesion and motility on

  3. Crosstalk between focal adhesions and material mechanical properties governs cell mechanics and functions.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Sabato; Panzetta, Valeria; Embrione, Valerio; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical properties of materials strongly influence cell fate and functions. Focal adhesions are involved in the extremely important processes of mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. To address the relationship between the mechanical properties of cell substrates, focal adhesion/cytoskeleton assembly and cell functions, we investigated the behavior of NIH/3T3 cells over a wide range of stiffness (3-1000kPa) using two of the most common synthetic polymers for cell cultures: polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane. An overlapping stiffness region was created between them to compare focal adhesion characteristics and cell functions, taking into account their different time-dependent behavior. Indeed, from a rheological point of view, polyacrylamide behaves like a strong gel (elastically), whereas polydimethylsiloxane like a viscoelastic solid. First, focal adhesion characteristics and dynamics were addressed in terms of material stiffness, then cell spreading area, migration rate and cell mechanical properties were correlated with focal adhesion size and assembly. Focal adhesion size was found to increase in the whole range of stiffness and to be in agreement in the overlapping rigidity region for the investigated materials. Cell mechanics directly correlated with focal adhesion lengths, whereas migration rate followed an inverse correlation. Cell spreading correlated with the substrate stiffness on polyacrylamide hydrogel, while no specific trend was found on polydimethylsiloxane. Substrate mechanics can be considered as a key physical cue that regulates focal adhesion assembly, which in turn governs important cellular properties and functions.

  4. Regulator of calcineurin 1 modulates cancer cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Allan V; Shinohara, Motoo; Porchia, Leonardo M; Chung, Yun Jae; McCarty, Samantha; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis suppressors and other regulators of cell motility play an important role in tumor invasion and metastases. We previously identified that activation of the G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) by the metastasis suppressor metastin inhibits cell migration in association with overexpression of Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous regulator of calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors also blocked cell migration in vitro and RCAN1 protein levels were reduced in nodal metastases in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the current study was to determine directly if RCAN1 functions as a motility suppressor in vitro. Several cancer cell lines derived from different cancer types with different motility rates were evaluated for RCAN1 expression levels. Using these systems we determined that reduction of endogenous RCAN1 using siRNA resulted in an increase in cancer cell motility while expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduced cell motility. In one cell line with a high migratory rate, the stability of exogenously expressed RCAN1 protein was reduced and was rescued by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of RCAN1 was associated with an increase in cell adhesion to collagen IV and reduced calcineurin activity. In summary, we have demonstrated that the expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduces migration and alters adhesion; and that the loss of endogenous RCAN1 leads to an increase in migration in the examined cancer cell lines. These results are consistent with a regulatory role for RCAN1 in cancer cell motility in vitro.

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase Regulates Fibroblast Migration via Integrin beta-1 and Plays a Central Role in Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Ke; Cheng, Yiju; Liang Cheng, Ming; Yu, Lei; Mu, Mao; Li, Hong; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Baofang; Yao, Yumei; Guo, Hui; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Quan

    2016-01-14

    Lung fibrosis is a major medical problem for the aging population worldwide. Fibroblast migration plays an important role in fibrosis. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) senses the extracellular stimuli and initiates signaling cascades that promote cell migration. This study first examined the dose and time responses of FAK activation in human lung fibroblasts treated with platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). The data indicate that FAK is directly recruited by integrin β1 and the subsequent FAK activation is required for fibroblast migration on fibronectin. In addition, the study has identified that α5β1 and α4β1 are the major integrins for FAK-mediated fibroblast migration on fibronect. In contrast, integrins αvβ3, αvβ6, and αvβ8 play a minor but distinct role in fibroblast migration on fibronectin. FAK inhibitor significantly reduces PDGF-BB stimulated fibroblast migration. Importantly, FAK inhibitor protects bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice. FAK inhibitor blocks FAK activation and significantly reduces signaling cascade of fibroblast migration in bleomycin-challenged mice. Furthermore, FAK inhibitor decreases lung fibrotic score, collagen accumulation, fibronectin production, and myofibroblast differentiation in in bleomycin-challenged mice. These data demonstrate that FAK mediates fibroblast migration mainly via integrin β1. Furthermore, the findings suggest that targeting FAK signaling is an effective therapeutic strategy against fibrosis.

  6. Regulation of epithelial cell organization by tuning cell-substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Andrea; Le, Anh Phuong; Saw, Thuan Beng; Tarle, Victoria; Ong, Hui Ting; Bertocchi, Cristina; Mège, René-Marc; Lim, Chwee Teck; Gov, Nir S; Ladoux, Benoit

    2015-10-01

    Collective migration of cells is of fundamental importance for a number of biological functions such as tissue development and regeneration, wound healing and cancer metastasis. The movement of cell groups consisting of multiple cells connected by cell-cell junctions depends on both extracellular and intercellular contacts. Epithelial cell assemblies are thus regulated by a cross-talk between cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions. Here, we investigated the onset of collective migration in groups of cells as they expand from a few cells into large colonies as a function of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein coating. By varying the amount of ECM presented to the cells, we observe that the mode of colony expansion, as well as their overall geometry, is strongly dependent on substrate adhesiveness. On high ECM protein coated surfaces, cells at the edges of the colonies are well spread exhibiting large outward-pointing protrusive activity, whereas cellular colonies display more circular and convex shapes on less adhesive surfaces. Actin structures at the edge of the colonies also show different organizations with the formation of lamellipodial structures on highly adhesive surfaces and a pluricellular actin cable on less adhesive ones. The analysis of traction forces and cell velocities within the cellular assemblies confirm these results. By increasing ECM protein density, cells exert higher traction forces together with a higher outward motility at the edges. Furthermore, tuning cell-cell adhesion of epithelial cells modified the mode of expansion of the colonies. Finally, we used a recently developed computational model to recapitulate the emergent experimental behaviors of expanding cell colonies and extract that the main effect of the different cell-substrate interactions is on the ability of edge cells to form outward lamellipodia-driven motility. Overall, our data suggest that switching behaviors of epithelial cell assemblies result in a tug-of-war between

  7. Investigation of the Viability, Adhesion, and Migration of Human Fibroblasts in a Hyaluronic acid/Gelatin Microgel-Reinforced Composite Hydrogel for Vocal Fold Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Heris, Hossein K.; Daoud, Jamal; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah; Tabrizian, Maryam; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The potential use of a novel scaffold biomaterial consisting of crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA)–gelatin (Ge) composite microgels was investigated for use in treating vocal fold injury and scarring. Cell adhesion integrins and kinematics of cell motion were investigated in two- and three-dimensional culture conditions, respectively. Human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cells were seeded on HA–Ge microgels attached to a HA hydrogel thin film. The results showed that hVFF cells established effective adhesion to HA–Ge microgels through the ubiquitous expression of β1 integrin in the cell membrane. The microgels were then encapsulated in a three-dimensional HA hydrogel for the study of cell migration. The cells within the HA–Ge microgel-reinforced composite hydrogel (MRCH) scaffold had an average motility speed of 0.24±0.08 μm/minute. The recorded microscopic images revealed features that are presumably associated with lobopodial and lamellipodial cell migration modes within the MRCH scaffold. Average cell speed during lobopodial migration was greater than that during lamellipodial migration. The cells moved faster in the MRCH than in the HA–Ge gel without microgels. These findings support the hypothesis that HA–Ge MRCH promote cell adhesion and migration; thereby they constitute a promising biomaterial for vocal fold repair. PMID:26501384

  8. Investigation of the Viability, Adhesion, and Migration of Human Fibroblasts in a Hyaluronic Acid/Gelatin Microgel-Reinforced Composite Hydrogel for Vocal Fold Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heris, Hossein K; Daoud, Jamal; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah; Tabrizian, Maryam; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-01-21

    The potential use of a novel scaffold biomaterial consisting of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin (Ge) composite microgels is investigated for use in treating vocal fold injury and scarring. Cell adhesion integrins and kinematics of cell motion are investigated in 2D and 3D culture conditions, respectively. Human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cells are seeded on HA-Ge microgels attached to a HA hydrogel thin film. The results show that hVFF cells establish effective adhesion to HA-Ge microgels through the ubiquitous expression of β1 integrin in the cell membrane. The microgels are then encapsulated in a 3D HA hydrogel for the study of cell migration. The cells within the HA-Ge microgel-reinforced composite hydrogel (MRCH) scaffold have an average motility speed of 0.24 ± 0.08 μm min(-1) . The recorded microscopic images reveal features that are presumably associated with lobopodial and lamellipodial cell migration modes within the MRCH scaffold. Average cell speed during lobopodial migration is greater than that during lamellipodial migration. The cells move faster in the MRCH than in the HA-Ge gel without microgels. These findings support the hypothesis that HA-Ge MRCH promotes cell adhesion and migration; thereby they constitute a promising biomaterial for vocal fold repair.

  9. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell's life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells' ability to hang on, and how it lets go.

  10. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  11. Bistability of cell adhesion in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-09-07

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area-bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms.

  12. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell’s life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells’ ability to hang on, and how it lets go. PMID:26236321

  13. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  14. Connexin 43 expressed in endothelial cells modulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion by regulating cell adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongdong; Sun, Guoliang; Zhang, Rui; Luo, Chenfang; Ge, Mian; Luo, Gangjian; Hei, Ziqing

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion between circulating monocytes and vascular endothelial cells is a key initiator of atherosclerosis. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that the expression of connexin (Cx)43 in monocytes modulates cell adhesion, however, the effects of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells in the process of cell adhesion. A total of four different methods with distinct mechanisms were used to change the function and expression of Cx43 channels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Cx43 channel inhibitor (oleamide), enhancer (retinoic acid), overexpression of Cx43 by transfection with pcDNA‑Cx43 and knock‑down of the expression of Cx43 by small interfering RNA against Cx43. The results indicated that the upregulation of the expression of Cx43 enhanced monocyte‑endothelial adhesion and this was markedly decreased by downregulation of Cx43. This mechanism was associated with Cx43‑induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule‑1. The effects of Cx43 in endothelial cells was independent of Cx37 or Cx40. These experiments suggested that local regulation of endothelial Cx43 expression within the vasculature regulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion, a critical event in the development of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory pathologies, with baseline adhesion set by the expression of Cx43. This balance may be crucial in controlling leukocyte involvement in inflammatory cascades.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  16. Yielding Elastic Tethers Stabilize Robust Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Matt J.; Luo, Jonathon P.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds. PMID:25473833

  17. Investigation of Cell-Substrate Adhesion Properties of Living Chondrocyte by Measuring Adhesive Shear Force and Detachment Using AFM and Inverse FEA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that cell adhesion is important in many biological processes such as cell migration and proliferation. A better understanding of the cell adhesion process will shed insight into these cellular biological responses as well as cell adhesion-related diseases treatment. However, there is little research which has attempted to investigate the process of cell adhesion and its mechanism. Thus, this paper aims to study the time-dependent adhesion properties of single living chondrocytes using an advanced coupled experimental-numerical approach. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) tips will be used to apply lateral forces to detach chondrocytes that are seeded for three different periods. An advanced Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model combining porohyperelastic (PHE) constitutive model and cohesive zone formulation is developed to explore the mechanism of adhesion. The results revealed that the cells can resist normal traction better than tangential traction in the beginning of adhesion. This is when the cell adhesion molecules establish early attachment to the substrates. After that when the cells are spreading, stress fiber bundles generate tangential traction on the substrate to form strong adhesion. Both simulation and experimental results agree well with each other, providing a powerful tool to study the cellular adhesion process. PMID:27892536

  18. The Autophagy Machinery: A New Player in Chemotactic Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Coly, Pierre-Michaël; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène; Morin, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-degradative process that plays a key role in diverse cellular processes such as stress response or differentiation. A growing body of work highlights the direct involvement of autophagy in cell migration and cancer metastasis. Specifically, autophagy has been shown to be involved in modulating cell adhesion dynamics as well as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. After providing a general overview of the mechanisms controlling autophagosome biogenesis and cell migration, we discuss how chemotactic G protein-coupled receptors, through the repression of autophagy, may orchestrate membrane trafficking and compartmentation of specific proteins at the cell front in order to support the critical steps of directional migration. PMID:28261054

  19. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  20. Cell-cell interactions stabilize emerging collective migration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Joshua; Guven, Can; Wang, Chenlu; Ott, Ed; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained mechanistic model for simulating the dynamics of the biological model organism Dictyostelium discoideum, incorporating gradient sensing, random motility via actin protrusions, persistent random motion and signal relay. We demonstrate that our simple cell model does result in the macroscopic group migration patterns seen in no-flow gradient chambers, namely a transition from individual motion to multi-cell ``streaming'' to aggregation as the external signal is decreased. We also find that cell-cell adhesion further stabilizes the contact network independent of chemical signaling, suggesting no indirect feedback between mechanical forces and gradient sensing. We discuss further modifications to the model and as well as further applications to quantifying dynamics using spatio-temporal contact networks. Co-first author

  1. Pattern formation in cell membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis; Hategan, A.; Sengupta, K.; Sackmann, E.

    2004-03-01

    Strong adhesion of highly active cells often nucleates focal adhesions or related structures that are, over time, reinforced by cytoskeleton (actin, etc.). Red cells lack such complex adhesion systems, but they are shown here to also exhibit complex spatial patterns within an adhesive contact zone. While strong adhesion and spreading of the red cell to a dense poly-L-lysine surface appears complete in < 1 s by reflective interference microscopy, over longer times of 10-15 min or more distinct patterns in fluorescently labeled membrane components emerge. The fluorescent lipid Fl-PE (fluorescein phosphoethanolamine), in particular, is seen to diffuse and reorganize (eg. worm-like domains of <500 nm) within the contact zone, independent of whether the cell is intact or ruptured. Lipid patterns are accompanied by visible perturbations in band 3 distribution and weaker perturbations in membrane skeleton actin. Although fluorescent poly-L-lysine is shown to be uniform under cells, pressing down on the membrane quenches the lipid patterns and reveals the topographical basis for pattern formation. Regions of strong contact are thus separated by regions where the membrane is more distant from the surface.

  2. Microtopography and flow modulate the direction of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Uttayarat, P; Chen, M; Li, M; Allen, F D; Composto, R J; Lelkes, P I

    2008-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells under flow can be modulated by the addition of chemical or mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate how topographic cues derived from a substrate containing three-dimensional microtopography interact with fluid shear stress in directing endothelial cell migration. Subconfluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates patterned with a combinatorial array of parallel and orthogonal microgrooves ranging from 2 to 5 microm in width at a constant depth of 1 microm. During a 4-h time-lapse observation in the absence of flow, the majority of the prealigned cells migrated parallel to the grooves with the distribution of their focal adhesions (FAs) depending on the groove width. No change in this migratory pattern was observed after the cells were exposed to moderate shear stress (13.5 dyn/cm(2)), irrespective of groove direction with respect to flow. After 4-h exposure to high shear stress (58 dyn/cm(2)) parallel to the grooves, the cells continued to migrate in the direction of both grooves and flow. By contrast, when microgrooves were oriented perpendicular to flow, most cells migrated orthogonal to the grooves and downstream with flow. Despite the change in the migration direction of the cells under high shear stress, most FAs and actin microfilaments maintained their original alignment parallel to the grooves, suggesting that topographic cues were more effective than those derived from shear stress in guiding the orientation of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins during the initial exposure to flow.

  3. Migration in action: profiling border cells.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2006-04-01

    Acquiring the ability to migrate is essential for cells taking part in many developmental and disease processes. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell use gene expression profiling of purified border cells from the Drosophila ovary to characterize the molecular changes required in cells to initiate migration in vivo. Their results offer interesting new insights into a moving cell's physiology.

  4. A discrete approach for modeling cell-matrix adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, J.; Sánchez, M. T.; García-Aznar, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    During recent years the interaction between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton of the cell has been object of numerous studies due to its importance in cell migration processes. These interactions are performed through protein clutches, known as focal adhesions. For migratory cells these focal adhesions along with force generating processes in the cytoskeleton are responsible for the formation of protrusion structures like lamellipodia or filopodia. Much is known about these structures: the different proteins that conform them, the players involved in their formation or their role in cell migration. Concretely, growth-cone filopodia structures have attracted significant attention because of their role as cell sensors of their surrounding environment and its complex behavior. On this matter, a vast myriad of mathematical models has been presented to explain its mechanical behavior. In this work, we aim to study the mechanical behavior of these structures through a discrete approach. This numerical model provides an individual analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of different phenomena, such as clutches unbinding or protein unfolding.

  5. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  6. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–myosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration. PMID:19603038

  7. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells.

    PubMed

    Cremaschi, Paolo; Oliverio, Matteo; Leva, Valentina; Bione, Silvia; Carriero, Roberta; Mazzucco, Giulia; Palamidessi, Andrea; Scita, Giorgio; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI) which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression.

  8. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  9. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  10. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  11. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  12. Role of Nonmuscle Myosin II in Migration of Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sneha; Saha, Shekhar; Roy, Saheli; Das, Madhurima; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    It is the promise of regeneration and therapeutic applications that has sparked an interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Following infusion, MSCs migrate to sites of injury or inflammation by virtue of their homing property. To exert optimal clinical benefits, systemically delivered MSCs need to migrate efficiently and in adequate numbers to pathological areas in vivo. However, underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for MSC migration are still not well understood. The Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord is an attractive source of MSCs for stem cell therapy because of its abundant availability and painless collection. In this study, we attempted to identify the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII), if any, in the migration of WJ-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). Expression of NMII isoforms, NMIIA, and NMIIB was observed both at RNA and protein levels in WJ-MSCs. Inhibition of NMII or its regulator ROCK, by pharmacological inhibitors, resulted in significant reduction in the migration of WJ-MSCs as confirmed by the scratch migration assay and time-lapse microscopy. Next, trying to dissect the role of each NMII isoform in migration of WJ-MSCs, we found that siRNA-mediated downregulation of NMIIA, but not NMIIB expression, led to cells failing to retract their trailing edge and losing cell–cell cohesiveness, while exhibiting a nondirectional migratory pathway. Migration, moreover, is also dependent on optimal affinity adhesion, which would allow rapid attachment and release of cells and, hence, can be influenced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules. We demonstrated that inhibition of NMII and more specifically NMIIA resulted in increased gene expression of ECM and adhesion molecules, which possibly led to stronger adhesions and, hence, decreased migration. Therefore, these data suggest that NMII acts as a regulator of cell migration and adhesion in WJ-MSCs. PMID:25923805

  13. Angiogenesis in Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Gaoyuan; Fehrenbach, Melane L.; Williams, James T.; Finklestein, Jeffrey M.; Zhu, Jing-Xu; DeLisser, Horace M.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 has been previously implicated in endothelial cell migration; additionally, anti-PECAM-1 antibodies have been shown to inhibit in vivo angiogenesis. Studies were therefore performed with PECAM-1-null mice to further define the involvement of PECAM-1 in blood vessel formation. Vascularization of subcutaneous Matrigel implants as well as tumor angiogenesis were both inhibited in PECAM-1-null mice. Reciprocal bone marrow transplants that involved both wild-type and PECAM-1-deficient mice revealed that the impaired angiogenic response resulted from a loss of endothelial, but not leukocyte, PECAM-1. In vitro wound migration and single-cell motility by PECAM-1-null endothelial cells were also compromised. In addition, filopodia formation, a feature of motile cells, was inhibited in PECAM-1-null endothelial cells as well as in human endothelial cells treated with either anti-PECAM-1 antibody or PECAM-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of PECAM-1 promoted filopodia formation and increased the protein expression levels of Cdc42, a Rho GTPase that is known to promote the formation of filopodia. In the developing retinal vasculature, numerous, long filamentous filopodia, emanating from endothelial cells at the tips of angiogenic sprouts, were observed in wild-type animals, but to a lesser extent in the PECAM-1-null mice. Together, these data further establish the involvement of endothelial PECAM-1 in angiogenesis and suggest that, in vivo, PECAM-1 may stimulate endothelial cell motility by promoting the formation of filopodia. PMID:19574426

  14. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; ...

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia aremore » motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.« less

  15. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  16. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  17. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively1–6, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography7 to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells toward higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  18. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  19. Investigation of Adhesion and Mechanical Properties of Human Glioma Cells by Single Cell Force Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma -HG- and Gasc for low-grade glioma -LG-) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25390644

  20. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling.

  1. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  2. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-02-17

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  3. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  4. Putting the brakes on cancer cell migration: JAM-A restrains integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ulhas P; Naik, Meghna U

    2008-01-01

    Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A) is a member of the Ig superfamily of membrane proteins expressed in platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. We have previously shown that in endothelial cells, JAM-A regulates basic fibroblast growth factor, (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis via augmenting endothelial cell migration. Recently, we have revealed that in breast cancer cells, downregulation of JAM-A enhances cancer cell migration and invasion. Further, ectopic expression of JAM-A in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells attenuates cell migration, and downregulation of JAM-A in low-metastatic T47D cells enhance migration. Interestingly, JAM-A expression is greatly diminished as breast cancer disease progresses. The molecular mechanism of this function of JAM-A is beyond its well-characterized barrier function at the tight junction. Our results point out that JAM-A differentially regulates migration of endothelial and cancer cells.

  5. Multi-scale models for cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yinghao; Chen, Jiawen; Xie, Zhong-Ru

    2014-03-01

    The interactions of membrane receptors during cell adhesion play pivotal roles in tissue morphogenesis during development. Our lab focuses on developing multi-scale models to decompose the mechanical and chemical complexity in cell adhesion. Recent experimental evidences show that clustering is a generic process for cell adhesive receptors. However, the physical basis of such receptor clustering is not understood. We introduced the effect of molecular flexibility to evaluate the dynamics of receptors. By delivering new theory to quantify the changes of binding free energy in different cellular environments, we revealed that restriction of molecular flexibility upon binding of membrane receptors from apposing cell surfaces (trans) causes large entropy loss, which dramatically increases their lateral interactions (cis). This provides a new molecular mechanism to initialize receptor clustering on the cell-cell interface. By using the subcellular simulations, we further found that clustering is a cooperative process requiring both trans and cis interactions. The detailed binding constants during these processes are calculated and compared with experimental data from our collaborator's lab.

  6. Controlled skeletal progenitor cell migration on nanostructured porous silicon/silicon micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Costa, V.; Sánchez-Vaquero, V.; Muñoz-Noval, Á.; González-Méndez, L.; Punzón-Quijorna, E.; Gallach-Pérez, D.; Manso-Silván, M.; Martínez-Muñoz, G.; Climent-Font, A.; García-Ruiz, J. P.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) was used for the fabrication of surface micropatterns aiming at controlling cell adhesion and migration. In particular, surface patterns of nanoPS and Si were engineered by high-energy ion-beam irradiation and subsequent anodization. It was found that human skeletal progenitor cells are sensitive to oneand two-dimensional patterns and that focal adhesion is inhibited on nanoPS areas. In spite of this anti-fouling characteristics, studies on patterns with reduced Si areas show that cells conform to nanoPS pathways favoring migration through cell protrusion, body translocation and tail retraction from two parallel Si traction rails. Moreover, migration can be blocked and cells tend to arrange when grid patterns with the appropriate dimensions are fabricated. The experimental results confirm that progenitor cells are able to exploit nanoPS anti-fouling designs by adapting to it for migration purposes.

  7. Inhibition of neuronal cell-cell adhesion measured by the microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiertz, R. W. F.; Marani, E.; Rutten, W. L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing (IS) were used to monitor a change in in vitro neuron-neuron adhesion in response to blocking of cell adhesion molecules. By blocking neuron-neuron adhesion, migration and aggregation of neuronal cells can be inhibited. This leads to better control of spatial arrangement of cells in culture. In the literature N-CAM, L1 and N-cadherin proteins are pointed out as main regulators of neuronal adhesion. In this study, these three main cell adhesion molecules were used to inhibit neuron-to-neuron adhesion and aggregation. Both soluble extracellular domains and antigen antibodies were added to these adhesion molecules. They were investigated for their blocking ability in neuronal cultures. First, in a 96 h aggregation assay on a low-adhesive substrate, the effect of inhibition of the three proteins on aggregation of cortical neurons was investigated optically. Both L1 antibody and L1 protein had no effect on the degree of aggregation. An N-cadherin antibody however was shown to be effective in aggregation inhibition at concentrations of 1 and 3 µg ml-1. Up to 96 h no aggregation occurred. A similar effect was achieved by the N-cadherin protein, although less distinct. N-CAM blocking revealed no inhibition of aggregation. Second, results from IS corresponded to those of the aggregation assays. In these experiments neuron-neuron adhesion was also inhibited by blocking N-CAM L1 and N-cadherin. Cortical neurons were cultured in small wells containing circular 100 µm diameter gold electrodes, so small changes in cell-cell interactions in monolayers of neurons could be monitored by IS. Impedances of neuron-covered electrodes were significantly lower in the presence of the N-cadherin antibody and protein at concentrations of 1, 3 and 10 µg ml-1, indicating a less profound binding between adjacent neurons. Results from the aggregation assays and impedance measurements demonstrate the applicability of blocking cell adhesion

  8. Quantifying modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  9. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates.

  10. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Weiss, Susan R; Silverman, Robert H

    2015-12-29

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2', 5'-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2', 5'-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis.

  11. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J.; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2′, 5′-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2′, 5′-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis. PMID:26517238

  12. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  13. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  14. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  15. Decoration of electrospun nanofibers with monomeric catechols to facilitate cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2014-02-01

    Monomeric catechols are displayed on the surface of polymeric nanofibers by robust catechol-thiol interactions to enhance cell adhesion and migration. Dihydroxyphenyl propionic acid is chemically conjugated to primary amine groups of poly(ϵ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-amine (PCL-PEG) nanofibers to display catechol moieties on the surface. At basic pH, catecholized nanofibers incorporate thiol groups at a five-fold higher rate than at acidic pH, while catechol-coated surfaces do not show any pH-dependent binding. Live/dead cell staining indicates that the catecholized nanofibers do not exert any cytotoxic effects. Also, NIH 3T3 cells cultured on the catecholized nanofibers show increased attachment and migration that is proportional to the amount of the immobilized catechol moieties on the surface. These results clearly indicate that 6 nmol of monomeric catechols on the surface of nanofiber can promote cell adhesion and migration by thiol-catehol interactions.

  16. Integrin engagement mediates tyrosine dephosphorylation on platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T T; Yan, L G; Madri, J A

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily expressed on endothelial cells, platelets, neutrophils, and monocytes and plays a role during endothelial cell migration. Phosphoamino acid analysis and Western blot analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody show that endothelial PECAM-1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is decreased with endothelial cell migration on fibronectin and collagen and with cell spreading on fibronectin but not on plastic. Cell adhesion on anti-integrin antibodies is also able to specifically induce PECAM-1 dephosphorylation while concurrently inducing pp125 focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Inhibition of dephosphorylation with sodium orthovanadate suggests that this effect is at least partially mediated by phosphatase activity. Tyr-663 and Tyr-686 are identified as potential phosphorylation sites and mutated to phenylalanine. When expressed, both mutants show reduced PECAM-1 phosphorylation but Phe-686 mutants also show significant reversal of PECAM-1-mediated inhibition of cell migration and do not localize PECAM-1 to cell borders. Our results suggest that beta 1-integrin engagement can signal to dephosphorylate PECAM-1 and that this signaling pathway may play a role during endothelial cell migration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8876219

  17. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  18. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  19. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  20. A stochastic model for adhesion-mediated cell random motility and haptotaxis.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, R B; Tranquillo, R T

    1993-01-01

    The active migration of blood and tissue cells is important in a number of physiological processes including inflammation, wound healing, embryogenesis, and tumor cell metastasis. These cells move by transmitting cytoplasmic force through membrane receptors which are bound specifically to adhesion ligands in the surrounding substratum. Recently, much research has focused on the influence of the composition of extracellular matrix and the distribution of its components on the speed and direction of cell migration. It is commonly believed that the magnitude of the adhesion influences cell speed and/or random turning behavior, whereas a gradient of adhesion may bias the net direction of the cell movement, a phenomenon known as haptotaxis. The mechanisms underlying these responses are presently not understood. A stochastic model is presented to provide a mechanistic understanding of how the magnitude and distribution of adhesion ligands in the substratum influence cell movement. The receptor-mediated cell migration is modeled as an interrelation of random processes on distinct time scales. Adhesion receptors undergo rapid binding and transport, resulting in a stochastic spatial distribution of bound receptors fluctuating about some mean distribution. This results in a fluctuating spatio-temporal pattern of forces on the cell, which in turn affects the speed and turning behavior on a longer time scale. The model equations are a system of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDE's) which govern the time evolution of the spatial distribution of bound and free receptors, and the orientation and position of the cell. These SDE's are integrated numerically to simulate the behavior of the model cell on both a uniform substratum, and on a gradient of adhesion ligand concentration. Furthermore, analysis of the governing SDE system and corresponding Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) yields analytical expressions for indices which characterize cell movement on multiple time

  1. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  2. DDR2 plays a role in fibroblast migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activated DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Mireya Liliana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto

    2012-12-07

    Discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) is a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that can be activated by soluble collagen and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions including organism growth and wound repair. In the current studies, we used fibronectin and collagen-coated 2D surfaces and collagen matrices in combination with siRNA technology to investigate the role of DDR2 in a range of fibroblast motile activities. Silencing DDR2 with siRNA inhibited cell spreading and migration, and similar inhibition occurred regardless whether cells were interacting with fibronectin or collagen surfaces. Under the assay conditions used, DDR2 tyrosine kinase activation was not observed unless soluble collagen was added to the incubation medium. Finally silencing DDR2 also inhibited human fibroblast migration in 3D collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D collagen matrix remodeling and contraction. Taken together, our findings suggest that DDR2 is required for normal fibroblast spreading and migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activation of DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

  3. Force nanoscopy of cell mechanics and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-05-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to mechanical stimuli in their environment and have several evolved mechanisms to sense and respond to these cues. It is becoming increasingly recognized that many cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, possess a diverse set of proteins to translate mechanical cues into biochemical signalling and to mediate cell surface interactions such as cell adhesion. Moreover, the mechanical properties of cells are involved in regulating cell function as well as serving as indicators of disease states. Importantly, the recent development of biophysical tools and nanoscale methods has facilitated a deeper understanding of the role that physical forces play in modulating cell mechanics and cell adhesion. Here, we discuss how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been used to investigate cell mechanics and cell adhesion at the single-cell and single-molecule levels. This knowledge is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and mechanoresponse in living cells. While pushing living cells with the AFM tip provides a means to quantify their mechanical properties and examine their response to nanoscale forces, pulling single surface proteins with a functionalized tip allows one to understand their role in sensing and adhesion. The combination of these nanoscale techniques with modern molecular biology approaches, genetic engineering and optical microscopies provides a powerful platform for understanding the sophisticated functions of the cell surface machinery, and its role in the onset and progression of complex diseases.

  4. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  5. Inhibition of Adhesion Molecule Gene Expression and Cell Adhesion by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays an important role in determining cell shape and function in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions. While links between metabolism and cell adhesion were previously suggested, the exact context and molecular details of such a cross-talk remain incompletely understood. Here we show that PGC-1α, a pivotal transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, acts to inhibit expression of cell adhesion genes. Using cell lines, primary cells and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate expression of a variety of cell adhesion molecules. Furthermore, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on cell adhesion gene expression. Interestingly, the L2/L3 motifs of PGC-1α, necessary for nuclear hormone receptor activation, are only partly required for inhibition of several cell adhesion genes by PGC-1α. Finally, PGC-1α is able to modulate adhesion of primary fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells to extracellular matrix proteins. Our results delineate a cross talk between a central pathway controlling metabolic regulation and cell adhesion, and identify PGC-1α as a molecular link between these two major cellular networks.

  6. Focal adhesion kinase maintains, but not increases the adhesion of dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuyan; Shao, Meiying; Zou, Wenlin; Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Ran; Hu, Tao

    2017-02-25

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as a key enzyme in the integrin-mediated adhesion-signalling pathway. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of FAK on adhesion of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. We transfected lentiviral vectors to silence or overexpress FAK in HDP cells ex vivo. Early cell adhesion, cell survival and focal contacts (FCs)-related proteins (FAK and paxillin) were examined. By using immunofluorescence, the formation of FCs and cytoskeleton was detected, respectively. We found that both adhesion and survival of HDP cells were suppressed by FAK inhibition. However, FAK overexpression slightly inhibited cell adhesion and exhibited no change in cell survival compared with the control. A thick rim of cytoskeleton accumulated and smaller dot-shaped FCs appeared in FAK knockdown cells. Phosphorylation of paxillin (p-paxillin) was inhibited in FAK knockdown cells, verifying that the adhesion was inhibited. Less cytoskeleton and elongated FCs were observed in FAK-overexpressed cells. However, p-paxillin had no significant difference compared with the control. In conclusion, the data suggest that FAK maintains cell adhesion, survival and cytoskeleton formation, but excessive FAK has no positive effects on these aspects.

  7. Inhibition of Adhesion Molecule Gene Expression and Cell Adhesion by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays an important role in determining cell shape and function in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions. While links between metabolism and cell adhesion were previously suggested, the exact context and molecular details of such a cross-talk remain incompletely understood. Here we show that PGC-1α, a pivotal transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, acts to inhibit expression of cell adhesion genes. Using cell lines, primary cells and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate expression of a variety of cell adhesion molecules. Furthermore, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on cell adhesion gene expression. Interestingly, the L2/L3 motifs of PGC-1α, necessary for nuclear hormone receptor activation, are only partly required for inhibition of several cell adhesion genes by PGC-1α. Finally, PGC-1α is able to modulate adhesion of primary fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells to extracellular matrix proteins. Our results delineate a cross talk between a central pathway controlling metabolic regulation and cell adhesion, and identify PGC-1α as a molecular link between these two major cellular networks. PMID:27984584

  8. A Customizable Chamber for Measuring Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Aniqa N; Vo, Huu Tri; Olang, Sharon; Mappus, Elliott; Peterson, Brian; Hlavac, Nora; Harvey, Tyler; Dean, Delphine

    2017-03-12

    Cell migration is a vital part of immune responses, growth, and wound healing. Cell migration is a complex process that involves interactions between cells, the extracellular matrix, and soluble and non-soluble chemical factors (e.g., chemoattractants). Standard methods for measuring the migration of cells, such as the Boyden chamber assay, work by counting cells on either side of a divider. These techniques are easy to use; however, they offer little geometric modification for different applications. In contrast, microfluidic devices can be used to observe cell migration with customizable concentration gradients of soluble factors(1)(,)(2). However, methods for making microfluidics based assays can be difficult to learn. Here, we describe an easy method for creating cell culture chambers to measure cell migration in response to chemical concentration gradients. Our cell migration chamber method can create different linear concentration gradients in order to study cell migration for a variety of applications. This method is relatively easy to use and is typically performed by undergraduate students. The microchannel chamber was created by placing an acrylic insert in the shape of the final microchannel chamber well into a Petri dish. After this, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was poured on top of the insert. The PDMS was allowed to harden and then the insert was removed. This allowed for the creation of wells in any desired shape or size. Cells may be subsequently added to the microchannel chamber, and soluble agents can be added to one of the wells by soaking an agarose block in the desired agent. The agarose block is added to one of the wells, and time-lapse images can be taken of the microchannel chamber in order to quantify cell migration. Variations to this method can be made for a given application, making this method highly customizable.

  9. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands.

  10. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Müller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPPalpha, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPPalpha has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  11. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Mueller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker . E-mail: Herzog@uni-bonn.de

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPP{alpha}) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPP{alpha}, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPP{alpha} has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  12. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  13. Rho GTPases and cancer cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are major regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and influence cell shape and migration. The expression of several Rho GTPases is often up-regulated in tumors and this frequently correlates with a poor prognosis for patients. Migration of cancer cells through endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, called transendothelial migration or extravasation, is a critical step during the metastasis process. The use of siRNA technology to target specifically each Rho family member coupled with imaging techniques allows the roles of individual Rho GTPases to be investigated. In this chapter we describe methods to assess how Rho GTPases affect the different steps of cancer cell transendothelial cell migration in vitro.

  14. Adhesion-Dependent Wave Generation in Crawling Cells.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Erin L; Allard, Jun; Lou, Sunny S; Theriot, Julie A; Mogilner, Alex

    2017-01-09

    Dynamic actin networks are excitable. In migrating cells, feedback loops can amplify stochastic fluctuations in actin dynamics, often resulting in traveling waves of protrusion. The precise contributions of various molecular and mechanical interactions to wave generation have been difficult to disentangle, in part due to complex cellular morphodynamics. Here we used a relatively simple cell type-the fish epithelial keratocyte-to define a set of mechanochemical feedback loops underlying actin network excitability and wave generation. Although keratocytes are normally characterized by the persistent protrusion of a broad leading edge, increasing cell-substrate adhesion strength results in waving protrusion of a short leading edge. We show that protrusion waves are due to fluctuations in actin polymerization rates and that overexpression of VASP, an actin anti-capping protein that promotes actin polymerization, switches highly adherent keratocytes from waving to persistent protrusion. Moreover, VASP localizes both to adhesion complexes and to the leading edge. Based on these results, we developed a mathematical model for protrusion waves in which local depletion of VASP from the leading edge by adhesions-along with lateral propagation of protrusion due to the branched architecture of the actin network and negative mechanical feedback from the cell membrane-results in regular protrusion waves. Consistent with our model simulations, we show that VASP localization at the leading edge oscillates, with VASP leading-edge enrichment greatest just prior to protrusion initiation. We propose that the mechanochemical feedbacks underlying wave generation in keratocytes may constitute a general module for establishing excitable actin dynamics in other cellular contexts.

  15. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  16. Mapping forces and kinematics during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Conte, Vito; Sunyer, Raimon; Muñoz, José J; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental biological processes including morphogenesis and tissue repair require cells to migrate collectively. In these processes, epithelial or endothelial cells move in a cooperative manner coupled by intercellular junctions. Ultimately, the movement of these multicellular systems occurs through the generation of cellular forces, exerted either on the substrate via focal adhesions (cell-substrate forces) or on neighboring cells through cell-cell junctions (cell-cell forces). Quantitative measurements of multicellular forces and kinematics with cellular or subcellular resolution have become possible only in recent years. In this chapter, we describe some of these techniques, which include particle image velocimetry to map cell velocities, traction force microscopy to map forces exerted by cells on the substrate, and monolayer stress microscopy to map forces within and between cells. We also describe experimental protocols to perform these measurements. The combination of these techniques with high-resolution imaging tools and molecular perturbations will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying collective cell migration in health and disease.

  17. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    We analyzed the dynamic shape of migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells. We found that regions of high boundary curvature propagate from the front to the back of cells in an organized fashion. These waves of high curvature are stabilized by surface contact, and so, at the sides of cells, are stationary relative to the surface. The initiation of curvature waves, though, which usually occurs at the front of cells, is associated with protrusive motion. The protrusion location shifts rapidly in a ballistic manner at speeds nearly double that of cellular migration. To examine curvature waves in the absence of surface contact, we guided cells to extend over the edge of micro-cliffs. The curvature wave speed of cells extended over a cliff was triple the wave speed of cells migrating on a surface, which is consistent with the higher wave speeds observed near the non-adherent leading edge of cells.

  18. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  19. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  20. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3-binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis.

  1. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant

    PubMed Central

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A.C. ‘t; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3–binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:25774502

  2. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  3. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  4. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuvelier, Susan L.; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4–stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechanosensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking. PMID:16172263

  5. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cuvelier, Susan L; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D

    2005-09-19

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4-stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechano-sensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking.

  6. PAF mediates neutrophil adhesion to thrombin or TNF-stimulated endothelial cells under shear stress.

    PubMed

    Macconi, D; Foppolo, M; Paris, S; Noris, M; Aiello, S; Remuzzi, G; Remuzzi, A

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to modulate polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion to endothelial cells cultured under static conditions and activated by thrombin. In contrast, there are no data on the role of PAF in PMN adhesion to cells exposed to flow conditions and activated by stimuli other than thrombin. Here we used the PAF receptor antagonist L-659,989 to evaluate PMN adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in basal conditions or upon challenge with thrombin or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Experiments were performed under dynamic flow using a parallel-plate flow chamber and a computer-based image analysis system. Rolling and adhesion of PMNs to endothelial cells significantly increased upon stimulation with thrombin. Thrombin-stimulated HUVEC also synthesized higher amounts of PAF than untreated cells. Pretreatment of PMNs with L-659,989 significantly reduced their rolling and adhesion to thrombin-activated HUVEC. Stimulation of HUVEC with TNF-alpha significantly increased the number of rolling and adherent PMNs as compared with untreated cells. Adhesion of PMNs to and migration across TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC were reduced by L-659,989, whereas cell rolling was unchanged. We conclude that PAF mediates leukocyte interaction under flow conditions with HUVEC activated by inflammatory stimuli.

  7. Cell substratum adhesion during early development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Tarantola, Marco; Bae, Albert; Fuller, Danny; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Loomis, William F

    2014-01-01

    Vegetative and developed amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum gain traction and move rapidly on a wide range of substrata without forming focal adhesions. We used two independent assays to quantify cell-substrate adhesion in mutants and in wild-type cells as a function of development. Using a microfluidic device that generates a range of hydrodynamic shear stress, we found that substratum adhesion decreases at least 10 fold during the first 6 hr of development of wild type cells. This result was confirmed using a single-cell assay in which cells were attached to the cantilever of an atomic force probe and allowed to adhere to untreated glass surfaces before being retracted. Both of these assays showed that the decrease in substratum adhesion was dependent on the cAMP receptor CAR1 which triggers development. Vegetative cells missing talin as the result of a mutation in talA exhibited slightly reduced adhesive properties compared to vegetative wild-type cells. In sharp contrast to wild-type cells, however, these talA mutant cells did not show further reduction of adhesion during development such that after 5 hr of development they were significantly more adhesive than developed wild type cells. In addition, both assays showed that substrate adhesion was reduced in 0 hr cells when the actin cytoskeleton was disrupted by latrunculin. Consistent with previous observations, substrate adhesion was also reduced in 0 hr cells lacking the membrane proteins SadA or SibA as the result of mutations in sadA or sibA. However, there was no difference in the adhesion properties between wild type AX3 cells and these mutant cells after 6 hr of development, suggesting that neither SibA nor SadA play an essential role in substratum adhesion during aggregation. Our results provide a quantitative framework for further studies of cell substratum adhesion in Dictyostelium.

  8. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  9. A Conserved Oct4/POUV-Dependent Network Links Adhesion and Migration to Progenitor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Livigni, Alessandra; Peradziryi, Hanna; Sharov, Alexei A.; Chia, Gloryn; Hammachi, Fella; Migueles, Rosa Portero; Sukparangsi, Woranop; Pernagallo, Salvatore; Bradley, Mark; Nichols, Jennifer; Ko, Minoru S.H.; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The class V POU domain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) is a pivotal regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Oct4 is also an important evolutionarily conserved regulator of progenitor cell differentiation during embryonic development. Results Here we examine the function of Oct4 homologs in Xenopus embryos and compare this to the role of Oct4 in maintaining mammalian embryo-derived stem cells. Based on a combination of expression profiling of Oct4/POUV-depleted Xenopus embryos and in silico analysis of existing mammalian Oct4 target data sets, we defined a set of evolutionary-conserved Oct4/POUV targets. Most of these targets were regulators of cell adhesion. This is consistent with Oct4/POUV phenotypes observed in the adherens junctions in Xenopus ectoderm, mouse embryonic, and epiblast stem cells. A number of these targets could rescue both Oct4/POUV phenotypes in cellular adhesion and multipotent progenitor cell maintenance, whereas expression of cadherins on their own could only transiently support adhesion and block differentiation in both ESC and Xenopus embryos. Conclusions Currently, the list of Oct4 transcriptional targets contains thousands of genes. Using evolutionary conservation, we identified a core set of functionally relevant factors that linked the maintenance of adhesion to Oct4/POUV. We found that the regulation of adhesion by the Oct4/POUV network occurred at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and was required for pluripotency. PMID:24210613

  10. Molecular markers of cell adhesion in ameloblastomas. An update

    PubMed Central

    González-González, Rogelio; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Damian-Matsumura, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin, and though it is of a benign nature, it frequently infiltrates the bone, has a high rate of recurrence and could potentially become malignant. Cellular adhesion potentially plays an important role in the manifestation of these characteristics and in the tumor biology of ameloblastomas. Losses of cell-cell and extracellular matrix adhesion and cohesion are among the first events that occur in the invasion and growth of tumors of epithelial origin. The present review includes a description of the molecules that are involved in cell adhesion as reported for various types of ameloblastomas and discusses the possible roles of these molecules in the biological behaviors of this odontogenic tumor. Knowledge of the complex mechanisms in which these molecules play a role is critical for the research and discovery of future therapeutic targets. Key words:Ameloblastoma, cellular adhesion, molecular markers, cell-cell adhesion, extracellular matrix-cell adhesion. PMID:23986011

  11. TMIGD1 is a novel adhesion molecule that protects epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Emad; Bondzie, Philip A; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Meyer, Rosana D; Hartsough, Edward; Henderson, Joel M; Schwartz, John H; Chitalia, Vipul; Rahimi, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative damage to renal tubular epithelial cells is a fundamental pathogenic mechanism implicated in both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. Because epithelial cell survival influences the outcome of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases, identifying its molecular regulators could provide new insight into pathobiology and possible new therapeutic strategies for these diseases. We have identified transmembrane and immunoglobulin domain-containing 1 (TMIGD1) as a novel adhesion molecule, which is highly conserved in humans and other species. TMIGD1 is expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells and promotes cell survival. The extracellular domain of TMIGD1 contains two putative immunoglobulin domains and mediates self-dimerization. Our data suggest that TMIGD1 regulates transepithelial electric resistance and permeability of renal epithelial cells. TMIGD1 controls cell migration, cell morphology, and protects renal epithelial cells from oxidative- and nutrient-deprivation-induced cell injury. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell injury downregulates TMIGD1 expression and targets it for ubiquitination. Moreover, TMIGD1 expression is significantly affected in both acute kidney injury and in deoxy-corticosterone acetate and sodium chloride (deoxy-corticosterone acetate salt)-induced chronic hypertensive kidney disease mouse models. Taken together, we have identified TMIGD1 as a novel cell adhesion molecule expressed in kidney epithelial cells that protects kidney epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury to promote cell survival.

  12. Cadherin-2 Is Required Cell Autonomously for Collective Migration of Facial Branchiomotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rebman, Jane K.; Kirchoff, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration depends on cell-cell interactions between neighbors that contribute to their overall directionality, yet the mechanisms that control the coordinated migration of neurons remains to be elucidated. During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) undergo a stereotypic tangential caudal migration from their place of birth in rhombomere (r)4 to their final location in r6/7. FBMNs engage in collective cell migration that depends on neuron-to-neuron interactions to facilitate caudal directionality. Here, we demonstrate that Cadherin-2-mediated neuron-to-neuron adhesion is necessary for directional and collective migration of FBMNs. We generated stable transgenic zebrafish expressing dominant-negative Cadherin-2 (Cdh2ΔEC) driven by the islet1 promoter. Cell-autonomous inactivation of Cadherin-2 function led to non-directional migration of FBMNs and a defect in caudal tangential migration. Additionally, mosaic analysis revealed that Cdh2ΔEC-expressing FBMNs are not influenced to migrate caudally by neighboring wild-type FBMNs due to a defect in collective cell migration. Taken together, our data suggest that Cadherin-2 plays an essential cell-autonomous role in mediating the collective migration of FBMNs. PMID:27716840

  13. Cell Adhesion in Epidermal Development and Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell adhesions are necessary for structural integrity and barrier formation of the epidermis. Here, we discuss insights from genetic and cell biological studies into the roles of individual cell–cell junctions and their composite proteins in regulating epidermal development and function. In addition to individual adhesive functions, we will discuss emerging ideas on mechanosensation/transduction of junctions in the epidermis, noncanonical roles for adhesion proteins, and crosstalk/interdependencies between the junctional systems. These studies have revealed that cell adhesion proteins are connected to many aspects of tissue physiology including growth control, differentiation, and inflammation. PMID:25733147

  14. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  15. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Torres, Vicente A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  16. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  17. Phosphoproteomic analysis of interacting tumor and endothelial cells identifies regulatory mechanisms of transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Locard-Paulet, Marie; Lim, Lindsay; Veluscek, Giulia; McMahon, Kelly; Sinclair, John; van Weverwijk, Antoinette; Worboys, Jonathan D; Yuan, Yinyin; Isacke, Clare M; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-02-09

    The exit of metastasizing tumor cells from the vasculature, extravasation, is regulated by their dynamic interactions with the endothelial cells that line the internal surface of vessels. To elucidate signals controlling tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent transendothelial migration, we performed phosphoproteomic analysis to map cell-specific changes in protein phosphorylation that were triggered by contact between metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. From the 2669 unique phosphorylation sites identified, 77 and 43 were differentially phosphorylated in the tumor cells and endothelial cells, respectively. The receptor tyrosine kinase ephrin type A receptor 2 (EPHA2) exhibited decreased Tyr(772) phosphorylation in the cancer cells upon endothelial contact. Knockdown of EPHA2 increased adhesion of the breast cancer cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and their transendothelial migration in coculture cell assays, as well as early-stage lung colonization in vivo. EPHA2-mediated inhibition of transendothelial migration of breast cancer cells depended on interaction with the ligand ephrinA1 on HUVECs and phosphorylation of EPHA2-Tyr(772). When EPHA2 phosphorylation dynamics were compared between cell lines of different metastatic ability, EPHA2-Tyr(772) was rapidly dephosphorylated after ephrinA1 stimulation specifically in cells targeting the lung. Knockdown of the phosphatase LMW-PTP reduced adhesion and transendothelial migration of the breast cancer cells. Overall, cell-specific phosphoproteomic analysis provides a bidirectional map of contact-initiated signaling between tumor and endothelial cells that can be further investigated to identify mechanisms controlling the transendothelial cell migration of cancer cells.

  18. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  19. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  20. Attraction rules: germ cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Raz, Erez; Reichman-Fried, Michal

    2006-08-01

    The migration of zebrafish primordial germ cell towards the region where the gonad develops is guided by the chemokine SDF-1a. Recent studies show that soon after their specification, the cells undergo a series of morphological alterations before they become motile and are able to respond to attractive cues. As migratory cells, primordial germ cells move towards their target while correcting their path upon exiting a cyclic phase in which morphological cell polarity is lost. In the following stages, the cells gather at specific locations and move as cell clusters towards their final target. In all of these stages, zebrafish germ cells respond as individual cells to alterations in the shape of the sdf-1a expression domain, by directed migration towards their target - the position where the gonad develops.

  1. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls actin cytoskeleton dynamics during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Prudent, Julien; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Gadet, Rudy; Deygas, Mathieu; Rimokh, Ruth; Gillet, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ signaling regulates cell migration by acting on cytoskeleton architecture, cell directionality and focal adhesions dynamics. In migrating cells, cytosolic Ca2+ pool and Ca2+ pulses are described as key components of these effects. Whereas the role of the mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and the Mitochondria Cacium Uniporter (MCU) in cell migration were recently highlighted in vivo using the zebrafish model, their implication in actin cystokeleton dynamics and cell migration in mammals is not totally characterized. Here, we show that mcu silencing in two human cell lines compromises their migration capacities. This phenotype is characterized by actin cytoskeleton stiffness, a cell polarization loss and an impairment of the focal adhesion proteins dynamics. At the molecular level, these effects appear to be mediated by the reduction of the ER and cytosolic Ca2+ pools, which leads to a decrease in Rho-GTPases, RhoA and Rac1, and Ca2+-dependent Calpain activites, but seem to be independent of intracellular ATP levels. Together, this study highlights the fundamental and evolutionary conserved role of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis in cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration. PMID:27827394

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the SH3 domain regulates CAS subcellular localization, cell migration, and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Janoštiak, Radoslav; Tolde, Ondřej; Brůhová, Zuzana; Novotný, Marian; Hanks, Steven K; Rösel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2011-11-01

    Crk-associated substrate (CAS) is a major tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in cells transformed by v-crk and v-src oncogenes and plays an important role in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells. A novel phosphorylation site on CAS, Tyr-12 (Y12) within the ligand-binding hydrophobic pocket of the CAS SH3 domain, was identified and found to be enriched in Src-transformed cells and invasive human carcinoma cells. To study the biological significance of CAS Y12 phosphorylation, phosphomimicking Y12E and nonphosphorylatable Y12F mutants of CAS were studied. The phosphomimicking mutation decreased interaction of the CAS SH3 domain with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and PTP-PEST and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Live-cell imaging showed that green fluorescent protein-tagged CAS Y12E mutant is, in contrast to wild-type or Y12F CAS, excluded from focal adhesions but retains its localization to podosome-type adhesions. Expression of CAS-Y12F in cas-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in hyperphosphorylation of the CAS substrate domain, and this was associated with slower turnover of focal adhesions and decreased cell migration. Moreover, expression of CAS Y12F in Src-transformed cells greatly decreased invasiveness when compared to wild-type CAS expression. These findings reveal an important role of CAS Y12 phosphorylation in the regulation of focal adhesion assembly, cell migration, and invasiveness of Src-transformed cells.

  3. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  4. Dissecting mesenchymal stem cell movement: migration assays for tracing and deducing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Erika L; Marini, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Targeted migration is a necessary attribute for any gene delivery vehicle. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used as effective delivery vehicles for treatments against cancer, graft versus host disease, -arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and many other diseases. MSC migrate toward sites of inflammation, however, the true migratory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. There are several receptors and respective chemokines known to be involved in the migration of the MSC. Further insight to MSC migration will be revealed both in vivo and in vitro through the application of migration assays from the most simple, to the more technologically demanding.

  5. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against certain cell surface molecules of Dictyostelium discoideum blocks cell-cell adhesion when the in vitro assay is performed in the presence of univalent goat anti-rabbit antibody. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the univalent second antibody blocks agglutination induced by the rabbit antibody without significantly interfering with its effect on cell-cell adhesion. This method promises to be useful for screening monoclonal antibodies raised against potential cell adhesion molecules because: (a) it allows for the screening of large numbers of antibody samples without preparation of univalent fragments; and (b) it requires much less antibody because of the greater affinity of divalent antibodies for antigens. PMID:6970200

  6. Microfabricated discontinuous-edge surface topographies influence osteoblast adhesion, migration, cytoskeletal organization, and proliferation and enhance matrix and mineral deposition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D W; Wong, K S; Brunette, D M

    2006-05-01

    The fabrication of surfaces that stimulate increased adhesion, migration, and differentiated function of osteoblasts has been viewed as being desirable for many orthopedic applications. Previous studies have shown that microfabricated pits and grooves alter adhesion, spreading, matrix secretion, and production of mineral by rat calvarial osteoblasts (RCOs). The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown, although microenvironment and cell alignment are considered to play a role. The aim of this work was to investigate the behavior of RCOs on microfabricated discontinuous-edge surfaces (DESs), which could provide an alternative means to control both the microenvironment and cellular alignment. Two types of discontinuous-type structures were employed, gap-cornered boxes and micron scale pillars. DES gap-cornered boxes and the pillars influenced the arrangement of F-actin, microtubules, and vinculin. Osteoblasts were guided in their direction of migration on both types of substrata. Both box DESs and pillars altered the staining intensity and localization pattern of phosphotyrosine and src-activated FAK localization. Cell multilayering, matrix deposition, and mineralization were enhanced on both discontinuous topographies when compared with smooth controls. This study shows that DESs alter adhesion, migration, and proliferative responses from osteoblasts at early time points (<1 week) and promote multilayering, matrix deposition, and mineral deposition at later times (2-6 weeks). Such topographical patterns could potentially be employed as effective surface features on bone-contacting implants or in membrane-based periodontal applications.

  7. Effect of channel geometry on cell adhesion in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Green, James V; Kniazeva, Tatiana; Abedi, Mehdi; Sokhey, Darshan S; Taslim, Mohammad E; Murthy, Shashi K

    2009-03-07

    Microfluidic channels coated with ligands are a versatile platform for the separation or enrichment of cells from small sample volumes. This adhesion-based mode of separation is mediated by ligand-receptor bonds between the cells and channel surface and also by fluid shear stress. This paper demonstrates how aspects of microchannel geometry can play an additional role in controlling cell adhesion. With a combination of computational fluid dynamics modeling and cell adhesion experiments, channels with sharp turns are shown to have regions with near-zero velocity at the turn regions where large numbers of cells adhere or become collected. The lack of uniform adhesion in the turn regions compared to other regions of these channels, together with the large variability in observed cell adhesion indicates that channels with sharp turns are not optimal for cell-capture applications where predictable cell adhesion is desired. Channels with curved turns, on the other hand are shown to provide more uniform and predictable cell adhesion provided the gap between parallel arms of the channels is sufficiently wide. The magnitude of cell adhesion in these curved channels is comparable to that in straight channels with no turns.

  8. A Novel Collagen Dot Assay for Monitoring Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Alford, Vincent M; Roth, Eric; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical determinant of cancer invasion and metastasis. Drugs targeting cancer cell migration have been hindered due to the lack of effective assays for monitoring cancer cell migration. Here we describe a novel method to microscopically monitor cell migration in a quantitative fashion. This assay can be used to study genes involved in cancer cell migration, as well as screening anticancer drugs that target this cellular process.

  9. Golgi Anti-apoptotic Proteins Are Highly Conserved Ion Channels That Affect Apoptosis and Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guia; Saraiva, Nuno; Parsons, Maddy; Byrne, Bernadette; Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Golgi anti-apoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are multitransmembrane proteins that are expressed in the Golgi apparatus and are able to homo-oligomerize. They are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and are present in some prokaryotes and orthopoxviruses. Within eukaryotes, GAAPs regulate the Ca2+ content of intracellular stores, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell adhesion and migration. Data presented here demonstrate that purified viral GAAPs (vGAAPs) and human Bax inhibitor 1 form ion channels and that vGAAP from camelpox virus is selective for cations. Mutagenesis of vGAAP, including some residues conserved in the recently solved structure of a related bacterial protein, BsYetJ, altered the conductance (E207Q and D219N) and ion selectivity (E207Q) of the channel. Mutation of residue Glu-207 or -178 reduced the effects of GAAP on cell migration and adhesion without affecting protection from apoptosis. In contrast, mutation of Asp-219 abrogated the anti-apoptotic activity of GAAP but not its effects on cell migration and adhesion. These results demonstrate that GAAPs are ion channels and define residues that contribute to the ion-conducting pore and affect apoptosis, cell adhesion, and migration independently. PMID:25713081

  10. Continual Cell Deformation Induced via Attachment to Oriented Fibers Enhances Fibroblast Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sisi; Ricotta, Vincent; Simon, Marcia; Clark, Richard A. F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm for maximal contact with the fiber edge. In the case of en-mass cell migration out of an agarose droplet, fibroblasts on flat surfaces emerged with an enhanced velocity, v = 52μm/h, that decreases to the single cell value, v = 28μm/h within 24 hours and remained constant for at least four days. Fibroblasts emerging on fibrillar surfaces emerged with the single cell velocity, which remained constant for the first 24 hours and then increased reaching a plateau with more than twice the initial velocity within the next three days. The focal adhesions were distributed uniformly in cells on flat surfaces, while on the fibrillar surface they were clustered along the cell periphery. Furthermore, the number of focal adhesions for the cells on the flat surfaces remained constant, while it decreased on the fibrillar surface during the next three days. The deformation of the cell nuclei was found to be 50% larger on the fiber surfaces for the first 24 hours. While the mean deformation remained constant on the flat surface, it increased for the next three days by 24% in cells on fibers. On the fourth day, large actin/myosin fibers formed in cells on fibrillar surfaces only and coincided with a change from the standard migration mechanism involving extension of lamellipodia, and retraction of the rear, to one involving strong contractions oriented along the fibers and centered about the nucleus. PMID:25774792

  11. Adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a human oral cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, rapid assays were developed to study the adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium associated with periodontal disease, to human epithelial cells. The human oral carcinoma cell line KB was grown in microtiter plates, and adherent bacteria were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans serum and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody or [3H]thymidine-labeled bacteria. Adhesion was found to be time dependent and increased linearly with increasing numbers of bacteria added. Variation in the level of adhesion was noted among strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Adhesion was not significantly altered by changes in pH (from pH 5 to 9) but was sensitive to sodium chloride concentrations greater than 0.15 M. Pooled human saliva was inhibitory for adhesion when bacteria were pretreated with saliva before being added to the cells. Pretreatment of the KB cells with saliva did not inhibit adhesion. Protease treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans reduced adhesion of the bacteria to KB cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that a protein(s) is required for bacterial adhesion and that host components may play a role in modulating adhesion to epithelial cells. Images PMID:8063383

  12. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca2+ in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca2+ stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca2+ is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca2+/H+ exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca2+ signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca2+ is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca2+ stores in the control of Ca2+-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  13. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  14. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome.

  15. Reelin promotes the adhesion and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells via integrin β1 signaling and STAT3.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Yan, Fan; Zhao, Dandan; Lv, Meng; Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Hui; Qin, Xiaodan; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Jie; Sun, Xiuyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is essential for neuron migration and positioning. The expression of reelin in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its association with cell adhesion and survival were investigated. Overexpression, siRNA knockdown, and the addition of recombinant protein of reelin were used to examine the function of reelin in MM cells. Clinically, high expression of reelin was negatively associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Functionally, reelin promoted the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin via activation of α5β1 integrin. The resulting phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) led to the activation of Src/Syk/STAT3 and Akt, crucial signaling molecules involved in enhancing cell adhesion and protecting cells from drug-induced cell apoptosis. These findings indicate reelin's important role in the activation of integrin-β1 and STAT3/Akt pathways in multiple myeloma and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting reelin/integrin/FAK axis.

  16. Patterned Poly(dopamine) Films for Enhanced Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Choi, Gwan H; Björnmalm, Mattias; Dai, Yunlu; Yoo, Pil J; Caruso, Frank

    2017-01-18

    Engineered materials that promote cell adhesion and cell growth are important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, we produced poly(dopamine) (PDA) films with engineered patterns for improved cell adhesion. The patterned films were synthesized via the polymerization of dopamine at the air-water interface of a floating bed of spherical particles. Subsequent dissolution of the particles yielded free-standing PDA films with tunable geometrical patterns. Our results show that these patterned PDA films significantly enhance the adhesion of both cancer cells and stem cells, thus showing promise as substrates for cell attachment for various biomedical applications.

  17. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  18. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani, Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Single cell patterning holds important implications for biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. The challenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hosting only single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period of time. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses a covalently-bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells with improved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viability on gold patterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that cell adhesion is regulated by the type, availability and stability of effective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound short peptides would promote cell spreading and thus, single cell adhesion and viability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlying mechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion and prolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparing cellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on three model surfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin, physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently-bound Lys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and binding properties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin in producing adhesion of only single cells, while the covalently bound peptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosis of adhered cells. Controlling cell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis and viability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materials interaction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays of single cells. PMID:17371055

  19. Dynamic control over cell adhesive properties using molecular-based surface engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Robertus, Jort; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2010-01-01

    In complex organisms, cells are often dependent on their extracellular matrix (ECM) for structural integrity, the mechanical properties of tissues, and for signaled regulation of cellular processes including adhesion, migration, growth, secretion, gene expression and apoptosis. Achieving dynamic control, i.e. by using an external stimulus, over the interactions between cells and artificial interfaces holds considerable promise in tissue engineering, medicine, cell biology and immunology. For example, improved spatial control over cell-surface interaction is potentially useful in the design of cell-based screening devices. Dynamic control over SAMs for cell adhesion provides an additional handle to direct and study the attachment of cells to surfaces, e.g., in studying cell spreading from a predetermined pattern in order to screen the cytotoxicity of drug candidates. However, 'reversible' control of cell adhesion onto substrates is an area that is still in its infancy. In this critical review recent developments in cell adhesion of mammalian cells to SAM-modified surfaces, the physical properties of which can be controlled by an external stimulus, e.g. by light, electrochemistry, etc., are discussed (118 references).

  20. Label-free cell-substrate adhesion imaging on plasmonic nanocup arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, L. P.; Seo, S.; Kim, S.; Goddard, L. L.; Liu, G. L.

    2017-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a crucial biological and biomedical parameter defining cell differentiation, cell migration, cell survival, and state of disease. Because of its importance in cellular function, several tools have been developed in order to monitor cell adhesion in response to various biochemical and mechanical cues. However, there remains a need to monitor cell adhesion and cell-substrate separation with a method that allows real-time measurements on accessible equipment. In this article, we present a method to monitor cell-substrate separation at the single cell level using a plasmonic extraordinary optical transmission substrate, which has a high sensitivity to refractive index changes at the metal-dielectric interface. We show how refractive index changes can be detected using intensity peaks in color channel histograms from RGB images taken of the device surface with a brightfield microscope. This allows mapping of the nonuniform refractive index pattern of a single cell cultured on the plasmonic substrate and therefore high-throughput detection of cell-substrate adhesion with observations in real time. PMID:28271009

  1. United we stand: Adhesion and molecular mechanisms driving cell fusion across species.

    PubMed

    Zito, Francesca; Lampiasi, Nadia; Kireev, Igor; Russo, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    Cell-cell fusion is a physiological process playing an essential role for fertilization, shaping organs, tissue repair and immune defense in multicellular organisms. Recent research in the field aims to understand why two or more cells fuse each other and to decipher the general mechanisms regulating this process. Few basic and general steps can be identified, i.e. migration, adhesion and fusion, which are common to different types of cells. As pre-fused and fused cells undergo dramatic changes in their ultrastructure and behavior, the coordinated action of multiple factors is required, including adhesion molecules, cell surface receptors, intracellular kinases, transcription factors, and miRNAs. Although a number of reviews on cell-cell fusion have been published over the years, comprehensive reviews that broadly summarize this process including extracellular and intracellular cues are lacking. For example, a link between cell fusion and adhesive molecules and/or miRNAs has rarely been highlighted in the recent literature. In this review, we will summarize some molecular mechanisms controlling the process of somatic cell-cell fusion during embryonic development. We will specially focus on adhesive molecules, ECM components and miRNAs, providing a summary of important findings on their role in mediating this process in few model systems, in vertebrate and invertebrate organisms.

  2. Assessing the roles of galectins in regulating dendritic cell migration through extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H; Baum, Linda G

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream into tissues, and from tissues to lymph nodes, depends on expression of specific adhesion and signaling molecules by vascular endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. Tissue damage and microbial infection induce vascular endothelial cells to up-regulate expression of adhesion molecules to facilitate entry of several leukocyte populations from blood into tissues. Many of these cells then leave inflamed tissue and migrate to regional lymph nodes. A critical population that emigrates from inflamed tissue is dendritic cells. Dendritic cells in tissue have to migrate through extracellular matrix and across a layer of lymphatic endothelial cells to enter the lymphatic vasculature. Little is known about the adhesion molecules expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells or the processes required for the critical step of dendritic cell exit from tissues, specifically migration through the extracellular matrix and basal-to-apical migration across the lymphatic endothelial cell layer into lymphatic vasculature.Members of the galectin family of carbohydrate binding proteins are expressed in both vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells. Dynamic changes in galectin expression during inflammation are known to regulate leukocyte tissue entry during inflammation. However, the roles of galectin family members expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells in leukocyte tissue exit remain to be explored.Here, we describe an in vitro transmigration assay that mimics dendritic cell tissue exit in the presence and absence of galectin protein. Fluorescently labeled human dendritic cell migration through extracellular matrix and across human lymphatic endothelial cells is examined in the presence and absence of recombinant human galectin protein.

  3. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC.

  4. Myoferlin depletion elevates focal adhesion kinase and paxillin phosphorylation and enhances cell-matrix adhesion in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, B N; Li, R; Ackerman, W E; Ghadiali, S N; Powell, H M; Kniss, D A

    2015-04-15

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of malignant death among women. A crucial feature of metastatic cancers is their propensity to lose adhesion to the underlying basement membrane as they transition to a motile phenotype and invade surrounding tissue. Attachment to the extracellular matrix is mediated by a complex of adhesion proteins, including integrins, signaling molecules, actin and actin-binding proteins, and scaffolding proteins. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is pivotal for the organization of focal contacts and maturation into focal adhesions, and disruption of this process is a hallmark of early cancer invasive potential. Our recent work has revealed that myoferlin (MYOF) mediates breast tumor cell motility and invasive phenotype. In this study we demonstrate that noninvasive breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased cell-substrate adhesion and that silencing of MYOF using RNAi in the highly invasive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 also enhances cell-substrate adhesion. In addition, we detected elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK (FAK(Y397)) and paxillin (PAX(Y118)), markers of focal adhesion protein activation. Morphometric analysis of PAX expression revealed that RNAi-mediated depletion of MYOF resulted in larger, more elongated focal adhesions, in contrast to cells transduced with a control virus (MDA-231(LVC) cells), which exhibited smaller focal contacts. Finally, MYOF silencing in MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a more elaborate ventral cytoskeletal structure near focal adhesions, typified by pronounced actin stress fibers. These data support the hypothesis that MYOF regulates cell adhesions and cell-substrate adhesion strength and may account for the high degree of motility in invasive breast cancer cells.

  5. MIGRESIVES: a research project on migration from adhesives in food-packaging materials in support of European legislation and standardization.

    PubMed

    Störmer, A; Franz, R

    2009-12-01

    Most food packages and food-contact materials are manufactured using adhesives. The European Union regulates all food-contact materials, as their constituents may not contaminate food and endanger consumers' health. In contrast to plastics which are regulated by positive lists of authorized ingredients, adhesives have not yet a specific regulation. The MIGRESIVES project aimed to elaborate a scientific global risk-assessment approach to meet current general European Union regulatory requirements and as a basis for future specific European Union legislation as well as to provide the industry, especially small and medium-sized enterprises, a tool to ensure that migration from adhesives is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. The idea was to demonstrate that consumers' exposure to chemicals released by adhesives is in many cases below levels of concern. Technical/scientific knowledge from industry and research institutes will be merged into a collective research endeavour gathering all stakeholders. The major milestones are (1) the classification of adhesives according to chemistry and uses, (2) the test strategies based on physico-chemical behaviour of adhesives, (3) modelling migration/exposure from adhesives, (4) providing guidelines to integrate the risk-assessment approach into the daily life of companies, (5) the feasibility of applying the toxicological approach from the European Union BIOSAFEPAPER project, and (6) extensive training/education to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and large dissemination for general adoption of the concept in Europe.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Collective Cell Migration in a Three-Dimensional, Heterogeneous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stonko, David P.; Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Peercy, Bradford E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of interest. PMID:25875645

  7. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  8. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  9. Glial chain migration requires pioneer cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoît; Lepelletier, Léa; Giangrande, Angela

    2008-11-05

    The migration of glial chains along the nerve entails directional and coordinated movement. Despite its importance in the formation of the nervous system, this process remains poorly understood, because of the difficulty of manipulating identified cells. Using confocal time-lapse and cell ablation in the whole animal, we provide direct evidence for a discrete number of Drosophila peripheral glial cells acting as pioneers and guiding the rest of the migratory chain. These cells are in direct contact with several follower cells through a very long and stable cytoplasmic extension. The presence of pioneer cells and homotypic interactions at the tip of the chain allows coordinated movement and the formation of a continuous sheath around the nerve. These in vivo data open novel perspectives for understanding the cellular bases of vertebrate glial migration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Chemokine Oligomerization in Cell Signaling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sharp, Joshua S.; Handel, Tracy M.; Prestegard, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins best known for their role in controlling the migration of diverse cells, particularly leukocytes. Upon binding to their G-protein-coupled receptors on the leukocytes, chemokines stimulate the signaling events that cause cytoskeletal rearrangements involved in cell movement, and migration of the cells along chemokine gradients. Depending on the cell type, chemokines also induce many other types of cellular responses including those related to defense mechanisms, cell proliferation, survival, and development. Historically, most research efforts have focused on the interaction of chemokines with their receptors, where monomeric forms of the ligands are the functionally relevant state. More recently, however, the importance of chemokine interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans has come to light, and in most cases appears to involve oligomeric chemokine structures. This review summarizes existing knowledge relating to the structure and function of chemokine oligomers, and emerging methodology for determining structures of complex chemokine assemblies in the future. PMID:23663982

  11. Protein conformation as a regulator of cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2014-04-14

    The dynamic regulation of cell-matrix adhesion is essential for tissue homeostasis and architecture, and thus numerous pathologies are linked to altered cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and ECM scaffold. The molecular machinery involved in cell-matrix adhesion is complex and involves both sensory and matrix-remodelling functions. In this review, we focus on how protein conformation controls the organization and dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion. The conformational changes in various adhesion machinery components are described, including examples from ECM as well as cytoplasmic proteins. The discussed mechanisms involved in the regulation of protein conformation include mechanical stress, post-translational modifications and allosteric ligand-binding. We emphasize the potential role of intrinsically disordered protein regions in these processes and discuss the role of protein networks and co-operative protein interactions in the formation and consolidation of cell-matrix adhesion and extracellular scaffolds.

  12. Ultraweak sugar-sugar interactions for transient cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Pincet, F; Le Bouar, T; Zhang, Y; Esnault, J; Mallet, J M; Perez, E; Sinaÿ, P

    2001-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are rarely considered in biologically relevant situations such as cell recognition and adhesion. One Ca(2+)-mediated homotypic interaction between two Lewis(x) determinants (Le(x)) has been proposed to drive cell adhesion in murine embryogenesis. Here, we confirm the existence of this specific interaction by reporting the first direct quantitative measurements in an environment akin to that provided by membranes. The adhesion between giant vesicles functionalized with Le(x) was obtained by micropipette aspiration and contact angle measurements. This interaction is below the thermal energy, and cell-cell adhesion will require a large number of molecules, as illustrated by the Le(x) concentration peak observed at the cell membranes during the morula stage of the embryo. This adhesion is ultralow and therefore difficult to measure. Such small interactions explain why the concept of specific interactions between carbohydrates is often neglected. PMID:11222296

  13. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Coelho; Florentino, Rodrigo Machado; França, Andressa; Matias, Eveline; Guimarães, Paola Bianchi; Batista, Carolina; Freire, Valder; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Pesquero, João Bosco; de Paula, Ana Maria; Foureaux, Giselle; Leite, Maria de Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II). More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet. Aim Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration. Results We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC), and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5) showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Conclusion ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration. PMID:27992423

  14. The cell ratchet: Interplay between efficient protrusions and adhesion determines cell motion

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, David; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many physiological and pathological processes involve directed cell motion. In general, migrating cells are represented with a polarized morphology with extending and retracting protrusions at the leading edge. However, cell motion is a more complex phenomenon. Cells show heterogeneous morphologies and high protrusive dynamics is not always related to cell shape. This prevents the quantitative prediction of cell motion and the identification of cellular mechanisms setting directionality. Here we discuss the importance of protrusion fluctuations in directed cell motion. We show how their spatiotemporal distribution and dynamics determine the fluctuations and directions of cell motion for NIH3T3 fibroblasts plated on micro-patterned adhesive ratchets.1 We introduce efficient protrusions and direction index which capture short-term cell motility over hours: these new read-outs allow the prediction of parameters characteristic for the long-term motion of cells over days. The results may have important implications for the study of biological phenomena where directed cell migration is involved, in morphogenesis and in cancer. PMID:26313125

  15. Tumor cell migration is a superstatistical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Over short time scales, cell migration can be well described as a homogeneous correlated random walk with a fixed average step length and a certain degree of directional persistence. On time scales of up to 24 h, however, the migration process is highly inhomogeneous. Superstatistical fluctuations of step length and directional persistence lead to ``anomalous'' features, such as an exponential step width distribution (SWD) and a superdiffusive mean squared displacement (MSD). These features are quantitatively reproduced by a correlated random walk with temporally varying persistence. By comparing cell migration on planar substrates and in a 3D collagen matrix, we demonstrate that the globally averaged MSD and SWD are not sensitive to the microscopic migration mechanism of the cells and can therefore yield identical results in these different environments. By contrast, the temporal fluctuations of step length and directional persistence, and their mutual correlations, provide a characteristic fingerprint of the migration process in different environments. In collaboration with Julian Steinwachs and Claus Metzner, Department of Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

  16. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  17. Effects of curvature and cell-cell interaction on cell adhesion in microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yan, W W; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2010-10-01

    It has been found that both circulating blood cells and tumor cells are more easily adherent to curved microvessels than straight ones. This motivated us to investigate numerically the effect of the curvature of the curved vessel on cell adhesion. In this study, the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and the cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. The adhesive dynamics model involved the effect of receptor-ligand bonds between circulating cells and endothelial cells (ECs). It is found that the curved vessel would increase the simultaneous bond number, and the probability of cell adhesion is increased consequently. The interaction between traveling cells would also affect the cell adhesion significantly. For two-cell case, the simultaneous bond number of the rear cell is increased significantly, and the curvature of microvessel further enhances the probability of cell adhesion.

  18. Cleavage and Cell Adhesion Properties of Human Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (HEPCAM)*

    PubMed Central

    Tsaktanis, Thanos; Kremling, Heidi; Pavšič, Miha; von Stackelberg, Ricarda; Mack, Brigitte; Fukumori, Akio; Steiner, Harald; Vielmuth, Franziska; Spindler, Volker; Huang, Zhe; Jakubowski, Jasmine; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Luxenburger, Elke; Lauber, Kirsten; Lenarčič, Brigita; Gires, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Human epithelial cell adhesion molecule (HEPCAM) is a tumor-associated antigen frequently expressed in carcinomas, which promotes proliferation after regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Here, we describe extracellular shedding of HEPCAM at two α-sites through a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) and at one β-site through BACE1. Transmembrane cleavage by γ-secretase occurs at three γ-sites to generate extracellular Aβ-like fragments and at two ϵ-sites to release human EPCAM intracellular domain HEPICD, which is efficiently degraded by the proteasome. Mapping of cleavage sites onto three-dimensional structures of HEPEX cis-dimer predicted conditional availability of α- and β-sites. Endocytosis of HEPCAM warrants acidification in cytoplasmic vesicles to dissociate protein cis-dimers required for cleavage by BACE1 at low pH values. Intramembrane cleavage sites are accessible and not part of the structurally important transmembrane helix dimer crossing region. Surprisingly, neither chemical inhibition of cleavage nor cellular knock-out of HEPCAM using CRISPR-Cas9 technology impacted the adhesion of carcinoma cell lines. Hence, a direct function of HEPCAM as an adhesion molecule in carcinoma cells is not supported and appears to be questionable. PMID:26292218

  19. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  20. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  1. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Muralidharan, Pooja; Curtis, Courtney L.; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Buente, Bryce B.; Holdgrafer, David J.; Ogbeifun, Osato; Olorungbounmi, Opeyemi C.; Patino, Liliana; Lucas, Ryan; Gilbert, Sonya; Groninger, Evan S.; Arciero, Julia; Edenberg, Howard J.; Marrs, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell), prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a), which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue) microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression. PMID:24167711

  2. Vinculin regulates directionality and cell polarity in two- and three-dimensional matrix and three-dimensional microtrack migration

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Aniqua; Carey, Shawn P.; Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Goldblatt, Zachary E.; Bordeleau, Francois; Lampi, Marsha C.; Lin, Deanna Y.; García, Andrés J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    During metastasis, cells can use proteolytic activity to form tube-like “microtracks” within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using these microtracks, cells can migrate unimpeded through the stroma. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of microtrack migration, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) micromolded collagen platform. When in microtracks, cells tend to migrate unidirectionally. Because focal adhesions are the primary mechanism by which cells interact with the ECM, we examined the roles of several focal adhesion molecules in driving unidirectional motion. Vinculin knockdown results in the repeated reversal of migration direction compared with control cells. Tracking the position of the Golgi centroid relative to the position of the nucleus centroid reveals that vinculin knockdown disrupts cell polarity in microtracks. Vinculin also directs migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrates and in 3D uniform collagen matrices, as indicated by reduced speed, shorter net displacement, and decreased directionality in vinculin-deficient cells. In addition, vinculin is necessary for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation in three dimensions, as vinculin knockdown results in reduced FAK activation in both 3D uniform collagen matrices and microtracks but not on 2D substrates, and, accordingly, FAK inhibition halts cell migration in 3D microtracks. Together these data indicate that vinculin plays a key role in polarization during migration. PMID:26960796

  3. Vinculin Regulates Directionality and Cell Polarity in 2D, 3D Matrix and 3D Microtrack Migration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aniqua; Carey, Shawn P; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Goldblatt, Zachary E; Bordeleau, Francois; Lampi, Marsha C; Lin, Deanna Y; García, Andrés J; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-03-09

    During metastasis, cells can use proteolytic activity to form tube-like "microtracks" within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using these microtracks, cells can migrate unimpeded through the stroma. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of microtrack migration, we developed an in vitro 3D micromolded collagen platform. When in microtracks, cells tend to migrate unidirectionally. Since focal adhesions are the primary mechanism by which cells interact with the ECM, we examined the roles of several focal adhesion molecules in driving unidirectional motion. Vinculin knockdown results in the repeated reversal of migration direction compared with control cells. Tracking the position of the Golgi centroid relative to the position of the nucleus centroid reveals that vinculin knockdown disrupts cell polarity in microtracks. Vinculin also directs migration on 2D substrates and in 3D uniform collagen matrices, indicated by reduced speed, shorter net displacement and decreased directionality in vinculin-deficient cells. In addition, vinculin is necessary for Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) activation in 3D as vinculin knockdown results in reduced FAK activation in both 3D uniform collagen matrices and microtracks, but not on 2D substrates, and accordingly, FAK inhibition halts cell migration in 3D microtracks. Together, these data indicate that vinculin plays a key role in polarization during migration.

  4. Cell migration on ridges and cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Watts, John; Homan, Tess; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a model system for the study of cellular migration, an important physiological process that occurs in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We study the motion of D. discoideum on surfaces with various topographies, particularly those that affect the direction of cellular migration. Topographical features, such as ridges and cliffs, were fabricated using multiphoton absorption polymerization. As the cells encountered these topographical features, we tracked their overall motions and shapes, as well as the locations and intensities of certain intracellular signals. We found that when cells undergoing chemokinesis, random migration in response to a chemical signal, encounter a ridge, they tend to move along that ridge, even if the ridge is shorter than the cell. When cells undergoing chemotaxis, directed migration in response to a chemical signal, are directed off of a cliff, they do not fall off the cliff. Instead, they search for new attachment points, eventually change direction, and continue moving along the edge of the cliff. Both ridges and cliffs affect more than just the motion of a cell; they also affect its shape.

  5. Cadherin-11 endocytosis through binding to clathrin promotes cadherin-11-mediated migration in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L; Pan, Tianhong; Bilen, Mehmet A; Li, Xiaoxia; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ortiz, Angelica; Kowalczyk, Andrew P; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-12-15

    Cadherin-11 (Cad11) cell adhesion molecule plays a role in prostate cancer cell migration. Because disassembly of adhesion complexes through endocytosis of adhesion proteins has been shown to play a role in cell migration, we examined whether Cad11 endocytosis plays a role in Cad11-mediated migration. The mechanism by which Cad11 is internalized is unknown. Using a GST pulldown assay, we found that clathrin binds to the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain but not to that of E-cadherin. Using deletion analysis, we identified a unique sequence motif, VFEEE, in the Cad11 membrane proximal region (amino acid residues 11-15) that binds to clathrin. Endocytosis assays using K(+)-depletion buffer showed that Cad11 internalization is clathrin dependent. Proximity ligation assays showed that Cad11 colocalizes with clathrin, and immunofluorescence assays showed that Cad11 localizes in vesicles that stain for the early endosomal marker Rab5. Deletion of the VFEEE sequence from the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain (Cad11-cla-Δ5) leads to inhibition of Cad11 internalization and reduces Cad11-mediated cell migration in C4-2B and PC3-mm2 prostate cancer cells. These observations suggest that clathrin-mediated internalization of Cad11 regulates surface trafficking of Cad11 and that dynamic turnover of Cad11 regulates the migratory function of Cad11 in prostate cancer cells.

  6. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  7. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences. PMID:27680883

  8. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Ezio; Ingangi, Vincenzo; Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences.

  9. Substrate microtopography can enhance cell adhesive and migratory responsiveness to matrix ligand density.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, C S; Moghe, P V

    2001-02-01

    The regulation of cell motility by ligand density on substrates with variable microtopography is not well understood. In this report, we studied the adhesion and motility behavior of HepG2 cells on microtextured poly(glycolic-co-lactic)acid (PGLA) copolymer substrates, whose surface bioactivity was differentially modified through the adsorption of 0-5.5 ng/cm(2) collagen. Microtextured PGLA substrates were fabricated as thin films with a uniform surface distribution of micropores of median size of 3.1 +/- 1.5 microm and three-dimensional root mean squared roughness of 0.253 microm. Even in the absence of collagen, cells on microtextured substrates responded to substrate topography by exhibiting a 200% increase in adhesion strength compared with untextured controls and ventral localization of the intracellular adhesion protein vinculin. Further enhancement in adhesion strength (420% over untextured, untreated substrates) was demonstrated with bioactivated, microtextured surfaces, indicating that cell adhesion responses to topography and surface ligand density were cooperative. Our motility studies of cells on untextured substrates adsorbed with different levels of collagen demonstrated that a classical biphasic relationship between the cell population averaged migration rate, mu, and the collagen ligand density was preserved. However, comparison of cell motility responses between untextured and microtextured substrates indicates that the motility versus ligand density curve shifted, such that equivalent levels of cell motility were achieved at lower ligand density on microtextured surfaces. Furthermore, the maximum mu values achieved on the microtextured substrates exceeded those on untextured substrates by twofold. Taken together, we show that the magnitude of subcellular scale microtexture of a polymer substrate can sensitize the cell motility responsiveness to substrate ligand concentration; we suggest that the underlying mechanisms involve alteration in the

  10. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  11. Nanostructured conducting polymers for stiffness controlled cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Eric; Hama, Adel; Ismailova, Esma; Assaud, Loic; Malliaras, George; Hanbücken, Margrit; Owens, Roisin M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a facile and reproducible method, based on ultra thin porous alumina membranes, to produce cm2 ordered arrays of nano-pores and nano-pillars on any kind of substrates. In particular our method enables the fabrication of conducting polymers nano-structures, such as poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (PEDOT:PSS). Here, we demonstrate the potential interest of those templates with controlled cell adhesion studies. The triggering of the eventual fate of the cell (proliferation, death, differentiation or migration) is mediated through chemical cues from the adsorbed proteins and physical cues such as surface energy, stiffness and topography. Interestingly, as well as through material properties, stiffness modifications can be induced by nano-topography, the ability of nano-pillars to bend defining an effective stiffness. By controlling the diameter, length, depth and material of the nano-structures, one can possibly tune the effective stiffness of a (nano) structured substrate. First results indicate a possible change in the fate of living cells on such nano-patterned devices, whether they are made of conducting polymer (soft material) or silicon (hard material).

  12. Eimeria bovis modulates adhesion molecule gene transcription in and PMN adhesion to infected bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja

    2006-04-01

    Eimeria bovis is an important coccidian parasite of cattle causing severe diarrhea in young animals. Its first schizogony takes place in endothelial cells of the ileum resulting in the formation of macroschizonts 14-18 days p.i. This longlasting development suggests a particular immune evasion strategy of the parasite. Here, we analyse early innate immune reactions to E. bovis by determining the adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to infected endothelial cell layers under flow conditions and the transcription of adhesion molecule genes in infected host cells. Bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC) were infected with E. bovis sporozoites. Sporozoites invaded BUVEC within 1h and the first mature macroschizonts occurred 14 days p.i. PMN adhesion was enhanced in E. bovis-infected BUVEC layers as early as 8h p.i.; maximum adhesion occurred 48 h p.i. Increased adhesion rates persisted until the end of the observation period at 14 days p.i. PMN adhered to both infected and uninfected cells within monolayers, suggesting paracrine cell activation. E. bovis infection upregulated the transcription of genes encoding for P-selectin, E-selectin, vascular cellular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). Most marked effects concerned E-selectin followed by P-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Increased transcript levels were found beginning 30 min p.i. and maximum values occurred 1-2h p.i. (P-selectin) and 2-4h p.i. (E-selectin, VCAM-1, ICAM-1). By 12-24h p.i. levels had decreased to those of uninfected controls. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced PMN adhesion was significantly reduced in infected vs. uninfected BUVEC. Eimeria bovis also had suppressive effects on TNFalpha-mediated upregulation of adhesion molecule gene transcription. The data presented here suggest that infection of BUVEC with E. bovis on one hand induces proinflammatory reactions resulting in enhanced PMN adhesion mediated by upregulated adhesion

  13. Retinoic acid induces nuclear FAK translocation and reduces breast cancer cell adhesion through Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angel Matías; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Vargas-Roig, Laura María; Flamini, Marina Inés

    2016-07-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women, with metastases being the cause of death in 98%. In previous works we have demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA), the main retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ligand, is involved in the metastatic process by inhibiting migration through a reduced expression of the specific migration-related proteins Moesin, c-Src, and FAK. At present, our hypothesis is that RA also acts for short periods in a non-genomic action to cooperate with motility reduction and morphology of breast cancer cells. Here we identify that the administration of 10(-6) M RA (10-20 min) induces the activation of the migration-related proteins Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin in T-47D breast cancer cells. The phosphorylation exerted by the selective agonists for RARα and RARβ, on Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin was comparable to the activation exerted by RA. The RARγ agonist only led to a weak activation, suggesting the involvement of RARα and RARβ in this pathway. We then treated the cells with different inhibitors that are involved in cell signaling to regulate the mechanisms of cell motility. RA failed to activate Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin in cells treated with Src inhibitor (PP2) and PI3K inhibitor (WM), suggesting the participation of Src-PI3K in this pathway. Treatment with 10(-6) M RA for 20 min significantly decreased cell adhesion. However, when cells were treated with 10(-6) M RA and FAK inhibitor, the RA did not significantly inhibit adhesion, suggesting a role of FAK in the adhesion inhibited by RA. By immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analysis we demonstrated that RA induced nuclear FAK translocation leading to a reduced cellular adhesion. These findings provide new information on the actions of RA for short periods. RA participates in cell adhesion and subsequent migration, modulating the relocation and activation of proteins involved in cell migration.

  14. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  15. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  16. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  17. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  18. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  19. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Pandya, Chirayu D; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Chutkan, Norman; Markand, Shanu; Hill, William D; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38) and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  20. Pro-metastatic NEDD9 regulates individual cell migration via caveolin-1-dependent trafficking of integrins

    PubMed Central

    Kozyulina, Polina Y.; Loskutov, Yuriy V.; Kozyreva, Varvara K.; Rajulapati, Anuradha; Ice, Ryan J.; Jones, Brandon. C.; Pugacheva, Elena N.

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of tumor cells relies on efficient cell adhesion and migration, which in turn depends upon endocytic trafficking of integrins. In the current work, it was found that depletion of pro-metastatic protein, NEDD9, in breast cancer (BC) cells results in a significant decrease in individual cell migration due to impaired trafficking of ligand-bound integrins. NEDD9 deficiency does not affect the expression or internalization of integrins but heightens caveolae-dependent trafficking of ligand-bound integrins to early endosomes. Increase in mobility of ligand-bound integrins is concomitant with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin-1 (CAV1) and volume of CAV1-vesicles. NEDD9 directly binds to CAV1 and co-localizes within CAV1 vesicles. In the absence of NEDD9, the trafficking of ligand-bound integrins from early to late endosomes is impaired, resulting in a significant decrease in degradation of ligand/integrin complexes and an increase in recycling of ligand-bound integrins from early endosomes back to the plasma membrane without ligand disengagement, thus leading to low adhesion and migration. Re-expression of NEDD9 or decrease in the amount of active, tyrosine 14 phosphorylated (Tyr14) CAV1 in NEDD9 depleted cells rescues the integrin trafficking deficiency and restores cellular adhesion and migration capacity. Collectively, these findings indicate that NEDD9 orchestrates trafficking of ligand-bound integrins through the attenuation of CAV1 activity. PMID:25319010

  1. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues.

  2. Effect of the Fructus Ligustri Lucidi extract and its monomers quercetin and oleanolic acid on the adhesion and migration of melanocytes and intracellular actin

    PubMed Central

    WU, YANHUA; LI, QILIN; LI, XIANGJUN; HE, DANHUA; NIU, MU; LU, XIAOJUAN; LI, HUI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) extract and its monomers quercetin and oleanolic acid on the adhesion and migration of human epidermal melanocytes (MCs) and intracellular actin. The human epidermal MCs were cultured and identified. The cells were treated with different concentrations of FLL extract, quercetin and oleanolic acid. The adhesion and migration abilities of the cells were determined by the fibronectin-coated culture experiment and Transwell assay, respectively. The structure and distribution of intracellular actin were observed by confocal laser microscopy, with semi-quantitative analysis. Results showed that compared with the control group, 0.0375–0.3 mg/ml of the FLL extract and 40 µM quercetin significantly improved the adhesion rate of MCs (P<0.05). The numbers of MCs permeating the microporous membrane in the 0.15 mg/ml FLL extract and 12 µM oleanolic acid groups were 43.7 and 30.3, respectively, significantly higher compared to the control group (P<0.01). In the control group, the intracellular actin was less, and the stress fiber structure was not clear. In the 0.15 mg/ml FLL extract, 12 µM oleanolic acid and 40 µM quercetin groups, there were numerous bunched stress fibers, indicating the aggregation of filamentous fibrous actin. The mean optical densities of actin expression in the 0.15 mg/ml FLL extract, 12 µM oleanolic acid and 40 µM quercetin groups were significantly higher compared to the control group (P<0.05). The FLL extract has a significant stimulatory effect on the adhesion and migration of human epidermal MCs. The mechanism may be associated with the promotion of intracellular actin cytoskeleton aggregation. PMID:27123251

  3. β-PIX controls intracellular viscoelasticity to regulate lung cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Helen Wenshin; Chen, Yin-Quan; Huang, Chi-Ming; Liu, Ching-Yi; Chiou, Arthur; Wang, Yang-Kao; Tang, Ming-Jer; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer metastasis occurs via a progress involving abnormal cell migration. Cell migration, a dynamic physical process, is controlled by the cytoskeletal system, which includes the dynamics of actin organization and cellular adhesive organelles, focal adhesions (FAs). However, it is not known whether the organization of actin cytoskeletal system has a regulatory role in the physiologically relevant aspects of cancer metastasis. In the present studies, it was found that lung adenocarcinoma cells isolated from the secondary lung cancer of the lymph nodes, H1299 cells, show specific dynamics in terms of the actin cytoskeleton and FAs. This results in a higher level of mobility and this is regulated by an immature FA component, β-PIX (PAK-interacting exchange factor-β). In H1299 cells, β-PIX's activity was found not to be down-regulated by sequestration onto stress fibres, as the cells did not bundle actin filaments into stress fibres. Thus, β-PIX mainly remained localized at FAs, which allowed maturation of nascent adhesions into focal complexes; this resulted in actin polymerization, increased actin network integrity, changes in the intracellular microrheology at the peripheral of the cell, and cell polarity, which in turn regulated cell migration. Perturbation of β-PIX caused an inhibition of cell migration, including migration velocity, accumulated distance and directional persistence. Our results demonstrate the importance of β-PIX to the regulation of high mobility of lung adenocarcinoma cell line H1299 and that this occurs via regulation of FA dynamics, changes in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell polarity. PMID:25683605

  4. The structure of cell-matrix adhesions: the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Hanein, Dorit; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2012-02-01

    Adhesions between the cell and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mechanosensitive multi-protein assemblies that transmit force across the cell membrane and regulate biochemical signals in response to the chemical and mechanical environment. These combined functions in force transduction, signaling and mechanosensing contribute to cellular phenotypes that span development, homeostasis and disease. These adhesions form, mature and disassemble in response to actin organization and physical forces that originate from endogenous myosin activity or external forces by the extracellular matrix. Despite advances in our understanding of the protein composition, interactions and regulation, our understanding of matrix adhesion structure and organization, how forces affect this organization, and how these changes dictate specific signaling events is limited. Insights across multiple structural levels are acutely needed to elucidate adhesion structure and ultimately the molecular basis of signaling and mechanotransduction. Here we describe the challenges and recent advances and prospects for unraveling the structure of cell-matrix adhesions and their response to force.

  5. A Photoactivatable Nanopatterned Substrate for Analyzing Collective Cell Migration with Precisely Tuned Cell-Extracellular Matrix Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Boehm, Heike; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Spatz, Joachim P.; Nakanishi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML), and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K) and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions. PMID:24632806

  6. Cell Chirality Induces Collective Cell Migration in Epithelial Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    During early development, epithelial cells form a monolayer sheet and migrate in a uniform direction. Here, we address how this collective migration can occur without breaking the cell-to-cell attachments. Repeated contraction and expansion of the cell-to-cell interfaces enables the cells to rearrange their positions autonomously within the sheet. We show that when the interface tension is strengthened in a direction that is tilted from the body axis, cell rearrangements occur in such a way that unidirectional movement is induced. We use a vertex model to demonstrate that such anisotropic tension can generate the unidirectional motion of cell sheets. Our results suggest that cell chirality facilitates collective cell migration during tissue morphogenesis.

  7. In vivo collective cell migration requires an LPAR2-dependent increase in tissue fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Sei; Theveneau, Eric; Benedetto, Alexandre; Parsons, Maddy; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Charras, Guillaume; Kabla, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) are common to cancer and morphogenesis, and are often considered to be mutually exclusive in spite of the fact that many cancer and embryonic cells that have gone through EMT still cooperate to migrate collectively. Here we use neural crest (NC) cells to address the question of how cells that have down-regulated cell–cell adhesions can migrate collectively. NC cell dissociation relies on a qualitative and quantitative change of the cad