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Sample records for adhesion cell migration

  1. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    PubMed

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  2. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. PMID:26727165

  3. Migration of adhesive glioma cells: Front propagation and fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Charteris, Nicholas; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the migration of glioma cells as a front propagation phenomenon both theoretically (by using both discrete lattice modeling and a continuum approach) and experimentally. For small effective strength of cell-cell adhesion q, the front velocity does not depend on q. When q exceeds a critical threshold, a fingeringlike front propagation is observed due to cluster formation in the invasive zone. We show that the experiments correspond to the transient regime, before the regime of front propagation is established. We performed an additional experiment on cell migration. A detailed comparison with experimental observations showed that the theory correctly predicts the maximal migration distance but underestimates the migration of the main mass of cells.

  4. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  5. Mechanics in Mechanosensitivity of Cell Adhesion and its Roles in Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; He, Shijie; Ji, Baohua

    2012-12-01

    Cells sense and respond to external stimuli and properties of their environment through focal adhesion complexes (FACs) to regulate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including cell migration. Currently, the basic principles in mechanics of the mechanosensitivity of cell adhesion and migration have not been fully understood. In this paper, an FEM-based mechano-chemical coupling model is proposed for studying the cell migration behaviors in which the dynamics of stability of FACs and the effect of cell shape on cell traction force distribution are considered. We find that the driving force of cell migration is produced by the competition of stability of cell adhesion between the cell front and cell rear, which consequently controls the speed of cell migration. We show that the rigidity gradient of matrix can bias this competition which allows cell to exhibit a durotaxis behavior, i.e. the larger the gradient, the higher the cell speed.

  6. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  7. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  8. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazão, Tiago F; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and have critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA-mediated interference screen, we identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We found that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via the kinases OXSR1 and STK39 and the ion co-transporter SLC12A2. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway previously known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration.

  9. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazão, Tiago F; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and have critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA-mediated interference screen, we identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We found that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via the kinases OXSR1 and STK39 and the ion co-transporter SLC12A2. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway previously known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration. PMID:27400149

  10. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Su, Fong-Chin

    2005-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level (approximately 600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration.

  11. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  12. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  13. Confinement and low adhesion induce fast amoeboid migration of slow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Le Berre, Maël; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Heuzé, Mélina; Takaki, Tohru; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-02-12

    The mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) was proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to adapt their migration mode to their environment. While the molecular pathways involved in this transition are well documented, the role of the microenvironment in the MAT is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how confinement and adhesion affect this transition. We report that, in the absence of focal adhesions and under conditions of confinement, mesenchymal cells can spontaneously switch to a fast amoeboid migration phenotype. We identified two main types of fast migration--one involving a local protrusion and a second involving a myosin-II-dependent mechanical instability of the cell cortex that leads to a global cortical flow. Interestingly, transformed cells are more prone to adopt this fast migration mode. Finally, we propose a generic model that explains migration transitions and predicts a phase diagram of migration phenotypes based on three main control parameters: confinement, adhesion, and contractility.

  14. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  15. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  16. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  17. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  18. Controlling cell migration and adhesion into a scaffold by external electric currents.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Leena; Vörös, Janos; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-08-01

    Fabrication of more complex tissue-engineered structures, resembling the tissues and organs in vivo requires combining more than one cell type within the same construct. This can be achieved by designing and fabricating complex scaffolds with asymmetric properties but controlled arrangement of cells within the scaffold could also be realized by using electric current. External electric currents are able to modify cell adhesion, orientation and migration and this can be used for influencing cell location within a scaffold. In this paper we studied the effect of an electric current on cell migration and adhesion into a three-dimensional scaffold through a conductive mesh.

  19. Arachidonic Acid Randomizes Endothelial Cell Motion and Regulates Adhesion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Ninna Struck; Hansen, Anker Jon; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are essential for the evolution, organization, and repair of living organisms. An example of a combination of these processes is the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), which is mediated by a directed migration and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs). Angiogenesis is an essential part of wound healing and a prerequisite of cancerous tumor growth. We investigated the effect of the amphiphilic compound arachidonic acid (AA) on EC adhesion and migration by combining live cell imaging with biophysical analysis methods. AA significantly influenced both EC adhesion and migration, in either a stimulating or inhibiting fashion depending on AA concentration. The temporal evolution of cell adhesion area was well described by a two-phase model. In the first phase, the spreading dynamics were independent of AA concentration. In the latter phase, the spreading dynamics increased at low AA concentrations and decreased at high AA concentrations. AA also affected EC migration; though the instantaneous speed of individual cells remained independent of AA concentration, the individual cells lost their sense of direction upon addition of AA, thus giving rise to an overall decrease in the collective motion of a confluent EC monolayer into vacant space. Addition of AA also caused ECs to become more elongated, this possibly being related to incorporation of AA in the EC membrane thus mediating a change in the viscosity of the membrane. Hence, AA is a promising non-receptor specific regulator of wound healing and angiogenesis. PMID:21966453

  20. Correlation between substratum roughness and wettability, cell adhesion, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Lampin, M; Warocquier-Clérout; Legris, C; Degrange, M; Sigot-Luizard, M F

    1997-07-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading of chick embryo vascular and corneal explants grown on rough and smooth poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were analyzed to test the cell response specificity to substratum surface properties. Different degrees of roughness were obtained by sand-blasting PMMA with alumina grains. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic components of the surface free energy (SFE) were calculated according to Good-van Oss's model. Contact angles were determined using a computerized angle meter. The apolar component of the SFE gamma s(LW), increased with a slight roughness whereas the basic component, gamma s-, decreased. The acido-basic properties disappeared as roughness increased. Incubation of PMMA in culture medium, performed to test the influence if the biological environment, allowed surface adsorption of medium proteins which annihilated roughness effect and restored hydrophilic properties. An organotypic culture assay was carried out in an attempt to relate the biocompatibility to substratum surface state. Cell migration was calculated from the area of cell layer. Cellular adhesion was determined by measuring the kinetic of release of enzymatically dissociated cells. A slight roughness raised the migration are to an upper extent no matter which cell type. Enhancement of the cell adhesion potential was related to the degree of roughness and the hydrophobicity.

  1. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-01-01

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  2. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-03-22

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  3. A direct interaction between fascin and microtubules contributes to adhesion dynamics and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Villari, Giulia; Jayo, Asier; Zanet, Jennifer; Fitch, Briana; Serrels, Bryan; Frame, Margaret; Stramer, Brian M.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Parsons, Maddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fascin is an actin-binding and bundling protein that is highly upregulated in most epithelial cancers. Fascin promotes cell migration and adhesion dynamics in vitro and tumour cell metastasis in vivo. However, potential non-actin bundling roles for fascin remain unknown. Here, we show for the first time that fascin can directly interact with the microtubule cytoskeleton and that this does not depend upon fascin-actin bundling. Microtubule binding contributes to fascin-dependent control of focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration speed. We also show that fascin forms a complex with focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2) and Src, and that this signalling pathway lies downstream of fascin–microtubule association in the control of adhesion stability. These findings shed light on new non actin-dependent roles for fascin and might have implications for the design of therapies to target fascin in metastatic disease. PMID:26542021

  4. Endocytosis Regulates Cell Soma Translocation and the Distribution of Adhesion Proteins in Migrating Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jennifer C.; Schaar, Bruce T.; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brodsky, Frances M.; McConnell, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn neurons migrate from their birthplace to their final location to form a properly functioning nervous system. During these movements, young neurons must attach and subsequently detach from their substrate to facilitate migration, but little is known about the mechanisms cells use to release their attachments. We show that the machinery for clathrin-mediated endocytosis is positioned to regulate the distribution of adhesion proteins in a subcellular region just proximal to the neuronal cell body. Inhibiting clathrin or dynamin function impedes the movement of migrating neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting dynamin function in vitro shifts the distribution of adhesion proteins to the rear of the cell. These results suggest that endocytosis may play a critical role in regulating substrate detachment to enable cell body translocation in migrating neurons. PMID:21445347

  5. Mathematical model for the effects of adhesion and mechanics on cell migration speed.

    PubMed Central

    DiMilla, P A; Barbee, K; Lauffenburger, D A

    1991-01-01

    Migration of mammalian blood and tissue cells over adhesive surfaces is apparently mediated by specific reversible reactions between cell membrane adhesion receptors and complementary ligands attached to the substratum. Although in a number of systems these receptors and ligand molecules have been isolated and identified, a theory capable of predicting the effects of their properties on cell migration behavior currently does not exist. We present a simple mathematical model for elucidating the dependence of cell speed on adhesion-receptor/ligand binding and cell mechanical properties. Our model can be applied to propose answers to questions such as: does an optimal adhesiveness exist for cell movement? How might changes in receptor and ligand density and/or affinity affect the rate of migration? Can cell rheological properties influence movement speed? This model incorporates cytoskeletal force generation, cell polarization, and dynamic adhesion as requirements for persistent cell movement. A critical feature is the proposed existence of an asymmetry in some cell adhesion-receptor property, correlated with cell polarity. We consider two major alternative mechanisms underlying this asymmetry: (a) a spatial distribution of adhesion-receptor number due to polarized endocytic trafficking and (b) a spatial variation in adhesion-receptor/ligand bond strength. Applying a viscoelastic-solid model for cell mechanics allows us to represent one-dimensional locomotion with a system of differential equations describing cell deformation and displacement along with adhesion-receptor dynamics. In this paper, we solve these equations under the simplifying assumption that receptor dynamics are at a quasi-steady state relative to cell locomotion. Thus, our results are strictly valid for sufficiently slow cell movement, as typically observed for tissue cells such as fibroblasts. Numerical examples relevant to experimental systems are provided. Our results predict how cell speed might

  6. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  7. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  8. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  9. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  10. Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles inhibit the adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Minelli, R; Serpe, L; Pettazzoni, P; Minero, V; Barrera, G; Gigliotti, CL; Mesturini, R; Rosa, AC; Gasco, P; Vivenza, N; Muntoni, E; Fantozzi, R; Dianzani, U; Zara, GP; Dianzani, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles (cholbut SLN) provide a delivery system for the anti-cancer drug butyrate. These SLN inhibit the adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells to the endothelium and may act as anti-inflammatory agents. As cancer cell adhesion to endothelium is crucial for metastasis dissemination, here we have evaluated the effect of cholbut SLN on adhesion and migration of cancer cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cholbut SLN was incubated with a number of cancer cell lines or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and adhesion was quantified by a computerized micro-imaging system. Migration was detected by the scratch ‘wound-healing’ assay and the Boyden chamber invasion assay. Expression of ERK and p38 MAPK was analysed by Western blot. Expression of the mRNA for E-cadherin and claudin-1 was measured by RT-PCR. KEY RESULTS Cholbut SLN inhibited HUVEC adhesiveness to cancer cell lines derived from human colon–rectum, breast, prostate cancers and melanoma. The effect was concentration and time-dependent and exerted on both cancer cells and HUVEC. Moreover, these SLN inhibited migration of cancer cells and substantially down-modulated ERK and p38 phosphorylation. The anti-adhesive effect was additive to that induced by the triggering of B7h, which is another stimulus inhibiting both ERK and p38 phosphorylation, and cell adhesiveness. Furthermore, cholbut SLN induced E-cadherin and inhibited claudin-1 expression in HUVEC. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that cholbut SLN could act as an anti-metastastic agent and they add a new mechanism to the anti-tumour activity of this multifaceted preparation of butyrate. PMID:22049973

  11. The Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in T-Cell Adhesion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Braiman, Alex; Isakov, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Crk adaptor proteins are key players in signal transduction from a variety of cell surface receptors. They are involved in early steps of lymphocyte activation through their SH2-mediated transient interaction with signal transducing effector molecules, such as Cbl, ZAP-70, CasL, and STAT5. In addition, they constitutively associate, via their SH3 domain, with effector molecules, such as C3G, that mediate cell adhesion and regulate lymphocyte extravasation and recruitment to sites of inflammation. Recent studies demonstrated that the conformation and function of CrkII is subjected to a regulation by immunophilins, which also affect CrkII-dependent T-cell adhesion to fibronectin and migration toward chemokines. This article addresses mechanisms that regulate CrkII conformation and function, in general, and emphasizes the role of Crk proteins in receptor-coupled signaling pathways that control T-lymphocyte adhesion and migration to inflammatory sites. PMID:26500649

  12. Rab'ing tumor cell migration and invasion: focal adhesion disassembly driven by Rab5.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente A

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been extensively studied in the context of endocytic trafficking because it is critical in the regulation of early endosome dynamics. In addition to this canonical role, evidence obtained in recent years implicates Rab5 in the regulation of cell migration. This novel role of Rab5 is based not only on an indirect relationship between cell migration and endosomal trafficking as separate processes, but also on the direct regulation of signaling proteins implicated in cell migration. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this connection have remained elusive. Recent studies have shown that the activation of Rab5 is a critical event for maintaining the dynamics of focal adhesions, which is fundamental in regulating not only cell migration but also tumor cell invasion.

  13. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  14. Non-muscle myosin II takes centre stage in cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S.; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2010-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) is an actin-binding protein that has actin cross-linking and contractile properties and is regulated by the phosphorylation of its light and heavy chains. The three mammalian NM II isoforms have both overlapping and unique properties. Owing to its position downstream of convergent signalling pathways, NM II is central in the control of cell adhesion, cell migration and tissue architecture. Recent insight into the role of NM II in these processes has been gained from loss-of-function and mutant approaches, methods that quantitatively measure actin and adhesion dynamics and the discovery of NM II mutations that cause monogenic diseases. PMID:19851336

  15. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G.; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J.

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology. PMID:26809067

  16. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  17. [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles inhibit the migration and adhesion of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JING; GU, FENG; DING, TING; LIU, XIAOLI; XING, GENGMEI; ZHAO, YULIANG; ZHANG, NING; MA, YONGJIE

    2010-01-01

    In our previous study, [Gd@C82(OH)22]n, a fullerene-based nanoparticle, exhibited potent anti-tumor effects in mouse tumor-bearing models without detectable toxicity. The mechanism involved in the anti-tumor effect exerted by [Gd@C82(OH)22]n remains to be elucidated. This study found that glioblastoma cells treated with [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles showed a significant impairment in migration and adhesion by cell chemotaxis, scratch and adhesion assays in vitro. Furthermore, our data showed that the key proteins, CD40 and ICAM-1, were involved in the inhibition of adhesion in the [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle-treated glioblastoma cells. Thus, our study suggests that the [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle is a new potential anti-tumor effector and a therapeutic component for malignant glioblastoma infiltration. PMID:22966378

  18. Physical Biology in Cancer. 4. Physical cues guide tumor cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Stroka, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    As tumor cells metastasize from the primary tumor location to a distant secondary site, they encounter an array of biologically and physically heterogeneous microenvironments. While it is well established that biochemical signals guide all stages of the metastatic cascade, mounting evidence indicates that physical cues also direct tumor cell behavior, including adhesion and migration phenotypes. Physical cues acting on tumor cells in vivo include extracellular matrix mechanical properties, dimensionality, and topography, as well as interstitial flow, hydrodynamic shear stresses, and local forces due to neighboring cells. State-of-the-art technologies have recently enabled us and other researchers to engineer cell microenvironments that mimic specific physical properties of the cellular milieu. Through integration of these engineering strategies, along with physics, molecular biology, and imaging techniques, we have acquired new insights into tumor cell adhesion and migration mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the extravasation and invasion stages of the metastatic cascade. We first discuss the physical role of the endothelium during tumor cell extravasation and invasion and how contractility of endothelial and tumor cells contributes to the ability of tumor cells to exit the vasculature. Next, we examine how matrix dimensionality and stiffness coregulate tumor cell adhesion and migration beyond the vasculature. Finally, we summarize how tumor cells translate and respond to physical cues through mechanotransduction. Because of the critical role of tumor cell mechanotransduction at various stages of the metastatic cascade, targeting signaling pathways involved in tumor cell mechanosensing of physical stimuli may prove to be an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. PMID:24133064

  19. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  20. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  1. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour.

    PubMed

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E; Klip, Janna E; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J; Danen, Erik H J; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  2. Collective epithelial cell sheet adhesion and migration on polyelectrolyte multilayers with uniform and gradients of compliance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jessica S; Schlenoff, Joseph B; Keller, Thomas C S

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMUs) are tunable thin films that could serve as coatings for biomedical implants. PEMUs built layer by layer with the polyanion poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) modified with a photosensitive 4-(2-hydroxyethoxy) benzophenone (PAABp) group and the polycation poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) are mechanically tunable by UV irradiation, which forms covalent bonds between the layers and increases PEMU stiffness. PAH-terminated PEMUs (PAH-PEMUs) that were uncrosslinked, UV-crosslinked to a uniform stiffness, or UV-crosslinked with an edge mask or through a neutral density optical gradient filter to form continuous compliance gradients were used to investigate how differences in PEMU stiffness affect the adhesion and migration of epithelial cell sheets from scales of the fish Poecilia sphenops (Black Molly) and Carassius auratus (Comet Goldfish). During the progressive collective cell migration, the edge cells (also known as 'leader' cells) in the sheets on softer uncrosslinked PEMUs and less crosslinked regions of the gradient formed more actin filaments and vinculin-containing adherens junctions and focal adhesions than formed in the sheet cells on stiffer PEMUs or glass. During sheet migration, the ratio of edge cell to internal cell (also known as 'follower' cells) motilities were greater on the softer PEMUs than on the stiffer PEMUs or glass, causing tension to develop across the sheet and periods of retraction, during which the edge cells lost adhesion to the substrate and regions of the sheet retracted toward the more adherent internal cell region. These retraction events were inhibited by the myosin II inhibitor Blebbistatin, which reduced the motility velocity ratios to those for sheets on the stiffer PEMUs. Blebbistatin also caused disassembly of actin filaments, reorganization of focal adhesions, increased cell spreading at the leading edge, as well as loss of edge cell-cell connections in epithelial cell sheets on all surfaces

  3. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  4. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lautscham, Lena A.; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R.; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L.; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C.; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness. PMID:26331248

  5. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  6. Sticky situations: recent advances in control of cell adhesion during neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Solecki, David J

    2012-10-01

    The migration of neurons along glial fibers from a germinal zone (GZ) to their final laminar positions is essential for morphogenesis of the developing brain; aberrations in this process are linked to profound neurodevelopmental and cognitive disorders. During this critical morphogenic movement, neurons must navigate complex migration paths, propelling their cell bodies through the dense cellular environment of the developing nervous system to their final destinations. It is not understood how neurons can successfully migrate along their glial guides through the myriad processes and cell bodies of neighboring neurons. Although much progress has been made in understanding the substrates (Fishell G, Hatten ME: Astrotactin provides a receptor system for CNS neuronal migration. Development 1991, 113:755; Elias LA, Wang DD, Kriegstein AR: Gap junction adhesion is necessary for radial migration in the neocortex. Nature 2007, 448:901; Anton ES, Kreidberg JA, Rakic P: Distinct functions of alpha3 and alpha. (v) integrin receptors in neuronal migration and laminar organization of the cerebral cortex. Neuron 1999, 22:277; Anton ES, Marchionni MA, Lee KF, Rakic P: Role of GGF/neuregulin signaling in interactions between migrating neurons and radial glia in the developing cerebral cortex. Development 1997, 124:3501), guidance mechanisms (Polleux F, Whitford KL, Dijkhuizen PA, Vitalis T, Ghosh A: Control of cortical interneuron migration by neurotrophins and PI3-kinase signaling. Development 2002, 129:3147; Zhou P, et al.: Polarized signaling endosomes coordinate BDNF-induced chemotaxis of cerebellar precursors. Neuron 2007, 55:53; Renaud J, et al.: Plexin-A2 and its ligand, Sema6A, control nucleus-centrosome coupling in migrating granule cells. Nat Neurosci 2008, 11:440), cytoskeletal elements (Schaar BT, McConnell SK: Cytoskeletal coordination during neuronal migration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2005, 102:13652; Tsai JW, Bremner KH, Vallee RB: Dual subcellular roles for LIS1

  7. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    PubMed

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells.

  8. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    PubMed

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells. PMID:26641717

  9. Vanadium(IV) complexes inhibit adhesion, migration and colony formation of UMR106 osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, María S; Cortizo, Ana M; Etcheverry, Susana B

    2008-04-01

    Vanadium is a trace element widely distributed in the environment. In vertebrates it is mainly stored in bone tissue. The unique cellular environment in the bone and the variety of interactions that mediate cancer metastasis determine that certain types of cancer, such as breast and prostate cancer, preferentially metastize in the skeleton. Since this effect usually signifies serious morbidity and grave prognosis there is an increasing interest in the development of new treatments for this pathology. The present work shows that vanadium complexes can inhibit some parameters related to cancer metastasis such as cell adhesion, migration and clonogenicity. We have also investigated the role of protein kinase A in these processes.

  10. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Esther; vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M.; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lehnherr, André; Rieder, Philip; Keller, Philip J.; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Gesemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In this study we have analyzed the function of the MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2A (MDGA2A) protein in zebrafish cranial motoneuron development. MDGA2A is prominently expressed in distinct clusters of cranial motoneurons, especially in the ones of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Analyses of MDGA2A knockdown embryos by light sheet and confocal microscopy revealed impaired migration and aberrant axonal outgrowth of these neurons; suggesting that adhesive interactions mediated by MDGA2A are required for the proper arrangement and outgrowth of cranial motoneuron subtypes. PMID:25572423

  11. Promotion of cell migration by neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is enhanced by PSA in a polysialyltransferase-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng; Wang, Xin; He, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule 140 (NCAM-140) is a glycoprotein and always highly polysialylated in cancer. Functions of polysialic acid (PSA) that binds to N-glycan termini on NCAM remain unclear. ldlD-14 cells, a CHO cell mutant deficient in UDP-Gal 4-epimerase, are useful for structural and functional studies of Gal-containing glycoproteins because their abnormal glycosylation can be converted to normal status by exogenous addition of galactose (Gal). We cloned the genes for NCAM-140 and for polysialyltransferases STX and PST (responsible for PSA synthesis) from normal murine mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and transfected them into ldlD-14 and human breast cancer cells MCF-7. The effect of PSA on NCAM-mediated cell proliferation, motility, migration and adhesion was studied. We found that NCAM-140 significantly promoted cell proliferation, motility and migration, while polysialylation of NCAM-140 catalyzed by STX, but not by PST, enhanced NCAM-mediated cell migration, but not cell proliferation or motility. In addition, PSA catalyzed by different polysialyltransferases affected the adhesion of NCAM to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. PMID:25885924

  12. Problems in biology with many scales of length: Cell-cell adhesion and cell jamming in collective cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Adrian F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Park, Jin-Ah

    2016-04-10

    As do all things in biology, cell mechanosensation, adhesion and migration begin at the scale of the molecule. Collections of molecules assemble to comprise microscale objects such as adhesions, organelles and cells. And collections of cells in turn assemble to comprise macroscale tissues. From the points of view of mechanism and causality, events at the molecular scale are seen most often as being the most upstream and, therefore, the most fundamental and the most important. In certain collective systems, by contrast, events at many scales of length conspire to make contributions of equal importance, and even interact directly and strongly across disparate scales. Here we highlight recent examples in cellular mechanosensing and collective cellular migration where physics at some scale bigger than the cell but smaller than the tissue - the mesoscale - becomes the missing link that is required to tie together findings that might otherwise seem counterintuitive or even unpredictable. These examples, taken together, establish that the phenotypes and the underlying physics of collective cellular migration are far richer than previously anticipated. PMID:26546401

  13. Dynamics of Cell Ensembles on Adhesive Micropatterns: Bridging the Gap between Single Cell Spreading and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-01-01

    The collective dynamics of multicellular systems arise from the interplay of a few fundamental elements: growth, division and apoptosis of single cells; their mechanical and adhesive interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix; and the tendency of polarized cells to move. Micropatterned substrates are increasingly used to dissect the relative roles of these fundamental processes and to control the resulting dynamics. Here we show that a unifying computational framework based on the cellular Potts model can describe the experimentally observed cell dynamics over all relevant length scales. For single cells, the model correctly predicts the statistical distribution of the orientation of the cell division axis as well as the final organisation of the two daughters on a large range of micropatterns, including those situations in which a stable configuration is not achieved and rotation ensues. Large ensembles migrating in heterogeneous environments form non-adhesive regions of inward-curved arcs like in epithelial bridge formation. Collective migration leads to swirl formation with variations in cell area as observed experimentally. In each case, we also use our model to predict cell dynamics on patterns that have not been studied before. PMID:27054883

  14. Disentangling Membrane Dynamics and Cell Migration; Differential Influences of F-actin and Cell-Matrix Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Jacob M; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Endrias Ganebo, Bereket; Gong, Xiaowei; Strömblad, Staffan; Lock, John G

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is heavily interconnected with plasma membrane protrusion and retraction (collectively termed "membrane dynamics"). This makes it difficult to distinguish regulatory mechanisms that differentially influence migration and membrane dynamics. Yet such distinctions may be valuable given evidence that cancer cell invasion in 3D may be better predicted by 2D membrane dynamics than by 2D cell migration, implying a degree of functional independence between these processes. Here, we applied multi-scale single cell imaging and a systematic statistical approach to disentangle regulatory associations underlying either migration or membrane dynamics. This revealed preferential correlations between membrane dynamics and F-actin features, contrasting with an enrichment of links between cell migration and adhesion complex properties. These correlative linkages were often non-linear and therefore context-dependent, strengthening or weakening with spontaneous heterogeneity in cell behavior. More broadly, we observed that slow moving cells tend to increase in area, while fast moving cells tend to shrink, and that the size of dynamic membrane domains is independent of cell area. Overall, we define macromolecular features preferentially associated with either cell migration or membrane dynamics, enabling more specific interrogation and targeting of these processes in future.

  15. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  16. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  17. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-09-15

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is.

  18. PEGylated human plasma fibronectin is proteolytically stable, supports cell adhesion, cell migration, focal adhesion assembly, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Hekmatfar, Sogol; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy W

    2013-01-01

    Delayed wound healing in many chronic wounds has been linked to the degradation of fibronectin (FN) by abnormally high protease levels. We sought to develop a proteolytically stable and functionally active form of FN. For this purpose, we conjugated 3.35 kDa polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) to human plasma fibronectin (HPFN). Conjugation of PEGDA to HPFN or HPFN PEGylation was characterized by an increase of approximately 16 kDa in the average molecular weight of PEGylated HPFN compared to native HPFN in SDS-PAGE gels. PEGylated HPFN was more resistant to α chymotrypsin or neutrophil elastase digestion than native HPFN: after 30 min incubation with α chymotrypsin, 56 and 90% of native and PEGylated HPFN respectively remained intact. PEGylated HPFN and native HPFN supported NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast adhesion and spreading, migration and focal adhesion formation in a similar manner. Fluorescence microscopy showed that both native and PEGylated HPFN in the culture media were assembled into extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrils. Interestingly, when coated on surfaces, native but not PEGylated HPFN was assembled into the ECM of fibroblasts. The proteolytically stable PEGylated HPFN developed herein could be used to replenish FN levels in the chronic wound bed and promote tissue repair.

  19. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14APD) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14APD cells. hCDC14APD cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14APD cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  20. Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML) Protein Plays Important Roles in Regulating Cell Adhesion, Morphology, Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mei Kuen; Liang, Yong Jia; Chan, John Yeuk Hon; Wong, Sing Wan; Chen, Elve; Yao, Yao; Gan, Jingyi; Xiao, Lihai; Leung, Hin Cheung; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Wang, Hua; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho

    2013-01-01

    PML protein plays important roles in regulating cellular homeostasis. It forms PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) that act like nuclear relay stations and participate in many cellular functions. In this study, we have examined the proteome of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from normal (PML+/+) and PML knockout (PML−/−) mice. The aim was to identify proteins that were differentially expressed when MEFs were incapable of producing PML. Using comparative proteomics, total protein were extracted from PML−/− and PML+/+ MEFs, resolved by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels and the differentially expressed proteins identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Nine proteins (PML, NDRG1, CACYBP, CFL1, RSU1, TRIO, CTRO, ANXA4 and UBE2M) were determined to be down-regulated in PML−/− MEFs. In contrast, ten proteins (CIAPIN1, FAM50A, SUMO2 HSPB1 NSFL1C, PCBP2, YWHAG, STMN1, TPD52L2 and PDAP1) were found up-regulated. Many of these differentially expressed proteins play crucial roles in cell adhesion, migration, morphology and cytokinesis. The protein profiles explain why PML−/− and PML+/+ MEFs were morphologically different. In addition, we demonstrated PML−/− MEFs were less adhesive, proliferated more extensively and migrated significantly slower than PML+/+ MEFs. NDRG1, a protein that was down-regulated in PML−/− MEFs, was selected for further investigation. We determined that silencing NDRG1expression in PML+/+ MEFs increased cell proliferation and inhibited PML expression. Since NDRG expression was suppressed in PML−/− MEFs, this may explain why these cells proliferate more extensively than PML+/+ MEFs. Furthermore, silencing NDRG1expression also impaired TGF-β1 signaling by inhibiting SMAD3 phosphorylation. PMID:23555679

  1. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells.

  2. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  3. A continuum approximation to an off-lattice individual-cell based model of cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Alistair M; Fleck, Christian; Grima, Ramon

    2014-10-21

    Cell-cell adhesion plays a key role in the collective migration of cells and in determining correlations in the relative cell positions and velocities. Recently, it was demonstrated that off-lattice individual cell based models (IBMs) can accurately capture the correlations observed experimentally in a migrating cell population. However, IBMs are often computationally expensive and difficult to analyse mathematically. Traditional continuum-based models, in contrast, are amenable to mathematical analysis and are computationally less demanding, but typically correspond to a mean-field approximation of cell migration and so ignore cell-cell correlations. In this work, we address this problem by using an off-lattice IBM to derive a continuum approximation which does take into account correlations. We furthermore show that a mean-field approximation of the off-lattice IBM leads to a single partial integro-differential equation of the same form as proposed by Sherratt and co-workers to model cell adhesion. The latter is found to be only effective at approximating the ensemble averaged cell number density when mechanical interactions between cells are weak. In contrast, the predictions of our novel continuum model for the time-evolution of the ensemble cell number density distribution and of the density-density correlation function are in close agreement with those obtained from the IBM for a wide range of mechanical interaction strengths. In particular, we observe 'front-like' propagation of cells in simulations using both our IBM and our continuum model, but not in the continuum model simulations obtained using the mean-field approximation.

  4. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  5. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-03-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear.

  6. hGAAP promotes cell adhesion and migration via the stimulation of store-operated Ca2+ entry and calpain 2

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Nuno; Prole, David L.; Carrara, Guia; Johnson, Benjamin F.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Golgi antiapoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are highly conserved Golgi membrane proteins that inhibit apoptosis and promote Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Given the role of Ca2+ in controlling cell adhesion and motility, we hypothesized that human GAAP (hGAAP) might influence these events. In this paper, we present evidence that hGAAP increased cell adhesion, spreading, and migration in a manner that depended on the C-terminal domain of hGAAP. We show that hGAAP increased store-operated Ca2+ entry and thereby the activity of calpain at newly forming protrusions. These hGAAP-dependent effects regulated focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Indeed, inhibition or knockdown of calpain 2 abrogated the effects of hGAAP on cell spreading and migration. Our data reveal that hGAAP is a novel regulator of focal adhesion dynamics, cell adhesion, and migration by controlling localized Ca2+-dependent activation of calpain. PMID:23940116

  7. β-eudesmol, a sesquiterpene from Teucrium ramosissimum, inhibits superoxide production, proliferation, adhesion and migration of human tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Mousslim, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Ammari, Youssef; Luis, José; Kovacic, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species are well-known mediators of various biological responses. Recently, new homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase have been discovered in non phagocytic cells. These new homologues (Nox1-Nox5) produce low levels of superoxides compared to the phagocytic homologue Nox2/gp91phox. In this study we examined the effect of β-eudesmol, a sesquiterpenoid alcohol isolated from Teucrium ramosissimum leaves, on proliferation, superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon (HT29 and Caco-2) cancer cell lines. Proliferation of tumor cells was inhibited by β-eudesmol. It also significantly inhibited superoxide production in A549 cells. Furthermore, β-eudesmol inhibited adhesion and migration of A549 and HT29 cell. These results demonstrate that β-eudesmol may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of lung and colon cancer by different ways: by inhibition of superoxide production or by blocking proliferation, adhesion and migration.

  8. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  9. The effect of {gamma}-tocopherol on proliferation, integrin expression, adhesion, and migration of human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samandari, Elika; Visarius, Theresa; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo . E-mail: angelo.azzi@tufts.edu

    2006-04-21

    The effect of vitamin E on proliferation, integrin expression, adhesion, and migration in human glioma cells has been studied. {gamma}-tocopherol at 50 {mu}M concentration exerted more inhibitory effect than {alpha}-tocopherol at the same concentration on glioma cell proliferation. Integrin {alpha}5 and {beta}1 protein levels were increased upon both {alpha}- and {gamma}-tocopherol treatments. In parallel, an increase in the {alpha}5{beta}1 heterodimer cell surface expression was observed. The tocopherols inhibited glioma cell-binding to fibronectin where {gamma}-tocopherol treatment induced glioma cell migration. Taken together, the data reported here are consistent with the notion that the inhibition of glioma cell proliferation induced by tocopherols may be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in integrin {alpha}5 and {beta}1 expression. Cell adhesion is also negatively affected by tocopherols, despite a small increase in the surface appearance of the {alpha}5{beta}1 heterodimer. Cell migration is stimulated by {gamma}-tocopherol. It is concluded that {alpha}5 and {beta}1 integrin expression and surface appearance are not sufficient to explain all the observations and that other integrins or in general other factors may be associated with these events.

  10. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha L.; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and 1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. cell motility | EGF receptor | extracellular matrix | matrix metalloproteinase

  11. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  12. Effect of junctional adhesion molecule-2 expression on cell growth, invasion and migration in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, HUISHAN; YU, HEFEN; MARTIN, TRACEY A.; ZHANG, YUXIANG; CHEN, GANG; JIANG, WEN G.

    2016-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAMs) family belongs to the immunoglobulin subfamily involved in the formation of tight junctions (TJ) in both endothelial and epithelial cells. Aberrant expression of JAM-2 is associated with cancer progression but little work has been carried out in discovering how this affects changes in cell behaviour. The present study aimed to examine the expression of JAM-2 in human colon cancer specimens and cell lines and its role in the development of colon cancer. JAM-2 expression in human colon cancer specimens (normal, n=75; cancer, n=94) and cell lines was analysed using quantitative real-time PCR and conventional RT-PCR. Colon cancer cells were stably transfected with a mammalian expression vector to overexpress JAM-2-Flag. The effect on growth, adhesion and migration following overexpression of JAM-2 was then investigated using in vitro models. TJ function was assessed using a trans-epithelial resistance assay (TER, with an EVOM voltammeter). JAM-2 was lowly expressed in colon cancer cells such as RKO, HT115. JAM-2 overexpression in RKO cells (RKO-JAM-2) and HT115 cells (HT115-JAM-2) showed retarded adhesion (P<0.05). An in vivo tumour model showed that RKO-JAM-2 had significantly reduced growth (P<0.05), invasion (P<0.05) and migration (P<0.05) as well as in HT115-JAM-2, except on proliferation and migration. Expression of JAM-2 resulted in a significant increase in TER and decrease in permeability of polarized monolayers (P<0.05). Further analysis of JAM-2 transcript levels against clinical aspects demonstrated that the decreasing JAM-2 expression correlated to disease progression, metastasis and poor survival. Taken together, JAM-2 may function as a putative tumour suppressor in the progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer. PMID:26782073

  13. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Kishimoto, Keishi; Kato, Ayumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Sato, Ryuichiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-03-10

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration.

  14. MIP-1α enhances Jurkat cell transendothelial migration by up-regulating endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Ma, Ying-Huan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) in Jurkat cells and its effect on transendothelial migration. In the present study, human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells (Jurkat cells) were used as a model of T cells in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), which demonstrated significantly higher MIP-1α expression compared with that in normal T-cell controls. The ability of Jurkat cells to cross a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) monolayer was almost completely abrogated by MIP-1α siRNA. In addition, the overexpression of MIP-1α resulted in the up-regulated expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, which enhanced the migration of Jurkat cells through a monolayer of HBMEC. MIP-1α levels in Jurkat cells appeared to be an important factor for its transendothelial migration, which may provide the theoretical basis to understand the mechanisms of brain metastases of T-ALL at cellular and molecular levels.

  15. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  16. AML1/ETO accelerates cell migration and impairs cell-to-cell adhesion and homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Marco; Termanini, Alberto; Rizzi, Nicoletta; Mazza, Massimiliano; Barbieri, Elisa; Valli, Debora; Ciana, Paolo; Gruszka, Alicja M.; Alcalay, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The AML1/ETO fusion protein found in acute myeloid leukemias functions as a transcriptional regulator by recruiting co-repressor complexes to its DNA binding site. In order to extend the understanding of its role in preleukemia, we expressed AML1/ETO in a murine immortalized pluripotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell line, EML C1, and found that genes involved in functions such as cell-to-cell adhesion and cell motility were among the most significantly regulated as determined by RNA sequencing. In functional assays, AML1/ETO-expressing cells showed a decrease in adhesion to stromal cells, an increase of cell migration rate in vitro, and displayed an impairment in homing and engraftment in vivo upon transplantation into recipient mice. Our results suggest that AML1/ETO expression determines a more mobile and less adherent phenotype in preleukemic cells, therefore altering the interaction with the hematopoietic niche, potentially leading to the migration across the bone marrow barrier and to disease progression. PMID:27713544

  17. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-05-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(-) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl-amino)-phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes.

  18. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  19. Connexin 32 and its derived homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication inhibit the migration and invasion of transfected HeLa cells via enhancement of intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qin; Yuan, Dongdong; Hong, Xiaoting; Yang, Yan; Tao, Liang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of connexin (Cx) and its derived homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between tumor cells on the invasion of metastatic cancers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of Cx32 and the homotypic GJIC mediated by this Cx on the migration, invasion and intercellular adhesion of transfected HeLa cells. The expression of Cx32 significantly increased cell adhesion and inhibited migration and invasion. The inhibition of GJIC by oleamide, a widely used GJIC inhibitor, reduced the enhanced adhesion and partly reversed the decreased migration and invasion that had been induced by Cx32 expression. Blockage of the p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 MAPKs) pathways using their specific inhibitors attenuated the effects of Cx32, but not those of GJIC, on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. These results indicate that the homotypic GJIC mediated by Cx32, as well as the Cx itself, inhibit cell migration and invasion, most likely through the elevation of intercellular adhesion. The suppressive effect of Cx32 on the migration and invasion of cancer cells, but not that of its derived homotypic GJIC, partly depends on the activation of the p38 and the ERK1/2 MAPKs pathways.

  20. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  1. Cigarette smoke modulates PC3 prostate cancer cell migration by altering adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUPING; LONG, MINICA; TACHADO, SOUVENIR D.; SENG, SEYHA

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among American males. Studies suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with the progression of PCa; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process have not been extensively investigated. PCa progression is characterized by increased cell migration and alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM)- and cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-related gene expression. In the present study, the influence of cigarette smoke medium (SM) on cell migration and on the expression of ECM- and CAM-related genes in PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. According to a wound-healing assay, SM treatment promoted PC3 cell migration. RNA expression levels from SM-treated and control cells were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Of 84 genes analyzed, 27.38% (23/84) exhibited a ≥2-fold change in threshold cycle in PC3 cells following 0.5% SM treatment. Functional gene grouping analysis demonstrated that SM treatment modulated the RNA transcription of approximately 18.4% of CAMs and 33.93% of ECM-related genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that SM treatment led to a significant decrease in transcription levels of the following genes: Collagen 5 α-1(V), connective tissue growth factor, integrin β-2, kallmann syndrome 1, laminin α 3, matrix metallopeptidase 7 (MMP7), MMP13, secreted protein acidic cysteine-rich, thrombospondin-2 and versican; and that SM significantly increased the transcription levels of MMP2 and MMP12. Furthermore, MMP2 knockdown significantly reduced the migration of SM-treated PC3 cells. The present study provides novel insights into the association of cigarette smoking with PCa progression, via the alteration of ECM/CAM interactions. PMID:26351771

  2. Overexpression of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines: effects on apoptosis, migration and adhesion of cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghua; Mao, Lihong; Wang, Ruili; Zhu, Liqiang; Xue, Lexun

    2014-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is the sole enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in methylation reaction. Previous studies have shown that its inhibition or deficiency leads to several human disorders such as severe coagulopathy, hepatopathy and myopathy. However, the effects of SAHH on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells have not been explored so far. To determine whether SAHH is involved in carcinogenesis of the esophagus, we investigated the expression of SAHH in ESCC and normal esophageal epithelial cells and found that SAHH was downregulated in ESCC cells compared with normal esophageal epithelial cells (P < 0.05). The overexpressed SAHH in ESCC cells promoted cell apoptosis, inhibited cell migration and adhesion, but did not affect the cell proliferation and cell cycle. Furthermore, an interaction of SAHH with receptor of activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) protein was detected by coimmunoprecipitation and an increased RACK1, which is caused by overexpression of SAHH, was verified by Western blotting. The findings mentioned above demonstrate that SAHH can promote apoptosis, inhibit migration and adhesion of ESCC cells suggesting that it may be involved in carcinogenesis of the esophagus.

  3. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration.

  4. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration. PMID:27698945

  5. Effects of laver extracts on adhesion, invasion, and migration in SK-Hep1 human hepatoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Do Thi, Nhuan; Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-01-01

    The laver (Porphyra tenera), red seaweed, has been reported to have anticancer activity, but little is known about its molecular mechanisms of action. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of laver extract on cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in SK-Hep1 cells using migration and invasion assays. We also investigated the relationship of MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1/-2 expression at both the protein and gene level in SK-Hep1 human hepatoma carcinoma cells after laver extract treatment. Laver extract inhibited cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. In an invasion assay conducted in Transwell chambers, laver extract showed 19.6 and 27.2% inhibition of cancer cell at 200 and 400 μg/mL, respectively, compared to the control. The mRNA levels of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 were down-regulated by laver extract treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Laver extract, at 400 μg/mL, was inhibited by MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions by 70.1 and 77.0%, respectively. An inverse relationship in the mRNA contents of MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1/-2 expressions in SK-Hep1 cells was found by laver extract treatment. Our results demonstrate antimetastatic properties of laver extract in inhibiting the adhesion, invasion, and migration of SK-Hep1 human hepatoma cancer cells. PMID:25036133

  6. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  7. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  8. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC.

  9. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  10. Vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits migration through inhibition of PDGF signaling and enhancement of cell adhesiveness in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Eng-Thaim; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2011-10-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in normal vessel formation and in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Grape plants contain resveratrol monomer and oligomers and drinking of wine made from grape has been linked to 'French Paradox'. In this study we evaluated the effect of vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, on VSMC behaviors. Vitisin B inhibited basal and PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Strikingly, it did not inhibit VSMC proliferation but inversely enhanced cell cycle progression and proliferation. Among the tested resveratrol oligomers, vitisin B showed an excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity on PDGF signaling. The anti-migratory effect by vitisin B was due to direct inhibition on PDGF signaling but was independent of interference with PDGF binding to VSMCs. Moreover, the enhanced VSMC adhesiveness to matrix contributed to the anti-migratory effect by vitisin B. Fluorescence microscopy revealed an enhanced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and redistribution of activated focal adhesion proteins from cytosol to the peripheral edge of the cell membrane. This was confirmed by the observation that enhanced adhesiveness was repressed by the Src inhibitor. Finally, among the effects elicited by vitisin B, only the inhibitory effect toward basal migration was partially through estrogen receptor activation. We have demonstrated here that a resveratrol tetramer exhibited dual but opposite actions on VSMCs, one is to inhibit VSMC migration and the other is to promote VSMC proliferation. The anti-migratory effect was through a potent inhibition on PDGF signaling and novel enhancement on cell adhesion. - Highlights: > Several resveratrol oligomers from grape plants are examined on VSMC behaviors. > Tetraoligomer vitisin B shows excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity. > It exerts dual but opposing actions: anti-migratory and pro-proliferative effects. > The anti-migratory effect results from anti-PDGF signaling

  11. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  12. Cathepsin E generates a sumoylated intracellular fragment of the cell adhesion molecule L1 to promote neuronal and Schwann cell migration as well as myelination.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David; Wolters-Eisfeld, Gerrit; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 regulates cellular responses in the developing and adult nervous system. Here, we show that stimulation of cultured mouse cerebellar neurons by a function-triggering L1 antibody leads to cathepsin E-mediated generation of a sumoylated 30 kDa L1 fragment (L1-30) and to import of L1-30 into the nucleus. Mutation of the sumoylation site at K1172 or the cathepsin E cleavage site at E1167 abolishes generation of L1-30, while mutation of the nuclear localization signal at K1147 prevents nuclear import of L1-30. Moreover, the aspartyl protease inhibitor pepstatin impairs the generation of L1-30 and inhibits L1-induced migration of cerebellar neurons and Schwann cells as well as L1-dependent in vitro myelination on axons of dorsal root ganglion neurons by Schwann cells. L1-stimulated migration of HEK293 cells expressing L1 with mutated cathepsin E cleavage site is diminished in comparison to migration of cells expressing non-mutated L1. In addition, L1-stimulated migration of HEK293 cells expressing non-mutated L1 is also abolished upon knock-down of cathepsin E expression and enhanced by over-expression of cathepsin E. The findings of the present study indicate that generation and nuclear import of L1-30 regulate neuronal and Schwann cell migration as well as myelination. Cell adhesion molecule L1 regulates cellular responses in the developing and adult nervous system. L1 stimulation triggers sumoylation and cleavage of L1, thus generating the L1-70 fragment (1) which is cleaved by cathepsin E (2) yielding the L1-30 fragment that is imported to the nucleus (3), may bind to DNA and/or nuclear proteins (4), to regulate diverse cellular functions. PMID:24118054

  13. Hydrogen peroxide activates focal adhesion kinase and c-Src by a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent mechanism and promotes cell migration in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Dunagan, Mitzi; Sheth, Parimal; Seth, Ankur; Rao, R K

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies showed that c-Src and phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase mediate the oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present study evaluated the roles of PI3 kinase and Src kinase in the oxidative stress-induced activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and acceleration of cell migration. Oxidative stress, induced by xanthine and xanthine oxidase system, rapidly increased phosphorylation of FAK on Y397, Y925, and Y577 in the detergent-insoluble and soluble fractions and increased its tyrosine kinase activity. The PI3 kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, and the Src kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5[chlorophyll]-7-[t-butyl]pyrazolo[3-4-d]pyrimidine, attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Oxidative stress induced phosphorylation of c-Src on Y418 by a PI3 kinase-dependent mechanism, whereas oxidative stress-induced activation of PI3 kinase was independent of Src kinase activity. Hydrogen peroxide accelerated Caco-2 cell migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Promotion of cell migration by hydrogen peroxide was attenuated by LY294002 and PP2. Reduced expression of FAK by siRNA attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced acceleration of cell migration. The expression of constitutively active c-Src(Y527F) enhanced cell migration, whereas the expression of dominant negative c-Src(K296R/Y528F) attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced stimulation of cell migration. Oxidative stress-induced activation of c-Src and FAK was associated with a rapid increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation and the levels of paxillin and p130(CAS) in actin-rich, detergent-insoluble fractions. This study shows that oxidative stress activates FAK and accelerates cell migration in an intestinal epithelium by a PI3 kinase- and Src kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:20378826

  14. Adhesion and migration of avian neural crest cells on fibronectin require the cooperating activities of multiple integrins of the (beta)1 and (beta)3 families.

    PubMed

    Testaz, S; Delannet, M; Duband, J

    1999-12-01

    Based on genetic, functional and histological studies, the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin has been proposed to play a key role in the migration of neural crest cells in the vertebrate embryo. In the present study, we have analyzed in vitro the repertoire and function of integrin receptors involved in the adhesive and locomotory responses of avian truncal neural crest cells to fibronectin. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that neural crest cells express multiple integrins, namely (alpha)3(beta)1, (alpha)4(beta)1, (alpha)5(beta)1, (alpha)8(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)3 and a (beta)8 integrin, as potential fibronectin receptors, and flow cytometry analyses revealed no major heterogeneity among the cell population for expression of integrin subunits. In addition, the integrin repertoire expressed by neural crest cells was found not to change dramatically during migration. At the cellular level, only (alpha)v(beta)1 and (alpha)v(beta)3 were concentrated in focal adhesion sites in connection with the actin microfilaments, whereas the other integrins were predominantly diffuse over the cell surface. In inhibition assays with function-perturbing antibodies, it appeared that complete abolition of cell spreading and migration could be achieved only by blocking multiple integrins of the (beta)1 and (beta)3 families, suggesting possible functional compensations between different integrins. In addition, these studies provided evidence for functional partitioning of integrins in cell adhesion and migration. While spreading was essentially mediated by (alpha)v(beta)1 and (alpha)8(beta)1, migration involved primarily (alpha)4(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)3 and (alpha)8(beta)1 and, more indirectly, (alpha)3(beta)1. (alpha)5(beta)1 and the (beta)8 integrin were not found to play any major role in either adhesion or migration. Finally, consistent with the results of inhibition experiments, recruitment of (alpha)4(beta)1 and (alpha)v(beta)3, individually or in

  15. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  16. Imatinib and Nilotinib Inhibit Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Growth, but Do Not Prevent Adhesion, Migration and Engraftment of Human Cord Blood CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ludovic; Bruck, France; Foguenne, Jacques; Gothot, André; Beguin, Yves; Baron, Frédéric; Briquet, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Background The availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably changed the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib is also known to inhibit the tyrosine kinase of the stem cell factor receptor, c-Kit. Nilotinib is 30 times more potent than imatinib towards BCR-ABL in vitro. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or gastrointestinal stromal tumors have shown that therapeutic doses of nilotinib deliver drug levels similar to those of imatinib. The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effects of imatinib and nilotinib on proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration and engraftment capacities of human cord blood CD34+ cells. Design and Methods After a 48-hour cell culture with or without TKIs, CFC, LTC-IC, migration, adhesion and cell cycle analysis were performed. In a second time, the impact of these TKIs on engraftment was assessed in a xenotransplantation model using NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ (null) mice. Results TKIs did not affect LTC-IC frequencies despite in vitro inhibition of CFC formation due to inhibition of CD34+ cell cycle entry. Adhesion of CD34+ cells to retronectin was reduced in the presence of either imatinib or nilotinib but only at high concentrations. Migration through a SDF-1α gradient was not changed by cell culture in the presence of TKIs. Finally, bone marrow cellularity and human chimerism were not affected by daily doses of imatinib and nilotinib in a xenogenic transplantation model. No significant difference was seen between TKIs given the equivalent affinity of imatinib and nilotinib for KIT. Conclusions These data suggest that combining non-myeloablative conditioning regimen with TKIs starting the day of the transplantation could be safe. PMID:23285088

  17. In-depth Characterization of the Secretome of Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Cells Identifies Key Proteins in Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Barderas, Rodrigo; Mendes, Marta; Torres, Sofia; Bartolomé, Rubén A.; López-Lucendo, María; Villar-Vázquez, Roi; Peláez-García, Alberto; Fuente, Eduardo; Bonilla, Félix; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Liver metastasis in colorectal cancer is the major cause of cancer-related deaths. To identify and characterize proteins associated with colon cancer metastasis, we have compared the conditioned serum-free medium of highly metastatic KM12SM colorectal cancer cells with the parental, poorly metastatic KM12C cells using quantitative stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) analyses on a linear ion trap-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. In total, 1337 proteins were simultaneously identified in SILAC forward and reverse experiments. For quantification, 1098 proteins were selected in both experiments, with 155 proteins showing >1.5-fold change. About 52% of these proteins were secreted directly or using alternative secretion pathways. GDF15, S100A8/A9, and SERPINI1 showed capacity to discriminate cancer serum samples from healthy controls using ELISAs. In silico analyses of deregulated proteins in the secretome of metastatic cells showed a major abundance of proteins involved in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. To characterize the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of some top up- and down-regulated proteins, we used siRNA silencing and antibody blocking. Knockdown expression of NEO1, SERPINI1, and PODXL showed a significant effect on cellular adhesion. Silencing or blocking experiments with SOSTDC1, CTSS, EFNA3, CD137L/TNFSF9, ZG16B, and Midkine caused a significant decrease in migration and invasion of highly metastatic cells. In addition, silencing of SOSTDC1, EFNA3, and CD137L/TNFSF9 reduced liver colonization capacity of KM12SM cells. Finally, the panel of six proteins involved in invasion showed association with poor prognosis and overall survival after dataset analysis of gene alterations. In summary, we have defined a collection of proteins that are relevant for understanding the mechanisms underlying adhesion, migration, invasion, and metastasis in colorectal cancer. PMID:23443137

  18. Immature leukemic CD34+CXCR4+ cells from CML patients have lower integrin-dependent migration and adhesion in response to the chemokine SDF-1.

    PubMed

    Peled, Amnon; Hardan, Izhar; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Gur, Eyal; Magid, Michal; Darash-Yahana, Merav; Cohen, Ninette; Grabovsky, Valentin; Franitza, Suzana; Kollet, Orit; Lider, Ofer; Alon, Ronen; Rechavi, Gideon; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2002-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a malignant myeloproliferative disorder originating from a pluripotent stem cell expressing the bcr-abl oncogene, is characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow (BM) into the circulation. Moreover, immature CD34+ CML cells have lower adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin as well as lower engraftment potential in severe combined immunedeficient (SCID) and nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice than normal CD34+ cells. We report in this study that leukemic Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+)CD34+ cells from newly diagnosed CML patients that express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 migrate in response to stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). However, normal Ph-CD34+CXCR4+ cells derived from the same patient have significantly higher migration levels toward SDF-1. In contrast to their transwell migration potential, the SDF-1-mediated integrin-dependent polarization and migration of the Ph+CD34+CXCR4+ cells through extracellular matrix-like gels were significantly lower than for normal cells. Concomitantly, binding of these cells to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or fibronectin, in the presence of SDF-1, was also substantially lower. These findings suggest a major role for SDF-1-mediated, integrin-dependent BM retention of Ph+CD34+ cells. PMID:12004084

  19. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in mechanosensing during fibroblast migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Hanks, S. K.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase localized at focal adhesions and is believed to mediate adhesion-stimulated effects. Although ablation of FAK impairs cell movement, it is not clear whether FAK might be involved in the guidance of cell migration, a role consistent with its putative regulatory function. We have transfected FAK-null fibroblasts with FAK gene under the control of the tetracycline repression system. Cells were cultured on flexible polyacrylamide substrates for the detection of traction forces and the application of mechanical stimulation. Compared with control cells expressing wild-type FAK, FAK-null cells showed a decrease in migration speed and directional persistence. In addition, whereas FAK-expressing cells responded to exerted forces by reorienting their movements and forming prominent focal adhesions, FAK-null cells failed to show such responses. Furthermore, FAK-null cells showed impaired responses to decreases in substrate flexibility, which causes control cells to generate weaker traction forces and migrate away from soft substrates. Cells expressing Y397F FAK, which cannot be phosphorylated at a key tyrosine site, showed similar defects in migration pattern and force-induced reorientation as did FAK-null cells. However, other aspects of F397-FAK cells, including the responses to substrate flexibility and the amplification of focal adhesions upon mechanical stimulation, were similar to that of control cells. Our results suggest that FAK plays an important role in the response of migrating cells to mechanical input. In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr-397 is required for some, but not all, of the functions of FAK in cell migration.

  20. In vivo selection for spine-derived highly metastatic lung cancer cells is associated with increased migration, inflammation and decreased adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Zhang, Jishen; Li, Shichang; Wei, Haifeng; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Leqin; Jin, Rongrong; Li, Zhenxi; Zhou, Wang; Ding, JianDong; Chu, Jianjun; Jia, Lianshun; Jia, Qi; Tan, Chengjun; Liu, Mingyao; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-01-01

    We developed a murine spine metastasis model by screening five metastatic non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (PC-9, A549, NCI-H1299, NCI-H460, H2030). A549 cells displayed the highest tendency towards spine metastases. After three rounds of selection in vivo, we isolated a clone named A549L6, which induced spine metastasis in 80% of injected mice. The parameters of the A549L6 cell spinal metastatic mouse models were consistent with clinical spine metastasis features. All the spinal metastatic mice developed symptoms of nerve compression after 40 days. A549L6 cells had increased migration, invasiveness and decreased adhesion compared to the original A549L0 cells. In contrast, there was no significant differences in cell proliferation, apoptosis and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. Comparative transcriptomic analysis and Real-time PCR analysis showed that expression of signaling molecules regulating several tumor properties including migration (MYL9), metastasis (CEACAM6, VEGFC, CX3CL1, CST1, CCL5, S100A9, IGF1, NOTCH3), adhesion (FN1, CEACAM1) and inflammation (TRAF2, NFκB2 and RelB) were altered in A549L6 cells. We suggest that migration, adhesion and inflammation related genes contribute to spine metastatic capacity. PMID:26090868

  1. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) interferes with endothelial cell migration by inhibition of both the Erk pathway and focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Provençal, Mathieu; Michaud, Marisol; Beaulieu, Edith; Ratel, David; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a plasma Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor that is mainly known for its inhibition of tissue factor-mediated coagulation. In addition to its anticoagulant properties, emerging data show that TFPI may also regulate endothelial cell functions via a non-haemostatic pathway. In this work we demonstrate that at concentrations within the physiological range, TFPI inhibits both endothelial cell migration and their differentiation into capillary-like structures in vitro. These effects were specific to endothelial cells since no inhibitory effect was observed on the migration of tumor (glioblastoma) cells. Inhibition of endothelial cell migration was correlated with a concomitant loss in cell adhesion, suggesting an alteration of focal adhesion complex integrity. Accordingly, we observed that TFPI inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin, two key proteins involved in the scaffolding of these complexes, and that this effect was specific to endothelial cells. These results suggest that TFPI influences the angiogenic process via a non-haemostatic pathway, by downregulating the migratory mechanisms of endothelial cells. PMID:18327407

  2. In vivo selection for spine-derived highly metastatic lung cancer cells is associated with increased migration, inflammation and decreased adhesion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaopan; Luo, Jian; Yang, Xinghai; Deng, Huayun; Zhang, Jishen; Li, Shichang; Wei, Haifeng; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Leqin; Jin, Rongrong; Li, Zhenxi; Zhou, Wang; Ding, JianDong; Chu, Jianjun; Jia, Lianshun; Jia, Qi; Tan, Chengjun; Liu, Mingyao; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-09-01

    We developed a murine spine metastasis model by screening five metastatic non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (PC-9, A549, NCI-H1299, NCI-H460, H2030). A549 cells displayed the highest tendency towards spine metastases. After three rounds of selection in vivo, we isolated a clone named A549L6, which induced spine metastasis in 80% of injected mice. The parameters of the A549L6 cell spinal metastatic mouse models were consistent with clinical spine metastasis features. All the spinal metastatic mice developed symptoms of nerve compression after 40 days. A549L6 cells had increased migration, invasiveness and decreased adhesion compared to the original A549L0 cells. In contrast, there was no significant differences in cell proliferation, apoptosis and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. Comparative transcriptomic analysis and real-time PCR analysis showed that expression of signaling molecules regulating several tumor properties including migration (MYL9), metastasis (CEACAM6, VEGFC, CX3CL1, CST1, CCL5, S100A9, IGF1, NOTCH3), adhesion (FN1, CEACAM1) and inflammation (TRAF2, NFκB2 and RelB) were altered in A549L6 cells. We suggest that migration, adhesion and inflammation related genes contribute to spine metastatic capacity. PMID:26090868

  3. Hydroxyapatite-Based Colloidal Gels Facilitate the Proliferation and Migration of Chondrocytes and the Adhesion of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Syed A; Ye, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Collective movement of cells that have been delivered on biomaterials for transplantation purposes would be a desirable attribute that would promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and eventual growth and regeneration of damaged organs. We hypothesized that colloidal gels made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles will be conducive to the growth and migration of porcine chondrocytes, will allow the adhesion of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, and will have negligible effects on the cell cycle of these cells. Then, we performed experiments designed to assess the viability and migratory properties of porcine chondrocytes studded on nanosized HA/PLGA particles. Our experiments show that porcine chondrocytes migrated in and around a hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial that could be described as a colloidal gel. Cells in the colloidal gel demonstrated unidirectional movement. Cells were seen to be extending lamellae and were followed by other cells. PMID:27382607

  4. Hydroxyapatite-Based Colloidal Gels Facilitate the Proliferation and Migration of Chondrocytes and the Adhesion of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Syed A.; Ye, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Collective movement of cells that have been delivered on biomaterials for transplantation purposes would be a desirable attribute that would promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and eventual growth and regeneration of damaged organs. We hypothesized that colloidal gels made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles will be conducive to the growth and migration of porcine chondrocytes, will allow the adhesion of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, and will have negligible effects on the cell cycle of these cells. Then, we performed experiments designed to assess the viability and migratory properties of porcine chondrocytes studded on nanosized HA/PLGA particles. Our experiments show that porcine chondrocytes migrated in and around a hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial that could be described as a colloidal gel. Cells in the colloidal gel demonstrated unidirectional movement. Cells were seen to be extending lamellae and were followed by other cells. PMID:27382607

  5. Epithelia migration: A spatiotemporal interplay between contraction and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris; Pinto, Inês Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues represent 60% of the cells that form the human body and where more than 90% of all cancers derived. Epithelia transformation and migration involve altered cell contractile mechanics powered by an actomyosin-based cytoskeleton and influenced by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. A balance between contractile and adhesive forces regulates a large number of cellular and tissue properties crucial for epithelia migration and tumorigenesis. In this review, the forces driving normal epithelia transformation into highly motile and invasive cells and tissues will be discussed. PMID:26176587

  6. Microfluidic Platform for Studying Chemotaxis of Adhesive Cells Revealed a Gradient-Dependent Migration and Acceleration of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Heng; Yue, Wanqing; Yu, Wai-Kin; Liu, Dandan; Fong, Chi-Chun; Zhao, Jianlong; Yang, Mengsu

    2015-07-21

    Recent studies reveal that solid tumors consist of heterogeneous cells with distinct phenotypes and functions. However, it is unclear how different subtypes of cancer cells migrate under chemotaxis. Here, we developed a microfluidic device capable of generating multiple stable gradients, culturing cells on-chip, and monitoring single cell migratory behavior. The microfluidic platform was used to study gradient-induced chemotaxis of lung cancer stem cell (LCSC) and differentiated LCSC (dLCSC) in real time. Our results showed the dynamic and differential response of both LCSC and dLCSC to chemotaxis, which was regulated by the β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling pathway. The microfluidic analysis showed that LCSC and dLCSC from the same origin behaved differently in the same external stimuli, suggesting the importance of cancer cell heterogeneity. We also observed for the first time the acceleration of both LCSC and dLCSC during chemotaxis caused by increasing local concentration in different gradients, which could only be realized through the microfluidic approach. The capability to analyze single cell chemotaxis under spatially controlled conditions provides a novel analytical platform for the study of cellular microenvironments and cancer cell metastasis.

  7. Adhesion-related kinase induction of migration requires phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and ras stimulation of rac activity in immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Allen, Melissa P; Xu, Mei; Linseman, Daniel A; Pawlowski, John E; Bouchard, R J; Varnum, Brian C; Heidenreich, Kim A; Wierman, Margaret E

    2007-06-01

    GnRH neurons migrate into the hypothalamus during development. Although migratory defects may result in disordered activation of the reproductive axis and lead to delayed or absent sexual maturation, specific factors regulating GnRH neuronal migration remain largely unknown. The receptor tyrosine kinase, adhesion-related kinase (Ark) (also known as Axl, UFO, and Tyro7), has been implicated in the migration of GnRH neuronal cells. Binding of its ligand, growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), promotes cytoskeletal remodeling and migration of NLT GnRH neuronal cells via Rac and p38 MAPK. Here, we examined the Axl effectors proximal to Rac in the signaling pathway. Gas6/Axl-induced lamellipodia formation and migration were blocked after phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells. The p85 subunit of PI3K coimmunoprecipitated with Axl and was phosphorylated in a Gas6-sensitive manner. In addition, PI3K inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells diminished Gas6-induced Rac activation. Exogenous expression of a dominant-negative form of Ras also decreased GnRH neuronal lamellipodia formation, migration, and Rac activation. PI3K inhibition blocked Ras in addition to Rac activation and migration. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the phospholipase C gamma effectors, protein kinase C or calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II, had no effect on Gas6/Axl signaling to promote Rac activation or stimulate cytoskeletal reorganization and migration. Together, these data show that the PI3K-Ras pathway is a major mediator of Axl actions upstream of Rac to induce GnRH neuronal cell migration. PMID:17332061

  8. Functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in O-2A glial precursor cells: a critical role in regulating polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule expression and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The capacity for long-distance migration of the oligodendrocyte precursor cell, oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A), is essential for myelin formation. To study the molecular mechanisms that control this process, we used an in vitro migration assay that uses neurohypophysial explants. We provide evidence that O-2A cells in these preparations express functional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, most likely as homomeric complexes of the NR1 subunit. We show that NMDA evokes an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ that can be blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 and by Mg2+. Blocking the activity of these receptors dramatically diminished O-2A cell migration from explants. We also show that NMDA receptor activity is necessary for the expression by O-2A cells of the highly sialylated polysialic acid- neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) that is required for their migration. Thus, glutamate or glutamate receptor ligands may regulate O- 2A cell migration by modulating expression of PSA-NCAM. These studies demonstrate how interactions between ionotropic receptors, intracellular signaling, and cell adhesion molecule expression influence cell surface properties, which in turn are critical determinants of cell migration. PMID:8978823

  9. Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) supports adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells through interaction with RGD-binding integrins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yueqing; Hu Xiaobo; Tian Ruiyang; Wei Wangui; Hu Wei; Chen Xia; Han Wei; Chen Huayou; Gong Yi . E-mail: ygong@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-08-18

    Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) is a newly identified member of angiopoietin-related proteins (ARPs)/angiopoietin-like proteins (Angptls). AGF has been considered as a novel growth factor in accelerating cutaneous wound healing, as it is capable of stimulating keratinocytes proliferation as well as angiogenesis. But in our paper, we demonstrate that AGF stimulates keratinocytes proliferation only at high protein concentration, however, it can potently promote adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirm that the adhesion and migration cellular events are mediated by RGD-binding integrins, most possibly the {alpha}{sub v}-containing integrins, by in vitro inhibition assays using synthetic competitive peptides. Our results strongly suggest that AGF is an integrin ligand as well as a mitogenic growth factor and theoretically participates in cutaneous wound healing in a more complex mechanism.

  10. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2–59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  11. The adhesive and migratory effects of osteopontin are mediated via distinct cell surface integrins. Role of alpha v beta 3 in smooth muscle cell migration to osteopontin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, L; Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R; Cheresh, D A; Schwartz, S M; Giachelli, C M

    1995-01-01

    Osteopontin is an arginine-glycine-aspartate containing acidic glycoprotein postulated to mediate adhesion, migration, and biomineralization in diverse tissues. The mechanisms explaining this multifunctionality are not well understood, although it is known that one osteopontin receptor is the alpha v beta 3 integrin. In this work, we studied human smooth muscle cells varying in alpha v beta 3 levels to identify additional osteopontin receptors. We report that, in addition to alpha v beta 3, both alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 are osteopontin receptors. Moreover, the presence or absence of alpha v beta 3 on the cell surface altered the adhesive and migratory responses of smooth muscle cells to osteopontin. Adhesion of alpha v beta 3-deficient cell populations to osteopontin was only half that of cells containing alpha v beta 3, and migration toward an osteopontin gradient in the Boyden chamber was dependent on cell surface alpha v beta 3. Although alpha v beta 3-deficient smooth muscle cells were unable to migrate to osteopontin, they did migrate significantly in response to vitronectin and fibronectin. These findings represent the first description of alpha v beta 5 and alpha v beta 1 as osteopontin receptors and suggest that, while adhesion to osteopontin is supported by integrins containing beta 1, beta 3, and beta 5, migration in response to osteopontin appears to depend on alpha v beta 3. Thus, interaction with distinct receptors is one mechanism by which osteopontin may initiate multiple functions. Images PMID:7532190

  12. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  13. Preparation of gelatin density gradient on poly(ε-caprolactone) membrane and its influence on adhesion and migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2015-08-01

    Directional migration of endothelial cells (ECs) can be achieved by gradient cues in vitro, which mimics the corresponding biological events in vivo. Currently, most of the gradients have been prepared on model surfaces which are too simple compared to real degradable biomaterials. In this study, the amino group density gradient was prepared on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) membrane surface by a gradient aminolysis method, which was transferred into gelatin density gradient by covalent linking with glutaraldehyde. The resulted gelatin density gradient ranged from 0.49 to 1.57μg/cm(2) on the PCL membrane. The adhesion, orientation and migration of ECs on the PCL membrane with the gelatin density gradient were studied. The ECs showed preferred orientation and directional migration toward the gradient direction with enhanced gelatin density at proper position (gelatin density), forwarding a new step toward the preparation of applicable gradient biomaterials in tissue regeneration.

  14. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  15. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes. PMID:27067049

  16. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes.

  17. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Owen L.; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  18. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  19. The Orphan Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptor GPR97 Regulates Migration of Lymphatic Endothelial Cells via the Small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42*

    PubMed Central

    Valtcheva, Nadejda; Primorac, Adriana; Jurisic, Giorgia; Hollmén, Maija; Detmar, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The important role of the lymphatic vascular system in pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer has been increasingly recognized, but its potential as a pharmacological target is poorly exploited. Our study aimed at the identification and molecular characterization of lymphatic-specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to assess new targets for pharmacological manipulation of the lymphatic vascular system. We used a TaqMan quantitative RT-PCR-based low density array to determine the GPCR expression profiles of ex vivo isolated intestinal mouse lymphatic (LECs) and blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs). GPR97, an orphan adhesion GPCR of unknown function, was the most highly and specifically expressed GPCR in mouse lymphatic endothelium. Using siRNA silencing, we found that GPR97-deficient primary human LECs displayed increased adhesion and collective cell migration, whereas single cell migration was decreased as compared with nontargeting siRNA-transfected control LECs. Loss of GPR97 shifted the ratio of active Cdc42 and RhoA and initiated cytoskeletal rearrangements, including F-actin redistribution, paxillin and PAK4 phosphorylation, and β1-integrin activation. Our data suggest a possible role of GPR97 in lymphatic remodeling and furthermore provide the first insights into the biological functions of GPR97. PMID:24178298

  20. Simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton and decreases cardiac fibroblast adhesion, migration and viability.

    PubMed

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Avalos, Yennifer; Garcia, Lorena; Chiong, Mario; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-03-29

    Statins reduce the isoprenoids farnesyl and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, essential intermediates, which control a diversity of cellular events such as cytoskeleton integrity, adhesion, migration and viability. Cardiac fibroblasts are the major non-myocyte cell constituent in the normal heart, and play a key role in the maintenance of extracellular matrix. The effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast processes previously mentioned remain unknown. Our aims were to investigate the effects of simvastatin on cytoskeleton structure and focal adhesion complex assembly and their relationships with cell adhesion, migration and viability in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. To this end, cells were treated with simvastatin for 24 h and changes in actin cytoskeleton, levels of vimentin and paxillin as well as their subcellular localization were analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cell adhesion to plastic or collagen coated dishes, migration in Transwell chambers, and cell viability were analyzed after simvastatin treatment. Our results show that simvastatin disrupts actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion complex evaluated by phalloidin stain and immunocytochemistry for paxillin and vinculin. All these effects occurred by a cholesterol synthesis-independent mechanism. Simvastatin decreased cell adhesion, migration and viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, simvastatin decreased angiotensin II-induced phospho-paxillin levels and cell adhesion. We concluded that simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton integrity and focal adhesion complex assembly in cultured cardiac fibroblasts by a cholesterol-independent mechanism and consequently decreases cell migration, adhesion and viability. PMID:22306966

  1. Down-regulation of the cancer/testis antigen 45 (CT45) is associated with altered tumor cell morphology, adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to their restricted expression in male germ cells and certain tumors, cancer/testis (CT) antigens are regarded as promising targets for tumor therapy. CT45 is a recently identified nuclear CT antigen that was associated with a severe disease score in Hodgkin’s lymphoma and poor prognosis in multiple myeloma. As for many CT antigens, the biological function of CT45 in developing germ cells and in tumor cells is largely unknown. Methods CT45 expression was down-regulated in CT45-positive Hodgkin’s lymphoma (L428), fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and myeloma (U266B1) cells using RNA interference. An efficient CT45 knock-down was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining and/or Western blotting. These cellular systems allowed us to analyze the impact of CT45 down-regulation on proliferation, cell cycle progression, morphology, adhesion, migration and invasive capacity of tumor cells. Results Reduced levels of CT45 did not coincide with changes in cell cycle progression or proliferation. However, we observed alterations in cell adherence, morphology and migration/invasion after CT45 down-regulation. Significant changes in the distribution of cytoskeleton-associated proteins were detected by confocal imaging. Changes in cell adherence were recorded in real-time using the xCelligence system with control and siRNA-treated cells. Altered migratory and invasive capacity of CT45 siRNA-treated cells were visualized in 3D migration and invasion assays. Moreover, we found that CT45 down-regulation altered the level of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein syncrip (hnRNP-Q1) which is known to be involved in the control of focal adhesion formation and cell motility. Conclusions Providing first evidence of a cell biological function of CT45, we suggest that this cancer/testis antigen is involved in the modulation of cell morphology, cell adherence and cell motility. Enhanced motility and/or invasiveness of CT45-positive cells could contribute to the more severe

  2. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  3. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  4. Silencing the Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc Transferase Reduces Proliferation, Adhesion, and Migration of Cancer and Fetal Human Colon Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Steenackers, Agata; Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Baldini, Steffi F; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram; Lefebvre, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is regulated by a unique couple of enzymes. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) transfers the GlcNAc residue from UDP-GlcNAc, the final product of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP), whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes it. This study and others show that OGT and O-GlcNAcylation levels are increased in cancer cell lines. In that context, we studied the effect of OGT silencing in the colon cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116 and the primary colon cell line CCD841CoN. Herein, we report that OGT silencing diminished proliferation, in vitro cell survival and adhesion of primary and cancer cell lines. SiOGT dramatically decreased HT29 and CCD841CoN migration, CCD841CoN harboring high capabilities of migration in Boyden chamber system when compared to HT29 and HCT116. The expression levels of actin and tubulin were unaffected by OGT knockdown but siOGT seemed to disorganize microfilament, microtubule, and vinculin networks in CCD841CoN. While cancer cell lines harbor higher levels of OGT and O-GlcNAcylation to fulfill their proliferative and migratory properties, in agreement with their higher consumption of HBP main substrates glucose and glutamine, our data demonstrate that OGT expression is not only necessary for the biological properties of cancer cell lines but also for normal cells.

  5. dysfusion Transcriptional Control of Drosophila Tracheal Migration, Adhesion, and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Crews, Stephen T.

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila dysfusion basic-helix-loop-helix-PAS transcription factor gene is expressed in specialized fusion cells that reside at the tips of migrating tracheal branches. dysfusion mutants were isolated, and genetic analysis of live embryos revealed that mutant tracheal branches migrate to close proximity but fail to recognize and adhere to each other. Misexpression of dysfusion throughout the trachea further indicated that dysfusion has the ability to both inhibit cell migration and promote ectopic tracheal fusion. Nineteen genes whose expression either increases or decreases in fusion cells during development were analyzed in dysfusion mutant embryos. dysfusion upregulates the levels of four genes, including the shotgun cell adhesion protein gene and the zona pellucida family transmembrane protein gene, CG13196. Misexpression experiments with CG13196 result in ectopic tracheal fusion events, suggesting that it also encodes a cell adhesion protein. Another target gene of dysfusion is members only, which inhibits protein nuclear export and influences tracheal fusion. dysfusion also indirectly downregulates protein levels of Trachealess, an important regulator of tracheal development. These results indicate that fusion cells undergo dynamic changes in gene expression as they switch from migratory to fusion modes and that dysfusion regulates a discrete, but important, set of these genes. PMID:16914738

  6. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development.

  7. Cyclin D1b splice variant promotes αvβ3-mediated adhesion and invasive migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Hua; Luo, Li-Qiong; Liu, Yi; Zhan, Qiu-Xiao; Luo, Chao; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Cyclin D1b, a splice variant of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, holds oncogenic functions in human cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying cyclin D1b function remain poorly understood. Here we introduced wild-type cyclin D1a or cyclin D1b variant into non-metastatic MCF-7 cells. Our results show that ectopic expression of cyclin D1b promotes invasiveness of the cancer cells in a cyclin D1a independent manner. Specifically, cyclin D1b is found to modulate the expression of αvβ3, which characterizes the metastatic phenotype, and enhance tumor cell invasive potential in cooperating with HoxD3. Notably, cyclin D1b promotes αvβ3-mediated adhesion and invasive migration, which are associated with invasive potential of breast cancer cells. Further exploration indicates that cyclin D1b makes breast cancer cells more sensitive to toll-like receptor 4 ligand released from damaged tumor cells. These findings reveal a role of cyclin D1b as a possible mediator of αvβ3 transcription to promote tumor metastasis.

  8. Cyclin D1b splice variant promotes αvβ3-mediated adhesion and invasive migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Hua; Luo, Li-Qiong; Liu, Yi; Zhan, Qiu-Xiao; Luo, Chao; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Cyclin D1b, a splice variant of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, holds oncogenic functions in human cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying cyclin D1b function remain poorly understood. Here we introduced wild-type cyclin D1a or cyclin D1b variant into non-metastatic MCF-7 cells. Our results show that ectopic expression of cyclin D1b promotes invasiveness of the cancer cells in a cyclin D1a independent manner. Specifically, cyclin D1b is found to modulate the expression of αvβ3, which characterizes the metastatic phenotype, and enhance tumor cell invasive potential in cooperating with HoxD3. Notably, cyclin D1b promotes αvβ3-mediated adhesion and invasive migration, which are associated with invasive potential of breast cancer cells. Further exploration indicates that cyclin D1b makes breast cancer cells more sensitive to toll-like receptor 4 ligand released from damaged tumor cells. These findings reveal a role of cyclin D1b as a possible mediator of αvβ3 transcription to promote tumor metastasis. PMID:25193465

  9. A novel and critical role for tyrosine 663 in platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 trafficking and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Bidisha; Dufour, Eric; Mamdouh, Zahra; Muller, William A

    2009-04-15

    PECAM-1/CD31 is required for leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) under most inflammatory conditions. A critical pool of PECAM-1 resides in the lateral border recycling compartment (LBRC). During TEM, membrane from the LBRC is redirected to surround the leukocyte, and this targeted recycling per se is required for TEM. The cytoplasmic domain of PECAM-1 contains two tyrosine residues that have been implicated in PECAM-1 signaling in other cells but never examined in the context of TEM. We found that expression of PECAM-1 imparts on cells the ability to support TEM and that tyrosine 663 (but not tyrosine 686) is required. Furthermore, tyrosine 663 is required for PECAM-1 to efficiently enter and exit the LBRC. Most important, mutation of tyrosine 663 abolishes the ability of the endothelial cells to support targeted recycling of the LBRC. These data define a novel role for tyrosine 663 and suggest that it is part of a recognition motif for trafficking to and/or from the LBRC. PMID:19342684

  10. Cell adhesion: integrating cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular tension

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Thomas; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration affects all morphogenetic processes and contributes to numerous diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. For most cells in most environments, movement begins with protrusion of the cell membrane followed by the formation of new adhesions at the cell front that link the actin cytoskeleton to the substratum, generation of traction forces that move the cell forwards and disassembly of adhesions at the cell rear. Adhesion formation and disassembly drive the migration cycle by activating Rho GTPases, which in turn regulate actin polymerization and myosin II activity, and therefore adhesion dynamics. PMID:20729930

  11. Fps/Fes protein-tyrosine kinase regulates mast cell adhesion and migration downstream of Kit and beta1 integrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie A; Samayawardhena, Lionel A; Craig, Andrew W B

    2010-03-01

    Activation of Kit receptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) by its ligand Stem Cell Factor (SCF) is required for the development of mast cells, and for the regulation of mast cell proliferation, migration and modulation of inflammatory mediator release. Recent studies have implicated the non-receptor PTK Fps/Fes (hereafter referred to as Fes) in signaling downstream of oncogenic Kit, however, the potential role of Fes in regulating Kit signaling is not well defined. In this study, we show that SCF induces transient tyrosine phosphorylation of wild-type Fes as well as kinase-dead Fes in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The latter finding implicates an upstream kinase acting on Fes, which we identified as Fyn PTK. SCF treatment of BMMCs promoted recruitment of Fes to Kit, potentially via direct interaction of the Fes SH2 domain with phosphorylated Kit. While Fes was not required for SCF-induced signaling to Akt and Erk kinases, Fes-deficient (fes-/-) BMMCs displayed a defect in sustained p38 kinase activation, compared to control cells. SCF-treated Fes-deficient BMMCs also displayed elevated beta1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin, compared to control cells, and a reduction in cell polarization at later times of SCF treatment. Restoring Fes expression in fes-/- BMMCs by retroviral transduction was sufficient to rescue cell spreading and polarization defects. Interestingly, SCF-induced chemotaxis of BMMCs was also defective in Fes-deficient BMMCs, and restored in Fes-rescue BMMCs. Overall, these results implicate Fes in regulating cross-talk between Kit and beta1 integrins to promote cytoskeletal reorganization and motility of mast cells.

  12. Mediation of the migration of endothelial cells and fibroblasts on polyurethane nanocomposites by the activation of integrin-focal adhesion kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Huey-Shan; Chu, Mei-Yun; Lin, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Chia-Ching; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2012-01-01

    Model surfaces of polyurethane-gold nanocomposites (PU-Au) were used to examine cell behavior on nanophase-segregated materials. Previously we showed that endothelial cell (EC) migration on these materials was modulated by the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. The present study, investigated the expressions of alpha5/beta3 (α5β3) integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and other downstream signal molecules such as the Rho family and matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) induced by the materials in two different cells, that is bovine arterial endothelial cells (BAEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). Both cells proliferated better on the more phase-separated PU-Au 43.5 ppm than on the less phase-separated controls (PU and PU-Au 174 ppm). On PU-Au 43.5 ppm, BAEC compared to HSF had denser actin fibers and were more extended. BAEC became rounded with Y-27632 treatment and shrunk with LY294002 treatment. Treatment by inhibitors only caused slight changes in HSF. The migration distance of BAEC on PU-Au 43.5 ppm was greater than that of HSF, and was significantly reduced by LY294002 or Y-27632 but not SU-1498. The expressions of p-FAK, p-RhoA, p-Rac/Cdc42, MMP2, and α5β3 integrin induced by PU-Au 43.5 ppm were more pronounced in BAEC versus HSF. Further enhancement in MMP2 and α5β3 integrin expressions by FAK-GFP transfection was more remarkable for cells on PU-Au 43.5 ppm. Our findings suggested that the integrin α5β3/FAK pathway may be induced by nanophase-separated materials in both ECs and fibroblasts to promote their proliferation/migration, while the crosstalk between the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway and FAK/Rho-GTPase activation may account for the greater effect in ECs than in fibroblasts.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of primary schwann cells and a spontaneously immortalized schwann cell line RSC 96: a comprehensive overview with a focus on cell adhesion and migration related proteins.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuhua; Shen, Mi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Shuqiang; Yu, Shu; Chen, Gang; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei

    2012-06-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the principal glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). As a result of tissue heterogeneity and difficulties in the isolation and culture of primary SCs, a considerable understanding of SC biology is obtained from SC lines. However, the differences between the primary SCs and SC lines remain uncertain. In the present study, quantitative proteomic analysis based on isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling was conducted to obtain an unbiased view of the proteomic profiles of primary rat SCs and RSC96, a spontaneously immortalized rat SC line. Out of 1757 identified proteins (FDR < 1%), 1702 were quantified, while 61 and 78 were found to be, respectively, up- or down-regulated (90% confidence interval) in RSC96. Bioinformatics analysis indicated the unique features of spontaneous immortalization, illustrated the dedifferentiated state of RSC96, and highlighted a panel of novel proteins associated with cell adhesion and migration including CADM4, FERMT2, and MCAM. Selected proteomic data and the requirement of these novel proteins in SC adhesion and migration were properly validated. Taken together, our data collectively revealed proteome differences between primary SCs and RSC96, validated several differentially expressed proteins with potential biological significance, and generated a database that may serve as a useful resource for studies of SC biology and pathology.

  14. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  15. Aquaporins and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, M C; Saadoun, S; Verkman, A S

    2008-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are expressed primarily in cell plasma membranes. In this paper, we review recent evidence that AQPs facilitate cell migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has been found in a variety of cell types in vitro and in mice in vivo. AQP1 deletion reduces endothelial cell migration, limiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. AQP4 deletion slows the migration of reactive astrocytes, impairing glial scarring after brain stab injury. AQP1-expressing tumor cells have enhanced metastatic potential and local infiltration. Impaired cell migration has also been seen in AQP1-deficient proximal tubule epithelial cells, and AQP3-deficient corneal epithelial cells, enterocytes, and skin keratinocytes. The mechanisms by which AQPs enhance cell migration are under investigation. We propose that, as a consequence of actin polymerization/depolymerization and transmembrane ionic fluxes, the cytoplasm adjacent to the leading edge of migrating cells undergoes rapid changes in osmolality. AQPs could thus facilitate osmotic water flow across the plasma membrane in cell protrusions that form during migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has potentially broad implications in angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound healing, glial scarring, and other events requiring rapid, directed cell movement. AQP inhibitors may thus have therapeutic potential in modulating these events, such as slowing tumor growth and spread, and reducing glial scarring after injury to allow neuronal regeneration. PMID:17968585

  16. Adhesion molecules involved in hepoxilin A3-mediated neutrophil transepithelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, B P; Sin, A; McCormick, B A

    2008-01-01

    A common feature underlying active states of inflammation is the migration of neutrophils (PMNs) from the circulation and across a number of tissue barriers in response to chemoattractant stimuli. Although our group has recently established a discreet role for the PMN chemoattractant, hepoxilin A3 (HXA3) in the process of PMN recruitment, very little is known regarding the interaction of HXA3 with PMNs. To characterize further the event of HXA3-induced PMN transepithelial migration, we sought to determine the adhesion molecules required for migration across different epithelial surfaces (T84 intestinal and A549 airway cells) relative to two well-studied PMN chemoattractants, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Our findings reveal that the adhesion interaction profile of PMN transepithelial migration in response to HXA3 differs from the adhesion interaction profile exhibited by the structurally related eicosanoid LTB4. Furthermore, unique to PMN transepithelial migration induced by gradients of HXA3 was the critical dependency of all four major surface adhesion molecules examined (i.e. CD18, CD47, CD44 and CD55). Our results suggest that the particular chemoattractant gradient imposed, as well as the type of epithelial cell monolayer, each plays a role in determining the adhesion molecules involved in transepithelial migration. Given the complexities of these interactions, our findings are important to consider with respect to adhesion molecules that may be targeted for potential drug development. PMID:18005361

  17. Single chain fragment variable antibodies developed by using as target the 3rd fibronectin type III homologous repeat fragment of human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 promote cell migration and neuritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xuan-Jun; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2015-01-15

    L1CAM plays important roles during ontogeny, including promotion of neuronal cell migration and neuritogenesis, and stimulation of axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and myelination. These functions are at least partially exerted through a 16-mer amino acid sequence in the third fibronectin type III-like repeat of L1, which associates with several interaction partners, including integrins, other adhesion molecules and growth factor receptors. Here, using the Tomlinson I library for phage display, we obtained two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs) against this peptide sequence of human L1, hereafter called H3 peptide. Both scFvs recognize the H3 peptide and the extracellular domain of L1, as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of L1 expresssing cells. Furthermore, both scFvs reduce U-87 MG cell adhesion to fibronectin, while stimulating cell migration. Application of scFvs to human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells promote process outgrowth. Similar to triggering of endogenous L1 functions at the cell surface, both scFvs activate the signal transducers Erk and Src in these cells. Our results indicate that scFvs against a functionally pivotal domain in L1 trigger its regeneration-beneficial functions in vitro, encouraging thoughts on therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in the hope to ameliorate human nervous system diseases. PMID:25447207

  18. Adsorption of plasma proteins and fibronectin on poly(hydroxylethyl methacrylate) brushes of different thickness and their relationship with adhesion and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jun; Ren, Tanchen; Zhu, Jiyu; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2014-01-01

    The surface-grafted poly(hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) molecules were demonstrated to show a brush state regardless of their molecular length (molecular weight). Adsorption of proteins from 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), fibronectin (Fn) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was quantified by ellipsometry, revealing that the amounts of FBS and Fn decreased monotonously along with the increase of PHEMA thickness, whereas not detectable for BSA when the PHEMA thickness was larger than 6 nm. Radio immunoassay found that the adsorption of Fn from 10% FBS had no significant difference regardless of the PHEMA thickness. However, ELISA results showed that the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) activity of adsorbed Fn decreased with the increase of PHEMA thickness. By comparison of cellular behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) being cultured in vitro in the normal serum-containing medium and the Fn-depleted serum-containing medium, the significant role of Fn on modulating the adhesion and migration of VSMCs was verified. Taking account all the results, the Fn adsorption model and its role on linking the biomaterials surface to the VSMCs behaviors are proposed. PMID:26814446

  19. AFM studied the effect of celastrol on β1 integrin-mediated HUVEC adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Ke, Changhong; Jin, Hua; Cai, Jiye

    2013-01-01

    Integrin-mediated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a fundamental role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Celastrol, a traditional Chinese medicine plant, has possessed anticancer and suppressed angiogenesis activities. Here, the mechanism underling the antiangiogenesis capacity of celastrol was investigated by exploring the effect of celastrol on β1(CD29) integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Flow cytometry results showed that the HUVECs highly expressed CD29 and cell adhesion assay indicated that celastrol specifically inhibited the adhesion of HUVECs to fibronectin (FN) without affecting nonspecific adhesion to poly-L-lysine (PLL). After cell FN adhesion being inhibited, the cell surface nanoscale structure and adhesion force were detected by atomic force microscope (AFM). High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with celastrol. The membrane average roughness (Ra) and the major forces were decreased from 31.34 ± 4.56 nm, 519.60 ± 82.86 pN of 0 μg/ml celastrol to 18.47 ± 6.53 nm, 417.79 ± 53.35 pN of 4.0 μg/ml celastrol, 10.54 ± 2.85 nm, 258.95 ± 38.98 pN of 8.0 μg/ml celastrol, respectively. Accompanying with the decrease of adhesion force, the actin cytoskeleton in the cells was obviously disturbed by the celastrol. All of these changes influenced the migration of HUVECs from the wound-healing migration assay. Taken together, our results suggest that celastrol can be as an inhibitor of HUVEC adhesion to FN. This work provides a novel approach to inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:23239560

  20. Systems microscopy approaches to understand cancer cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Yan, Kuan; de Bont, Hans; Ghotra, Veerander; Truong, Hoa; Danen, Erik H.; Verbeek, Fons

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in a number of processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. Especially, invasion of cancer cells in the surrounding tissue is a crucial step that requires increased cell motility. Cell migration is a well-orchestrated process that involves the continuous formation and disassembly of matrix adhesions. Those structural anchor points interact with the extra-cellular matrix and also participate in adhesion-dependent signalling. Although these processes are essential for cancer metastasis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate adhesion dynamics during tumour cell migration. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advanced imaging strategies together with quantitative image analysis that can be implemented to understand the dynamics of matrix adhesions and its molecular components in relation to tumour cell migration. This dynamic cell imaging together with multiparametric image analysis will help in understanding the molecular mechanisms that define cancer cell migration. PMID:20556632

  1. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell-substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Langhe, Rahul P; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell-cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell-matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  2. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength. PMID:22208188

  3. IAPs and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dubrez, Laurence; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) constitute a family of cell signaling regulators controlling several fundamental biological processes such as innate immunity, inflammation, cell death, cell proliferation, and cell differentiation. Increasing evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies indicate a function for IAPs in the modulation of invasive and migratory properties of cells. Here, we present and discuss the mechanisms whereby IAPs can control cell migration.

  4. sFRP-1 binds via its netrin-related motif to the N-module of thrombospondin-1 and blocks thrombospondin-1 stimulation of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Martin-Manso, Gema; Calzada, Maria J; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sipes, John M; Xavier, Charles P; Wolf, Vladimir; Kuznetsova, Svetlana A; Rubin, Jeffrey S; Roberts, David D

    2011-05-15

    Secreted frizzled-related protein (sFRP)-1 is a Wnt antagonist that inhibits breast carcinoma cell motility, whereas the secreted glycoprotein thrombospondin-1 stimulates adhesion and motility of the same cells. We examined whether thrombospondin-1 and sFRP-1 interact directly or indirectly to modulate cell behavior. Thrombospondin-1 bound sFRP-1 with an apparent K(d)=48nM and the related sFRP-2 with a K(d)=95nM. Thrombospondin-1 did not bind to the more distantly related sFRP-3. The association of thrombospondin-1 and sFRP-1 is primarily mediated by the amino-terminal N-module of thrombospondin-1 and the netrin domain of sFRP-1. sFRP-1 inhibited α3β1 integrin-mediated adhesion of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to a surface coated with thrombospondin-1 or recombinant N-module, but not adhesion of the cells on immobilized fibronectin or type I collagen. sFRP-1 also inhibited thrombospondin-1-mediated migration of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 breast carcinoma cells. Although sFRP-2 binds similarly to thrombospondin-1, it did not inhibit thrombospondin-1-stimulated adhesion. Thus, sFRP-1 binds to thrombospondin-1 and antagonizes stimulatory effects of thrombospondin-1 on breast carcinoma cell adhesion and motility. These results demonstrate that sFRP-1 can modulate breast cancer cell responses by interacting with thrombospondin-1 in addition to its known effects on Wnt signaling.

  5. Altering FAK-Paxillin Interactions Reduces Adhesion, Migration and Invasion Processes

    PubMed Central

    Deramaudt, Thérèse B.; Dujardin, Denis; Noulet, Fanny; Martin, Sophie; Vauchelles, Romain; Takeda, Ken; Rondé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role in signal transduction pathways initiated at sites of integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Thus, FAK is involved in many aspects of the metastatic process including adhesion, migration and invasion. Recently, several small molecule inhibitors which target FAK catalytic activity have been developed by pharmaceutical companies. The current study was aimed at addressing whether inhibiting FAK targeting to focal adhesions (FA) represents an efficient alternative strategy to inhibit FAK downstream pathways. Using a mutagenesis approach to alter the targeting domain of FAK, we constructed a FAK mutant that fails to bind paxillin. Inhibiting FAK-paxillin interactions led to a complete loss of FAK localization at FAs together with reduced phosphorylation of FAK and FAK targets such as paxillin and p130Cas. This in turn resulted in altered FA dynamics and inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Moreover, the migration properties of cells expressing the FAK mutant were reduced as compared to FAK-/- cells. This was correlated with a decrease in both phospho-Src and phospho-p130Cas levels at FAs. We conclude that targeting FAK-paxillin interactions is an efficient strategy to reduce FAK signalling and thus may represent a target for the development of new FAK inhibitors. PMID:24642576

  6. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  7. Antcin K, an Active Triterpenoid from the Fruiting Bodies of Basswood-Cultivated Antrodia cinnamomea, Inhibits Metastasis via Suppression of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lai, Chiao-I; Su, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-05-13

    Previous research demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract from Antrodia cinnamomea suppresses the invasive potential of human breast and hepatoma cells, but the effective compounds are not identified. The main bioactive compounds of A. cinnamomea are ergostane-type triterpenoids, and the content of antcin K is the highest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimetastatic activity and mechanisms of antcin K purified from the fruiting body of basswood-cultivated A. cinnamomea on human liver cancer Hep 3B cells. The results showed that adhesion, migration, and invasion of Hep 3B cells were effectively inhibited by antcin K within 24 h of treatment. Antcin K not only reduced the protein expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 but also down-regulated vimentin and up-regulated E-cadherin in Hep 3B cells. In depth investigation for the molecular mechanism revealed that antcin K could reduce the protein expression of integrin β1, β3, α5, and αv and suppress phosphorylation of FAK, Src, PI3K, AKT, MEK, ERK, and JNK. These results suggested that antcin K was able to inhibit the metastasis of human hepatoma cells through suppression of integrin-mediated adhesion, migration, and invasion. Coupled with these findings, antcin K has a good potential to reduce the risk of liver cancer metastasis. PMID:25911944

  8. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei -Jen; Chen, Shao -Yu; Yang, Feng; et al

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essentialmore » for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.« less

  9. Short-Lived, Transitory Cell-Cell Interactions Foster Migration-Dependent Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Melissa D.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2012-01-01

    During embryonic development, motile cells aggregate into cohesive groups, which give rise to tissues and organs. The role of cell migration in regulating aggregation is unclear. The current paradigm for aggregation is based on an equilibrium model of differential cell adhesivity to neighboring cells versus the underlying substratum. In many biological contexts, however, dynamics is critical. Here, we provide evidence that multicellular aggregation dynamics involves both local adhesive interactions and transport by cell migration. Using time-lapse video microscopy, we quantified the duration of cell-cell contacts among migrating cells that collided and adhered to another cell. This lifetime of cell-cell interactions exhibited a monotonic decreasing dependence on substratum adhesivity. Parallel quantitative measurements of cell migration speed revealed that across the tested range of adhesive substrata, the mean time needed for cells to migrate and encounter another cell was greater than the mean adhesion lifetime, suggesting that aggregation dynamics may depend on cell motility instead of the local differential adhesivity of cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, aggregate size exhibited a biphasic dependence on substratum adhesivity, matching the trend we observed for cell migration speed. Our findings suggest a new role for cell motility, alongside differential adhesion, in regulating developmental aggregation events and motivate new design principles for tuning aggregation dynamics in tissue engineering applications. PMID:22912835

  10. Schwann cells promote endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiago; Ahmed, Maqsood; Wieringa, Paul; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration is a crucial orchestrated process in embryonic development, wound healing, and immune response. The underlying substrate can provide physical and/or chemical cues that promote directed cell migration. Here, using electrospinning we developed substrates of aligned poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibres to study the influence of glial cells on endothelial cells (ECs) in a 3-dimensional (3D) co-culture model. ECs build blood vessels and regulate their plasticity in coordination with neurons. Likewise, neurons construct nerves and regulate their circuits in coordination with ECs. In our model, the neuro-vascular cross-talk was assessed using a direct co-culture model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat Schwann cells (rSCs). The effect of rSCs on ECs behavior was demonstrated by earlier and higher velocity values and genetic expression profiles different of those of HUVECs when seeded alone. We observed 2 different gene expression trends in the co-culture models: (i) a later gene expression of angiogenic factors, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and (ii) an higher gene expression of genes involved in actin filaments rearrangement, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 13 (MAPKAPK13), Vinculin (VCL), and Profilin (PROF). These results suggested that the higher ECs migration is mainly due to proteins involved in the actin filaments rearrangement and in the directed cell migration rather than the effect of angiogenic factors. This co-culture model provides an approach to enlighten the neurovascular interactions, with particular focus on endothelial cell migration. PMID:26491999

  11. The Novel Receptor C5aR2 Is Required for C5a-Mediated Human Mast Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Proinflammatory Mediator Production.

    PubMed

    Pundir, Priyanka; MacDonald, Clayton A; Kulka, Marianna

    2015-09-15

    C5a generated during complement activation possesses proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties critical for the development and modulation of allergic immune responses. In immune cells, C5a mediates its effects through binding to two G protein-coupled receptors, C5aR1 and C5aR2. Mast cells are key effectors in allergic reactions, and decades of research have suggested that the majority of C5a effects on mast cells are mediated through C5aR1, whereas the expression and function of C5aR2 have not been explored. We demonstrated that the human mast cell line Laboratory of Allergic Diseases 2 (LAD2) expresses surface C5aR2 but not C5aR1, whereas CD34(+) cell-derived primary mast cells do not express surface C5aR1 or C5aR2. Stem cell factor and IL-4 upregulated C5aR2 expression on LAD2 cells. Furthermore, C5a caused internalization of LAD2 cell-surface C5aR2. We therefore used LAD2 cells as a model to study C5a/C5aR2-induced biological responses and signaling in human mast cells. We found that whereas C5a was unable to induce degranulation, it stimulated GM-CSF, TNF, CXCL10, and CCL2 production. C5a caused ERK phosphorylation, a signaling molecule important in cytokine and chemokine generation. In addition, C5a stimulated adhesion and chemotaxis of mast cells. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, and small interfering RNA against β-arrestin-2 blocked C5a-induced adhesion. Silencing of C5aR2 using lentiviral short hairpin RNA rendered the cells unresponsive to C5a-induced adhesion, chemotaxis, and mediator release, as well as ERK phosphorylation. Overall, this study reveals a novel role for C5aR2 in C5a-mediated activation of mast cells and demonstrates that C5aR2 ligation initiates a β-arrestin-2-, PI3K-, and ERK-dependent signaling pathway in these cells.

  12. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26636434

  13. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. CD47 mediates post-adhesive events required for neutrophil migration across polarized intestinal epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Transepithelial migration of neutrophils (PMN) is a defining characteristic of active inflammatory states of mucosal surfaces. The process of PMN transepithelial migration, while dependent on the neutrophil beta 2 integrin CD11b/CD18, remains poorly understood. In these studies, we define a monoclonal antibody, C5/D5, raised against epithelial membrane preparations, which markedly inhibits PMN migration across polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84 in a bidirectional fashion. In T84 cells, the antigen defined by C5/D5 is upregulated by epithelial exposure to IFN-gamma, and represents a membrane glycoprotein of approximately 60 kD that is expressed on the basolateral membrane. While transepithelial migration of PMN was markedly inhibited by either C5/D5 IgG or C5/D5 Fab fragments, the antibody failed to inhibit both adhesion of PMN to T84 monolayers and adhesion of isolated T84 cells to the purified PMN integrin, CD11b/CD18. Thus, epithelial-PMN interactions blocked by C5/D5 appear to be downstream from initial CD11b/CD18-mediated adhesion of PMN to epithelial cells. Purification, microsequence analysis, and cross-blotting experiments indicate that the C5/D5 antigen represents CD47, a previously cloned integral membrane glycoprotein with homology to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Expression of the CD47 epitope was confirmed on PMN and was also localized to the basolateral membrane of normal human colonic epithelial cells. While C5/D5 IgG inhibited PMN migration even in the absence of epithelial, preincubation of T84 monolayers with C5/D5 IgG followed by antibody washout also resulted in inhibition of transmigration. These results suggest the presence of both neutrophil and epithelial components to CD47-mediated transepithelial migration. Thus, CD47 represents a potential new therapeutic target for downregulating active inflammatory disease of mucosal surfaces. PMID:8636220

  15. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  16. Free energy landscape of receptor-mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianyi; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion plays a critical role in cell migration, proliferation, signaling, and survival. A number of diseases, including cancer, show a strong correlation between integrin activation and metastasis. A better understanding of cell adhesion is highly desirable for not only therapeutic but also a number of tissue engineering applications. While a number of computational models and experimental studies have addressed the issue of cell adhesion to surfaces, no model or theory has adequately addressed cell adhesion at the molecular level. In this paper, the authors present a thermodynamic model that addresses receptor-mediated cell adhesion at the molecular level. By incorporating the entropic, conformational, solvation, and long- and short-range interactive components of receptors and the extracellular matrix molecules, they are able to predict adhesive free energy as a function of a number of key variables such as surface coverage, interaction distance, molecule size, and solvent conditions. Their method allows them to compute the free energy of adhesion in a multicomponent system where they can simultaneously study adhesion receptors and ligands of different sizes, chemical identities, and conformational properties. The authors' results not only provide a fundamental understanding of adhesion at the molecular level but also suggest possible strategies for designing novel biomaterials.

  17. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  18. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  19. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  20. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  1. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  2. Networking galore: intermediate filaments and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung-Min; Rotty, Jeremy D; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2013-10-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are assembled from a diverse group of evolutionarily conserved proteins and are specified in a tissue-dependent, cell type-dependent, and context-dependent fashion in the body. IFs are involved in multiple cellular processes that are crucial for the maintenance of cell and tissue integrity and the response and adaptation to various stresses, as conveyed by the broad array of crippling clinical disorders caused by inherited mutations in IF coding sequences. Accordingly, the expression, assembly, and organization of IFs are tightly regulated. Migration is a fitting example of a cell-based phenomenon in which IFs participate as both effectors and regulators. With a particular focus on vimentin and keratin, we here review how the contributions of IFs to the cell's mechanical properties, to cytoarchitecture and adhesion, and to regulatory pathways collectively exert a significant impact on cell migration.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  4. Paxillin binding to the alpha 4 integrin subunit stimulates LFA-1 (integrin alpha L beta 2)-dependent T cell migration by augmenting the activation of focal adhesion kinase/proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2.

    PubMed

    Rose, David M; Liu, Shouchun; Woodside, Darren G; Han, Jaewon; Schlaepfer, David D; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2003-06-15

    Engagement of very late Ag-4 (integrin alpha(4)beta(1)) by ligands such as VCAM-1 markedly stimulates leukocyte migration mediated by LFA-1 (integrin alpha(L)beta(2)). This form of integrin trans-regulation in T cells requires the binding of paxillin to the alpha(4) integrin cytoplasmic domain. This conclusion is based on the abolition of trans-regulation in Jurkat T cells by an alpha(4) mutation (alpha(4)(Y991A)) that disrupts paxillin binding. Furthermore, cellular expression of an alpha(4)-binding fragment of paxillin that blocks the alpha(4)-paxillin interaction, selectively blocked VCAM-1 stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent cell migration. The alpha(4)-paxillin association mediates trans-regulation by enhancing the activation of tyrosine kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and/or proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2), based on two lines of evidence. First, disruption of the paxillin-binding site in the alpha(4) tail resulted in much less alpha(4)beta(1)-mediated phosphorylation of Pyk2 and FAK. Second, transfection with cDNAs encoding C-terminal fragments of Pyk2 and FAK, which block the function of the intact kinases, blocked alpha(4)beta(1) stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent migration. These results define a proximal protein-protein interaction of an integrin cytoplasmic domain required for trans-regulation between integrins, and establish that augmented activation of Pyk2 and/or FAK is an immediate signaling event required for the trans-regulation of integrin alpha(L)beta(2) by alpha(4)beta(1). PMID:12794117

  5. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  6. Nucleophosmin Mutants Promote Adhesion, Migration and Invasion of Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells through MMPs Up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Jingrong; Shao, Huiyuan; Chen, Xianchun; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Quan, Jing; Zou, Qin; Jin, Hongjun; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1) has been defined as a unique subgroup in the new classification of myeloid neoplasm, and the AML patients with mutated NPM1 frequently present extramedullary infiltration, but how NPM1 mutants regulate this process remains elusive. In this study, we found that overexpression of type A NPM1 gene mutation (NPM1-mA) enhanced the adhesive, migratory and invasive potential in THP-1 AML cells lacking mutated NPM1. NPM1-mA had up-regulated expression and gelatinolytic matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 activity, as assessed by real-time PCR, western blotting and gelatin zymography. Following immunoprecipitation analysis to identify the interaction of NPM1-mA with K-Ras, we focused on the effect of NPM1-mA overexpression on the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling axis and showed that NPM1-mA increased the MEK and ERK phosphorylation levels, as evaluated by western blotting. Notably, a specific inhibitor of the ERK/MAPK pathway (PD98059), but not p38/MAPK, JNK/MAPK or PI3-K/AKT inhibitors, markedly decreased the cell invasion numbers in a transwell assay. Further experiments demonstrated that blocking the ERK/MAPK pathway by PD98059 resulted in reduced MMP-2/9 protein levels and MMP-9 activity. Additionally, NPM1-mA overexpression had down-regulated gene expression and protein production of tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) in THP-1 cells. Furthermore, evaluation of gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that MMP-2 was overexpressed in AML patient samples with NPM1 mutated and high MMP-2 expression associated with leukemic skin infiltration. Taken together, our results reveal that NPM1 mutations contribute to the invasive potential of AML cells through MMPs up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK signaling pathway activation and offer novel insights into the potential role of NPM1 mutations in leukemogenesis. PMID:26884713

  7. Effect of Linomide on adhesion molecules, TNF-alpha, nitrogen oxide, and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hai, A; Hershkoviz, R; Weiss, L; Lider, O; Slavin, S

    2005-02-01

    Linomide (quinoline-3-carboxamide) is an immunomodulator with anti-inflammatory effects in rodents with autoimmune diseases. Its mode of action still remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that an investigation of T cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of glycoproteins such as fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN), might provide better understanding of their in vivo mode of action in extravascular inflammatory sites. We examined the effect of Linomide on T cell adhesion to intact ECM, and separately to LN, and FN, and on the release and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and nitrogen oxide (NO) in relation to adhesive molecules in non-obese diabetic (NOD) female spleen cells, focusing on intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44. NOD female mice that developed spontaneous autoimmune insulitis, which destroys pancreatic islets and subsequently leads to insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus, were studied. Linomide, given in the drinking water or added to tissue cultures in vitro, inhibited the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of T cells to ECM, FN and LN, as well as the production and release of TNFalpha and NO, which play a major role in the induction and propagation of T cell-mediated insulitis. In addition, exposure of T cells to Linomide resulted in increased expression of CD44 and ICAM-1 molecules on spleen cells of Linomide-treated mice; such an increase in adhesion molecule expression may lead to more effective arrest of T cell migration in vivo. The regulation of T-cell adhesion, adhesion receptor expression, and inhibition of TNFalpha and NO secretion by Linomide may explain its beneficial role and provide a new tool for suppressing self-reactive T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases. PMID:15652754

  8. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  9. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells' focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  10. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells. PMID:24635174

  11. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells.

  12. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  13. Innate Non-Specific Cell Substratum Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, William F.; Fuller, Danny; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of motile cells to solid surfaces is necessary to transmit forces required for propulsion. Unlike mammalian cells, Dictyostelium cells do not make integrin mediated focal adhesions. Nevertheless, they can move rapidly on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. We have found that adhesion to such surfaces can be inhibited by addition of sugars or amino acids to the buffer. Treating whole cells with αlpha-mannosidase to cleave surface oligosaccharides also reduces adhesion. The results indicate that adhesion of these cells is mediated by van der Waals attraction of their surface glycoproteins to the underlying substratum. Since glycoproteins are prevalent components of the surface of most cells, innate adhesion may be a common cellular property that has been overlooked. PMID:22952588

  14. Impact of jamming on collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnetu, Kenechukwu David; Knorr, Melanie; Pawlizak, Steve; Fuhs, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; KäS, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-cellular migration plays an important role in physiological processes such as embryogenesis, cancer metastasis and tissue repair. During migration, single cells undergo cycles of extension, adhesion and retraction resulting in morphological changes. In a confluent monolayer, there are inter-cellular interactions and crowding, however, the impact of these interactions on the dynamics and elasticity of the monolayer at the multi-cellular and single cell level is not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of a confluent epithelial monolayer by simultaneously measuring cell motion at the multi-cellular and single cell level for various cell densities and tensile elasticity. At the multi-cellular level, the system exhibited spatial kinetic transitions from isotropic to anisotropic migration on long times and the velocity of the monolayer decreased with increasing cell density. Moreover, the dynamics was spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Interestingly, the dynamics was also heterogeneous in wound-healing assays and the correlation length was fitted by compressed exponential. On the single cell scale, we observed transient caging effects with increasing cage rearrangement times as the system age due to an increase in density. Also, the density dependent elastic modulus of the monolayer scaled as a weak power law. Together, these findings suggest that caging effects at the single cell level initiates a slow and heterogeneous dynamics at the multi-cellular level which is similar to the glassy dynamics of deformable colloidal systems.

  15. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  16. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  17. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  18. High Glucose-Mediated Oxidative Stress Impairs Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Marcelo L.; Almeida, Maíra E. S.; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Horwitz, Alan F.; Santos, Marinilce F.

    2011-01-01

    Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG), 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG) or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control - OC), we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC). We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients. PMID:21826213

  19. LINKIN, a new transmembrane protein necessary for cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mihoko; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Yu, Collin Z; DeModena, John; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial collective migration, leader and follower cells migrate while maintaining cell–cell adhesion and tissue polarity. We have identified a conserved protein and interactors required for maintaining cell adhesion during a simple collective migration in the developing C. elegans male gonad. LINKIN is a previously uncharacterized, transmembrane protein conserved throughout Metazoa. We identified seven atypical FG–GAP domains in the extracellular domain, which potentially folds into a β-propeller structure resembling the α-integrin ligand-binding domain. C. elegans LNKN-1 localizes to the plasma membrane of all gonadal cells, with apical and lateral bias. We identified the LINKIN interactors RUVBL1, RUVBL2, and α-tubulin by using SILAC mass spectrometry on human HEK 293T cells and testing candidates for lnkn-1-like function in C. elegans male gonad. We propose that LINKIN promotes adhesion between neighboring cells through its extracellular domain and regulates microtubule dynamics through RUVBL proteins at its intracellular domain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04449.001 PMID:25437307

  20. Calcium- and integrin-binding protein 1 regulates megakaryocyte ploidy, adhesion, and migration

    PubMed Central

    Kostyak, John C.; Naik, Meghna U.

    2012-01-01

    Megakaryocytes are large, polyploid cells that produce platelets. We have previously reported that calcium- and integrin-binding protein 1 (CIB1) regulates endomitosis in Dami cells. To further characterize the role of CIB1 in megakaryopoiesis, we used a Cib1−/− mouse model. Cib1−/− mice have more platelets and BM megakaryocytes than wild-type (WT) controls (P < .05). Furthermore, subsequent analysis of megakaryocyte-CFU production revealed an increase with Cib1 deletion compared with WT (P < .05). In addition, BM from Cib1−/− mice, cultured with thrombopoietin (TPO) for 24 hours, produced more highly polyploid megakaryocytes than WT BM (P < .05). Subsequent analysis of TPO signaling revealed enhanced Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas FAKY925 phosphorylation was reduced in Cib1−/− megakaryocytes treated with TPO. Conversely, platelet recovery in Cib1−/− mice after platelet depletion was attenuated compared with WT (P < .05). This could be the result of impaired adhesion and migration, as adhesion to fibrinogen and fibronectin and migration toward an SDF-1α gradient were reduced in Cib1−/− megakaryocytes compared with WT (P < .05). In addition, Cib1−/− megakaryocytes formed fewer proplatelets compared with WT (P < .05), when plated on fibrinogen. These data suggest that CIB1 plays a dual role in megakaryopoiesis, initially by negatively regulating TPO signaling and later by augmenting proplatelet production. PMID:22128142

  1. Small heat shock proteins in cellular adhesion and migration: evidence from Plasmodium genetics.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Georgina N; Matuschewski, Kai; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular locomotion and adhesion critically depend on regulated turnover of filamentous actin. Biochemical data from diverse model systems support a role for the family of small heat shock proteins (HSPBs) in microfilament regulation. The small chaperones could either act directly, through competition with the motor myosin, or indirectly, through modulation of actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin activity. However, a direct link between HSPBs and actin-based cellular motility remained to be established. In a recent experimental genetics study, we provided evidence for regulation of Plasmodium motility by HSPB6/Hsp20. The infectious forms of malaria parasites, termed sporozoites, display fast and continuous substrate-dependent motility, which is largely driven by turnover of actin microfilaments. Sporozoite gliding locomotion is essential to avoid destruction by host defense mechanisms and to ultimately reach a hepatocyte, the target cell, where to transform and replicate. Genetic ablation of Plasmodium HSP20 dramatically changed sporozoite speed and substrate adhesion, resulting in impaired natural malaria transmission. In this article, we discuss the function of Hsp20 in this fast-moving unicellular protozoan and implications for the roles of HSPBs in adhesion and migration of eukaryotic cells.

  2. A role for adherons in neural retina cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Embryonic chick neural retina cells release glycoprotein complexes, termed adherons, into their culture medium. When absorbed onto the surface of petri dishes, neural retina adherons increase the initial rate of neural retina cell adhesion; they also stimulate the rate of cell-cell aggregation. Adheron-stimulated adhesion is tissue specific, and the spontaneous aggregation of neural retina cells is inhibited by monovalent Fab' fragments prepared from an antiserum against neural retina adherons. Therefore cell surface antigenic determinants shared with adherons are involved in normal cell-cell adhesions. The particles from the heterogeneous neural retina population contain many proteins and several glycosaminoglycans. The adherons migrate as a symmetrical 12S peak on sucrose gradients and are predominantly 15-nm spheres when examined by electron microscopy. Finally, the specific activity of neural retina adherons increases from embryonic days 7 through 12 and then declines. These results suggest that glycoprotein particles may be involved in some of the adhesive interactions between neural retina cells and between the cells and their environment. PMID:6187755

  3. Cell adhesion on ligand gradient substrates: a thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-01-01

    Gradient distribution of bio-adhesive proteins can regulate multiple cellular processes, including adhesion, growth, and migration. The ability to control the cell function by changing the surface density of immobilized ligands has become increasingly important in design of implantable medical devices and tissue regenerating scaffolds. Recent techniques in fabrication of substrates with controlled surface properties allow the examination of cell sensitivity to a wide range of adhesion gradients. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to these directional cues warrants a quantitative assessment of macroscopic cellular response to the surface gradients, supported by predictive theoretical models. This article presents a theoretical basis to examine the effect of ligand gradients on cellular adhesion, using an equilibrium thermodynamic model. The model facilitates a systematic investigation of the complex interplay of cell-substrate specific adhesions, non-specific repulsions, and membrane elasticity. This purely mechanistic model predicts a biphasic dependence between the extent of cell spreading and its position across the gradient substrate. PMID:19701944

  4. Neuropeptides, via specific receptors, regulate T cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Levite, M; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Steinman, L; Lider, O

    1998-01-15

    The ability of T cells to adhere to and interact with components of the blood vessel walls and the extracellular matrix is essential for their extravasation and migration into inflamed sites. We have found that the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of resting human T cells to fibronectin, a major glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, is induced by physiologic concentrations of three neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin; each acts via its own specific receptor on the T cell membrane. In contrast, substance P (SP), which coexists with CGRP in the majority of peripheral endings of sensory nerves, including those innervating the lymphoid organs, blocks T cell adhesion to fibronectin when induced by CGRP, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, and PMA. Inhibition of T cell adhesion was obtained both by the intact SP peptide and by its 1-4 N-terminal and its 4-11, 5-11, and 6-11 C-terminal fragments, used at similar nanomolar concentrations. The inhibitory effects of the parent SP peptide and its fragments were abrogated by an SP NK-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting they all act through the same SP NK-1 receptor. These findings suggest that neuropeptides, by activating their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can provide the T cells with both positive (proadhesive) and negative (antiadhesive) signals and thereby regulate their function. Thus, neuropeptides may influence diverse physiologic processes involving integrins, including leukocyte-mediated migration and inflammation. PMID:9551939

  5. Sympathetic stimulation facilitates thrombopoiesis by promoting megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilei; Du, Changhong; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhao, Gaomei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xinmiao; Li, Fengju; Zeng, Dongfeng; Chen, Fang; Wang, Song; Chen, Mo; Wang, Cheng; He, Ting; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-02-25

    The effect of sympathetic stimulation on thrombopoiesis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that both continual noise and exhaustive exercise elevate peripheral platelet levels in normal and splenectomized mice, but not in dopamine β-hydroxylase-deficient (Dbh(-/-)) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Further investigation demonstrates that sympathetic stimulation via NE or EPI injection markedly promotes platelet recovery in mice with thrombocytopenia induced by 6.0 Gy of total-body irradiation and in mice that received bone marrow transplants after 10.0 Gy of lethal irradiation. Unfavorably, sympathetic stress-stimulated thrombopoiesis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by increasing both the amount and activity of platelets in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro studies reveal that both NE and EPI promote megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation (PPF) in addition to the expansion of CD34(+) cells, thereby facilitating platelet production. It is found that α2-adrenoceptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation is involved in NE- and EPI-induced megakaryocyte adhesion and migration, and PPF is regulated by ERK1/2 activation-mediated RhoA GTPase signaling. Our data deeply characterize the role of sympathetic stimulation in the regulation of thrombopoiesis and reevaluate its physiopathological implications. PMID:26644453

  6. Diverse evolutionary paths to cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Monika; King, Nicole

    2010-12-01

    The morphological diversity of animals, fungi, plants, and other multicellular organisms stems from the fact that each lineage acquired multicellularity independently. A prerequisite for each origin of multicellularity was the evolution of mechanisms for stable cell-cell adhesion or attachment. Recent advances in comparative genomics and phylogenetics provide critical insights into the evolutionary foundations of cell adhesion. Reconstructing the evolution of cell junction proteins in animals and their unicellular relatives exemplifies the roles of co-option and innovation. Comparative studies of volvocine algae reveal specific molecular changes that accompanied the evolution of multicellularity in Volvox. Comparisons between animals and Dictyostelium show how commonalities and differences in the biology of unicellular ancestors influenced the evolution of adhesive mechanisms. Understanding the unicellular ancestry of cell adhesion helps illuminate the basic cell biology of multicellular development in modern organisms. PMID:20817460

  7. Neutrophil motility in extracellular matrix gels: mesh size and adhesion affect speed of migration.

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, R M; Saltzman, W M

    1997-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) migration through tissue extracellular space is an essential step in the inflammatory response, but little is known about the factors influencing PMN migration through gels of extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, PMN migration within reconstituted gels containing collagen type I or collagen type I supplemented with laminin, fibronectin, or heparin was measured by quantitative direct visualization, resulting in a random motility coefficient (mum a quantitative index for rate of cell dispersion) for the migrating cell population. The random motility coefficient in unsupplemented collagen (0.4 mg/ml) gels was approximately 9 x 10(-9) cm2/s. Supplementing gels with heparin or fibronectin produced a significant decrease in mu, even at the lowest concentrations studied (1 microgram/ml fibronectin or 0.4 microgram/ml heparin). At least 100 micrograms/ml of laminin, or 20% of the total gel protein, was required to produce a similar decrease in mu. Scanning electron microscopy revealed two different gel morphologies: laminin or fibronectin appeared to coat the 150-nm collagen fibers whereas heparin appeared to induce fiber bundle formation and, therefore, larger interstitial spaces. The decrease in mu observed in heparin-supplemented gels correlated with the increased mesh size of the fiber network, but the difference observed in mu for fibronectin- and laminin-supplemented gels did not correlate with either mesh size or the mechanical properties of the gel, as determined by rheological measurements. However, PMNs adhered to fibronectin-coated surfaces in greater numbers than to collagen- or laminin-coated surfaces, suggesting that changes in cell adhesion to protein fibers can also produce significant changes in cell motility within an ECM gel. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 PMID:9138592

  8. Bilirubin acts as an endogenous regulator of inflammation by disrupting adhesion molecule-mediated leukocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Megan E.; Zucker, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that bilirubin, which is generated during the physiological breakdown of heme, exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects. Previous work by our group suggests that bilirubin is able to suppress inflammatory responses by preventing the migration of leukocytes into target tissues through disruption of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent cell signaling. As VCAM-1 is an important mediator of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. As anticipated, bilirubin-treated animals manifested significantly less colonic injury and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells into colon tissues. We further observed that bilirubin administration was associated with a reduced number of eosinophils and monocytes in the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia, regardless of whether mice received DSS. These findings suggest that bilirubin impairs the normal migration of eosinophils into intestinal tissues, as supported by in vitro experiments showing that bilirubin blocks the VCAM-1-dependent movement of Jurkat cells across human endothelial cell monolayers. Taken together, our findings support that bilirubin ameliorates DSS-induced colitis and disrupts the physiological trafficking of leukocytes to the intestine by preventing transmigration across the vascular endothelium, potentially through the inhibition VCAM-1-mediated signaling. Our findings raise the possibility that bilirubin functions as an endogenous regulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:26925435

  9. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polystyrene. This technique together with various oxidation techniques that render surfaces suitable for cell culture generated high surface densities of hydroxyl groups. The importance of surface hydroxyl groups for the adhesion of baby hamster kidney cells or leukocytes was demonstrated by the inhibition of adhesion when these groups were blocked: blocking of carboxyl groups did not inhibit adhesion and may raise the adhesion of a surface. These results applied to cell adhesion in the presence and absence of serum. The relative unimportance of fibronectin for the adhesion and spreading of baby hamster kidney cells to hydroxyl-rich surfaces was concluded when cells spread on such surfaces after protein synthesis was inhibited with cycloheximide, fibronectin was removed by trypsinization, and trypsin activity was stopped with leupeptin. PMID:6355120

  10. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  11. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    DOE PAGES

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignmentmore » of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.« less

  12. Interplay between motility and cell-substratum adhesion in amoeboid cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Bouffanais, Roland; Yue, Dick K. P.

    2015-01-01

    The effective migration of amoeboid cells requires a fine regulation of cell-substratum adhesion. These entwined processes have been shown to be regulated by a host of biophysical and biochemical cues. Here, we reveal the pivotal role played by calcium-based mechanosensation in the active regulation of adhesion resulting in a high migratory adaptability. Using mechanotactically driven Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae, we uncover the existence of optimal mechanosensitive conditions—corresponding to specific levels of extracellular calcium—for persistent directional migration over physicochemically different substrates. When these optimal mechanosensitive conditions are met, noticeable enhancement in cell migration directionality and speed is achieved, yet with significant differences among the different substrates. In the same narrow range of calcium concentrations that yields optimal cellular mechanosensory activity, we uncovered an absolute minimum in cell-substratum adhesion activity, for all considered substrates, with differences in adhesion strength among them amplified. The blocking of the mechanosensitive ion channels with gadolinium—i.e., the inhibition of the primary mechanosensory apparatus—hampers the active reduction in substrate adhesion, thereby leading to the same undifferentiated and drastically reduced directed migratory response. The adaptive behavioral responses of Dictyostelium cells sensitive to substrates with varying physicochemical properties suggest the possibility of novel surface analyses based on the mechanobiological ability of mechanosensitive and guidable cells to probe substrates at the nanometer-to-micrometer level. PMID:26487898

  13. Alpha actinin-1 regulates cell-matrix adhesion organization in keratinocytes: consequences for skin cell motility.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Kevin J; Hiroyasu, Sho; Colburn, Zachary T; Ventrella, Rosa V; Hopkinson, Susan B; Skalli, Omar; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2015-04-01

    The migration of keratinocytes in wound healing requires coordinated activities of the motility machinery of a cell, the cytoskeleton, and matrix adhesions. In this study, we assessed the role of alpha actinin-1 (ACTN1), one of the two alpha actinin isoforms expressed in keratinocytes, in skin cell migration via a small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown approach. Keratinocytes deficient in ACTN1 exhibit changes in their actin cytoskeleton organization, a loss in front-rear polarity, and impaired lamellipodial dynamics. They also display aberrant directed motility and move slower compared with their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, they have abnormally arranged matrix adhesion sites. Specifically, the focal adhesions in ACTN1 knockdown keratinocytes are not organized as distinct entities. Rather, focal adhesion proteins are arranged in a circle subjacent to cortical fibers of actin. In the same cells, hemidesmosome proteins arrange in cat paw patterns, more typical of confluent, stationary cells, and β4 integrin dynamics are reduced in knockdown cells compared with control keratinocytes. In summary, our data suggest a mechanism by which ACTN1 determines the motility of keratinocytes by regulating the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and hemidesmosome proteins complexes, thereby modulating cell speed, lamellipodial dynamics, and directed migration. PMID:25431851

  14. FLRT Structure: Balancing Repulsion and Cell Adhesion in Cortical and Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; del Toro, Daniel; Nagel, Daniel; Cop, Florian; Härtl, Ricarda; Ruff, Tobias; Seyit-Bremer, Gönül; Harlos, Karl; Border, Ellen Clare; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are broadly expressed proteins with the unique property of acting as homophilic cell adhesion molecules and as heterophilic repulsive ligands of Unc5/Netrin receptors. How these functions direct cell behavior and the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. Here we use X-ray crystallography to reveal the distinct structural bases for FLRT-mediated cell adhesion and repulsion in neurons. We apply this knowledge to elucidate FLRT functions during cortical development. We show that FLRTs regulate both the radial migration of pyramidal neurons, as well as their tangential spread. Mechanistically, radial migration is controlled by repulsive FLRT2-Unc5D interactions, while spatial organization in the tangential axis involves adhesive FLRT-FLRT interactions. Further, we show that the fundamental mechanisms of FLRT adhesion and repulsion are conserved between neurons and vascular endothelial cells. Our results reveal FLRTs as powerful guidance factors with structurally encoded repulsive and adhesive surfaces. PMID:25374360

  15. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  16. Crosstalk between focal adhesions and material mechanical properties governs cell mechanics and functions.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Sabato; Panzetta, Valeria; Embrione, Valerio; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical properties of materials strongly influence cell fate and functions. Focal adhesions are involved in the extremely important processes of mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. To address the relationship between the mechanical properties of cell substrates, focal adhesion/cytoskeleton assembly and cell functions, we investigated the behavior of NIH/3T3 cells over a wide range of stiffness (3-1000kPa) using two of the most common synthetic polymers for cell cultures: polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane. An overlapping stiffness region was created between them to compare focal adhesion characteristics and cell functions, taking into account their different time-dependent behavior. Indeed, from a rheological point of view, polyacrylamide behaves like a strong gel (elastically), whereas polydimethylsiloxane like a viscoelastic solid. First, focal adhesion characteristics and dynamics were addressed in terms of material stiffness, then cell spreading area, migration rate and cell mechanical properties were correlated with focal adhesion size and assembly. Focal adhesion size was found to increase in the whole range of stiffness and to be in agreement in the overlapping rigidity region for the investigated materials. Cell mechanics directly correlated with focal adhesion lengths, whereas migration rate followed an inverse correlation. Cell spreading correlated with the substrate stiffness on polyacrylamide hydrogel, while no specific trend was found on polydimethylsiloxane. Substrate mechanics can be considered as a key physical cue that regulates focal adhesion assembly, which in turn governs important cellular properties and functions. PMID:26004223

  17. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell's life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells' ability to hang on, and how it lets go.

  18. Zebrafish germ cells: motility and guided migration.

    PubMed

    Paksa, Azadeh; Raz, Erez

    2015-10-01

    In the course of embryonic development, the process of cell migration is critical for establishment of the embryonic body plan, for morphogenesis and for organ function. Investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying cell migration is thus crucial for understanding developmental processes and clinical conditions resulting from abnormal cell migration such as cancer metastasis. The long-range migration of primordial germ cells toward the region at which the gonad develops occurs in embryos of various species and thus constitutes a useful in vivo model for single-cell migration. Recent studies employing zebrafish embryos have greatly contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms facilitating the migration of these cells en route to their target.

  19. Investigation of the Viability, Adhesion, and Migration of Human Fibroblasts in a Hyaluronic Acid/Gelatin Microgel-Reinforced Composite Hydrogel for Vocal Fold Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heris, Hossein K; Daoud, Jamal; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah; Tabrizian, Maryam; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-01-21

    The potential use of a novel scaffold biomaterial consisting of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin (Ge) composite microgels is investigated for use in treating vocal fold injury and scarring. Cell adhesion integrins and kinematics of cell motion are investigated in 2D and 3D culture conditions, respectively. Human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cells are seeded on HA-Ge microgels attached to a HA hydrogel thin film. The results show that hVFF cells establish effective adhesion to HA-Ge microgels through the ubiquitous expression of β1 integrin in the cell membrane. The microgels are then encapsulated in a 3D HA hydrogel for the study of cell migration. The cells within the HA-Ge microgel-reinforced composite hydrogel (MRCH) scaffold have an average motility speed of 0.24 ± 0.08 μm min(-1) . The recorded microscopic images reveal features that are presumably associated with lobopodial and lamellipodial cell migration modes within the MRCH scaffold. Average cell speed during lobopodial migration is greater than that during lamellipodial migration. The cells move faster in the MRCH than in the HA-Ge gel without microgels. These findings support the hypothesis that HA-Ge MRCH promotes cell adhesion and migration; thereby they constitute a promising biomaterial for vocal fold repair.

  20. Endothelial cells enhance migration of meniscus cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Eng, George M.; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the interactions between vascular endothelial cells and meniscal fibrochondrocytes from the inner avascular and outer vascular regions of the meniscus, and identify angiogenic factors that enhance cell migration and integrative repair. Methods Bovine meniscal fibrochondrocytes (bMFCs) from the inner and outer regions of meniscus were cultured for seven days with and without human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a micropatterned three-dimensional hydrogel system for cell migration. Angiogenic factors secreted by HUVECs were probed for their role in paracrine mechanisms governing bMFC migration, and applied to a full-thickness defect model of meniscal repair in explants from the inner and outer regions over four weeks. Results Endothelial cells enhanced migration of inner and outer bMFCs in the micropatterned system via endothelin-1 (ET-1) signaling. Supplementation of ET-1 significantly enhanced integration strength of full-thickness defects in inner and outer explants, and cell migration at the macro-scale, compared to controls without ET-1 treatment. Conclusion We report for the first time that bMFCs from both the avascular and vascular regions respond to the presence of endothelial cells with increased migration. Paracrine signaling by endothelial cells regulates the bMFCs differentially by region, but we identify ET-1 as an angiogenic factor that stimulates migration of inner and outer cells at the micro-scale, and integrative repair of inner and outer explants at the macro-scale. These findings reveal the regional interactions between vasculature and MFCs, and suggest ET-1 as a potential new treatment modality for avascular meniscal injuries, in order to prevent the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:25307081

  1. Glass-like dynamics in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Thomas; Weitz, David

    2011-03-01

    The collective movement of tissue cells is essential to fundamental biological processes in both health and disease, and occurs throughout embryonic development, during wound healing, and in cancerous tumor invasion. Most knowledge of cell migration, however, comes from single cell studies. Single cells migrate by executing cyclic processes of extension, adhesion, and retraction, during which the cell body fluctuates dramatically and the cell changes direction erratically. These sub-cellular motions must be coupled between neighbors in confluent layers, yet the influence of this coupling on collective migration is not known. In this talk we present a study of motion in confluent epithelial cell sheets. We measure collective migration and sub-cellular motions, covering a broad range of length-scales, time-scales, and cell densities. We find that that collective cell migration exhibits many behaviors characteristic of classical supercooled particulate fluids, including growing dynamic heterogeneities in the migration velocity field, non-Arrhenius relaxation behavior, and peaks in the density of states analogous to the Boson peak. These results provide a suggestive analogy between collective cell motion and the dynamics of supercooled fluids approaching a glass transition.

  2. Cell migration in confinement: a micro-channel-based assay.

    PubMed

    Heuzé, Mélina L; Collin, Olivier; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method to study cells migrating in micro-channels, a confining environment of well-defined geometry. This assay is a complement to more complex 3D migration systems and provides several advantages even if it does not recapitulate the full complexity of 3D migration. Important parameters such as degree of adhesion, degree of confinement, mechanical properties, and geometry can be varied independently of each other. The device is fully compatible with almost any type of light microscopy and the simple geometry makes automated analysis very easy to perform, which allows screening strategy. The chapters is divided into five parts describing the design of different types of migration chambers, the fabrication of a mold by photolithography, the assembly of the chamber, the loading of cells, and finally the imaging on live or fixed cells. PMID:21748692

  3. Podoplanin-mediated cell adhesion through extracellular matrix in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), one of the representative mucin-like type-I transmembrane glycoproteins specific to lymphatic endothelial cells, is expressed in various cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). On the basis of our previous studies, we have developed the hypothesis that PDPN functions in association with the extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell surface side. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular role of PDPN in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration in oral SCC cells. Forty-four surgical specimens of oral SCC were used for immunohistochemistry for PDPN, and the expression profiles were correlated with their clinicopathological properties. Using ZK-1, a human oral SCC cell system, and five other cell systems, we examined PDPN expression levels by immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR. The effects of transient PDPN knockdown by siRNA in ZK-1 were determined for cellular functions in terms of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion in association with CD44 and hyaluronan. Cases without PDPN-positive cells were histopathologically classified as less-differentiated SCC, and SCC cells without PDPN more frequently invaded lymphatics. Adhesive properties of ZK-1 were significantly inhibited by siRNA, and PDPN was shown to collaborate with CD44 in cell adhesion to tether SCC cells with hyaluronan-rich ECM of the narrow intercellular space as well as with the stromal ECM. There was no siRNA effect in migration. We have demonstrated the primary function of PDPN in cell adhesion to ECM, which is to secondarily promote oral SCC cell proliferation.

  4. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  5. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell’s life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells’ ability to hang on, and how it lets go. PMID:26236321

  6. Characterizing Cell Adhesion by Using Micropipette Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brenna; Babataheri, Avin; Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I.; Husson, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a technique to directly quantify cell-substrate adhesion force using micropipette aspiration. The micropipette is positioned perpendicular to the surface of an adherent cell and a constant-rate aspiration pressure is applied. Since the micropipette diameter and the aspiration pressure are our control parameters, we have direct knowledge of the aspiration force, whereas the cell behavior is monitored either in brightfield or interference reflection microscopy. This setup thus allows us to explore a range of geometric parameters, such as projected cell area, adhesion area, or pipette size, as well as dynamical parameters such as the loading rate. We find that cell detachment is a well-defined event occurring at a critical aspiration pressure, and that the detachment force scales with the cell adhesion area (for a given micropipette diameter and loading rate), which defines a critical stress. Taking into account the cell adhesion area, intrinsic parameters of the adhesion bonds, and the loading rate, a minimal model provides an expression for the critical stress that helps rationalize our experimental results. PMID:26200857

  7. Cadherin-11 mediates contact inhibition of locomotion during Xenopus neural crest cell migration.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sarah F S; Mayor, Roberto; Kashef, Jubin

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell migration is an essential feature both in embryonic development and cancer progression. The molecular mechanisms of these coordinated directional cell movements still need to be elucidated. The migration of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during embryogenesis is an excellent model for collective cell migration in vivo. These highly motile and multipotent cells migrate directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo. Interestingly, local cell-cell interactions seem to be the key force for directionality. CNC cells can change their migration direction by a repulsive cell response called contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL). Cell protrusions collapse upon homotypic cell-cell contact and internal repolarization leads to formation of new protrusions toward cell-free regions. Wnt/PCP signaling was shown to mediate activation of small RhoGTPase RhoA and inhibition of cell protrusions at the contact side. However, the mechanism how a cell recognizes the contact is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus cadherin-11 (Xcad-11) mediated cell-cell adhesion is necessary in CIL for directional and collective migration of CNC cells. Reduction of Xcad-11 adhesive function resulted in higher invasiveness of CNC due to loss of CIL. Additionally, transplantation analyses revealed that CNC migratory behaviour in vivo is non-directional and incomplete when Xcad-11 adhesive function is impaired. Blocking Wnt/PCP signaling led to similar results underlining the importance of Xcad-11 in the mechanism of CIL and directional migration of CNC.

  8. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Matt J; Luo, Jonathon P; Thomas, Wendy E

    2014-12-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  9. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  10. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  11. Differential modulation of IL-1-induced endothelial adhesion molecules and transendothelial migration of granulocytes by G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Eissner, G; Lindner, H; Reisbach, G; Klauke, I; Holler, E

    1997-06-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used for mobilization of haemopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in mobilization and the immune modulatory effects of this growth factor. In this report we show that G-CSF down-regulated intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) induced by Interleukin-1 (IL-1) on human endothelial cells. Interestingly, the G-CSF-mediated down-modulation of IL-1-induced ICAM-1 appeared to be biphasic. In pharmacological concentrations (> 300 ng/ml), and in dose ranges of plasma G-CSF levels above that of nonfebrile healthy individuals (30 pg/ml), a significant decrease in surface ICAM-1 could be observed. This could be explained, at least in part, by an increased autocrine G-CSF production by endothelial cells in response to IL-1 and exogenous G-CSF. In contrast to ICAM-1, IL-1-triggered VCAM-1 expression was superinduced by G-CSF with the optimal concentration of 30 pg/ml. To evaluate the functional significance of these findings, 51Cr adhesion assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or granulocytes known to lack the VCAM-1 counter-receptor very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) and IL-1-stimulated endothelial cells, in the presence or absence of G-CSF, were performed. G-CSF could not inhibit the IL-1-induced adhesion of PBMC to endothelial cells, which may be due to the differential adhesion molecule modulation. In contrast, granulocyte adhesion induced by IL-1 could effectively be blocked by co-incubation with G-CSF. Finally, G-CSF also inhibited transendothelial migration of granulocytes through IL-1-activated endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

  12. Factors controlling cardiac neural crest cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Mary R

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac neural crest cells originate as part of the postotic caudal rhombencephalic neural crest stream. Ectomesenchymal cells in this stream migrate to the circumpharyngeal ridge and then into the caudal pharyngeal arches where they condense to form first a sheath and then the smooth muscle tunics of the persisting pharyngeal arch arteries. A subset of the cells continues migrating into the cardiac outflow tract where they will condense to form the aorticopulmonary septum. Cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are all critical for the initial migration, pauses, continued migration and condensation of these cells. This Review elucidates what is currently known about these factors. PMID:20890117

  13. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  14. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  15. Collective cell streams in epithelial monolayers depend on cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, András; Varga, Katalin; Méhes, Előd; Szabó, András

    2013-07-01

    We report spontaneously emerging, randomly oriented, collective streaming behavior within a monolayer culture of a human keratinocyte cell line, and explore the effect of modulating cell adhesions by perturbing the function of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. We demonstrate that decreasing cell adhesion induces narrower and more anisotropic cell streams, reminiscent of decreasing the Taylor scale of turbulent liquids. To explain our empirical findings, we propose a cell-based model that represents the dual nature of cell-cell adhesions. Spring-like connections provide mechanical stability, while a cellular Potts model formalism represents surface-tension driven attachment. By changing the relevance and persistence of mechanical links between cells, we are able to explain the experimentally observed changes in emergent flow patterns.

  16. Collective cell streams in epithelial monolayers depend on cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Czirók, András; Varga, Katalin; Méhes, Előd; Szabó, András

    2013-01-01

    We report a spontaneously emerging, randomly oriented, collective streaming behavior within a monolayer culture of a human keratinocyte cell line, and explore the effect of modulating cell adhesions by perturbing the function of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. We demonstrate that decreasing cell adhesion induces narrower and more anisotropic cell streams, reminiscent of decreasing the Taylor scale of turbulent liquids. To explain our empirical findings, we propose a cell-based model that represents the dual nature of cell-cell adhesions. Spring-like connections provide mechanical stability, while a cellular Potts model formalism represents surface-tension driven attachment. By changing the relevance and persistence of mechanical links between cells, we are able to explain the experimentally observed changes in emergent flow patterns. PMID:24363603

  17. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  18. Estrogen Stimulation of Cell Migration Involves Multiple Signaling Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Santen, Richard J.; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Hoyong; Fan, Ping; Yue, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Hormone-dependent breast cancers respond to inhibitors of estrogen synthesis or action with tumor regression and with a reduction of new metastases. The mechanisms underlying the effects of estrogen on metastasis likely differ from those on tumor regression. Cell migration is a key first step in the metastatic process. Based on our prior work and other published data, we designed and tested a working model that suggested that estrogen receptor α, epidermal growth factor receptor, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, p60 Src tyrosine kinase (c-Src), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and MAPK interact to facilitate estradiol (E2)-induced cell migration. Accordingly, we examined the effect of E2 on activation of these pathways and demonstrated mechanistic effects by blocking each component and assessing cell migration as a biologic endpoint. Initial studies validated a robust cell migration assay characterized by highly reproducible, dose-dependent responses to E2. Examining various mechanisms involved in migration, we showed that E2 induced activation of c-Src, FAK, and paxillin with early peaks within 5–30 min and later peaks at 24 h. ERK and protein kinase B phosphorylation exhibited only early peaks. Blockade of various steps in these signaling pathways with use of small interfering RNA or specific inhibitors demonstrated mechanistic effects of these signaling molecules on cell migration. Our results suggest that the effects of E2 on cell migration involve multiple, interacting signaling pathways. Important effects are mediated by the MAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways and use FAK, paxillin, and c-Src for activation. Each pathway represents a potential target for blocking cell migration and metastasis of breast cancer cells. PMID:20861240

  19. Three Functions of Cadherins in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell–cell adhesion in animals. By regulating contact formation and stability, cadherins play a crucial role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Here, we review the three major functions of cadherins in cell–cell contact formation and stability. Two of those functions lead to a decrease in interfacial tension at the forming cell–cell contact, thereby promoting contact expansion — first, by providing adhesion tension that lowers interfacial tension at the cell–cell contact, and second, by signaling to the actomyosin cytoskeleton in order to reduce cortex tension and thus interfacial tension at the contact. The third function of cadherins in cell–cell contact formation is to stabilize the contact by resisting mechanical forces that pull on the contact. PMID:23885883

  20. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  1. Role of Differential Adhesion in Cell Cluster Evolution: from Vasculogenesis to Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaykrishna; Hussain, Fazle; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions are fundamental to numerous physiological processes, including angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, metastatic spreading, and wound healing. We employ cellular potts model to computationally predict the organization of cells within a 3D matrix. The energy potentials regulating cell-cell (JCC) and cell-matrix (JMC) adhesive interactions are systematically varied to represent different, biologically relevant adhesive conditions. Chemotactically induced cell migration is also addressed. Starting from a cluster of cells, variations in relative cell adhesion alone lead to different cellular patterns such as spreading of metastatic tumors and angiogenesis. The combination of low cell-cell adhesion (high JCC) and high heterotypic adhesion (low JMC) favors the fragmentation of the original cluster into multiple, smaller cell-clusters (metastasis). Conversely, cellular systems exhibiting high homotypic affinity (low JCC) preserve their original configuration, avoiding fragmentation (organogenesis). For intermediate values of JCC and JMC (i.e. JCC/JMC ~ 1), tubular and corrugated structures form. Fully developed vascular trees are assembled only in systems where contact-inhibited-chemotaxis is activated upon cell contact. Also, the rate of secretion, diffusion and sequestration of chemotactic factors, cell deformability and motility; do not significantly affect these trends. Further developments of this computational model will predict the efficacy of therapeutic interventions to modulate the diseased microenvironment by directly altering cell cohesion. PMID:23656190

  2. To The Abercrombie Meeting and back again: a journey into the world of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Katarzyna Anna

    2013-01-01

    The 7th Abercrombie Meeting took place in Oxford this past summer. It was organized by The Royal Microscopical Society with the support of The British Society for Cell Biology. Michael Abercrombie was a pioneer in the field of investigating cell behavior using time-lapse microscopy. The meeting was focused on "multi-dimensional cell migration in development and disease" and it brought together many of the world's leading researchers in the area, providing an opportunity to discuss the very latest advances and possible future developments in the field. The meeting sessions included Invasive Migration, Invasive Adhesions in Migrating Cells, Signaling in Migration, Immune Cell Migration, Migrations during Morphogenesis and Migration and Disease. As with all Abercrombie meetings, the conference delegates were treated to a staggering array of live cell imaging, in vivo imaging and images generated by the latest developments in microscopy.

  3. Siah regulation of Pard3A controls neuronal cell adhesion during germinal zone exit.

    PubMed

    Famulski, Jakub K; Trivedi, Niraj; Howell, Danielle; Yang, Yuan; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard; Solecki, David J

    2010-12-24

    The brain's circuitry is established by directed migration and synaptogenesis of neurons during development. Although neurons mature and migrate in specific patterns, little is known about how neurons exit their germinal zone niche. We found that cerebellar granule neuron germinal zone exit is regulated by proteasomal degradation of Pard3A by the Seven in Absentia homolog (Siah) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Pard3A gain of function and Siah loss of function induce precocious radial migration. Time-lapse imaging using a probe to measure neuronal cell contact reveals that Pard3A promotes adhesive interactions needed for germinal zone exit by recruiting the epithelial tight junction adhesion molecule C to the neuronal cell surface. Our findings define a Siah-Pard3A signaling pathway that controls adhesion-dependent exit of neuronal progenitors or immature neurons from a germinal zone niche.

  4. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  5. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  6. Role of Nonmuscle Myosin II in Migration of Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sneha; Saha, Shekhar; Roy, Saheli; Das, Madhurima; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    It is the promise of regeneration and therapeutic applications that has sparked an interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Following infusion, MSCs migrate to sites of injury or inflammation by virtue of their homing property. To exert optimal clinical benefits, systemically delivered MSCs need to migrate efficiently and in adequate numbers to pathological areas in vivo. However, underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for MSC migration are still not well understood. The Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord is an attractive source of MSCs for stem cell therapy because of its abundant availability and painless collection. In this study, we attempted to identify the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII), if any, in the migration of WJ-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). Expression of NMII isoforms, NMIIA, and NMIIB was observed both at RNA and protein levels in WJ-MSCs. Inhibition of NMII or its regulator ROCK, by pharmacological inhibitors, resulted in significant reduction in the migration of WJ-MSCs as confirmed by the scratch migration assay and time-lapse microscopy. Next, trying to dissect the role of each NMII isoform in migration of WJ-MSCs, we found that siRNA-mediated downregulation of NMIIA, but not NMIIB expression, led to cells failing to retract their trailing edge and losing cell–cell cohesiveness, while exhibiting a nondirectional migratory pathway. Migration, moreover, is also dependent on optimal affinity adhesion, which would allow rapid attachment and release of cells and, hence, can be influenced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules. We demonstrated that inhibition of NMII and more specifically NMIIA resulted in increased gene expression of ECM and adhesion molecules, which possibly led to stronger adhesions and, hence, decreased migration. Therefore, these data suggest that NMII acts as a regulator of cell migration and adhesion in WJ-MSCs. PMID:25923805

  7. Glutamate involvement in calcium–dependent migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. Methods The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. Results We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca2+ transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca2+ oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca2+ oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca2+]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  8. White blood cell deformation and firm adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2011-11-01

    For a white blood cell (WBC) to arrive at infection sites, it forms chemical attachments with activated endothelial cells. First, it bonds with P-selectin, which holds it to the wall, but weakly; this allows the WBC to roll under the shear flow of the blood around it. Later, the WBCs bond with the stronger intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); it is these ICAM bonds that allow the WBCs to fully resist the flow and stop rolling, allowing them to crawl through the endothelial wall. We model this numerically. Our model uses the immersed boundary method to represent the interaction of the shear flow with the deformable cell membrane. Receptors are on the tips of microvilli-little fingers sticking off of the cell membrane. The microvilli also deform. The receptors stochastically form and break bonds with molecules on the wall. Using this method, the history of each microvillus and its bonds can be found, as well as the distribution of the adhesion traction forces and how all of these vary with the deformability of the white blood cell. At higher shear rates, the white blood cell membrane deforms more, increasing its contact area with the surface; this effect is larger for softer membranes. We investigate how the deformability of the WBC affects the ease with which it forms firm adhesion.

  9. Fascin Regulates Nuclear Movement and Deformation in Migrating Cells.

    PubMed

    Jayo, Asier; Malboubi, Majid; Antoku, Susumu; Chang, Wakam; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Groen, Christopher; Pfisterer, Karin; Tootle, Tina; Charras, Guillaume; Gundersen, Gregg G; Parsons, Maddy

    2016-08-22

    Fascin is an F-actin-bundling protein shown to stabilize filopodia and regulate adhesion dynamics in migrating cells, and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis and increased metastatic potential in a number of cancers. Here, we identified the nuclear envelope protein nesprin-2 as a binding partner for fascin in a range of cell types in vitro and in vivo. Nesprin-2 interacts with fascin through a direct, F-actin-independent interaction, and this binding is distinct and separable from a role for fascin within filopodia at the cell periphery. Moreover, disrupting the interaction between fascin and nesprin-2 C-terminal domain leads to specific defects in F-actin coupling to the nuclear envelope, nuclear movement, and the ability of cells to deform their nucleus to invade through confined spaces. Together, our results uncover a role for fascin that operates independently of filopodia assembly to promote efficient cell migration and invasion. PMID:27554857

  10. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  11. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  12. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia aremore » motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.« less

  13. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively1–6, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography7 to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells toward higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  14. Rho GTPase signalling in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    Cells migrate in multiple different ways depending on their environment, which includes the extracellular matrix composition, interactions with other cells, and chemical stimuli. For all types of cell migration, Rho GTPases play a central role, although the relative contribution of each Rho GTPase depends on the environment and cell type. Here, I review recent advances in our understanding of how Rho GTPases contribute to different types of migration, comparing lamellipodium-driven versus bleb-driven migration modes. I also describe how cells migrate across the endothelium. In addition to Rho, Rac and Cdc42, which are well known to regulate migration, I discuss the roles of other less-well characterized members of the Rho family. PMID:26363959

  15. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling. PMID:26779779

  16. Syndecan-1 Regulates Cell Migration and Fibronectin Fibril Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Mary Ann; Daley, William P.; Bernstein, Audrey M.; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Shashurin, Alexey; Palsen, Sarah; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Larsen, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Corneal scarring is a major cause of blindness worldwide and can result from the deposition of abnormal amounts of collagen fibers lacking the correct size and spacing required to produce a clear cornea. Collagen fiber formation requires a preformed fibronectin (FN) matrix. We demonstrate that the loss of syndecan1 (sdc1) in corneal stromal cells (CSC) impacts cell migration rates, the sizes and composition of focal and fibrillar adhesions, the activation of integrins, and the assembly of fibronectin into fibrils. Integrin and fibronectin expression are not altered on sdc1 null CSCs. Cell adhesion, spreading, and migration studies using low compared to high concentrations of FN and collagen I (CNI) or vitronectin (VN) with and without activation of integrins by manganese chloride show that the impact of sdc1 depletion on integrin activation varies depending on the integrin-mediated activity evaluated. Differences in FN-fibrillogenesis and migration in sdc1 null CSCs are reversed by addition of manganese chloride but cell spreading differences remain. To determine if our findings on sdc1 were specific to the cornea, we compared the phenotypes of sdc1 null dermal fibroblasts with those of CSCs. We found that without sdc1, both cell types migrate faster; however, cell-type specific differences in FN expression and its assembly into fibrils exist between these two cell types. Together, our data demonstrate that sdc1 functions to regulate integrin activity in multiple cell types. Loss of sdc1-mediated integrin function results in cell-type specific differences in matrix assembly. A better understanding of how different cell types regulate FN fibril formation via syndecans and integrins will lead to better treatments for scarring and fibrosis. PMID:20580707

  17. Controlled skeletal progenitor cell migration on nanostructured porous silicon/silicon micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Costa, V.; Sánchez-Vaquero, V.; Muñoz-Noval, Á.; González-Méndez, L.; Punzón-Quijorna, E.; Gallach-Pérez, D.; Manso-Silván, M.; Martínez-Muñoz, G.; Climent-Font, A.; García-Ruiz, J. P.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) was used for the fabrication of surface micropatterns aiming at controlling cell adhesion and migration. In particular, surface patterns of nanoPS and Si were engineered by high-energy ion-beam irradiation and subsequent anodization. It was found that human skeletal progenitor cells are sensitive to oneand two-dimensional patterns and that focal adhesion is inhibited on nanoPS areas. In spite of this anti-fouling characteristics, studies on patterns with reduced Si areas show that cells conform to nanoPS pathways favoring migration through cell protrusion, body translocation and tail retraction from two parallel Si traction rails. Moreover, migration can be blocked and cells tend to arrange when grid patterns with the appropriate dimensions are fabricated. The experimental results confirm that progenitor cells are able to exploit nanoPS anti-fouling designs by adapting to it for migration purposes.

  18. Control cell adhesion with dynamic bilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2012-02-01

    Interfacially-directed assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers was employed to create ultrathin films having the potential to correlate the dynamics of ECM cues with cell adhesion and cytoskeletally-generated forces. The mobility of the polymeric bilayer films were tuned by the incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer chains, which are thought to reduce interlayer friction. Labeling of the block copolymer chains with an adhesive peptide ligand (RGD) provided a specific means to study integrin-mediated cellular processes and the corresponding mechanotransduction. By seeding anchorage-dependent cells on ``dynamic'' (laterally mobile) and ``static'' films that display the same amount of RGD, we have found that cells recognize the difference in RGD diffusivity and develop distinct responses over time. We intend to examine changes in cell response by controlling the extent of cytoskeletally-generated forces and the assembly dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. Such films provide a unique platform to unveil the biomechanical signals related with ECM dynamics, and may ultimately facilitate a deeper understanding of cellular processes.

  19. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  20. PAK4 promotes kinase-independent stabilization of RhoU to modulate cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dart, Anna E.; Box, Gary M.; Court, William; Gale, Madeline E.; Brown, John P.; Pinder, Sarah E.; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is a Cdc42 effector protein thought to regulate cell adhesion disassembly in a kinase-dependent manner. We found that PAK4 expression is significantly higher in high-grade human breast cancer patient samples, whereas depletion of PAK4 modifies cell adhesion dynamics of breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, systematic analysis of PAK4 functionality revealed that PAK4-driven adhesion turnover is neither dependent on Cdc42 binding nor kinase activity. Rather, reduced expression of PAK4 leads to a concomitant loss of RhoU expression. We report that RhoU is targeted for ubiquitination by the Rab40A–Cullin 5 complex and demonstrate that PAK4 protects RhoU from ubiquitination in a kinase-independent manner. Overexpression of RhoU rescues the PAK4 depletion phenotype, whereas loss of RhoU expression reduces cell adhesion turnover and migration. These data support a new kinase-independent mechanism for PAK4 function, where an important role of PAK4 in cellular adhesions is to stabilize RhoU protein levels. Thus, PAK4 and RhoU cooperate to drive adhesion turnover and promote cell migration. PMID:26598620

  1. PAK4: a pluripotent kinase that regulates prostate cancer cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Claire M.; Whale, Andrew D.; Parsons, Maddy; Masters, John R. W.; Jones, Gareth E.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is associated with tumour progression and increases the invasiveness of prostate carcinoma cells. Migration and invasion require coordinated reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton and regulation of cell-adhesion dynamics. Rho-family GTPases orchestrate both of these cellular processes. p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4), a specific effector of the Rho GTPase Cdc42, is activated by HGF, and we have previously shown that activated PAK4 induces a loss of both actin stress fibres and focal adhesions. We now report that DU145 human prostate cancer cells with reduced levels of PAK4 expression are unable to successfully migrate in response to HGF, have prominent actin stress fibres, and an increase in the size and number of focal adhesions. Moreover, these cells have a concomitant reduction in cell-adhesion turnover rates. We find that PAK4 is localised at focal adhesions, is immunoprecipitated with paxillin and phosphorylates paxillin on serine 272. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PAK4 can regulate RhoA activity via GEF-H1. Our results suggest that PAK4 is a pluripotent kinase that can regulate both actin cytoskeletal rearrangement and focal-adhesion dynamics. PMID:20406887

  2. L1CAM: Cell adhesion and more.

    PubMed

    Samatov, Timur R; Wicklein, Daniel; Tonevitsky, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    L1CAM is a cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was originally discovered as a major player in the development of the nervous system. L1CAM was demonstrated to have prognostic value in different cancers and to be a promising target for anti-cancer therapy. Here we overview the present data on L1CAM structure and function, regulation of its expression, role in cancer and therapeutic potential. PMID:27267927

  3. Cognate antigen directs CD8+ T cell migration to vascularized transplants.

    PubMed

    Walch, Jeffrey M; Zeng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Williams, Amanda L; Rothstein, David M; Shlomchik, Warren D; Kim, Jiyun V; Camirand, Geoffrey; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2013-06-01

    The migration of effector or memory T cells to the graft is a critical event in the rejection of transplanted organs. The prevailing view is that the key steps involved in T cell migration - integrin-mediated firm adhesion followed by transendothelial migration - are dependent on the activation of Gαi-coupled chemokine receptors on T cells. In contrast to this view, we demonstrated in vivo that cognate antigen was necessary for the firm adhesion and transendothelial migration of CD8+ effector T cells specific to graft antigens and that both steps occurred independent of Gαi signaling. Presentation of cognate antigen by either graft endothelial cells or bone marrow-derived APCs that extend into the capillary lumen was sufficient for T cell migration. The adhesion and transmigration of antigen-nonspecific (bystander) effector T cells, on the other hand, remained dependent on Gαi, but required the presence of antigen-specific effector T cells. These findings underscore the primary role of cognate antigen presented by either endothelial cells or bone marrow-derived APCs in the migration of T cells across endothelial barriers and have important implications for the prevention and treatment of graft rejection.

  4. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  5. Surface wettability of plasma SiOx:H nanocoating-induced endothelial cells' migration and the associated FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Guixue; Huang, Xianliang; Zhang, Qin; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Chaojun; Yu, Qingsong; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration are essential processes in re-endothelialization of implanted biomaterials. There is no clear relationship and mechanism between EC adhesion and migration behaviour on surfaces with varying wettabilities. As model substrates, plasma SiOx:H nanocoatings with well-controlled surface wettability (with water contact angles in the range of 98.5 ± 2.3° to 26.3 ± 4.0°) were used in this study to investigate the effects of surface wettability on cell adhesion/migration and associated protein expressions in FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways. It was found that EC adhesion/migration showed opposite behaviour on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces promoted EC migration but were anti-adhesions). The number of adherent ECs showed a maximum on hydrophilic surfaces, while cells adhered to hydrophobic surfaces exhibited a tendency for cell migration. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor targeting the Y-397 site of FAK could significantly inhibit cell adhesion/migration, suggesting that EC adhesion and migration on surfaces with different wettabilities involve (p)FAK and its downstream signalling pathways. Western blot results suggested that the FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways were correlative to EC migration on hydrophobic plasma SiOx:H surfaces, but uncertain to hydrophilic surfaces. This work demonstrated that surface wettability could induce cellular behaviours that were associated with different cellular signalling events. PMID:21715399

  6. Force nanoscopy of cell mechanics and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-05-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to mechanical stimuli in their environment and have several evolved mechanisms to sense and respond to these cues. It is becoming increasingly recognized that many cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, possess a diverse set of proteins to translate mechanical cues into biochemical signalling and to mediate cell surface interactions such as cell adhesion. Moreover, the mechanical properties of cells are involved in regulating cell function as well as serving as indicators of disease states. Importantly, the recent development of biophysical tools and nanoscale methods has facilitated a deeper understanding of the role that physical forces play in modulating cell mechanics and cell adhesion. Here, we discuss how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been used to investigate cell mechanics and cell adhesion at the single-cell and single-molecule levels. This knowledge is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and mechanoresponse in living cells. While pushing living cells with the AFM tip provides a means to quantify their mechanical properties and examine their response to nanoscale forces, pulling single surface proteins with a functionalized tip allows one to understand their role in sensing and adhesion. The combination of these nanoscale techniques with modern molecular biology approaches, genetic engineering and optical microscopies provides a powerful platform for understanding the sophisticated functions of the cell surface machinery, and its role in the onset and progression of complex diseases.

  7. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  8. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  9. Cyclin D1 functions in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiping; Wang, Chenguang; Prendergast, George C; Pestell, Richard G

    2006-11-01

    Cell migration is essential for developmental morphogenesis, tissue repair, and tumor metastasis. A recent study reveals that cyclin D1 acts to promote cell migration by inhibiting Rho/ROCK signaling and expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an extracellular matrix protein that regulates cell migration in many settings including cancer. Given the frequent overexpression of cyclin D1 in cancer cells, due to its upregulation by Ras, Rho, Src, and other genes that drive malignant development, the new findings suggest that cyclin D1 may have a central role in mediating invasion and metastasis of cancer cells by controlling Rho/ROCK signaling and matrix deposition of TSP-1.

  10. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  11. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  12. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  13. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands.

  14. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands. PMID:7511663

  15. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  16. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  17. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  18. Light-induced Adhesion of Spirogyra Cells to Glass.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Y

    1977-04-01

    Adhesion of Spirogyra (tentatively, Spirogyra fluviatilis) cells to glass is described. The cells of an algal filament can adhere to a substrate only when they are located at the end of the filament. Rapid adhesion is induced by blue-violet light (blue adhesion) as well as by temperature shift (about 6 C --> about 22 C) or shaking (dark adhesion). Adherent cells detach in 1 hour in the absence of one of these stimuli. Slow adhesion is induced by red light (red adhesion) 1 hour after irradiation, and may be controlled by phytochrome. A cell once caused to adhere by red light does not release from the glass.Adhesion seems to be maintained by a cementing substance, probably qa mucoprotein. A transparent material which appears around the tip of the cell may be the cementing substance.

  19. Common mechanisms linking connexin43 to neural progenitor cell migration and glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Naus, Christian C; Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun Chey

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is critical for cell differentiation, tissue formation and organ development. Several mechanisms come to play in the process of cell migration, orchestrating changes in cell polarity, adhesion, process extension and motility. Recent findings have shown that gap junctions, and specifically connexin43 (Cx43), can play a significant role in these processes, impacting adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Thus Cx43 within a cell regulates its motility and migration via intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Cx43 in the host cells can impact the degree of cellular migration through that tissue. Similarities in these connexin-based processes account for both neural progenitor migration in the developing brain, and for glioma cell invasion in the mature brain. In both cases, Cx43 in the tissue ("soil") in which cells ("seeds") exist facilitates their migration and, for glioma cells, tissue invasion. Cx43 mediates these effects through channel- and non-channel-dependent mechanisms which have similarities in both paradigms of cell migration. This provides insight into developmental processes and pathological situations, as well as possible therapeutic approaches regarding specific functional domains of gap junction proteins.

  20. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Nan-Hong; Chen, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Li, Xiu-Jin; Yin, Feng-Zhi; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells. METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR, respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment. RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipo-ASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37 ± 1.56% to 14.23 ± 1.07%, P < 0.001). Meanwhile, cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37 ± 1.56% vs 27.2 ± 1.31%, P < 0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34 ± 2.50% vs 68.07 ± 2.10%, P > 0.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-α inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P < 0.05), and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P < 0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion. PMID:14695770

  1. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Mueller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker . E-mail: Herzog@uni-bonn.de

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPP{alpha}) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPP{alpha}, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPP{alpha} has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  2. Differential adhesiveness between blood and marrow leukemic cells having similar pattern of VLA adhesion molecule expression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, X; Anglaret, B; Bailly, M; Maritaz, O; Magaud, J P; Archimbaud, E

    1998-10-01

    Functional adhesion of blood and marrow leukemic cells from 14 acute myeloid leukemia patients presenting with hyperleukocytosis was evaluated by performing cytoadhesion assays on purified (extracellular matrix proteins) and non-purified supports (MRC5 fibroblastic cell line). Results, in 30-min chromium release assay, show a mean +/- S.D. adhesion to fibronectin, collagen, and laminin respectively of 30 +/- 17%, 20 +/- 13%, 25 +/- 17% for blood leukemic cells and 18 +/- 11%, 11 +/- 10%, 11 +/- 8% for marrow leukemic cells. These differences between blood and marrow cells were statistically significant (respectively P = 0.005, P = 0.01 and P = 0.002), while no difference was noted regarding adhesion to non-purified supports. The higher adhesion of blood blast cells to purified supports was observed regardless of CD34 expression. No significant difference was observed in the expression of cell surface VLA-molecules (CD29, CD49b, CD49d, CD49e, CD49f) between blood and marrow blast cells. The addition of GM-CSF or G-CSF induced increased adhesion of marrow blasts and decreased adhesion of blood blasts leading to a loss of the difference between blood and marrow cells. In a 60-min chromium release assay, marrow blasts adhered even more than blood leukemic cells to fibronectin. In contrast, marrow blasts from 'aleukemic' acute myeloid leukemia patients did not show any modification regarding their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins when co-cultured with growth factors. PMID:9766756

  3. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  4. The de-adhesive activity of matricellular proteins: is intermediate cell adhesion an adaptive state?

    PubMed

    Murphy-Ullrich, J E

    2001-04-01

    The process of cellular de-adhesion is potentially important for the ability of a cell to participate in morphogenesis and to respond to injurious stimuli. Cellular de-adhesion is induced by the highly regulated matricellular proteins TSP1 and 2, tenascin-C, and SPARC. These proteins induce a rapid transition to an intermediate state of adhesiveness characterized by loss of actin-containing stress fibers and restructuring of the focal adhesion plaque that includes loss of vinculin and alpha-actinin, but not of talin or integrin. This process involves intracellular signaling mediators, which are engaged in response to matrix protein-receptor interactions. Each of these proteins employs different receptors and signaling pathways to achieve this common morphologic endpoint. What is the function of this intermediate adhesive state and what is the physiologic significance of this action of the matricellular proteins? Given that matricellular proteins are expressed in response to injury and during development, one can speculate that the intermediate adhesive state is an adaptive condition that facilitates expression of specific genes that are involved in repair and adaptation. Since cell shape is maintained in weakly adherent cells, this state might induce survival signals to prevent apoptosis due to loss of strong cell adhesion, but yet allow for cell locomotion. The three matricellular proteins considered here might each preferentially facilitate one or more aspects of this adaptive response rather than all of these equally. Currently, we have only preliminary data to support the specific ideas proposed in this article. It will be interesting in the next several years to continue to elucidate the biological roles of the intermediate adhesive state induced by these matricellular proteins. and focal adhesions in a cell that nevertheless maintains a spread, extended morphology and integrin clustering. TSP1, tenascin-C, and SPARC induce the intermediate adhesive state, as

  5. Immobilization of Cell-Adhesive Laminin Peptides in Degradable PEGDA Hydrogels Influences Endothelial Cell Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saniya; Saik, Jennifer E.; Gould, Dan J.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Attachment, spreading, and organization of endothelial cells into tubule networks are mediated by interactions between cells in the extracellular microenvironment. Laminins are key extracellular matrix components and regulators of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. In this study, laminin-derived peptides were conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monoacrylate and covalently incorporated into degradable PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels to investigate the influence of these peptides on endothelial cellular adhesion and function in organizing into tubule networks. Degradable PEGDA hydrogels were synthesized by incorporating a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–sensitive peptide, GGGPQGIWGQGK (abbreviated PQ), into the polymer backbone. The secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by endothelial cells promotes polymer degradation and consequently cell migration. We demonstrate the formation of extensive networks of tubule-like structures by encapsulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in hydrogels with immobilized synthetic peptides. The resulting structures were stabilized by pericyte precursor cells (10T1/2s) in vitro. During tubule formation and stabilization, extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen IV and laminin were deposited. Tubules formed in the matrix of metalloproteinase sensitive hydrogels were visualized from 7 days to 4 weeks in response to different combination of peptides. Moreover, hydrogels functionalized with laminin peptides and transplanted in a mouse cornea supported the ingrowth and attachment of endothelial cells to the hydrogel during angiogenesis. Results of this study illustrate the use of laminin-derived peptides as potential candidates for modification of biomaterials to support angiogenesis. PMID:23914330

  6. Disaccharides generated from heparan sulphate or heparin modulate chemokine-induced T-cell adhesion to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Schor, H; Ariel, A; Hecht, I; Cohen, I R; Lider, O; Cahalon, L

    2000-01-01

    We have found previously that disaccharides (DS) enzymatically generated from heparin or heparan sulphate can modulate tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from immune cells in vitro and cell-mediated immune reactions in vivo. Here, we show that such DS can modulate the adhesion and migration of human T cells. We found that certain heparin- and heparan sulphate-derived DS induced, in a dose-dependent manner, the adhesion of human T cells to both extracellular matrix (ECM) and immobilized fibronectin (FN); maximal T-cell adhesion occurred with 1 ng/ml of DS. The levels of T-cell adhesion to ECM that were induced by the tested DS molecules resembled those induced by the prototypic chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta). However, the kinetics of DS-induced T-cell adhesion to FN resembled that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), but not that induced by MIP-1beta. This adhesion appeared to involve beta1 integrin recognition and activation, and was associated with specific intracellular activation pathways. Although a first exposure of T cells to certain DS molecules appeared to result in cell adhesion, a subsequent exposure of T cells to pro-adhesive chemokines, such as MIP-1beta or RANTES, but not to other pro-adhesive stimuli, for example interleukin-2 or CD3 cross-linking, resulted in inhibition of T-cell adhesion to and chemotactic migration through FN. Hence, we propose that the breakdown products of tissues generated by inflammatory enzymes are part of an intrinsic functional programme, and not necessarily molecular waste. Moreover, because the DS molecules exert their modulatory functions within a limited time, it appears that the historical encounters of the tissue-invading cells with the constituents of inflamed loci may dictate the cells' behaviour upon subsequent exposure to proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10651945

  7. Cell adhesion molecules and actin cytoskeleton at immune synapses and kinapses.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Michael L

    2007-10-01

    The immunological synapse is a stable adhesive junction between a polarized immune effector cell and an antigen-bearing cell. Immunological synapses are often observed to have a striking radial symmetry in the plane of contact with a prominent central cluster of antigen receptors surrounded by concentric rings of adhesion molecules and actin-rich projections. There is a striking similarity between the radial zones of the immunological synapse and the dynamic actinomyosin modules employed by migrating cells. Breaking the symmetry of an immunological synapse generates a moving adhesive junction that can be defined as a kinapse, which facilitates signal integration by immune cells while moving over the surface of antigen-presenting cells.

  8. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  9. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr-925 regulates cross-talk between focal adhesion turnover and cell protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Deramaudt, Therese B.; Dujardin, Denis; Hamadi, Abdelkader; Noulet, Fanny; Kolli, Kaouther; De Mey, Jan; Takeda, Kenneth; Rondé, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration is a highly complex process that requires the coordinated formation of membrane protrusion and focal adhesions (FAs). Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a major signaling component of FAs, is involved in the disassembly process of FAs through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of its tyrosine residues, but the role of such phosphorylations in nascent FA formation and turnover near the cell front and in cell protrusion is less well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that, depending on the phosphorylation status of Tyr-925 residue, FAK modulates cell migration via two specific mechanisms. FAK−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing nonphosphorylatable Y925F-FAK show increased interactions between FAK and unphosphorylated paxillin, which lead to FA stabilization and thus decreased FA turnover and reduced cell migration. Conversely, MEFs expressing phosphomimetic Y925E-FAK display unchanged FA disassembly rates, show increase in phosphorylated paxillin in FAs, and exhibit increased formation of nascent FAs at the cell leading edges. Moreover, Y925E-FAK cells present enhanced cell protrusion together with activation of the p130CAS/Dock180/Rac1 signaling pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 is required for FAK-mediated cell migration and cell protrusion. PMID:21289086

  10. Facile preparation of a photoactivatable surface on a 96-well plate: a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masao; Scheideler, Olivia; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Shota; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is an essential cellular activity in various physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. Therefore, in vitro cell migration assays are important not only for fundamental biological studies but also for evaluating potential drugs that control cell migration activity in medical applications. In this regard, robust control over cell migrating microenvironments is critical for reliable and quantitative analysis as cell migration is highly dependent upon the microenvironments. Here, we developed a facile method for making a commercial glass-bottom 96-well plate photoactivatable for cell adhesion, aiming to develop a versatile and multiplex cell migration assay platform. Cationic poly-d-lysine was adsorbed to the anionic glass surface via electrostatic interactions and, subsequently, functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) bearing a photocleavable reactive group. The initial PEGylated surface is non-cell-adhesive. However, upon near-ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, the photorelease of PEG switches the surface from non-biofouling to cell-adhesive. With this platform, we assayed cell migration in the following procedure: (1) create cell-attaching regions of precise geometries by controlled photoirradiation, (2) seed cells to allow them to attach selectively to the irradiated regions, (3) expose UV light to the remaining PEGylated regions to extend the cell-adhesive area, (4) analyse cell migration using microscopy. Surface modification of the glass surface was characterized by ζ-potential and contact angle measurements. The PEGylated surface showed cell-resistivity and became cell-adhesive upon releasing PEG by near-UV irradiation. The method was applied for parallelly evaluating the effect of model drugs on the migration of epithelial MDCK cells in the multiplexed platform. The dose-response relationship for cytochalasin D treatment on cell migration behavior was successfully evaluated with high

  11. Group I PAK Inhibitor IPA-3 Induces Cell Death and Affects Cell Adhesivity to Fibronectin in Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuželová, Kateřina; Grebeňová, Dana; Holoubek, Aleš; Röselová, Pavla; Obr, Adam

    2014-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are involved in the regulation of multiple processes including cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. However, the current knowledge about their function is mainly based on results obtained in adherent cell types. We investigated the effect of group I PAK inhibition using the compound IPA-3 in a variety of human leukemic cell lines (JURL-MK1, MOLM-7, K562, CML-T1, HL-60, Karpas-299, Jurkat, HEL) as well as in primary blood cells. IPA-3 induced cell death with EC50 ranging from 5 to more than 20 μM. Similar range was found for IPA-3-mediated dephosphorylation of a known PAK downstream effector, cofilin. The cell death was associated with caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. In parallel, 20 μM IPA-3 treatment induced rapid and marked decrease of the cell adhesivity to fibronectin. Per contra, partial reduction of PAK activity using lower dose IPA-3 or siRNA resulted in a slight increase in the cell adhesivity. The changes in the cell adhesivity were also studied using real-time microimpedance measurement and by interference reflection microscopy. Significant differences in the intracellular IPA-3 level among various cell lines were observed indicating that an active mechanism is involved in IPA-3 transport. PMID:24664099

  12. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  13. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  14. Cell-adhesion molecules in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R

    1995-01-23

    After learning events the CNS of higher organisms selects, which acquired informations are permanently stored as a memory trace. This period of memory consolidation is susceptible to interference by biochemical inhibitors of transcription and translation. Ependymin is a specific CNS glycoprotein functionally involved in memory consolidation in goldfish: after active shock-avoidance conditioning ependymin mRNA is rapidly induced in meningeal fibroblasts followed by enhanced synthesis and secretion of several closely related forms of the protein. Intracranial injections of anti-ependymin antisera or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides interfere specifically with memory consolidation, indicating that only de novo synthesized ependymin molecules are involved. Ependymin is capable of directing the growth of central axons in vitro and participates in neuronal regeneration in situ, presumably by its HNK-1 cell-adhesion epitope. Experiments reviewed in this article suggest a model that involves two regulation mechanisms for the function of ependymin in behavioural plasticity: while hormones appear to determine, how much of this cell adhesion molecule is synthesized after learning, local changes of metal cation concentrations in the micro-environment of activated neurons may polymerize ependymin at those synapses, that have to be consolidated to improve their efficacy for future use.

  15. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against certain cell surface molecules of Dictyostelium discoideum blocks cell-cell adhesion when the in vitro assay is performed in the presence of univalent goat anti-rabbit antibody. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the univalent second antibody blocks agglutination induced by the rabbit antibody without significantly interfering with its effect on cell-cell adhesion. This method promises to be useful for screening monoclonal antibodies raised against potential cell adhesion molecules because: (a) it allows for the screening of large numbers of antibody samples without preparation of univalent fragments; and (b) it requires much less antibody because of the greater affinity of divalent antibodies for antigens. PMID:6970200

  16. Cadherin-2 Is Required Cell Autonomously for Collective Migration of Facial Branchiomotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rebman, Jane K.; Kirchoff, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration depends on cell-cell interactions between neighbors that contribute to their overall directionality, yet the mechanisms that control the coordinated migration of neurons remains to be elucidated. During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) undergo a stereotypic tangential caudal migration from their place of birth in rhombomere (r)4 to their final location in r6/7. FBMNs engage in collective cell migration that depends on neuron-to-neuron interactions to facilitate caudal directionality. Here, we demonstrate that Cadherin-2-mediated neuron-to-neuron adhesion is necessary for directional and collective migration of FBMNs. We generated stable transgenic zebrafish expressing dominant-negative Cadherin-2 (Cdh2ΔEC) driven by the islet1 promoter. Cell-autonomous inactivation of Cadherin-2 function led to non-directional migration of FBMNs and a defect in caudal tangential migration. Additionally, mosaic analysis revealed that Cdh2ΔEC-expressing FBMNs are not influenced to migrate caudally by neighboring wild-type FBMNs due to a defect in collective cell migration. Taken together, our data suggest that Cadherin-2 plays an essential cell-autonomous role in mediating the collective migration of FBMNs. PMID:27716840

  17. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  18. Chemistry and biology of the compounds that modulate cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Etsu; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental step for embryonic development, wound repair, immune responses, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Extensive studies have attempted to reveal the molecular mechanisms behind cell migration; however, they remain largely unclear. Bioactive compounds that modulate cell migration show promise as not only extremely powerful tools for studying the mechanisms behind cell migration but also as drug seeds for chemotherapy against tumor metastasis. Therefore, we have screened cell migration inhibitors and analyzed their mechanisms for the inhibition of cell migration. In this mini-review, we introduce our chemical and biological studies of three cell migration inhibitors: moverastin, UTKO1, and BU-4664L.

  19. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  20. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Torres, Vicente A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  1. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  2. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  3. Three-Dimensional Photolithographic Micropatterning: A Novel Tool to Probe the Complexities of Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    West, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to independently study the numerous variables that influence cell movement, it will be necessary to employ novel tools and materials that allow for exquisite control of the cellular microenvirenment. In this work, we have applied advanced 3D micropatterning technology, known as two-photon laser scanning lithography (TP-LSL), to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels modified with bioactive peptides in order to fabricate precisely designed microenvirenments to guide and quantitatively investigate cell migration. Specifically, TP-LSL was used to fabricate cell adhesive PEG-RGDS micropatterns on the surface of non-degradable PEG-based hydrogels (2D) and in the interior of proteolytically degradable PEG-based hydrogels (3D). HT1080 cell migration was guided down these adhesive micropatterns in both 2D and 3D, as observed via time-lapse microscopy. Differences in cell speed, cell persistence, and cell shape were observed based on variation of adhesive ligand, hydrogel composition, and patterned area for both 2D and 3D migration. Results indicated that HT1080s migrate faster and with lower persistence on 2D surfaces, while HT1080s migrating in 3D were smaller and more elongated. Further, cell migration was shown to have a biphasic dependence on PEG-RGDS concentration and cells moving within PEG-RGDS micropatterns were seen to move faster and with more persistence over time. Importantly, the work presented here begins to elucidate the multiple complex factors involved in cell migration, with typical confounding factors being independently controlled. The development of this unique platform will allow researchers to probe how cells behave within increasingly complex 3D microenvironments that begin to mimic specifically chosen aspects of the in vivo landscape. PMID:23460015

  4. Visualizing T Cell Migration in situ

    PubMed Central

    Benechet, Alexandre P.; Menon, Manisha; Khanna, Kamal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen-specific T cells persists as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in situ visualization of T cell responses. Here, we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naïve, effector, and memory T cells. PMID:25120547

  5. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 modulates endothelial cell motility through the small G-protein Rho.

    PubMed

    Gratzinger, Dita; Canosa, Sandra; Engelhardt, Britta; Madri, Joseph A

    2003-08-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), an immunoglobulin family vascular adhesion molecule, is involved in endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis (1, 2). We found that endothelial cells lacking PECAM-1 exhibit increased single cell motility and extension formation but poor wound healing migration, reminiscent of cells in which Rho activity has been suppressed by overexpressing a GTPase-activating protein (3). The ability of PECAM-1 to restore wound healing migration to PECAM-1-deficient cells was independent of its extracellular domain or signaling via its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1-deficient endothelial cells had a selective defect in RhoGTP loading, and inhibition of Rho activity mimicked the PECAM-1-deficient phenotype of increased chemokinetic single cell motility at the expense of coordinated wound healing migration. The wound healing advantage of PECAM-1-positive endothelial cells was not only Rho mediated but pertussis toxin inhibitable, characteristic of migration mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor signaling such as signaling in response to the serum sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) (4, 5). Indeed, we found that the wound healing defect of PECAM-1 null endothelial cells is minimized in sphingolipid-depleted media; moreover, PECAM-1 null endothelial cells fail to increase their migration in response to S1P. We have also found that PECAM-1 localizes to rafts and that in its absence heterotrimeric G-protein components are differentially recruited to rafts, providing a potential mechanism for PECAM-1-mediated coordination of S1P signaling. PECAM-1 may thus support the effective S1P/RhoGTP signaling required for wound healing endothelial migration by allowing for the spatially directed, coordinated activation of Galpha signaling pathways. PMID:12890700

  6. Extracellular glutathione promotes migration of hydrogen peroxide-stressed cultured chick embryonic skin cells.

    PubMed

    Denunzio, Mia; Gomez, George

    2014-04-01

    The ability of glutathione to affect melanocyte survival has fostered its use in a variety of applications related to epithelial cells. Our study focused on fibroblast migration and the effects of oxidative stress. We used scratch assays to measure cell migration: fibroblasts were harvested from embryonic chicks, grown to confluence in a monolayer, and the layer was scratched to initiate migration. Migration rates were measured over 8 h using photomicrographs, and vinculin expression as an indicator focal adhesion formation was measured using immunofluorescence. Addition of 200 μM glutathione to the culture media in which the cells grew resulted in a significantly increased rate of scratch closure. When the scratch assays were performed in the presence of 100 μM H2O2 (to simulate oxidative stress), the cells ceased to migrate. Addition of 200 μM glutathione to the H2O2-treated scratched layers resulted in a restoration of the scratch closure capabilities. At the subcellular level, addition of extracellular glutathione resulted in a redistribution of vinculin into fewer but larger aggregates. In cells at the edge of scratched monolayers that were treated with H2O2, vinculin particles were distributed throughout the cell in smaller aggregates; addition of glutathione resulted in vinculin aggregates that were larger and closer to the edges of the cell, indicating that these cells were more migratory. Our results suggest that glutathione promotes fibroblast migration, possibly via a mechanism that promotes the formation of focal adhesions.

  7. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  8. Adhesion and Fusion of Muscle Cells Are Promoted by Filopodia.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dagan; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-08-01

    Indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila are generated during pupariation by fusion of hundreds of myoblasts with larval muscle templates (myotubes). Live observation of these muscles during the fusion process revealed multiple long actin-based protrusions that emanate from the myotube surface and require Enabled and IRSp53 for their generation and maintenance. Fusion is blocked when formation of these filopodia is compromised. While filopodia are not required for the signaling process underlying critical myoblast cell-fate changes prior to fusion, myotube-myoblast adhesion appears to be filopodia dependent. Without filopodia, close apposition between the cell membranes is not achieved, the cell-adhesion molecule Duf is not recruited to the myotube surface, and adhesion-dependent actin foci do not form. We therefore propose that the filopodia are necessary to prime the heterotypic adhesion process between the two cell types, possibly by recruiting the cell-adhesion molecule Sns to discrete patches on the myoblast cell surface.

  9. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K

    2016-03-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  10. Exogenous expression of N-cadherin in breast cancer cells induces cell migration, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hazan, R B; Phillips, G R; Qiao, R F; Norton, L; Aaronson, S A

    2000-02-21

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell-cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findings have raised the possibility that N-cadherin contributes to the invasive phenotype. To determine whether N-cadherin promotes invasion and metastasis, we transfected a weakly metastatic and E-cadherin-expressing breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, with N-cadherin and analyzed the effects on cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Transfected cells expressed both E- and N-cadherin and exhibited homotypic cell adhesion from both molecules. In vitro, N-cadherin-expressing cells migrated more efficiently, showed an increased invasion of Matrigel, and adhered more efficiently to monolayers of endothelial cells. All cells produced low levels of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9, which was dramatically upregulated by treatment with FGF-2 only in N-cadherin-expressing cells. Migration and invasion of Matrigel were also greatly enhanced by this treatment. When injected into the mammary fat pad of nude mice, N-cadherin-expressing cells, but not control MCF-7 cells, metastasized widely to the liver, pancreas, salivary gland, omentum, lung, lymph nodes, and lumbar spinal muscle. The expression of both E- and N-cadherin was maintained both in the primary tumors and metastatic lesions. These results demonstrate that N-cadherin promotes motility, invasion, and metastasis even in the presence of the normally suppressive E-cadherin. The increase in MMP-9 production by N-cadherin-expressing cells in response to a growth factor may endow them with a greater ability to penetrate matrix protein

  11. Mammary collective cell migration involves transient loss of epithelial features and individual cell migration within the epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Andrew J.; Huebner, Robert J.; Palsdottir, Hildur; Lee, Jessie K.; Perez, Melissa J.; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Tauscher, Andrew N.; Cheung, Kevin J.; Werb, Zena; Auer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Normal mammary morphogenesis involves transitions between simple and multilayered epithelial organizations. We used electron microscopy and molecular markers to determine whether intercellular junctions and apico-basal polarity were maintained in the multilayered epithelium. We found that multilayered elongating ducts had polarized apical and basal tissue surfaces both in three-dimensional culture and in vivo. However, individual cells were only polarized on surfaces in contact with the lumen or extracellular matrix. The basolateral marker scribble and the apical marker atypical protein kinase C zeta localized to all interior cell membranes, whereas PAR3 displayed a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that the apico-basal polarity was incomplete. Despite membrane localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin, we did not observe a defined zonula adherens connecting interior cells. Instead, interior cells were connected through desmosomes and exhibited complex interdigitating membrane protrusions. Single-cell labeling revealed that individual cells were both protrusive and migratory within the epithelial multilayer. Inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) further reduced intercellular adhesion on apical and lateral surfaces but did not disrupt basal tissue organization. Following morphogenesis, segregated membrane domains were re-established and junctional complexes re-formed. We observed similar epithelial organization during mammary morphogenesis in organotypic culture and in vivo. We conclude that mammary epithelial morphogenesis involves a reversible, spatially limited, reduction in polarity and intercellular junctions and active individualistic cell migration. Our data suggest that reductions in polarity and adhesion during breast cancer progression might reflect partial recapitulation of a normal developmental program. PMID:22344263

  12. TIMP-1 inhibits microvascular endothelial cell migration by MMP-dependent and MMP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Takemi; Akahane, Manabu; Shah, Amy; Connor, Christine M; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P

    2004-12-10

    It was reported over a decade ago that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) suppresses angiogenesis in experimental models but the mechanism is still incompletely understood. This in vitro study focused on the molecular basis of TIMP-1-mediated inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration, a key step in the angiogenic process. Both recombinant human TIMP-1 and the synthetic MMP inhibitors, GM6001 and MMP-2-MMP-9 Inhibitor III, suppressed migration of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) in a dose-dependent fashion. The MMP-dependent inhibition of migration was associated with increased expression of the junctional adhesion proteins, VE-cadherin and PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin accumulation at cell-cell junctions. TIMP-1 also caused MMP-independent dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (pY397) and paxillin, which was associated with reduced number of F-actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. Moreover, TIMP-1 stimulated expression of PTEN that has been shown to reduce phosphorylation of FAK and inhibit cell migration. Our data suggest that TIMP-1 inhibits HDMVEC migration through MMP-dependent stimulation of VE-cadherin and MMP-independent stimulation of PTEN with subsequent dephosphorylation of FAK and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:15530852

  13. Golgi Anti-apoptotic Proteins Are Highly Conserved Ion Channels That Affect Apoptosis and Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guia; Saraiva, Nuno; Parsons, Maddy; Byrne, Bernadette; Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Golgi anti-apoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are multitransmembrane proteins that are expressed in the Golgi apparatus and are able to homo-oligomerize. They are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and are present in some prokaryotes and orthopoxviruses. Within eukaryotes, GAAPs regulate the Ca2+ content of intracellular stores, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell adhesion and migration. Data presented here demonstrate that purified viral GAAPs (vGAAPs) and human Bax inhibitor 1 form ion channels and that vGAAP from camelpox virus is selective for cations. Mutagenesis of vGAAP, including some residues conserved in the recently solved structure of a related bacterial protein, BsYetJ, altered the conductance (E207Q and D219N) and ion selectivity (E207Q) of the channel. Mutation of residue Glu-207 or -178 reduced the effects of GAAP on cell migration and adhesion without affecting protection from apoptosis. In contrast, mutation of Asp-219 abrogated the anti-apoptotic activity of GAAP but not its effects on cell migration and adhesion. These results demonstrate that GAAPs are ion channels and define residues that contribute to the ion-conducting pore and affect apoptosis, cell adhesion, and migration independently. PMID:25713081

  14. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  15. GTSE1 Is a Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein That Regulates EB1-Dependent Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Silvano; Bublik, Debora Rosa; Reber, Simone; Peche, Leticia Y.; Ciani, Yari; Hubner, Nina; Isokane, Mayumi; Monte, Martin; Ellenberg, Jan; Hyman, Anthony A.; Schneider, Claudio; Bird, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of cell migration is a highly complex process that is often compromised when cancer cells become metastatic. The microtubule cytoskeleton is necessary for cell migration, but how microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins regulate multiple pathways promoting cell migration remains unclear. Microtubule plus-end binding proteins (+TIPs) are emerging as important players in many cellular functions, including cell migration. Here we identify a +TIP, GTSE1, that promotes cell migration. GTSE1 accumulates at growing microtubule plus ends through interaction with the EB1+TIP. The EB1-dependent +TIP activity of GTSE1 is required for cell migration, as well as for microtubule-dependent disassembly of focal adhesions. GTSE1 protein levels determine the migratory capacity of both nontransformed and breast cancer cell lines. In breast cancers, increased GTSE1 expression correlates with invasive potential, tumor stage, and time to distant metastasis, suggesting that misregulation of GTSE1 expression could be associated with increased invasive potential. PMID:23236459

  16. The cell ratchet: Interplay between efficient protrusions and adhesion determines cell motion

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, David; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many physiological and pathological processes involve directed cell motion. In general, migrating cells are represented with a polarized morphology with extending and retracting protrusions at the leading edge. However, cell motion is a more complex phenomenon. Cells show heterogeneous morphologies and high protrusive dynamics is not always related to cell shape. This prevents the quantitative prediction of cell motion and the identification of cellular mechanisms setting directionality. Here we discuss the importance of protrusion fluctuations in directed cell motion. We show how their spatiotemporal distribution and dynamics determine the fluctuations and directions of cell motion for NIH3T3 fibroblasts plated on micro-patterned adhesive ratchets.1 We introduce efficient protrusions and direction index which capture short-term cell motility over hours: these new read-outs allow the prediction of parameters characteristic for the long-term motion of cells over days. The results may have important implications for the study of biological phenomena where directed cell migration is involved, in morphogenesis and in cancer. PMID:26313125

  17. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  18. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca2+ in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca2+ stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca2+ is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca2+/H+ exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca2+ signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca2+ is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca2+ stores in the control of Ca2+-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  19. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K; Mayor, Roberto; Patel, Sandip

    2016-03-28

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca(2+) in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca(2+) stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca(2+) is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca(2+)/H(+)exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca(2+) signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca(2+) is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca(2+) stores in the control of Ca(2+)-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  20. Adhesion of single bacterial cells in the micronewton range

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Peter H.; Li, Guanglai; Brun, Yves V.; Freund, L. Ben; Tang, Jay X.

    2006-01-01

    The adhesion of bacteria to surfaces plays critical roles in the environment, disease, and industry. In aquatic environments, Caulobacter crescentus is one of the first colonizers of submerged surfaces. Using a micromanipulation technique, we measured the adhesion force of single C. crescentus cells attached to borosilicate substrates through their adhesive holdfast. The detachment forces measured for 14 cells ranged over 0.11 to 2.26 μN, averaging 0.59 ± 0.62 μN. Based on the calculation of stress distribution with the finite element analysis method (dividing an object into small grids and calculating relevant parameters for all of the elements), the adhesion strength between the holdfast and the substrate is >68 N/mm2 in the central region of contact. To our knowledge, this strength of adhesion is the strongest ever measured for biological adhesives. PMID:16585522

  1. Microfluidic Assay To Study the Combinatorial Impact of Substrate Properties on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Menon, Nishanth V; Chuah, Yon Jin; Phey, Samantha; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yingnan; Chan, Vincent; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-08-12

    As an alternative to complex and costly in vivo models, microfluidic in vitro models are being widely used to study various physiological phenomena. It is of particular interest to study cell migration in a controlled microenvironment because of its vital role in a large number of physiological processes, such as wound healing, disease progression, and tissue regeneration. Cell migration has been shown to be affected by variations in the biochemical and physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). To study the combinatorial impact of the ECM physical properties on cell migration, we have developed a microfluidic assay to induce migration of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with varying combinatorial properties (hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness). The results show that although the initial cell adhesion and viability appear similar on all PDMS samples, the cell spreading and migration are enhanced on PDMS samples exhibiting intermediate levels of hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness. This study suggests that there is a particular range of substrate properties for optimal cell spreading and migration. The influence of substrate properties on hBMSC migration can help understand the physical cues that affect cell migration, which may facilitate the development of optimized engineered scaffolds with desired properties for tissue regeneration applications. PMID:26186177

  2. A new candidate substrate for cell-matrix adhesion study: the acellular human amniotic matrix.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianchen; Lu, Xuya; Xue, Yuan; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Xiaotao; Zhao, Huajian

    2012-01-01

    In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D) matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM) with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  3. Adhesive interactions regulate transcriptional diversity in malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Nadav-Dagan, Liat; Shay, Tal; Dezorella, Nili; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Domany, Eytan; Katz, Ben-Zion; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic profiling of B-cell malignancies is rapidly expanding, providing important information on the tumorigenic potential, response to treatment, and clinical outcome of these diseases. However, the relative contributions of inherent gene expression versus microenvironmental effects are poorly understood. The regulation of gene expression programs by means of adhesive interactions was studied here in ARH-77 human malignant B-cell variants, derived from the same cell line by selective adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. The populations included cells that adhere to fibronectin and are highly tumorigenic (designated "type A" cells) and cells that fail to adhere to fibronectin and fail to develop tumors in vivo ("type F" cells). To identify genes directly affected by cell adhesion to fibronectin, type A cells deprived of an adhesive substrate (designated "AF cells") were also examined. Bioinformatic analyses revealed a remarkable correlation between cell adhesion and both B-cell differentiation state and the expression of multiple myeloma (MM)-associated genes. The highly adherent type A cells expressed higher levels of NFkappaB-regulated genes, many of them associated with MM. Moreover, we found that the transcription of several MM-related proto-oncogenes is stimulated by adhesion to fibronectin. In contrast, type F cells, which display poor adhesive and tumorigenic properties, expressed genes associated with higher levels of B-cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that B-cell differentiation, as manifested by gene expression profiles, is attenuated by cell adhesion to fibronectin, leading to upregulation of specific genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of MM.

  4. Calreticulin modulates cell adhesiveness via regulation of vinculin expression

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Calreticulin is an ubiquitous and highly conserved high capacity Ca(2+)- binding protein that plays a major role in Ca2+ storage within the lumen of the ER. Here, using L fibroblast cell lines expressing different levels of calreticulin, we show that calreticulin plays a role in the control of cell adhesiveness via regulation of expression of vinculin, a cytoskeletal protein essential for cell-substratum and cell-cell attachments. Both vinculin protein and mRNA levels are increased in cells overexpressing calreticulin and are downregulated in cells expressing reduced level of calreticulin. Abundance of actin, talin, alpha 5 and beta 1 integrins, pp125 focal adhesion kinase, and alpha-catenin is not affected by the differential calreticulin expression. Overexpression of calreticulin increases both cell- substratum and cell-cell adhesiveness of L fibroblasts that, most surprisingly, establish vinculin-rich cell-cell junctions. Upregulation of calreticulin also affects adhesion-dependent phenomena such as cell motility (which decreases) and cell spreading (which increases). Downregulation of calreticulin brings about inverse effects. Cell adhesiveness is Ca2+ regulated. The level of calreticulin expression, however, has no effect on either the resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration or the magnitude of FGF-induced Ca2+ transients. Calreticulin, however, participates in Ca2+ homeostasis as its level of expression affects cell viability at low concentrations of extracellular Ca2+. Consequently, we infer that it is not the Ca2+ storage function of calreticulin that affects cell adhesiveness. Neither endogenous calreticulin nor overexpressed green fluorescent protein-calreticulin construct can be detected outside of the ER. Since all of the adhesion-related effects of differential calreticulin expression can be explained by its regulation of vinculin expression, we conclude that it is the ER-resident calreticulin that affects cellular adhesiveness. PMID:8991101

  5. Cell adhesion strength from cortical tension - an integration of concepts.

    PubMed

    Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2015-10-15

    Morphogenetic mechanisms such as cell movement or tissue separation depend on cell attachment and detachment processes, which involve adhesion receptors as well as the cortical cytoskeleton. The interplay between the two components is of stunning complexity. Most strikingly, the binding energy of adhesion molecules is usually too small for substantial cell-cell attachment, pointing to a main deficit in our present understanding of adhesion. In this Opinion article, I integrate recent findings and conceptual advances in the field into a coherent framework for cell adhesion. I argue that active cortical tension is best viewed as an integral part of adhesion, and propose on this basis a non-arbitrary measure of adhesion strength - the tissue surface tension of cell aggregates. This concept of adhesion integrates heterogeneous molecular inputs into a single mechanical property and simplifies the analysis of attachment-detachment processes. It draws attention to the enormous variation of adhesion strengths among tissues, whose origin and function is little understood. PMID:26471994

  6. MIGRESIVES: a research project on migration from adhesives in food-packaging materials in support of European legislation and standardization.

    PubMed

    Störmer, A; Franz, R

    2009-12-01

    Most food packages and food-contact materials are manufactured using adhesives. The European Union regulates all food-contact materials, as their constituents may not contaminate food and endanger consumers' health. In contrast to plastics which are regulated by positive lists of authorized ingredients, adhesives have not yet a specific regulation. The MIGRESIVES project aimed to elaborate a scientific global risk-assessment approach to meet current general European Union regulatory requirements and as a basis for future specific European Union legislation as well as to provide the industry, especially small and medium-sized enterprises, a tool to ensure that migration from adhesives is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. The idea was to demonstrate that consumers' exposure to chemicals released by adhesives is in many cases below levels of concern. Technical/scientific knowledge from industry and research institutes will be merged into a collective research endeavour gathering all stakeholders. The major milestones are (1) the classification of adhesives according to chemistry and uses, (2) the test strategies based on physico-chemical behaviour of adhesives, (3) modelling migration/exposure from adhesives, (4) providing guidelines to integrate the risk-assessment approach into the daily life of companies, (5) the feasibility of applying the toxicological approach from the European Union BIOSAFEPAPER project, and (6) extensive training/education to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and large dissemination for general adoption of the concept in Europe.

  7. A Mathematical Model of Collective Cell Migration in a Three-Dimensional, Heterogeneous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stonko, David P.; Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Peercy, Bradford E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of interest. PMID:25875645

  8. Nanostructured conducting polymers for stiffness controlled cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Eric; Hama, Adel; Ismailova, Esma; Assaud, Loic; Malliaras, George; Hanbücken, Margrit; Owens, Roisin M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a facile and reproducible method, based on ultra thin porous alumina membranes, to produce cm2 ordered arrays of nano-pores and nano-pillars on any kind of substrates. In particular our method enables the fabrication of conducting polymers nano-structures, such as poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (PEDOT:PSS). Here, we demonstrate the potential interest of those templates with controlled cell adhesion studies. The triggering of the eventual fate of the cell (proliferation, death, differentiation or migration) is mediated through chemical cues from the adsorbed proteins and physical cues such as surface energy, stiffness and topography. Interestingly, as well as through material properties, stiffness modifications can be induced by nano-topography, the ability of nano-pillars to bend defining an effective stiffness. By controlling the diameter, length, depth and material of the nano-structures, one can possibly tune the effective stiffness of a (nano) structured substrate. First results indicate a possible change in the fate of living cells on such nano-patterned devices, whether they are made of conducting polymer (soft material) or silicon (hard material).

  9. Cross-talk between calcium and protein kinase A in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K

    2011-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are pleiotropic cellular regulators and both exert powerful, diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration. Localization, by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs), of PKA activity to the protrusive leading edge, integrins, and other regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics has emerged as an important facet of its role in cell migration. Additional recent work has firmly established the importance of Ca(2+) influx through mechanosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in cell migration. Finally, there is considerable evidence showing that these mechanisms of Ca(2+) influx and PKA regulation intersect--and often interact--and thus may work in concert to translate complex extracellular cues into the intracellular biochemical anisotropy required for directional cell migration.

  10. Laminin and Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion: Enhanced Adhesion of Cells from Regenerating Liver to Laminin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Roland; Engvall, Eva; Freeman, Aaron; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1981-04-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein isolated from cultures of mouse endodermal cells and rat yolk sac carcinoma cells, promoted the attachment of liver cells obtained from regenerating mouse liver. Cells from normal mouse liver attached readily to dishes coated with fibronectin but attached poorly to surfaces coated with laminin. Both proteins efficiently promoted the attachment of cells from livers undergoing regeneration. After regeneration, the attachment to laminin returned to the low levels found in animals not subjected to partial hepatectomy but attachment to fibronectin remained high. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of normal liver with antilaminin revealed the presence of laminin in or adjacent to the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels. After induction of regeneration by partial hepatectomy, increased amounts of laminin appeared in the sinusoidal areas. After carbon tetrachloride poisoning, staining for laminin was especially pronounced in the necrotic and postnecrotic areas around the central veins. This additional expression of laminin was transient. It reached a maximum around 5-6 days after the injury and then gradually disappeared. These findings show that laminin is an adhesive protein. The increase of laminin in regenerating liver and the adhesiveness of cells from such livers to laminin suggest a role for laminin in the maintenance of a proper tissue organization during liver regeneration.

  11. Primordial Germ Cell Specification and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells are the progenitor cells that give rise to the gametes. In some animals, the germline is induced by zygotic transcription factors, whereas in others, primordial germ cell specification occurs via inheritance of maternally provided gene products known as germ plasm. Once specified, the primordial germ cells of some animals must acquire motility and migrate to the gonad in order to survive. In all animals examined, perinuclear structures called germ granules form within germ cells. This review focuses on some of the recent studies, conducted by several groups using diverse systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates, which have provided mechanistic insight into the molecular regulation of germ cell specification and migration. PMID:26918157

  12. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  13. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  14. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  15. Regulation of Embryonic Cell Adhesion by the Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Yvonne; Geiss, Corinna; Luncz, Lydia; Thomanetz, Venus; Stuermer, Claudia A. O

    2009-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrPs) are key players in fatal neurodegenerative disorders, yet their physiological functions remain unclear, as PrP knockout mice develop rather normally. We report a strong PrP loss-of-function phenotype in zebrafish embryos, characterized by the loss of embryonic cell adhesion and arrested gastrulation. Zebrafish and mouse PrP mRNAs can partially rescue this knockdown phenotype, indicating conserved PrP functions. Using zebrafish, mouse, and Drosophila cells, we show that PrP: (1) mediates Ca+2-independent homophilic cell adhesion and signaling; and (2) modulates Ca+2-dependent cell adhesion by regulating the delivery of E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. In vivo time-lapse analyses reveal that the arrested gastrulation in PrP knockdown embryos is due to deficient morphogenetic cell movements, which rely on E-cadherin–based adhesion. Cell-transplantation experiments indicate that the regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by PrP is cell-autonomous. Moreover, we find that the local accumulation of PrP at cell contact sites is concomitant with the activation of Src-related kinases, the recruitment of reggie/flotillin microdomains, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, consistent with a role of PrP in the modulation of cell adhesion via signaling. Altogether, our data uncover evolutionarily conserved roles of PrP in cell communication, which ultimately impinge on the stability of adherens cell junctions during embryonic development. PMID:19278297

  16. Vinculin regulates directionality and cell polarity in two- and three-dimensional matrix and three-dimensional microtrack migration

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Aniqua; Carey, Shawn P.; Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Goldblatt, Zachary E.; Bordeleau, Francois; Lampi, Marsha C.; Lin, Deanna Y.; García, Andrés J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    During metastasis, cells can use proteolytic activity to form tube-like “microtracks” within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using these microtracks, cells can migrate unimpeded through the stroma. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of microtrack migration, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) micromolded collagen platform. When in microtracks, cells tend to migrate unidirectionally. Because focal adhesions are the primary mechanism by which cells interact with the ECM, we examined the roles of several focal adhesion molecules in driving unidirectional motion. Vinculin knockdown results in the repeated reversal of migration direction compared with control cells. Tracking the position of the Golgi centroid relative to the position of the nucleus centroid reveals that vinculin knockdown disrupts cell polarity in microtracks. Vinculin also directs migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrates and in 3D uniform collagen matrices, as indicated by reduced speed, shorter net displacement, and decreased directionality in vinculin-deficient cells. In addition, vinculin is necessary for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation in three dimensions, as vinculin knockdown results in reduced FAK activation in both 3D uniform collagen matrices and microtracks but not on 2D substrates, and, accordingly, FAK inhibition halts cell migration in 3D microtracks. Together these data indicate that vinculin plays a key role in polarization during migration. PMID:26960796

  17. Expression sequences of cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Crossin, K L; Chuong, C M; Edelman, G M

    1985-01-01

    A reexamination of the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) during the development of the chicken embryo was carried out using more sensitive immunocytochemical techniques than had been used previously. While the previously determined sequence of CAM expression was confirmed, neural CAM (N-CAM) was also detected on endodermal structures such as the lung epithelium, gut epithelium, and pancreas and on budding structures such as the pancreatic duct and gall bladder. It was also found on ectodermal derivatives of the skin. In most of these sites, N-CAM expression was transient, but in the chicken embryo lung, the epithelium remained positive for N-CAM and liver CAM (L-CAM) into adult life. Thus, at one time or another, both of these primary CAMs can be expressed on derivatives of all three germ layers. At sites of embryonic induction, epithelial cells expressing both L-CAM and N-CAM, or L-CAM only, were apposed to mesenchymal cells expressing N-CAM. Examples included epiblast (NL) and notochord (N); endodermal epithelium (NL) and lung mesenchyme (N); Wolffian duct (NL) and mesonephric mesenchyme (N); apical ectodermal ridge (NL) and limb mesenchyme (N); and feather placode (L) and dermal condensation (N). The cumulative observations indicate that cell surface modulation of the primary CAMs at induction sites can be classified into two modes. In mode I, expression of N-CAM (or both CAMs) in mesenchyme decreases to low amounts at the cell surface, and then N-CAM is reexpressed. In mode II, one or the other CAM disappears from epithelia expressing both CAMs. As a result of the primary processes of development, collectives of cells linked by N-CAM and undergoing modulation mode I are brought into the proximity of collectives of cells linked by L-CAM plus N-CAM or by L-CAM undergoing modulation mode II. Such adjoining cell collectives or CAM couples were found at all sites of embryonic induction examined. Images PMID:3863135

  18. Cadherin-11 endocytosis through binding to clathrin promotes cadherin-11-mediated migration in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L; Pan, Tianhong; Bilen, Mehmet A; Li, Xiaoxia; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ortiz, Angelica; Kowalczyk, Andrew P; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-12-15

    Cadherin-11 (Cad11) cell adhesion molecule plays a role in prostate cancer cell migration. Because disassembly of adhesion complexes through endocytosis of adhesion proteins has been shown to play a role in cell migration, we examined whether Cad11 endocytosis plays a role in Cad11-mediated migration. The mechanism by which Cad11 is internalized is unknown. Using a GST pulldown assay, we found that clathrin binds to the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain but not to that of E-cadherin. Using deletion analysis, we identified a unique sequence motif, VFEEE, in the Cad11 membrane proximal region (amino acid residues 11-15) that binds to clathrin. Endocytosis assays using K(+)-depletion buffer showed that Cad11 internalization is clathrin dependent. Proximity ligation assays showed that Cad11 colocalizes with clathrin, and immunofluorescence assays showed that Cad11 localizes in vesicles that stain for the early endosomal marker Rab5. Deletion of the VFEEE sequence from the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain (Cad11-cla-Δ5) leads to inhibition of Cad11 internalization and reduces Cad11-mediated cell migration in C4-2B and PC3-mm2 prostate cancer cells. These observations suggest that clathrin-mediated internalization of Cad11 regulates surface trafficking of Cad11 and that dynamic turnover of Cad11 regulates the migratory function of Cad11 in prostate cancer cells.

  19. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences. PMID:27680883

  20. Heparanase induces inflammatory cell recruitment in vivo by promoting adhesion to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Lever, Rebecca; Rose, Mark J; McKenzie, Edward A; Page, Clive P

    2014-06-15

    Heparanase (HPSE1) is known to be involved in mechanisms of metastatic tumor cell migration. This enzyme selectively cleaves heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which are ubiquitously expressed in mammals and are known to be involved in regulating the activity of an array of inflammatory mediators. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of human recombinant heparanase, the inactive precursor of this enzyme (proheparanase) and enzymatically inactivated heparanase, on inflammatory cell recruitment in the rat and on human leukocyte-endothelial adhesion in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of heparanase (500 μg) induced a significant inflammatory cell infiltrate in the rat, as assessed by peritoneal lavage 4 h later. Intravital microscopy of the mesenteric microcirculation of anesthetized rats showed an increase in rolling and adherent cells in postcapillary venules that was sensitive to heparin, a nonselective inhibitor of heparanase activity. In vitro, heparanase augmented the adhesion of human neutrophils and mononuclear cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Proheparanase had similar effects to the active enzyme both with respect to leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavity and adhesion in vitro. However, heat-inactivated heparanase induced cell adhesion in vitro but was without effect in vivo. Together, these data indicate a role for heparanase in inflammatory cell trafficking in vivo that appears to require enzymatic activity.

  1. The structure of cell-matrix adhesions: the new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Hanein, Dorit; Horwitz, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions between the cell and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mechanosensitive multi-protein assemblies that transmit force across the cell membrane and regulate biochemical signals in response to the chemical and mechanical environment. These combined functions in force transduction, signaling and mechanosensing contribute to cellular phenotypes that span development, homeostasis and disease. These adhesions form, mature and disassemble in response to actin organization and physical forces that originate from endogenous myosin activity or external forces by the extracellular matrix. Despite advances in our understanding of the protein composition, interactions and regulation, our understanding of matrix adhesion structure and organization, how forces affect this organization, and how these changes dictate specific signaling events is limited. Insights across multiple structural levels are acutely needed to elucidate adhesion structure and ultimately the molecular basis of signaling and mechanotransduction. Here we describe the challenges and recent advances and prospects for unraveling the structure of cell-matrix adhesions and their response to force. PMID:22196929

  2. Variable Nanoparticle-Cell Adhesion Strength Regulates Cellular Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyan; Li, Ju; Bao, Gang; Zhang, Sulin

    2010-09-01

    In receptor-mediated endocytosis, cells exercise biochemical control over the mechanics of adhesion to engulf foreign particles, featuring a variable adhesion strength. Here we present a thermodynamic model with which we elucidate that the variable adhesion strength critically governs the cellular uptake, yielding an uptake phase diagram in the space of ligand density and particle size. We identify from the diagram an endocytosed phase with markedly high uptake, encompassed by a lower and an upper phase boundary that are set, respectively, by the enthalpic and entropic limits of the adhesion strength. The phase diagram may provide useful guidance to the rational design of nanoparticle-based therapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  3. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  4. [MIP-1α promotes the migration ability of Jurkat cell through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yi-Yang; Song, Qian; Hao, Yi-Wen

    2014-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia resulting from brain metastasis of human acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) cells and the role of MIP-1α in migration of Jurkat cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). The real-time PCR, siRNA test, transendothelial migration test, endothelial permeability assay and cell adhesion assay were used to detect MIP-1α expression, penetration and migration ability as well as adhesion capability respectively. The results showed that the MIP-1α expression in Jurkat cells was higher than that in normal T cells and CCRF-HSB2, CCRF-CEM , SUP-T1 cells. The MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells enhanced the ability of Jurkat cells to penetrate through HBMEC, the ability of Jurkat cells treated by MIP-1α siRNA to adhere to HBMEC and to migrate trans endothelial cells decreased. It is concluded that the MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells participates in process of penetrating the Jurkat cells through HBMEC monolayer.

  5. van der Waals forces influencing adhesion of cells

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, K.; Roberts, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion molecules, often thought to be acting by a ‘lock and key’ mechanism, have been thought to control the adhesion of cells. While there is no doubt that a coating of adhesion molecules such as fibronectin on a surface affects cell adhesion, this paper aims to show that such surface contamination is only one factor in the equation. Starting from the baseline idea that van der Waals force is a ubiquitous attraction between all molecules, and thereby must contribute to cell adhesion, it is clear that effects from geometry, elasticity and surface molecules must all add on to the basic cell attractive force. These effects of geometry, elasticity and surface molecules are analysed. The adhesion force measured between macroscopic polymer spheres was found to be strongest when the surfaces were absolutely smooth and clean, with no projecting protruberances. Values of the measured surface energy were then about 35 mJ m−2, as expected for van der Waals attractions between the non-polar molecules. Surface projections such as abrasion roughness or dust reduced the molecular adhesion substantially. Water cut the measured surface energy to 3.4 mJ m−2. Surface active molecules lowered the adhesion still further to less than 0.3 mJ m−2. These observations do not support the lock and key concept. PMID:25533101

  6. Feedback Regulation of Cell-Substratum Adhesion by Integrin-Mediated Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjaastad, Michael D.; Angres, Brigitte; Lewis, Richard S.; Nelson, W. James

    1994-08-01

    Integrin binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell migration and gene expression in embryogenesis, metastasis, wound healing, and the inflammatory response. In many cases, binding of integrins to ECM triggers intracellular signaling pathways. The regulatory roles of intracellular signaling mechanisms in these events are poorly understood. Using single-cell analysis, we demonstrate that beads coated with peptide containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), an integrin recognition motif found in many ECM proteins, elicit a rapid transient increase in intracellular calcium in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Also, significantly more beads bind to responding cells than to nonresponders. Several independent methods that inhibit RGD-induced Ca2+ signaling decrease both the number of beads bound and the strength of adhesion to an RGD-coated substratum. These results indicate that intracellular Ca2+ signaling participates in a positive feedback loop that enhances integrin-mediated cell adhesion

  7. Regulation of ionizing radiation-induced adhesion of breast cancer cells to fibronectin by alpha5beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Hee; Cheng, Huiwen; Yuan, Ye; Wu, Shiyong

    2014-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is commonly used for cancer therapy, however, its potential influence on cancer metastatic potential remains controversial. In this study, we elucidated the role of integrins in regulation of IR-altered adhesion between breast cancer cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, which is a key step in the initial phase of metastasis. Our data suggest that the extent of effect that ionizing radiation had on cell adhesion depended on the genetic background of the breast cancer cells. Ionizing radiation was a better adhesion inducer for p53-mutated cells, such as MDA-MB-231 cells, than for p53 wild-type cells, such as MCF-7 cells. While IR-induced adhesions between MDA-MB-231 cells to fibronectin, laminin, collagen I and collagen IV, only blocking of the adhesion between α5β1 integrin and fibronectin using anti-α5β1 integrin antibody could completely inhibit the radiation-induced adhesion of the cells. A soluble Arg-Gly-Asp peptide, the binding motif for fibronectin binding integrins, could also reduce the adhesion of the cells to fibronectin with or without ionizing radiation exposure. The inhibition of the cell-fibronectin interaction also affected, but did not always correlate with, transwell migration of the cancer cells. In addition, our data showed that the total expression of α5 integrin and surface expression of α5β1 integrin were increased in the cells treated with ionizing radiation. The increased surface expression of α5β1 integrin, along with the adhesion between the cells and fibronectin, could be inhibited by both ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase inhibitors. These results suggested that ATM/ATR-mediated surface expression of α5β1 integrin might play a central role in regulation of ionizing radiation-altered adhesion. PMID:24785587

  8. Theoretical study of the competition between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Li, Bo

    2009-07-01

    Adhesions between neighboring cells or between cells and their surrounding tissue/matrix play a crucial role in a wide range of biological processes. In order to investigate the competitive mechanisms between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, we here develop a theoretical framework for multiple interacting cells lying on a planar matrix coated with distributed ligands. This model allows us to study, from the viewpoints of energy and statistics, the effects of such physical mechanisms as binding energy of bonds, nonspecific interactions, elastic deformation of cell membranes, and mixing entropy. Our calculations show that cell-matrix adhesion cannot occur when the ligand density on the matrix is lower than a threshold value, and cell-cell adhesion does not happen for a high ligand density. Glycocalyx repulsion plays a more important role in cell-matrix adhesion than in cell-cell adhesion. In addition, it is found that the cell-cell adhesion density decreases as the number of cells increases.

  9. Contractile forces in tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja; Rösel, Daniel; Fabry, Ben; Brábek, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Cancer is a deadly disease primarily because of the ability of tumor cells to spread from the primary tumor, to invade into the connective tissue, and to form metastases at distant sites. In contrast to cell migration on a planar surface where large cell tractions and contractile forces are not essential, tractions and forces are thought to be crucial for overcoming the resistance and steric hindrance of a dense three-dimensional connective tissue matrix. In this review, we describe recently developed biophysical tools, including 2-D and 3-D traction microscopy to measure contractile forces of cells. We discuss evidence indicating that tumor cell invasiveness is associated with increased contractile force generation.

  10. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Pandya, Chirayu D; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Chutkan, Norman; Markand, Shanu; Hill, William D; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38) and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  11. Effect of the Fructus Ligustri Lucidi extract and its monomers quercetin and oleanolic acid on the adhesion and migration of melanocytes and intracellular actin

    PubMed Central

    WU, YANHUA; LI, QILIN; LI, XIANGJUN; HE, DANHUA; NIU, MU; LU, XIAOJUAN; LI, HUI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) extract and its monomers quercetin and oleanolic acid on the adhesion and migration of human epidermal melanocytes (MCs) and intracellular actin. The human epidermal MCs were cultured and identified. The cells were treated with different concentrations of FLL extract, quercetin and oleanolic acid. The adhesion and migration abilities of the cells were determined by the fibronectin-coated culture experiment and Transwell assay, respectively. The structure and distribution of intracellular actin were observed by confocal laser microscopy, with semi-quantitative analysis. Results showed that compared with the control group, 0.0375–0.3 mg/ml of the FLL extract and 40 µM quercetin significantly improved the adhesion rate of MCs (P<0.05). The numbers of MCs permeating the microporous membrane in the 0.15 mg/ml FLL extract and 12 µM oleanolic acid groups were 43.7 and 30.3, respectively, significantly higher compared to the control group (P<0.01). In the control group, the intracellular actin was less, and the stress fiber structure was not clear. In the 0.15 mg/ml FLL extract, 12 µM oleanolic acid and 40 µM quercetin groups, there were numerous bunched stress fibers, indicating the aggregation of filamentous fibrous actin. The mean optical densities of actin expression in the 0.15 mg/ml FLL extract, 12 µM oleanolic acid and 40 µM quercetin groups were significantly higher compared to the control group (P<0.05). The FLL extract has a significant stimulatory effect on the adhesion and migration of human epidermal MCs. The mechanism may be associated with the promotion of intracellular actin cytoskeleton aggregation. PMID:27123251

  12. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  13. β-PIX controls intracellular viscoelasticity to regulate lung cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Helen Wenshin; Chen, Yin-Quan; Huang, Chi-Ming; Liu, Ching-Yi; Chiou, Arthur; Wang, Yang-Kao; Tang, Ming-Jer; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer metastasis occurs via a progress involving abnormal cell migration. Cell migration, a dynamic physical process, is controlled by the cytoskeletal system, which includes the dynamics of actin organization and cellular adhesive organelles, focal adhesions (FAs). However, it is not known whether the organization of actin cytoskeletal system has a regulatory role in the physiologically relevant aspects of cancer metastasis. In the present studies, it was found that lung adenocarcinoma cells isolated from the secondary lung cancer of the lymph nodes, H1299 cells, show specific dynamics in terms of the actin cytoskeleton and FAs. This results in a higher level of mobility and this is regulated by an immature FA component, β-PIX (PAK-interacting exchange factor-β). In H1299 cells, β-PIX's activity was found not to be down-regulated by sequestration onto stress fibres, as the cells did not bundle actin filaments into stress fibres. Thus, β-PIX mainly remained localized at FAs, which allowed maturation of nascent adhesions into focal complexes; this resulted in actin polymerization, increased actin network integrity, changes in the intracellular microrheology at the peripheral of the cell, and cell polarity, which in turn regulated cell migration. Perturbation of β-PIX caused an inhibition of cell migration, including migration velocity, accumulated distance and directional persistence. Our results demonstrate the importance of β-PIX to the regulation of high mobility of lung adenocarcinoma cell line H1299 and that this occurs via regulation of FA dynamics, changes in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell polarity. PMID:25683605

  14. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Y.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conducting polymers have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, conducting polymers have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of conducting polymers with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-L-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized conducting polymer substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, an amine functionality present on conducting polymers can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. PMID:25294089

  15. Physics of adhesion and elasticity of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    Forces exerted by adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. By pulling on their environment, cells sense rigidity gradients, boundaries and strains induced by the presence of other cells. Many cell types respond to these signals by actively adjusting the magnitude and direction of the adhesions that connect cells to surfaces or to each other. These adhesions are formed from membrane-bound integrin proteins and other cytoplasmic proteins that form condensed domains that grow in the direction of externally applied or internal, cytoskeletal forces. We present a model for the adsorption of adhesion proteins from the cell interior to the adhesion site and the resulting, force-sensitive anisotropic growth. The theory couples the mechanical forces to the non- linear adsorption dynamics and predicts the growth velocities of the back and front of the adhesion in qualitative agreement with experiment. The adhesion forces generated by a collection of cells in a tissue significantly alter the overall elastic response of the system. We model an ensemble of cells by an extension of the treatment of dielectric response of polar molecules to elastic interactions. By introducing the elastic analogy of the dielectric constant of the medium, we are able to predict the average cell polarization, their orientational order, and the effective material constants.

  16. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  17. Synergistic and hierarchical adhesive and topographic guidance of BHK cells.

    PubMed

    Britland, S; Morgan, H; Wojiak-Stodart, B; Riehle, M; Curtis, A; Wilkinson, C

    1996-11-01

    Guided cell movement is a fundamental process in development and regeneration. We have used microengineered culture substrates to study the interaction between model topographic and adhesive guidance cues in steering BHK cell orientation. Grooves 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 microm deep together with pitch-matched aminosilane tracks 5, 12, 25, 50, and 100 microm wide were fabricated on fused silica substrates using photolithographic and dry-etching techniques. The cues were presented to the cells individually, simultaneously in parallel and orthogonally opposed. Cells aligned most strongly to 25-microm-wide adhesive tracks and to 5-microm-wide, 6-microm-deep grooves. Stress fibers and vinculin were found to align with the adhesive tracks and to the grooves and ridges. Cell alignment was profoundly enhanced on all surfaces that presented both cues in parallel. Cells were able to switch alignment from ridges to grooves, and vice versa, depending on the location of superimposed adhesive tracks. Cells aligned preferentially to adhesive tracks superimposed orthogonally over grooves of matched pitch, traversing numerous grooves and ridges. The strength of the cues was more closely matched on narrower 3- and 6-microm-deep gratings with cells showing evidence of alignment to both cues. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed two groups of mutually opposed f-actin stress fibers within the same cell, one oriented with the topographic cues and the other with the adhesive cues. However, the adhesive response was consistently dominant. We conclude that cells are able to detect and respond to multiple guidance cues simultaneously. The adhesive and topographic guidance cues modeled here were capable of interacting both synergistically and hierarchically to guide cell orientation. PMID:8912725

  18. p63 Inhibits Extravillous Trophoblast Migration and Maintains Cells in a Cytotrophoblast Stem Cell-Like State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchun; Moretto-Zita, Matteo; Leon-Garcia, Sandra; Parast, Mana M.

    2015-01-01

    Proper differentiation of placental epithelial cells, called trophoblast, is required for implantation. Early during placentation, trophoblast cell columns help anchor the developing embryo in the uterine wall. Although proximally continuous with villous cytotrophoblast (CTB) distally, these cells differentiate into invasive extravillous trophoblast. We previously reported that p63, a p53 family member, is highly expressed in proliferative villous CTB and required for induction of the trophoblast lineage in human pluripotent stem cells. We now further explore its function in human trophoblast by using both primary CTB from the early placenta and established trophoblast cell lines. We show that p63 is expressed in epidermal growth factor receptor-positive CTB and that its expression decreases with differentiation into HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblast. In trophoblast cell lines, p63 is expressed in JEG3 cells but absent from HTR8 cells. Overexpression of p63 in both cell lines enhances cell proliferation and significantly reduces cell migration; conversely, down-regulation of p63 in JEG3 cells reduces cell proliferation and restores cell migration. Analysis of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and matrix degradation pathways shows that p63 blocks epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, promotes a CTB-specific cell adhesion profile, and inhibits expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Taken together, these data show that p63 maintains the proliferative CTB state, at least partially through regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and matrix degradation pathways. PMID:25307348

  19. A Photoactivatable Nanopatterned Substrate for Analyzing Collective Cell Migration with Precisely Tuned Cell-Extracellular Matrix Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Boehm, Heike; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Spatz, Joachim P.; Nakanishi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML), and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K) and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions. PMID:24632806

  20. Cell adhesion molecules and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Simopoulou, Maria; Nikolopoulou, Elena; Dimakakos, Andreas; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses issues regarding the need in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) field for further predictive markers enhancing the standing embryo selection criteria. It aims to serve as a source of defining information for an audience interested in factors related to the wide range of multiple roles played by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in several aspects of IVF ultimately associated with the success of an IVF cycle. We begin by stressing the importance of enriching the standing embryo selection criteria available aiming for the golden standard: "extract as much information as possible focusing on non-invasive techniques" so as to guide us towards selecting the embryo with the highest implantation potential. We briefly describe the latest trends on how to best select the right embryo, moving closer towards elective single embryo transfer. These trends are: frozen embryo transfer for all, preimplantation genetic screening, non-invasive selection criteria, and time-lapse imaging. The main part of this review is dedicated to categorizing and presenting published research studies focused on the involvement of CAMs in IVF and its final outcome. Specifically, we discuss the association of CAMs with conditions and complications that arise from performing assisted reproductive techniques, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the state of the endometrium, and tubal pregnancies, as well as the levels of CAMs in biological materials available in the IVF laboratory such as follicular fluid, trophectoderm, ovarian granulosa cells, oocytes, and embryos. To conclude, since CAMs have been successfully employed as a diagnostic tool in several pathologies in routine clinical work, we suggest that their multi-faceted nature could serve as a prognostic marker in assisted reproduction, aiming to enrich the list of non-invasive selection and predictive criteria in the IVF setting. We propose that in light of the well-documented involvement of CAMs in the developmental

  1. In vivo collective cell migration requires an LPAR2-dependent increase in tissue fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Sei; Theveneau, Eric; Benedetto, Alexandre; Parsons, Maddy; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Charras, Guillaume; Kabla, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) are common to cancer and morphogenesis, and are often considered to be mutually exclusive in spite of the fact that many cancer and embryonic cells that have gone through EMT still cooperate to migrate collectively. Here we use neural crest (NC) cells to address the question of how cells that have down-regulated cell–cell adhesions can migrate collectively. NC cell dissociation relies on a qualitative and quantitative change of the cadherin repertoire. We found that the level of cell–cell adhesion is precisely regulated by internalization of N-cadherin downstream of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 2. Rather than promoting the generation of single, fully mesenchymal cells, this reduction of membrane N-cadherin only triggers a partial mesenchymal phenotype. This intermediate phenotype is characterized by an increase in tissue fluidity akin to a solid-like–to–fluid-like transition. This change of plasticity allows cells to migrate under physical constraints without abolishing cell cooperation required for collectiveness. PMID:25002680

  2. Continuum Model of Collective Cell Migration in Wound Healing and Colony Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Julia C.; Mi, Qi; Branca, Maria F.; Hackam, David J.; Swigon, David

    2011-01-01

    Collective cell migration plays an important role during wound healing and embryo development. Although the exact mechanisms that coordinate such migration are still unknown, experimental studies of moving cell layers have shown that the primary interactions governing the motion of the layer are the force of lamellipodia, the adhesion of cells to the substrate, and the adhesion of cells to each other. Here, we derive a two-dimensional continuum mechanical model of cell-layer migration that is based on a novel assumption of elastic deformation of the layer and incorporates basic mechanical interactions of cells as well as cell proliferation and apoptosis. The evolution equations are solved numerically using a level set method. The model successfully reproduces data from two types of experiments: 1), the contraction of an enterocyte cell layer during wound healing; and 2), the expansion of a radially symmetric colony of MDCK cells, both in the edge migration velocity and in cell-layer density. In accord with experimental observations, and in contrast to reaction-diffusion models, this model predicts a partial wound closure if lamellipod formation is inhibited at the wound edge and gives implications of the effect of spatially restricted proliferation. PMID:21281567

  3. Sub-micron lateral topography affects endothelial migration by modulation of focal adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Antonini, S; Meucci, S; Jacchetti, E; Klingauf, M; Beltram, F; Poulikakos, D; Cecchini, M; Ferrari, A

    2015-06-24

    Through the interaction with topographical features, endothelial cells tune their ability to populate target substrates, both in vivo and in vitro. Basal textures interfere with the establishment and maturation of focal adhesions (FAs) thus inducing specific cell-polarization patterns and regulating a plethora of cell activities that govern the overall endothelial function. In this study, we analyze the effect of topographical features on FAs in primary human endothelial cells. Reported data demonstrate a functional link between FA dynamics and cell polarization and spreading on structured substrates presenting variable lateral feature size. Our results reveal that gratings with 2 µm lateral periodicity maximize contact guidance. The effect is linked to the dynamical state of FAs. We argue that these results are readily applicable to the rational design of active surfaces at the interface with the blood stream.

  4. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure.

    PubMed

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; El Sayad, Sara; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β(-/-) Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β(-/-) cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β(-/-) cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β-actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β-microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β-EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  5. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; Sayad, Sara El; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W.; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β−/− Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β−/− cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β−/− cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β–actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β–microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β–EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  6. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  7. Capillary electrophoretic determination of theanine, caffeine, and catechins in fresh tea leaves and oolong tea and their effects on rat neurosphere adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Nan; Liang, Chia-Min; Lai, Jueng-Rong; Tsai, Yao-Jen; Tsay, Jyh-Shyan; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2003-12-01

    Theanine, caffeine, and catechins in fresh tea leaves and oolong tea were determined by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). CE separated these tea polyphenols from three other tea ingredients, namely, caffeine, theophylline, and theanine, within 8 min. The young leaves (apical bud and the two youngest leaves) were found to be richer in caffeine, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg) than old leaves (from 5th to 7th leaves). On the other hand, the old leaves (from 8th to 10th leaves) contained higher levels of theanine, (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), and (-)-epicatechin (EC). Results from a comparison of fresh young tea and oolong tea compositions indicated oolong tea contained more theanine and catechins than fresh young tea. Furthermore, it was found that the levels of theanine, EGC, and EGCg in young leaves rose markedly with the withering process. Caffeine did not markedly change. However, fully or partially fermented teas (oolong tea or pauchong tea) have a common initial step in the withering process. Fresh tea leaves or oolong tea extract (0.1%, w/v) markedly inhibited neurosphere adhesion, cell migration, and neurite outgrowth in rat neurospheres. Theanine (348 micrograms/mL) and caffeine at high concentration (50 micrograms/mL) did not inhibit neurosphere adhesion or migration activities, but EGCg at 20 micrograms/mL effectively inhibited neurosphere adhesion for 24 h. These results indicated that EGCg might affect neural stem cell survival or differentiation.

  8. Cadmium migration in aerospace nickel cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of temperature, the nature of separator material, charge and discharge, carbonate contamination, and the mode of storage are studied with respect to the migration of active material from the negative toward the positive plate. A theoretical model is proposed which takes into account the solubility of cadmium in various concentrations of hydroxide and carbonate at different temperatures, the generation of the cadmiate ion, Cd(OH)3(-), during discharge, the migration of the cadmiate ion and particulate Cd(OH)2 due to electrophoretic effects and the movement of electrolyte in and out of the negative plate and, finally, the recrystallization of cadmiate ion in the separator as Cd(OH)2. Application of the theoretical model to observations of cadmium migration in cycled cells is also discussed.

  9. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  10. Higher-order architecture of cell adhesion mediated by polymorphic synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Matoba, Kyoko; Nogi, Terukazu; Iwasaki, Kenji; Takagi, Junichi

    2012-07-26

    Polymorphic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin (NL) mediate asymmetric trans-synaptic adhesion, which is crucial for synapse development and function. It is not known whether or how individual synapse function is controlled by the interactions between variants and isoforms of these molecules with differing ectodomain regions. At a physiological concentration of Ca(2+), the ectodomain complex of neurexin-1 β isoform (Nrx1β) and NL1 spontaneously assembled into crystals of a lateral sheet-like superstructure topologically compatible with transcellular adhesion. Correlative light-electron microscopy confirmed extracellular sheet formation at the junctions between Nrx1β- and NL1-expressing non-neuronal cells, mimicking the close, parallel synaptic membrane apposition. The same NL1-expressing cells, however, did not form this higher-order architecture with cells expressing the much longer neurexin-1 α isoform, suggesting a functional discrimination mechanism between synaptic contacts made by different isoforms of neurexin variants.

  11. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease.

  12. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  13. Spatio-Temporally Restricted Expression of Cell Adhesion Molecules during Chicken Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Priti; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2014-01-01

    Differential cell adhesive properties are known to regulate important developmental events like cell sorting and cell migration. Cadherins and protocadherins are known to mediate these cellular properties. Though a large number of such molecules have been predicted, their characterization in terms of interactive properties and cellular roles is far from being comprehensive. To narrow down the tissue context and collect correlative evidence for tissue specific roles of these molecules, we have carried out whole-mount in situ hybridization based RNA expression study for seven cadherins and four protocadherins. In developing chicken embryos (HH stages 18, 22, 26 and 28) cadherins and protocadherins are expressed in tissue restricted manner. This expression study elucidates precise expression domains of cell adhesion molecules in the context of developing embryos. These expression domains provide spatio-temporal context in which the function of these genes can be further explored. PMID:24806091

  14. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27085002

  15. A PKA-Csk-pp60Src signaling pathway regulates the switch between endothelial cell invasion and cell-cell adhesion during vascular sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hui; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Avraamides, Christie J.; Stoletov, Konstantin; Klemke, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is controlled by signals that stimulate motility in endothelial cells at the tips of vascular sprouts while maintaining cell-cell adhesion in the stalks of angiogenic sprouts. We show here that Gs-linked G protein–coupled receptor activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in regulating the switch between endothelial cell adhesion and migration by activating C-terminal Src kinase, leading to inhibition of pp60Src. Activated PKA blocks pp60Src-dependent vascular endot helial-cadherin phosphorylation, thereby stimulating cell-cell adhesion while suppressing endothelial cell polarization, motility, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. Similar to the actions of Notch and Dll4, PKA activation blocks sprouting in newly forming embryonic blood vessels, while PKA inhibition promotes excessive sprouting in these vessels. These findings demonstrate that G protein–coupled receptors and PKA regulate vascular sprouting during angiogenesis by controlling endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion through their actions on pp60Src. PMID:20826718

  16. A PKA-Csk-pp60Src signaling pathway regulates the switch between endothelial cell invasion and cell-cell adhesion during vascular sprouting.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Avraamides, Christie J; Stoletov, Konstantin; Klemke, Richard L; Varner, Judith A

    2010-12-16

    Angiogenesis is controlled by signals that stimulate motility in endothelial cells at the tips of vascular sprouts while maintaining cell-cell adhesion in the stalks of angiogenic sprouts. We show here that Gs-linked G protein-coupled receptor activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in regulating the switch between endothelial cell adhesion and migration by activating C-terminal Src kinase, leading to inhibition of pp60Src. Activated PKA blocks pp60Src-dependent vascular endot helial-cadherin phosphorylation, thereby stimulating cell-cell adhesion while suppressing endothelial cell polarization, motility, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. Similar to the actions of Notch and Dll4, PKA activation blocks sprouting in newly forming embryonic blood vessels, while PKA inhibition promotes excessive sprouting in these vessels. These findings demonstrate that G protein-coupled receptors and PKA regulate vascular sprouting during angiogenesis by controlling endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion through their actions on pp60Src. PMID:20826718

  17. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  18. A dynamic cell adhesion surface regulates tissue architecture in growth plate cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M.; Conoan, Nicholas H.; Chen, Baojiang; Dudley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    The architecture and morphogenetic properties of tissues are founded in the tissue-specific regulation of cell behaviors. In endochondral bones, the growth plate cartilage promotes bone elongation via regulated chondrocyte maturation within an ordered, three-dimensional cell array. A key event in the process that generates this cell array is the transformation of disordered resting chondrocytes into clonal columns of discoid proliferative cells aligned with the primary growth vector. Previous analysis showed that column-forming chondrocytes display planar cell divisions, and the resulting daughter cells rearrange by ∼90° to align with the lengthening column. However, these previous studies provided limited information about the mechanisms underlying this dynamic process. Here we present new mechanistic insights generated by application of a novel time-lapse confocal microscopy method along with immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We show that, during cell division, daughter chondrocytes establish a cell-cell adhesion surface enriched in cadherins and β-catenin. Rearrangement into columns occurs concomitant with expansion of this adhesion surface in a process more similar to cell spreading than to migration. Column formation requires cell-cell adhesion, as reducing cadherin binding via chelation of extracellular calcium inhibits chondrocyte rearrangement. Importantly, physical indicators of cell polarity, such as cell body alignment, are not prerequisites for oriented cell behavior. Our results support a model in which regulation of adhesive surface dynamics and cortical tension by extrinsic signaling modifies the thermodynamic landscape to promote organization of daughter cells in the context of the three-dimensional growth plate tissue. PMID:24764078

  19. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  20. Nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin+ cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin+ cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin+ cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin+ stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin+ cells—but not in endothelial cells only— increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  1. Dopamine Increases CD14+CD16+ Monocyte Migration and Adhesion in the Context of Substance Abuse and HIV Neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coley, Jacqueline S.; Calderon, Tina M.; Gaskill, Peter J.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug abuse is a major comorbidity of HIV infection and cognitive disorders are often more severe in the drug abusing HIV infected population. CD14+CD16+ monocytes, a mature subpopulation of peripheral blood monocytes, are key mediators of HIV neuropathogenesis. Infected CD14+CD16+ monocyte transmigration across the blood brain barrier mediates HIV entry into the brain and establishes a viral reservoir within the CNS. Despite successful antiretroviral therapy, continued influx of CD14+CD16+ monocytes, both infected and uninfected, contributes to chronic neuroinflammation and the development of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Drug abuse increases extracellular dopamine in the CNS. Once in the brain, CD14+CD16+ monocytes can be exposed to extracellular dopamine due to drug abuse. The direct effects of dopamine on CD14+CD16+ monocytes and their contribution to HIV neuropathogenesis are not known. In this study, we showed that CD14+CD16+ monocytes express mRNA for all five dopamine receptors by qRT-PCR and D1R, D5R and D4R surface protein by flow cytometry. Dopamine and the D1-like dopamine receptor agonist, SKF38393, increased CD14+CD16+ monocyte migration that was characterized as chemokinesis. To determine whether dopamine affected cell motility and adhesion, live cell imaging was used to monitor the accumulation of CD14+CD16+ monocytes on the surface of a tissue culture dish. Dopamine increased the number and the rate at which CD14+CD16+ monocytes in suspension settled to the dish surface. In a spreading assay, dopamine increased the area of CD14+CD16+ monocytes during the early stages of cell adhesion. In addition, adhesion assays showed that the overall total number of adherent CD14+CD16+ monocytes increased in the presence of dopamine. These data suggest that elevated extracellular dopamine in the CNS of HIV infected drug abusers contributes to HIV neuropathogenesis by increasing the accumulation of CD14+CD16+ monocytes in dopamine rich brain

  2. SATB2 expression increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Jordan, Ashley; Kluz, Thomas; Shen, Steven; Sun, Hong; Cartularo, Laura A; Costa, Max

    2016-02-15

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a protein that binds to the nuclear matrix attachment region of the cell and regulates gene expression by altering chromatin structure. In our previous study, we reported that SATB2 gene expression was induced in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells transformed by arsenic, chromium, nickel and vanadium. In this study, we show that ectopic expression of SATB2 in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell-line BEAS-2B increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, meanwhile, shRNA-mediated knockdown of SATB2 significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth in Ni transformed BEAS-2B cells. RNA sequencing analyses of SATB2 regulated genes revealed the enrichment of those involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell-movement pathways. Our evidence supports the hypothesis that SATB2 plays an important role in BEAS-2B cell transformation. PMID:26780400

  3. Baicalein inhibits the migration and invasive properties of human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Teng, Chun-Yuh; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Huang, Hai-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Huang, Chih-Yang; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hwang, Jin-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Flavonoids have been demonstrated to exert health benefits in humans. We investigated whether the flavonoid baicalein would inhibit the adhesion, migration, invasion, and growth of human hepatoma cell lines, and we also investigated its mechanism of action. The separate effects of baicalein and baicalin on the viability of HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep1 cells were investigated for 24 h. To evaluate their invasive properties, cells were incubated on matrigel-coated transwell membranes in the presence or absence of baicalein. We examined the effect of baicalein on the adhesion of cells, on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), protein kinase C (PKC), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and on tumor growth in vivo. We observed that baicalein suppresses hepatoma cell growth by 55%, baicalein-treated cells showed lower levels of migration than untreated cells, and cell invasion was significantly reduced to 28%. Incubation of hepatoma cells with baicalein also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to matrigel, collagen I, and gelatin-coated substrate. Baicalein also decreased the gelatinolytic activities of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased phosphorylated I-kappa-B (IKB)-{beta}. In addition, baicalein reduced the phosphorylation levels of PKC{alpha} and p38 proteins, which regulate invasion in poorly differentiated hepatoma cells. Finally, when SK-Hep1 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of baicalein induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results demonstrate the anticancer properties of baicalein, which include the inhibition of adhesion, invasion, migration, and proliferation of human hepatoma cells in vivo. - Highlight: > Baicalein inhibits several essential steps in the onset of metastasis.

  4. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  5. Nuclear actin modulates cell motility via transcriptional regulation of adhesive and cytoskeletal genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharili, Amir S.; Kenny, Fiona N.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Connelly, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a classic biomechanical mediator of cell migration. While it is known that actin also shuttles in and out of the nucleus, its functions within this compartment remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how nuclear actin regulates keratinocyte gene expression and cell behavior. Gene expression profiling of normal HaCaT keratinocytes compared to HaCaTs over-expressing wild-type β-actin or β-actin tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-actin), identified multiple adhesive and cytoskeletal genes, such as MYL9, ITGB1, and VCL, which were significantly down-regulated in keratinocytes with high levels of nuclear actin. In addition, genes associated with transcriptional regulation and apoptosis were up-regulated in cells over expressing NLS-actin. Functionally, accumulation of actin in the nucleus altered cytoskeletal and focal adhesion organization and inhibited cell motility. Exclusion of endogenous actin from the nucleus by knocking down Importin 9 reversed this phenotype and enhanced cell migration. Based on these findings, we conclude that the level of actin in the nucleus is a transcriptional regulator for tuning keratinocyte migration. PMID:27650314

  6. Nuclear actin modulates cell motility via transcriptional regulation of adhesive and cytoskeletal genes.

    PubMed

    Sharili, Amir S; Kenny, Fiona N; Vartiainen, Maria K; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a classic biomechanical mediator of cell migration. While it is known that actin also shuttles in and out of the nucleus, its functions within this compartment remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how nuclear actin regulates keratinocyte gene expression and cell behavior. Gene expression profiling of normal HaCaT keratinocytes compared to HaCaTs over-expressing wild-type β-actin or β-actin tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-actin), identified multiple adhesive and cytoskeletal genes, such as MYL9, ITGB1, and VCL, which were significantly down-regulated in keratinocytes with high levels of nuclear actin. In addition, genes associated with transcriptional regulation and apoptosis were up-regulated in cells over expressing NLS-actin. Functionally, accumulation of actin in the nucleus altered cytoskeletal and focal adhesion organization and inhibited cell motility. Exclusion of endogenous actin from the nucleus by knocking down Importin 9 reversed this phenotype and enhanced cell migration. Based on these findings, we conclude that the level of actin in the nucleus is a transcriptional regulator for tuning keratinocyte migration. PMID:27650314

  7. Netrin-4 promotes mural cell adhesion and recruitment to endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Netrins are secreted molecules involved in axon guidance and angiogenesis. We previously showed that Netrin-4 acts as an anti-angiogenic factor by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of Netrin-4 on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) activity in vitro and in vivo. We show that exogenous Netrin-4 stimulated VSMC adhesion and migration, and increased their coverage on EC tubes (grown on a Matrigel substrate). siRNA knock-down of endogenous Netrin-4 expression in VSMC decreased their recruitment to EC tubes. VSMC expressed Netrin-4 and three of the six Netrin-1 cognate receptors: DCC, Neogenin, and Unc5B. Silencing of these receptors reduced Netrin-4 adhesion to VSMC, strongly suggesting that these receptors were involved in the recruitment process. We previously showed that Netrin-4 overexpression in PC3 cancer cells delayed tumor growth in a model of subcutaneous xenograft by reducing tumor vessel density. Here, we show that Netrin-4 overexpression improved tumor blood vessel structure and increased VSMC coverage. Thus, Netrin-4 induced mural cell recruitment may play a role in the inhibition of tumor growth. Our data suggest that Netrin-4 is important for blood vessel normalization through the regulation of both endothelial and perivascular cells. PMID:24472220

  8. Cell adhesion in zebrafish myogenesis: distribution of intermediate filaments, microfilaments, intracellular adhesion structures and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Costa, Manoel L; Escaleira, Roberta C; Jazenko, Fernanda; Mermelstein, Claudia S

    2008-10-01

    To overcome the limitations of in vitro studies, we have been studying myogenesis in situ in zebrafish embryos, at a sub-cellular level. While in previous works we focused on myofibrillogenesis and some aspects of adhesion structures, here we describe in more detail cell adhesion structures and interactions among cytoskeletal components, membrane and extracellular matrix during zebrafish muscle development. We studied the intermediate filaments, and we describe the full range of desmin distribution in zebrafish development, from perinuclear to striated, until its deposition around the intersomite septa of older somites. This adhesion structure, positive for desmin and actin, has not been previously observed in myogenesis in vitro. We also show that actin is initially located in the intersomite septum region whereas it is confined to the myofibrils later on. While actin localization changes during development, the adhesion complex proteins vinculin, paxillin, talin, dystrophin, laminin and fibronectin always appear exclusively at the intersomite septa, and appear to be co-distributed, even though the extracellular proteins accumulates before the intracellular ones. Contrary to the adhesion proteins, that are continuously distributed, desmin and sarcomeric actin form triangular aggregates among the septa and the cytoskeleton. We studied the cytoskeletal linker plectin as well, and we show that it has a distribution similar to desmin and not to actin. We conclude that the in situ adhesion structures differ from their in vitro counterparts, and that the actual zebrafish embryo myogenesis is quite different than that which occurs in in vitro systems.

  9. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  10. Gold Nanorods Indirectly Promote Migration of Metastatic Human Breast Cancer Cells in Three-Dimensional Cultures.

    PubMed

    Grzincic, Elissa M; Murphy, Catherine J

    2015-07-28

    Gold nanomaterials are intensively studied for applications in disease detection, diagnosis and therapeutics, and this has motivated considerable research to determine their interaction with biomolecules, cells and cell behaviors. However, few studies look at how nanomaterials alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-ECM interactions. Nanomaterials in the body would interact with the entire cellular environment, and it is imperative to account for this when studying the impact of nanomaterials on living systems. Furthermore, recent evidence finds that migration rates of cells in 2D can be affected by nanomaterials, and uptake of the nanomaterials is not necessary to exert an effect. In this study, three-dimensional nested type I collagen matrices were utilized as a model ECM to study how gold nanorods affect the migration of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Spontaneous cell migration through collagen containing gold nanorods was found to increase with increasing concentrations of gold nanorods, independent of intracellular uptake of the nanorods. Gold nanorods in the collagen matrix were found to alter collagen mechanical properties and structure, molecular diffusion, cellular adhesion, cell morphology, mode of migration and protease expression. Correlation between decreased cellular adhesion and rounded cell morphology and locomotion in nanorod-containing collagen suggests the induction of an amoeboid-like migratory phenotype.

  11. Matricellular protein Cyr61 bridges lysophosphatidic acid and integrin pathways leading to cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daniel Dongwei; Zhang, Fuqiang; Hao, Feng; Chun, Jerold; Xu, Xuemin; Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2014-02-28

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a potent bioactive lipid found in atherosclerotic lesions, markedly induces smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration, which is an important process in atherogenesis. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of LPA-induced SMC migration is important. Several microarray databases suggest that the matricellular protein Cyr61 is highly induced by LPA. We hypothesized that Cyr61 mediates LPA-induced cell migration. Our data show that LPA induced temporal and spatial expression of Cyr61, which promptly accumulated in the cellular Golgi apparatus and then translocated to the extracellular matrix. Cyr61 antibody blockade and siRNA inhibition both diminished LPA-induced SMC migration, indicating a novel regulatory role of Cyr61. SMCs derived from LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) knock-out mice lack the ability of Cyr61 induction and cell migration, supporting the concept that LPA1 is required for Cyr61 expression and migration. By contrast, PPARγ was not found to be involved in LPA-mediated effects. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase important for regulating cell migration, was activated by LPA at a late time frame coinciding with Cyr61 accumulation. Interestingly, knockdown of Cyr61 blocked LPA-induced FAK activation, indicating that an LPA-Cyr61-FAK axis leads to SMC migration. Our results further demonstrate that plasma membrane integrins α6β1 and ανβ3 transduced the LPA-Cyr61 signal toward FAK activation and migration. Taken together, these data reveal that de novo Cyr61 in the extracellular matrix bridges LPA and integrin pathways, which in turn, activate FAK, leading to cell migration. The current study provides new insights into mechanisms underlying cell migration-related disorders, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and cancers.

  12. Cell adhesion molecules and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Simopoulou, Maria; Nikolopoulou, Elena; Dimakakos, Andreas; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses issues regarding the need in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) field for further predictive markers enhancing the standing embryo selection criteria. It aims to serve as a source of defining information for an audience interested in factors related to the wide range of multiple roles played by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in several aspects of IVF ultimately associated with the success of an IVF cycle. We begin by stressing the importance of enriching the standing embryo selection criteria available aiming for the golden standard: "extract as much information as possible focusing on non-invasive techniques" so as to guide us towards selecting the embryo with the highest implantation potential. We briefly describe the latest trends on how to best select the right embryo, moving closer towards elective single embryo transfer. These trends are: frozen embryo transfer for all, preimplantation genetic screening, non-invasive selection criteria, and time-lapse imaging. The main part of this review is dedicated to categorizing and presenting published research studies focused on the involvement of CAMs in IVF and its final outcome. Specifically, we discuss the association of CAMs with conditions and complications that arise from performing assisted reproductive techniques, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the state of the endometrium, and tubal pregnancies, as well as the levels of CAMs in biological materials available in the IVF laboratory such as follicular fluid, trophectoderm, ovarian granulosa cells, oocytes, and embryos. To conclude, since CAMs have been successfully employed as a diagnostic tool in several pathologies in routine clinical work, we suggest that their multi-faceted nature could serve as a prognostic marker in assisted reproduction, aiming to enrich the list of non-invasive selection and predictive criteria in the IVF setting. We propose that in light of the well-documented involvement of CAMs in the developmental

  13. Quantifying Cell Adhesion through Impingement of a Controlled Microjet

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claas Willem; Gielen, Marise V.; Hao, Zhenxia; Le Gac, Séverine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and routine use. In this work, we both model and measure the shear stress exerted by the jet on the impingement surface in the micrometer-domain, and subsequently correlate this to jet-induced cell detachment. The measured and numerically calculated shear stress data are in good agreement with each other, and with previously published values. Real-time monitoring of the cell detachment reveals the creation of a circular cell-free area upon jet impingement, with two successive detachment regimes: 1), a dynamic regime, during which the cell-free area grows as a function of both the maximum shear stress exerted by the jet and the jet diameter; followed by 2), a stationary regime, with no further evolution of the cell-free area. For the latter regime, which is relevant for cell adhesion strength assessment, a relationship between the jet Reynolds number, the cell-free area, and the cell adhesion strength is proposed. To illustrate the capability of the technique, the adhesion strength of HeLa cervical cancer cells is determined ((34 ± 14) N/m2). Real-time visualization of cell detachment in the dynamic regime shows that cells detach either cell-by-cell or by collectively (for which intact parts of the monolayer detach as cell sheets). This process is dictated by the cell monolayer density, with a typical threshold of (1.8 ± 0.2) × 109 cells/m2, above which the collective behavior is mostly observed. The jet impingement method presents great promises for the field of tissue engineering, as the influence of both the shear stress and the surface characteristics on cell adhesion can be systematically studied. PMID:25564849

  14. Celecoxib exhibits an anti-gastric cancer effect by targeting focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guo-Hua; Xu, Wei; Shi, Yang; Wang, Li-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a prevalent cancer, which remains incurable, and therefore requires an alternative treatment method. Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that targets cyclooxygenase-2, and exhibits anticancer effects. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-GC mechanism of celecoxib using bioinformatics methods. Gene expression datasets GSE56807 (GC tissues and normal gastric tissues) and GSE54657 (celecoxib-treated and non-treated human GC epithelial AGS cells) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Two groups of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using limma package in R language. The criterion for GSE56807 was a false discovery rate of <0.05, while that for GSE54657 was P<0.01. Overlapping DEGs from the two datasets were screened out. Subsequently, pathway enrichment analysis was performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software (P<0.1; gene count ≥2). In addition, the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) among the overlapped DEGs were obtained based on IntAct, Database of Interacting Proteins, Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and Human Protein Reference Database. Finally, a PPI network was visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 137 overlapped DEGs were obtained, and DEGs with opposite regulation directions in the two datasets were significantly enriched in focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration. Subsequently, a PPI network of overlapped DEGs was constructed. Comprehensively, a total of 8 key DEGs [cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), myosin light chain 9 (MYL9), filamin A (FLNA), actinin alpha 1 (ACTN1), vinculin (VCL), laminin subunit gamma 2 (LAMC2) and claudin 1 (CLDN1)] were upregulated in GC tissues and downregulated in celecoxib-treated cells. In conclusion, celecoxib may exhibit anti-GC effects by suppressing the expression of CSRP1, THBS1, MYL9, FLNA, ACTN1, VCL, LAMC2 and CLDN1

  15. Celecoxib exhibits an anti-gastric cancer effect by targeting focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guo-Hua; Xu, Wei; Shi, Yang; Wang, Li-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a prevalent cancer, which remains incurable, and therefore requires an alternative treatment method. Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that targets cyclooxygenase-2, and exhibits anticancer effects. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-GC mechanism of celecoxib using bioinformatics methods. Gene expression datasets GSE56807 (GC tissues and normal gastric tissues) and GSE54657 (celecoxib-treated and non-treated human GC epithelial AGS cells) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Two groups of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using limma package in R language. The criterion for GSE56807 was a false discovery rate of <0.05, while that for GSE54657 was P<0.01. Overlapping DEGs from the two datasets were screened out. Subsequently, pathway enrichment analysis was performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software (P<0.1; gene count ≥2). In addition, the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) among the overlapped DEGs were obtained based on IntAct, Database of Interacting Proteins, Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and Human Protein Reference Database. Finally, a PPI network was visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 137 overlapped DEGs were obtained, and DEGs with opposite regulation directions in the two datasets were significantly enriched in focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration. Subsequently, a PPI network of overlapped DEGs was constructed. Comprehensively, a total of 8 key DEGs [cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), myosin light chain 9 (MYL9), filamin A (FLNA), actinin alpha 1 (ACTN1), vinculin (VCL), laminin subunit gamma 2 (LAMC2) and claudin 1 (CLDN1)] were upregulated in GC tissues and downregulated in celecoxib-treated cells. In conclusion, celecoxib may exhibit anti-GC effects by suppressing the expression of CSRP1, THBS1, MYL9, FLNA, ACTN1, VCL, LAMC2 and CLDN1

  16. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  17. Adhesion of phospholipid vesicles to Chinese hamster fibroblasts: Role of cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, RE; Takeichi, M

    1977-01-01

    The adhesion of artificially generated lipid membrane vesicles to Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts in suspension was used as a model system for studying membrane interactions. Below their gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, vesicles comprised of dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL) or dimyristoyl lecithin (DML) absorbed to the surfaces of EDTA- dissociated cells. These adherent vesicles could not be removed by repeated washings of the treated cells but could be released into the medium by treatment with trypsin. EM autoradiographic studies of cells treated with[(3)H]DML or [(3)H]DPL vesicles showed that most of the radioactive lipids were confined to the cell periphery. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy further confirmed the presence of adherent vesicles at the cell surface. Adhesion of DML or DPL vesicles to EDTA-dissociated cells modified the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination pattern of the cell surface proteins; the inhibition of labeling of two proteins with an approximately 60,000- dalton mol wt was particularly evident. Incubation of cells wit h (3)H-lipid vesicles followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that some of the (3)H-lipid migrated preferentially with these approximately 60,000-mol wt proteins. Studies of the temperature dependence of vesicle uptake and subsequent release by trypsin showed that DML or DPL vesicle adhesion to EDTA- dissociated cells increased with decreasing temperatures. In contrast, cells trypsinized before incubation with vesicles showed practically no temperature dependence of vesicle uptake. These results suggest two pathways for adhesion of lipid vesicles to the cell surface-a temperature-sensitive one involving cell surface proteins, and a temperature-independent one. These findings are discussed in terms of current models for cell-cell interactions. PMID:407233

  18. Soluble cell adhesion molecules in hypertriglyceridemia and potential significance on monocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; El-Masri, B; Kimball, K T; Pownall, H; Reilly, C F; Osmundsen, K; Smith, C W; Ballantyne, C M

    1998-05-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis by increasing expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Although the cellular expression of CAMs is difficult to assess clinically, soluble forms of CAMs (sCAMs) are present in the circulation and may serve as markers for CAMs. In this study, we examined the association between sCAMs and other risk factors occurring with hypertriglyceridemia, the effect of triglyceride reduction on sCAM levels, and the role of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in monocyte adhesion in vitro. Compared with normal control subjects (n=20), patients with hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL (n=39) had significantly increased levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) (316+/-28.8 versus 225+/-16.6 ng/mL), sVCAM-1 (743+/-52.2 versus 522+/-43.6 ng/mL), and soluble E-selectin (83+/-5.9 versus 49+/-3.6 ng/mL). ANCOVA showed that the higher sCAM levels in patients occurred independently of diabetes mellitus and other risk factors. In 27 patients who received purified n-3 fatty acid (Omacor) 4 g/d for > or =7 months, triglyceride level was reduced by 47+/-4.6%, sICAM-1 level was reduced by 9+/-3.4% (P=.02), and soluble E-selectin level was reduced by 16+/-3.2% (P<.0001), with the greatest reduction in diabetic patients. These results support previous in vitro data showing that disorders in triglyceride and HDL metabolism influence CAM expression and treatment with fish oils may alter vascular cell activation. In a parallel-plate flow chamber, recombinant sVCAM-1 at the concentration seen in patients significantly inhibited adhesion of monocytes to interleukin-1-stimulated cultured endothelial cells under conditions of flow by 27.5+/-7.2%. Thus, elevated sCAMs may negatively regulate monocyte adhesion.

  19. Inhibition of cell adhesion by high molecular weight kininogen

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    An anti-cell adhesion globulin was purified from human plasma by heparin-affinity chromatography. The purified globulin inhibited spreading of osteosarcoma and melanoma cells on vitronectin, and of endothelial cells, platelets, and mononuclear blood cells on vitronectin or fibrinogen. It did not inhibit cell spreading on fibronectin. The protein had the strongest antiadhesive effect when preadsorbed onto the otherwise adhesive surfaces. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the globulin is cleaved (kinin-free) high molecular weight kininogen (HKa). Globulin fractions from normal plasma immunodepleted of high molecular weight kininogen (HK) or from an individual deficient of HK lacked adhesive activity. Uncleaved single- chain HK preadsorbed at neutral pH, HKa preadsorbed at pH greater than 8.0, and HKa degraded further to release its histidine-rich domain had little anti-adhesive activity. These results indicate that the cationic histidine-rich domain is critical for anti-adhesive activity and is somehow mobilized upon cleavage. Vitronectin was not displaced from the surface by HKa. Thus, cleavage of HK by kallikrein results in both release of bradykinin, a potent vasoactive and growth-promoting peptide, and formation of a potent anti-adhesive protein. PMID:1370494

  20. Twist1-positive epithelial cells retain adhesive and proliferative capacity throughout dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Coutinho, Kester; Georgess, Dan; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dissemination is the process by which cells detach and migrate away from a multicellular tissue. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) conceptualizes dissemination in a stepwise fashion, with downregulation of E-cadherin leading to loss of intercellular junctions, induction of motility, and then escape from the epithelium. This gain of migratory activity is proposed to be mutually exclusive with proliferation. We previously developed a dissemination assay based on inducible expression of the transcription factor Twist1 and here utilize it to characterize the timing and dynamics of intercellular adhesion, proliferation and migration during dissemination. Surprisingly, Twist1+ epithelium displayed extensive intercellular junctions, and Twist1– luminal epithelial cells could still adhere to disseminating Twist1+ cells. Although proteolysis and proliferation were both observed throughout dissemination, neither was absolutely required. Finally, Twist1+ cells exhibited a hybrid migration mode; their morphology and nuclear deformation were characteristic of amoeboid cells, whereas their dynamic protrusive activity, pericellular proteolysis and migration speeds were more typical of mesenchymal cells. Our data reveal that epithelial cells can disseminate while retaining competence to adhere and proliferate. PMID:27402962

  1. An artificial blood vessel implanted three-dimensional microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Pei, Ying; Xie, Min; Jin, Zi-He; Xiao, Ya-Shi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Yan; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2015-02-21

    Reproducing a tumor microenvironment consisting of blood vessels and tumor cells for modeling tumor invasion in vitro is particularly challenging. Here, we report an artificial blood vessel implanted 3D microfluidic system for reproducing transvascular migration of tumor cells. The transparent, porous and elastic artificial blood vessels are obtained by constructing polysaccharide cellulose-based microtubes using a chitosan sacrificial template, and possess excellent cytocompatibility, permeability, and mechanical characteristics. The artificial blood vessels are then fully implanted into the collagen matrix to reconstruct the 3D microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells. Well-defined simulated vascular lumens were obtained by proliferation of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) lining the artificial blood vessels, which enables us to reproduce structures and functions of blood vessels and replicate various hemodynamic parameters. Based on this model, the adhesion and transvascular migration of tumor cells across the artificial blood vessel have been well reproduced.

  2. Crystal violet staining to quantify Candida adhesion to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Negri, M; Gonçalves, V; Silva, S; Henriques, M; Azeredo, J; Oliveira, R

    2010-01-01

    In vitro studies of adhesion capability are essential to characterise the virulence of Candida species. However, the assessment of adhesion by traditional methods is time-consuming. The aim of the present study is the development of a simple methodology using crystal violet staining to quantify in vitro adhesion of different Candida species to epithelial cells. The experiments are performed using Candida albicans (ATCC 90028), C. glabrata (ATCC 2001), C. parapsilosis (ATCC 22019) and C. tropicalis (ATCC 750). A human urinary bladder epithelial cell line (TCC-SUP) is used. Yeast and epithelial cells were stained with crystal violet, epithelial cells were then destained using intermediate washing, and the dye in the yeast cells was extracted with acetic acid. The method was validated for the different Candida reference species by comparison with traditional microscope observation and enumeration. The method was then used to assess Candida adhesion to epithelial cells and also to silicone. For all Candida spp. high correlation values (r2= 0.9724-0.9997) between the number of adherent yeasts (microscope enumeration) and absorbance values were obtained for an inoculum concentration >10(6) cells/mL. The proposed technique was easy to perform and reproducible, enabling the determination of adhesion ability of Candida species to an epithelial cell line. PMID:20973406

  3. Expression of mutant amyloid precursor proteins decreases adhesion and delays differentiation of Hep-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kusiak, J W; Lee, L L; Zhao, B

    2001-03-30

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I integral membrane protein and is processed to generate several intra-cellular and secreted fragments. The physiological role of APP and its processed fragments is unclear. Several mutations have been discovered in APP, which are causative of early-onset, familial, neurological disease, including Alzheimer's disease (FAD). These mutations alter the processing of APP and lead to excess production and extra-cellular deposition of A-beta peptide (Abeta). We have examined the role of APP in a cell culture model of endothelial cell function. The endothelial cell line, Hep-1, was stably transfected with wild-type (wt) and FAD mutant forms of APP (mAPP). Secretion of sAPPalpha was reduced in cell lines over-expressing mAPP when these cells were grown on several different substrates. Levels of secreted Abeta were increased as measured by ELISA in the mutant cell lines. Cell adhesion to laminin-, fibronectin-, collagen I-, and collagen IV-coated culture flasks was reduced in all mAPP-expressing cell lines, while in lines over-expressing wt-APP, adhesiveness was slightly increased. Cell lines over-expressing mAPP differentiated more slowly into capillary network-like structures on Matrigel than those expressing wt-APP. No differences were detected among all cell lines in a migration/invasion assay. The results suggest that APP may have a role in cell adhesiveness and maturation of endothelial cells into capillary-like networks. The reduction in adhesion and differentiation in mutant cell lines may be due to reduced amounts of sAPPalpha released into the culture media or toxic effects of increased extracellular Abeta.

  4. A modified method by differential adhesion for enrichment of bladder cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-tong; Pang, Shi-yu; Luo, Yang; Chen, Wei; Bao, Ji-ming; Tan, Wan-long

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In a previous study the vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in a mouse model. However, a small portion of tumors regrew because the vaccine could not eliminate bladder cancer stem cells (CSCs). In this study, we showed a modified method for the isolation of bladder CSCs using a combination of differential adhesion method and serum-free culture medium (SFM) method. Materials and Methods: Trypsin-resistant cells and trypsin-sensitive cells were isolated from MB49, EJ and 5637 cells by a combination of differential adhesion method and SFM method. The CSCs characterizations of trypsin-resistant cells were verified by the flow cytometry, the western blotting, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the resistance to chemotherapy assay, the transwell assay, and the tumor xenograft formation assay. Results: Trypsin-resistant cells were isolated and identified in CSCs characters, with high expression of CSCs markers, higher resistance to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenicity in vivo. Conclusion: Trypsin-resistant cells displayed specific CSCs properties. Our study showed trypsin-resistant cells were isolated successfully with a modified method using a combination of differential adhesion method and SFM method. PMID:27564296

  5. Endothelial cell cytosolic free calcium regulates neutrophil migration across monolayers of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) traverse an endothelial cell (EC) barrier by crawling between neighboring EC. Whether EC regulate the integrity of their intercellular adhesive and junctional contacts in response to chemotaxing PMN is unresolved. EC respond to the binding of soluble mediators such as histamine by increasing their cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca++]i) (Rotrosen, D., and J.I. Gallin. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:2379-2387) and undergoing shape changes (Majno, G., S. M. Shea, and M. Leventhal. 1969. J. Cell Biol. 42:617-672). Substances such as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and thrombin, which increased the permeability of EC monolayers to ions, as measured by the electrical resistance of the monolayers, transiently increased EC [Ca++]i. To determine whether chemotaxing PMN cause similar changes in EC [Ca++]i, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) maintained as monolayers were loaded with fura-2. [Ca++]i was measured in single EC during PMN adhesion to and migration across these monolayers. PMN-EC adhesion and transendothelial PMN migration in response to formyl- methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) as well as to interleukin 1 (IL- 1) treated EC induced a transient increase in EC [Ca++]i which temporally corresponded with the time course of PMN-EC interactions. When EC [Ca++]i was clamped at resting levels with a cell permeant calcium buffer, PMN migration across EC monolayers and PMN induced changes in EC monolayer permeability were inhibited. However, clamping of EC [Ca++]i did not inhibit PMN-EC adhesion. These studies provide evidence that EC respond to stimulated PMN by increasing their [Ca++]i and that this increase in [Ca++]i causes an increase in EC monolayer permeability. Such [Ca++]i increases are required for PMN transit across an EC barrier. We suggest EC [Ca++]i regulates transendothelial migration of PMN by participating in a signal cascade which stimulates EC to open their intercellular junctions to allow transendothelial

  6. Modulation of cell spreading and migration by pp125FAK phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S.; Mahooti-Brooks, N.; Hu, G.; Madri, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide evidence for both matrix-dependent and pp60v-src tyrosine kinase-dependent modulation of cell migration via tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK, a focal adhesion kinase, thought to be involved in integrin-mediated signaling. Enhanced pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and cell spreading was associated with decreased migration. Cells plated on type I collagen were less spread and exhibited lower levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and faster migration rates compared with cells on fibronectin that were well spread, which exhibited enhanced levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and slower migration rates. Inside-out signaling via expression of pp60v-src or its kinase-negative mutant caused a decrease in cell migration by changing the extent of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation to above or below the levels obtained with control cells plated on fibronectin. Hence, pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation appears to play a role in the signaling cascade pathway involved in regulation of extracellular matrix-modulated, integrin-mediated cell migration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7677174

  7. Taking Aim at Moving Targets in Computational Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Masuzzo, Paola; Van Troys, Marleen; Ampe, Christophe; Martens, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Fundamental understanding of cell migration can, for example, direct novel therapeutic strategies to control invasive tumor cells. However, the study of cell migration yields an overabundance of experimental data that require demanding processing and analysis for results extraction. Computational methods and tools have therefore become essential in the quantification and modeling of cell migration data. We review computational approaches for the key tasks in the quantification of in vitro cell migration: image pre-processing, motion estimation and feature extraction. Moreover, we summarize the current state-of-the-art for in silico modeling of cell migration. Finally, we provide a list of available software tools for cell migration to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate solution for their needs.

  8. PBRM1 Regulates the Expression of Genes Involved in Metabolism and Cell Adhesion in Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Porter, Elizabeth G.; Stewart, Jane C.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Dykhuizen, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) is a component of the PBAF (Polybromo-associated-BRG1- or BRM-associated factors) chromatin remodeling complex and is the second most frequently mutated gene in clear-cell renal cell Carcinoma (ccRCC). Mutation of PBRM1 is believed to be an early event in carcinogenesis, however its function as a tumor suppressor is not understood. In this study, we have employed Next Generation Sequencing to profile the differentially expressed genes upon PBRM1 re-expression in a cellular model of ccRCC. PBRM1 re-expression led to upregulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, apoptotic process and response to hypoxia, and a downregulation of genes involved in different stages of cell division. The decrease in cellular proliferation upon PBRM1 re-expression was confirmed, validating the functional role of PBRM1 as a tumor suppressor in a cell-based model. In addition, we identified a role for PBRM1 in regulating metabolic pathways known to be important for driving ccRCC, including the regulation of hypoxia response genes, PI3K signaling, glucose uptake, and cholesterol homeostasis. Of particular novelty is the identification of cell adhesion as a major downstream process uniquely regulated by PBRM1 expression. Cytoskeletal reorganization was induced upon PBRM1 reexpression as evidenced from the increase in the number of cells displaying cortical actin, a hallmark of epithelial cells. Genes involved in cell adhesion featured prominently in our transcriptional dataset and overlapped with genes uniquely regulated by PBRM1 in clinical specimens of ccRCC. Genes involved in cell adhesion serve as tumor suppressor and maybe involved in inhibiting cell migration. Here we report for the first time genes linked to cell adhesion serve as downstream targets of PBRM1, and hope to lay the foundation of future studies focusing on the role of chromatin remodelers in bringing about these alterations during malignancies. PMID:27100670

  9. Dynamic contact guidance of migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Fourkas, John

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effects of nanotopographical surfaces on the cell migration and cell shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Amoeboid motion exhibits significant contact guidance along surfaces with nanoscale ridges or grooves. We show quantitatively that nanoridges spaced 1.5 μm apart exhibit the greatest contact guidance efficiency. Using principal component analysis, we characterize the dynamics of the cell shape modulated by the coupling between the cell membrane and ridges. We show that motion parallel to the ridges is enhanced, while the turning, at the largest spatial scales, is suppressed. Since protrusion dynamics are principally governed by actin dynamics, we imaged the actin polymerization of cells on ridges. We found that actin polymerization occurs preferentially along nanoridges in a ``monorail'' like fashion. The ridges then provide us with a tool to study actin dynamics in an effectively reduced dimensional system.

  10. Role of Cortactin Homolog HS1 in Transendothelial Migration of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Suranjana; Kim, Joanna; Mooren, Olivia L.; Shahan, Stefanie T.; Cohan, Megan; Cooper, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells perform many functions that depend on actin assembly, including adhesion, chemotaxis, lytic synapse assembly and cytolysis. HS1, the hematopoietic homolog of cortactin, binds to Arp2/3 complex and promotes actin assembly by helping to form and stabilize actin filament branches. We investigated the role of HS1 in transendothelial migration (TEM) by NK cells. Depletion of HS1 led to a decrease in the efficiency of TEM by NK cells, as measured by transwell assays with endothelial cell monolayers on porous filters. Transwell assays involve chemotaxis of NK cells across the filter, so to examine TEM more specifically, we imaged live-cell preparations and antibody-stained fixed preparations, with and without the chemoattractant SDF-1α. We found small to moderate effects of HS1 depletion on TEM, including whether the NK cells migrated via the transcellular or paracellular route. Expression of HS1 mutants indicated that phosphorylation of HS1 tyrosines at positions 222, 378 and 397 was required for rescue in the transwell assay, but HS1 mutations affecting interaction with Arp2/3 complex or SH3-domain ligands had no effect. The GEF Vav1, a ligand of HS1 phosphotyrosine, influenced NK cell transendothelial migration. HS1 and Vav1 also affected the speed of NK cells migrating across the surface of the endothelium. We conclude that HS1 has a role in transendothelial migration of NK cells and that HS1 tyrosine phosphorylation may signal through Vav1. PMID:25723543

  11. Non-Cell-Adhesive Substrates for Printing of Arrayed Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Eric A.; Larson, Benjamin L.; Luly, Kathryn M.; Kim, Jinseong D.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular microarrays have become extremely useful in expediting the investigation of large libraries of (bio)materials for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. We have developed an exceedingly simple strategy for the fabrication of non-cell-adhesive substrates supporting the immobilization of diverse (bio)material features, including both monomeric and polymeric adhesion molecules (e.g. RGD and polylysine), hydrogels, and polymers. PMID:25430948

  12. Dynamic interplay between adhesion surfaces in carcinomas: Cell-cell and cell-matrix crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Yvonne E; Vellanki, Sri HariKrishna; Hopkins, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and communication between adhesion sites involve mechanisms which are required for cellular functions during normal development and homeostasis; however these cellular functions and mechanisms are often deregulated in cancer. Aberrant signaling at cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites often involves downstream mediators including Rho GTPases and tyrosine kinases. This review discusses these molecules as putative mediators of cellular crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to their attractiveness as therapeutic targets in cancer. Interestingly, inter-junctional crosstalk mechanisms are frequently typified by the way in which bacterial and viral pathogens opportunistically infect or intoxicate mammalian cells. This review therefore also discusses the concept of learning from pathogen-host interaction studies to better understand coordinated communication between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to highlighting the potential therapeutic usefulness of exploiting pathogens or their products to tap into inter-junctional crosstalk. Taken together, we feel that increased knowledge around mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion site crosstalk and consequently a greater understanding of their therapeutic targeting offers a unique opportunity to contribute to the emerging molecular revolution in cancer biology. PMID:26981196

  13. Micropatterned surfaces for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under flow.

    PubMed

    Nalayanda, Divya D; Kalukanimuttam, Mahendran; Schmidtke, David W

    2007-04-01

    Cell adhesion and rolling on the vascular wall is critical to both inflammation and thrombosis. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of using microfluidic patterning for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under physiological flow conditions. By controlling the width of the lines (50-1000 microm) and the spacing between them (50-100 microm) we were able to fabricate surfaces with well-defined patterns of adhesion molecules. We demonstrate the versatility of this technique by patterning surfaces with 3 different adhesion molecules (P-selectin, E-selectin, and von Willebrand Factor) and controlling the adhesion and rolling of three different cell types (neutrophils, Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and platelets). By varying the concentration of the incubating solution we could control the surface ligand density and hence the cell rolling velocity. Finally by patterning surfaces with both P-selectin and von Willebrand Factor we could control the rolling of both leukocytes and platelets simultaneously. The technique described in this paper provides and effective and inexpensive way to fabricate patterned surfaces for use in cell rolling assays under physiologic flow conditions. PMID:17160704

  14. Rsu1 contributes to regulation of cell adhesion and spreading by PINCH1-dependent and - independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Nieves, Reyda; Desantis, Akiko Iwahari; Cutler, Mary L

    2013-12-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are complex processes that require integrin activation, the formation and dissolution of focal adhesion (FAs), and linkage of actin cytoskeleton to the FAs. The IPP (ILK, PINCH, Parvin) complex regulates FA formation via binding of the adaptor protein ILK to β1 integrin, PINCH and parvin. The signaling protein Rsu1 is linked to the complex via binding PINCH1. The role of Rsu1 and PINCH1 in adhesion and migration was examined in non-transformed mammary epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that the depletion of either Rsu1 or PINCH1 by siRNA in MCF10A cells decreased the number of focal adhesions and altered the distribution and localization of β1 integrin, vinculin, talin and paxillin without affecting the levels of FA protein expression. This correlated with reduced adhesion, failure to spread or migrate in response to EGF and a loss of actin stress fibers and caveolae. In addition, constitutive phosphorylation of actin regulatory proteins occurred in the absence of PINCH1. The depletion of Rsu1 caused significant reduction in PINCH1 implying that Rsu1 may function by regulating levels of PINCH1. However, while both Rsu1- or PINCH1-depleted cells retained the ability to activate adhesion signaling in response to EGF stimulation, only Rsu1 was required for EGF-induced p38 Map Kinase phosphorylation and ATF2 activation, suggesting an Rsu1 function independent from the IPP complex. Reconstitution of Rsu1-depleted cells with an Rsu1 mutant that does not bind to PINCH1 failed to restore FAs or migration but did promote spreading and constitutive p38 activation. These data show that Rsu1-PINCH1 association with ILK and the IPP complex is required for regulation of adhesion and migration but that Rsu1 has a critical role in linking integrin-induced adhesion to activation of p38 Map kinase signaling and cell spreading. Moreover, it suggests that Rsu1 may regulate p38 signaling from the IPP complex affecting other functions including

  15. Mechanisms of lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells: studies using a LFA-1-deficient cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Haskard, D O; Strobel, S; Thornhill, M; Pitzalis, C; Levinsky, R J

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells (EC), we have studied the adhesion of a LFA-1-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line, ICH-KM, which has < 10% of the cell surface LFA-1 expressed on a normal lymphoblastoid cell line, ICH-BJ. The adhesion of ICH-KM cells to unstimulated EC was 49.9 +/- 8.6% (mean +/- SD) that of ICH-BJ cells. Moreover, phorbol ester-stimulated ICH-KM cells showed a considerably weaker increase in adhesion to unstimulated EC compared with ICH-BJ cells (mean +/- SD increase in percentage adhesion, 3.8 +/- 2.3 compared with 18.5 +/- 8.0; P<0.025). In contrast, there was no significant difference between the enhanced adhesion of ICH-KM cells and ICH-BJ cells to interleukin-1 (IL-1)-stimulated EC. Thus ICH-KM cells showed a 22.7 +/- 11.0 (mean +/- SD) increase in percentage adhesion to IL-1-stimulated EC compared with the 24.8 +/- 8.5 increase in percentage adhesion of ICH-BJ cells. Anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies had no effect on the enhanced adhesion of ICH-KM and ICH-BJ cells to IL-1-stimulated EC but abolished the differences in adhesion between the two cell lines. The study therefore indicates that although a major part of unstimulated and phorbol ester-stimulated lymphocyte-EC adhesion is dependent upon LFA-1, the enhanced adhesion due to stimulation of EC with IL-1 is not dependent upon this molecule. The data therefore supports the existence of cytokine-inducible LFA-1-independent adhesion molecules for lymphocytes on EC. PMID:15493272

  16. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  17. CD44-related chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a cell surface receptor implicated with tumor cell invasion, mediates endothelial cell migration on fibrinogen and invasion into a fibrin matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Henke, C A; Roongta, U; Mickelson, D J; Knutson, J R; McCarthy, J B

    1996-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cell invasion into the fibrin provisional matrix is an integral component of angiogenesis during wound repair. Cell surface receptors which interact with extracellular matrix proteins participate in cell migration and invasion. Malignant cells use CD44-related chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) as a matrix receptor to mediate migration and invasion. In this study, we examine whether cell surface CSPG can mediate similar events in nonmalignant wound microvascular endothelial cells or whether use of CSPG for migration and invasion is a property largely restricted to malignant cells. After inhibiting CSPG synthesis with p-nitrophenyl beta-d xylopyranoside (beta-d xyloside), wound microvascular endothelial cells were capable of attaching and spreading on the surface of a fibrin gel; however, their ability to invade the fibrin matrix was virtually eliminated. To begin to examine the mechanism by which endothelial cells use CSPG to invade fibrin matrices, cell adhesion and migration on fibrinogen was examined. Endothelial cell adhesion and migration on fibrinogen were inhibited by both beta-d xyloside and after cleavage of chondroitin sulfate from the core protein by chondroitinase ABC. We have determined that wound microvascular endothelial cells express the majority of their proteoglycan as CSPG and that the CSPG core protein is immunologically related to CD44. PCR studies show that these cells express both the "standard" (CD44H) isoform and an isoform containing the variably spliced exon V3. In addition, anti-CD44 antibody blocks endothelial cell migration on fibrinogen. Affinity chromatography studies reveal that partially purified microvascular endothelial cell CSPG binds fibrinogen. These findings suggest that CD44-related CSPG, a molecule implicated in the invasive behavior of tumor cells, is capable of binding fibrinogen/fibrin, thereby mediating endothelial cell migration and invasion into the fibrin provisional matrix during wound

  18. Effect of surface chemistry on the integrin induced pathway in regulating vascular endothelial cells migration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gao, Min; Ma, Yunlong; Yu, Hongchi; Cui, Fu-zhai; Gregersen, Hans; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2015-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for reendothelialization after implantation of cardiovascular biomaterials. Reendothelialization is largely determined by surface properties of implants. In this study, surfaces modified with various chemical functional groups (CH3, NH2, COOH, OH) prepared by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as model system. Expressions and distributions of critical proteins in the integrin-induced signaling pathway were examined to explore the mechanisms of surface chemistry regulating EC migration. The results showed that SAMs modulated cell migration were in the order CH3>NH2>OH>COOH, determined by differences in the expressions of focal adhesion components and Rho GTPases. Multiple integrin subunits showed difference in a surface chemistry-dependent manner, which induced a stepwise activation of signaling cascades associated with EC migration. This work provides a broad overview of surface chemistry regulated endothelial cell migration and establishes association among the surface chemistry, cell migration behavior and associated integrin signaling events. Understanding the relationship between these factors will help us to understand the surface/interface behavior between biomaterials and cells, reveal molecular mechanism of cells sensing surface characterization, and guide surface modification of cardiovascular implanted materials. PMID:25575348

  19. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016.

  20. Cell Adhesion Molecules and Ubiquitination—Functions and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Homrich, Mirka; Gotthard, Ingo; Wobst, Hilke; Diestel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily represent the biggest group of cell adhesion molecules. They have been analyzed since approximately 40 years ago and most of them have been shown to play a role in tumor progression and in the nervous system. All members of the Ig superfamily are intensively posttranslationally modified. However, many aspects of their cellular functions are not yet known. Since a few years ago it is known that some of the Ig superfamily members are modified by ubiquitin. Ubiquitination has classically been described as a proteasomal degradation signal but during the last years it became obvious that it can regulate many other processes including internalization of cell surface molecules and lysosomal sorting. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the ubiquitination of cell adhesion molecules of the Ig superfamily and to discuss its potential physiological roles in tumorigenesis and in the nervous system. PMID:26703751

  1. Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Motility in 3D Synthetic Scaffold Is Governed by Geometry Along With Adhesivity and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kalcioglu, Z. Ilke; Cohen, Joshua C.; Runkle, Anne P.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Design of 3D scaffolds that can facilitate proper survival, proliferation, and differentiation of progenitor cells is a challenge for clinical applications involving large connective tissue defects. Cell migration within such scaffolds is a critical process governing tissue integration. Here, we examine effects of scaffold pore diameter, in concert with matrix stiffness and adhesivity, as independently tunable parameters that govern marrow-derived stem cell motility. We adopted an “inverse opal” processing technique to create synthetic scaffolds by crosslinking poly(ethylene glycol) at different densities (controlling matrix elastic moduli or stiffness) and small doses of a heterobifunctional monomer (controlling matrix adhesivity) around templating beads of different radii. As pore diameter was varied from 7 to 17 µm (i.e., from significantly smaller than the spherical cell diameter to approximately cell diameter), it displayed a profound effect on migration of these stem cells—including the degree to which motility was sensitive to changes in matrix stiffness and adhesivity. Surprisingly, the highest probability for substantive cell movement through pores was observed for an intermediate pore diameter, rather than the largest pore diameter, which exceeded cell diameter. The relationships between migration speed, displacement, and total path length were found to depend strongly on pore diameter. We attribute this dependence to convolution of pore diameter and void chamber diameter, yielding different geometric environments experienced by the cells within. PMID:21449030

  2. Cell-stiffness-induced mechanosignaling - a key driver of leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Antje; Hordijk, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    The breaching of cellular and structural barriers by migrating cells is a driving factor in development, inflammation and tumor cell metastasis. One of the most extensively studied examples is the extravasation of activated leukocytes across the vascular endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels. Each step of this leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) process is regulated by distinct endothelial adhesion receptors such as the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1). Adherent leukocytes exert force on these receptors, which sense mechanical cues and transform them into localized mechanosignaling in endothelial cells. In turn, the function of the mechanoreceptors is controlled by the stiffness of the endothelial cells and of the underlying substrate representing a positive-feedback loop. In this Commentary, we focus on the mechanotransduction in leukocytes and endothelial cells, which is induced in response to variations in substrate stiffness. Recent studies have described the first key proteins involved in these mechanosensitive events, allowing us to identify common regulatory mechanisms in both cell types. Finally, we discuss how endothelial cell stiffness controls the individual steps in the leukocyte TEM process. We identify endothelial cell stiffness as an important component, in addition to locally presented chemokines and adhesion receptors, which guides leukocytes to sites that permit TEM.

  3. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies.

  4. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L.; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  5. Fluorescence Interferometry of Neuronal Cell Adhesion on Microstructured Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Fromherz, Peter

    1998-12-01

    We measured the separation of cell membranes from a surface of silica with nanometer precision taking advantage of the fluorescence of an organic dye in the standing modes of light above silicon. For neural cells from rat brain we found about 105 nm on a surface coated with laminin and about 60 nm with fibronectin. No plaques of close adhesion were seen within a lateral resolution of 400 nm. The wide homogeneous cleft raises the question about the nature of the attractive and repulsive forces in cell adhesion.

  6. Analysis of cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration in drosophila ovaries using GFP-actin and E-cadherin-GFP fusion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhusha, Vladyslav V.; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Oda, Hiroki

    1999-06-01

    Coordination of cell migration and adhesion is essential for movement of tissues during morphogenesis. During Drosophila oogenesis so called border cells (BCs) break from an anterior epithelium of egg chamber, acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology, and migrate posteriorly between nurse cells to oocyte. The confocal microscopic observation of BCs has revealed well-developed forepart lamellipodium stained with Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin), PS2 integrin, cytoplasmic myosin and F-actin. To investigate mechanism of BC migration in vivo we have constructed a DE-cadherin-GFP and a GFP-actin fusion proteins and induced their expression BCs utilizing the UAS/GAL4 system. The DE-cadherin-GFP signal as well as immunostaining of PS2 integrin visualized a track of migrating BCs providing an evidence that adhesive molecules are pulled out and left behind on the surface of nurse cells. Our data suggest that two distinct adhesive systems, DE-cadherins and PS2 integrins simultaneously mediate the migration of BCs. Release of adhesive contacts in the tail region is a rate- limited event in BC migration. The spatial-temporal sequence of actin-based events visualized by the GFP-actin suggest a treadmilling model for actin behavior in BC lamellipodium. BC migration can be considered as simultaneous reiterating processes of lamellipodium extension and adhesive attachment, cytoskeletal contraction, and rear detachment.

  7. Isoform-specific function of calpains in cell adhesion disruption: studies in postlactational mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Lucía; Ferrer-Vicens, Iván; García, Concha; Oltra, Sara S; Zaragozá, Rosa; Viña, Juan R; García-Trevijano, Elena R

    2016-09-15

    Cleavage of adhesion proteins is the first step for physiological clearance of undesired cells during postlactational regression of the mammary gland, but also for cell migration in pathological states such as breast cancer. The intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent proteases, calpains (CAPNs), are known to cleave adhesion proteins. The isoform-specific function of CAPN1 and CAPN2 was explored and compared in two models of cell adhesion disruption: mice mammary gland during weaning-induced involution and breast cancer cell lines according to tumor subtype classification. In both models, E-cadherin, β-catenin, p-120, and talin-1 were cleaved as assessed by western blot analysis. Both CAPNs were able to cleave adhesion proteins from lactating mammary gland in vitro Nevertheless, CAPN2 was the only isoform found to co-localize with E-cadherin in cell junctions at the peak of lactation. CAPN2/E-cadherin in vivo interaction, analyzed by proximity ligation assay, was dramatically increased during involution. Calpain inhibitor administration prevented the cytosolic accumulation of truncated E-cadherin cleaved by CAPN2. Conversely, in breast cancer cells, CAPN2 was restricted to the nuclear compartment. The isoform-specific expression of CAPNs and CAPN activity was dependent on the breast cancer subtype. However, CAPN1 and CAPN2 knockdown cells showed that cleavage of adhesion proteins and cell migration was mediated by CAPN1, independently of the breast cancer cell line used. Data presented here suggest that the subcellular distribution of CAPN1 and CAPN2 is a major issue in target-substrate recognition; therefore, it determines the isoform-specific role of CAPNs during disruption of cell adhesion in either a physiological or a pathological context.

  8. Isoform-specific function of calpains in cell adhesion disruption: studies in postlactational mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Lucía; Ferrer-Vicens, Iván; García, Concha; Oltra, Sara S; Zaragozá, Rosa; Viña, Juan R; García-Trevijano, Elena R

    2016-09-15

    Cleavage of adhesion proteins is the first step for physiological clearance of undesired cells during postlactational regression of the mammary gland, but also for cell migration in pathological states such as breast cancer. The intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent proteases, calpains (CAPNs), are known to cleave adhesion proteins. The isoform-specific function of CAPN1 and CAPN2 was explored and compared in two models of cell adhesion disruption: mice mammary gland during weaning-induced involution and breast cancer cell lines according to tumor subtype classification. In both models, E-cadherin, β-catenin, p-120, and talin-1 were cleaved as assessed by western blot analysis. Both CAPNs were able to cleave adhesion proteins from lactating mammary gland in vitro Nevertheless, CAPN2 was the only isoform found to co-localize with E-cadherin in cell junctions at the peak of lactation. CAPN2/E-cadherin in vivo interaction, analyzed by proximity ligation assay, was dramatically increased during involution. Calpain inhibitor administration prevented the cytosolic accumulation of truncated E-cadherin cleaved by CAPN2. Conversely, in breast cancer cells, CAPN2 was restricted to the nuclear compartment. The isoform-specific expression of CAPNs and CAPN activity was dependent on the breast cancer subtype. However, CAPN1 and CAPN2 knockdown cells showed that cleavage of adhesion proteins and cell migration was mediated by CAPN1, independently of the breast cancer cell line used. Data presented here suggest that the subcellular distribution of CAPN1 and CAPN2 is a major issue in target-substrate recognition; therefore, it determines the isoform-specific role of CAPNs during disruption of cell adhesion in either a physiological or a pathological context. PMID:27402795

  9. Cell-cell adhesion in the cnidaria: insights into the evolution of tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magie, Craig R; Martindale, Mark Q

    2008-06-01

    Cell adhesion is a major aspect of cell biology and one of the fundamental processes involved in the development of a multicellular animal. Adhesive mechanisms, both cell-cell and between cell and extracellular matrix, are intimately involved in assembling cells into the three-dimensional structures of tissues and organs. The modulation of adhesive complexes could therefore be seen as a central component in the molecular control of morphogenesis, translating information encoded within the genome into organismal form. The availability of whole genomes from early-branching metazoa such as cnidarians is providing important insights into the evolution of adhesive processes by allowing for the easy identification of the genes involved in adhesion in these organisms. Discovery of the molecular nature of cell adhesion in the early-branching groups, coupled with comparisons across the metazoa, is revealing the ways evolution has tinkered with this vital cellular process in the generation of the myriad forms seen across the animal kingdom.

  10. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  11. Vinculin-dependent actin bundling regulates cell migration and traction forces

    PubMed Central

    Jannie, Karry M.; Ellerbroek, Shawn M.; Zhou, Dennis W.; Chen, Sophia; Crompton, David J.; García, Andrés J.; DeMali, Kris A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinculin binding to actin filaments is thought to be critical for force transduction within a cell, but direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion has been limited . In this study, we found mutation (R1049E) of the vinculin tail impairs its ability to bind F-actin, stimulate actin polymerization, and bundle F-actin in vitro. Further , mutant (R1049E) vinculin expressing cells are altered in cell migration, which is accompanied by changes in cell adhesion, cell spreading, and cell generation of traction forces, providing direct evidence for the critical role of vinculin in mechanotransduction at adhesion sites. Lastly, we herein discuss the viability of models detailing the F-actin-binding surface on vinculin in context of our mutational analysis. PMID:25358683

  12. Hybrid inverse opals for regulating cell adhesion and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Zheng, Fuyin; Cheng, Yao; Ding, Haibo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-09-21

    Cell adhesion and alignment are two important considerations in tissue engineering applications as they can regulate the subsequent cell proliferation activity and differentiation program. Although many effects have been applied to regulate the adhesion or alignment of cells by using physical and chemical methods, it is still a challenge to regulate these cell behaviors simultaneously. Here, we present novel substrates with tunable nanoscale patterned structures for regulating the adhesion and alignment of cells. The substrates with different degrees of pattern orientation were achieved by customizing the amount of stretching applied to polymer inverse opal films. Cells cultured on these substrates showed an adjustable morphology and alignment. Moreover, soft hydrogels, which have poor plasticity and are difficult to cast into patterned structures, were applied to infiltrate the inverse opal structure. We demonstrated that the adhesion ratio of cells could be regulated by these hybrid substrates, as well as adjusting the cell morphology and alignment. These features of functional inverse opal substrates make them suitable for important applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25088946

  13. Hybrid inverse opals for regulating cell adhesion and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jie; Zheng, Fuyin; Cheng, Yao; Ding, Haibo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-08-01

    Cell adhesion and alignment are two important considerations in tissue engineering applications as they can regulate the subsequent cell proliferation activity and differentiation program. Although many effects have been applied to regulate the adhesion or alignment of cells by using physical and chemical methods, it is still a challenge to regulate these cell behaviors simultaneously. Here, we present novel substrates with tunable nanoscale patterned structures for regulating the adhesion and alignment of cells. The substrates with different degrees of pattern orientation were achieved by customizing the amount of stretching applied to polymer inverse opal films. Cells cultured on these substrates showed an adjustable morphology and alignment. Moreover, soft hydrogels, which have poor plasticity and are difficult to cast into patterned structures, were applied to infiltrate the inverse opal structure. We demonstrated that the adhesion ratio of cells could be regulated by these hybrid substrates, as well as adjusting the cell morphology and alignment. These features of functional inverse opal substrates make them suitable for important applications in tissue engineering.

  14. Hybrid inverse opals for regulating cell adhesion and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Zheng, Fuyin; Cheng, Yao; Ding, Haibo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-09-21

    Cell adhesion and alignment are two important considerations in tissue engineering applications as they can regulate the subsequent cell proliferation activity and differentiation program. Although many effects have been applied to regulate the adhesion or alignment of cells by using physical and chemical methods, it is still a challenge to regulate these cell behaviors simultaneously. Here, we present novel substrates with tunable nanoscale patterned structures for regulating the adhesion and alignment of cells. The substrates with different degrees of pattern orientation were achieved by customizing the amount of stretching applied to polymer inverse opal films. Cells cultured on these substrates showed an adjustable morphology and alignment. Moreover, soft hydrogels, which have poor plasticity and are difficult to cast into patterned structures, were applied to infiltrate the inverse opal structure. We demonstrated that the adhesion ratio of cells could be regulated by these hybrid substrates, as well as adjusting the cell morphology and alignment. These features of functional inverse opal substrates make them suitable for important applications in tissue engineering.

  15. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  16. Cell-substrate impedance fluctuations of single amoeboid cells encode cell-shape and adhesion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Gerhardt, Matthias; Höppner, Nadine; Krüger, Kirsten; Tarantola, Marco; Beta, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We show systematic electrical impedance measurements of single motile cells on microelectrodes. Wild-type cells and mutant strains were studied that differ in their cell-substrate adhesion strength. We recorded the projected cell area by time-lapse microscopy and observed irregular oscillations of the cell shape. These oscillations were correlated with long-term variations in the impedance signal. Superposed to these long-term trends, we observed fluctuations in the impedance signal. Their magnitude clearly correlated with the adhesion strength, suggesting that strongly adherent cells display more dynamic cell-substrate interactions.

  17. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate induced modulation of cell deadhesion and migration on thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Feng, Huixing; Chen, Beiyi; Ng, Soon Seng; Chen, Wei Ning; Chan, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is the main polyphenolic constituent of green tea, has emerged as a promising candidate for potential applications in selected anticancer therapeutics. Generally, tumor metastasis is known to be correlated with the alterations in cell adhesion and migration of normal cells. Nevertheless, the effect of EGCG on the biophysical responses of tumor cell adhering on extracellular matrix remains obscure. In this study, a thermosenstive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) system was developed to elucidate the potential anti-tumor effect of EGCG on the deadhesion and migration of HepG2 cells. First, both XPS and ELISA validated the coating of laminin (LA) on PIPAAm. Second, a change of nanotopology of LA layer on PIPAAm across the lower solution critical temperature (LCST) was detected with AFM. HepG2 cells seeded on LA-coated PIPAAm surface was shown to go through deadhesion by lowering the temperature below the LCST. Interestingly, EGCG was shown to decelerate the thermally triggered deadhesion of HepG2 cell on LA coated PIPAAm. Moreover, the inhibition of cell deadhesion in EGCG treated cells was shown to be driven by actin remodeling. Interestingly, the modulation of cell deadhesion on LA coated PIPAAm by EGCG leads to the reduction of cell motility as shown by real-time cell migration assay. Overall, the use of PIPAAm system demonstrated the promise of EGCG as anticancer therapy through the suppression of cell deadhesion and migration. PMID:21661094

  18. Reduced migration of Ishikawa cells associated with downregulation of aquaporin-5

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, XIU XIU; XU, KAI HONG; MA, JUN YAN; TIAN, YONG HONG; GUO, XIAO YAN; LIN, JUN; WU, RUI JIN

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP)-dependent cell migration has broad implications in angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound healing, glial scarring and other events requiring cell movement. There are 13 isoforms of AQP (0–12) that have been identified in mammals. It is unclear whether AQP5 plays a role in the development of endometrial cancer. We recently demonstrated that ovarian steroids may affect the expression of AQP5 in the female genital tract. In this study, we considered whether AQP5 may affect cell migration in Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line derived from the endometrium. The results showed that the downregulation of AQP5 results in reduced Ishikawa cell migration. The estrogen (E2) receptor in the promoter of AQP5 mediated the regulation of AQP5 expression in the normal endometrium and endometrial cancer. By contrast, the upregulation of AQP5 by E2 increased cell migration, invasion and adhesion through increased annexin-2, which is responsible for F-actin remodeling and rearrangement. E2 regulates Ishikawa cell migration by regulating the AQP5 expression. PMID:22844365

  19. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  20. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  1. Spatially controlled cell adhesion on three-dimensional substrates.

    PubMed

    Richter, Christine; Reinhardt, Martina; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Leisen, Daniel; Trouillet, Vanessa; Truckenmüller, Roman; Blau, Axel; Ziegler, Christiane; Welle, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    The microenvironment of cells in vivo is defined by spatiotemporal patterns of chemical and biophysical cues. Therefore, one important goal of tissue engineering is the generation of scaffolds with defined biofunctionalization in order to control processes like cell adhesion and differentiation. Mimicking extrinsic factors like integrin ligands presented by the extracellular matrix is one of the key elements to study cellular adhesion on biocompatible scaffolds. By using special thermoformable polymer films with anchored biomolecules micro structured scaffolds, e.g. curved and micro-patterned substrates, can be fabricated. Here, we present a novel strategy for the fabrication of micro-patterned scaffolds based on the "Substrate Modification and Replication by Thermoforming" (SMART) technology: The surface of a poly lactic acid membrane, having a low forming temperature of 60 degrees C and being initially very cell attractive, was coated with a photopatterned layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (VAHyal) to gain spatial control over cell adhesion. Subsequently, this modified polymer membrane was thermoformed to create an array of spherical microcavities with diameters of 300 microm for 3D cell culture. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and mouse fibroblasts (L929) were used to demonstrate guided cell adhesion. HepG2 cells adhered and aggregated exclusively within these cavities without attaching to the passivated surfaces between the cavities. Also L929 cell