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Sample records for adhesion complex formation

  1. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Suresh, Anil K; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  2. Formation of focal adhesion-stress fibre complexes coordinated by adhesive and non-adhesive surface domains.

    PubMed

    Zimerman, B; Arnold, M; Ulmer, J; Blümmel, J; Besser, A; Spatz, J P; Geiger, B

    2004-04-01

    Cell motility consists of repeating cycles of protrusion of a leading edge in the direction of migration, attachment of the advancing membrane to the matrix, and pulling of the trailing edge forward. In this dynamic process there is a major role for the cytoskeleton, which drives the protrusive events via polymerisation of actin in the lamellipodium, followed by actomyosin contractility. To study the transition of the actin cytoskeleton from a 'protrusive' to 'retractive' form, we have monitored the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibres during cell migration on a micro-patterned surface. This surface consisted of parallel arrays of 2 microm-wide, fibronectin-coated gold stripes, separated by non-adhesive (poly(ethylene glycol)-coated) glass areas with variable width, ranging from 4-12 microm. Monitoring the spreading of motile cells indicated that cell spreading was equally effective along and across the adhesive stripes, as long as the non-adhesive spaces between them did not exceed 6 microm. When the width of the PEG region was 8 microm or more, cells became highly polarised upon spreading, and failed to reach the neighboring adhesive stripes. It was also noted that as soon as the protruding lamella successfully crossed the PEG-coated area and reached an adhesive region, the organisation of actin in that area was transformed from a diffuse meshwork into a bundle, oriented perpendicularly to the stripes and anchored at its ends in focal adhesions. This transition depends on actomyosin-based contractility and is apparently triggered by the adhesion to the rigid fibronectin surface. PMID:16475844

  3. Integrin-Associated Complexes Form Hierarchically with Variable Stoichiometry during Nascent Adhesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Alexia I.; Zareno, Jessica; Moissoglu, Konstadinos; Plow, Edward; Gratton, Enrico; Horwitz, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background A complex network of putative molecular interactions underlies the architecture and function of cell-matrix adhesions. Most of these interactions are implicated from co-immunoprecipitation studies using expressed components; but few have been demonstrated or characterized functionally in living cells. Results We introduce fluorescence fluctuation methods to determine, at high spatial and temporal resolution, ‘when’ and ‘where’ molecular complexes form and their stoichiometry in nascent adhesions (NAs). We focus on integrin-associated molecules implicated in integrin-activation and in the integrin-actin linkage in NAs and show that these molecules form integrin containing complexes hierarchically within the adhesion itself. Integrin and kindlin reside in a molecular complex as soon as adhesions are visible; talin, while also present early, associates with the integrin-kindlin complex only after NAs have formed and in response to myosin II activity. Furthermore, talin and vinculin association precedes the formation of the integrin-talin complex. Finally, α-actinin enters NAs periodically and in clusters that transiently associate with integrins. The absolute number and stoichiometry of these molecules varies among the molecules studied and changes as adhesions mature. Conclusions These observations suggest a working model for NA assembly, whereby transient α-actinin- integrin complexes help nucleate NAs within the lamellipodium. Subsequently integrin complexes containing kindlin, but not talin, emerge. Once NAs have formed, myosin II activity promotes talin association with the integrin-kindlin complex in a stoichiometry consistent with each talin molecule linking two integrin-kindlin complexes. PMID:25088556

  4. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  5. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation is not required for genistein-induced FAK-beta-1-integrin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kyle, E; Lieberman, R; Crowell, J; Kellof, G; Bergan, R C

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been shown that changes in the activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and its binding to beta-1-integrin, accompany genistein-induced adhesion of prostate cells. Consumption of genistein world wide is associated with a lower incidence of metastatic prostate cancer. Early human clinical trials of genistein are under way to evaluate genistein's potential causal role in this regard. Though an important cell adhesion-associated signaling molecule, FAK's role in regulating prostate cell adhesion was not clear. Elucidation of this process would provide important information relating to both biology and potential clinical endpoints. It was hypothesized that FAK activation and complex formation are temporally related in prostate cells, and can thus be separated. Significant activation of FAK was demonstrated when cells adhered to fibronectin, as compared to poly-L-lysine, thus demonstrating that beta-1-integrin plays a significant role in activating FAK. Neither FAK activation, nor FAK-integrin complex formation, required beta-1-integrin ligand. However, disruption of the cellular cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D prevented FAK activation, but did not block genistein-induced complex formation. In the face of a disrupted cytoskeleton, signaling through FAK could not be restored through either integrin cross linking, or re-establishment of tensile forces via attachment to solid matrix. These studies demonstrate that FAK-beta-1-integrin complex formation does not require FAK activation, suggesting that it is an early event in prostate cell adhesion. An intact cytoskeleton is necessary for FAK activation. The functional importance of beta-1-integrin in prostate cells is demonstrated. Current findings support plans to test genistein in prostate cancer. PMID:11315093

  6. Introduction of p130cas signaling complex formation upon integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a role for Src family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Vuori, K; Hirai, H; Aizawa, S; Ruoslahti, E

    1996-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion triggers intracellular signaling cascades, including tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins. Among these are the focal adhesion proteins p130cas (Cas) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here we identify the kinase(s) mediating integrin-induced Cas phosphorylation and characterize protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphorylated Cas. We found that expression of a constitutively active FAK in fibroblasts results in a consecutive tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. This effect required the autophosphorylation site of FAK, which is a binding site for Src family kinases. Integrin-mediated phosphorylation of Cas was not, however, compromised in fibroblasts lacking FAK. In contrast, adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas was reduced in cells lacking Src, whereas enhanced phosphorylation of Cas was observed Csk- cells, in which Src kinases are activated. These results suggest that Src kinases are responsible for the integrin-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. FAK seems not to be necessary for phosphorylation of Cas, but when autophosphorylated, FAK may recruit Src family kinases to phosphorylate Cas. Cas was found to form complexes with Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing signaling molecules, such as the SH2/SH3 adapter protein Crk, following integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors C3G and Sos were found in the Cas-Crk complex upon integrin ligand binding. These observations suggest that Cas serves as a docking protein and may transduce signals to downstream signaling pathways following integrin-mediated cell adhesion. PMID:8649368

  7. Complex coacervates as a foundation for synthetic underwater adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Wang, Ching Shuen; Shao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Complex coacervation was proposed to play a role in the formation of the underwater bioadhesive of the Sandcastle worm (Phragmatopoma californica) based on the polyacidic and polybasic nature of the glue proteins and the balance of opposite charges at physiological pH. Morphological studies of the secretory system suggested the natural process does not involve complex coacervation as commonly defined. The distinction may not be important because electrostatic interactions likely play an important role in formation of the sandcastle glue. Complex coacervation has also been invoked in the formation of adhesive underwater silk fibers of caddisfly larvae and the adhesive plaques of mussels. A process similar to complex coacervation, that is, condensation and dehydration of biopolyelectrolytes through electrostatic associations, seems plausible for the caddisfly silk. This much is clear, the sandcastle glue complex coacervation model provided a valuable blueprint for the synthesis of a biomimetic, waterborne, underwater adhesive with demonstrated potential for repair of wet tissue. PMID:21081223

  8. Fibrinogen-independent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium mediated by glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex at high shear rate.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H J; Hawiger, J; Ruggeri, Z M; Turitto, V T; Thiagarajan, P; Hoffmann, T

    1989-01-01

    Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium, studied at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, were inhibited by two synthetic peptides known to interact with GPIIb-IIIa. One peptide (HHLGGAKQAGDV) corresponds to the carboxyl terminal segment of the fibrinogen gamma-chain (gamma 400-411) and the other (RGDS) contains the amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) common to fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin and the alpha-chain of fibrinogen. Neither platelet adhesion nor thrombus formation were decreased in a patient with severe congenital fibrinogen deficiency and this was equally true when his blood was further depleted of the small amounts of fibrinogen present utilizing an anti-fibrinogen antibody. In normal subjects, adhesion and thrombus formation were inhibited by the Fab' fragments of a monoclonal anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-CP8), which interferes with the interaction of platelets with all four adhesive proteins in both the fluid and solid phase. However, another anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-P5) that had minimal effects on the interaction of platelets with fibrinogen, but inhibited to varying degrees platelet interaction with other adhesive proteins, was equally effective. The findings demonstrate that, at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, adhesive proteins other than fibrinogen are involved in GPIIb-IIIa-mediated platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium. In addition, since LJ-P5 inhibited the binding of soluble von Willebrand factor and vitronectin, these adhesive proteins may be involved in platelet thrombus formation. In contrast to the results obtained at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, fibrinogen could play a role in mediating platelet-platelet interactions with weak agonists or lower shear rates. PMID:2910912

  9. ISOLATION OF INTEGRIN-BASED ADHESION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew C.; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angelique; Robertson, Joseph; Paul, Nikki R.; Ng, Daniel H. J.; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of cells with their extracellular environment is facilitated by cell surface adhesion receptors, such as integrins, which play important roles in both normal development and the onset of pathologies. Engagement of integrins with their ligands in the extracellular matrix, or counter receptors on other cells, initiates the intracellular assembly of a wide variety of proteins into adhesion complexes such as focal contacts, focal adhesions and fibrillar adhesions. The proteins recruited to these complexes mediate bidirectional signalling across the plasma membrane and as such help to coordinate and / or modulate the multitude of physical or chemical signals to which the cell is subjected. The protocols in this unit describe two approaches for the isolation or enrichment of proteins contained within integrin-associated adhesion complexes together with their local plasma membrane / cytosolic environments from cells in culture. In the first protocol integrin-associated adhesion structures are affinity isolated using microbeads coated with extracellular ligands or antibodies. The second protocol describes the isolation of ventral membrane preparations that are enriched for adhesion complex structures. The protocols permit the determination of adhesion complex components by subsequent downstream analysis by Western blotting or mass spectrometry. PMID:25727331

  10. Pseudoelastic deformation during nanoscale adhesive contact formation.

    PubMed

    Mordehai, Dan; Rabkin, Eugen; Srolovitz, David J

    2011-08-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to demonstrate that adhesive contact formation through classical jump to contact is mediated by extensive dislocation activity in metallic nanoparticles. The dislocations generated during jump to contact are completely annihilated by the completion of the adhesive contact, leaving the nanoparticles dislocation-free. This rapid and efficient jump to contact process is pseudoelastic, rather than purely elastic or plastic. PMID:21929255

  11. Strategies to Minimize Adhesion Formation After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lazarou, George; Mondesir, Carlene; Wei, Kai; Khullar, Poonan; Ogden, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the potential for postoperative laparoscopic adhesion formation utilizing either monopolar cautery or ultrasonic energy and to determine whether there is added benefit with the addition of a suspension of hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose in saline versus saline alone. Methods: Injuries were induced in rabbits by using monopolar cautery on 1 uterine horn and adjacent sidewall and ultrasonic energy on the opposite. Hyaluronate/ carboxymethylcellulose or saline was added to every other animal. Autopsies were performed after 3 weeks. Clinical and pathologic scoring of adhesions was performed by blinded investigators. Results: A very significant difference occurred in pathologic adhesion scores favoring the ultrasonic scalpel when the animals were treated with saline. However, a borderline significant difference was found in pathologic scores favoring the ultrasonic scalpel compared to the monopolar cautery. There was no significant difference in clinical adhesion scores between the 2 modalities. No significant difference in either score was found with the addition of hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose or saline with either instrument. Conclusion: No benefit was found for adhesion prevention with hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose. Although no reduction was achieved in clinical adhesions, the ultrasonic scalpel resulted in fewer histologic signs of tissue inflammation in the early postoperative period, suggesting that further clinical adhesions might develop over time with cautery. PMID:21985723

  12. Microtubule-dependent modulation of adhesion complex composition.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daniel H J; Humphries, Jonathan D; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angélique; Humphries, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule network regulates the turnover of integrin-containing adhesion complexes to stimulate cell migration. Disruption of the microtubule network results in an enlargement of adhesion complex size due to increased RhoA-stimulated actomyosin contractility, and inhibition of adhesion complex turnover; however, the microtubule-dependent changes in adhesion complex composition have not been studied in a global, unbiased manner. Here we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine adhesion complex changes that occur upon microtubule disruption with nocodazole. Nocodazole-treated cells displayed an increased abundance of the majority of known adhesion complex components, but no change in the levels of the fibronectin-binding α5β1 integrin. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed these findings, but revealed a change in localisation of adhesion complex components. Specifically, in untreated cells, α5-integrin co-localised with vinculin at peripherally located focal adhesions and with tensin at centrally located fibrillar adhesions. In nocodazole-treated cells, however, α5-integrin was found in both peripherally located and centrally located adhesion complexes that contained both vinculin and tensin, suggesting a switch in the maturation state of adhesion complexes to favour focal adhesions. Moreover, the switch to focal adhesions was confirmed to be force-dependent as inhibition of cell contractility with the Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, prevented the nocodazole-induced conversion. These results highlight a complex interplay between the microtubule cytoskeleton, adhesion complex maturation state and intracellular contractile force, and provide a resource for future adhesion signaling studies. The proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001183. PMID:25526367

  13. Characterizing the initial encounter complex in cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Zhang, Yunxiang; Nelson, W. James; Chu, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cadherins are Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins with an extracellular region of five domains (EC1 to EC5). Adhesion is mediated by “strand-swapping” of a conserved tryptophan residue in position 2 between EC1 domains of opposing cadherins, but the formation of this structure is not well understood. Using single molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and single molecule force measurements with the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), we demonstrate that cadherins initially interact via EC1 domains without swapping tryptophan-2 to form a weak Ca2+ dependent initial encounter complex that has 25% of the bond strength of a strand-swapped dimer. We suggest that cadherin dimerization proceeds via an induced fit mechanism where the monomers first form a tryptophan-2 independent initial encounter complex and then undergo subsequent conformational changes to form the final strand-swapped dimer. PMID:19646884

  14. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  15. Nuclear Signaling from Cadherin Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Pierre D.; Maher, Meghan T.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell–cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of “outside-in” or “inside-out” signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure–function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell–cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell–cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  16. Nuclear signaling from cadherin adhesion complexes.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Pierre D; Maher, Meghan T; Gottardi, Cara J

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell-cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of "outside-in" or "inside-out" signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure-function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell-cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell-cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  17. Hydrogel Adhesion with Wrinkle Formation by Spatial Control of Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masatoshi; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Asoh, Taka-Aki

    2016-06-01

    We prepared a novel wrinkled adhesive interface of hydrogels for strong adhesion via spatial control of polymer networks, including the density, distribution, and mobility of interactive units. A wrinkle structure was formed by the elasticity mismatch of hydrogels and adhesive polyion complex layers when electrophoresis was carried out between cationic and anionic semi-IPNs. The wrinkling wavelength of interfaces was controlled by Young's modulus of hydrogels. The role of wrinkle structure in adhesion was investigated by the measurement of the adhesive strength of hydrogels which were adhered under the compression, resulting in the disappearance of the wrinkle structure by compression that induced a decrease in adhesive strength. These results indicate that strong hydrogel adhesion was achieved by both the spatial design of interactive units and wrinkle formation. PMID:27187544

  18. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  19. Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) of Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    White, Helen; Betzig, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Key to understanding a protein’s biological function is the accurate determination of its spatial distribution inside a cell. Although fluorescent protein markers allow the targeting of specific proteins with molecular precision, much of this information is lost when the resultant fusion proteins are imaged with conventional, diffraction-limited optics. In response, several imaging modalities that are capable of resolution below the diffraction limit (~200 nm) have emerged. Here, both single- and dual-color superresolution imaging of biological structures using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) are described. The examples discussed focus on adhesion complexes: dense, protein-filled assemblies that form at the interface between cells and their substrata. A particular emphasis is placed on the instrumentation and photoactivatable fluorescent protein (PA-FP) tags necessary to achieve PALM images at ~20 nm resolution in 5 to 30 min in fixed cells. PMID:19085989

  20. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. Here, the variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is unraveled by evidencing simultaneous (progressive) breaking of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of the tip-surface distance, showing that they result from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility of exploiting the ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of the static friction force with the hold time. Such an effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities. PMID:26975343

  1. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, B. Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m−2) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule. PMID:26478273

  2. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, B. Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (~50 mJ m-2) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (<4 nm) and strong glue layer. The catecholic zwitterion holds particular promise as an adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  3. Nephrin phosphorylation regulates podocyte adhesion through the PINCH-1-ILK-α-parvin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Dongqing; Chen, Cheng; Liang, Wei; Chen, Xinghua; Ma, Tean; Yang, Hongxia; van Goor, Harry; Ding, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Nephrin, a structural molecule, is also a signaling molecule after phosphorylation. Inhibition of nephrin phosphorylation is correlated with podocyte injury. The PINCH-1-ILK-α-parvin (PIP) complex plays a crucial role in cell adhesion and cytoskeleton formation. We hypothesized that nephrin phosphorylation influenced cytoskeleton and cell adhesion in podocytes by regulating the PIP complex. The nephrin phosphorylation, PIP complex formation, and F-actin in Wistar rats intraperitoneally injected with puromycin aminonucleoside were gradually decreased but increased with time, coinciding with the recovery from glomerular/podocyte injury and proteinuria. In cultured podocytes, PIP complex knockdown resulted in cytoskeleton reorganization and decreased cell adhesion and spreading. Nephrin and its phosphorylation were unaffected after PIP complex knockdown. Furthermore, inhibition of nephrin phosphorylation suppressed PIP complex expression, disorganized podocyte cytoskeleton, and decreased cell adhesion and spreading. These findings indicate that alterations in nephrin phosphorylation disorganize podocyte cytoskeleton and decrease cell adhesion through a PIP complex-dependent mechanism. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4): 230-235] PMID:23615266

  4. An extracellular adhesion molecule complex patterns dendritic branching and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xintong; Liu, Oliver W.; Howell, Audrey S.; Shen, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Robust dendrite morphogenesis is a critical step in the development of reproducible neural circuits. However, little is known about the extracellular cues that pattern complex dendrite morphologies. In the model nematode C. elegans, the sensory neuron PVD establishes stereotypical, highly-branched dendrite morphology. Here, we report the identification of a tripartite ligand-receptor complex of membrane adhesion molecules that is both necessary and sufficient to instruct spatially restricted growth and branching of PVD dendrites. The ligand complex SAX-7/L1CAM and MNR-1 function at defined locations in the surrounding hypodermal tissue, while DMA-1 acts as the cognate receptor on PVD. Mutations in this complex lead to dramatic defects in the formation, stabilization, and organization of the dendritic arbor. Ectopic expression of SAX-7 and MNR-1 generates a predictable, unnaturally patterned dendritic tree in a DMA-1 dependent manner. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that all three molecules are needed for interaction. PMID:24120131

  5. The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Stephanie J.; Lostchuck, Emily; Goult, Benjamin T.; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Fairchild, Michael J.; López-Ceballos, Pablo; Calderwood, David A.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development. PMID:25393120

  6. RhoJ interacts with the GIT-PIX complex and regulates focal adhesion disassembly.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Poulter, Natalie S; Edelmann, Francesca; Salisbury, Victoria A; Noy, Peter J; Bacon, Andrea; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Heath, John K; Bicknell, Roy; Heath, Victoria L

    2014-07-15

    RhoJ is a Rho GTPase expressed in endothelial cells and tumour cells, which regulates cell motility, invasion, endothelial tube formation and focal adhesion numbers. This study aimed to further delineate the molecular function of RhoJ. Using timelapse microscopy RhoJ was found to regulate focal adhesion disassembly; small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of RhoJ increased focal adhesion disassembly time, whereas expression of an active mutant (daRhoJ) decreased it. Furthermore, daRhoJ co-precipitated with the GIT-PIX complex, a regulator of focal adhesion disassembly. An interaction between daRhoJ and GIT1 was confirmed using yeast two-hybrid experiments, and this depended on the Spa homology domain of GIT1. GIT1, GIT2, β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF7) and RhoJ all colocalised in focal adhesions and depended on each other for their recruitment to focal adhesions. Functionally, the GIT-PIX complex regulated endothelial tube formation, with knockdown of both GIT1 and GIT2, or β-PIX phenocopying RhoJ knockdown. RhoJ-knockout mice showed reduced tumour growth and diminished tumour vessel density, identifying a role for RhoJ in mediating tumour angiogenesis. These studies give new insight into the molecular function of RhoJ in regulating cell motility and tumour vessel formation. PMID:24928894

  7. Effect of Hypericum perforatum on intraperitoneal adhesion formation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hızlı, Fatih; Köşüş, Aydın; Yılmaz, Saynur; Köşüş, Nermin; Haltaş, Hacer; Dede, Hülya; Kafalı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Hypericum perforatum for prevention of adhesion formation in rats. Material and methods Twenty-four female wistar rats underwent left uterine horn adhesion model. Rats were randomised into 4 groups. Group 1 (Control): Closure of abdominal incision without any agent administration. Group 2: Closure of incision after administration of intraperitoneal (i.p.) Ringer's lactate solution. Group 3: Closure of incision after administration of i.p. olive oil (diluent of H. perforatum). Group 4: Hypericum perforatum extract (Ecodab®) was administered i.p. before the closure of incision. Fourteen days later, relaparatomy was performed and surgical adhesion scores, inflammation and fibrosis scores were noted. Groups were compared according to these scores. Results There was statistical significant difference between ringer's lactate group and olive oil group according to surgical adhesion score (p = 0.009). However, groups were not different according to inflammation and fibrosis scores (p > 0.05). Conclusions Despite antiinflammatory, antioxidants and antimicrobial properties of H. perforatum, our results revealed no positive effect of H. perforatum on the prevention of intraperitoneal adhesion formation. PMID:24904678

  8. A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area defines adhesion size and lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Lock, John G.; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized adhesions, small and large adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix adhesion properties. PMID:26109125

  9. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Michael B.; Orner, Caitlin A.; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A.; Hammert, Warren C.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Loiselle, Alayna E.

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  10. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A; Hammert, Warren C; O'Keefe, Regis J; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  11. Effects of Material Properties on Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Song, F; Koo, H; Ren, D

    2015-08-01

    Adhesion of microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, to surfaces and the subsequent formation of biofilms cause multidrug-tolerant infections in humans and fouling of medical devices. To address these challenges, it is important to understand how material properties affect microbe-surface interactions and engineer better nonfouling materials. Here we review the recent progresses in this field and discuss the main challenges and opportunities. In particular, we focus on bacterial biofilms and review the effects of surface energy, charge, topography, and stiffness of substratum material on bacterial adhesion. We summarize how these surface properties influence oral biofilm formation, and we discuss the important findings from nondental systems that have potential applications in dental medicine. PMID:26001706

  12. Underwater contact adhesion and microarchitecture in polyelectrolyte complexes actuated by solvent exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Lee, Dong Woog; Ahn, B. Kollbe; Seo, Sungbaek; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexation is critical to the formation and properties of many biological and polymeric materials, and is typically initiated by aqueous mixing followed by fluid-fluid phase separation, such as coacervation. Yet little to nothing is known about how coacervates evolve into intricate solid microarchitectures. Inspired by the chemical features of the cement proteins of the sandcastle worm, here we report a versatile and strong wet-contact microporous adhesive resulting from polyelectrolyte complexation triggered by solvent exchange. After premixing a catechol-functionalized weak polyanion with a polycation in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), the solution was applied underwater to various substrates whereupon electrostatic complexation, phase inversion, and rapid setting were simultaneously actuated by water-DMSO solvent exchange. Spatial and temporal coordination of complexation, inversion and setting fostered rapid (~25 s) and robust underwater contact adhesion (Wad >= 2 J m-2) of complexed catecholic polyelectrolytes to all tested surfaces including plastics, glasses, metals and biological materials.

  13. Renewable Interfaces: Surface Topography Actuation for Complex Biological Adhesion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Ye, Sangho; Cao, Kathleen; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Velankar, Sachin; Wagner, William

    2015-03-01

    Controlling adhesion at biological interfaces is a complex problem with great biomedical importance. We use dynamic wrinkling, generated with PDMS/UVO chemistry under different macroscopic strains (ɛij ~ 0 . 3), to create a mechanical interfacial term that frustrates particle adhesion. This device actuates surface topography between flat (zero surface confinement χij) and wrinkled surfaces (χij ~(A / λ) 2 , where A and λ are wrinkle amplitude and wavelength, respectively), with a maximum rate of 0.6 Hz. Un-actuated PDMS placed in contact with whole sheep blood shows near total surface coverage with adhered platelets over 90 min. Actuation showed a nearly 100-fold decrease in platelet adhesion. Interestingly, topographic actuation is four times as effective compared to flat surface actuation in controlling platelet adhesion. Our model explores the competition between surface tension terms (Uγ = γɛij) and interfacial elastic terms (Uχ =Eij (t .ɛij2 +t3 . (χij /λ2)) generated because of actuation and wrinkling, where Eij is platelet modulus and t is characteristic platelet length scale. The condition for de-adhesion is Uχ >Uγ .

  14. Super-complexes of adhesion GPCRs and neural guidance receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Verity A.; Mehmood, Shahid; Chavent, Matthieu; Roversi, Pietro; Carrasquero, Maria; del Toro, Daniel; Seyit-Bremer, Goenuel; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M.; Comoletti, Davide; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Latrophilin adhesion-GPCRs (Lphn1–3 or ADGRL1–3) and Unc5 cell guidance receptors (Unc5A–D) interact with FLRT proteins (FLRT1–3), thereby promoting cell adhesion and repulsion, respectively. How the three proteins interact and function simultaneously is poorly understood. We show that Unc5D interacts with FLRT2 in cis, controlling cell adhesion in response to externally presented Lphn3. The ectodomains of the three proteins bind cooperatively. Crystal structures of the ternary complex formed by the extracellular domains reveal that Lphn3 dimerizes when bound to FLRT2:Unc5, resulting in a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 (FLRT2:Unc5D:Lphn3). This 1:1:2 complex further dimerizes to form a larger ‘super-complex' (2:2:4), using a previously undescribed binding motif in the Unc5D TSP1 domain. Molecular dynamics simulations, point-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry demonstrate the stability and molecular properties of these complexes. Our data exemplify how receptors increase their functional repertoire by forming different context-dependent higher-order complexes. PMID:27091502

  15. Super-complexes of adhesion GPCRs and neural guidance receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Verity A.; Mehmood, Shahid; Chavent, Matthieu; Roversi, Pietro; Carrasquero, Maria; Del Toro, Daniel; Seyit-Bremer, Goenuel; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M.; Comoletti, Davide; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Latrophilin adhesion-GPCRs (Lphn1-3 or ADGRL1-3) and Unc5 cell guidance receptors (Unc5A-D) interact with FLRT proteins (FLRT1-3), thereby promoting cell adhesion and repulsion, respectively. How the three proteins interact and function simultaneously is poorly understood. We show that Unc5D interacts with FLRT2 in cis, controlling cell adhesion in response to externally presented Lphn3. The ectodomains of the three proteins bind cooperatively. Crystal structures of the ternary complex formed by the extracellular domains reveal that Lphn3 dimerizes when bound to FLRT2:Unc5, resulting in a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 (FLRT2:Unc5D:Lphn3). This 1:1:2 complex further dimerizes to form a larger `super-complex' (2:2:4), using a previously undescribed binding motif in the Unc5D TSP1 domain. Molecular dynamics simulations, point-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry demonstrate the stability and molecular properties of these complexes. Our data exemplify how receptors increase their functional repertoire by forming different context-dependent higher-order complexes.

  16. Adhesive complex coacervate inspired by the sandcastle worm as a sealant for fetoscopic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sarbjit

    Inspired by the Sandcastle Worm, biomimetic of the water-borne adhesive was developed by complex coacervation of the synthetic copolyelectrolytes, mimicking the chemistries of the worm glue. The developed underwater adhesive was designed for sealing fetal membranes after fetoscopic surgery in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and sealing neural tissue of a fetus in aminiotic sac for spina bifida condition. Complex coacervate with increased bond strength was created by entrapping polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-dA) monomer within the cross-linked coacervate network. Maximum shear bond strength of ~ 1.2 MPa on aluminum substrates was reached. The monomer-filled coacervate had complex flow behavior, thickening at low shear rates and then thinning suddenly with a 16-fold drop in viscosity at shear rates near 6 s-1. The microscale structure of the complex coacervates resembled a three-dimensional porous network of interconnected tubules. This complex coacervate adhesive was used in vitro studies to mimic the uterine wall-fetal membrane interface using a water column with one end and sealed with human fetal membranes and poultry breast, and a defect was created with an 11 French trocar. The coacervate adhesive in conjunction with the multiphase adhesive was used to seal the defect. The sealant withstood an additional traction of 12 g for 30-60 minutes and turbulence of the water column without leakage of fluid or slippage. The adhesive is nontoxic when in direct contact with human fetal membranes in an organ culture setting. A stable complex coacervate adhesive for long-term use in TTTS and spina bifida application was developed by methacrylating the copolyelectrolytes. The methacrylated coacervate was crosslinked chemically for TTTS and by photopolymerization for spina bifida. Tunable mechanical properties of the adhesive were achieved by varying the methacrylation of the polymers. Varying the amine to phosphate (A/P) ratio in the coacervate formation

  17. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  18. An Elmo–Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell–cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell–cell adhesion identified an Elmo–Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo–Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell–cell contacts in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. At cell–cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell–cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell–cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell–cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell–cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo–Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell–cell adhesion. PMID:25452388

  19. Kank2 activates talin, reduces force transduction across integrins and induces central adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqi; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Tan, Steven; Senger, Fabrice; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Dedden, Dirk; Mizuno, Naoko; Wasik, Anita A; Thery, Manuel; Dunn, Alexander R; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-based adhesions play critical roles in cell migration. Talin activates integrins and flexibly connects integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton, thereby serving as a 'molecular clutch' that transmits forces to the extracellular matrix to drive cell migration. Here we identify the evolutionarily conserved Kank protein family as novel components of focal adhesions (FAs). Kank proteins accumulate at the lateral border of FAs, which we term the FA belt, and in central sliding adhesions, where they directly bind the talin rod domain through the Kank amino-terminal (KN) motif and induce talin and integrin activation. In addition, Kank proteins diminish the talin-actomyosin linkage, which curbs force transmission across integrins, leading to reduced integrin-ligand bond strength, slippage between integrin and ligand, central adhesion formation and sliding, and reduced cell migration speed. Our data identify Kank proteins as talin activators that decrease the grip between the integrin-talin complex and actomyosin to regulate cell migration velocity. PMID:27548916

  20. Deacetylation of Fungal Exopolysaccharide Mediates Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark J.; Geller, Alexander M.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Liu, Hong; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Le Mauff, François; Chabot, Joseé; Ralph, Benjamin; Ostapska, Hanna; Lehoux, Mélanie; Cerone, Robert P.; Baptista, Stephanie D.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Filler, Scott G.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive infection in immunocompromised patients. Recently, galactosaminogalactan (GAG), an exopolysaccharide composed of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), was identified as a virulence factor required for biofilm formation. The molecular mechanisms underlying GAG biosynthesis and GAG-mediated biofilm formation were unknown. We identified a cluster of five coregulated genes that were dysregulated in GAG-deficient mutants and whose gene products share functional similarity with proteins that mediate the synthesis of the bacterial biofilm exopolysaccharide poly-(β1-6)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG). Bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GAG cluster gene agd3 encodes a protein containing a deacetylase domain. Because deacetylation of N-acetylglucosamine residues is critical for the function of PNAG, we investigated the role of GAG deacetylation in fungal biofilm formation. Agd3 was found to mediate deacetylation of GalNAc residues within GAG and render the polysaccharide polycationic. As with PNAG, deacetylation is required for the adherence of GAG to hyphae and for biofilm formation. Growth of the Δagd3 mutant in the presence of culture supernatants of the GAG-deficient Δuge3 mutant rescued the biofilm defect of the Δagd3 mutant and restored the adhesive properties of GAG, suggesting that deacetylation is an extracellular process. The GAG biosynthetic gene cluster is present in the genomes of members of the Pezizomycotina subphylum of the Ascomycota including a number of plant-pathogenic fungi and a single basidiomycete species, Trichosporon asahii, likely a result of recent horizontal gene transfer. The current study demonstrates that the production of cationic, deacetylated exopolysaccharides is a strategy used by both fungi and bacteria for biofilm formation. PMID:27048799

  1. Modulation of FAK and Src adhesion signaling occurs independently of adhesion complex composition.

    PubMed

    Horton, Edward R; Humphries, Jonathan D; Stutchbury, Ben; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Ballestrem, Christoph; Barry, Simon T; Humphries, Martin J

    2016-02-01

    Integrin adhesion complexes (IACs) form mechanochemical connections between the extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton and mediate phenotypic responses via posttranslational modifications. Here, we investigate the modularity and robustness of the IAC network to pharmacological perturbation of the key IAC signaling components focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. FAK inhibition using AZ13256675 blocked FAK(Y397) phosphorylation but did not alter IAC composition, as reported by mass spectrometry. IAC composition was also insensitive to Src inhibition using AZD0530 alone or in combination with FAK inhibition. In contrast, kinase inhibition substantially reduced phosphorylation within IACs, cell migration and proliferation. Furthermore using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that FAK inhibition increased the exchange rate of a phosphotyrosine (pY) reporter (dSH2) at IACs. These data demonstrate that kinase-dependent signal propagation through IACs is independent of gross changes in IAC composition. Together, these findings demonstrate a general separation between the composition of IACs and their ability to relay pY-dependent signals. PMID:26833789

  2. Autocrine netrin function inhibits glioma cell motility and promotes focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Andrew A; Durko, Margaret; Luk, Tamarah L; Marçal, Nathalie; Shekarabi, Masoud; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Deregulation of mechanisms that control cell motility plays a key role in tumor progression by promoting tumor cell dissemination. Secreted netrins and their receptors, Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), neogenin, and the UNC5 homologues, regulate cell and axon migration, cell adhesion, and tissue morphogenesis. Netrin and netrin receptor expression have previously been shown to be disrupted in invasive tumors, including glioblastoma. We determined that the human glioblastoma cell lines U87, U343, and U373 all express neogenin, UNC5 homologues, and netrin-1 or netrin-3, but only U87 cells express DCC. Using transfilter migration assays, we demonstrate DCC-dependent chemoattractant migration of U87 cells up a gradient of netrin-1. In contrast, U343 and U373 cells, which do not express DCC, were neither attracted nor repelled. Ectopic expression of DCC by U343 and U373 cells resulted in these cells becoming competent to respond to a gradient of netrin-1 as a chemoattractant, and also slowed their rate of spontaneous migration. Here, in addition to netrins' well-characterized chemotropic activity, we demonstrate an autocrine function for netrin-1 and netrin-3 in U87 and U373 cells that slows migration. We provide evidence that netrins promote the maturation of focal complexes, structures associated with cell movement, into focal adhesions. Consistent with this, netrin, DCC, and UNC5 homologues were associated with focal adhesions, but not focal complexes. Disrupting netrin or DCC function did not alter cell proliferation or survival. Our findings provide evidence that DCC can slow cell migration, and that neogenin and UNC5 homologues are not sufficient to substitute for DCC function in these cells. Furthermore, we identify a role for netrins as autocrine inhibitors of cell motility that promote focal adhesion formation. These findings suggest that disruption of netrin signalling may disable a mechanism that normally restrains inappropriate cell migration. PMID

  3. Dystrophin Dp71f associates with the beta1-integrin adhesion complex to modulate PC12 cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Cerna, Joel; Cerecedo, Doris; Ortega, Arturo; García-Sierra, Francisco; Centeno, Federico; Garrido, Efrain; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-01-01

    Dystrophin Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain; however, its function is unknown. To study the role of Dp71 in neuronal cells, we previously generated by antisense treatment PC12 neuronal cell clones with decreased Dp71 expression (antisense-Dp71 cells). PC12 cells express two different splicing isoforms of Dp71, a cytoplasmic variant called Dp71f and a nuclear isoform called Dp71d. We previously reported that antisense-Dp71 cells display deficient adhesion to substrate and reduced immunostaining of β1-integrin in the cell area contacting the substrate. In this study, we isolated additional antisenseDp71 clones to analyze in detail the potential involvement of Dp71f isoform with the β1-integrin adhesion system of PC12 cells. Immunofluorescence analyses as well as immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the PC12 cell β1-integrin adhesion complex is composed of β1-integrin, talin, paxillin, α-actinin, FAK and actin. In addition, our results showed that Dp71f associates with most of the β1-integrin complex components (β1-integrin, FAK, α-actinin, talin and actin). In the antisense-Dp71 cells, the deficiency of Dp71 provokes a significant reduction of the β1-integrin adhesion complex and, consequently, the deficient adhesion of these cells to laminin. In vitro binding experiments confirmed the interaction of Dp71f with FAK and β1-integrin. Our data indicate that Dp71f is a structural component of the β1-integrin adhesion complex of PC12 cells that modulates PC12 cell adhesion by conferring proper complex assembly and/or maintenance. PMID:16935300

  4. Underwater contact adhesion and microarchitecture in polyelectrolyte complexes actuated by solvent exchange.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Lee, Dong Woog; Ahn, B Kollbe; Seo, Sungbaek; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexation is critical to the formation and properties of many biological and polymeric materials, and is typically initiated by aqueous mixing followed by fluid-fluid phase separation, such as coacervation. Yet little to nothing is known about how coacervates evolve into intricate solid microarchitectures. Inspired by the chemical features of the cement proteins of the sandcastle worm, here we report a versatile and strong wet-contact microporous adhesive resulting from polyelectrolyte complexation triggered by solvent exchange. After premixing a catechol-functionalized weak polyanion with a polycation in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), the solution was applied underwater to various substrates whereupon electrostatic complexation, phase inversion, and rapid setting were simultaneously actuated by water-DMSO solvent exchange. Spatial and temporal coordination of complexation, inversion and setting fostered rapid (∼25 s) and robust underwater contact adhesion (Wad ≥ 2 J m(-2)) of complexed catecholic polyelectrolytes to all tested surfaces including plastics, glasses, metals and biological materials. PMID:26779881

  5. Underwater contact adhesion and microarchitecture in polyelectrolyte complexes actuated by solvent exchange

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sungbaek; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexation is critical to the formation and properties of many biological and polymeric materials, and is typically initiated by aqueous mixing1 followed by fluid–fluid phase separation, such as coacervation2–5. Yet little to nothing is known about how coacervates evolve into intricate solid microarchitectures. Inspired by the chemical features of the cement proteins of the sandcastle worm, here we report a versatile and strong wet-contact microporous adhesive resulting from polyelectrolyte complexation triggered by solvent exchange. After premixing a catechol-functionalized weak polyanion with a polycation in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), the solution was applied underwater to various substrates whereupon electrostatic complexation, phase inversion, and rapid setting were simultaneously actuated by water–DMSO solvent exchange. Spatial and temporal coordination of complexation, inversion and setting fostered rapid (~25 s) and robust underwater contact adhesion (Wad ≥ 2 J m−2) of complexed catecholic polyelectrolytes to all tested surfaces including plastics, glasses, metals and biological materials. PMID:26779881

  6. Controlled Curing of Adhesive Complex Coacervates with Reversible Periodate Carbohydrate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hui; Weerasekare, G. Mahika; Stewart, Russell J.

    2011-01-01

    Periodate oxidation of carbohydrates with vicinal hydroxyl groups and aromatic ortho-dihydroxyphenyl groups has been employed extensively to initiate crosslinking or conjugation reactions in adhesive biomaterials. Periodate forms stable tridentate complexes with carbohydrates containing three appropriately configured hydroxyls, such as 1,2-O-Isopropylidene-a-D-glucofuranose, that are not appreciably oxidized relative to carbohydrates with vicinal hydroxyls and ortho-dihydroxyphenyl groups. In the presence of 1,2-O-Isopropylidene-a-D-glucofuranose the rate of periodate oxidation of dihydroxy containing compounds is controlled by the rates of association and dissociation of the periodate-carbohydrate complex. By varying the ratio of 1,2-O-Isopropylidene-a-D-glucofuranose to periodate the curing rate of adhesive complex coacervates was varied over a wide range. PMID:21308985

  7. Reduction of postsurgical adhesion formation with hydrogels synthesized by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Lee, Joon-Ho

    2005-07-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG) were prepared as physical barriers for preventing surgical adhesions. These interpolymeric hydrogels were synthesized by gamma irradiation crosslinking technique. A 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm of cecal serosa and an adjacent abdominal wall were abraded with bone burr until the serosal surface was disrupted and hemorrhagic but not perforated. The denuded cecum was covered with either CMC/PEG hydrogels or a solution from a CMC/PEG hydrogel. Control rat serosa was not covered. Two weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and the adhesion was scored on a 0-5 scale. Control rat showed a significantly higher incidence of adhesions than either the CMC/PEG hydrogels or a solution from the CMC/PEG hydrogel. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that CMC/PEG hydrogels have a function of the prevention for an intra abdominal adhesion in a rat model.

  8. Formation of tunable graphene oxide coating with high adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liangxu; Wu, Huaping; Green, Stephen J; Crompton, Joanna; Zhang, Shaowei; Horsell, David W

    2016-02-10

    Graphene oxide (GO) can be applied as a coating on metals, but few of these coatings have an adhesion suitable for practical applications. We demonstrate here how to form a GO coating on metals with a high adhesion (∼10.6 MPa) and tuneable surface, which can be further applied using similar/modified techniques for special applications (e.g. anti-corrosion and anti-biofouling). PMID:26814138

  9. Interfacial tension of complex coacervated mussel adhesive protein according to the Hofmeister series.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Moon, Dustin; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kang, In Seok; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-02-01

    Complex coacervation is a liquid-liquid phase separation in a colloidal system of two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes or colloids. The interfacial tension of the coacervate phase is the key parameter for micelle formation and interactions with the encapsulating material. However, the relationship between interfacial tensions and various salt solutions is poorly understood in complex coacervation. In the present work, the complex coacervate dynamics of recombinant mussel adhesive protein (MAP) with hyaluronic acid (HA) were determined in the presence of Hofmeister series salt ions. Using measurements of absorbance, hydrodynamic diameter, capillary force, and receding contact angle in the bulk phase, the interfacial tensions of complex coacervated MAP/HA were determined to be 0.236, 0.256, and 0.287 mN/m in 250 mM NaHCOO, NaCl, and NaNO3 solutions, respectively. The sequences of interfacial tensions and contact angles of the complex coacervates in the presence of three sodium salts with different anions were found to follow the Hofmeister ordering. The tendency of interfacial tension between the coacervate and dilute phases in the presence of different types of Hofmeister salt ions could provide a better understanding of Hofmeister effects on complex coacervated materials based on the protein-polysaccharide system. This information can also be utilized for microencapsulation and adsorption by controlling intramolecular interactions. In addition, the injection molding dynamics of mussel byssus formation was potentially explained based on the measured interfacial tension of coacervated MAP. PMID:24490867

  10. P-glycoprotein Mediates Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesion Formation by Enhancing Phosphorylation of the Chloride Channel-3

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lulu; Li, Qin; Lin, Guixian; Huang, Dan; Zeng, Xuxin; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Ping; Jin, Xiaobao; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Chunmei; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shulin; Shao, Hongwei; Xu, Bin; Mao, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene and is well studied as a multi-drug resistance transporter. Peritoneal adhesion formation following abdominal surgery remains an important clinical problem. Here, we found that P-gp was highly expressed in human adhesion fibroblasts and promoted peritoneal adhesion formation in a rodent model. Knockdown of P-gp expression by intraperitoneal injection of MDR1-targeted siRNA significantly reduced both the peritoneal adhesion development rate and adhesion grades. Additionally, we found that operative injury up-regulated P-gp expression in peritoneal fibroblasts through the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway and histone H3 acetylation. The overexpression of P-gp accelerated migration and proliferation of fibroblasts via volume-activated Cl- current and cell volume regulation by enhancing phosphorylation of the chloride channel-3. Therefore, P-gp plays a critical role in postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation and may be a valuable therapeutic target for preventing the formation of peritoneal adhesions. PMID:26877779

  11. A Chitosan-Based Sinus Sealant for Reduction of Adhesion Formation in Rabbit and Sheep Models

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jennifer G.; Steinke, John W.; Das, Subinoy

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic sinusitis is the most prevalent chronic disease in the United States in adults aged 18 to 44 years, with approximately 250,000 operations performed annually. Although often successful, sinus surgery fails in greater than 15% of patients. Adhesion formation is a common complication and cause for subsequent revision surgery. Here, the authors evaluate a sprayable chitosan/starch-based sinus sealant and demonstrate its ability to reduce adhesion formation both in vitro and in 2 animal models. Study Design Randomized, controlled, animal trials. Setting Academic medical center (fibroblast experiments) and animal laboratories (sheep and rabbit studies). Subjects and Methods This sinus sealant was applied to human cultured fibroblasts obtained from surgically removed polyps to examine its ability to inhibit fibroblast migration and proliferation. The sinus sealant was applied to New Zealand White rabbits (n = 20) in an established cecal-sidewall abrasion model and to sheep (n = 10) in a sinus surgical adhesion model to examine its ability to reduce adhesion formation. Results This sinus sealant inhibited migration and proliferation of human cultured fibroblasts and reduced the total adhesion score from 4.9 to 0.3 for a total reduction of 94% (95th percentile confidence interval [CI], 78%, 100%; P < .001) in a well-established rabbit cecal-sidewall model commonly used for adhesion testing. Moreover, this sealant reduced adhesion formation from 80% to 10% for a total reduction of 70% (95th percentile CI, 57%, 93%; P = .003) in a sheep sinus adhesion surgical model. Conclusion This chitosan-based sealant demonstrates promise for reducing adhesion formation in sinus surgery. PMID:22492298

  12. Effect of Antibacterial Dental Adhesive on Multispecies Biofilms Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Wang, S.; Zhou, X.; Xu, H.H.K.; Weir, M.D.; Ge, Y.; Li, M.; Wang, S.; Li, Y.; Xu, X.; Zheng, L.

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial adhesives have favorable prospects to inhibit biofilms and secondary caries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of dental adhesives containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) on different bacteria in controlled multispecies biofilms and its regulating effect on development of biofilm for the first time. Antibacterial material was synthesized, and Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus sanguinis were chosen to form multispecies biofilms. Lactic acid assay and pH measurement were conducted to study the acid production of controlled multispecies biofilms. Anthrone method and exopolysaccharide (EPS):bacteria volume ratio measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to determine the EPS production of biofilms. The colony-forming unit counts, scanning electron microscope imaging, and dead:live volume ratio decided by confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the biomass change of controlled multispecies biofilms. The TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization imaging were used to study the proportion change in multispecies biofilms of different groups. The results showed that DMADDM-containing adhesive groups slowed the pH drop and decreased the lactic acid production noticeably, especially lactic acid production in the 5% DMADDM group, which decreased 10- to 30-fold compared with control group (P < 0.05). EPS was reduced significantly in 5% DMADDM group (P < 0.05). The DMADDM groups reduced the colony-forming unit counts significantly (P < 0.05) and had higher dead:live volume ratio in biofilms compared with control group (P < 0.05). The proportion of S. mutans decreased steadily in DMADDM-containing groups and continually increased in control group, and the biofilm had a more healthy development tendency after the regulation of DMADDM. In conclusion, the adhesives containing DMADDM had remarkable antimicrobial

  13. Effect of antibacterial dental adhesive on multispecies biofilms formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Wang, S; Zhou, X; Xu, H H K; Weir, M D; Ge, Y; Li, M; Wang, S; Li, Y; Xu, X; Zheng, L; Cheng, L

    2015-04-01

    Antibacterial adhesives have favorable prospects to inhibit biofilms and secondary caries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of dental adhesives containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) on different bacteria in controlled multispecies biofilms and its regulating effect on development of biofilm for the first time. Antibacterial material was synthesized, and Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus sanguinis were chosen to form multispecies biofilms. Lactic acid assay and pH measurement were conducted to study the acid production of controlled multispecies biofilms. Anthrone method and exopolysaccharide (EPS):bacteria volume ratio measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to determine the EPS production of biofilms. The colony-forming unit counts, scanning electron microscope imaging, and dead:live volume ratio decided by confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the biomass change of controlled multispecies biofilms. The TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization imaging were used to study the proportion change in multispecies biofilms of different groups. The results showed that DMADDM-containing adhesive groups slowed the pH drop and decreased the lactic acid production noticeably, especially lactic acid production in the 5% DMADDM group, which decreased 10- to 30-fold compared with control group (P < 0.05). EPS was reduced significantly in 5% DMADDM group (P < 0.05). The DMADDM groups reduced the colony-forming unit counts significantly (P < 0.05) and had higher dead:live volume ratio in biofilms compared with control group (P < 0.05). The proportion of S. mutans decreased steadily in DMADDM-containing groups and continually increased in control group, and the biofilm had a more healthy development tendency after the regulation of DMADDM. In conclusion, the adhesives containing DMADDM had remarkable antimicrobial

  14. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig; Andrews, Katrina A; Szestak, Tadge; Zhao, Yuguang; Larsen, Sine; Craig, Alister G; Higgins, Matthew K

    2013-02-22

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria. The PfEMP1 family of adhesive proteins is responsible for this sequestration by mediating interactions with diverse human ligands. In addition, as the primary targets of acquired, protective immunity, the PfEMP1s are potential vaccine candidates. PfEMP1s contain large extracellular ectodomains made from CIDR (cysteine-rich interdomain regions) and DBL (Duffy-binding-like) domains and show extensive variation in sequence, size, and domain organization. Here we use biophysical methods to characterize the entire ∼300-kDa ectodomain from IT4VAR13, a protein that interacts with the host receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). We show through small angle x-ray scattering that IT4VAR13 is rigid, elongated, and monomeric. We also show that it interacts with ICAM-1 through the DBLβ domain alone, forming a 1:1 complex. These studies provide a first low resolution structural view of a PfEMP1 ectodomain in complex with its ligand. They show that it combines a modular domain arrangement consisting of individual ligand binding domains, with a defined higher order architecture that exposes the ICAM-1 binding surface to allow adhesion. PMID:23297413

  15. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  16. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  17. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms. PMID:26456320

  18. Comparative Dynamics of Retrograde Actin Flow and Focal Adhesions: Formation of Nascent Adhesions Triggers Transition from Fast to Slow Flow

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y.; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  19. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  20. Letting Go of JuNK by Disassembly of Adhesive Complexes.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jonathan E; Freeman, Marc R

    2015-12-01

    Immature neural circuits form excessive synaptic connections that are later refined through pruning of exuberant branches. In this issue, Bornstein et al. identify a role for JNK signaling in selective axon elimination through disassembly of cell adhesion complexes. PMID:26637791

  1. Plasticity of hydrogen bond networks regulates mechanochemistry of cell adhesion complexes.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2014-06-24

    Mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion receptor proteins regulate a range of cellular functions by formation and rupture of noncovalent interactions with ligands. Typically, force decreases the lifetimes of intact complexes ("slip bonds"), making the discovery that these lifetimes can also be prolonged ("catch bonds") a surprise. We created a microscopic analytic theory by incorporating the structures of selectin and integrin receptors into a conceptual framework based on the theory of stochastic equations, which quantitatively explains a wide range of experimental data (including catch bonds at low forces and slip bonds at high forces). Catch bonds arise due to force-induced remodeling of hydrogen bond networks, a finding that also accounts for unbinding in structurally unrelated integrin-fibronectin and actomyosin complexes. For the selectin family, remodeling of hydrogen bond networks drives an allosteric transition resulting in the formation of the maximum number of hydrogen bonds determined only by the structure of the receptor and independent of the ligand. A similar transition allows us to predict the increase in the number of hydrogen bonds in a particular allosteric state of α5β1 integrin-fibronectin complex, a conformation which is yet to be crystallized. We also make a testable prediction that a single point mutation (Tyr51Phe) in the ligand associated with selectin should dramatically alter the nature of the catch bond compared with the wild type. Our work suggests that nature uses a ductile network of hydrogen bonds to engineer function over a broad range of forces. PMID:24927549

  2. Efficiency of heating methods for polymer fibers with formation of adhesion compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Markova, L.V.; Markov, E.M.; Pinchuk, I.S.

    1995-12-01

    Efficiency of contact and contactless methods of heating of a fiber polymer material upon formation of adhesion compounds between its layers is analyzed. The advisability of contact heating in the preliminary stage and contactless heating in the final stage of formation of compounds is shown.

  3. Neurite Fasciculation Mediated by Complexes of Axonin-1 and Ng Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Stefan; Spirig, Marianne; Ginsburg, Claudia; Buchstaller, Andrea; Berger, Philipp; Lanz, Rainer; Rader, Christoph; Vogt, Lorenz; Kunz, Beat; Sonderegger, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecules composed of immunoglobulin and fibronectin type III-like domains have been implicated in cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth, and fasciculation. Axonin-1 and Ng cell adhesion molecule (NgCAM), two molecules with predominantly axonal expression exhibit homophilic interactions across the extracellular space (axonin- 1/axonin-1 and NgCAM/NgCAM) and a heterophilic interaction (axonin-1–NgCAM) that occurs exclusively in the plane of the same membrane (cis-interaction). Using domain deletion mutants we localized the NgCAM homophilic binding in the Ig domains 1-4 whereas heterophilic binding to axonin-1 was localized in the Ig domains 2-4 and the third FnIII domain. The NgCAM–NgCAM interaction could be established simultaneously with the axonin-1–NgCAM interaction. In contrast, the axonin-1–NgCAM interaction excluded axonin-1/axonin-1 binding. These results and the examination of the coclustering of axonin-1 and NgCAM at cell contacts, suggest that intercellular contact is mediated by a symmetric axonin-12/NgCAM2 tetramer, in which homophilic NgCAM binding across the extracellular space occurs simultaneously with a cis-heterophilic interaction of axonin-1 and NgCAM. The enhanced neurite fasciculation after overexpression of NgCAM by adenoviral vectors indicates that NgCAM is the limiting component for the formation of the axonin-12/NgCAM2 complexes and, thus, neurite fasciculation in DRG neurons. PMID:9852159

  4. Formation of an artificial blood vessel: adhesion force measurements with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoener, Gregor; Campbell, Julie H.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2004-10-01

    We are investigating the formation of a tissue capsule around a foreign body. This tissue capsule can be used as an autologous graft for the replacement of diseased blood vessels or for bypass surgery. The graft is grown in the peritoneal cavity of the recipient and the formation starts with the adhesion of cells to the foreign body. We identify the cell type and measure the adhesion of these cells to foreign materials using optical tweezers. Cell adhesion to macroscopic samples and microspheres is investigated. No difference in the adhesion force was measurable for polyethylene, silicon and Tygon on a scale accessible to optical tweezers. The density of adherent cells was found to vary strongly, being highest on polyethylene. The mean rupture forces for cell-microsphere adhesion ranged from 24 to 39 pN and changed upon preadsorption of bovine serum albumin. For plain microspheres, the highest mean rupture force was found for PMMA, which also showed the highest adhesion probability for the cell-microsphere interaction.

  5. Administration of Intravenous Inf liximab for Prevention of Peritoneal Adhesions Formation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Vafaei, Homeira; Moradian, Farid; Kazemi, Kourosh; Tanideh, Nader; Shayan, Leila; Nikeghbalian, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of intravenous infliximab in preventing the formation of peritoneal adhesions in an animal model of rat. Methods: This was an experimental study being performed in animal laboratory of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during 2012. Sixty albino rats were randomly assigned in to three groups by Random Design Method. The first group received single infliximab injection (n=20), the second one received double infliximab injection (n=20) and the third received nothing (n=20), after receiving intra-peritoneal injection of talc for induction of peritoneal adhesions. All the animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks and the peritoneal adhesions were evaluated according to Nair classification. Results: We observed that the mean adhesion grade was lower in those who received double dose of infliximib when compared to single dose and controls. However the difference did not reach a significant value (p=0.178). The grade of peritoneal adhesion was also comparable between the three study groups (p=0.103). The mean number of 1st WBC count was also comparable between three study groups (p=0.382). We observed that 2nd WBC count was also comparable between two study groups (p=0.317). Conclusion: Administration of intravenous infliximab after intraabdominal surgicalprocedures would not prevent the formation of peritoneal adhesions in animal model of albino rat. PMID:27162911

  6. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation in the rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V.; Jetha, N. )

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid solution in preventing intraperitoneal (IP) adhesions. The study design was prospective, randomized and blinded and involved 83 rats. Measured serosal injury was inflicted using a CO2 laser on the right uterine horn of the rat. Animals randomized to groups 1 and 2 received either 0.4% hyaluronic acid or its diluent phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally before and after the injury. In groups 3 and 4, the same solutions were used only after the injury. Postoperative adhesions were assessed at second-look laparotomy. Histologic assessment of the fresh laser injury was carried out on uteri pretreated with hyaluronic acid, PBS, or nothing. Pretreatment with hyaluronic acid was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative adhesions and a significantly decreased crater depth. Hyaluronic acid appears to reduce postoperative IP adhesion formation by coating the serosal surfaces and decreasing the extent of initial tissue injury.

  7. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion-site formation.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Grégory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin J; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P

    2007-02-01

    Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion, and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction, and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  8. Focal Adhesion Kinase regulates cell-cell contact formation in epithelial cells via modulation of Rho

    SciTech Connect

    Playford, Martin P.; Vadali, Kavita; Cai Xinming; Burridge, Keith; Schaller, Michael D.

    2008-10-15

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and survival. Recent studies have also implicated FAK in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Here, evidence is presented showing that siRNA-mediated suppression of FAK levels in NBT-II cells and expression of dominant negative mutants of FAK caused loss of epithelial cell morphology and inhibited the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Rac and Rho have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cell adhesions and can be regulated by FAK signaling. Expression of active Rac or Rho in NBT-II cells disrupted formation of cell-cell contacts, thus promoting a phenotype similar to FAK-depleted cells. The loss of intercellular contacts in FAK-depleted cells is prevented upon expression of a dominant negative Rho mutant, but not a dominant negative Rac mutant. Inhibition of FAK decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and elevated the level of GTP-bound Rho. This suggests that FAK regulates cell-cell contact formation by regulation of Rho.

  9. Efficient inhibition of the formation of joint adhesions by ERK2 small interfering RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fengfeng; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi; Zeng, Bingfang; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 is considered to be crucial. Based on these theories, we examined the effects of a lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERK2 on the suppression of joint adhesion formation in vivo. The effects were assessed in vivo from different aspects including the adhesion score, histology and joint contracture angle. We found that the adhesions in the ERK2 siRNA group became soft and weak, and were easily stretched. Accordingly, the flexion contracture angles in the ERK2 siRNA group were also reduced (P < 0.05 compared with the control group). The animals appeared healthy, with no signs of impaired wound healing. In conclusion, local delivery of a lentivirus-mediated siRNA targeting ERK2 can ameliorate joint adhesion formation effectively and safely.

  10. Neuropilin-2 regulates α6β1 integrin in the formation of focal adhesions and signaling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Pursell, Bryan; Standley, Clive; Fogarty, Kevin; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-01-15

    The neuropilins (NRPs) contribute to the function of cancer cells in their capacity as VEGF receptors. Given that NRP2 is induced in breast cancer and correlates with aggressive disease, we examined the role of NRP2 in regulating the interaction of breast cancer cells with the ECM. Using epithelial cells from breast tumors, we defined NRP2(high) and NRP2(low) populations that differed in integrin expression and adhesion to laminin. Specifically, the NRP2(high) population adhered more avidly to laminin and expressed high levels of the α6β1 integrin than the NRP2(low) population. The NRP2(high) population formed numerous focal adhesions on laminin that were not seen in the NRP2(low) population. These results were substantiated using breast carcinoma cell lines that express NRP2 and α6β1 integrin. Depletion experiments revealed that adhesive strength on laminin but not collagen is dependent on NRP2, and that VEGF is needed for adhesion on laminin. A specific interaction between NRP2 and α6β1 integrin was detected by co-immunoprecipitation. NRP2 is necessary for focal adhesion formation on laminin and for the association of α6β1 integrin with the cytoskeleton. NRP2 also facilitates α6β1-integrin-mediated activation of FAK and Src. Unexpectedly, we discovered that NRP2 is located in focal adhesions on laminin. The mechanism by which NRP2 regulates the interaction of α6β1 integrin with laminin to form focal adhesions involves PKC activation. Together, our data reveal a new VEGF-NRP2 signaling pathway that activates the α6β1 integrin and enables it to form focal adhesions and signal. This pathway is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:22302985

  11. Injury and adhesion formation following ovarian wedge resection with different thermal surgical modalities.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, N; Isaacson, K; Flotte, T; Schiff, I; Anderson, R R

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the role of bleeding, acute thermal damage, and charring in adhesion formation. Postoperative adhesions were compared following ovarian wedge resection in 48 rabbits using different lasers, electrosurgery, and scalpel. Twelve ovaries were sectioned per modality, in randomized pairs. Acute thermal injury as assessed by histology, bleeding, and charring differed among the modalities used. Adhesions were assessed 4 weeks later, by an investigator completely blinded of the treatment protocol. The adhesion scores were 11.6 +/- 8.0 with pulsed Er:YAG laser; 11.9 +/- 7.5 with scalpel; 8.3 +/- 9.3 with electrocautery; 6.7 +/- 8.8 with a continuous (c.w.) Nd:YAG laser; 5.3 +/- 4.8 with c.w. CO2 laser; 3.1 +/- 2.7 with pulsed CO2 laser; 1.7 +/- 1.8 with pulsed Ho:YAG laser; and 0.8 +/- 1.5 in the control (no resection) group. Ho:YAG, Nd:YAG, and electrocautery were completely hemostatic. Bleeding was minimal with the CO2 lasers. Er:YAG and scalpel caused maximum bleeding, requiring hemostatic measures to prevent exsanguination. Charring occurred with electrocautery, CO2 laser, and Nd:YAG laser. Bleeding and charring correlated with adhesion formation, but the histological depth of thermal damage did not. The Ho:YAG laser is a hemostatic, fiber-optic compatible laser causing significantly fewer adhesions (P < 0.04) than scalpel, electrocautery, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, and c.w. CO2 lasers. Clinical use of the Ho:YAG laser, and the role of carbonization in promoting adhesions, deserve further study. PMID:8515673

  12. Postoperative Adhesion Formation in a Rabbit Model: Monopolar Electrosurgery Versus Ultrasonic Scalpel

    PubMed Central

    Lazarou, George; Apostol, Radu; Khullar, Poonam; Okonkwo, Linda; Nezhat, Farr

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To determine if surgery using ultrasonic energy for dissection results in less adhesion formation than monopolar electrosurgical energy in the late (8 weeks) postoperative period. Methods: Injuries were induced in rabbits by using ultrasonic energy on one uterine horn and the adjacent pelvic sidewall and using monopolar energy on the opposite side. Eight weeks postoperatively, the rabbits underwent autopsy and clinical and pathologic scoring of adhesions was performed by blinded investigators. Results: There was no significant difference in clinical adhesion scores between the two modalities. The mean clinical score for monopolar cautery was 1.00 versus 0.88 for the Harmonic device (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, Ohio) (P = .71). Furthermore, there was no significant difference found in the pathologic adhesion scores between the ultrasonic scalpel and monopolar energy. The mean pathologic score for monopolar electrosurgery was 4.35 versus 3.65 for the Harmonic scalpel (P = .30). Conclusion: Neither monopolar electrosurgery nor ultrasonic dissection is superior in the prevention of adhesion formation in the late postoperative period. PMID:26005316

  13. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  14. Plasticity of hydrogen bond networks regulates mechanochemistry of cell adhesion complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion receptor proteins regulate a range of cellular functions by formation and rupture of noncovalent interactions with ligands. Typically, force decreases the lifetimes of intact complexes (“slip bonds”), making the discovery that these lifetimes can also be prolonged (“catch bonds”) a surprise. We created a microscopic analytic theory by incorporating the structures of selectin and integrin receptors into a conceptual framework based on the theory of stochastic equations, which quantitatively explains a wide range of experimental data (including catch bonds at low forces and slip bonds at high forces). Catch bonds arise due to force-induced remodeling of hydrogen bond networks, a finding that also accounts for unbinding in structurally unrelated integrin–fibronectin and actomyosin complexes. For the selectin family, remodeling of hydrogen bond networks drives an allosteric transition resulting in the formation of the maximum number of hydrogen bonds determined only by the structure of the receptor and independent of the ligand. A similar transition allows us to predict the increase in the number of hydrogen bonds in a particular allosteric state of α5β1 integrin–fibronectin complex, a conformation which is yet to be crystallized. We also make a testable prediction that a single point mutation (Tyr51Phe) in the ligand associated with selectin should dramatically alter the nature of the catch bond compared with the wild type. Our work suggests that nature uses a ductile network of hydrogen bonds to engineer function over a broad range of forces. PMID:24927549

  15. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. PMID:27367677

  16. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. PMID:27367677

  17. Ultrastable cellulosome-adhesion complex tightens under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeler, Constantin; Malinowska, Klara H.; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Milles, Lukas F.; Jobst, Markus A.; Durner, Ellis; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B.; Bayer, Edward A.; Schulten, Klaus; Gaub, Hermann E.; Nash, Michael A.

    2014-12-01

    Challenging environments have guided nature in the development of ultrastable protein complexes. Specialized bacteria produce discrete multi-component protein networks called cellulosomes to effectively digest lignocellulosic biomass. While network assembly is enabled by protein interactions with commonplace affinities, we show that certain cellulosomal ligand-receptor interactions exhibit extreme resistance to applied force. Here, we characterize the ligand-receptor complex responsible for substrate anchoring in the Ruminococcus flavefaciens cellulosome using single-molecule force spectroscopy and steered molecular dynamics simulations. The complex withstands forces of 600-750 pN, making it one of the strongest bimolecular interactions reported, equivalent to half the mechanical strength of a covalent bond. Our findings demonstrate force activation and inter-domain stabilization of the complex, and suggest that certain network components serve as mechanical effectors for maintaining network integrity. This detailed understanding of cellulosomal network components may help in the development of biocatalysts for production of fuels and chemicals from renewable plant-derived biomass.

  18. The role of cell adhesion molecules in visual circuit formation: from neurite outgrowth to maps and synaptic specificity.

    PubMed

    Missaire, Mégane; Hindges, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The formation of visual circuitry is a multistep process that involves cell-cell interactions based on a range of molecular mechanisms. The correct implementation of individual events, including axon outgrowth and guidance, the formation of the topographic map, or the synaptic targeting of specific cellular subtypes, are prerequisites for a fully functional visual system that is able to appropriately process the information captured by the eyes. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) with their adhesive properties and their high functional diversity have been identified as key actors in several of these fundamental processes. Because of their growth-promoting properties, CAMs play an important role in neuritogenesis. Furthermore, they are necessary to control additional neurite development, regulating dendritic spacing and axon pathfinding. Finally, trans-synaptic interactions of CAMs ensure cell type-specific connectivity as a basis for the establishment of circuits processing distinct visual features. Recent discoveries implicating CAMs in novel mechanisms have led to a better general understanding of neural circuit formation, but also revealed an increasing complexity of their function. This review aims at describing the different levels of action for CAMs to shape neural connectivity, with a special focus on the visual system. PMID:25649254

  19. The role of cell adhesion molecules in visual circuit formation: From neurite outgrowth to maps and synaptic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Missaire, Mégane

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of visual circuitry is a multistep process that involves cell–cell interactions based on a range of molecular mechanisms. The correct implementation of individual events, including axon outgrowth and guidance, the formation of the topographic map, or the synaptic targeting of specific cellular subtypes, are prerequisites for a fully functional visual system that is able to appropriately process the information captured by the eyes. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) with their adhesive properties and their high functional diversity have been identified as key actors in several of these fundamental processes. Because of their growth‐promoting properties, CAMs play an important role in neuritogenesis. Furthermore, they are necessary to control additional neurite development, regulating dendritic spacing and axon pathfinding. Finally, trans‐synaptic interactions of CAMs ensure cell type‐specific connectivity as a basis for the establishment of circuits processing distinct visual features. Recent discoveries implicating CAMs in novel mechanisms have led to a better general understanding of neural circuit formation, but also revealed an increasing complexity of their function. This review aims at describing the different levels of action for CAMs to shape neural connectivity, with a special focus on the visual system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 569–583, 2015 PMID:25649254

  20. Complex organic molecules and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Star forming regions are characterised by the presence of a wealth of chemical species. For the past two to three decades, ever more complex organic species have been detected in the hot cores of protostars. The evolution of these molecules in the course of the star forming process is still uncertain, but it is likely that they are partially incorporated into protoplanetary disks and then into planetesimals and the small bodies of planetary systems. The complex organic molecules seen in star forming regions are particularly interesting since they probably make up building blocks for prebiotic chemistry. Recently we showed that these species were also present in the cold gas in prestellar cores, which represent the very first stages of star formation. These detections question the models which were until now accepted to account for the presence of complex organic molecules in star forming regions. In this article, we shortly review our current understanding of complex organic molecule formation in the early stages of star formation, in hot and cold cores alike and present new results on the formation of their likely precursor radicals.

  1. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  2. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian; Baum, Linda G.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  3. Severe inflammatory reaction induced by peritoneal trauma is the key driving mechanism of postoperative adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors have been put forward as a driving mechanism of surgery-triggered adhesion formation (AF). In this study, we underline the key role of specific surgical trauma related with open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic (LS) conditions in postoperative AF and we aimed to study peritoneal tissue inflammatory reaction (TIR), remodelling specific complications of open surgery (OS) versus LS and subsequently evaluating AF induced by these conditions. Methods A prospective randomized study was done in 80 anaesthetised female Wistar rats divided equally into 2 groups. Specific traumatic OS conditions were induced by midline incision line (MIL) extension and tissue drying and specific LS conditions were remodelled by intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation at the 10 cm of water. TIR was evaluated at the 24th, 72nd, 120th and 168th hour by scoring scale. Statistical analysis was performed by the non-parametric t test and two-way ANOVA using Bonferroni post-tests. Results More pronounced residual TIR was registered after OS than after LS. There were no significant TIR interactions though highly significant differences were observed between the OS and LS groups (p < 0.0001) with regard to surgical and time factors. The TIR change differences between the OS and LS groups were pronounced with postoperative time p < 0.05 at the 24th and 72nd; p < 0.01 - 120th and p < 0.001 - 168th hrs. Adhesion free wounds were observed in 20.0 and 31.0% of cases after creation of OS and LS conditions respectively; with no significant differences between these values (p > 0.05). However larger adhesion size (41.67 ± 33.63) was observed after OS in comparison with LS (20.31 ± 16.38). The upper-lower 95% confidential limits ranged from 60.29 to 23.04 and from 29.04 to 11.59 respectively after OS and LS groups with significant differences (p = 0.03). Analogous changes were observed in adhesion severity values. Subsequently, severe TIR parameters were followed by larger sizes of severe

  4. Influence of Aae Autotransporter Protein on Adhesion and Biofilm Formation by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Ana Carla Robatto; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans colonizes oral cavity by binding to and invading epithelial cells as well as by participating in biofilms formed on hard surfaces. Aae, an autotransporter protein, is implicated in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Due to the multiple functions of bacterial autotransporter proteins, this study aimed to evaluate the role of aae in A. actinomycetemcomitans ability to adhere to both saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and biofilm. An aae null mutant was constructed. Its hydrophobic properties as well as its ability to adhere to epithelial cells, SHA and to form biofilm were evaluated and compared with the parental strain, A. actinomycetemcomitans VT1169. The aae null mutant showed reduced hydrophobicity, as well as decreased binding to SHA and biofilm formation compared to the parental strain. These data suggest that aae mediates A. actinomycetemcomitans adhesion to epithelial cells and may be involved in biofilm formation and interaction with adsorbed salivary proteins. PMID:27224556

  5. Physicochemical analysis of initial adhesion and biofilm formation of Methanosarcina barkeri on polymer support material.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vi; Karunakaran, Esther; Collins, Gavin; Biggs, Catherine A

    2016-07-01

    The retention of selective biofilms of Methanosarcina species within anaerobic digesters could reduce start-up times and enhance the efficiency of the process in treating high-strength domestic sewage. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of the surface characteristics of six common polymer support materials on the initial adhesion of the model methanogen, Methanosarcina barkeri, and to assess the potential of these support materials as selective biofilm carriers. Results from both the initial adhesion tests and extended DLVO (xDLVO) model correlated with each other, with PVC (12% surface coverage/mm(2)), PTFE (6% surface coverage/mm(2)), and PP (6% surface coverage/mm(2)), shown to be the better performing support materials for initial adhesion, as well as subsequent biofilm formation by M. barkeri after 72h. Experimental results of these three support materials showed that the type of material strongly influenced the extent of adhesion from M. barkeri (p<0.0001), and the xDLVO model was able to explain the results in these environmental conditions. Therefore, DLVO physicochemical forces were found to be influential on the initial adhesion of M. barkeri. Scanning electron microscopy suggested that production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from M. barkeri could facilitate further biofilm development. This study highlights the potential of using the xDLVO model to rapidly identify suitable materials for the selective adhesion of M. barkeri, which could be beneficial in both the start-up and long-term phases of anaerobic digestion. PMID:27038917

  6. Formation of semi-dilute adhesion domains driven by weak elasticity-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2016-08-21

    Cell-cell adhesion is established by specific binding of receptor and ligand proteins anchored in the cell membranes. The adhesion bonds attract each other and often aggregate into large clusters that are central to many biological processes. One possible origin of attractive interactions between adhesion bonds is the elastic response of the membranes to their deformation by the bonds. Here, we analyze these elasticity-mediated interactions using a novel mean-field approach. Our analysis of systems at different densities of bonds, ϕ, reveals that the phase diagram, i.e., the binodal and spinodal lines, exhibit a nearly universal behavior when the temperature T is plotted against the scaled density x = ϕξ(2), where ξ is the linear size of the membrane's region affected by the presence of a single isolated bond. The critical point (ϕc , Tc) is located at very low densities, and slightly below Tc we identify phase coexistence between two low-density phases. Dense adhesion domains are observed only when the height by which the bonds deform the membranes, h0, is much larger than their thermal roughness, Δ, which occurs at very low temperatures T≪Tc. We, thus, conclude that the elasticity-mediated interactions are weak and cannot be regarded as responsible for the formation of dense adhesion domains. The weakness of the elasticity-mediated effect and its relevance to dilute systems only can be attributed to the fact that the membrane's elastic energy saturates in the semi-dilute regime, when the typical spacing between the bonds r≳ξ, i.e., for x≲ 1. Therefore, at higher densities, only the mixing entropy of the bonds (which always favors uniform distributions) is thermodynamically relevant. We discuss the implications of our results for the question of immunological synapse formation, and demonstrate that the elasticity-mediated interactions may be involved in the aggregation of these semi-dilute membrane domains. PMID:27426284

  7. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Nobrega, Marcelo M.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  8. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  9. Quantitative Characterization of the Influence of the Nanoscale Morphology of Nanostructured Surfaces on Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Vyas, Varun; Patil, Rajendra; Sharma, Vimal; Scopelliti, Pasquale Emanuele; Bongiorno, Gero; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Gade, Wasudev Namdev; Milani, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological features. The

  10. Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) promotes the adhesion of marine bacteria and algae and enhances following biofilm formation in artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinpeng; Abdoli, Leila; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms in the marine environment is essential for initiation and following development of biofouling. A variety of factors play roles in regulating the adhesion. Here we report the influence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in artificial seawater on attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp., Chlorella and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on silicon wafer. Extra addition of the typical divalent cations in culturing solution gives rise to significantly enhanced adhesion of the microorganisms. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) affect the adhesion of Bacillus sp. presumably by regulating aggregation and formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The ions alter quantity and types of the proteins in EPS, in turn affecting subsequent adhesion. However, it is noted that Mg(2+) promotes adhesion of Chlorella likely by regulating EPS formation and polysaccharide synthesis. Ca(2+) plays an important role in protein expression to enhance the adhesion of Chlorella. For Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ca(2+) expedites protein synthesis for enhanced adhesion. The results shed some light on effective ways of utilizing divalent cations to mediate formation of biofilms on the marine structures for desired performances. PMID:27362920

  11. Mechanism of platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and microparticle formation under high shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Armin J.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Schumann, Hannah; Specht, Hanno M.; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the mechanism of platelet adhesion to immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF) and subsequent formation of platelet-derived microparticles mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) under high shear stress. As visualized in whole blood perfused in a flow chamber, platelet attachment to VWF involved one or few membrane areas of 0.05 to 0.1 μm2 that formed discrete adhesion points (DAPs) capable of resisting force in excess of 160 pN. Under the influence of hydrodynamic drag, membrane tethers developed between the moving platelet body and DAPs firmly adherent to immobilized VWF. Continued stretching eventually caused the separation of many such tethers, leaving on the surface tube-shaped or spherical microparticles with a diameter as low as 50 to 100 nm. Adhesion receptors (GPIbα, αIIbβ3) and phosphatidylserine were expressed on the surface of these microparticles, which were procoagulant. Shearing platelet-rich plasma at the rate of 10 000 s–1 in a cone-and-plate viscosimeter increased microparticle counts up to 55-fold above baseline. Blocking the GPIb-VWF interaction abolished microparticle generation in both experimental conditions. Thus, a biomechanical process mediated by GPIbα-VWF bonds in rapidly flowing blood may not only initiate platelet arrest onto reactive vascular surfaces but also generate procoagulant microparticles that further enhance thrombus formation. PMID:16449527

  12. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  13. Effects of Intraperitoneal Administration of Simvastatin in Prevention of Postoperative Intra-abdominal Adhesion Formation in Animal Model of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Javaherzadeh, Mojtaba; Shekarchizadeh, Ali; Kafaei, Marjan; Mirafshrieh, Abass; Mosaffa, Nariman; Sabet, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the preventive effects of local administration of simvastatin for postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in animal model of rat.  Methods: In this experimental study, 32 Wistar albino rats as the animal model of intra-abdominal adhesion formation were included. Adhesions were induced in all the animals via abrasion of the peritoneal and intestinal surface during laparotomy. Afterwards, the rats were randomly assigned to receive simvastatin (30 mg/kg body weight) as a single intraperitoneal dose at the time of laparotomy (n=16) or normal saline in same volume at the same time (n=16). At the day 21, animals were euthanized and the adhesions were quantified clinically (via repeated laparotomy) and pathologically and compared between the two groups. Results: The baseline characteristics of the animals were comparable between two study groups. Clinically, in simvastatin group, 10 rats (62.5%) did not develop any adhesion and 6 (37.5%) had first-grade adhesion; whereas in the control group, 11 (68.8%) rats had first- and 5 (31.2%) had second-grade adhesions (p<0.001). Pathologically, in simvastatin group, 6 rats (37.5%) had first-grade adhesion, while in control group, 11 rats (68.8%) had first- and 5 (31.2%) had second-grade adhesions (p<0.001). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that intraperitoneal administration of simvastatin is an effective method for prevention of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in animal model of rat.   PMID:27540550

  14. Adhesion and biofilm formation in artificial saliva and susceptibility of yeasts isolated from chronic kidney patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Paula Assis; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; Mendonça, Patrícia de Souza Bonfim; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Negri, Melyssa

    2015-09-01

    Yeasts of the genera Candida and Saccharomyces are opportunist pathogens and cause oral lesions, especially in immunocompromised patients. This study assessed yeasts isolated from chronic kidney patients undergoing haemodialysis for their adhesion capacity, biofilm formation and susceptibility to antifungal agents. Ten isolates of Candida spp. and one isolate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were tested for adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BECs), adhesion and formation of biofilm in artificial saliva and their susceptibility profile to antifungal agents. Adhesion and biofilm formation were undertaken in polystyrene plates with artificial saliva, whilst susceptibility to antifungal agents was evaluated by broth microdilution. Candida parapsilosis had the highest adhesion index in BECs (154.55 ± 22.13) and Candida rugosa was the species with the highest adhesion capacity (18 398  Abs cm(-2)) in abiotic surface with artificial saliva. Candida albicans provided the greatest biofilm formation (2035  Abs cm(-2) ± 0.09) but was revealed to be susceptible to the five antifungal agents under analysis. However, some non-albicans Candida isolates showed a lower susceptibility for the antifungal agents itraconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole. All of the species were sensitive to amphotericin B and nystatin. The current analysis showed that yeasts isolated from the mouth of chronic kidney patients undergoing haemodialysis varied significantly with regard to their capacity for adherence, biofilm formation and susceptibility to antifungal agents, underscoring the high virulence of non-albicans Candida species. PMID:26297016

  15. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Chou, Joshua; de Vega, Susana; Mizuniwa, Chihiro; Sekimoto, Kaori; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Teneurin-4 (Ten-4), a transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the central nervous system; however, its cellular and molecular function in neuronal differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in neurite outgrowth. Ten-4 expression was induced during neurite outgrowth of the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2a. Ten-4 protein was localized at the neurite growth cones. Knockdown of Ten-4 expression in Neuro-2a cells decreased the formation of the filopodia-like protrusions and the length of individual neurites. Conversely, overexpression of Ten-4 promoted filopodia-like protrusion formation. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of Ten-4 reduced and elevated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-family small GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1, key molecules for the membranous protrusion formation downstream of FAK, respectively. Inhibition of the activation of FAK and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a downstream regulator of FAK and Cdc42, blocked protrusion formation by Ten-4 overexpression. Further, Ten-4 colocalized with phosphorylated FAK in the filopodia-like protrusion regions. Together, our findings show that Ten-4 is a novel positive regulator of cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through the FAK signaling pathway.—Suzuki, N., Numakawa, T., Chou, J., de Vega, S., Mizuniwa, C., Sekimoto, K., Adachi, N., Kunugi, H., Arikawa-Hirasawa, E., Yamada, Y., Akazawa, C. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling. PMID:24344332

  16. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans arcB influences hydrophobic properties, biofilm formation and adhesion to hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Longo, PL; Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Nunes, ACR; Fernandes, BL; Mintz, K; Fives-Taylor, P; Mayer, MPA

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is still not fully elucidated. ArcAB is a two-component system which allows facultative anaerobic bacteria to sense various respiratory growth conditions and adapt their gene expression accordingly.This study investigated in A. actinomycetemcomitans the role of ArcB on the regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to saliva coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and the hydrophobic properties of the cell. These phenotypic traits were determined for an A. actinomycetemcomitans arcB deficient type and a wild type strain. Differences in hydrophobic properties were shown at early and late exponential growth phases under microaerobic incubation and at late exponential phase under anaerobiosis.The arcB mutant formed less biofilm than the wild type strain when grown under anaerobic incubation, but displayed higher biofilm formation activity under microaerobic conditions. The adherence to SHA was significantly lower in the mutant when compared with the wild type strain. These results suggest that the transmembrane sensor kinase ArcB, in A. actinomycetemcomitans, senses redox growth conditions and regulates the expression of surface components of the bacterial cell related to biofilm formation and adhesion to saliva coated surfaces. PMID:24031399

  17. The EP3 Agonist Sulprostone Enhances Platelet Adhesion But Not Thrombus Formation Under Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pasterk, Lisa; Philipose, Sonia; Eller, Kathrin; Marsche, Gunther; Heinemann, Akos; Schuligoi, Rufina

    2015-01-01

    Platelets express the EP2, EP3 and EP4 receptors. Prostaglandin (PG) E2 has a biphasic effect on platelets. Low concentrations of PGE2 enhance platelet aggregation through the activation of the EP3 receptors, while at high concentrations it attenuates aggregation via the EP4 receptor. Consequently, EP3 receptor inhibition was shown to inhibit artherothrombosis, but had no influence on bleeding time in vivo. In this study, we investigated the role of the EP3 receptor in adhesion and thrombus formation under flow conditions in vitro. The EP3 agonist sulprostone caused an increase in the adhesion of washed platelets to fibrinogen as well as to collagen under low shear stress, an effect that was blocked by the EP3 antagonist L-798106. In contrast, when whole blood was perfused over collagen-coated surfaces, sulprostone did not enhance binding and thrombus formation of platelets on collagen; at high concentrations it even attenuated this response. We conclude that in more physiological models of thrombus formation, the role for EP3 receptors is limited, indirectly suggesting that the primary action of PGE2 in haemostasis might be an inhibitory one. PMID:26228833

  18. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of −3.0 ± 0.4 nN and −330 ± 43 aJ (10−18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions. PMID:26585552

  19. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10(-18) J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions. PMID:26585552

  20. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10-18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  1. Digital oedema, adhesion formation and resistance to digital motion after primary flexor tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Chen, C H; Wu, Y F; Xu, X F; Xie, R G; Tang, J B

    2008-12-01

    The development of digital oedema, adhesion formation, and resistance to digital motion at days 0, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 14 after primary flexor tendon repairs using 102 long toes of 51 Leghorn chickens was studied. Oedema presented as tissue swelling from days 3 to 7, which peaked at day 3. After day 7, oedema was manifest as hardening of subcutaneous tissue. The degree of digital swelling correlated with the resistance to tendon motion between days 3 and 7. At day 9, granulation tissues were observed around the tendon and loose adhesions were observed at day 14. Resistance to digital motion increased significantly from day 0 to day 3, but did not increase between days 3 and 9. The early postoperative changes appear to have three stages: initial (days 0-3, increasing resistance with development of oedema), delayed (days 4-7, higher resistance with continuing oedema) and late (after day 7-9, hardening of subcutaneous tissue with development of adhesions). PMID:18936126

  2. A three-phase in-vitro system for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion and biofilm formation upon hydrogel contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly associated with contact lens (CL) -related eye infections, for which bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation upon hydrogel CLs is a specific risk factor. Whilst P. aeruginosa has been widely used as a model organism for initial biofilm formation on CLs, in-vitro models that closely reproduce in-vivo conditions have rarely been presented. Results In the current investigation, a novel in-vitro biofilm model for studying the adherence of P. aeruginosa to hydrogel CLs was established. Nutritional and interfacial conditions similar to those in the eye of a CL wearer were created through the involvement of a solid:liquid and a solid:air interface, shear forces and a complex artificial tear fluid. Bioburdens varied depending on the CL material and biofilm maturation occurred after 72 h incubation. Whilst a range of biofilm morphologies were visualised including dispersed and adherent bacterial cells, aggregates and colonies embedded in extracellular polymer substances (EPS), EPS fibres, mushroom-like formations, and crystalline structures, a compact and heterogeneous biofilm morphology predominated on all CL materials. Conclusions In order to better understand the process of biofilm formation on CLs and to test the efficacy of CL care solutions, representative in-vitro biofilm models are required. Here, we present a three-phase biofilm model that simulates the environment in the eye of a CL wearer and thus generates biofilms which resemble those commonly observed in-situ. PMID:21062489

  3. Simulation of biomolecular diffusion and complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, S A; Northrup, S H; McCammon, J A

    1986-01-01

    Diffusion is a phenomenon of very widespread importance in molecular biophysics. Diffusion can determine the rates and character of the assembly of multisubunit structures, the binding of ligands to receptors, and the internal motions of molecules and assemblies that involve solvent surface displacements. Current computer simulation techniques provide much more detailed descriptions of diffusional processes than have been available in the past. Models can be constructed to include such realistic features as structural subunits at the submolecular level (domains, monomers, or atoms); detailed electrostatic charge distributions and corresponding solvent-screened inter- and intramolecular interactions; and hydrodynamic interactions. The trajectories can be analyzed either to provide direct information on biomolecular function (e.g., the bimolecular rate constant for formation of an electron-transfer complex between two proteins), or to provide or test models for the interpretation of experimental data (e.g., the time dependence of fluorescence depolarization for segments of DNA). Here, we first review the theory of diffusional simulations, with special emphasis on new techniques such as those for obtaining transport properties of flexible assemblies and rate constants of diffusion-controlled reactions. Then we survey a variety of recent applications, including studies of large-scale motion in DNA segments and substrate "steering" in enzyme-substrate binding. We conclude with a discussion of current work (e.g., formation of protein complexes) and possible areas for future work. PMID:3955168

  4. Actomyosin-dependent formation of the mechanosensitive talin-vinculin complex reinforces actin anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanasu, Corina; Faivre, Bruno; Le Clainche, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The force generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton controls focal adhesion dynamics during cell migration. This process is thought to involve the mechanical unfolding of talin to expose cryptic vinculin-binding sites. However, the ability of the actomyosin cytoskeleton to directly control the formation of a talin-vinculin complex and the resulting activity of the complex are not known. Here we develop a microscopy assay with pure proteins in which the self-assembly of actomyosin cables controls the association of vinculin to a talin-micropatterned surface in a reversible manner. Quantifications indicate that talin refolding is limited by vinculin dissociation and modulated by the actomyosin network stability. Finally, we show that the activation of vinculin by stretched talin induces a positive feedback that reinforces the actin-talin-vinculin association. This in vitro reconstitution reveals the mechanism by which a key molecular switch senses and controls the connection between adhesion complexes and the actomyosin cytoskeleton.

  5. Role of focal adhesions and mechanical stresses in the formation and progression of the lamellipodium-lamellum interface [corrected].

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Tom; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Svitkina, Tatyana M; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Kozlov, Michael M

    2009-09-01

    Actin network in the front part of a moving cell is organized into a lamellipodium and a lamellum. A distinct lamellipodium-lamellum interface is associated with focal adhesions and consists of a series of arclike segments linking neighboring focal adhesions in the front row. The interface advances by leaping onto new rows of focal adhesions maturating underneath the lamellipodium. We propose a mechanism of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary generation, shape formation, and progression based on the elastic stresses generated in the lamellipodial actin gel by its friction against the focal adhesions. The crucial assumption of the model is that stretching stresses trigger actin gel disintegration. We compute the stress distribution throughout the actin gel and show that the gel-disintegrating stresses drive formation of a gel boundary passing through the row of focal adhesions. Our computations recover the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary shapes detected in cells and predict the mode of the boundary transition to the row of the newly maturing focal adhesions in agreement with the experimental observations. The model fully accounts for the current phenomenology of the lamellipodium-lamellum interface formation and advancing, and makes experimentally testable predictions on the dependence of these phenomena on the sizes of the focal adhesions, the character of the focal adhesion distribution on the substrate, and the velocity of the actin retrograde flow with respect to the focal adhesions. The phase diagram resulting from the model provides a background for quantitative classification of different cell types with respect to their ability to form a lamellipodium-lamellum interface. In addition, the model suggests a mechanism of nucleation of the dorsal and arclike actin bundles found in the lamellum. PMID:19720013

  6. The cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 is critical for normal enamel formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J.; Brookes, Steven J.; Draper, Clare E.; Garrod, David; Kirkham, Jennifer; Shore, Roger C.; Dixon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Nectin-1 is a member of a sub-family of immunoglobulin-like adhesion molecules and a component of adherens junctions. In the current study, we have shown that mice lacking nectin-1 exhibit defective enamel formation in their incisor teeth. Although the incisors of nectin-1-null mice were hypomineralized, the protein composition of the enamel matrix was unaltered. While strong immunostaining for nectin-1 was observed at the interface between the maturation-stage ameloblasts and the underlying cells of the stratum intermedium (SI), its absence in nectin-1-null mice correlated with separation of the cell layers at this interface. Numerous, large desmosomes were present at this interface in wild-type mice; however, where adhesion persisted in the mutant mice, the desmosomes were smaller and less numerous. Nectins have been shown to regulate tight junction formation; however, this is the first report showing that they may also participate in the regulation of desmosome assembly. Importantly, our results show that integrity of the SI–ameloblast interface is essential for normal enamel mineralization. PMID:18703497

  7. Efficacy of surface-generated nitric oxide against Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Privett, Benjamin J.; Nutz, Steven T.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    This report details the efficacy of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing xerogel surfaces composed of N-(6-aminohexyl)aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (AHAP3) and isobutyltrimethoxysilane (BTMOS) against Candida albicans adhesion, viability, and biofilm formation. A parallel plate flow cell assay was used to examine the effect of NO on planktonic fungal cells. Nitric oxide fluxes as low as 14 pmol cm−2 s−1 were sufficient to reduce fungal adhesion by ~49% over controls after 90 min. By utilizing a fluorescence live/dead assay and replicate plating, NO flux was determined to reduce fungal viability in a dose dependent manner. The formation of C. albicans biofilms on NO-releasing xerogel-coated silicon rubber (SiR) coupons was impeded when compared to control (non-NO-releasing) and bare SiR surfaces. Finally, the synergistic efficacy of NO and silver sulfadiazine against C. albicans adhered fungal cells and biofilms is reported with increased killing and biofilm inhibition over NO alone. PMID:21082455

  8. Vortex formation in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    Complex plasma experiments in ground-based laboratories as well as in microgravity conditions have shown the formation of vortex structures in various conditions (e.g., 1,2,3,4). The vortex structures formed in a complex plasma are visible by naked eyes with the help of irradiating laser and the individual dust particles in the structure give us the opportunity to study detailed physics of the commonly observed natural phenomena known such as tornadoes, typhoons, hurricanes and dust devils. Based on the Navier-Stokes equation with proper complex plasma conditions we analyze as much as possible in a universal way the vortex structure and clarifies the role of the controlling parameters like flow velocity and external magnetic field. 1. G. E. Morfill,H. M. Thomas, U. Konopka,H. Rothermel, M. Zuzic, A. Ivlev, and J. Goree, Phys,. Rev. Lett. 83, 1598 (1999). 2. E. Nebbat and R. Annou, Phys. Plasmas 17, 093702 (2010). 3. Y. Saitou and O. Ishihara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185003 (2013). 4. V. N. Tsytovich and N. G. Gusein-zade, Plasma Phys. Rep. 39, 515 (2013).

  9. Retention of a cell adhesion complex at the paranodal junction requires the cytoplasmic region of Caspr.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Leora; Sabanay, Helena; Poliak, Sebastian; Berglund, Erik O; Ranscht, Barbara; Peles, Elior

    2002-06-24

    An axonal complex of cell adhesion molecules consisting of Caspr and contactin has been found to be essential for the generation of the paranodal axo-glial junctions flanking the nodes of Ranvier. Here we report that although the extracellular region of Caspr was sufficient for directing it to the paranodes in transgenic mice, retention of the Caspr-contactin complex at the junction depended on the presence of an intact cytoplasmic domain of Caspr. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that a Caspr mutant lacking its intracellular domain was often found within the axon instead of the junctional axolemma. We further show that a short sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of Caspr mediated its binding to the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4.1B. Clustering of contactin on the cell surface induced coclustering of Caspr and immobilized protein 4.1B at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, deletion of the protein 4.1B binding site accelerated the internalization of a Caspr-contactin chimera from the cell surface. These results suggest that Caspr serves as a "transmembrane scaffold" that stabilizes the Caspr/contactin adhesion complex at the paranodal junction by connecting it to cytoskeletal components within the axon. PMID:12082082

  10. Retention of a cell adhesion complex at the paranodal junction requires the cytoplasmic region of Caspr

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Leora; Sabanay, Helena; Poliak, Sebastian; Berglund, Erik O.; Ranscht, Barbara; Peles, Elior

    2002-01-01

    An axonal complex of cell adhesion molecules consisting of Caspr and contactin has been found to be essential for the generation of the paranodal axo-glial junctions flanking the nodes of Ranvier. Here we report that although the extracellular region of Caspr was sufficient for directing it to the paranodes in transgenic mice, retention of the Caspr–contactin complex at the junction depended on the presence of an intact cytoplasmic domain of Caspr. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that a Caspr mutant lacking its intracellular domain was often found within the axon instead of the junctional axolemma. We further show that a short sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of Caspr mediated its binding to the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4.1B. Clustering of contactin on the cell surface induced coclustering of Caspr and immobilized protein 4.1B at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, deletion of the protein 4.1B binding site accelerated the internalization of a Caspr–contactin chimera from the cell surface. These results suggest that Caspr serves as a “transmembrane scaffold” that stabilizes the Caspr/contactin adhesion complex at the paranodal junction by connecting it to cytoskeletal components within the axon. PMID:12082082

  11. Inverted formin 2 in focal adhesions promotes dorsal stress fiber and fibrillar adhesion formation to drive extracellular matrix assembly

    PubMed Central

    Skau, Colleen T.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments and integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs) form integrated systems that mediate dynamic cell interactions with their environment or other cells during migration, the immune response, and tissue morphogenesis. How adhesion-associated actin structures obtain their functional specificity is unclear. Here we show that the formin-family actin nucleator, inverted formin 2 (INF2), localizes specifically to FAs and dorsal stress fibers (SFs) in fibroblasts. High-resolution fluorescence microscopy and manipulation of INF2 levels in cells indicate that INF2 plays a critical role at the SF–FA junction by promoting actin polymerization via free barbed end generation and centripetal elongation of an FA-associated actin bundle to form dorsal SF. INF2 assembles into FAs during maturation rather than during their initial generation, and once there, acts to promote rapid FA elongation and maturation into tensin-containing fibrillar FAs in the cell center. We show that INF2 is required for fibroblasts to organize fibronectin into matrix fibers and ultimately 3D matrices. Collectively our results indicate an important role for the formin INF2 in specifying the function of fibrillar FAs through its ability to generate dorsal SFs. Thus, dorsal SFs and fibrillar FAs form a specific class of integrated adhesion-associated actin structure in fibroblasts that mediates generation and remodeling of ECM. PMID:25918420

  12. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  13. Sympathetic stimulation facilitates thrombopoiesis by promoting megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilei; Du, Changhong; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhao, Gaomei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xinmiao; Li, Fengju; Zeng, Dongfeng; Chen, Fang; Wang, Song; Chen, Mo; Wang, Cheng; He, Ting; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-02-25

    The effect of sympathetic stimulation on thrombopoiesis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that both continual noise and exhaustive exercise elevate peripheral platelet levels in normal and splenectomized mice, but not in dopamine β-hydroxylase-deficient (Dbh(-/-)) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Further investigation demonstrates that sympathetic stimulation via NE or EPI injection markedly promotes platelet recovery in mice with thrombocytopenia induced by 6.0 Gy of total-body irradiation and in mice that received bone marrow transplants after 10.0 Gy of lethal irradiation. Unfavorably, sympathetic stress-stimulated thrombopoiesis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by increasing both the amount and activity of platelets in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro studies reveal that both NE and EPI promote megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation (PPF) in addition to the expansion of CD34(+) cells, thereby facilitating platelet production. It is found that α2-adrenoceptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation is involved in NE- and EPI-induced megakaryocyte adhesion and migration, and PPF is regulated by ERK1/2 activation-mediated RhoA GTPase signaling. Our data deeply characterize the role of sympathetic stimulation in the regulation of thrombopoiesis and reevaluate its physiopathological implications. PMID:26644453

  14. Arachidonic acid stimulates formation of a novel complex containing nucleolin and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa C; Williams, Jason; Johnson, Katina; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D

    2011-02-18

    Arachidonic acid (AA) stimulates cell adhesion through a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase-mediated RhoA signaling pathway. Here we report that a proteomic screen following AA-treatment identified nucleolin, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, in a complex with the GTPase, RhoA, that also included the Rho kinase, ROCK. AA-stimulated cell adhesion was inhibited by expression of nucleolin-targeted shRNA and formation of the multiprotein complex was blocked by expression of dominant-negative RhoA. AA-treatment also induced ROCK-dependent serine phosphorylation of nucleolin and translocation of nucleolin from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it appeared to co-localize with RhoA. These data suggest the existence of a new signaling pathway through which the location and post-translational state of nucleolin are modulated. PMID:21281639

  15. Cadmium(II) complex formation with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Mah, Vicky; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2010-03-01

    Complex formation between heavy metal ions and glutathione (GSH) is considered as the initial step in many detoxification processes in living organisms. In this study the structure and coordination between the cadmium(II) ion and GSH were investigated in aqueous solutions (pH 7.5 and 11.0) and in the solid state, using a combination of spectroscopic techniques. The similarity of the Cd K-edge and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the solid compound [Cd(GS)(GSH)]ClO(4).3H(2)O, precipitating at pH 3.0, with the previously studied cysteine compound {Cd(HCys)(2).H(2)O}(2).H(3)O(+).ClO(4) (-) corresponds to Cd(S-GS)(3)O (dominating) and Cd(S-GS)(4) four-coordination within oligomeric complexes with mean bond distances of 2.51 +/- 0.02 A for Cd-S and 2.24 +/- 0.04 A for Cd-O. For cadmium(II) solutions (C (Cd(II)) approximately 0.05 M) at pH 7.5 with moderate excess of GSH (C (GSH)/C (Cd(II)) = 3.0-5.0), a mix of Cd(S-GS)(3)O (dominating) and Cd(S-GS)(4) species is consistent with the broad (113)Cd NMR resonances in the range 632-658 ppm. In alkaline solutions (pH 11.0 and C (GSH)/C (Cd(II)) = 2.0 or 3.0), two distinct peaks at 322 and 674 ppm are obtained. The first peak indicates six-coordinated mononuclear and dinuclear complexes with CdS(2)N(2)(N/O)(2) and CdSN(3)O(2) coordination in fast exchange, whereas the second corresponds to Cd(S-GS)(4) sites. At high ligand excess the tetrathiolate complex, Cd(S-GS)(4), characterized by a sharp delta((113)Cd) NMR signal at 677 ppm, predominates. The average Cd-S distance, obtained from the X-ray absorption spectra, varied within a narrow range, 2.49-2.53 A, for all solutions (pH 7.5 and 11.0) regardless of the coordination geometry. PMID:20035360

  16. A systemic review of randomized controlled studies about prevention with pharmacologic agents of adhesion formation in the rat uterine horn model

    PubMed Central

    Ulug, Pasa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evaluation of treatment attempts in postoperative adhesion formation is pivotal for the prevention of several morbidities including infertility, pelvic pain, bowel obstruction, and subsequent intraoperative complications. The purpose of this systemic review was to assess the literature on the rat uterine horn model for adhesion formation and treatment modalities to prevent adhesion in the most frequently used experimental animal model. Material and methods We performed a systemic review of publications from January 1st 2000 to December 31st 2013 via a PubMed search. A high number of agents were evaluated for the prevention of postoperative adhesion formation in the rat uterine horn model. Results According to most of the studies, adjuvants such as antiinflamatuars, antiestrogens, antioxidants were effective to prevent adhesion formation. Conclusions Prevention of adhesion formation is pivotal and numerous types of agents were described in the literature were summarized in this review. PMID:25995741

  17. Molecular orbital studies in oxidation: Sulfate formation and metal-metal oxide adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical mechanisms for sulfate formation from sodium chloride and sulfur trioxide, which is a product of jet fuel combustion was determined. Molten sodium sulfate leads to hot corrosion of the protective oxide layers on turbine blades. How yttrium dopants in nidkel-aluminum alloys used in turbine blades reduce the spalling rate of protective alumina films and enhance their adhesion was also determined. Two other fulfate mechanisms were deduced and structure of carbon monoxide on a clean chronium and clean platinum-titanium alloys surfaces was determined. All studies were by use of the atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital (ASED-MO) theory. Seven studies were completed. Their titles and abstracts are given.

  18. Molecular basis for disruption of E-cadherin adhesion by botulinum neurotoxin A complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangkook; Zhong, Xiaofen; Gu, Shenyan; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Dorner, Martin B; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-06-20

    How botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cross the host intestinal epithelial barrier in foodborne botulism is poorly understood. Here, we present the crystal structure of a clostridial hemagglutinin (HA) complex of serotype BoNT/A bound to the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin at 2.4 angstroms. The HA complex recognizes E-cadherin with high specificity involving extensive intermolecular interactions and also binds to carbohydrates on the cell surface. Binding of the HA complex sequesters E-cadherin in the monomeric state, compromising the E-cadherin-mediated intercellular barrier and facilitating paracellular absorption of BoNT/A. We reconstituted the complete 14-subunit BoNT/A complex using recombinantly produced components and demonstrated that abolishing either E-cadherin- or carbohydrate-binding of the HA complex drastically reduces oral toxicity of BoNT/A complex in vivo. Together, these studies establish the molecular mechanism of how HAs contribute to the oral toxicity of BoNT/A. PMID:24948737

  19. Dynamic Regulation of a Cell Adhesion Protein Complex Including CADM1 by Combinatorial Analysis of FRAP with Exponential Curve-Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation. PMID:25780926

  20. Effect of carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin on preventing postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation and promoting healing in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Lin, Long-Xiang; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Huang, Dan; Sun, Yu-Long

    2016-05-01

    Adhesions often occur after abdominal surgery. It could cause chronic pelvic pain, intestinal obstruction, and infertility. A hydrogel biomaterial, carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin (cd-HA gelatin), has been successfully used to reduce adhesion formation after flexor tendon grafting. This study investigated the efficacy of cd-HA gelatin in preventing postsurgical peritoneal adhesions in a rat model. The surgical traumas were created on the underlying muscle of the abdominal wall and the serosal layer of the cecum. The wounds were covered with or without cd-HA gelatin. Animals were euthanized at day 14 after surgery. Adhesion formation was assessed with adhesion degree and adhesion breaking strength. The healing of abdominal wall was evaluated with biomechanical testing and histological analysis. The adhesions occurred in all rats (n = 12) without cd-HA gelatin treatment. The application of cd-HA gelatin significantly reduced the adhesion rate from 100% to 58%. The decrease of adhesion breaking strength also manifested that cd-HA gelatin could reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Moreover, it was found that cd-HA gelatin was a safe material and could promote tissue healing. The cd-HA gelatin hydrogel could reduce the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions without adversely effects on wound healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1175-1181, 2016. PMID:26749008

  1. 25 Years of Tension over Actin Binding to the Cadherin Cell Adhesion Complex: The Devil is in the Details.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been a conceptual (re)evolution in understanding how the cadherin cell adhesion complex, which contains F-actin-binding proteins, binds to the actin cytoskeleton. There is now good synergy between structural, biochemical, and cell biological results that the cadherin-catenin complex binds to F-actin under force. PMID:27166091

  2. The Effect of Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor on the Development of Adhesion Formation in Laparotomized Rats: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Basbug, Murat; Bulbuller, Nurullah; Camci, Cemalettin; Ayten, Refik; Aygen, Erhan; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Arikanoglu, Zulfu; Akbulut, Sami

    2011-01-01

    Aims. This study determined the effects of a single dose of bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic recombinant monoclonal antibody that specifically targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), on adhesion formation in the rat cecal abrasion model. Methodology. Thirty female Wistar albino rats (200–224 g) were divided into three groups. All rats underwent laparotomy at which time cecal wall abrasion and abdominal wall injuries were induced. Group I (control) underwent only the abrasion procedure; Groups II and III received saline or bevacizumab intraperitoneally, respectively, following the abrasion. The rats were killed on postoperative day 7, and the severity of adhesions was evaluated, together with histopathological fibrosis parameters and immunohistochemical staining to identify the VEGF receptor. Results. The mean adhesion severity score in Groups I–III was 2.5 ± 0.52, 2.4 ± 0.69, and 0.7 ± 0.82, respectively; the score in Group III was significantly lower than that in Groups I (P < 0.001) and II (P < 0.001). In the histopathological evaluation, the mean fibrosis score in Group III was significantly lower that the scores in Groups I (P < 0.001) and II (P < 0.001). VEGF staining of the adhesion areas in Group III was significantly lower than that in Groups I (P < 0.001) and II (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Bevacizumab decreases adhesion formation following laparotomy in rats by blocking VEGF receptor occupancy. PMID:21760775

  3. Gene expression analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex cortical tubers reveals increased expression of adhesion and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Crino, Peter B.; Gorter, Jan A.; Nellist, Mark; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G.M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Breit, Timo M.; Troost, Dirk; Wadman, Wytse J.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are associated with disabling neurological manifestations, including intractable epilepsy. While these malformations are believed to result from the effects of TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations, the molecular mechanisms leading to tuber formation, as well as the onset of seizures remain largely unknown. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip platform to provide the first genome wide investigation of gene expression in surgically resected tubers, compared with histological normal perituberal tissue from the same patients or autopsy control tissue. We identified 2501 differentially expressed genes in cortical tubers compared with autopsy controls. Expression of genes associated with cell adhesion e.g., VCAM1, integrins and CD44, or with the inflammatory response, including complement factors, serpinA3, CCL2 and several cytokines, was increased in cortical tubers, whereas genes related to synaptic transmission e.g., the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1, and voltage-gated channel activity, exhibited lower expression. Gene expression in perituberal cortex was distinct from autopsy control cortex suggesting that even in the absence of tissue pathology the transcriptome is altered in TSC. Changes in gene expression yield insights into new candidate genes that may contribute to tuber formation or seizure onset, representing new targets for potential therapeutic development. PMID:19912235

  4. Effects of Magnolol and Honokiol on Adhesion, Yeast-Hyphal Transition, and Formation of Biofilm by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Wang, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Background The first step in infection by Candida albicans is adhesion to host cells or implanted medical devices and this followed by hyphal growth and biofilm formation. Yeast-to-hyphal transition has long been identified as a key factor in fungal virulence. Following biofilm formation, C. albicans is usually less sensitive or insensitive to antifungals. Therefore, development of new antifungals with inhibitory action on adhesion, yeast-hyphal transition and biofilm formation by C. albicans is very necessary. Methods The effects of magnolol and honokiol on hypha growth were investigated using different induction media. Their inhibitory effects were determined using the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5- carboxanilide assay, and biofilm thickness and viability were observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. Mammalian cells were used in adhesion assays. Genes related to hyphae development and cell adhesions were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The exogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate was used to determine the mechanisms of action of magnolol and honokiol. Caenorhabditis elegans was used as an in vivo model to estimate the antifungal activities of magnolol and honokiol. Results and conclusions Magnolol and honokiol inhibited adhesion, the transition from yeast to hypha, and biofilm formation by C. albicans through the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Moreover, magnolol and honokiol prolonged the survival of nematodes infected by C. albicans. Magnolol and honokiol have potential inhibitory effects against biofilm formation by C. albicans. General Significance This study provides useful information towards the development of new strategies to reduce the incidence of C. albicans biofilm-associated infection. PMID:25710475

  5. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    FRP1 in regulating spermiation via its effects on the FAK signaling and retention of nectin-3 adhesion complex at the apical ES.—Wong, E. W. P., Lee, W. M., Cheng, C. Y. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex. PMID:23073828

  6. Research of surface activating influence on formation of adhesion between gas-thermal coating and steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Z.; Klimenov, V.; Zaitsev, K.

    2015-09-01

    Estimation of influence of physical and thermal activating on adhesion between steel substrates and thermal coatings has been performed. The substrates with surfaces obtained by and ultrasonic surface plastic deformation were used. To evaluate physical activating, preheating of the substrates to 600°C was performed. To evaluate the effect of thermal activating, the substrate surfaces after interfacial detachment were examined. Bonded areas on the substrate surfaces were measured by means of optical profilometry. The experiments have shown that surface physical activating is the main factor in formation of the adhesive bond between the coating and the substrate processed with the proposed methods.

  7. Targeted Gene Deletion Demonstrates that Cell Adhesion MoleculeICAM-4 is Critical for Erythroblastic Island Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Lo, Annie; Short, Sarah A.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Spring, Frances; Parsons, Stephen F.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2006-02-15

    Erythroid progenitors differentiate in erythroblastic islands, bone marrow niches composed of erythroblasts surrounding a central macrophage. Evidence suggests that within islands adhesive interactions regulate erythropoiesis and apoptosis. We are exploring whether erythroid intercellular adhesion molecule-4 (ICAM-4), animmunoglobulin superfamily member, participates in island formation. Earlier, we identified alpha V integrins as ICAM-4 counter receptors. Since macrophages express alpha V, ICAM-4 potentially mediates island attachments. To test this, we generated ICAM-4 knockout mice and developed quantitative, live cell techniques for harvesting intact islands and for reforming islands in vitro. We observed a 47 percent decrease in islands reconstituted from ICAM-4 null marrow compared to wild type. We also found a striking decrease in islands formed in vivo in knockout mice. Further, peptides that block ICAM-4 alpha V adhesion produced a 53-57 percent decrease in reconstituted islands, strongly suggesting that ICAM-4 binding to macrophage alpha V functions in island integrity. Importantly, we documented that alpha V integrin is expressed in macrophages isolated from erythro blastic islands. Collectively, these data provide convincing evidence that ICAM-4 is critical in erythroblastic island formation via ICAM-4/alpha V adhesion and also demonstrate that the novel experimental strategies we developed will be valuable in exploring molecular mechanisms of erythroblastic island formation and their functional role in regulating erythropoiesis.

  8. Dynamic effects in friction and adhesion through cooperative rupture and formation of supramolecular bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blass, Johanna; Albrecht, Marcel; Bozna, Bianca L.; Wenz, Gerhard; Bennewitz, Roland

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a molecular toolkit for studying the dynamics in friction and adhesion from the single molecule level to effects of multivalency. As experimental model system we use supramolecular bonds established by the inclusion of ditopic adamantane connector molecules into two surface-bound cyclodextrin molecules, attached to a tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and to a flat silicon surface. The rupture force of a single bond does not depend on the pulling rate, indicating that the fast complexation kinetics of adamantane and cyclodextrin are probed in thermal equilibrium. In contrast, the pull-off force for a group of supramolecular bonds depends on the unloading rate revealing a non-equilibrium situation, an effect discussed as the combined action of multivalency and cantilever inertia effects. Friction forces exhibit a stick-slip characteristic which is explained by the cooperative rupture of groups of host-guest bonds and their rebinding. No dependence of friction on the sliding velocity has been observed in the accessible range of velocities due to fast rebinding and the negligible delay of cantilever response in AFM lateral force measurements.We introduce a molecular toolkit for studying the dynamics in friction and adhesion from the single molecule level to effects of multivalency. As experimental model system we use supramolecular bonds established by the inclusion of ditopic adamantane connector molecules into two surface-bound cyclodextrin molecules, attached to a tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and to a flat silicon surface. The rupture force of a single bond does not depend on the pulling rate, indicating that the fast complexation kinetics of adamantane and cyclodextrin are probed in thermal equilibrium. In contrast, the pull-off force for a group of supramolecular bonds depends on the unloading rate revealing a non-equilibrium situation, an effect discussed as the combined action of multivalency and cantilever inertia effects. Friction

  9. Terpenoids of plant origin inhibit morphogenesis, adhesion, and biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Raut, Jayant S; Shinde, Ravikumar B; Chauhan, Nitin M; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections caused by Candida albicans and associated drug resistant micro-organisms are serious problems for immunocompromised populations. Molecules which can prevent or remove biofilms are needed. Twenty-eight terpenoids of plant origin were analysed for their activity against growth, virulence attributes, and biofilms of C. albicans. Eighteen molecules exhibited minimum inhibitory concentrations of <2 mg ml(-1) for planktonic growth. Selected molecules inhibited yeast to hyphal dimorphism at low concentrations (0.031-0.5 mg ml(-1)), while adhesion to a solid surface was prevented at 0.5-2 mg ml(-1). Treatment with 14 terpenoids resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of biofilm formation, and of these, linalool, nerol, isopulegol, menthol, carvone, α-thujone, and farnesol exhibited biofilm-specific activity. Eight terpenoids were identified as inhibitors of mature biofilms. This study demonstrated the antibiofilm potential of terpenoids, which need to be further explored as therapeutic strategy against biofilm associated infections of C. albicans. PMID:23216018

  10. Nanolayer formation on titanium by phosphonated gelatin for cell adhesion and growth enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoyue; Park, Shin-Hye; Mao, Hongli; Isoshima, Takashi; Wang, Yi; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Phosphonated gelatin was prepared for surface modification of titanium to stimulate cell functions. The modified gelatin was synthesized by coupling with 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid using water-soluble carbodiimide and characterized by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatography. Circular dichroism revealed no differences in the conformations of unmodified and phosphonated gelatin. However, the gelation temperature was changed by the modification. Even a high concentration of modified gelatin did not form a gel at room temperature. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry showed direct bonding between the phosphonated gelatin and the titanium surface after binding. The binding behavior of phosphonated gelatin on the titanium surface was quantitatively analyzed by a quartz crystal microbalance. Ellipsometry showed the formation of a several nanometer layer of gelatin on the surface. Contact angle measurement indicated that the modified titanium surface was hydrophobic. Enhancement of the attachment and spreading of MC-3T3L1 osteoblastic cells was observed on the phosphonated gelatin-modified titanium. These effects on cell adhesion also led to growth enhancement. Phosphonation of gelatin was effective for preparation of a cell-stimulating titanium surface. PMID:26366080

  11. Non-channel mechanosensors working at focal adhesion-stress fiber complex.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) have long been the only established molecular class of cell mechanosensors; however, in the last decade, a variety of non-channel type mechanosensor molecules have been identified. Many of them are focal adhesion-associated proteins that include integrin, talin, and actin. Mechanosensors must be non-soluble molecules firmly interacting with relatively rigid cellular structures such as membranes (in terms of lateral stiffness), cytoskeletons, and adhesion structures. The partner of MSCs is the membrane in which MSC proteins efficiently transduce changes in the membrane tension into conformational changes that lead to channel opening. By contrast, the integrin, talin, and actin filament form a linear complex of which both ends are typically anchored to the extracellular matrices via integrins. Upon cell deformation by forces, this structure turns out to be a portion that efficiently transduces the generated stress into conformational changes of composite molecules, leading to the activation of integrin (catch bond with extracellular matrices) and talin (unfolding to induce vinculin bindings). Importantly, this structure also serves as an "active" mechanosensor to detect substrate rigidity by pulling the substrate with contraction of actin stress fibers (SFs), which may induce talin unfolding and an activation of MSCs in the vicinity of integrins. A recent study demonstrates that the actin filament acts as a mechanosensor with unique characteristics; the filament behaves as a negative tension sensor in which increased torsional fluctuations by tension decrease accelerate ADF/cofilin binding, leading to filament disruption. Here, we review the latest progress in the study of those non-channel mechanosensors and discuss their activation mechanisms and physiological roles. PMID:24965068

  12. Dynamic effects in friction and adhesion through cooperative rupture and formation of supramolecular bonds.

    PubMed

    Blass, Johanna; Albrecht, Marcel; Bozna, Bianca L; Wenz, Gerhard; Bennewitz, Roland

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a molecular toolkit for studying the dynamics in friction and adhesion from the single molecule level to effects of multivalency. As experimental model system we use supramolecular bonds established by the inclusion of ditopic adamantane connector molecules into two surface-bound cyclodextrin molecules, attached to a tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and to a flat silicon surface. The rupture force of a single bond does not depend on the pulling rate, indicating that the fast complexation kinetics of adamantane and cyclodextrin are probed in thermal equilibrium. In contrast, the pull-off force for a group of supramolecular bonds depends on the unloading rate revealing a non-equilibrium situation, an effect discussed as the combined action of multivalency and cantilever inertia effects. Friction forces exhibit a stick-slip characteristic which is explained by the cooperative rupture of groups of host-guest bonds and their rebinding. No dependence of friction on the sliding velocity has been observed in the accessible range of velocities due to fast rebinding and the negligible delay of cantilever response in AFM lateral force measurements. PMID:25833225

  13. Formation of β-cyclodextrin complexes in an anhydrous environment.

    PubMed

    Sifaoui, Hocine; Modarressi, Ali; Magri, Pierre; Stachowicz-Kuśnierz, Anna; Korchowiec, Jacek; Rogalski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The formation of inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin was studied at the melting temperature of guest compounds by differential scanning calorimetry. The complexes of long-chain n-alkanes, polyaromatics, and organic acids were investigated by calorimetry and IR spectroscopy. The complexation ratio of β-cyclodextrin was compared with results obtained in an aqueous environment. The stability and structure of inclusion complexes with various stoichiometries were estimated by quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results confirmed the possible formation of multiple inclusion complexes with guest molecules capable of forming hydrogen bonds. This finding gives new insight into the mechanism of formation of host-guest complexes and shows that hydrophobic interactions play a secondary role in this case. Graphical abstract The formation of complexes of β-cyclodextrin with selected n-alkanes, polyaromatics, and organic acids in an anhydrous environment is studied by differential scanning calorimetry, IR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling. The results obtained confirm the possible formation of multiple inclusion complexes with guest molecules capable of forming hydrogen bonds and give a new perspective on the mechanism of formation of host-guest complexes. PMID:27518085

  14. Germ cell differentiation and synaptonemal complex formation are disrupted in CPEB knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Richter, J D

    2001-08-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that regulates translation during vertebrate oocyte maturation. Adult female CPEB knockout mice contained vestigial ovaries that were devoid of oocytes; ovaries from mid-gestation embryos contained oocytes that were arrested at the pachytene stage. Male CPEB null mice also contained germ cells arrested at pachytene. The germ cells from the knockout mice harbored fragmented chromatin, suggesting a possible defect in homologous chromosome adhesion or synapsis. Two CPE-containing synaptonemal complex protein mRNAs, which interact with CPEB in vitro and in vivo, contained shortened poly(A) tails and mostly failed to sediment with polysomes in the null mice. Synaptonemal complexes were not detected in these animals. CPEB therefore controls germ cell differentiation by regulating the formation of the synaptonemal complex. PMID:11702780

  15. Role of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene in the formation of beta1-integrin fibrillar adhesions.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Barragán, Miguel A; Avila, Pilar; Alvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Gutiérrez, M Dolores; García-Pardo, Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Landázuri, Manuel O

    2002-05-15

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene (VHL) is absent or inactivated in the VHLcancer syndrome and in most sporadic renal cancers. VHL is requiredfor the assembly of a proper extracellular fibronectin matrix, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that 786-O renal cancer cells are unable to organize an adequate matrix even in the presence of an excess of exogenous fibronectin. Because the formation of integrin fibrillar adhesions plays a pivotal role in the organization of extracellular fibronectin, we next examined the expression and subcellular distribution of integrins in VHL- cells and their wild-type VHL stably transfected counterparts. The levels of beta1 and alphav integrins were increased in VHL- cells when compared with VHL+ transfectants. Early after plating, both VHL+ and VHL- cells were capable of assembling classic "patch-like" alphav focal contacts. As the culture advanced and cells became confluent, alphav integrins partly relocated to the intercellular junctions in VHL+ transfectants, which then developed large beta1 fibrillar-type adhesions and anchored firmly to the substrate. In contrast, confluent VHL- cells were unable to assemble beta1 fibrillar adhesions, and alphav focal contacts remained unchanged at all stages of the culture. Exogenous activation of beta1 integrins with either divalent cations or activating antibodies partly restored the capability of VHL- cells to assemble beta1 fibrillar adhesions and fibronectin fibers. Finally, pulse-chase studies of metabolically labeled 786-O cells revealed that the maturation of the common beta1-integrin chain was delayed in VHL- cells when compared with VHL+ cells. Our results show that VHL is an important regulator of integrins and is essential for the formation of beta1 fibrillar adhesions. These findings help to explain the abnormal extracellular matrix organization and increased motility of VHL- renal cancer cells. PMID:12019174

  16. Quantitative analysis of adhesion and biofilm formation on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Cerca, Nuno; Pier, Gerald B; Vilanova, Manuel; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2005-05-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is now well established as a major nosocomial pathogen associated with infections of indwelling medical devices. The major virulence factor of these organisms is their ability to adhere to devices and form biofilms. However, it has not been established that adherence and biofilm formation are closely linked phenotypes for clinical isolates. In this study, the initial adhesion to different materials (acrylic and glass) of 9 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis, along with biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative control strains, was assayed using physico-chemical interactions to analyze the basis for bacterial adherence to the substratum. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the cell surface elemental composition was also performed in an attempt to find a relationship between chemical composition and adhesion capabilities. Biofilm formation on the two surfaces was evaluated by dry weight measurements. Human erythrocytes were used to evaluate the ability of S. epidermidis strains to cause hemagglutination, an indicator of the production of a poly-N-acetyl glucosamine cell surface polysaccharide also involved in biofilm formation. The clinical isolates exhibited different cell wall physico-chemical properties, resulting in differing abilities to adhere to surfaces. Adhesion to hydrophobic substrata for all strains occurred to a greater extent than that to hydrophilic surfaces. Bacterial cell hydrophobicity seemed to have little or no influence on adhesion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a high ratio of oxygen/carbon for all strains, which is a common characteristic of S. epidermidis species. No relevant relationship was found between XPS data and adhesion values. All strains forming biofilms were able to agglutinate erythrocytes. However, no direct relationship was found between the amount of biofilm formed and the initial adhesion extent. These results indicate that high levels of initial adherence do not

  17. Implications for complex cognition from the hafting of tools with compound adhesives in the Middle Stone Age, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wadley, Lyn; Hodgskiss, Tamaryn; Grant, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Compound adhesives made from red ochre mixed with plant gum were used in the Middle Stone Age (MSA), South Africa. Replications reported here suggest that early artisans did not merely color their glues red; they deliberately effected physical transformations involving chemical changes from acidic to less acidic pH, dehydration of the adhesive near wood fires, and changes to mechanical workability and electrostatic forces. Some of the steps required for making compound adhesive seem impossible without multitasking and abstract thought. This ability suggests overlap between the cognitive abilities of modern people and people in the MSA. Our multidisciplinary analysis provides a new way to recognize complex cognition in the MSA without necessarily invoking the concept of symbolism. PMID:19433786

  18. Bow shock formation in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kamimura, T; Ishihara, O

    2012-02-10

    A bow shock is observed in a two-dimensional supersonic flow of charged microparticles in a complex plasma. A thin conducting needle is used to make a potential barrier as an obstacle for the particle flow in the complex plasma. The flow is generated and the flow velocity is controlled by changing a tilt angle of the device under the gravitational force. A void, microparticle-free region, is formed around the potential barrier surrounding the obstacle. The flow is bent around the leading edge of the void and forms an arcuate structure when the flow is supersonic. The structure is characterized by the bow shock as confirmed by a polytropic hydrodynamic theory as well as numerical simulation. PMID:22401079

  19. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation and reformation in the rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V. )

    1991-09-01

    The local application of 0.25% or 0.4% HA before the induction of a measured laser injury on the rat uterine horn was associated with a significant reduction (P less than 0.05) in postoperative IP adhesions when compared with the group of animals pretreated with the diluent vehicle PBS or received no pretreatment. However, 0.4% HA, when applied in a similar manner, was ineffective in reducing reformation of adhesions after microsurgical adhesiolysis.

  20. Cross-linked hyaluronate hydrogel prevents adhesion formation and reformation in mouse uterine horn model.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Tsukada, K; Hasegawa, K; Ohashi, Y; Udagawa, Y; Gomel, V

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cross-linked hyaluronate hydrogel (HA gel) as an adjuvant for postoperative adhesion prevention, in a mouse uterine horn model. In experiment 1 uterine horns were abrased with iodine. HA gel was applied to the injured surface before closure in the treatment group. In experiment 2, after injuring the uterine horns, three stitches were placed at equal distances around the uterine horns to appose the injured medial surfaces of the two horns during healing. HA gel was inserted between the uterine horns in the treatment group. In experiment 3 prevention of adhesion reformation was assessed. After lysis of adhesions that were induced as in experiment 2, HA gel was introduced between the serosal surfaces of apposing uterine horns. Untreated animals served as controls in each experiment. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student's t-test. The adhesion score was significantly lower in the HA gel group on the 14th day compared with controls in all the experiments: in experiment 1, 0.3 +/- 0.4 versus 1.7 +/- 1.2; in experiment 2, 0.9 +/- 1.0 versus 2.6 +/- 0.5; and in experiment 3, 1.5 +/- 0.9 versus 2.2 +/- 0.6 respectively. Cross-linked HA gel significantly reduced de-novo adhesions (P< 0.03) and adhesion reformation (P < 0.03). PMID:11157833

  1. Formation, structure, and reactivity of palladium superoxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Talsi, E.P.; Babenko, V.P.; Shubin, A.A.; Chinakov, V.D.; Nekipelov, V.M.; Zamaraev, K.I.

    1987-11-18

    The mechanism of formation of palladium superoxo complexes, their structure, and their reactivity are discussed. The formation of the palladium superoxo complexes in the reaction of palladium(II) acetate, propionate, trifluororacetate, and bis(acetylacetonate) and palladium(0) tetrakis(triphenylphosphine) with hydrogen peroxide and potassium superoxide has been detected in solution by electron proton resonance. The oxidation of olefins and carbon monoxide by these complexes is considered. Reaction mechanisms and reaction kinetics for these oxidations are reported using the palladium superoxo complexes. 44 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Dentin bonding performance using Weibull statistics and evaluation of acid-base resistant zone formation of recently introduced adhesives.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rui; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Sato, Takaaki; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    Dentin bonding durability of recently introduced dental adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond 2 (SE2), Optibond XTR (XTR), and Scotchbond Universal (SBU) was investigated using Weibull analysis as well as analysis of the micromorphological features of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) created for the adhesives. The bonding procedures of SBU were divided into three subgroups: self-etch (SBS), phosphoric acid (PA) etching on moist (SBM) or dry dentin (SBD). All groups were thermocycled for 0, 5,000 and 10,000 cycles followed by microtensile bond strength testing. Acid-base challenge was undertaken before SEM and TEM observations of the adhesive interface. The etch-and-rinse method with SBU (SBM and SBD) created inferior interfaces on the dentin surface which resulted in reduced bond durability. ABRZ formation was detected with the self-etch adhesive systems; SE2, XTR and SBS. In the PA etching protocols of SBM and SBD, a thick hybrid layer but no ABRZ was detected, which might affect dentin bond durability. PMID:27335136

  3. Lead(II) complex formation with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Mah, Vicky; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2012-06-01

    A structural investigation of complexes formed between the Pb(2+) ion and glutathione (GSH, denoted AH(3) in its triprotonated form), the most abundant nonprotein thiol in biological systems, was carried out for a series of aqueous solutions at pH 8.5 and C(Pb(2+)) = 10 mM and in the solid state. The Pb L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) oscillation for a solid compound with the empirical formula [Pb(AH(2))]ClO(4) was modeled with one Pb-S and two short Pb-O bond distances at 2.64 ± 0.04 and 2.28 ± 0.04 Å, respectively. In addition, Pb···Pb interactions at 4.15 ± 0.05 Å indicate dimeric species in a network where the thiolate group forms an asymmetrical bridge between two Pb(2+) ions. In aqueous solution at the mole ratio GSH/Pb(II) = 2.0 (C(Pb(2+)) = 10 mM, pH 8.5), lead(II) complexes with two thiolate ligands form, characterized by a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer band (LMCT) S(-) → Pb(2+) at 317 nm in the UV-vis spectrum and mean Pb-S and Pb-(N/O) bond distances of 2.65 ± 0.04 and 2.51 ± 0.04 Å, respectively, from a Pb L(III)-edge EXAFS spectrum. For solutions with higher mole ratios, GSH/Pb(II) ≥ 3.0, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy spectra identified a triglutathionyllead(II) complex, for which Pb L(III)-edge EXAFS spectroscopy shows a mean Pb-S distance of 2.65 ± 0.04 Å in PbS(3) coordination, (207)Pb NMR spectroscopy displays a chemical shift of 2793 ppm, and in the UV-vis spectrum, an S(-) → Pb(2+) LMCT band appears at 335 nm. The complex persists at high excess of GSH and also at ∼25 K in frozen glycerol (33%)/water glasses for GSH/Pb(II) mole ratios from 4.0 to 10 (C(Pb(2+)) = 10 mM) measured by Pb L(III)-edge EXAFS spectroscopy. PMID:22594853

  4. Comparison of Peritoneal Adhesion Formation in Bowel Retraction by Cotton Towels Versus the Silicone Lap Pak Device in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Brian G.; Ruben, Dawn S.; Renz, Wolfgang; Santillan, Antonio; Kubisen, Steven J.; Harmon, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Manipulation of cotton operating room towels within the abdominal cavity in open abdominal surgery has been associated with the formation of peritoneal adhesions. In a rabbit model, the use of standard cotton operating room towels is compared to the Lap Pak, a silicone bowel-packing device, to determine the potential for reducing the risk of adhesions. Methods: Thirty rabbits were randomly assigned to 3 groups. The rabbits underwent a sham surgery with incision only (n = 10), placement of operating room towels (n = 10), or placement of a Lap Pak (n = 10). After 14 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the peritoneal cavity explored for adhesions. The number, tenacity, ease of dissection, and density of adhesions were recorded, and the adhesions quantitatively graded using a Modified Hopkins Adhesion scoring system. Results: The operating room towel group had an average adhesion score of 2.5, and 8 (80%) rabbits developed adhesions. The sham group had an average adhesion score of 0.3 and one rabbit (10%) developed adhesions. The Lap Pak group had an average adhesion score of 0.2 and 1 rabbit (10%) developed adhesions. The frequency and severity of adhesions in the operating room towel group were significantly greater from that of the baseline sham group. There was no significant difference between the Lap Pak and sham groups. Conclusions: In this rabbit laparotomy model, the use of the Lap Pak to retract the bowels resulted in significantly fewer adhesions compared to cotton operating room towels. Lap Pak may be beneficial for bowel packing in general abdominal surgeries. PMID:22096614

  5. Glycoprotein Ib-IX-V Complex Transmits Cytoskeletal Forces That Enhance Platelet Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Shirin; Munday, Adam D; Tooley, Wes W; Rajsekar, Shreya; Fura, Adriane M; Kulman, John D; López, Jose A; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-08-01

    Platelets bind to exposed vascular matrix at a wound site through a highly specialized surface receptor, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V complex, which recognizes von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the matrix. GPIb-IX-V is a catch bond for it becomes more stable as force is applied to it. After attaching to the wound site, platelets generate cytoskeletal forces to compact and reinforce the hemostatic plug. Here, we evaluated the role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the transmission of cytoskeletal forces. We used arrays of flexible, silicone nanoposts to measure the contractility of individual platelets on VWF. We found that a significant proportion of cytoskeletal forces were transmitted to VWF through GPIb-IX-V, an unexpected finding given the widely held notion that platelet forces are transmitted exclusively through its integrins. In particular, we found that the interaction between GPIbα and the A1 domain of VWF mediates this force transmission. We also demonstrate that the binding interaction between GPIbα and filamin A is involved in force transmission. Furthermore, our studies suggest that cytoskeletal forces acting through GPIbα are involved in maintaining platelet adhesion when external forces are absent. Thus, the GPIb-IX-V/VWF bond is able to transmit force, and uses this force to strengthen the bond through a catch-bond mechanism. This finding expands our understanding of how platelets attach to sites of vascular injury, describing a new, to the best of our knowledge, mechanism in which the catch bonds of GPIb-IX-V/VWF can be supported by internal forces produced by cytoskeletal tension. PMID:27508443

  6. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  7. Formation of a Bridging Phosphinidene Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Castro, Ludovic; Maron, Laurent; Walensky, Justin R

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and structural determination of the first thorium phosphinidene complex are reported. The reaction of 2 equiv of (C5Me5)2Th(CH3)2 with H2P(2,4,6-(i)Pr3C6H2) at 95 °C produces [(C5Me5)2Th]2(μ2-P[(2,6-CH2CHCH3)2-4-(i)PrC6H2] as well as 4 equiv of methane, 2 equiv from deprotonation of the phosphine and 2 equiv from C-H bond activation of one methyl group of each of the isopropyl groups at the 2- and 6-positions. Transition state calculations indicate that the steps in the mechanism are P-H, C-H, C-H, and then P-H bond activation to form the phosphinidene. PMID:26575219

  8. Dynamics of Lane Formation in Driven Binary Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Raeth, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Morfill, G. E.; Wysocki, A.; Loewen, H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2009-02-27

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation process is in good agreement with computer simulations of a binary Yukawa model with Langevin dynamics. The laning is quantified in terms of the anisotropic scaling index, leading to a universal order parameter for driven systems.

  9. Kinetic studies of chemical shrinkage and residual stress formation in thermoset epoxy adhesives under confined curing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, M.; Geiß, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    Faultless processing of thermoset polymers in demanding applications requires a profound mastering of the curing kinetics considering both the physico-chemical changes in the transition from the liquid to the solid state and the consolidation of the polymers network in the diffusion controlled curing regime past the gel point. Especially in adhesive joints shrinkage stress occurring at an early state of the curing process under confined conditions is likely to cause defects due to local debonding and thus reduce their strength and durability1. Rheometry is considered the method of choice to investigate the change of elastic and viscous properties in the progress of curing. Drawbacks however relate to experimental challenges in accessing the full range of kinetic parameters of thermoset resins with low initial viscosity from the very beginning of the curing reaction to the post-cure consolidation of the polymer due to the formation of secondary chemical bonds. Therefore the scope of this study was to interrelate rheological data with results from in-situ measurements of the shrinkage stress formation in adhesive joints and with the change of refractive index in the progress of curing. This combination of different methods has shown to be valuable in gaining advanced insight into the kinetics of the curing reaction. The experimental results are based on a multi component thermoset epoxy-amine adhesive.

  10. Normalizing the bone marrow microenvironment with p38 inhibitor reduces multiple myeloma cell proliferation and adhesion and suppresses osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Aaron N.; Stebbins, Elizabeth G.; Henson, Margaret; O'Young, Gilbert; Choi, Sun J.; Quon, Diana; Damm, Debby; Reddy, Mamatha; Ma, Jing Y.; Haghnazari, Edwin; Kapoun, Ann M.; Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Protter, Andy; Schreiner, George F.; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Anderson, Judy; Roodman, G. David; Navas, Tony A.; Higgins, Linda S. . E-mail: lhiggin3@scius.jnj.com

    2006-06-10

    The multiple myeloma (MM) bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays a critical role in supporting tumor growth and survival as well as in promoting formation of osteolytic lesions. Recent results suggest that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is an important factor in maintaining this activated environment. In this report, we demonstrate that the p38{alpha} MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469, suppresses secretion of the tumor-supportive factors IL-6 and VEGF from BM stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as cocultures of BMSCs with MM cells, resulting in reduction in MM cell proliferation. Additionally, we show that SCIO-469 prevents TNF{alpha}-induced adhesion of MM cells to BMSCs through an ICAM-1- and VCAM-1-independent mechanism. Microarray analysis revealed a novel set of TNF{alpha}-induced chemokines in BMSCs that is strongly inhibited by SCIO-469. Furthermore, reintroduction of chemokines CXCL10 and CCL8 to BMSCs overcomes the inhibitory effect of SCIO-469 on TNF{alpha}-induced MM adhesion. Lastly, we show that SCIO-469 inhibits secretion and expression of the osteoclast-activating factors IL-11, RANKL, and MIP-1{alpha} as well as prevents human osteoclast formation in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that SCIO-469 treatment can suppress factors in the bone marrow microenvironment to inhibit MM cell proliferation and adhesion and also to alleviate osteolytic activation in MM.

  11. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  12. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history. PMID:25302375

  13. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Reiter, John B.; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-02-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T ≈ 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics - CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO - in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history.

  14. Surface modulation of complex stiffness via layer-by-layer assembly as a facile strategy for selective cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Zhang, He; Hu, Mi; Chen, Xia-chao; Ren, Ke-feng; Wang, Jin-lei; Ji, Jian

    2015-02-01

    In-stent restenosis and thrombosis are the main severe problems that occur after the percutaneous vascular intervention. The competition between endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role during these pathological changes. The regulation of this competition offers new opportunities to design biomaterials in the cardiovascular fields. Bioactive molecules have been typically employed to increase EC adhesion and thereafter to enhance EC competitiveness; however, this method is associated with limitations from the point of view of practical and industrial applications. Herein, we present an approach to enhance EC competitiveness over that of SMC through the selective EC adhesion, which is achieved by modulating a complex surface stiffness based on the technique of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. This complex stiffness can be achieved by regulating the thickness of multilayer films coordinating with a rigid underlying substrate. The selective cell adhesion is attributed to changes in the complex surface stiffness and a different intrinsic property between ECs and SMCs. This study provides a facile and broadly applicable approach for the purpose of the enhancement of EC competitiveness over that of SMC, which has great potential for the development of cell-based functional biomaterials in the cardiovascular field. PMID:26218126

  15. Investigation into the Formation and Adhesion of Cyclopentane Hydrates on Mechanically Robust Vapor-Deposited Polymeric Coatings.

    PubMed

    Sojoudi, Hossein; Walsh, Matthew R; Gleason, Karen K; McKinley, Gareth H

    2015-06-01

    Blockage of pipelines by formation and accumulation of clathrate hydrates of natural gases (also called gas hydrates) can compromise project safety and economics in oil and gas operations, particularly at high pressures and low temperatures such as those found in subsea or arctic environments. Cyclopentane (CyC5) hydrate has attracted interest as a model system for studying natural gas hydrates, because CyC5, like typical natural gas hydrate formers, is almost fully immiscible in water; and thus CyC5 hydrate formation is governed not only by thermodynamic phase considerations but also kinetic factors such as the hydrocarbon/water interfacial area, as well as mass and heat transfer constraints, as for natural gas hydrates. We present a macroscale investigation of the formation and adhesion strength of CyC5 hydrate deposits on bilayer polymer coatings with a range of wettabilities. The polymeric bilayer coatings are developed using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of a mechanically robust and densely cross-linked polymeric base layer (polydivinylbenzene or pDVB) that is capped with a covalently attached thin hydrate-phobic fluorine-rich top layer (poly(perfluorodecyl acrylate) or pPFDA). The CyC5 hydrates are formed from CyC5-in-water emulsions, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to confirm the thermal dissociation properties of the solid hydrate deposits. We also investigate the adhesion of the CyC5 hydrate deposits on bare and bilayer polymer-coated silicon and steel substrates. Goniometric measurements with drops of CyC5-in-water emulsions on the coated steel substrates exhibit advancing contact angles of 148.3 ± 4.5° and receding contact angles of 142.5 ± 9.8°, indicating the strongly emulsion-repelling nature of the iCVD coatings. The adhesion strength of the CyC5 hydrate deposits is reduced from 220 ± 45 kPa on rough steel substrates to 20 ± 17 kPa on the polymer-coated steel substrates. The measured strength of CyC5 hydrate

  16. Intraepithelial p63-dependent expression of distinct components of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophageal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thépot, Amélie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Pétré, Aurélia; Damour, Odile; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    TP63 gene is a member of TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that encodes several protein isoforms involved in the process of epithelial stratification and in epithelial-mesenchyme interactions. TP63 is amplified in a significant proportion of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), resulting in the hyper-expression of DeltaNp63 as the major p63 isoform. To better understand the contribution of this high expression to tumorigenesis, we have analyzed the impact of intraepithelial p63 expression on the expression of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophagus and in ESCC cell lines. Cells expressing p63 showed an adhesion pattern characterized by lack of tight junctions and presence of adherens junctions. Cell differentiation was accompanied by a decrease in p63 and by a shift to adhesion patterns involving tight junctions. Silencing of p63 mRNA in ESCC cell lines resulted in a similar shift, characterized by increased expression of component of tight junctions, decreased cell-to-cell communication and downregulation of cell proliferation. These results indicate that DeltaNp63 may contribute to esophageal squamous carcinogenesis by maintaining cell adhesion patterns compatible with cell proliferation. PMID:20127860

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  18. Synaptopodin-2 induces assembly of peripheral actin bundles and immature focal adhesions to promote lamellipodia formation and prostate cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kai, FuiBoon; Fawcett, James P; Duncan, Roy

    2015-05-10

    Synaptopodin-2 (Synpo2), an actin-binding protein and invasive cancer biomarker, induces formation of complex stress fiber networks in the cell body and promotes PC3 prostate cancer cell migration in response to serum stimulation. The role of these actin networks in enhanced cancer cell migration is unknown. Using time-course analysis and live cell imaging of mock- and Synpo2-transduced PC3 cells, we now show that Synpo2 induces assembly of actin fibers near the cell periphery and Arp2/3-dependent lamellipodia formation. Lamellipodia formed in a non-directional manner or repeatedly changed direction, explaining the enhanced chemokinetic activity of PC3 cells in response to serum stimulation. Myosin contraction promotes retrograde flow of the Synpo2-associated actin filaments at the leading edge and their merger with actin networks in the cell body. Enhanced PC3 cell migration correlates with Synpo2-induced formation of lamellipodia and immature focal adhesions (FAs), but is not dependent on myosin contraction or FA maturation. The previously reported correlation between Synpo2-induced stress fiber assembly and enhanced PC3 cell migration therefore reflects the role of Synpo2 as a newly identified regulator of actin bundle formation and nascent FA assembly near the leading cell edge. PMID:25883213

  19. Adhesion to and biofilm formation on IB3-1 bronchial cells by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has recently gained considerable attention as an important emerging pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the role of this microorganism in the pathophysiology of CF lung disease remains largely unexplored. In the present study for the first time we assessed the ability of S. maltophilia CF isolates to adhere to and form biofilm in experimental infection experiments using the CF-derived bronchial epithelial IB3-1cell line. The role of flagella on the adhesiveness of S. maltophilia to IB3-1 cell monolayers was also assessed by using fliI mutant derivative strains. Results All S. maltophilia CF isolates tested in the present study were able, although at different levels, to adhere to and form biofilm on IB3-1 cell monolayers. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy revealed S. maltophilia structures typical of biofilm formation on bronchial IB3-1 cells. The loss of flagella significantly (P < 0.001) decreased bacterial adhesiveness, if compared to that of their parental flagellated strains. S. maltophilia CF isolates were also able to invade IB3-1 cells, albeit at a very low level (internalization rate ranged from 0.01 to 4.94%). Pre-exposure of IB3-1 cells to P. aeruginosa PAO1 significantly increased S. maltophilia adhesiveness. Further, the presence of S. maltophilia negatively influenced P. aeruginosa PAO1 adhesiveness. Conclusions The main contribution of the present study is the finding that S. maltophilia is able to form biofilm on and invade CF-derived IB3-1 bronchial epithelial cells, thus posing a rationale for the persistence and the systemic spread of this opportunistic pathogen in CF patients. Experiments using in vivo models which more closely mimic CF pulmonary tissues will certainly be needed to validate the relevance of our results. PMID:20374629

  20. Separation of distinct adhesion complexes and associated cytoskeleton by a micro-stencil-printing method.

    PubMed

    Caballero, David; Osmani, Naël; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Labouesse, Michel; Riveline, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion between cells and the extracellular matrix is mediated by different types of transmembraneous proteins. Their associations to specific partners lead to the assembly of contacts such as focal adhesions and hemidesmosomes. The spatial overlap between both contacts within cells has however limited the study of each type of contact. Here we show that with "stampcils" focal contacts and hemidesmosomes can be spatially separated: cells are plated within the cavities of a stencil and the grids of the stencil serve as stamps for grafting an extracellular matrix protein-fibronectin. Cells engage new contacts on stamped zones leading to the segregation of adhesions and their associated cytoskeletons, i.e., actin and intermediate filaments of keratins. This new method should provide new insights into cell contacts compositions and dynamics. PMID:23076134

  1. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  2. Biofilm Formation and the Presence of the Intercellular Adhesion Locus ica among Staphylococci from Food and Food Processing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Møretrø, Trond; Hermansen, Lene; Holck, Askild L.; Sidhu, Maan S.; Rudi, Knut; Langsrud, Solveig

    2003-01-01

    In clinical staphylococci, the presence of the ica genes and biofilm formation are considered important for virulence. Biofilm formation may also be of importance for survival and virulence in food-related staphylococci. In the present work, staphylococci from the food industry were found to differ greatly in their abilities to form biofilms on polystyrene. A total of 7 and 21 of 144 food-related strains were found to be strong and weak biofilm formers, respectively. Glucose and sodium chloride stimulated biofilm formation. The biofilm-forming strains belonged to nine different coagulase-negative species of Staphylococcus. The icaA gene of the intercellular adhesion locus was detected by Southern blotting and hybridization in 38 of 67 food-related strains tested. The presence of icaA was positively correlated with strong biofilm formation. The icaA gene was partly sequenced for 22 food-related strains from nine different species of Staphylococcus, and their icaA genes were found to have DNA similarities to previously sequenced icaA genes of 69 to 100%. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression of the ica genes was higher in strong biofilm formers than that seen with strains not forming biofilms. Biofilm formation on polystyrene was positively correlated with biofilm formation on stainless steel and with resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds, a group of disinfectants. PMID:12957956

  3. Effect of intraperitoneal cetuximab administration on colonic anastomosis and early postoperative adhesion formation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Atilla; Karanlık, Hasan; Soylu, Sinan; Özgür, İlker; Soydinç, Hilal Oğuz; Duranyıldız, Derya; Olgaç, Vakur; Şen, Fatma; Asoğlu, Oktar

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the effect of intraperitoneal cetuximab administration on the healing of anastomosis and development of early adhesion formation in a rat model. Materials and Methods Twenty-four female rats were used. A colon segment was resected and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The rats were randomized into three groups after the performance of colonic anastomosis and received 10 mL of intraperitoneal solution including study drugs after closure of abdominal cavity: normal saline was administered to the normal saline group (n=8), cetuximab (400 mg/m2) was administered to the postoperative 1 group (n=8) 1 day after surgery, and cetuximab (400 mg/m2) was administered to the peroperative group (n=8) during surgery. Results The mean adhesion grade was 2.63±0.92, and 0.50±0.76 and 0.63±0.74 for control and test groups, respectively. Cetuximab reduced adhesion formation in test groups (p<0.05). When all groups were compared, it was found that vascular endothelial growth factor levels decreased significantly only in the abdomen (p<0.05). Hydroxyproline levels and anastomosis bursting pressure were examined, and a statistical difference was found between groups (hydroxyproline p<0.05, bursting pressure p<0.05). However, when postoperative 1 day group was compared with the control group, it was found that there was no difference between groups according to these parameters (p>0.05), but when peroperative group was compared with the control group a significant decrease was observed in both parameters. Histopathological healing score was also evaluated. No statistical difference between groups was found. Conclusion Twenty-four hours later from the operation, intraperitoneal cetuximab therapy may be a safe and feasible treatment for metastatic colorectal patients. PMID:27528807

  4. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO2 and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO2 particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. PMID:24746987

  5. Direct Loading and Tunable Release of Antibiotics from Polyelectrolyte Multilayers To Reduce Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bailiang; Jin, Tingwei; Xu, Qingwen; Liu, Huihua; Ye, Zi; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-18

    Bacteria adhesion on the surface of biomaterials and following biofilm formation are important problems in biomedical applications. The charged antibiotics with small molar mass can hardly deposit alternately with polymers into multilayered films to load the drug. Herein, the (poly(acrylic acid)-gentamicin/poly(ethylenimine))n ((PAA-GS/PEI)n) multilayer film was designed and constructed via a layer-by-layer self-assembly method. Low molar mass GS cations were first combined with polyanion PAA and self-assembled with PEI to form multilayer films showing exponential growth behavior. The GS dosage could be adjusted by changing the layer number of films. Furthermore, the thermal cross-linking method was used to control the release rate of GS in PBS buffer. Owing to the diffusion of GS, a zone of inhibition of about 7.0 mm showed the efficient disinfection activity of the multilayer film. It could also be seen from the biofilm inhibition assay that the multilayer film effectively inhibited bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As the drug loading dosage was 160 μg/cm(2), the multilayer films showed very low cytotoxicity against human lens epithelial cells. The present work provides an easy way to load GS into multilayer films which can be applied to surface modification of implants and biomedical devices. PMID:27105066

  6. Splat Formation and Adhesion Mechanisms of Cold Gas-Sprayed Al Coatings on Al2O3 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.; Manygoats, K.; Schucknecht, T.; Rafaja, D.

    2014-01-01

    The metallization of ceramics by means of cold gas spraying (CGS) has been in the focus of numerous publications in the recent past. However, the bonding mechanism of metallic coatings on non-ductile substrates is still not fully understood. Former investigations of titanium coatings deposited on corundum revealed that a combination of recrystallization induced by adiabatic shear processes and hetero-epitaxial growth might be responsible for the high adhesion strengths of coatings applied on smooth ceramic surfaces. In the present work, the interface formation between CGS aluminum and alumina substrates is examined for different particle sizes and substrate temperatures. Furthermore, the influence of subsequent heat treatment on tensile strength and hardness is investigated. The splat formation of single particles is examined by means of scanning electron microscopy, while a high resolution transmission electron microscope is used to study the Al/Al2O3 interface. First results suggest that mechanical interlocking is the primary adhesion mechanism on polycrystalline substrates having the roughness in sub-micrometer range, while the heteroepitaxy between Al and Al2O3 can be considered as the main bonding mechanism for single-crystalline sapphire (α-Al2O3) substrates with the surface roughness in nanometer range. The heteroepitaxial growth is facilitated by deformation-induced recrystallisation of CGS aluminum.

  7. Formation of Osteogenic Colonies on Well-Defined Adhesion Peptides by Freshly-Isolated Human Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ada; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Mayes, Anne M.; Muschler, George F.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2007-01-01

    Bone graft performance can be enhanced by addition of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from fresh bone marrow in a manner that concentrates the CTP cell population within the graft. Here, we used small peptide adhesion ligands presented against an otherwise adhesion-resistant synthetic polymer background in order to illuminate the molecular basis for the attachment and colony formation by osteogenic CTPs from fresh human marrow, and contrast the behavior of fresh marrow to many commonly-used osteogenic cell sources. The linear GRGDSPY ligand was as effective as tissue culture polystyrene in fostering attachment of culture-expanded porcine CTPs. Although this GRGDSPY peptide was more effective than control peptides in fostering alkaline phosphatase-positive (AP) colony formation from primary human marrow in 5 of the 7 patients tested, GRGDSPY was as effective as the control glass substrate in only one patient of 7. Thus, the peptide appears capable of enabling osteoblastic development from only a subpopulation of CTPs in marrow. The bone sialoprotein-derived peptide FHRRIKA was ineffective in fostering attachment of primary culture-expanded pig CTPs, although it was as effective as GRGDSPY in fostering AP-positive colonies from fresh human marrow. This study provides insights into integrin-mediated behaviors of CTPs and highlights differences between freshly-isolated marrow and culture-expanded cells. PMID:17222453

  8. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chagnot, Caroline; Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates) is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative), monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive) and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast) bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors) involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field. PMID:24133488

  9. Studies on chemical kinetics of positronium complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Youming; Zhang, Tianbao; Cao, Chun; Chen, Yun-Ti; Liang, Jiachang

    1993-09-01

    The complex formation between ortho-positronium and N-( p-substituted-phenyl) glycine ( p-RPhG, G=NHCH 2COOH; R=NO 2, Cl, H, CH 3, CH 3O) or N-( m-substituted-phenyl) glycine ( m-RPhG, R=NO 2, Cl) in solutions of 30% (v/v) ethanol—water and 20% (v/v) dioxane—water is discussed. The application of a BaF 2 scintillation counter to a positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer is described. By means of this new type of spectrometer, the complex formation reaction rate constants of ortho-positronium with the glycine derivatives in solutions are determined. The results indicate that the rate constants mainly depend on the conjugation effect at the benzene ring, the induction effects of the substitutes on the phenyl and solvents. There exists a linear free-energy relationship between rate constants and the basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in ortho-positronium—glycine complex formation. It means that the transient complex formation of ortho-positronium with molecules is like a general chemical reaction and obeys classical rules.

  10. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    PubMed

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. PMID:17997209

  11. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jirsa, M.A.; Miller, J.D., Jr.; Morey, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a ???1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by ???1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface-Guided Formation of an Organocobalt Complex.

    PubMed

    Weber, Peter B; Hellwig, Raphael; Paintner, Tobias; Lattelais, Marie; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Casado Aguilar, Pablo; Deimel, Peter S; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yi-Qi; Allegretti, Francesco; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Reichert, Joachim; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Barth, Johannes V; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Klappenberger, Florian

    2016-05-01

    Organocobalt complexes represent a versatile tool in organic synthesis as they are important intermediates in Pauson-Khand, Friedel-Crafts, and Nicholas reactions. Herein, a single-molecule-level investigation addressing the formation of an organocobalt complex at a solid-vacuum interface is reported. Deposition of 4,4'-(ethyne-1,2-diyl)dibenzonitrile and Co atoms on the Ag(111) surface followed by annealing resulted in genuine complexes in which single Co atoms laterally coordinated to two carbonitrile groups undergo organometallic bonding with the internal alkyne moiety of adjacent molecules. Alternative complexation scenarios involving fragmentation of the precursor were ruled out by complementary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to density functional theory analysis, the complexation with the alkyne moiety follows the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model for a two-electron-donor ligand where an alkyne-to-Co donation occurs together with a strong metal-to-alkyne back-donation. PMID:27059261

  13. Formation of complex bacterial colonies via self-generated vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, András; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Vicsek, Tamás

    1996-08-01

    Depending on the environmental conditions bacterial colonies growing on agar surfaces can exhibit complex colony formation and various types of collective motion. Experimental results are presented concerning the hydrodynamics (vortices, migration of bacteria in clusters) and colony formation of a morphotype of Bacillus subtilis. Some of these features are not specific to this morphotype but also have been observed in several other bacterial strains, suggesting the presence of universal effects. A simple model of self-propelled particles is proposed, which is capable of describing the hydrodynamics on the intermediate level, including the experimentally observed rotating disks of bacteria. The colony formation is captured by a complex generic model taking into account nutrient diffusion, reproduction, and sporulation of bacteria, extracellular slime deposition, chemoregulation, and inhomogeneous population. Our model also sheds light on some possible biological benefits of this ``multicellular behavior.''

  14. An occludin-focal adhesion kinase protein complex at the blood-testis barrier: a study using the cadmium model.

    PubMed

    Siu, Erica R; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Sze, K L; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-07-01

    Several integral membrane proteins that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in mammalian testes, in particular rodents, are known to date. These include tight junction (TJ) proteins (e.g. occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudins), basal ectoplasmic specialization proteins (e.g. N-cadherin), and gap junction proteins (e.g. connexin43). However, the regulators (e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases) that affect these proteins, such as their interaction with the cytoskeletal actin, which in turn confer cell adhesion at the TJ, remain largely unknown. We report herein that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a putative interacting partner of occludin, but not claudin-11 or junctional adhesion molecule-A. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy studies illustrated that the expression of FAK in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes was stage specific. FAK colocalized with occludin at the BTB in virtually all stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle but considerably diminished in stages VIII-IX, at the time of BTB restructuring to facilitate the transit of primary leptotene spermatocytes. Using Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with established TJ-permeability barrier and ultrastructures of TJ, basal ectoplasmic specialization and desmosome-like junction that mimicked the BTB in vivo, FAK was shown to colocalize with occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) at the Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface. When these Sertoli cell cultures were treated with CdCl(2) to perturb the TJ-barrier function, occludin underwent endocytic-mediated internalization in parallel with FAK and ZO-1. Thus, these findings demonstrate that FAK is an integrated regulatory component of the occludin-ZO-1 protein complex, suggesting that functional studies can be performed to study the role of FAK in BTB dynamics. PMID:19213829

  15. An Occludin-Focal Adhesion Kinase Protein Complex at the Blood-Testis Barrier: A Study Using the Cadmium Model

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Sze, K. L.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Several integral membrane proteins that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in mammalian testes, in particular rodents, are known to date. These include tight junction (TJ) proteins (e.g. occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudins), basal ectoplasmic specialization proteins (e.g. N-cadherin), and gap junction proteins (e.g. connexin43). However, the regulators (e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases) that affect these proteins, such as their interaction with the cytoskeletal actin, which in turn confer cell adhesion at the TJ, remain largely unknown. We report herein that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a putative interacting partner of occludin, but not claudin-11 or junctional adhesion molecule-A. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy studies illustrated that the expression of FAK in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes was stage specific. FAK colocalized with occludin at the BTB in virtually all stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle but considerably diminished in stages VIII–IX, at the time of BTB restructuring to facilitate the transit of primary leptotene spermatocytes. Using Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with established TJ-permeability barrier and ultrastructures of TJ, basal ectoplasmic specialization and desmosome-like junction that mimicked the BTB in vivo, FAK was shown to colocalize with occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) at the Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface. When these Sertoli cell cultures were treated with CdCl2 to perturb the TJ-barrier function, occludin underwent endocytic-mediated internalization in parallel with FAK and ZO-1. Thus, these findings demonstrate that FAK is an integrated regulatory component of the occludin-ZO-1 protein complex, suggesting that functional studies can be performed to study the role of FAK in BTB dynamics. PMID:19213829

  16. LRP-1–CD44, a New Cell Surface Complex Regulating Tumor Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Perrot, Gwenn; Langlois, Benoit; Devy, Jérôme; Jeanne, Albin; Verzeaux, Laurie; Almagro, Sébastien; Sartelet, Hervé; Hachet, Cathy; Schneider, Christophe; Sick, Emilie; David, Marion; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Emonard, Hervé; Martiny, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) is a large endocytic receptor mediating the clearance of various molecules from the extracellular matrix. In the field of cancer, LRP-1-mediated endocytosis was first associated with antitumor properties. However, recent results suggested that LRP-1 may coordinate the adhesion-deadhesion balance in malignant cells to support tumor progression. Here, we observed that LRP-1 silencing or RAP (receptor-associated protein) treatment led to accumulation of CD44 at the tumor cell surface. Moreover, we evidenced a tight interaction between CD44 and LRP-1, not exclusively localized in lipid rafts. Overexpression of LRP-1-derived minireceptors indicated that the fourth ligand-binding cluster of LRP-1 is required to bind CD44. Labeling of CD44 with EEA1 and LAMP-1 showed that internalized CD44 is routed through early endosomes toward lysosomes in a LRP-1-dependent pathway. LRP-1-mediated internalization of CD44 was highly reduced under hyperosmotic conditions but poorly affected by membrane cholesterol depletion, revealing that it proceeds mostly via clathrin-coated pits. Finally, we demonstrated that CD44 silencing abolishes RAP-induced tumor cell attachment, revealing that cell surface accumulation of CD44 under LRP-1 blockade is mainly responsible for the stimulation of tumor cell adhesion. Altogether, our data shed light on the LRP-1-mediated internalization of CD44 that appeared critical to define the adhesive properties of tumor cells. PMID:22711991

  17. Positronium formation studies in crystalline molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide - Acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Guerra, L. D. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Windmöller, D.; Santos, G. C.; Fernandes, N. G.; Yoshida, M. I.; Donnici, C. L.; Magalhães, W. F.; Machado, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen bond formation in the triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), acetanilide (ACN) supramolecular heterosynton system, named [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5], has been studied by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and supported by several analytical techniques. In toluene solution, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) presented a 1:1 stoichiometry and indicated that the complexation process is driven by entropy, with low enthalpy contribution. X-ray structure determination showed the existence of a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds, allowing also the confirmation of the existence of a 1:1 crystalline molecular complex in solid state. The results of thermal analysis (TGA, DTA and DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy showed that the interactions in the complex are relatively weaker than those found in pure precursors, leading to a higher positronium formation probability at [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5]. These weak interactions in the complex enhance the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is higher. Through the present work is shown that PALS is a sensible powerful tool to investigate intermolecular interactions in solid heterosynton supramolecular systems.

  18. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  19. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  20. Phenylethanol promotes adhesion and biofilm formation of the antagonistic yeast Kloeckera apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus.

    PubMed

    Pu, Liu; Jingfan, Fang; Kai, Chen; Chao-an, Long; Yunjiang, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    The yeast Kloeckera apiculata strain 34-9 is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. In a previous study it was demonstrated that K. apiculata produced the aromatic alcohol phenylethanol. In the present study, we found that K. apiculata was able to form biofilm on citrus fruit and embed in an extracellular matrix, which created a mechanical barrier interposed between the wound surface and pathogen. As a quorum-sensing molecule, phenylethanol can promote the formation of filaments by K. apiculata in potato dextrose agar medium, whereas on the citrus fruit, the antagonist remains as yeast after being treated with the same concentration of phenylethanol. It only induced K. apiculata to adhere and form biofilm. Following genome-wide computational and experimental identification of the possible genes associated with K. apiculata adhesion, we identified nine genes possibly involved in triggering yeast adhesion. Six of these genes were significantly induced after phenylethanol stress treatment. This study provides a new model system of the biology of the antagonist-pathogen interactions that occur in the antagonistic yeast K. apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus caused by Penicillium italicum. PMID:24479773

  1. Antibiofilm formation and anti-adhesive property of three mediterranean essential oils against a foodborne pathogen Salmonella strain.

    PubMed

    Miladi, Hanene; Mili, Donia; Ben Slama, Rihab; Zouari, Sami; Ammar, Emna; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2016-04-01

    Plant extracts, and their essential oils (EOs) are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites with antimicrobial properties. Our aim was to determine the bioactive compound in three mediterranean essential oils belonging to Lamiaceae family, Satureja montana L., Thymus vulgaris L. and Rosmarinus officinalis L., and to assess their antimicrobial, antibiofilm and anti-adhesive potentials against a foodborne pathogen Salmonella strain. The antibacterial activity of EOs and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 2 reference strains Salmonella typhimurium and 12 Salmonella spp. isolated from food. Biofilm inhibition were assessed using the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay. The analytical data indicated that various monoterpene hydrocarbons and phenolic monoterpenes constitute the major components of the oils, but their concentrations varied greatly among the oils examined. Our results showed that S. montana L. and T. vulgaris L. essential oils possess remarkable anti biofilm, anti-adhesive and bactericidal properties, compared to R. officinalis EO. There is an indication that Rosmary EO might inhibit biofilm formation at higher concentrations. Therefore, the witer savory and thyme EOs represent a source of natural compounds that exhibit potentials for use in food systems to prevent the growth of foodborne bacteria and extend the shelf life of the processed food. PMID:26802522

  2. Salusin-β induces foam cell formation and monocyte adhesion in human vascular smooth muscle cells via miR155/NOX2/NFκB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Jian; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Liu, Tong-Yan; Ren, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are indispensible components in foam cell formation. Salusin-β is a stimulator in the progression of atherosclerosis. Here, we showed that salusin-β increased foam cell formation evidenced by accumulation of lipid droplets and intracellular cholesterol content, and promoted monocyte adhesion in human VSMCs. Salusin-β increased the expressions and activity of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in VSMCs. Silencing of ACAT-1 abolished the salusin-β-induced lipid accumulation, and silencing of VCAM-1 prevented the salusin-β-induced monocyte adhesion in VSMCs. Salusin-β caused p65-NFκB nuclear translocation and increased p65 occupancy at the ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 promoter. Inhibition of NFκB with Bay 11-7082 prevented the salusin-β-induced ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 upregulation, foam cell formation and monocyte adhesion in VSMCs. Scavenging ROS, inhibiting NADPH oxidase or knockdown of NOX2 abolished the effects of salusin-β on ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, p65-NFκB nuclear translocation, lipid accumulation and monocyte adhesion in VSMCs. Salusin-β increased miR155 expression, and knockdown of miR155 prevented the effects of salusin-β on ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, p65-NFκB nuclear translocation, lipid accumulation, monocyte adhesion and ROS production in VSMCs. These results indicate that salusin-β induces foam formation and monocyte adhesion via miR155/NOX2/NFκB-mediated ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in VSMCs. PMID:27004848

  3. Star Formation in Giant Complexes: the Cat's Paw Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, Joana; Wolk, Scott; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, João; Rathborne, Jill; Forbrich, Jan; Leibundgut, Bruno; Hilker, Michael

    2013-07-01

    NGC 6334, the Cat's Paw Nebula, is a 106 M⊙ molecular cloud, one of the most massive known clouds in the Galaxy. It hosts the youngest massive cluster complex within 2 kpc of the Sun, and is therefore an ideal laboratory to investigate the onset and early evolution of star formation in an environment comparable to that of massive, extra-galactic complexes. Using multi-wavelength data, we are conducting the most sensitive and most complete characterization of this unique region to date.

  4. Role of Aeromonas hydrophila Flagella Glycosylation in Adhesion to Hep-2 Cells, Biofilm Formation and Immune Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Wilhelms, Markus; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Polar flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-3 (serotype O34) were found to be O-glycosylated with a heterogeneous heptasaccharide glycan. Two mutants with altered (light and strong) polar flagella glycosylation still able to produce flagella were previously obtained, as well as mutants lacking the O34-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. We compared these mutants, altogether with the wild type strain, in different studies to conclude that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. Furthermore, the polar flagella glycosylation is an important factor for the immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll receptor 5 (TLR5). PMID:25464381

  5. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  6. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  7. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM) and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months) polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material) while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization. PMID:21396112

  8. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  9. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Auer, S; Heitzig, J; Kornek, U; Schöll, E; Kurths, J

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation ("coalitions") on an acquaintance network. We include both the network's influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  10. Correlations between Community Structure and Link Formation in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; He, Jia-Lin; Kapoor, Komal; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Background Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. Methodology/Principal Findings Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction. PMID:24039818

  11. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  12. A role for the WH-30 protein in sperm-sperm adhesion during rouleaux formation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, S P; Swann, N J; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1993-03-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa participate in specific cell adhesion phenomena during their development and functional lifespan; this includes interaction with Sertoli cells, the zona pellucida, and the oolemma. In some species such as the guinea pig, an additional sperm-sperm adhesion occurs during epididymal maturation which results in the formation of rouleaux in which the sperm heads are stacked one upon the other and the periacrosomal plasma membranes of adjacent sperm are linked by periodic cross-bridges. In this study, we have used a monoclonal antibody to investigate the role of the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface in the formation of the junctional zones between adjacent guinea pig sperm in rouleaux. WH-30 monoclonal antibodies caused a dose- and time-dependent dissociation of rouleaux and an increase in the percentage of single, acrosome-intact sperm; there were no effects on sperm motility (maintained at 80-90%) or ultrastructure during the 120-min incubations. The maximal effect of about 80% single sperm was obtained with a 1:4 dilution of the WH-30 hybridoma supernatant or 5-50 micrograms/ml of purified WH-30 IgG. In contrast, incubation of sperm in AH-20 IgG, myeloma cell supernatants, or purified, nonspecific mouse IgG1 had no effect on rouleaux. Treatment of sperm with a WH-30 Fab fragment resulted in almost complete dissociation of rouleaux without any observed effect on sperm motility or acrosomal status. Surface labeling of sperm followed by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE revealed that the WH-30 antibody recognizes a single polypeptide of 43-45 kDa. Using immunofluorescence, the WH-30 protein was localized over the entire surface of the sperm head (whole-head pattern), and immunogold labeling showed that WH-30 is localized in the glycocalyx on both the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the periacrosomal and postacrosomal plasma membranes. These results indicate that the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface is a cell adhesion protein which is involved in

  13. Effect of the Mode of Application of Cryopreserved Human Amniotic Membrane on Adhesion Formation after Abdomino-Pelvic Surgery in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, Joseph; Abbasi, Sehrish A.; Kechli, Mohamad Karim; Boutary, Suzan S.; Ghulmiyyah, Labib; Khalifeh, Ibrahim; Abou Ghaddara, Hussein; Nassar, Anwar H.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions after abdomino-pelvic surgery are a cause of morbidity and reoperations. The use of human amniotic membrane (HAM) for adhesion prevention has given controversial results. The mode of administration of the amniotic membrane has not been well studied. This study assessed the efficacy of two modes of application of cryopreserved HAM, patch or fragmented in Lactated Ringer (LR) solution, for the prevention of pelvic adhesion formation postabdomino-pelvic surgery in a mice model. After a midline laparotomy incision, a small cautery lesion was done on each side of the abdominal wall peritoneum in mice. In Group A (control; n = 42), the abdomen was closed directly, Group B (n = 42) received 2.5 ml of LR prior to closure. In Groups C (n = 42) and D (n = 42), a 2 cm × 2 cm patch of HAM and another one fragmented and dispersed in 2.5 ml of LR were applied prior to closure, respectively. Two weeks later, a laparotomy was performed, and gross and pathological evaluation of adhesions, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and inflammation were conducted. Group D exhibited a significantly lower rate of gross adhesion formation. Fibrosis was significantly lowest in Group C as compared to the control. Group B had the lowest vascular formation in the adhesions. The use of HAM fragmented in LR solution is associated with a significantly lower incidence of postoperative adhesions in mice when compared to LR alone, HAM patch, or control. The mechanism of action of this reduction needs to be elucidated by future studies. PMID:27066485

  14. Complex formation between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged oligoelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiajia; Barz, Matthias; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-04-28

    We study the complex formation between one long polyanion chain and many short oligocation chains by computer simulations. We employ a coarse-grained bead-spring model for the polyelectrolyte chains and model explicitly the small salt ions. We systematically vary the concentration and the length of the oligocation and examine how the oligocations affects the chain conformation, the static structure factor, the radial and axial distribution of various charged species, and the number of bound ions in the complex. At low oligocation concentration, the polyanion has an extended structure. Upon increasing the oligocation concentration, the polyanion chain collapses and forms a compact globule, but the complex still carries a net negative charge. Once the total charge of the oligocations is equal to that of the polyanion, the collapse stops and is replaced by a slow expansion. In this regime, the net charge on the complexes is positive or neutral, depending on the microion concentration in solution. The expansion can be explained by the reduction of the oligocation bridging. We find that the behavior and the structure of the complex are largely independent of the length of oligocations, and very similar to that observed when replacing the oligocations by multivalent salt cations, and conclude that the main driving force keeping the complex together is the release of monovalent counterions and coions. We speculate on the implications of this finding for the problem of controlled oligolyte release and oligolyte substitution. PMID:27131564

  15. Complex formation between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged oligoelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiajia; Barz, Matthias; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    We study the complex formation between one long polyanion chain and many short oligocation chains by computer simulations. We employ a coarse-grained bead-spring model for the polyelectrolyte chains and model explicitly the small salt ions. We systematically vary the concentration and the length of the oligocation and examine how the oligocations affects the chain conformation, the static structure factor, the radial and axial distribution of various charged species, and the number of bound ions in the complex. At low oligocation concentration, the polyanion has an extended structure. Upon increasing the oligocation concentration, the polyanion chain collapses and forms a compact globule, but the complex still carries a net negative charge. Once the total charge of the oligocations is equal to that of the polyanion, the collapse stops and is replaced by a slow expansion. In this regime, the net charge on the complexes is positive or neutral, depending on the microion concentration in solution. The expansion can be explained by the reduction of the oligocation bridging. We find that the behavior and the structure of the complex are largely independent of the length of oligocations, and very similar to that observed when replacing the oligocations by multivalent salt cations, and conclude that the main driving force keeping the complex together is the release of monovalent counterions and coions. We speculate on the implications of this finding for the problem of controlled oligolyte release and oligolyte substitution.

  16. BAG3 regulates formation of the SNARE complex and insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, V; Festa, M; Rosati, A; Hahne, M; Tiberti, C; Capunzo, M; De Laurenzi, V; Turco, M C

    2015-01-01

    Insulin release in response to glucose stimulation requires exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. Glucose stimulation of beta cells leads to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, which acts on the Rho family proteins (Rho, Rac and Cdc42) that direct F-actin remodeling. This process requires docking and fusion of secretory vesicles to the release sites at the plasma membrane and is a complex mechanism that is mediated by SNAREs. This transiently disrupts the F-actin barrier and allows the redistribution of the insulin-containing granules to more peripheral regions of the β cell, hence facilitating insulin secretion. In this manuscript, we show for the first time that BAG3 plays an important role in this process. We show that BAG3 downregulation results in increased insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation and in disruption of the F-actin network. Moreover, we show that BAG3 binds to SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1, two components of the t-SNARE complex preventing the interaction between SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1. Upon glucose stimulation BAG3 is phosphorylated by FAK and dissociates from SNAP-25 allowing the formation of the SNARE complex, destabilization of the F-actin network and insulin release. PMID:25766323

  17. BAG3 regulates formation of the SNARE complex and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Iorio, V; Festa, M; Rosati, A; Hahne, M; Tiberti, C; Capunzo, M; De Laurenzi, V; Turco, M C

    2015-01-01

    Insulin release in response to glucose stimulation requires exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. Glucose stimulation of beta cells leads to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, which acts on the Rho family proteins (Rho, Rac and Cdc42) that direct F-actin remodeling. This process requires docking and fusion of secretory vesicles to the release sites at the plasma membrane and is a complex mechanism that is mediated by SNAREs. This transiently disrupts the F-actin barrier and allows the redistribution of the insulin-containing granules to more peripheral regions of the β cell, hence facilitating insulin secretion. In this manuscript, we show for the first time that BAG3 plays an important role in this process. We show that BAG3 downregulation results in increased insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation and in disruption of the F-actin network. Moreover, we show that BAG3 binds to SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1, two components of the t-SNARE complex preventing the interaction between SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1. Upon glucose stimulation BAG3 is phosphorylated by FAK and dissociates from SNAP-25 allowing the formation of the SNARE complex, destabilization of the F-actin network and insulin release. PMID:25766323

  18. Formative Assessment as Educational and Administrative Adhesive: Establishing an Elementary School Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Brad; Black, Sharon; Anstead, Marcia Howell

    1997-01-01

    Describes the collaboration between a university and an elementary school to establish a writing center at the elementary school, staffed by university students (preservice teachers). Describes the crucial role of ongoing formative assessment activity for both elementary students and the university preservice teachers. (SR)

  19. A Discovery Strategy for Selective Inhibitors of c-Src in Complex with the Focal Adhesion Kinase SH3/SH2-binding Region

    PubMed Central

    Moroco, Jamie A.; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Rust, Heather L.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Hur, Wooyoung; Gray, Nathanael S.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Src tyrosine kinase co-operates with the focal adhesion kinase to regulate cell adhesion and motility. Focal adhesion kinase engages the regulatory SH3 and SH2 domains of c-Src, resulting in localized kinase activation that contributes to tumor cell metastasis. Using assay conditions where c-Src kinase activity required binding to a tyrosine phosphopeptide based on the focal adhesion kinase SH3-SH2 docking sequence, we screened a kinase-biased library for selective inhibitors of the Src/focal adhesion kinase peptide complex versus c-Src alone. This approach identified an aminopyrimidinyl carbamate compound, WH-4-124-2, with nanomolar inhibitory potency and fivefold selectivity for c-Src when bound to the phospho-focal adhesion kinase peptide. Molecular docking studies indicate that WH-4-124-2 may preferentially inhibit the ‘DFG-out’ conformation of the kinase active site. These findings suggest that interaction of c-Src with focal adhesion kinase induces a unique kinase domain conformation amenable to selective inhibition. PMID:25376742

  20. Titanium complex formation of organic ligands in titania gels.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Todoroki, Kenta; Setiawan, Rudi Agus; Teshima, Katsuya; Fujii, Tsuneo; Satozono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-27

    Thin films of organic ligand-dispersing titania gels were prepared from titanium alkoxide sols containing ligand molecules by steam treatment without heating. The formation of the ligand-titanium complex and the photoinduced electron transfer process in the systems were investigated by photoelectrochemical measurements. The complex was formed between the 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) and titanium species, such as the titanium ion, on the titania nanoparticle surface through the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the quinolate. A photocurrent was observed in the electrodes containing the complex due to the electron injection from the LUMO of the complex into the titania conduction band. A bidentate ligand, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN), formed the complex on the titania surface through dehydration between its two hydroxyl groups of DHN and two TiOH groups of the titania. The electron injection from the HOMO of DHN to the titania conduction band was observed during light irradiation. This direct electron injection was more effective than the two-step electron injection. PMID:25535798

  1. Formation of a Ternary Complex for Selenocysteine Biosynthesis in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ivan R; Serrão, Vitor H B; Manzine, Livia R; Faim, Lívia M; da Silva, Marco T A; Makki, Raphaela; Saidemberg, Daniel M; Cornélio, Marinônio L; Palma, Mário S; Thiemann, Otavio H

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis of selenocysteine-containing proteins (selenoproteins) involves the interaction of selenocysteine synthase (SelA), tRNA (tRNA(Sec)), selenophosphate synthetase (SelD, SPS), a specific elongation factor (SelB), and a specific mRNA sequence known as selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS). Because selenium compounds are highly toxic in the cellular environment, the association of selenium with proteins throughout its metabolism is essential for cell survival. In this study, we demonstrate the interaction of SPS with the SelA-tRNA(Sec) complex, resulting in a 1.3-MDa ternary complex of 27.0 ± 0.5 nm in diameter and 4.02 ± 0.05 nm in height. To assemble the ternary complex, SPS undergoes a conformational change. We demonstrated that the glycine-rich N-terminal region of SPS is crucial for the SelA-tRNA(Sec)-SPS interaction and selenoprotein biosynthesis, as revealed by functional complementation experiments. Taken together, our results provide new insights into selenoprotein biosynthesis, demonstrating for the first time the formation of the functional ternary SelA-tRNA(Sec)-SPS complex. We propose that this complex is necessary for proper selenocysteine synthesis and may be involved in avoiding the cellular toxicity of selenium compounds. PMID:26378233

  2. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  3. GABAergic complex basket formations in the human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; García-Marín, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-12-15

    Certain GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex, basket cells, establish multiple connections with cell bodies that typically outline the somata and proximal dendrites of pyramidal cells. During studies into the distribution of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) in the human cerebral cortex, we were struck by the presence of a very dense, pericellular arrangement of multiple VGAT-immunoreactive (-ir) terminals in certain cortical areas. We called these terminals "Complex basket formations" (Cbk-formations) to distinguish them from the simpler and more typical pericellular GABAergic innervations of most cortical neurons. Here we examined the distribution of these VGAT-ir Cbk-formations in various cortical areas, including the somatosensory (area 3b), visual (areas 17 and 18), motor (area 4), associative frontal (dorsolateral areas 9, 10, 45, 46, and orbital areas 11, 12, 13, 14, 47), associative temporal (areas 20, 21, 22, and 38), and limbic cingulate areas (areas 24, 32). Furthermore, we used dual or triple staining techniques to study the chemical nature of the innervated cells. We found that VGAT-ir Cbk-formations were most frequently found in area 4 followed by areas 3b, 13, and 18. In addition, they were mostly observed in layer III, except in area 17, where they were most dense in layer IV. We also found that 70% of the innervated neurons were pyramidal cells, while the remaining 30% were multipolar cells. Most of these multipolar cells expressed the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and the lectin Vicia villosa agglutinin. PMID:21031559

  4. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI+] prion – an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein – and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome. PMID:25739058

  5. Formation and Redox Interconversion of Niobium Methylidene and Methylidyne Complexes.

    PubMed

    Searles, Keith; Smith, Kyle T; Kurogi, Takashi; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Carroll, Patrick J; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    The niobium methylidene [{(Ar'O)2 Nb}2 (μ2 -Cl)2 (μ2 -CH2 )] (2) can be cleanly prepared via thermolysis or photolysis of [(Ar'O)2 Nb(CH3 )2 Cl] (1) (OAr'=2,6-bis(diphenylmethyl)-4-tert-butylphenoxide). Reduction of 2 with two equivalents of KC8 results in formation of the first niobium methylidyne [K][{(Ar'O)2 Nb}2 (μ2 -CH)(μ2 -H)(μ2 -Cl)] (3) via a binuclear α-hydrogen elimination. Oxidation of 3 with two equiv of ClCPh3 reforms 2. In addition to solid state X-ray analysis, all these complexes were elucidated via multinuclear NMR experiments and isotopic labelling studies, including a crossover experiment, support the notion for a radical mechanism as well as a binuclear α-hydrogen abstraction pathway being operative in the formation of 2 from 1. PMID:27110689

  6. Formation of glutathionyl dinitrosyl iron complexes protects against iron genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Hanna; Sadło, Jarosław; Męczyńska, Sylwia; Stępkowski, Tomasz M; Wójciuk, Grzegorz; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-07-28

    Dinitrosyl iron(i) complexes (DNICs), intracellular NO donors, are important factors in nitric oxide-dependent regulation of cellular metabolism and signal transduction. It has been shown that NO diminishes the toxicity of iron ions and vice versa. To gain insight into the possible role of DNIC in this phenomenon, we examined the effect of GS-DNIC formation on the ability of iron ions to mediate DNA damage, by treatment of the pUC19 plasmid with physiologically relevant concentrations of GS-DNIC. It was shown that GS-DNIC formation protects against the genotoxic effect of iron ions alone and iron ions in the presence of a naturally abundant antioxidant, GSH. This sheds new light on the iron-related protective effect of NO under the circumstances of oxidative stress. PMID:26079708

  7. Formation of gold mineralization in ultramafic alkalic magmatic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, I. D.; Kogarko, L. N.; Sazonov, A. M.; Kononkova, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    Study of mineral inclusions within alluvial gold particles of the Guli Complex (East Siberia) and findings of lode gold in rocks of the same intrusion have demonstrated that gold mineralization occurs in interstitions of both early high-magnesium rocks (dunite) and later alkalic and carbonatite rocks. In dunite the native gold occurs in association with Fe-Ni sulfides (monosulfide solid solution, pentlandite, and heazlewoodite). Formation of the gold-bearing alloys took place under a low oxygen potential over a broad range of temperatures: from those close to 600°C down to below 400°C.

  8. Complex formation between uranyl and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between hexavalent uranium and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L), salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q), S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide(H/sub 2/Z), and thiosemicarbazidodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/R) has been studied spectrophotometrically in solution. Stability constants for complexes having the composition UO/sub 2/A have been calculated. Solid uranyl derivatives having the composition UO/sub 2/L x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Q x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Z x 2H/sub 2/O, and UO/sub 2/R x 2H/sub 2/O have been obtained. These derivatives were isolated and their IR spectroscopic behavior and thermal properties were investigated.

  9. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  10. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  11. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    van Miltenburg, M H A M; van Nimwegen, M J; Tijdens, I; Lalai, R; Kuiper, R; Klarenbeek, S; Schouten, P C; de Vries, A; Jonkers, J; van de Water, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneous mammary tumour development caused by loss of tumour suppressor genes such as p53 is lacking. Alterations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 have been implicated in over 50% of human breast cancers. Given that elevated FAK expression highly correlates with p53 mutation status in human breast cancer, we set out to investigate the importance of FAK in p53-mediated spontaneous mammary tumour development. Methods: To directly assess the role of FAK, we generated mice with conditional inactivation of FAK and p53. We generated female p53lox/lox/FAK+/+/WapCre, p53lox/lox/FAKflox/+/WapCre and p53lox/lox/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice, and mice with WapCre-mediated conditional expression of p53R270H, the mouse equivalent of human p53R273H hot spot mutation, together with conditional deletion of FAK, P53R270H/+/FAKlox/+/WapCre and p53R270H/+/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice. All mice were subjected to one pregnancy to induce WapCre-mediated deletion of p53 or expression of p53 R270H, and Fak genes flanked by two loxP sites, and subsequently followed the development of mammary tumours. Results: Using this approach, we show that FAK is important for p53-induced mammary tumour development. In addition, mice with the mammary gland-specific conditional expression of p53 point mutation R270H, the mouse equivalent to human R273H, in combination with conditional deletion of Fak showed reduced incidence of p53R270H-induced mammary tumours. In both models these effects of FAK were related to reduced proliferation in preneoplastic lesions in the mammary gland ductal structures. Conclusions: Mammary gland-specific ablation of FAK hampers p53-regulated spontaneous mammary tumour formation. Focal adhesion

  12. Interference-mediated synaptonemal complex formation with embedded crossover designation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangran; Espagne, Eric; de Muyt, Arnaud; Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems exhibit complex patterns at length scales ranging from the molecular to the organismic. Along chromosomes, events often occur stochastically at different positions in different nuclei but nonetheless tend to be relatively evenly spaced. Examples include replication origin firings, formation of chromatin loops along chromosome axes and, during meiosis, localization of crossover recombination sites (“crossover interference”). We present evidence in the fungus Sordaria macrospora that crossover interference is part of a broader pattern that includes synaptonemal complex (SC) nucleation. This pattern comprises relatively evenly spaced SC nucleation sites, among which a subset are crossover sites that show a classical interference distribution. This pattern ensures that SC forms regularly along the entire length of the chromosome as required for the maintenance of homolog pairing while concomitantly having crossover interactions locally embedded within the SC structure as required for both DNA recombination and structural events of chiasma formation. This pattern can be explained by a threshold-based designation and spreading interference process. This model can be generalized to give diverse types of related and/or partially overlapping patterns, in two or more dimensions, for any type of object. PMID:25380597

  13. Incipient species formation in salamanders of the Ensatina complex

    PubMed Central

    Wake, David B.

    1997-01-01

    The Ensatina eschscholtzii complex of plethodontid salamanders, a well-known “ring species,” is thought to illustrate stages in the speciation process. Early research, based on morphology and coloration, has been extended by the incorporation of studies of protein variation and mitochondrial DNA sequences. The new data show that the complex includes a number of geographically and genetically distinct components that are at or near the species level. The complex is old and apparently has undergone instances of range contraction, isolation, differentiation, and then expansion and secondary contact. While the hypothesis that speciation is retarded by gene flow around the ring is not supported by molecular data, the general biogeographical hypothesis is supported. There is evidence of a north to south range expansion along two axes, with secondary contact and completion of the ring in southern California. Current research targets regions once thought to show primary intergradation, but which molecular markers reveal to be zones of secondary contact. Here emphasis is on the subspecies E. e. xanthoptica, which is involved in four distinct secondary contacts in central California. There is evidence of renewed genetic interactions upon recontact, with greater genetic differentiation within xanthoptica than between it and some of the interacting populations. The complex presents a full array of intermediate conditions between well-marked species and geographically variable populations. Geographically differentiated segments represent a diversity of depths of time of isolation and admixture, reflecting the complicated geomorphological history of California. Ensatina illustrates the continuing difficulty in making taxonomic assignments in complexes studied during species formation. PMID:9223261

  14. Addition of surfactants in ozonated water cleaning for the suppression of functional group formation and particle adhesion on the SiO2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jahyun; Im, Kyungtaek; Lim, Sangwoo

    2011-04-01

    Various kinds of surfactants were added to a cleaning solution and deionized (DI) water, and their effect on the suppression of organic function group formation and particle adhesion to a SiO2 surface was analyzed using multi-internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results implied that attached organic functional groups are affected by the chemical structure of a surfactant in DI water. Furthermore, the addition of anionic glycolic acid ethoxylate 4-tert-butylphenyl ether (GAE4E) is the most effective in terms of preventing organic group attachment and particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface, whether it was added to the cleaning solution or post-cleaning rinse water, with or without polystyrene latex particles. Moreover, it was possible to completely prevent particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface with the proper addition of GAE4E in DIO3 solution.

  15. Cadmium(II) Complex Formation with Cysteine and Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O.; Mah, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H2Cys) or penicillamine (H2Pen = 3, 3′-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, containing CCd(II) ∼ 0.1 mol dm-3 and CH2L = 0.2 – 2 mol dm-3, was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of 113Cd-NMR and Cd K- and L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine mole ratios the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52 – 2.54 Å and 2.27 – 2.35 Å, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50 – 2.53 Å, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28 – 2.33 Å. For the mole ratio CH2L / CCd(II) = 2, the 113Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509 – 527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS2N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (mole ratios CH2Cys / CCd(II) ≥ 10) complexes with CdS4 coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the 113Cd NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636 - 658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances of 2.53 ± 0.02 Å. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)4]n-, while at higher pH the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation, and at pH 11.0 a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)3]4- complex with CdS3N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with mole ratios CH2Pen / CCd(II) ≥ 10, the 113Cd-NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances Cd-S 2.53 ± 0.02 Å and Cd-O 2.30 – 2.33 Å, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)3]n- complexes with chelating CdS3(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5, and become mixed with CdS2N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the cadmium(II) ion that can explain why cysteine-rich metallothionines

  16. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the

  17. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  18. Internalization of nucleoside phosphates into live cells by complex formation with different CPPs and JBS-nucleoducin.

    PubMed

    Mussbach, Franziska; Pietrucha, Regina; Schaefer, Buerk; Reissmann, Siegmund

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoside phosphates can bind to many functional proteins like G-proteins or other GTP-binding proteins in signal transduction or translation processes. Till now internalization of nucleoside phosphates into live cells remains a challenge. We study the internalization of a fluorescent-labelled deoxyuridine triphosphate into HeLa cells and other adhesion and suspension cells. We use different cell-penetrating peptides and a cocktail suitable for formation of non-covalent complexes with the nucleotide. Internalization is observed by fluorescence microscopy, and the uptake efficiency is quantitatively estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The applied concentrations of CPPs and the cocktail were checked on cell viability (MTT test) and membrane integrity (bioluminescence test with peptidyl-luciferin), indicating that the CPPs and the complexes with the nucleotide are cytotoxic above certain concentrations. These concentrations depend on CPP and cell type and are the limiting factors for the cargo uptake. PMID:21053144

  19. Diffusion impregnation of alloys under conditions of complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlina, V.S.; Matychak, Y.S.

    1985-05-01

    In most cases, diffusion impregnation of alloys with elements for the purpose of improving their service properties occurs with chemical interaction with the constituents of the base. Such processes are described within the limits of the model of reaction diffusion, assuming the formation and growth of new continuous layers by the Fick equation. At the same time, instantaneous reaction of the elements is assumed, as the result of which the rate of the whole process is limited by diffusion. Together with this, diffusion processes and chemical transformations occur simultaneously, as the result of which continuous phases are not formed (internal oxidation, nitriding, etc.). The purpose of this work was an analytical investigation of diffusion impregnation by element A from a constant source of a flat specimen initially uniformly alloyed with a mobile impurity B. The model presented makes it possible to investigate the initial stage of homogeneous formation of complexes and to reveal their influence on the kinetics of redistribution of the diffusing elements.

  20. Intervening with Urinary Tract Infections Using Anti-Adhesives Based on the Crystal Structure of the FimH–Oligomannose-3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien; Van Gerven, Nani; Slättegård, Rikard; Hernalsteens, Jean-Pierre; Wyns, Lode; Oscarson, Stefan; De Greve, Henri; Hultgren, Scott; Bouckaert, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli strains adhere to the normally sterile human uroepithelium using type 1 pili, that are long, hairy surface organelles exposing a mannose-binding FimH adhesin at the tip. A small percentage of adhered bacteria can successfully invade bladder cells, presumably via pathways mediated by the high-mannosylated uroplakin-Ia and α3β1 integrins found throughout the uroepithelium. Invaded bacteria replicate and mature into dense, biofilm-like inclusions in preparation of fluxing and of infection of neighbouring cells, being the major cause of the troublesome recurrent urinary tract infections. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that α-d-mannose based inhibitors of FimH not only block bacterial adhesion on uroepithelial cells but also antagonize invasion and biofilm formation. Heptyl α-d-mannose prevents binding of type 1-piliated E. coli to the human bladder cell line 5637 and reduces both adhesion and invasion of the UTI89 cystitis isolate instilled in mouse bladder via catheterization. Heptyl α-d-mannose also specifically inhibited biofilm formation at micromolar concentrations. The structural basis of the great inhibitory potential of alkyl and aryl α-d-mannosides was elucidated in the crystal structure of the FimH receptor-binding domain in complex with oligomannose-3. FimH interacts with Manα1,3Manβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,4GlcNAc in an extended binding site. The interactions along the α1,3 glycosidic bond and the first β1,4 linkage to the chitobiose unit are conserved with those of FimH with butyl α-d-mannose. The strong stacking of the central mannose with the aromatic ring of Tyr48 is congruent with the high affinity found for synthetic inhibitors in which this mannose is substituted for by an aromatic group. Conclusions/Significance The potential of ligand-based design of antagonists of urinary tract infections is ruled by the structural mimicry of natural epitopes and extends into blocking of bacterial invasion, intracellular

  1. Image formation in the eye: very specified complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzmann, David E.

    2005-08-01

    The formation of an image, and its correct interpretation by sighted living creatures, is a unique example of specified complexity unlike anything else in nature. While many of the functional aspects of living organisms are extremely complex, only an image requires a unique mapping process by the eye-brain system to be useful to the organism. The transfer of light from an object scene to a visual detection system (eye + brain) conveys an enormous amount of information. But unless that information is correctly organized into a useful image, the exchange of information is degraded and of questionable use. This paper examines the "connections" necessary for images to be interpreted correctly, as well as addressing the additional complexity requirement of dual-image mapping for stereovision capabilities. Statistics are presented for "simple eyes" consisting of a few pixels to illustrate the daunting task that random chance has to produce any form of a functional eye. For example, a 12-pixel eye (or camera) has 12! (479,001,600) possible pixel-to-brain (computer) wiring combinations, which can then be compared to the 126 million rods/cones of the actual human eye. If one tries to "connect the wires" (correctly interpret the information contained) in a 12-pixel image by random processes, by the time 6 pixels become correctly connected, over 99.9% of all the trials are incorrect, producing "noise" rather than a recognizable image. Higher numbers of pixels quickly make the problem astronomically worse for achieving any kind of useful image. This paper concludes that random-chance purposeless undirected processes cannot account for how images are perceived by living organisms.

  2. Unbinding and unfolding of adhesion protein complexes through stretching: interplay between shear and tensile mechanical clamps.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Mioduszewski, Łukasz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze mechanically induced dissociation and unfolding of the protein complex CD48-2B4. This heterodimer is an indispensable component of the immunological system: 2B4 is a receptor on natural killer cells whereas CD48 is expressed on surfaces of various immune cells. So far, its mechanostability has not been assessed either experimentally or theoretically. We find that the dissociation processes strongly depend on the direction of pulling and may take place in several pathways. Interestingly, the CD48-2B4 interface can be divided into three distinct patches that act as units when resisting the pulling forces. At experimentally accessible pulling speeds, the characteristic mechanostability forces are in the range between 100 and 200 pN, depending on the pulling direction. These characteristic forces need not be associated with tensile forces involved in the act of separation of the complex because prior shear-involving unraveling within individual proteins may give rise to a higher force peak. PMID:25142868

  3. Cyclodextrins in pharmaceutical formulations I: structure and physicochemical properties, formation of complexes, and types of complex.

    PubMed

    Jambhekar, Sunil S; Breen, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides that have been recognized as pharmaceutical adjuvants for the past 20 years. The molecular structure of these glucose derivatives, which approximates a truncated cone, bucket, or torus, generates a hydrophilic exterior surface and a nonpolar interior cavity. Cyclodextrins can interact with appropriately sized drug molecules to yield an inclusion complex. These noncovalent inclusion complexes offer a variety of advantages over the noncomplexed form of a drug. Cyclodextrins are primarily used to enhance the aqueous solubility, physical chemical stability, and bioavailability of drugs. Their other applications include preventing drug-drug interactions, converting liquid drugs into microcrystalline powders, minimizing gastrointestinal and ocular irritation, and reducing or eliminating unpleasant taste and smell. Here, we discuss the physical chemical properties of various cyclodextrins, including the effects of substitutions on these properties. Additionally, we report on the regulatory status of their use, commercial products containing cyclodextrins, toxicological considerations, and the forces involved in complex formation. We also highlight the types of complex formed and discuss the methods used to determine the types of complex present. PMID:26686054

  4. Influence of the monomer structure and electrochemical parameters on the formation of nanotubes with parahydrophobic properties (high water adhesion) by a templateless electropolymerization process.

    PubMed

    Darmanin, Thierry; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Orange, François; Guittard, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    Controlling the formation of surface nanostructures and nanotubes in particular is extremely important for various applications in electronic devices for energy systems, biosensing but also for the control of water adhesion. Here, we use a direct (without template) electropolymerization process to produce vertically aligned nanotubes. Different monomers are tested as well as different solvents, electrolytes and electrodeposition methods. We show that naphtho[2,3-b]thieno[3,4-e][1,4]dioxine (NaphDOT) is the best monomer to obtain these nanotubes while dichloromethane has to be used as solvent for their formation. The surfaces with nanotubes display both extremely high apparent contact angles (θ(w)=142.7°) and high water adhesion even if the nanotubes are made of intrinsically hydrophilic polymers and are not densely packed. PMID:26771504

  5. Epithelial junction formation requires confinement of Cdc42 activity by a novel SH3BP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Zihni, Ceniz; Terry, Stephen J.; Clark, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cell–cell adhesion and morphogenesis require dynamic control of actin-driven membrane remodeling. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Cdc42 regulates sequential molecular processes during cell–cell junction formation; hence, mechanisms must exist that inactivate Cdc42 in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. In this paper, we identify SH3BP1, a GTPase-activating protein for Cdc42 and Rac, as a regulator of junction assembly and epithelial morphogenesis using a functional small interfering ribonucleic acid screen. Depletion of SH3BP1 resulted in loss of spatial control of Cdc42 activity, stalled membrane remodeling, and enhanced growth of filopodia. SH3BP1 formed a complex with JACOP/paracingulin, a junctional adaptor, and CD2AP, a scaffolding protein; both were required for normal Cdc42 signaling and junction formation. The filamentous actin–capping protein CapZ also associated with the SH3BP1 complex and was required for control of actin remodeling. Epithelial junction formation and morphogenesis thus require a dual activity complex, containing SH3BP1 and CapZ, that is recruited to sites of active membrane remodeling to guide Cdc42 signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics. PMID:22891260

  6. Whole-exome sequencing of endometriosis identifies frequent alterations in genes involved in cell adhesion and chromatin-remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Luyang; Wang, Lingxiong; Wu, Zhiqiang; Mei, Qian; Nie, Jing; Li, Xiang; Li, Yali; Fu, Xiaobing; Wang, Xiaoning; Meng, Yuanguang; Han, Weidong

    2014-11-15

    Endometriosis is a complex and enigmatic disease that arises from the interplay among multiple genetic and environmental factors. The defining feature of endometriosis is the deposition and growth of endometrial tissues at sites outside of the uterine cavity. Studies to date have established that endometriosis is heritable but have not addressed the causal genetic variants for this disease. Here, we conducted whole-exome sequencing to comprehensively search for somatic mutations in both eutopic and ectopic endometrium from 16 endometriosis patients and five normal control patients using laser capture microdissection. We compared the mutational landscape of ectopic endometrium with the corresponding eutopic sample from endometriosis patients compared with endometrium from normal women and identified previously unreported mutated genes and pathway alternations. Statistical analysis of exome data identified that most genes were specifically mutated in both eutopic and ectopic endometrium cells. In particular, genes that are involved in biological adhesion, cell-cell junctions, and chromatin-remodeling complex(es) were identified, which partially supports the retrograde menstruation theory that proposes that endometrial cells are refluxed through the fallopian tubes during menstruation and implanted onto the peritoneum or pelvic organs. Conspicuously, when we compared exomic mutation data for paired eutopic and ectopic endometrium, we identified a mutational signature in both endometrial types for which no overlap in somatic single nucleotide variants were observed. These mutations occurred in a mutually exclusive manner, likely because of the discrepancy in endometriosis pathology and physiology, as eutopic endometrium rapidly regrows, and ectopic endometrial growth is inert. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, an unbiased view of the landscape of genetic alterations in endometriosis and vital information for indicating that genetic alterations in cytoskeletal and

  7. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1: evidence for involvement of cell adhesion molecules in HTLV-1 biology.

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, J E; Subramanium, A; Hampton, R A

    1997-01-01

    While studying the potential role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in infection of endothelial cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we found that VCAM-1 can mediate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation. Both expression-vector-encoded and endogenously expressed VCAM-1 supported fusion of uninfected cells with HTLV-1-infected cells. Fusion was obtained with cell lines carrying the HTLV-1 genome and expressing viral proteins but not with an HTLV-1-transformed cell line that does not express viral proteins. In clones of VCAM-1-transfected cells, the degree of syncytium formation observed directly reflected the level of VCAM-1 expression. Syncytium formation between HTLV-1-expressing cells and VCAM-1+ cells could be blocked with antiserum against HTLV-1 gp46 and with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VCAM-1. Fusion was not blocked by antiserum against HIV or a MAb against VLA-4, the physiological counter-receptor for VCAM-1. The results indicate that VCAM-1 can serve as an accessory molecule or potential coreceptor for HTLV-1-induced cell fusion and provide direct evidence of a role for cell adhesion molecules in the biology of HTLV-1. PMID:8995639

  8. From the Cover: Implications for complex cognition from the hafting of tools with compound adhesives in the Middle Stone Age, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Lyn; Hodgskiss, Tamaryn; Grant, Michael

    2009-06-16

    Compound adhesives made from red ochre mixed with plant gum were used in the Middle Stone Age (MSA), South Africa. Replications reported here suggest that early artisans did not merely color their glues red; they deliberately effected physical transformations involving chemical changes from acidic to less acidic pH, dehydration of the adhesive near wood fires, and changes to mechanical workability and electrostatic forces. Some of the steps required for making compound adhesive seem impossible without multitasking and abstract thought. This ability suggests overlap between the cognitive abilities of modern people and people in the MSA. Our multidisciplinary analysis provides a new way to recognize complex cognition in the MSA without necessarily invoking the concept of symbolism. PMID:19433786

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Hyaluronate with 1,4-Butanediol Diglycidyl Ether Compared to Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose in Preventing Adhesion Formation after Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Moon, Byung Gwan; Yi, Seong; Han, In Bo; Heo, Dong Hwa; Kim, Ki-Tack; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epidural injection of hyaluronic acid may prevent adhesion formation after spine surgery, but the compounds used to stabilize hyaluronidase could interfere with its anti-adhesion effects. The present study was conducted as a clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an experimental medical gel in preventing adhesion formation. Methods This study was designed as a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and comparative controlled clinical trial with an observation period of 6 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: group A with sodium hyaluronate + 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) and group B with sodium hyaluronate + sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Visual analogue scale (VAS) of back and leg pain and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and scar score ratings were assessed after surgery. Results Mean scar grade was 2.37±1.13 in group A and 2.75±0.97 in group B, a statistically significant difference (p=0.012). VAS of back and leg pain and ODI scores decreased significantly from baseline to 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively in both groups (p<0.001). However, VAS and ODI scores were not statistically different between groups A and B at baseline or at 3 and 6 weeks after operation (p>0.3). The number of adverse reactions related to the anti-adhesion gels was not statistically different (p=0.569), but subsequent analysis of nervous adverse reactions showed group B was superior with a statistically difference (p=0.027). Conclusion Sodium hyaluronate with BDDE demonstrated similar anti-adhesion properties to sodium hyaluronate with CMC. But, care should be used to nervous adverse reactions by using sodium hyaluronate with BDDE. PMID:26217381

  10. Crystal structure of linoleate 13R-manganese lipoxygenase in complex with an adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Wennman, Anneli; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Engström, Åke; Oliw, Ernst H

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure of 13R-manganese lipoxygenase (MnLOX) of Gaeumannomyces graminis (Gg) in complex with zonadhesin of Pichia pastoris was solved by molecular replacement. Zonadhesin contains β-strands in two subdomains. A comparison of Gg-MnLOX with the 9S-MnLOX of Magnaporthe oryzae (Mo) shows that the protein fold and the geometry of the metal ligands are conserved. The U-shaped active sites differ mainly due to hydrophobic residues of the substrate channel. The volumes and two hydrophobic side pockets near the catalytic base may sanction oxygenation at C-13 and C-9, respectively. Gly-332 of Gg-MnLOX is positioned in the substrate channel between the entrance and the metal center. Replacements with larger residues could restrict oxygen and substrate to reach the active site. C18 fatty acids are likely positioned with C-11 between Mn(2+)OH2 and Leu-336 for hydrogen abstraction and with one side of the 12Z double bond shielded by Phe-337 to prevent antarafacial oxygenation at C-13 and C-11. Phe-347 is positioned at the end of the substrate channel and replacement with smaller residues can position C18 fatty acids for oxygenation at C-9. Gg-MnLOX does not catalyze the sequential lipoxygenation of n-3 fatty acids in contrast to Mo-MnLOX, which illustrates the different configurations of their substrate channels. PMID:27313058

  11. Drug delivery and cell interaction of adhesive poly(ethyleneimine)/sulfated polysaccharide complex particle films.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin; Torger, Bernhard; Wehrum, Diana; Vehlow, David; Urban, Birgit; Woltmann, Beatrice; Hempel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the authors report and review polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with zoledronate (ZOL) and simvastatin and their effects on bone cells. PEC NPs are intended for modification of bone substitute materials. For characterization, they can be solution casted on germanium (Ge) substrates serving as analytically accessible model substrate. PEC NPs were generated by mixing poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) either with linear cellulose sulfate (CS) or with branched dextransulfate (DS). Four important requirements for drug loaded PEC NPs and their films are addressed herein, which are the colloidal stability of PEC dispersions (1), interfacial stability (2), cytocompatibility (3), and retarded drug release (4). Dynamic light scattering measurements (DLS) showed that both PEI/CS and PEI/DS PEC NP were obtained with hydrodynamic radii in the range of 35-170 nm and were colloidally stable up to several months. Transmission FTIR spectroscopy evidenced that films of both systems were stable in contact to the release medium up to several days. ZOL-loaded PEI/CS nanoparticles, which were immobilized on an osteoblast-derived extracellular matrix, reduced significantly the resorption and the metabolic activity of human monocyte-derived osteoclasts. FTIR spectroscopy at cast PEC/drug films at Ge substrates revealed retarded drug releases in comparison to the pure drug films. PMID:25708630

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class I-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 association on the surface of target cells: implications for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Tatiana; Anikeeva, Nadja; Kalams, Spyros A; Walker, Bruce D; Gaidarov, Ibragim; Keen, James H; Sykulev, Yuri

    2004-12-01

    Polarization and segregation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and integrins upon productive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) target cell encounters are well documented. Much less is known about the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins on target cells interacting with CTLs. Here we show that human leucocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) MHC-I and ICAM-1 are physically associated and recovered from both the raft fraction and the fraction of soluble membranes of target cells. Conjugation of target cells with surrogate CTLs, i.e. polystyrene beads loaded with antibodies specific for HLA-A2 and ICAM-1, induced the accumulation of membrane rafts, and beads loaded with ICAM-1-specific antibodies caused the selective recruitment of HLA-A2 MHC-I at the contact area of the target cells. Disruption of raft integrity on target cells led to a release of HLA-A2 and ICAM-1 from the raft fraction, abatement of HLA-A2 polarization, and diminished the ability of target cells bearing viral peptides to induce a Ca(2+) flux in virus-specific CTLs. These data suggest that productive engagement of ICAM-1 on target cells facilitates the polarization of MHC-I at the CTL-target cell interface, augmenting presentation of cognate peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes to CTLs. We propose that ICAM-1-MHC-I association on the cell membrane is a mechanism that enhances the linkage between antigen recognition and early immunological synapse formation. PMID:15554924

  13. Large-scale gas dynamics in the adhesion model: implications for the two-phase massive galaxy formation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Tenreiro, R.; Oñorbe, J.; Martínez-Serrano, F.; Serna, A.

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the mass assembly and star formation histories of massive galaxies identified at low redshift in different cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. To this end, we have carried out a detailed follow-up backwards in time of their constituent mass elements (sampled by particles) of different types. After that, the configurations they depict at progressively higher zs were carefully analysed. The analyses show that these histories share common generic patterns, irrespective of particular circumstances. In any case, however, the results we have found are different depending on the particle type. The most outstanding differences follow. We have found that by z˜ 3.5-6, mass elements identified as stellar particles at z= 0 exhibit a gaseous cosmic-web-like morphology with scales of ˜1 physical Mpc, where the densest mass elements have already turned into stars by z˜ 6. These settings are in fact the densest pieces of the cosmic web, where no hot particles show up, and dynamically organized as a hierarchy of flow convergence regions (FCRs), that is, attraction basins for mass flows. At high z FCRs undergo fast contractive deformations with very low angular momentum, shrinking them violently. Indeed, by z˜ 1 most of the gaseous or stellar mass they contain shows up as bound to a massive elliptical-like object at their centres, with typical half-mass radii of rmassstar˜ 2-3 kpc. After this, a second phase comes about where the mass assembly rate is much slower and characterized by mergers involving angular momentum. On the other hand, mass elements identified at the diffuse hot coronae surrounding massive galaxies at z= 0 do not display a clear web-like morphology at any z. Diffuse gas is heated when FCRs go through contractive deformations. Most of this gas remains hot and with low density throughout the evolution. To shed light on the physical foundations of the behaviour revealed by our analyses (i.e. a two-phase formation process with different

  14. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  15. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L; Morgan, B Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-01-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a 'multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a 'split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration. PMID:26841837

  16. Lipogenic Enzymes Complexes and Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplet Formation During Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Velez-delValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2016-10-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that store triglycerides and participate in their mobilization in adipose cells. These organelles require the reorganization of some structural components, the cytoskeleton, and the activation of lipogenic enzymes. Using confocal microscopy, we analyzed the participation of cytoskeletal components and two lipogenic enzymes, fatty acid synthase and glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, during lipid droplet biogenesis in differentiating 3T3-F442A cells into adipocytes. We show that subcortical actin microfilaments are extended at the basal side of the cells in parallel arrangement to the culture dish substrate, and that the microtubule network traverses the cytoplasm as a scaffold that supports the round shape of the mature adipocyte. By immunoprecipitation, we show that vimentin and perilipin1a associate during the early stages of the differentiation process for lipid droplet formation. We also report that the antibody against perilipin1 detected a band that might correspond to a modified form of the molecule. Finally, the cytosolic distribution and punctate organization of lipogenic enzymes and their co-localization in the proximity of lipid droplets suggest the existence of dynamic protein complexes involved in synthesis and storage of triglycerides. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2315-2326, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928794

  17. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-02-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a `multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a `split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration.

  18. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-01-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a ‘multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a ‘split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration. PMID:26841837

  19. Adeno-associated virus-2-mediated TGF-β1 microRNA transfection inhibits adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y F; Mao, W F; Zhou, Y L; Wang, X T; Liu, P Y; Tang, J B

    2016-02-01

    Adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury greatly affects gliding function of the tendon, which is a major clinical complication after hand surgery. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has a critical role in adhesion formation during tendon healing. Persistent regulation of TGF-β1 through application of microRNA (miRNA) specifically inhibiting the function of TGF-β1 (TGF-β1-miRNA) holds promise for treatment of such a complication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) was used to transfer TGF-β1-miRNA to the chicken digital flexor tendons, which had been injured and surgically repaired. Four doses of AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA (2 × 10(11), 2 × 10(10), 2 × 10(9) and 2 × 10(8) vector genomes (vg)) were used to determine the transfection efficiency. At postoperative 3 weeks, we found a positive correlation between the administered AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA doses and transfection efficiency. The transfection rate ranged from 10% to 77% as the doses increased. Production of TGF-β1 protein in the tendons decreased on increasing vector dosage. When 2 × 10(11) and 2 × 10(10) vg were injected into the tendon, gliding excursion of the repaired tendon and work of flexion of chicken toes were significantly increased and adhesion score decreased 6 and 8 weeks later, indicating the improvement of tendon gliding and decreases in adhesion formations. However, the ultimate strength of the tendons transfected at the dose of 2 × 10(10) vg was 12-24% lower than that of the control tendons. The results of this study demonstrate that application of TGF-β1-miRNA had a mixed impact on tendon healing: adhesion around the tendon is reduced but strength of the tendon healing is adversely affected. Future studies should aim at maintaining the beneficial effects of reducing tendon adhesions, while eliminating the adverse effects of decreasing the healing strength. PMID:26381218

  20. Suitable in vitro Eimeria arloingi macromeront formation in host endothelial cells and modulation of adhesion molecule, cytokine and chemokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana M R; Vila-Viçosa, Maria J M; Cortes, Helder C E; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Eimeria arloingi infections can cause severe haemorrhagic enteritis in young goat kids, thereby leading to high economic losses in goat industry worldwide. We aimed to isolate a new E. arloingi strain and establish a suitable in vitro culture system for the first merogony. E. arloingi oocysts were collected from naturally infected goat kids in the province of Alentejo, Portugal. For the maintenance of E. arloingi (strain A), kids kept under strict parasite-free conditions were orally infected with 10(3) sporulated oocysts each. Further, a new excystation protocol was successfully established to obtain viable sporozoites for further in vitro development in primary bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC). Overall, E. arloingi first merogony was successfully accomplished in BUVEC leading to macromeront formation (up to 150 μm) and the release of fully developed merozoites I stages. Moreover, host endothelial cell-parasite interactions were investigated in order to determine the extent of modulation carried out by E. arloingi in BUVEC during the first merogony. Gene transcription of adhesion molecules (E-selectin, P-selectin, VCAM-1, ICAM-1) was enhanced in the first hours post-infection (p.i.) in E. arloingi-infected BUVEC. BUVEC activation due to invasion was also shown by increased chemokine (CXCL8, CCL2, CCL5), cytokine (GM-CSF) and COX-2 gene transcription. The new E. arloingi (strain A) will be useful for better comprehension of early host innate immune reactions against this parasite in vitro/in vivo as well as to further our investigations in the complex Eimeria-host endothelial cell interactions. PMID:25339511

  1. GPVI and α2β1 play independent critical roles during platelet adhesion and aggregate formation to collagen under flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarratt, Kendra L.; Chen, Hong; Zutter, Mary M.; Santoro, Samuel A.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2005-01-01

    The roles of the 2 major platelet-collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and integrin α2β1, have been intensely investigated using a variety of methods over the past decade. In the present study, we have used pharmacologic and genetic approaches to study human and mouse platelet adhesion to collagen under flow conditions. Our studies demonstrate that both GPVI and integrin α2β1 play significant roles for platelet adhesion to collagen under flow and that the loss of both receptors completely ablates this response. Intracellular signaling mediated by the cytoplasmic adaptor Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) but not by the transmembrane adaptor linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is critical for platelet adhesion to collagen under flow. In addition, reduced GPVI receptor density results in severe defects in platelet adhesion to collagen under flow. Defective adhesion to collagen under flow is associated with prolonged tail-bleeding times in mice lacking one or both collagen receptors. These studies establish platelet-collagen responses under physiologic flow as the consequence of a close partnership between 2 structurally distinct receptors and suggest that both receptors play significant hemostatic roles in vivo. PMID:15886326

  2. Simultaneous formation of fine and large-area electrode patterns using screen-offset printing and its application to the patterning on adhesive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Sato, Junya; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Arai, Masahiro; Kurata, Yuji; Iwata, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    Additive-type printing techniques such as gravure-offset printing and screen printing are effective for low-cost and ecofriendly electrode pattern formation. Gravure-offset printing is effective for fine pattern formation with widths on the order of 10-20 µm, whereas screen printing is effective for the formation of large-area patterns. However, it is difficult to simultaneously form fine and large-area patterns using these printing techniques. In this study, we demonstrate that fine (minimum width of 15 µm) and medium- as well as large-area patterns can be formed simultaneously using our developed screen-offset printing technique, which is a combination of screen printing on a silicone blanket and transfer printing from the blanket to a substrate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our method to printing on adhesive materials, which allows electrode formation without applying heat to the film substrate.

  3. Apigenin inhibits platelet adhesion and thrombus formation and synergizes with aspirin in the suppression of the arachidonic acid pathway.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Núñez, L; Lozano, M L; Palomo, M; Martínez, C; Vicente, V; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Diaz-Ricart, M; Escolar, G; Rivera, J

    2008-05-14

    Previous studies using washed platelets demonstrated that certain flavonoids inhibit platelet function through several mechanisms including blockade of TxA(2) receptors (TPs). We aimed to analyze the binding capacity of flavonoids to TPs in platelet rich plasma (PRP), investigated their effect in flowing blood, and evaluated the ability of apigenin to improve the efficacy of aspirin in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding of flavonoids to TPs in PRP was explored using binding assays and the TP antagonist [ (3)H]SQ29548. Effects of flavonoids on platelet adhesion were assessed using arterial subendothelium with annular plate perfusion chambers, and global evaluation of apigenin on high-shear-dependent platelet function was determined by the PFA-100. To evaluate the ability of apigenin to potentiate the effect of aspirin, arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation was measured prior to and after consumption of subaggregatory doses of aspirin in the presence or absence of apigenin. Binding assays revealed that apigenin was an efficient competitor of [ (3)H]SQ29548 binding to PRP ( K i = 155.3 +/- 65.4 microM), and perfusion studies showed that apigenin, genistein, and catechin significantly diminished thrombus formation when compared to control (26.2 +/- 3.8, 33.1 +/- 5.2, and 26.2 +/- 5.2 vs 76.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). Apigenin, similarly to the TP antagonist SQ29548, significantly prolonged collagen epinephrine-induced PFA-100 closure time in comparison to the control and, when added to platelets that had been exposed in vivo to aspirin, potentiated its inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. The inhibitory effect of some flavonoids in the presence of plasma, particularly apigenin, might in part rely on TxA(2) receptor antagonism. There is a clear increase in the ex vivo antiplatelet effect of aspirin in the presence of apigenin, which encourages the idea of the combined use of aspirin and certain flavonoids in patients in which

  4. Upregulation of adhesion complex proteins and fibronectin by human keratinocytes treated with an aqueous extract from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata (Eupolin).

    PubMed

    Phan, T T; Allen, J; Hughes, M A; Cherry, G; Wojnarowska, F

    2000-01-01

    The fresh leaves and extract of the plant Chromolaena odorata are a traditional herbal treatment in developing countries for burns, soft tissue wounds and skin infections. We have previously shown that the extract had an effect on the growth and proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in culture. This study has demonstrated that Eupolin extract increased expression of several components of the adhesion complex and fibronectin by human keratinocytes. Using indirect immunofluorescence we found increased expression (dose-dependent) of laminin 5, laminin 1, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The expression of the b1 and b4 integrins was upregulated by the extract at low concentrations (0.1 and 1 microg/ml), but the expression was decreased at higher doses of Eupolin (10 microg-150 microg/ml). A number of clinical studies carried out by Vietnamese and international medical investigators have demonstrated the efficacy of this extract on the wound healing process. In this study we have shown that Eupolin stimulated the expression of many proteins of the adhesion complex and fibronectin by human keratinocytes. The adhesion complex proteins are essential to stabilise epithelium and this effect could contribute to the clinical efficacy of Eupolin in healing. PMID:11056422

  5. Characterization of the Cadherin-Catenin Complex of the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis and Implications for the Evolution of Metazoan Cell-Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Donald Nathaniel; Miller, Phillip W; Lowe, Christopher J; Weis, William I; Nelson, William James

    2016-08-01

    The cadherin-catenin complex (CCC) mediates cell-cell adhesion in bilaterian animals by linking extracellular cadherin-based adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton. However, it is unknown whether the basic organization of the complex is conserved across all metazoans. We tested whether protein interactions and actin-binding properties of the CCC are conserved in a nonbilaterian animal, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis We demonstrated that N. vectensis has a complete repertoire of cadherin-catenin proteins, including two classical cadherins, one α-catenin, and one β-catenin. Using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering, we showed that α-catenin and β-catenin formed a heterodimer that bound N. vectensis Cadherin-1 and -2. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin bound F-actin with equivalent affinity as either a monomer or an α/β-catenin heterodimer, and its affinity for F-actin was, in part, regulated by a novel insert between the N- and C-terminal domains. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin inhibited Arp2/3 complex-mediated nucleation of actin filaments, a regulatory property previously thought to be unique to mammalian αE-catenin. Thus, despite significant differences in sequence, the key interactions of the CCC are conserved between bilaterians and cnidarians, indicating that the core function of the CCC as a link between cell adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton is ancestral in the eumetazoans. PMID:27189570

  6. Characterization of the Cadherin–Catenin Complex of the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis and Implications for the Evolution of Metazoan Cell–Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Donald Nathaniel; Miller, Phillip W.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, William James

    2016-01-01

    The cadherin–catenin complex (CCC) mediates cell–cell adhesion in bilaterian animals by linking extracellular cadherin-based adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton. However, it is unknown whether the basic organization of the complex is conserved across all metazoans. We tested whether protein interactions and actin-binding properties of the CCC are conserved in a nonbilaterian animal, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We demonstrated that N. vectensis has a complete repertoire of cadherin–catenin proteins, including two classical cadherins, one α-catenin, and one β-catenin. Using size-exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering, we showed that α-catenin and β-catenin formed a heterodimer that bound N. vectensis Cadherin-1 and -2. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin bound F-actin with equivalent affinity as either a monomer or an α/β-catenin heterodimer, and its affinity for F-actin was, in part, regulated by a novel insert between the N- and C-terminal domains. Nematostella vectensis α-catenin inhibited Arp2/3 complex-mediated nucleation of actin filaments, a regulatory property previously thought to be unique to mammalian αE-catenin. Thus, despite significant differences in sequence, the key interactions of the CCC are conserved between bilaterians and cnidarians, indicating that the core function of the CCC as a link between cell adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton is ancestral in the eumetazoans. PMID:27189570

  7. The thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation between calcium ions and L-leucine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, V. Yu.; Chernikov, V. V.; Orlova, T. D.

    2011-04-01

    Complex formation of L-leucine with calcium ions in aqueous solution was studied by potentiometric titration at 298.15 K and ionic strength values I = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 (KNO3). The formation of the CaL+ and CaHL2+ complex particles was established and their stability constants were determined. The enthalpies of protolytic equilibria of leucine and formation of calcium ion complexes with leucine were determined calorimetrically at 298.15 K and I = 0.5 (KNO3). The thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation between calcium ions and L-leucine were calculated.

  8. Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, David C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

  9. Ethanol oxidation by imidorhenium(V) complexes: formation of amidorhenium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Suing, A L; Dewan, C R; White, P S; Thorp, H H

    2000-12-25

    The reaction of Re(NC6H4R)Cl3(PPh3)2 (R = H, 4-Cl, 4-OMe) with 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe) is investigated in refluxing ethanol. The reaction produces two major products, Re(NC6H4R)Cl(dppe)(2)2+ (R = H, 1-H; R = Cl, 1-Cl; R = OMe, 1-OMe) and the rhenium(III) species Re(NHC6H4R)Cl(dppe)2+ (R = H, 2-H; R = Cl, 2-Cl). Complexes 1-H (orthorhombic, Pcab, a = 22.3075(10) A, b = 23.1271(10) A, c = 23.3584(10) A, Z = 8), 1-Cl (triclinic, P1, a = 11.9403(6) A, b = 14.6673(8) A, c = 17.2664(9) A, alpha = 92.019(1) degrees, beta = 97.379(1) degrees, gamma = 90.134(1) degrees, Z = 2), and 1-OMe (triclinic, P1, a = 11.340(3) A, b = 13.134(4) A, c = 13.3796(25) A, alpha = 102.370(20) degrees, beta = 107.688(17) degrees, gamma = 114.408(20) degrees, Z = 1) are crystallographically characterized and show an average Re-N bond length (1.71 A) typical of imidorhenium(V) complexes. There is a small systematic decrease in the Re-N bond length on going from Cl to H to OMe. Complex 2-Cl (monoclinic, Cc, a = 24.2381(11) A, b = 13.4504(6) A, c = 17.466(8) A, beta = 97.06900(0) degrees, Z = 4) is also crystallographically characterized and shows a Re-N bond length (1.98 A) suggestive of amidorhenium(III). The rhenium(III) complexes exhibit unusual proton NMR spectra where all of the resonances are found at expected locations except those for the amido protons, which are at 37.8 ppm for 2-Cl and 37.3 ppm for 1-H. The phosphorus resonances are also unremarkable, but the 13C spectrum of 2-Cl shows a significantly shifted resonance at 177.3 ppm, which is assigned to the ipso carbon of the phenylamido ligand. The extraordinary shifts of the amido hydrogen and ipso carbon are attributed to second-order magnetism that is strongly focused along the axially compressed amido axis. The reducing equivalents for the formation of the Re(III) product are provided by oxidation of the ethanol solvent, which produces acetal and acetaldehyde in amounts as much as 30 equiv based on the quantity of

  10. Bistability of Cell Adhesion in Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area—bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms. PMID:21889439

  11. A role for the retinoblastoma protein as a regulator of mouse osteoblast cell adhesion: implications for osteogenesis and osteosarcoma formation.

    PubMed

    Sosa-García, Bernadette; Gunduz, Volkan; Vázquez-Rivera, Viviana; Cress, W Douglas; Wright, Gabriela; Bian, Haikuo; Hinds, Philip W; Santiago-Cardona, Pedro G

    2010-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRb) is a cell cycle regulator inactivated in most human cancers. Loss of pRb function results from mutations in the gene coding for pRb or for any of its upstream regulators. Although pRb is predominantly known as a cell cycle repressor, our data point to additional pRb functions in cell adhesion. Our data show that pRb regulates the expression of a wide repertoire of cell adhesion genes and regulates the assembly of the adherens junctions required for cell adhesion. We conducted our studies in osteoblasts, which depend on both pRb and on cell-to-cell contacts for their differentiation and function. We generated knockout mice in which the RB gene was excised specifically in osteoblasts using the cre-lox P system and found that osteoblasts from pRb knockout mice did not assemble adherens junction at their membranes. pRb depletion in wild type osteoblasts using RNAi also disrupted adherens junctions. Microarrays comparing pRb-expressing and pRb-deficient osteoblasts showed that pRb controls the expression of a number of cell adhesion genes, including cadherins. Furthermore, pRb knockout mice showed bone abnormalities consistent with osteoblast adhesion defects. We also found that pRb controls the function of merlin, a well-known regulator of adherens junction assembly, by repressing Rac1 and its effector Pak1. Using qRT-PCR, immunoblots, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and immunofluorescent labeling, we observed that pRb loss resulted in Rac1 and Pak1 overexpression concomitant with merlin inactivation by Pak1, merlin detachment from the membrane, and adherens junction loss. Our data support a pRb function in cell adhesion while elucidating the mechanism for this function. Our work suggests that in some tumor types pRb inactivation results in both a loss of cell cycle control that promotes initial tumor growth as well as in a loss of cell-to-cell contacts, which contributes to later stages of metastasis. PMID:21085651

  12. The GafD protein of the G (F17) fimbrial complex confers adhesiveness of Escherichia coli to laminin.

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, S; Westerlund-Wikström, B; Rhen, M; Korhonen, T K

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli IHE11088(pRR-5) expressing the G (F17) fimbria adhered to immobilized laminin as well as to reconstituted basement membranes. No adhesion was seen with the plasmidless strain IHE11088 or with the deletion derivative IHE11088(pHUB110), which expresses the G-fimbrial filament with a defective GafD lectin and lacks N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific binding. Adhesion of IHE11088(pRR-5) to laminin and to reconstituted basement membranes was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and adhesion was abolished after N-glycosidase F treatment of laminin. The results show that the GafD lectin binds to laminin carbohydrate and suggest a novel function for the F17 fimbria in binding to mammalian basement membranes. PMID:8698525

  13. Double layer formation at the interface of complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Thoma, M. H.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Necessary conditions are formulated for the generation of a double layer at the interface of a complex plasma and a particle-free electron-ion plasma in a weakly collisional discharge. Examples are calculated for realistic observed complex plasmas, and it is shown that situations of both ''smooth'' transitions and 'sharp' transitions can exist. The model can explain the abrupt boundaries observed.

  14. Ankyrin repeat domain 28 (ANKRD28), a novel binding partner of DOCK180, promotes cell migration by regulating focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Mitsuhiro; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Hara, Shigeo; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Manabe, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2009-03-10

    DOCK180 is a guanine exchange factor of Rac1 originally identified as a protein bound to an SH3 domain of the Crk adaptor protein. DOCK180 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of p130(Cas), and recruits the Crk-p130(Cas) complex to focal adhesions. To understand the role of DOCK180 in cell adhesion and migration, we searched for DOCK180-binding proteins with a nano-LC/MS/MS system, and identified ANKRD28, a protein that contains twenty-six ankyrin domain repeats. Knockdown of ANKRD28 by RNA interference reduced the velocity of migration of HeLa cells, suggesting that this protein plays a physiologic role in the DOCK180-Rac1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, knockdown of ANKRD28 was found to alter the distribution of focal adhesion proteins such as Crk, paxillin, and p130(Cas). On the other hand, expression of ANKRD28, p130(Cas), Crk, and DOCK180 induced hyper-phosphorylation of p130(Cas), and impaired detachment of the cell membrane during migration. Consequently, cells expressing ANKRD28 exhibited multiple long cellular processes. ANKRD28 associated with DOCK180 in an SH3-dependent manner and competed with ELMO, another protein bound to the SH3 domain of DOCK180. In striking contrast to ANKRD28, overexpression of ELMO induced extensive lamellipodial protrusion around the entire circumference. These data suggest that ANKRD28 specifies the localization and the activity of the DOCK180-Rac1 pathway. PMID:19118547

  15. The Influence of Kinetics on the Formation of Complexes Between Mercury and Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. L.; Gu, B.; Brooks, S.; Southworth, G.

    2008-12-01

    Strong complexes between mercury (Hg) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) dominate the speciation of Hg(II) in most oxygenated aquatic systems but the rate of formation of these complexes has not be thoroughly investigated. Kinetic experiments were used to measure the formation rate of strong Hg(II)-DOM complexes in water collected from the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) in Oak Ridge, TN and in solution prepared using various DOM isolates. The loss of reactive mercury (HgR), defined as the amount of Hg reducible by stannous chloride (SnCl2), was used to examine the formation rates of strong Hg-DOM complexes which are nonreactive with SnCl2. We found that the formation of nonreactive Hg complexes followed first-order reaction kinetics, and the rate constant for the formation these complexes is similar both in creek water and solutions containing unfractionated DOM isolates ( ~4.8 day-1 ). C-18 Solid phase extractions were also used to examine the association of Hg(II) with different fractions of DOM as the mercury transformed from reactive, inorganic complexes to strong Hg-DOM complexes. In both the UEFPC and in laboratory solutions containing Hg and an unfractionated DOM isolate, the complexation of Hg shifted from hydrophilic to hydrophobic complexes as the strong Hg-DOM complexes were formed. This study concludes that, while equilibrium models suggest that strong Hg-DOM complexes dominate the speciation of Hg under equilibrium conditions, the formation of these complexes is kinetically limited. The slow formation of strong Hg-DOM complexes may have important implications in understanding the cycling, transport and bioavailability of Hg in systems such as the UEFPC with varying input sources of organic and inorganic Hg complexes.

  16. Rapid invasion of host cells by Toxoplasma requires secretion of the MIC2–M2AP adhesive protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, My-Hang; Rabenau, Karen E.; Harper, Jill M.; Beatty, Wandy L.; Sibley, L.David; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrate cells are highly susceptible to infection by obligate intracellular parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii, yet the mechanism by which these microbes breach the confines of their target cell is poorly understood. While it is thought that Toxoplasma actively invades by secreting adhesive proteins from internal organelles called micronemes, no genetic evidence is available to support this contention. Here, we report successful disruption of M2AP, a microneme protein tightly associated with an adhesive protein called MIC2. M2AP knockout parasites were >80% impaired in host cell entry. This invasion defect was likely due to defective expression of MIC2, which partially accumulated in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. M2AP knockout parasites were also unable to rapidly secrete MIC2, an event that normally accompanies parasite attachment to a target cell. These findings indicate a critical role for the MIC2–M2AP protein complex in parasite invasion. PMID:12727875

  17. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  18. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.su; Sud'ina, Galina F.; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na{sup +} and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl{sup -} efflux through chloride channels and Na{sup +} influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  19. The anti-CD74 humanized monoclonal antibody, milatuzumab, which targets the invariant chain of MHC II complexes, alters B-cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion molecule expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Targeting CD74 as the invariant chain of major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) became possible by the availability of a specific humanized monoclonal antibody, milatuzumab, which is under investigation in patients with hematological neoplasms. CD74 has been reported to regulate chemo-attractant migration of macrophages and dendritic cells, while the role of CD74 on peripheral naïve and memory B cells also expressing CD74 remains unknown. Therefore, the current study addressed the influence of milatuzumab on B-cell proliferation, chemo-attractant migration, and adhesion molecule expression. Methods Surface expression of CD74 on CD27- naïve and CD27+ memory B cells as well as other peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from normals, including the co-expression of CD44, CXCR4, and the adhesion molecules CD62L, β7-integrin, β1-integrin and CD9 were studied after binding of milatuzumab using multicolor flow cytometry. The influence of the antibody on B-cell proliferation and migration was analyzed in vitro in detail. Results In addition to monocytes, milatuzumab also specifically bound to human peripheral B cells, with a higher intensity on CD27+ memory versus CD27- naïve B cells. The antibody reduced B-cell proliferation significantly but moderately, induced enhanced spontaneous and CXCL12-dependent migration together with changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, CD44, β7-integrin and CD62L, mainly of CD27- naïve B cells. This was independent of macrophage migration-inhibitory factor as a ligand of CD74/CD44 complexes. Conclusions Milatuzumab leads to modestly reduced proliferation, alterations in migration, and adhesion molecule expression preferentially of CD27- naïve B cells. It thus may be a candidate antibody for the autoimmune disease therapy by modifying B cell functions. PMID:22404985

  20. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jonas S; Røder, Henriette L; Russel, Jakob; Sørensen, Helle; Burmølle, Mette; Sørensen, Søren J

    2016-09-01

    Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However, the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when co-culturing bacteria from environments where long-term coexistence was unlikely to have occurred. Phylogenetic diversity was not found to be a strong underlying factor but a relation between biofilm induction and phylogenetic history was found. The data indicates that biofilm reduction is typically correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence. PMID:27119650

  1. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  2. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  3. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  4. Structure of tetracarbonylethyleneosmium: ethylene structure changes upon complex formation.

    PubMed

    Karunatilaka, Chandana; Tackett, Brandon S; Washington, John; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2007-08-29

    Rotational spectra of seven isotopomers of tetracarbonylethyleneosmium, Os(CO)4(eta2-C2H4), were measured in the 4-12 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle-type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer system. Olefin-transition metal complexes of this type occur extensively in recent organic syntheses and serve as important models for transition states in the metal-mediated transformations of alkenes. Three osmium ((192)Os, (190)Os, and (188)Os) and three unique 13C isotopomers (13C in ethylene, axial, and equatorial positions) were observed in natural abundance. Additional spectra were measured for a perdeuterated sample, Os(CO)4(eta2-C2D4). The measured rotational constants for the main osmium isotopomer ((192)Os) are A = 929.3256(6), B = 755.1707(3), and C = 752.7446(3) MHz, indicating a near-prolate asymmetric top molecule. The approximately 140 assigned b-type transitions were fit using a Watson S-reduced Hamiltonian including A, B, C, and five centrifugal distortion constants. A near-complete r0 gas-phase structure has been determined from a least-squares structural fit using eight adjustable structural parameters to fit the 21 measured rotational constants. Changes in the structure of ethylene on coordination to Os(CO)4 are large and well-determined. For the complex, the experimental ethylene C-C bond length is 1.432(5) A, which falls between the free ethylene value of 1.3391(13) A and the ethane value of 1.534(2) A. The angle between the plane of the CH2 group and the extended ethylene C-C bond ( angleout-of-plane) is 26.0(3) degrees , indicating that this complex is better described as a metallacyclopropane than as a pi-bonded olefin-metal complex. The Os-C-C-H dihedral angle is 106.7(2) degrees , indicating that the ethylene carbon atoms have near sp3 character in the complex. Kraitchman analysis of the available rotational constants gave principal axis coordinates for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in excellent agreement with the least-squares fit

  5. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  6. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  7. Economy of operon formation: cotranscription minimizes shortfall in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Krishna, Sandeep; Dodd, Ian; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Genes of prokaryotes and Archaea are often organized in cotranscribed groups, or operons. In contrast, eukaryotic genes are generally transcribed independently. Here we show that there is a substantial economic gain for the cell to cotranscribe genes encoding protein complexes because it synchronizes the fluctuations, or noise, in the levels of the different components. This correlation substantially reduces the shortfall in production of the complex. This benefit is relatively large in small cells such as bacterial cells, in which there are few mRNAs and proteins per cell, and is diminished in larger cells such as eukaryotic cells. PMID:20877578

  8. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  9. DNA and buffers: the hidden danger of complex formation.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, N C; Gelfi, C; Righetti, P G

    2000-08-01

    The free solution electrophoretic mobility of DNA differs significantly in different buffers, suggesting that DNA-buffer interactions are present in certain buffer systems. Here, capillary and gel electrophoresis data are combined to show that the Tris ions in Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffers are associated with the DNA helix to approximately the same extent as sodium ions. The borate ions in Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffers interact with DNA to form highly charged DNA-borate complexes, which are stable both in free solution and in polyacrylamide gels. DNA-borate complexes are not observed in agarose gels, because of the competition of the agarose gel fibers for the borate residues. The resulting agarose-borate complexes increase the negative charge of the agarose gel fibers, leading to an increased electroendosmotic flow of the solvent in agarose-TBE gels. The combined results indicate that the buffers in which DNA is studied cannot automatically be assumed to be innocuous. PMID:10861374

  10. Static Adhesion Assay for the Study of Integrin Activation in T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Strazza, Marianne; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Pedoeem, Ariel; Mor, Adam

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocyte adhesion is required for multiple T cell functions, including migration to sites of inflammation and formation of immunological synapses with antigen presenting cells. T cells accomplish regulated adhesion by controlling the adhesive properties of integrins, a class of cell adhesion molecules consisting of heterodimeric pairs of transmembrane proteins that interact with target molecules on partner cells or extracellular matrix. The most prominent T cell integrin is lymphocyte function associated antigen (LFA)-1, composed of subunits αL and β2, whose target is the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. The ability of a T cell to control adhesion derives from the ability to regulate the affinity states of individual integrins. Inside-out signaling describes the process whereby signals inside a cell cause the external domains of integrins to assume an activated state. Much of our knowledge of these complex phenomena is based on mechanistic studies performed in simplified in vitro model systems. The T lymphocyte adhesion assay described here is an excellent tool that allows T cells to adhere to target molecules, under static conditions, and then utilizes a fluorescent plate reader to quantify adhesiveness. This assay has been useful in defining adhesion-stimulatory or inhibitory substances that act on lymphocytes, as well as characterizing the signaling events involved. Although described here for LFA-1 - ICAM-1 mediated adhesion; this assay can be readily adapted to allow for the study of other adhesive interactions (e.g. VLA-4 - fibronectin). PMID:24961998

  11. Rapid Development of Wet Adhesion between Carboxymethylcellulose Modified Cellulose Surfaces Laminated with Polyvinylamine Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Pelton, Robert; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-09-14

    The surface of regenerated cellulose membranes was modified by irreversible adsorption of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Pairs of wet CMC-modified membranes were laminated with polyvinylamine (PVAm) at room temperature, and the delamination force for wet membranes was measured for both dried and never-dried laminates. The wet adhesion was studied as a function of PVAm molecular weight, amine content, and deposition pH of the polyelectrolyte. Surprisingly the PVAm-CMC system gave substantial wet adhesion that exceeded that of TEMPO-oxidized membranes with PVAm for both dried and never-dried laminates. The greatest wet adhesion was achieved for fully hydrolyzed high molecular weight PVAm. Bulk carboxymethylation of cellulose membranes gave inferior wet adhesion combined with PVAm as compared to CMC adsorption which indicates that a CMC layer of the order of 10 nm was necessary. There are no obvious covalent cross-linking reactions between CMC and PVAm at room temperature, and on the basis of our results, we are instead attributing the wet adhesion to complex formation between the PVAm and the irreversibly adsorbed CMC at the cellulose surface. We propose that interdigitation of PVAm chains into the CMC layer is responsible for the high wet adhesion values. PMID:27552256

  12. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.J.; Meinhardt, H. )

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of [ital Drosophila] and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  13. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to “organ metamorphosis”, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  14. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  15. Ganymede and Callisto - Complex crater formation and planetary crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements of crater depths and other morphological parameters (such as central peak and terrace frequency) of fresh craters on Ganymede and Callisto, two geophysically very similar but geologically divergent large icy satellites of Jupiter. These data were used to investigate the crater mechanics on icy satellites and the intersatellite crater scaling and crustal properties. The morphological transition diameters of and complex crater depths on Ganymede and Callisto were found to be similar, indicating that the crusts of both satellites are dominated by water ice with only a minor rocky component.

  16. New Pathways for the Formation of Complex Organics and Prebiotic Synthesis in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shall, M. S.

    2010-04-01

    We study the formation mechanisms of complex organics that are present in interstellar clouds. The reaction of acetylene ion with water produces vinyl alcohol while the reaction of benzene ion with acetylene produces naphthalene-type ion.

  17. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    PubMed

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing. PMID:24950389

  18. Formation mechanism and adhesive strength of a hydroxyapatite/TiO2 composite coating on a titanium surface prepared by micro-arc oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shimin; Li, Baoe; Liang, Chunyong; Wang, Hongshui; Qiao, Zhixia

    2016-01-01

    A hydroxyapatite (HA)/TiO2 composite coating was prepared on a titanium surface by one-step micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The formation mechanism of the composite coating was investigated and the adhesion of the coating to the substrate was also measured. The results showed that flocculent structures could be obtained during the early stages of treatment. As the treatment period extended, increasing amounts of Ca-P precipitate appeared on the surface, and the flocculent morphology transformed into a plate-like morphology. Then the plate-like calcium and phosphate salt self-assembled to form flower-like apatite. The Ca/P atomic ratio gradually decreased, indicating that the amounts of Ca2+ ions which diffused into the coating decreased more rapidly than that of PO43- or HPO42-. The adhesive strength between the apatite and TiO2 coating was improved. This improvement is attributed to the interlocking effect between the apatite and TiO2 layer which formed simultaneously during the early stages of the one-step MAO. This study shows that it is a promising method to prepare bioactive coating on a titanium surface.

  19. Subcellular location for the formation of the retinol/retinol-binding protein complex in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbaugh, L.M.; Green, E.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol complexes with retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the hepatocyte, however the subcellular location where complex formation occurs has not previously been identified. A model similar to that of lipoproteins formation has been hypothesized. The authors have identified the initial site of retinol/RBP complex formation. Furthermore, the authors have elucidated the progression of the complex through the subcellular organelles. Intravenous injections of /sup 3/H-retinol suspended in Tween 40 were administered to vitamin A depleted rats. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes the rat livers were removed and fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. Extracts of these subcellular fractions were chromatographed on Sephadex G-100. Simultaneous elution of /sup 3/H-retinol and immunoreactive RBP indicated the presence of the complex. The retinol/RBP complex was observed in rough microsomes 2 minute after the injection of /sup 3/H-retinal. The complex appeared subsequently in smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus. The complex was first detected serum around 10 minutes after injection. Based on the data, they believe that the retinol/RBP complex formation occurs in rough microsomes.

  20. Arp2/3 complex is critical for lamellipodia and organization of cell-matrix adhesion but dispensable for fibroblast chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Congying; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Berginski, Matthew E.; Haynes, Elizabeth M.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Griffith, Jack D.; Gomez, Shawn M.; Bear, James E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Lamellipodia are sheet-like, leading edge protrusions in firmly adherent cells that contain Arp2/3-generated dendritic actin networks. Although lamellipodia are widely believed to be critical for directional cell motility, this notion has not been rigorously tested. Using fibroblasts derived from Ink4a/Arf-deficient mice, we generated a stable line depleted of Arp2/3 complex that lacks lamellipodia. This line shows defective random cell motility and relies on a filopodia-based protrusion system. Utilizing a microfluidic gradient generation system, we tested the role of Arp2/3 complex and lamellipodia in directional cell migration. Surprisingly, Arp2/3-depleted cells respond normally to shallow gradients of PDGF indicating that lamellipodia are not required for fibroblast chemotaxis. Conversely, these cells cannot respond to a surface-bound gradient of extracellular matrix (haptotaxis). Consistent with this finding, cells depleted of Arp2/3 fail to globally align focal adhesions suggesting that one principle function of lamellipodia is to organize cell-matrix adhesions in a spatially coherent manner. PMID:22385962

  1. On-resin Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand: an efficient ligation method for complex peptides with a varying spacer to optimize cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Mareen; Meier, René; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2016-06-01

    Solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice to produce peptides. Several protecting groups enable specific modifications. However, complex peptide conjugates usually require a rather demanding conjugation strategy, which is mostly performed in solution. Herein, an efficient strategy is described using an on-resin Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand (DARinv). This method is compatible with the standard Fmoc/tBu strategy and is easy to monitor. As a proof of concept a titanium binding peptide was modified with a cyclic cell binding peptide (RGD) by DARinv on a solid support applying different tetrazines and alkenes. The generated bulky DARinv linkers were employed to act as the required spacer for RGD mediated cell adhesion on titanium. In vitro studies demonstrated improved cell spreading on DARinv-conjugated peptides and revealed, in combination with molecular dynamics-simulation, new insights into the design of spacers between the RGD peptide and the surface. Performing the DARinv on resin expands the toolbox of SPPS to produce complex peptide conjugates under mild, catalyst free conditions with reduced purification steps. The resulting conjugate can be effectively exploited to promote cell adhesion on biomaterials. PMID:27117044

  2. Carbon–heteroatom bond formation catalysed by organometallic complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    At one time the synthetic chemist’s last resort, reactions catalysed by transition metals are now the preferred method for synthesizing many types of organic molecule. A recent success in this type of catalysis is the discovery of reactions that form bonds between carbon and heteroatoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, silicon and boron) via complexes of transition metals with amides, alkoxides, thiolates, silyl groups or boryl groups. The development of these catalytic processes has been supported by the discovery of new elementary reactions that occur at metal–heteroatom bonds and by the identification of factors that control these reactions. Together, these findings have led to new synthetic processes that are in daily use and have formed a foundation for the development of processes that are likely to be central to synthetic chemistry in the future. PMID:18800130

  3. Enhancing the Reduction Potential of Quinones via Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Binod; Scheiner, Steve

    2016-05-20

    Quantum calculations are used to study the manner in which quinones interact with proton-donating molecules. For neutral donors, a stacked geometry is favored over a H-bond structure. The former is stabilized by charge transfers from the N or O lone pairs to the quinone's π* orbitals. Following the addition of an electron to the quinone, the radical anion forms strong H-bonded complexes with the various donors. The presence of the donor enhances the electron affinity of the quinone. This enhancement is on the order of 15 kcal/mol for neutral donors, but up to as much as 85 kcal/mol for a cationic donor. The increase in electron affinity is larger for electron-rich quinones than for their electron-deficient counterparts, containing halogen substituents. Similar trends are in evidence when the systems are immersed in aqueous solvent. PMID:27135719

  4. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  5. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au-CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, John T

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au-CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au-CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10(-8) to 10(-4) Torr (dosage up to 10(6) langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au-CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au-CO complex result from the reduced Au-Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au-CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO(δ+)) on Au. Our studies indicate that the mobile Au-CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers. PMID:26754257

  6. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  7. Substrate Binding Promotes Formation of the Skp1-Cul1-Fbxl3 (SCFFbxl3) Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yumimoto, Kanae; Muneoka, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2013-01-01

    The Skp1–Cul1–F-box protein (SCF) complex is one of the most well characterized types of ubiquitin ligase (E3), with the E3 activity of the complex being regulated in part at the level of complex formation. Fbxl3 is an F-box protein that is responsible for the ubiquitylation and consequent degradation of cryptochromes (Crys) and thus regulates oscillation of the circadian clock. Here we show that formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex is regulated by substrate binding in vivo. Fbxl3 did not associate with Skp1 and Cul1 to a substantial extent in transfected mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, however, formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex was markedly promoted by forced expression of its substrate Cry1 in these cells. A mutant form of Fbxl3 that does not bind to Cry1 was unable to form an SCF complex, suggesting that interaction of Cry1 with Fbxl3 is essential for formation of SCFFbxl3. In contrast, recombinant Fbxl3 associated with recombinant Skp1 and Cul1 in vitro even in the absence of recombinant Cry1. Domain-swap analysis revealed that the COOH-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of Fbxl3 attenuates the interaction of Skp1, suggesting that a yet unknown protein associated with the COOH-terminal domain of Fbxl3 and inhibited SCF complex formation. Our results thus provide important insight into the regulation of both SCF ubiquitin ligase activity and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:24085301

  8. The imidazole role in strontium beta-diketonate complexes formation.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Cingolani, Augusto; Gobetto, Roberto; Chierotti, Michele R; Drozdov, Andrei; Troyanov, Sergey I

    2006-04-01

    A selection of new strontium beta-diketonate derivatives (imH2)2[Sr2(beta-dike)6] [where imH = imidazole and beta-dike = tfac (tfacH = 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedione), tfbz (tfbzH = 1,1,1-trifluoro-4-phenyl-2,4-butanedione), or hfac (hfacH = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedione)], [Sr2(tfac)4(Meim)2(H2O)2], (MeimH)2[Sr(beta-dike)4] (where Meim = 1-methylimidazole and beta-dike = tfbz or hfac), [Sr2(thd)4(imH)2(EtOH)], and [Sr2(thd)4(Meim)2(EtOH)] (where thdH = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) have been synthesized and fully characterized. (imH2)2[Sr2(beta-dike)6] and (MeimH)2[Sr(beta-dike)4] are di- and mononuclear Sr anionic complexes, respectively, while [Sr2(tfac)4(Meim)2(H2O)2], [Sr2(thd)4(imH)2(EtOH)], and [Sr2(thd)4(Meim)2(EtOH)] are neutral dinuclear molecular derivatives. The derivative (imH2)2[Sr2(hfac)6] slowly decomposes in solution under aerobic conditions, giving (imH2)2[Sr(H2O)2(tfa)3](tfa) (tfaH = trifluoroacetic acid), which is an ionic compound containing polynuclear anionic chains composed of Sr(H2O)2(tfa)3 units. When a deficiency of imH is employed, the thdH proligand forms not only the dinuclear derivative [Sr2(thd)4(imH)2(EtOH)] but also an additional product with the formula [Sr(thd)2(H2O)2(EtOH)], in which the Sr atom is seven-coordinated. A complete solid-state characterization has been accomplished by comparing X-ray and solid-state 13C NMR data. Elucidation of the H-bond interaction between the heterocyclic rings and metal complexes by cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning 15N NMR is also reported. PMID:16562964

  9. Sns and Kirre, the Drosophila orthologs of Nephrin and Neph1, direct adhesion, fusion and formation of a slit diaphragm-like structure in insect nephrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shufei; Shao, Huanjie; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Pearce, Elspeth; Abmayr, Susan M

    2009-07-01

    The Immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) proteins Neph1 and Nephrin are co-expressed within podocytes in the kidney glomerulus, where they localize to the slit diaphragm (SD) and contribute to filtration between blood and urine. Herein, we demonstrate that their Drosophila orthologs Kirre (Duf) and Sns are co-expressed within binucleate garland cell nephrocytes (GCNs) that contribute to detoxification of the insect hemolymph by uptake of molecules through an SD-like nephrocyte diaphragm (ND) into labyrinthine channels that are active sites of endocytosis. The functions of Kirre and Sns in the embryonic musculature, to mediate adhesion and fusion between myoblasts to form multinucleate muscle fibers, have been conserved in the GCNs, where they contribute to adhesion of GCNs in the ;garland' and to their fusion into binucleate cells. Sns and Kirre proteins localize to the ND at the entry point into the labyrinthine channels and, like their vertebrate counterparts, are essential for its formation. Knockdown of Kirre or Sns drastically reduces the number of NDs at the cell surface. These defects are associated with a decrease in uptake of large proteins, suggesting that the ND distinguishes molecules of different sizes and controls access to the channels. Moreover, mutations in the Sns fibronectin-binding or immunoglobulin domains lead to morphologically abnormal NDs and to reduced passage of proteins into the labyrinthine channels for uptake by endocytosis, suggesting a crucial and direct role for Sns in ND formation and function. These data reveal significant similarities between the insect ND and the SD in mammalian podocytes at the level of structure and function. PMID:19515699

  10. An illustration of the complexity of continent formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    It was pointed out that a consensus may be emerging in crustal growth models, considering the clustering of most growth curves and their uncertainties. Curves most distant from this clustering represent models involving extensive recycling of continental material back into the mantle, but the author wondered if geochemical signatures for this would be recognizable considering the lack of evidence from seismic tomography for discrete mantle reservoirs, and the likelihood of core-mantle interaction based on recent high pressure experiments. Unreactivated Archean rocks represent only 2 percent of present continental area, and the author was uncomfortable about basing inferences on what the early Earth was like on such a small amount of information. He feels that the hypothesis of continental assembly that needs testing is that of banging together of island arcs, such as in Indonesia today. As an example of how complex this process can be, the author described the geology of the Caribbean arc system, which shows evidence for reversals of subduction polarity, numerous collisional events, and substantial strike-slip movements. It seemed unlikely to the author that Archean examples would have been less complicated.

  11. Interferogram formation in the presence of complex and large deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, S.-H.; Zebker, H.; Segall, P.; Hooper, A.; Poland, M.

    2007-01-01

    Sierra Negra volcano in Isabela island, Gala??pagos, erupted from October 22 to October 30 in 2005. During the 8 days of eruption, the center of Sierra Negra's caldera subsided about 5.4 meters. Three hours prior to the onset of the eruption, an earthquake (Mw 5.4) occurred, near the caldera. Because of the large and complex phase gradient due to the huge subsidence and the earthquake, it is difficult to form an interferogram inside the caldera that spans the eruption. The deformation is so large and spatially variable that the approximations used in existing InSAR software (ROI, ROI_PAC, DORIS, GAMMA) cannot properly coregister SAR image pairs spanning the eruption. We have developed here a two-step algorithm that can form intra-caldera interferograms from these data. The first step involves a "rubber-sheeting" SAR image coregistration. In the second step we use range offset estimates to mitigate the steep phase gradient. Using this new algorithm, we retrieve an interferogram with the best coverage to date inside the caldera of Sierra Negra. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Oxidative peptide /and amide/ formation from Schiff base complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehler, B. L.; Li, M. P.; Martin, K.; Fliss, H.; Schmid, P.

    1982-01-01

    One hypothesis of the origin of pre-modern forms of life is that the original replicating molecules were specific polypeptides which acted as templates for the assembly of poly-Schiff bases complementary to the template, and that these polymers were then oxidized to peptide linkages, probably by photo-produced oxidants. A double cycle of such anti-parallel complementary replication would yield the original peptide polymer. If this model were valid, the Schiff base between an N-acyl alpha mino aldehyde and an amino acid should yield a dipeptide in aqueous solution in the presence of an appropriate oxidant. In the present study it is shown that the substituted dipeptide, N-acetyl-tyrosyl-tyrosine, is produced in high yield in aqueous solution at pH 9 through the action of H2O2 on the Schiff-base complex between N-acetyl-tyrosinal and tyrosine and that a great variety of N-acyl amino acids are formed from amino acids and aliphatic aldehydes under similar conditions.

  13. Interferogram formation in the presence of complex and large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sang-Ho; Zebker, Howard; Segall, Paul; Hooper, Andrew; Poland, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Sierra Negra volcano in Isabela island, Galápagos, erupted from October 22 to October 30 in 2005. During the 8 days of eruption, the center of Sierra Negra's caldera subsided about 5.4 meters. Three hours prior to the onset of the eruption, an earthquake (Mw 5.4) occurred, near the caldera. Because of the large and complex phase gradient due to the huge subsidence and the earthquake, it is difficult to form an interferogram inside the caldera that spans the eruption. The deformation is so large and spatially variable that the approximations used in existing InSAR software (ROI, ROI_PAC, DORIS, GAMMA) cannot properly coregister SAR image pairs spanning the eruption. We have developed here a two-step algorithm that can form intra-caldera interferograms from these data. The first step involves a ``rubber-sheeting'' SAR image coregistration. In the second step we use range offset estimates to mitigate the steep phase gradient. Using this new algorithm, we retrieve an interferogram with the best coverage to date inside the caldera of Sierra Negra.

  14. The adenylate cyclase receptor complex and aqueous humor formation.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, J.; Sears, M.

    1984-01-01

    The secretory tissue of the eye, the ciliary processes, contains an enzyme receptor complex, composed of membrane proteins, the catalytic moiety of the enzyme adenylate cyclase, a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein (or N protein), and other features. The enzyme can be activated by well-known neurohumoral or humoral agents, catecholamines, glycoprotein hormones produced by the hypothalamic pituitary axis, and other related compounds, including placental gonadotropin, organic fluorides, and forskolin, a diterpene. These compounds cause the ciliary epithelia to produce cyclic AMP at an accelerated rate. Cyclic AMP, as a second messenger, causes, either directly or indirectly, a decrease in the net rate of aqueous humor inflow that may be modulated by cofactors. Clinical syndromes fit the experimental data so that an integrated explanation can be given for the reduced intraocular pressure witnessed under certain central nervous system and adrenergic influences. The molecular biology of this concept provides important leads for future investigations that bear directly both upon the regulation of intraocular pressure and upon glaucoma. Images FIG. 11 PMID:6093393

  15. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent formation of a quaternary complex at the c-fos SRE.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, H; Kortenjann, M; Strahl, T; Shaw, P E

    1996-01-01

    The rapid and transient induction of the human proto-oncogene c-fos in response to a variety of stimuli depends on the serum responses element (SRE). In vivo footprinting experiments show that this promoter element is bound by a multicomponent complex including the serum response factor (SRF) and a ternary complex factor such as Elk-1. SRF is thought to recruit a ternary complex factor monomer into an asymmetric complex. In this report, we describe a quaternary complex over the SRE which, in addition to an SRF dimer, contains two Elk-1 molecules. Its formation at the SRE is strictly dependent on phosphorylation of S-383 in the Elk-1 regulatory domain and appears to involve a weak intermolecular association between the two Elk-1 molecules. The influence of mutations in Elk-1 on quaternary complex formation in vitro correlates with their effect on the induction of c-fos reporter expression in response to mitogenic stimuli in vivo. PMID:8622654

  17. Periderm prevents pathological epithelial adhesions during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Rebecca J.; Hammond, Nigel L.; Coulombe, Pierre A.; Saloranta, Carola; Nousiainen, Heidi O.; Salonen, Riitta; Berry, Andrew; Hanley, Neil; Headon, Denis; Karikoski, Riitta; Dixon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate development of stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelia, such as the epidermis and oral epithelia, generates an outer protective permeability barrier that prevents water loss, entry of toxins, and microbial invasion. During embryogenesis, the immature ectoderm initially consists of a single layer of undifferentiated, cuboidal epithelial cells that stratifies to produce an outer layer of flattened periderm cells of unknown function. Here, we determined that periderm cells form in a distinct pattern early in embryogenesis, exhibit highly polarized expression of adhesion complexes, and are shed from the outer surface of the embryo late in development. Mice carrying loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding IFN regulatory factor 6 (IRF6), IκB kinase-α (IKKα), and stratifin (SFN) exhibit abnormal epidermal development, and we determined that mutant animals exhibit dysfunctional periderm formation, resulting in abnormal intracellular adhesions. Furthermore, tissue from a fetus with cocoon syndrome, a lethal disorder that results from a nonsense mutation in IKKA, revealed an absence of periderm. Together, these data indicate that periderm plays a transient but fundamental role during embryogenesis by acting as a protective barrier that prevents pathological adhesion between immature, adhesion-competent epithelia. Furthermore, this study suggests that failure of periderm formation underlies a series of devastating birth defects, including popliteal pterygium syndrome, cocoon syndrome, and Bartsocas-Papas syndrome. PMID:25133425

  18. Improving the performance of starch-based wood adhesive by using sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofeng; Wang, Jian; Cheng, Li; Gu, Zhengbiao; Hong, Yan; Kowalczyk, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to improve the performance of starch-based wood adhesive. The effects of SDS on shear strength, viscosity and storage stability were investigated. It was shown that, although the addition of 1.5-2% (dry starch basis) SDS resulted in a slight decrease in shear strength, the mobility and storage stability of adhesive were significantly enhanced. Possible mechanisms regarding specific action of SDS were discussed. It was proved, using blue value or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, that the amylose-SDS complexes were formed in the adhesive. The complex formation or simple adsorption of SDS with starch molecules might hinder the aggregation of latex particles, as shown by scanning electron microscopy images, and inhibit starch retrogradation, as observed by DSC analysis. As a result, in the presence of SDS, the adhesive had higher mobility and storage stability, indicating that SDS could be used to prepare starch-based wood adhesives with high performance. PMID:24274546

  19. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  20. MICROCALORIMETRIC STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF MAGNESIUM COMPLEXES OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, J. P.; Sari, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Values for the thermodynamic quantities (ΔF, ΔH, ΔS) in reactions in which complexes of adenine nucleotides with magnesium ion (ATPMg--, ADPMg-, AMPMg) are formed have been obtained by a microcalorimetric technique by using an isothermic Calvet's apparatus. Experimental values measured at ionic strength μ = 0.2 indicate that complex formation reactions are driven by the entropic factor and that stability of complexes increases with length of the phosphate chain. PMID:5261047

  1. Evidence of iron(III)-oxalato complex formation in aqueous solution from x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magini, Mauro

    1981-02-01

    An aqueous solution of ferric ammonium oxalate has been examined to provide direct experimental evidence of complex formation between iron(III) and a typical organic complexing ligand. The radial distribution function as well as analysis of the structure function lead to the conclusion that the dominant species present in solution is the trioxalato-iron(III) complex in which each oxalate ion occupies two corners of a distorted octahedron around the Fe 3+ ions.

  2. BCAR3/AND-34 can signal independent of complex formation with CAS family members or the presence of p130Cas

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Near, Richard I.; Makkinje, Anthony; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Lerner, Adam

    2011-01-01

    BCAR3 binds to the carboxy-terminus of p130Cas, a focal adhesion adapter protein. Both BCAR3 and p130Cas have been linked to resistance to anti-estrogens in breast cancer, Rac activation and cell motility. Using R743A BCAR3, a point mutant that has lost the ability to bind p130Cas, we find that BCAR3-p130Cas complex formation is not required for BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance, Rac activation or discohesion of epithelial breast cancer cells. Complex formation was also not required for BCAR3-induced lamellipodia formation in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts but was required for optimal BCAR3-induced motility. Although both wildtype and R743A BCAR3 induced phosphorylation of p130Cas and the related adapter protein HEF1/NEDD9, chimeric NSP3:BCAR3 experiments demonstrate that such phosphorylation does not correlate with BCAR3-induced anti-estrogen resistance or lamellipodia formation. Wildtype but not R743A BCAR3 induced lamellipodia formation and augmented cell motility in p130Cas-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), suggesting that while p130Cas itself is not strictly required for these endpoints, complex formation with other CAS family members is, at least in cells lacking p130Cas. Overall, our work suggests that many, but not all, BCAR3-mediated signaling events in epithelial and mesenchymal cells are independent of p130Cas association. These studies also indicate that disruption of the BCAR3-p130Cas complex is unlikely to reverse BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance. PMID:21262352

  3. Positronium formation studies in solid molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide-triphenylmethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Magalhães, W. F.; Alcântara, A. F. C.; Windmöller, D.; Machado, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Positronium formation in triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), triphenylmethanol (TPM), and systems [TPPO(1-X)ṡTPMX] has been studied. The low probability of positronium formation in complex [TPPO0.5ṡTPM0.5] was attributed to strong hydrogen bond and sixfold phenyl embrace interactions. These strong interactions in complex reduce the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons on the spur and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is lower. The τ3 parameter and free volume (correlated to τ3) were also sensitive to the formation of hydrogen bonds and sixfold phenyl embrace interactions within the complex. For physical mixture the positron annihilation parameters remained unchanged throughout the composition range.

  4. The chitosan-gelatin (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation in an acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Kuchina, Yuliya A; Sokolan, Nina I

    2016-03-15

    The interaction of cationic polysaccharide chitosan and gelatin accompanied by the stoichiometric (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation has been studied by the methods of capillary viscometry, UV and FTIR spectroscopy and dispersion of light scattering. Complexes were formed in the aqueous phase, with pH being less than the isoelectric point of gelatin (pIgel). The particle size of the disperse phase increases along with the growth of the relative viscosity in comparison with sols of the individual components-polysaccharide and gelatin. Possible models and mechanism of (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation have been discussed. It was shown that the complex formation takes place not only due to the hydrogen bonds, but also due to the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged amino-groups of chitosan and negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamic Glu and aspartic Asp acids) of gelatin. PMID:26794762

  5. State diagram for adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-08-17

    Due to the significance of understanding the underlying mechanisms of cell adhesion in biological processes and cell capture in biomedical applications, we numerically investigate the adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model. This model is based on the coupling of the front tracking-finite element method for elastic mechanics of the capsule membrane and the adhesion kinetics simulation for adhesive interactions between capsules and functionalized surfaces. Using this model, three distinct adhesion dynamic states are predicted, such as detachment, rolling and firm-adhesion. Specifically, the effects of capsule deformability quantified by the capillary number on the transitions of these three dynamic states are investigated by developing an adhesion dynamic state diagram for the first time. At low capillary numbers (e.g. Ca < 0.0075), whole-capsule deformation confers the capsule a flattened bottom in contact with the functionalized surface, which hence promotes the rolling-to-firm-adhesion transition. It is consistent with the observations from previous studies that cell deformation promotes the adhesion of cells lying in the rolling regime. However, it is surprising to find that, at relatively high capillary numbers (e.g. 0.0075 < Ca < 0.0175), the effect of capsule deformability on its adhesion dynamics is far more complex than just promoting adhesion. High deformability of capsules makes their bottom take a concave shape with no adhesion bond formation in the middle. The appearance of this specific capsule shape inhibits the transitions of both rolling-to-firm-adhesion and detachment-to-rolling, and it means that capsule deformation no longer promotes the capsule adhesion. Besides, it is interesting to note that, when the capillary number exceeds a critical value (e.g. Ca = 0.0175), the rolling state no longer appears, since capsules exhibit large deviation from the spherical shape

  6. Adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Goethite: A Two-Dimensional Correlation Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Jing, Chuanyong

    2016-04-19

    Bacterial adhesion to mineral surfaces is an important but underappreciated process. To decipher the molecular level process and mechanism, the adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells to goethite was investigated using flow-cell attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) analysis. The FTIR results indicate that bacterial phosphate-moieties play an important role in the formation of mono- and bidentate inner-sphere complexes, whereas carboxylic groups on cell surface only have a minor contribution to its adhesion. The 2D-COS analysis in short-term (0-120 min) and long-term (2-18 h) stages reveal that the adhesion process was in the following sequence: change in H-bonds of proteins on cell surfaces > formation of monodentate inner-sphere surface complexes > formation of outer-sphere surface complexes > transformation of protein secondary structure on cell surfaces > formation of additional bridging bidentate surface complexes. In addition, the adhesion of MR-1 cells on goethite was pH dependent due to pH impacts on the cell structure and the interface charge. The in situ ATR-FTIR integrated with 2D-COS analysis highlights its great potential in exploring complex surface reactions with microbes involved. These results improve our understanding of microbe-mineral interactions at the molecular level and have significant implications for a series of biogeochemical processes. PMID:27029565

  7. Adhesion of hydrogels under water by hydrogen bonding: from molecular interactions to macroscopic adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creton, Costantino

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogels are an essential part of living organisms and are widely used in biotechnologies, health care and food science. Although swelling properties, cell adhesion on gel surfaces and gel elasticity have attracted much interest, macroscopic adhesion of hydrogels on solid surfaces in aqueous environment is much less well understood. We studied systematically and in aqueous environment, the reversible adhesion by hydrogen bonding of macroscopic model hydrogels of polydimethylacrylamide (PDMA) or of polyacrylamide (PAAm) on solid surfaces functionalized with polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymer brushes. The hydrogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization and the brushes were prepared by grafting polytertbutyl acrylate chains and converting them by pyrolisis into polyacrylic acid. A new adhesion tester based on the flat punch geometry was designed and used to control the contact area, contact time, contact pressure and debonding velocity of the gels from the surface while the samples were fully immersed in water. The adhesion tests were performed at different pH and temperatures and the modulus of the gel and grafting density and molecular weight of the brushes was varied. Macroscopic adhesion results were compared with phase diagrams in dilute solution to detect molecular interactions. While the PDMA/PAA pair behaved very similarly in solution and in macroscopic adhesion tests, the PAAm/PAA pair showed an unexpectedly high adhesion level relatively to its complexation ability in dilute solution. Surprisingly, time dependent experiments showed that the kinetics of H-bond formation and breakup at interfaces was very slow resulting in adhesion energies which were very dependent on contact time up to one hour of contact. At the molecular level, neutron reflectivity showed that the equilibrium brush conformation when in contact with the gels was more extended at pH2 (H-bonds activated) than at pH9 (H-bonds deactivated) and that a certain applied pressure was

  8. Complexes of sulfur-containing ligands. I. Factors influencing complex formation between D-penicillamine and copper (II) ion.

    PubMed

    Gergely, A; Sóvágó, I

    1978-07-01

    Complex formation and redox reactions between copper (II) ion and D-penicillamine were studied in detail as functions of the metal/-ligand ratio and the concentration of halide ions. It was established that a copper (I)- D-penicillamine polymeric complex of amphoteric character is formed when excess D-penicillamine is present. When the D-penicillamine/copper (II) ratio = 1.45 in the starting reaction mixture, a mixed valence complex with an intense red-violet color is formed. The formation of this compound, which contains 44% copper (II) ion, is greatly influenced by the experimental conditions, primarily by the concentration of halide ions. The main chemical and physical characteristics of the mixed valence complex were determined via magnetic and spectroscopic measurements. It was further established that a very intense blue complex is formed when the D-penicillamine/copper (II) ratio = 2 and halide ions are present. On the basis of the nature of the products formed under various conditions it was concluded that the copper (II)-D-penicillamine system may serve as a good model for studying the binding sites of copper-containing proteins. PMID:210846

  9. Filamentation and spatiotemporal distribution of extracellular polymeric substances: role on X.fastidiosa single cell adhesion and biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Monteiro, Moniellen P.; César, Carlos L.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms can be defined as a community of microorganisms attached to a surface, living embedded in a self- produced matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which comprises most of the biofilm mass. We have recently used an extensive pool of microscopy techniques (confocal fluorescence, electron and scanning probe microscopies) at the micro and nanoscales in order to create a detailed temporal observation of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, using both wild type strain and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-modified cells of this citrus phytopathogen. We have identified three different EPS compositions, as well as their spatial and temporal distribution from single cell to mature biofilm formation stages. In the initial adhesion stage, soluble-EPS (S-EPS) accumulates at cell polar regions and forms a surface layer which facilitates irreversible cell attachment and cell cluster formation. These small clusters are subsequently connected by filamentous cells; further S-EPS surface coverage facilitates cell attachment and form filaments, leading to a floating framework of mature biofilms. The important role of EPS in X.fastidiosa biology was further investigated by imunolabelling experiments to detect the distribution of XadA1 adhesin, which is expressed in early stages of biofilm formation and released in outer membrane vesicles. This protein is located mainly in S-EPS covered areas, as well as on the filaments, indicating a molecular pathway to the enhanced cell attachment previously observed. These results suggest that S-EPS may thus represent an important target for disease control, slow plant colonization by the bacteria, keeping the plant more productive in the field.

  10. SEPALLATA3: the 'glue' for MADS box transcription factor complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Immink, Richard GH; Tonaco, Isabella AN; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna; van Dijk, Aalt DJ; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Borst, Jan W; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant MADS box proteins play important roles in a plethora of developmental processes. In order to regulate specific sets of target genes, MADS box proteins dimerize and are thought to assemble into multimeric complexes. In this study a large-scale yeast three-hybrid screen is utilized to provide insight into the higher-order complex formation capacity of the Arabidopsis MADS box family. SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) has been shown to mediate complex formation and, therefore, special attention is paid to this factor in this study. Results In total, 106 multimeric complexes were identified; in more than half of these at least one SEP protein was present. Besides the known complexes involved in determining floral organ identity, various complexes consisting of combinations of proteins known to play a role in floral organ identity specification, and flowering time determination were discovered. The capacity to form this latter type of complex suggests that homeotic factors play essential roles in down-regulation of the MADS box genes involved in floral timing in the flower via negative auto-regulatory loops. Furthermore, various novel complexes were identified that may be important for the direct regulation of the floral transition process. A subsequent detailed analysis of the APETALA3, PISTILLATA, and SEP3 proteins in living plant cells suggests the formation of a multimeric complex in vivo. Conclusions Overall, these results provide strong indications that higher-order complex formation is a general and essential molecular mechanism for plant MADS box protein functioning and attribute a pivotal role to the SEP3 'glue' protein in mediating multimerization. PMID:19243611

  11. Insights into complement convertase formation based on the structure of the factor B-cobra venom factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Bert J C; Gomes, Lucio; Koning, Roman I; Svergun, Dmitri I; Koster, Abraham J; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Gros, Piet

    2009-01-01

    Immune protection by the complement system critically depends on assembly of C3 convertases on the surface of pathogens and altered host cells. These short-lived protease complexes are formed through pro-convertases, which for the alternative pathway consist of the complement component C3b and the pro-enzyme factor B (FB). Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.2-Å resolution, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) data of the pro-convertase formed by human FB and cobra venom factor (CVF), a potent homologue of C3b that generates more stable convertases. FB is loaded onto CVF through its pro-peptide Ba segment by specific contacts, which explain the specificity for the homologous C3b over the native C3 and inactive products iC3b and C3c. The protease segment Bb binds the carboxy terminus of CVF through the metal-ion dependent adhesion site of the Von Willebrand factor A-type domain. A possible dynamic equilibrium between a ‘loading' and ‘activation' state of the pro-convertase may explain the observed difference between the crystal structure of CVFB and the EM structure of C3bB. These insights into formation of convertases provide a basis for further development of complement therapeutics. PMID:19574954

  12. Spectrophotometric study of complex formation between oxovanadium (IV) and antiamebic drugs.

    PubMed

    Abu-Eittah, R; El-Nasr, M S

    1976-09-01

    Complex formation between oxovanadium(IV) and the antiamebic drugs 5, 7-dibromo-8-quinolinol and 5, 7-dichloro-8-quinolinol was studied in the pH 1.5-2.0 range, using ethanol, dioxane-water, and dimethylformamide as solvents. The composition of the formed complexes was determined by more than one procedure. In ethanol and dioxane-water, the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes were formed; in dimethylformamide, the 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 complexes were formed. The stability constants were computed using two procedures: the molar ratio method and the extrapolation method. The reproducibility or results in satisfactory. PMID:966156

  13. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. PMID:25214300

  14. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer's plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  15. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer’s plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  16. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2.

    PubMed

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-19

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala(241) with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala(241) alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly(241) alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. PMID:27358403

  17. Incidence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, and deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase carriers in Brazilian Girolando cattle.

    PubMed

    Paiva, D S; Fonseca, I; Pinto, I S B; Ianella, P; Campos, T A; Caetano, A R; Paiva, S R; Silva, M V G B; Martins, M F

    2013-01-01

    Among the various hereditary diseases that have been widely studied in dairy cattle, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), and complex vertebral malformation (CVM) are noteworthy because of their high impact on overall herd productivity as a consequence of increased calf mortality. The aim of this study was to verify the frequency of carriers of BLAD, CVM, and DUMPS mutant alleles in cows and bulls from the National Girolando Progeny Test carried out in Brazil by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific PCR assays. A total of 777 animals were genotyped for BLAD, 783 for CVM, and 122 for DUMPS. The frequencies of carriers for BLAD and CVM were 0.77 and 1.53%, respectively, whereas no carriers of DUMPS were observed. PMID:24065661

  18. Schwann cell differentiation inhibits interferon-gamma induction of expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Robert P; Bealmear, Beverly; Benjamins, Joyce A

    2016-06-15

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) antigens and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on Schwann cells (SC) in vitro, but in nerves of animals and patients MHC class II is primarily expressed on inflammatory cells. We investigated whether SC maturation influences their expression. IFN-γ induced MHC class II and upregulated ICAM-1; the axolemma-like signal 8-bromo cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8 Br cAMP) with IFN-γ inhibited expression. Delaying addition of 8 Br cAMP to SC already exposed to IFN-γ inhibited ongoing expression; addition of IFN-γ to SC already exposed to 8 Br cAMP resulted in minimal expression. Variability of cytokine-induced MHC class II and ICAM-1 expression by SC in vivo may represent the variability of signals from axolemma. PMID:27235355

  19. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-oleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2015-04-29

    The solubility of starch-inclusion complexes affects the digestibility and bioavailability of the included molecules. Acetylation with two degrees of substitution, 0.041 (low) and 0.091 (high), combined without or with a β-amylase treatment was employed to improve the yield and solubility of the inclusion complex between debranched potato starch and oleic acid. Both soluble and insoluble complexes were recovered and analyzed for their degree of acetylation, complexation yields, molecular size distributions, X-ray diffraction patterns, and thermal properties. Acetylation significantly increased the amount of recovered soluble complexes as well as the complexed oleic acid in both soluble and insoluble complexes. High-acetylated debranched-only starch complexed the highest amount of oleic acid (38.0 mg/g) in the soluble complexes; low-acetylated starch with or without the β-amylase treatment resulted in the highest complexed oleic acid in the insoluble complexes (37.6-42.9 mg/g). All acetylated starches displayed the V-type X-ray pattern, and the melting temperature generally decreased with acetylation. The results indicate that starch acetylation with or without the β-amylase treatment can improve the formation and solubility of the starch-oleic acid complex. PMID:25877005

  20. Thermodynamics of the formation of copper(II) complexes with L-histidine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The heat effects from the reaction between L-histidine solutions and Cu(NO3)2 solutions at 298.15 K in the 0.2 to 1.0 (KNO3) range of ionic strength are measured by means of direct calorimetry. The experimental data is treated with allowance for the simultaneous proceeding of several processes. The heat effects of the formation of complexes Cu(His)+, Cu(His)2, CuHHis2+, CuH(His){2/+} and CuH2(His){2/2+} are calculated from calorimetric measurements. The standard enthalpies of formation for complexes of L-histidine with Cu2+ ions are obtained via extrapolation to zero ionic strength. The relationship between the thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of complexes of copper(II) with L-histidine and their structure is determined.

  1. Direct computer simulation of ferredoxin and FNR complex formation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, I. B.; Diakonova, A. N.; Abaturova, A. M.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    Ferredoxin reduced by Photosystem I in light serves as an electron donor for the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH, and this reaction is catalyzed by enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR). Kinetics and mechanisms of this reaction have been extensively studied experimentally by site-specific mutagenesis, laser flash photolysis and stopped-flow methods. We have applied a method of multiparticle computer simulation to study the effects of electrostatic interactions upon the reaction rate of Fd-FNR complex formation. Using the model we calculated rate constants of Fd-FNR complex formation for the wild-type proteins and some mutant forms of FNR at different values of ionic strength. Simulation revealed that electrostatic interactions play an important role in Fd-FNR complex formation and define its specificity.

  2. Direct computer simulation of ferredoxin and FNR complex formation in solution.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, I B; Diakonova, A N; Abaturova, A M; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2010-01-01

    Ferredoxin reduced by Photosystem I in light serves as an electron donor for the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, and this reaction is catalyzed by enzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+)-reductase (FNR). Kinetics and mechanisms of this reaction have been extensively studied experimentally by site-specific mutagenesis, laser flash photolysis and stopped-flow methods. We have applied a method of multiparticle computer simulation to study the effects of electrostatic interactions upon the reaction rate of Fd-FNR complex formation. Using the model we calculated rate constants of Fd-FNR complex formation for the wild-type proteins and some mutant forms of FNR at different values of ionic strength. Simulation revealed that electrostatic interactions play an important role in Fd-FNR complex formation and define its specificity. PMID:20453296

  3. High density of REC8 constrains sister chromatid axes and prevents illegitimate synaptonemal complex formation.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Ana; Manneberg, Otto; van Schendel, Robin; Hernández-Hernández, Abrahan; Kouznetsova, Anna; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Höög, Christer

    2016-06-01

    During meiosis, cohesin complexes mediate sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), synaptonemal complex (SC) assembly and synapsis. Here, using super-resolution microscopy, we imaged sister chromatid axes in mouse meiocytes that have normal or reduced levels of cohesin complexes, assessing the relationship between localization of cohesin complexes, SCC and SC formation. We show that REC8 foci are separated from each other by a distance smaller than 15% of the total chromosome axis length in wild-type meiocytes. Reduced levels of cohesin complexes result in a local separation of sister chromatid axial elements (LSAEs), as well as illegitimate SC formation at these sites. REC8 but not RAD21 or RAD21L cohesin complexes flank sites of LSAEs, whereas RAD21 and RAD21L appear predominantly along the separated sister-chromatid axes. Based on these observations and a quantitative distribution analysis of REC8 along sister chromatid axes, we propose that the high density of randomly distributed REC8 cohesin complexes promotes SCC and prevents illegitimate SC formation. PMID:27170622

  4. Defective Association of the Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex with the Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Membrane Domain Inhibits Murine Thrombus and Atheroma Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Ran, Yali; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner S; Shang, Dan; Reddy, Anilkumar K; López, José A; Ballantyne, Christie M; Ware, Jerry; Wu, Huaizhu; Peng, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    Localization of the platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex to the membrane lipid domain is essential for platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and subsequent platelet activation in vitro. Yet, the in vivo importance of this localization has never been addressed. We recently found that the disulfide linkage between Ibα and Ibβ is critical for the association of Ibα with the glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domain; in this study, we established a transgenic mouse model expressing this mutant human Ibα that is also devoid of endogenous Ibα (HαSSMα(-/-)). Characterization of this model demonstrated a similar dissociation of Ibα from murine platelet glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane to that expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which correlates well with the impaired adhesion of the transgenic platelets to von Willebrand factor ex vivo and in vivo. Furthermore, we bred our transgenic mice into an atherosclerosis-prone background (HαSSMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and HαWTMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-)). We observed that atheroma formation was significantly inhibited in mutant mice where fewer platelet-bound CD11c(+) leukocytes were circulating (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)/CD41(+)) and residing in atherosclerotic lesions (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)), suggesting that platelet-mediated adhesion and infiltration of CD11c(+) leukocytes may be one of the mechanisms. To our knowledge, these observations provide the first in vivo evidence showing that the membrane GEM is physiologically and pathophysiologically critical in the function of the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex. PMID:27206768

  5. Can arsenic-phytochelatin complex formation be used as an indicator for toxicity in Helianthus annuus?

    PubMed

    Raab, Andrea; Ferreira, Katia; Meharg, Andrew A; Feldmann, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The formation of arsenic-phytochelatin (As-PC) complexes is thought to be part of the plant detoxification strategy for arsenic. This work examines (i) the arsenic (As) concentration-dependent formation of As-PC complex formation and (ii) redistribution and metabolism of As after arrested As uptake in Helianthus annuus. HPLC with parallel ICP-MS/ES-MS detection was used to identify and quantify the species present in plant extracts exposed to arsenate (As(V)) (between 0 and 66.7 micromol As l-1 for 24 h). At As concentrations below the EC50 value for root growth (22 micromol As l-1) As uptake is exponential, but it is reduced at concentrations above. Translocation between root and shoot seemed to be limited to the uptake phase of arsenic. No redistribution of As between root and shoot was observed after arresting As exposure. The formation of As-PC complexes was concentration-dependent. The amount and number of As-PC complexes increased exponentially with concentration up to 13.7 micromol As l-1. As(III)-PC3 and GS-As(III)-PC2 complexes were the dominant species in all samples. The ratio of PC-bound As to unbound As increased up to 1.3 micromol As l-1 and decreased at higher concentrations. Methylation of inorganic As was only a minor pathway in H. annuus with about 1% As methylated over a 32 d period. The concentration dependence of As-PC complex formation, amount of unbound reduced and oxidized PC2, and the relative uptake rate showed that As starts to influence the cellular metabolism of H. annuus negatively at As concentrations well below the EC50 value determined by more traditional means. Generally, As-PC complexes and PC-synthesis rate seem to be the more sensitive parameters to be studied when As toxicity values are to be estimated. PMID:17283372

  6. Studies of formation of bivalent copper complexes with native and denatured DNA.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Blagoi, Y P; Valeev, V A; Kornilova, S V; Gladchenko, G O; Reva, I D; Sokhan, V I

    1987-06-01

    The formation of Cu2+ complexes with native and denatured DNA is studied by the methods of differential UV spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy, and viscometry. On ion binding to the bases of native DNA the latter transforms into a new conformation. This transition is accompanied with a sharp increase in UV absorption and a decrease in the intrinsic viscosity though the high degree of helicity persists. Possible sites of Cu2+ ion binding on DNA of various conformations are found along with corresponding constants of complex formation. PMID:3598574

  7. Thermodynamic functions of formation of n-alkane complexes with crystalline urea

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmachev, V.V.; Semenov, L.V.; Gaile, A.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1987-07-10

    For optimization of the conditions of deparaffination of petroleum fractions with the aid of urea, with the composition of the feedstock taken into account, it is important to know the equilibrium constants of formation of complexes of urea with n-alkanes differing in the number of carbon atoms in their molecules, as functions of temperature. In this investigation they obtained experimental data necessary for calculating the thermodynamic functions of formation of n-alkane complexes with crystalline urea up to the decomposition temperature, using Kirchhoff's equations.

  8. Formation of ATP by the adenosine triphosphatase complex from spinach chloroplasts reconstituted together with bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Winget, G D; Kanner, N; Racker, E

    1977-06-01

    The energy-linked ATPase complex has been isolated from spinach chloroplasts. This protein complex contained all the subunits of the chloroplast coupling factor (CF1) as well as several hydrophobic compoenents. When the activated complex was reconstituted with added soybean phospholipids, it catalyzed the exchange of radioactive inorganic phosphate with ATP. Sonication of the complex into proteoliposomes together with bacteriorhodopsin yield vesicles that catalyzed light-dependent ATP formation. Both the 32Pi-ATP exchange reactions and ATP formation were sensitive to uncouplers such as 3-tert-butyl-5,2'-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide, bis-(hexafluoroacetonyl)acetone and carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazone, that act to dissipate a proton gradient. The energy transfer inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, triphenyltin chloride and 2-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-4,6'-dihydroxydihydrochalcone were also effective inhibitors of both reactions. PMID:141938

  9. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  10. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  11. Synergistic effect of ATP for RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Takuma; Han, Yong-Woon; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Yokota, Hiroaki; Nakao, Kimiko; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Ono, Teruo; Harada, Yoshie

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RuvB hexameric ring motor proteins, together with RuvAs, promote branch migration of Holliday junction DNA. Zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) constitute of nanosized holes and enable the visualization of a single fluorescent molecule under micromolar order of the molecules, which is applicable to characterize the formation of RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex. In this study, we used ZMWs and counted the number of RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex. Our data demonstrated that different nucleotide analogs increased the amount of Cy5-RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex in the following order: no nucleotide, ADP, ATPγS, and mixture of ADP and ATPγS. These results suggest that not only ATP binding to RuvB but also ATP hydrolysis by RuvB facilitates a stable RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation. PMID:26658024

  12. Formation of P450•P450 Complexes and Their Effect on P450 Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, James R.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are membrane-bound enzymes that catalyze the monooxygenation of a diverse array of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. The P450s responsible for foreign compound metabolism generally are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of the liver, lung and small intestine. P450 enzymes do not act alone but require an interaction with other electron transfer proteins such as NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5. Because P450s are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum with these and other ER-resident proteins, there is a potential for protein-protein interactions to influence P450 function. There has been increasing evidence that P450 enzymes form complexes in the ER, with compelling support that formation of P450•P450 complexes can significantly influence their function. Our goal is to review the research supporting the formation of P450•P450 complexes, their specificity, and how drug metabolism may be affected. This review describes the potential mechanisms by which P450s may interact, and provides evidence to support each of the possible mechanisms. Additionally, evidence for the formation of both heteromeric and homomeric P450 complexes are reviewed. Finally, direct physical evidence for P450 complex formation in solution and in membranes is summarized, and questions directing the future research of functional P450 interactions are discussed with respect to their potential impact on drug metabolism. PMID:22155419

  13. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  14. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  15. Formation of Stable Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes for Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofland, Hans E. J.; Shephard, Lee; Sullivan, Sean M.

    1996-07-01

    Stable cationic lipid/DNA complexes were formed by solubilizing cationic liposomes with 1% octylglucoside and complexing a DNA plasmid with the lipid in the presence of detergent. Removal of the detergent by dialysis yielded a lipid/DNA suspension that was able to transfect tissue culture cells up to 90 days after formation with no loss in activity. Similar levels of gene transfer were obtained by mixing the cationic lipid in a liposome form with DNA just prior to cell addition. However, expression was completely lost 24 hr after mixing. The transfection efficiency of the stable complex in 15% fetal calf serum was 30% of that obtained in the absence of serum, whereas the transient complex was completely inactivated with 2% fetal calf serum. A 90-day stability study comparing various storage conditions showed that the stable complex could be stored frozen or as a suspension at 4 degrees C with no loss in transfection efficiency. Centrifugation of the stable complex produced a pellet that contained approximately 90% of the DNA and 10% of the lipid. Transfection of cells with the resuspended pellet and the supernatant showed that the majority of the transfection activity was in the pellet and all the toxicity was in the supernatant. Formation of a stable cationic lipid/DNA complex has produced a transfection vehicle that can be stored indefinitely, can be concentrated with no loss in transfection efficiency, and the toxicity levels can be greatly reduced when the active complex is isolated from the uncomplexed lipid.

  16. Quantitative assessment of complex formation of nuclear-receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Graumann, K; Jungbauer, A

    2000-02-01

    Like other nuclear receptors, steroid hormone receptors form large protein hetero-complexes in their inactive, ligand-friendly state. Several heat-shock proteins, immunophilins and others have been identified as members of these highly dynamic complexes. The interaction kinetics and dynamics of hsp90, hsp70, p60 (Hop), FKBP52, FKBP51, p48 (Hip) and p23 have been assessed by a biosensor approach measuring the complex formation in real time. A core chaperone complex has been reconstituted from p60, hsp90 and hsp70. p60 forms a molecular bridge between hsp90 and hsp70 with an affinity in the range of 10(5) M(-1). Dynamics of hsp90-p60 complex formation is modulated by ATP through changes in the co-operativity of interaction. At low protein concentrations ATP stabilizes the complex. Binding of p23 to hsp90 did not change the affinity of the hsp90-p60 complex and the stabilizing effect of ATP. Saturation of the p48-hsp70 interaction could not be achieved, suggesting multiple binding sites. A picture of the protein complex, including stoichiometric coefficients, co-operativity of interaction and equilibrium-binding constants, has been formed. PMID:10642522

  17. TAR RNA decoys inhibit tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Liu, Y; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    The ability of the HIV-1 Tat protein to trans -activate HIV-1 transcription in vitro is specifically inhibited by a circular TAR RNA decoy. This inhibition is not overcome by adding an excess of Tat to the reaction but is partially overcome by adding Tat in combination with nuclear extract, suggesting that TAR RNA might function by interacting with a complex containing Tat and cellular factor(s). A cell-free transcription system involving immobilized DNA templates was used to further define the factor(s) that interact with TAR RNA. Preinitiation complexes formed in the presence or absence of Tat were purified on immobilized templates containing the HIV-1 promoter. After washing, nucleotides and radiolabelled UTP were added and transcription was measured. The presence of Tat during preinitiation complex formation resulted in an increase in the level of full-length HIV-1 transcripts. This Tat-activated increase in HIV-1 transcription was not inhibited by circular TAR decoys added during preinitiation complex formation but was inhibited by circular TAR decoys subsequently added during the transcription reaction. These results suggest that TAR decoys inhibit Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation, perhaps by interacting with components of transcription complexes. PMID:9358155

  18. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  19. Complexes of DNA with cationic peptides: conditions of formation and factors effecting internalization by mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Dizhe, E B; Ignatovich, I A; Burov, S V; Pohvoscheva, A V; Akifiev, B N; Efremov, A M; Perevozchikov, A P; Orlov, S V

    2006-12-01

    This work was devoted to the study of conditions of the formation of DNA/K8 complex and analysis of factors effecting the entry of DNA/K8 complex into mammalian cells in comparison with DNA complexes with arginine-rich fragment (47-57) of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) transcription factor Tat (Tat peptide). The stoichiometry of positively charged DNA/K8 complexes has been studied for the first time. Non-cooperative character of DNA-K8 interaction was revealed. It has been shown that along with the positive charge of such complexes, the presence of an excess of free K8 peptide in the culture medium is a necessary condition for maximal efficiency of cell transfection with DNA/K8 complexes. A stimulatory effect of free K8 peptide on the efficiency of mammalian cell transfection by DNA/K8 complexes is likely to be mediated by the interactions of cationic peptide K8 with negatively charged proteoglycans on the cell surface, which leads to protection of DNA/K8 complexes from disruption by cellular heparan sulfates. However, the protective role of free cationic peptides depends not only on their positive charge, but also on the primary structure of the peptide. In contrast with the results obtained for DNA complexes with molecular conjugates based on poly-L-lysine, the aggregation of DNA/K8 complexes leads to a significant increase in the expression of transferred gene. PMID:17223788

  20. Formation of copper complexes in landfill leachate and their toxicity to zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.K.; Butler, C.A.; Timperley, M.H.; Evans, C.W.

    2000-05-01

    Toxic metal organic complexes have not been found in natural waters, although some organic acids form bioavailable lipophilic and metabolite-type metal complexes. Landfill leachates usually contain organic acids and in the urban environment these leachates, when mixed with storm waters containing Cu, could be a source of toxic Cu organic complexes in streams and estuaries. The authors investigated the formation of Cu complexes in the leachate from an active urban landfill and found that some of the complexes formed were toxic to zebrafish embryos. High and low nominal molecular weight (NMWT) fractions; >5,000 Da and <700 Da, of leachate both formed Cu complexes with almost identical Cu complexing characteristics but the toxicity was due solely to the low NMWT complexes formed in the <700 Da fraction. Chemical equilibrium modeling with MINTEQA2 and H and Cu complex conditional association constants and ligand concentrations obtained from pH and Cu titrations with a Cu ion-selective electrode and van den Berg-Ruzic analyses of the titration data was used to calculate the copper speciation in the embryo test solutions. This calculated speciation, which was confirmed by measurements of Cu{sup 2+} in the test solutions, enabled the toxicity due to the free Cu ion and to the Cu complexes to be distinguished.

  1. Identification of functional targets of the Zta transcriptional activator by formation of stable preinitiation complex intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P

    1994-01-01

    Transcriptional activator proteins stimulate the formation of a preinitiation complex that may be distinct from a basal-level transcription complex in its composition and stability. Components of the general transcription factors that form activator-dependent stable intermediates were determined by the use of Sarkosyl and oligonucleotide challenge experiments. High-level transcriptional activation by the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded Zta protein required an activity in the TFIID fraction that is distinct from the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factors. This additional activity copurifies with and is likely to be identical to the previously defined coactivator, USA (M. Meisterernst, A. L. Roy, H. M. Lieu, and R. G. Roeder, Cell 66:981-994, 1991). The formation of a stable preinitiation complex intermediate resistant to Sarkosyl required the preincubation of the promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID (TBP and TBP-associated factors), TFIIB, TFIIA, and the coactivator USA. The formation of a Zta response element-resistant preinitiation complex required the preincubation of promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID, TFIIB, and TFIIA. Agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift showed that a preformed Zta-holo-TFIID-TFIIA complex was resistant to Sarkosyl and to Zta response element oligonucleotide challenge. DNase I footprinting suggests that only Zta, holo-TFIID, and TFIIA make significant contacts with the promoter DNA. These results provide functional and physical evidence that the Zta transcriptional activator influences at least two distinct steps in preinitiation complex assembly, the formation of the stable holo-TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex and the subsequent binding of TFIIB and a USA-like coactivator. Images PMID:7969171

  2. Qualitative SEM/EDS analysis of microleakage and apical gap formation of adhesive root-filling materials

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho; FRANCCI, Carlos; BOMBANA, Antonio C.; KENSHIMA, Silvia; BARROSO, Lúcia P.; D'AGOSTINO, Liz Z.; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the correspondence between gap formation and apical microleakage in root canals filled with epoxy resin-based (AH Plus) combined or not with resinous primer or with a dimethacrylate-based root canal sealer (Epiphany). Material and Methods Thirty-nine lower single-rooted human premolars were filled by the lateral condensation technique (LC) and immersed in a 50-wt% aqueous silver nitrate solution at 37ºC (24 h). After longitudinal sectioning, epoxy resin replicas were made from the tooth specimens. Both the replicas and the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gaps were observed in the replicas. Apical microleakage was detected in the specimens by SEM/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The data were analyzed statistically using an Ordinal Logistic Regression model and Analysis of Correspondence (α=0.05). Results Epiphany presented more regions containing gaps between dentin and sealer (p<0.05). There was correspondence between the presence of gaps and microleakage (p<0.05). Microleakage was similar among the root-filling materials (p>0.05). Conclusions The resinous primer did not improve the sealing ability of AH Plus sealer and the presence of gaps had an effect on apical microleakage for all materials. PMID:22858699

  3. Bond formation and slow heterogeneous dynamics in adhesive spheres with long-ranged repulsion: quantitative test of mode coupling theory.

    PubMed

    Henrich, O; Puertas, A M; Sperl, M; Baschnagel, J; Fuchs, M

    2007-09-01

    A colloidal system of spheres interacting with both a deep and narrow attractive potential and a shallow long-ranged barrier exhibits a prepeak in the static structure factor. This peak can be related to an additional mesoscopic length scale of clusters and/or voids in the system. Simulation studies of this system have revealed that it vitrifies upon increasing the attraction into a gel-like solid at intermediate densities. The dynamics at the mesoscopic length scale corresponding to the prepeak represents the slowest mode in the system. Using mode coupling theory with all input directly taken from simulations, we reveal the mechanism for glassy arrest in the system at 40% packing fraction. The effects of the low-q peak and of polydispersity are considered in detail. We demonstrate that the local formation of physical bonds is the process whose slowing down causes arrest. It remains largely unaffected by the large-scale heterogeneities, and sets the clock for the slow cluster mode. Results from mode-coupling theory without adjustable parameters agree semiquantitatively with the local density correlators but overestimate the lifetime of the mesoscopic structure (voids). PMID:17930244

  4. The Aspergillus fumigatus sitA Phosphatase Homologue Is Important for Adhesion, Cell Wall Integrity, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Marine, Marçal; Hori, Juliana I.; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Brown, Neil Andrew; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Walker, Louise A.; Munro, Carol A.; Rocha, Marina Campos; Malavazi, Iran; Hagiwara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic pathogenic fungus able to infect immunocompromised patients, eventually causing disseminated infections that are difficult to control and lead to high mortality rates. It is important to understand how the signaling pathways that regulate these factors involved in virulence are orchestrated. Protein phosphatases are central to numerous signal transduction pathways. Here, we characterize the A. fumigatus protein phosphatase 2A SitA, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sit4p homologue. The sitA gene is not an essential gene, and we were able to construct an A. fumigatus null mutant. The ΔsitA strain had decreased MpkA phosphorylation levels, was more sensitive to cell wall-damaging agents, had increased β-(1,3)-glucan and chitin, was impaired in biofilm formation, and had decreased protein kinase C activity. The ΔsitA strain is more sensitive to several metals and ions, such as MnCl2, CaCl2, and LiCl, but it is more resistant to ZnSO4. The ΔsitA strain was avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and induces an augmented tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) response in mouse macrophages. These results stress the importance of A. fumigatus SitA as a possible modulator of PkcA/MpkA activity and its involvement in the cell wall integrity pathway. PMID:25911225

  5. α-Actinin-4 Enhances Colorectal Cancer Cell Invasion by Suppressing Focal Adhesion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tesshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2015-01-01

    α-Actinins (ACTNs) are known to crosslink actin filaments at focal adhesions in migrating cells. Among the four isoforms of mammalian ACTNs, ACTN1 and ACTN4 are ubiquitously expressed. Recently, ACTN4 was reported to enhance cancer cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanism by which ACTN4 drives these malignant phenotypes remains unclear. Here, we show that ACTN4, but not ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions in DLD-1 cells, leading to the rapid turnover of focal adhesions. Interestingly, zyxin (ZYX) assembly to focal adhesions was markedly decreased in ACTN4-expressing DLD-1 cells, while the recruitment of paxillin (PAX) occurred normally. On the other hand, in ACTN1-expressing DLD-1 cells, PAX and ZYX were normally recruited to focal adhesions, suggesting that ACTN4 specifically impairs focal adhesion maturation by inhibiting the recruitment of ZYX to focal complexes. Using purified recombinant proteins, we found that ZYX binding to ACTN4 was defective under conditions where ZYX binding to ACTN1 was observed. Furthermore, Matrigel invasion of SW480 cells that express high endogenous levels of ACTN4 protein was inhibited by ectopic expression of ACTN1. Altogether, our results suggest that ZYX defective binding to ACTN4, which occupies focal adhesions instead of ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions, resulting in the enhancement of cell motility and invasion. PMID:25860875

  6. Inhibition of E-cadherin/catenin complex formation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase is partially independent of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Yuchao; Qi, Jieqiong; Han, Cuifang; Zhang, Xinling; Bi, Chuanlin; Yu, Wengong

    2016-02-01

    p120-catenin (p120) contains a large central armadillo repeat domain, via which it binds to E‑cadherin to stabilize the latter, thereby regulating cell‑to‑cell adhesion. A previous study by our group demonstrated that O‑linked N‑acetylglucosamine (O‑GlcNAc) is involved in the regulation of the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. As O‑GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is able to directly bind to the majority of its target proteins, the present study hypothesized that OGT may additionally regulate the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. To verify this hypothesis, a catalytically inactive OGT mutant was expressed in H1299 cells, and its effects on the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex were assessed. A cytoskeleton‑binding protein extraction assay confirmed that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. In addition, co‑immunoprecipitation and pull‑down assays were used to evaluate the interaction between OGT and p120. Immunoblotting indicated that OGT was able to directly bind to p120. To determine the domain of p120 involved in binding to OGT, a series of deletion mutants of p120 were constructed and subjected to protein binding assays by pull‑down assays. Immunoblotting showed that OGT bound to the regulatory and armadillo domains of p120, which might interfere with the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. Finally, OGT, p120 and E‑cadherin cytoplasmic domains (ECD) were recombinantly expressed in BL21 (DE3) recombinant E. coli cells, and a glutathione S‑transferase (GST) pull‑down assay was performed to assess the interactions among the purified recombinant proteins. Immunoblotting indicated that maltose‑binding protein (MBP)‑OGT inhibited the binding of His‑p120 to GST‑ECD in a dose‑dependent manner. All of these results suggested that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex

  7. Controlling energy transfer in ytterbium complexes: oxygen dependent lanthanide luminescence and singlet oxygen formation.

    PubMed

    Watkis, Andrew; Hueting, Rebekka; Sørensen, Thomas Just; Tropiano, Manuel; Faulkner, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Pyrene-appended ytterbium complexes have been prepared using Ugi reactions to vary the chromophore-lanthanide separation. Formation of the ytterbium(iii) excited state is sensitised via both the singlet and triplet excited states of the chromophore. Energy transfer from the latter is relatively slow, and gives rise to oxygen-dependent luminescence. PMID:26346499

  8. Enthalpies of complex formation of boron and aluminum bromides with organic bases of high donor power

    SciTech Connect

    Grigor-ev, A.A.; Kondrat'ev, Y.V.; Suvorov, A.V.

    1986-11-20

    By the calorimetric method enthalpies of complex formation were determined for boron and aluminum bromides with piperidine and hexamethylphosphoric triamide in benzene solutions and for boron bromide with pyridine in dichloroethane, and also enthalpies of solution were determined for BBr/sub 3/ and the adducts AlBr/sub 3/ x PPy and BBr/sub 2/ x Py in benzene and pyridine.

  9. Three-Coordinate Terminal Imidoiron(III) Complexes: Structure, Spectroscopy, and Mechanism of Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Ryan E.; DeYonker, Nathan J.; Eckert, Nathan A.; Cundari, Thomas R.; DeBeer, Serena; Bill, Eckhard; Ottenwaelder, Xavier; Flaschenriem, Christine; Holland, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction of 1-adamantyl azide with iron(I) diketiminate precursors gives metastable but isolable imidoiron(III) complexes LFe=NAd (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand; Ad = 1-adamantyl). This paper addresses: (1) the spectroscopic and structural characterization of the Fe=N multiple bond in these interesting three-coordinate iron imido complexes, and (2) the mechanism through which the imido complexes form. The iron(III) imido complexes have been examined by 1H NMR and EPR spectroscopies and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility (SQUID), and structurally characterized by crystallography and/or X-ray absorption (EXAFS) measurements. These data show that the imido complexes have quartet ground states and short (1.68 ± 0.01 Å) iron-nitrogen bonds. The formation of the imido complexes proceeds through unobserved iron–RN3 intermediates, which are indicated by QM/MM computations to be best described as iron(II) with an RN3 radical anion. The radical character on the organoazide bends its NNN linkage to enable easy N2 loss and imido complex formation. The product distribution between imidoiron(III) products and hexazene-bridged diiron(II) products is solvent-dependent, and the solvent dependence can be explained by coordination of certain solvents to the iron(I) precursor prior to interaction with the organoazide. PMID:20524625

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule 2 promotes the formation of filopodia and neurite branching by inducing submembrane increases in Ca2+ levels.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lifu; Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-28

    Changes in expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2) have been proposed to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. The role of NCAM2 in neuronal differentiation remains, however, poorly understood. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) reporters, we show that clustering of NCAM2 at the cell surface of mouse cortical neurons induces submembrane [Ca(2+)] spikes, which depend on the L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) and require activation of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src. We also demonstrate that clustering of NCAM2 induces L-type VDCC- and c-Src-dependent activation of CaMKII. NCAM2-dependent submembrane [Ca(2+)] spikes colocalize with the bases of filopodia. NCAM2 activation increases the density of filopodia along neurites and neurite branching and outgrowth in an L-type VDCC-, c-Src-, and CaMKII-dependent manner. Our results therefore indicate that NCAM2 promotes the formation of filopodia and neurite branching by inducing Ca(2+) influx and CaMKII activation. Changes in NCAM2 expression in Down syndrome and autistic patients may therefore contribute to abnormal neurite branching observed in these disorders. PMID:25632147

  11. Effect of entropy-packing fraction relation on the formation of complex metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourki Samaei, Arash; Mohammadi, Ehsan

    2015-09-01

    By combining a number of elements to form complex metallic materials without a base element, it was recently shown that one can obtain rather complex structures, including random solute solutions, multi-phased mixtures and amorphous structures with/without nano-precipitations. Compared to conventional metallic materials, these complex ones could show excellent mechanical and physical properties across a wide range of temperatures, therefore being a promising advanced material for high-temperature applications; however, designing these complex materials, at present, still lacks a unified physical approach but relies on the choice of a few metallurgical parameters, such as atomic size mismatch, heat of mixing and valence electron concentration. Here, we identify a physical mechanism through the optimization of the excess configurational entropy of mixing in the control of phase formation in these metallic materials. The theoretical framework herein established is expected to provide a new paradigm in pursuit of complex metallic materials with superior properties.

  12. Formation of complex impact craters - Evidence from Mars and other planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the depth vs diameter data of Arthur (1980), is given along with geomorphic data for 73 Martian craters. The implications for the formation of complex impact craters on solid planets is discussed. The analysis integrates detailed morphological observations on planetary craters with geologic data from terrestrial meteorite and explosion craters. The simple to complex transition for impact craters on Mars appears at diameters in the range of 3 to 8 km. Five features appear sequentially with increasing crater size, flat floors, central peaks and shallower depths, scalloped rims, and terraced walls. This order suggests that a shallow depth of excavation and a rebound mechanism have produced the central peaks, not centripetal collapse and deep sliding. Simple craters are relatively uniform in shape from planet to planet, but complex craters vary considerably. Both the average onset diameter for complex impact craters on Mars and the average depth of complex craters vary inversely with gravitational acceleration on four planets.

  13. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that

  14. The role of plasma proteins in formation of obstructive protamine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    De Paulis, R.; Mohammad, S.F.; Chiariello, L.; Morea, M.; Olsen, D.B. )

    1991-06-01

    Formation of complexes between heparin and protamine (in saline), or heparin, plasma proteins, and protamine (in plasma) was assessed by measurements of light transmission through different test solutions. To examine the formation of these complexes, 125I-labeled protamine was used. Addition of 125I-protamine to plasma or blood resulted in the sedimentation of 125I-protamine in the form of insoluble complexes. This complex formation was not affected by the presence of heparin, suggesting that protamine-plasma protein interaction may be primarily responsible for precipitation of 125I-protamine. To assess the capability of these complexes to obstruct the pulmonary circulation, an in vitro experimental model was developed. Citrated serum, plasma, blood, or saline were allowed to flow through a glass bead column with the help of a peristaltic pump. A pressure transducer positioned before the column allowed pressure measurements at a constant flow rate during the experiment. Mixing of protamine with plasma or blood prior to their passage through the glass bead column resulted in a significant increase in pressure suggesting that the column was being clogged with insoluble complexes. The increase in pressure occurred both in the presence and absence of heparin in plasma or blood. Under identical experimental conditions, the increase in pressure was insignificant when protamine was added to saline or serum regardless of whether heparin was present or absent. This was further confirmed by the use of 125I-protamine. These observations suggest that protamine forms insoluble complexes with certain plasma proteins. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that following intravenous administration, protamine immediately forms complexes in circulating blood.

  15. The late endosomal p14–MP1 (LAMTOR2/3) complex regulates focal adhesion dynamics during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Schiefermeier, Natalia; Scheffler, Julia M.; de Araujo, Mariana E.G.; Stasyk, Taras; Yordanov, Teodor; Ebner, Hannes L.; Offterdinger, Martin; Munck, Sebastian; Hess, Michael W.; Wickström, Sara A.; Lange, Anika; Wunderlich, Winfried; Fässler, Reinhard; Teis, David

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is mediated by the dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions (FAs). Recently, an important role of endosomal signaling in regulation of cell migration was recognized. Here, we show an essential function for late endosomes carrying the p14–MP1 (LAMTOR2/3) complex in FA dynamics. p14–MP1-positive endosomes move to the cell periphery along microtubules (MTs) in a kinesin1- and Arl8b-dependent manner. There they specifically target FAs to regulate FA turnover, which is required for cell migration. Using genetically modified fibroblasts from p14-deficient mice and Arl8b-depleted cells, we demonstrate that MT plus end–directed traffic of p14–MP1-positive endosomes triggered IQGAP1 disassociation from FAs. The release of IQGAP was required for FA dynamics. Taken together, our results suggest that late endosomes contribute to the regulation of cell migration by transporting the p14–MP1 scaffold complex to the vicinity of FAs. PMID:24841562

  16. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  17. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J.; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-11-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference.The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of 1c; experimental details of conductance measurements, formation of charge transfer complexes of 1c and 2 in solution; further details of theoretical methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04420k

  18. Arsenic-Lipid Complex Formation During the Active Transport of Arsenate in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cerbón, Jorge

    1969-01-01

    In studying formation of an arsenic-lipid complex during the active transport of 74As-arsenate in yeast, it was found that adaptation of yeast to arsenate resulted in cell populations which showed a deficient inflow of arsenate as compared to the nonadapted yeast. Experiments with both types of cells showed a direct correlation between the arsenate taken up and the amount of As-lipid complex formed. 74As-arsenate was bound exclusively to the phosphoinositide fraction of the cellular lipids. When arsenate transport was inhibited by dinitrophenol and sodium azide, the formation of the As-lipid complex was also inhibited. Phosphate did not interfere with the arsenate transport at a non-inhibitory concentration of external arsenate (10−9m). The As-adapted cells but not the unadapted cells were able to take up phosphate when growing in the presence of 10−2m arsenate. PMID:5773018

  19. Standard thermodynamic functions of complex formation between Cu2+ and glycine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    Heat effects of the interaction of copper(II) solutions with aminoacetic acid (glycine) are measured by the direct calorimetry at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 against a background of potassium nitrate. Standard enthalpy values for reactions of the formation of aminoacetic acid copper complexes in aqueous solutions are obtained using an equation with a single individual parameter by extrapolating it to zero ionic strength. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation in the Cu2+-glycine system are calculated. It is shown that glycine-like coordination is most likely in Cu(II) complexes with L-asparagine, L-glutamine, and L-valine.

  20. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties. PMID:27516309

  1. Coordination of lanthanides by two polyamino polycarboxylic macrocycles: formation of highly stable lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Loncin, M.F.; Desreux, J.F.; Merciny, E.

    1986-07-16

    The formation constants of a few lanthanide complexes with DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) and TETA (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) have been measured by potentiometric and competition methods. The ligand DOTA forms the most stable lanthanide chelates known so far (log K/sub ML/ = 28.2-29.2) while the stability of the TETA compounds at 80 /sup 0/C (log K/sub ML/ = 14.5-16.5) is comparable to the stability of the EDTA complexes. A competition method with the oxalate anion as a probe had to be used for determining the formation constants of the DOTA lanthanide chelates because of the high stability of these compounds. The relative stability of the DOTA and TETA complexes in accounted for by steric factors with reference to known solution- and solid-state structures. 20 references, 2 tables.

  2. Mesoscopic Modeling of Thrombus Formation and Growth: Platelet Deposition in Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    Haemodynamics and blood rheology are important contributing factors to thrombus formation at a vulnerable vessel wall, and adhesion of platelets to a vascular surface, particularly in regions of flow stagnation, recirculation and reattachment is significantly important in formation of thrombi. For example, haemodynamic micro-environment can have effects on thrombosis inside the atherosclerotic plaques and aneurysms. To study these effects, we have developed and validated a model for platelet aggregation in blood flow using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. In this model platelets are considered as single DPD particles interacting with each other via Morse potential once activated. We assign an activation delay time to each platelet such that they remain passive during that time. We investigate the effect of different geometries on platelet aggregation by considering arterial stenosis at different levels of occlusion, and aneurysms of different shapes and sizes. The results show a marked increase in platelet aggregation within the boundaries of deceleration zone by increasing the degree of stenosis. Further, we observe enhanced platelet margination and wall deposition in the presence of red blood cells.

  3. The significance of ACTH for the process of formation of complex heparin compounds in the blood during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Shapiro, F. B.; Lomovskaya, F. B.; Lyapina, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) was administered to rats at different times following adrenalectomy. Adrenocorticotropin caused a significant increase in the formation of heparin complexes even in the absence of stress factor. When ACTH secretion is blocked, immobilization stress is not accompanied by an increase in the process of complex formation. The effect of ACTH on the formation of heparin complexes was mediated through its stimulation of the adrenal cortex.

  4. Formation and stability of lanthanide complexes and their encapsulation into polymeric microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mumper, R.J.; Jay, M.

    1992-10-15

    The complexation of lanthanides (Ln) with dicarbonyl compounds (acetylacetone, acac; ethyl acetoacetate; 3-ethyl-2,4-pentanedione; 2,4-hexanedione; 3-methyl-2,4-pentanedione; and diethyl malonate) was investigated using a potentiometric titration technique. The ability of a dicarbonyl compound to complex with the lanthanide elements was greatly dependent on its pK{sub a} and on the pH of the titrated solution. Selected lanthanide complexes (Ln complexes) were incorporated into spherical poly(L-lactic acid)(PLA) matrices and irradiated in a nuclear reactor with neutrons to produce short-lived high-energy {Beta}-particle-emitting radioisotopes. The lanthanides investigated (Ho, Dy, Sm, and La) were chosen on the basis of their physical and nuclear properties. A transition element (Re) was also studied. The small decrease in the ionic radii of the lanthanides with increasing atomic number led to (a) greater ability to extract and complex from an aqueous solution with complexing agents, (b) larger formation and stability constants for the Ln complexes, (c) increased solubility of the Ln complexes in chloroform, and (d) increase in the maximum percent incorporation of the stable lanthanides in PLA spheres. Ho(aca) was found to be the most promising candidate of the complexes studied on the basis of the above observations and due to the favorable physical properties of {sup 165}Ho and nuclear properties of {sup 166}Ho. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  6. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ► The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ► The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ► The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ► PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ► The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  7. Peritoneal Response to Abdominal Surgery: The Role of Equine Abdominal Adhesions and Current Prophylactic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Juliana de Moura; Alves, Ana Liz Garcia; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Rodrigues, Celso Antonio; Hussni, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions constitute a significant clinical and surgical problem that can lead to complications such as pain and bowel occlusion or subocclusion. These adhesions are frustrating and potentially fatal, representing a major postoperative complication in abdominal surgery. It is estimated that 32% of horses undergoing laparotomy will present clinical symptoms due to adhesions, but the true prevalence is not known because a large proportion of animals with postoperative recurrent colics are medically treated or submitted to euthanasia without necropsy. Adhesions are highly cellular, vascularized, dynamic structures that are influenced by complex signaling mechanisms. Understanding their pathogenesis could assist in applying better therapeutic strategies and in developing more effective antiadhesion products. Currently, there are no definitive strategies that prevent adhesion formation, and it is difficult to interpret the results of existing studies due to nonstandardization of an induction model and evaluation of their severity. The best clinical results have been obtained from using minimally traumatic surgical techniques, anti-inflammatory agents, antimicrobials, anticoagulants, and mechanical separation of serosal surfaces by viscous intraperitoneal solutions or physical barriers. This paper aims to review adhesion formation pathogenesis, guide the understanding of major products and drugs used to inhibit adhesion formation, and address their effectiveness in the equine species. PMID:24587939

  8. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  9. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-. PMID:2983613

  10. Kinetic mechanism for formation of the active, dimeric UvrD helicase-DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Maluf, Nasib K; Ali, Janid A; Lohman, Timothy M

    2003-08-22

    Escherichia coli UvrD protein is a 3' to 5' SF1 helicase required for DNA repair as well as DNA replication of certain plasmids. We have shown previously that UvrD can self-associate to form dimers and tetramers in the absence of DNA, but that a UvrD dimer is required to form an active helicase-DNA complex in vitro. Here we have used pre-steady state, chemical quenched flow methods to examine the kinetic mechanism for formation of the active, dimeric helicase-DNA complex. Experiments were designed to examine the steps leading to formation of the active complex, separate from the subsequent DNA unwinding steps. The results show that the active dimeric complex can form via two pathways. The first, faster path involves direct binding to the DNA substrate of a pre-assembled UvrD dimer (dimer path), whereas the second, slower path proceeds via sequential binding to the DNA substrate of two UvrD monomers (monomer path), which then assemble on the DNA to form the dimeric helicase. The rate-limiting step within the monomer pathway involves dimer assembly on the DNA. These results show that UvrD dimers that pre-assemble in the absence of DNA are intermediates along the pathway to formation of the functional dimeric UvrD helicase. PMID:12788954

  11. Complex coacervates obtained from peptide leucine and gum arabic: formation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gulão, Eliana da S; de Souza, Clitor J F; Andrade, Cristina T; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E

    2016-03-01

    In this study, interactions between polypeptide-leucine (0.2% w/w) and gum arabic (0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15% w/w) were examined at concentrations of NaCl (0, 0.01, 0.25, 0.3, 0.5mol/l) and at different pH values (from 1.0 to 12.0). Formation of insoluble complex coacervates was highest at pH 4.0. At pH 2.0, which is the pKa of the gum Arabic, the dissociation of precipitate occurred. The pHØ2 positively shifted with the addition of higher concentrations of salt. Samples containing 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA and no salt had higher turbidity and increased formation of precipitates showing greater turbidity and particle sizes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the complex coacervate formation of leucine and gum arabic, and rheological measurements suggest the elastic behavior of 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA complex. Overall, the study suggests that complex coacervates of PLs could be one feasible ways of incorporating amino acids in food products. PMID:26471607

  12. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  13. Complex formation of alkaline-earth cations with crown ethers and cryptands in methanol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Buschman, H.J.

    1986-06-01

    The complexation of alkaline-earth cations by different crown ethers, azacrown ethers, and cryptands has been studied in methanol solutions by means of calorimetric and potentiometric titrations. The smallest monocyclic ligands examined from 2:1 complexes (ratio of ligand to cation) with cations which are too large to fit into the ligand cavity. With the smallest cryptand, only Sr/sup 2 +/ and Ba/sup 2 +/ ions are able to form exclusive complexes. In the case of the reaction of cryptand (211) with Ca/sup 2 +/, a separate estimation of stability constants for the formation of exclusive and inclusive complexes was possible for the first time. Higher values for stability constants are found for the reaction of alkaline-earth cations with cryptands compared to the reaction with alkali ions. This increase is only caused by favorable entropic contributions.

  14. The formation of molecular aggregates of sulfophthalocyanine in complexes with semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadadzhanov, D. R.; Martynenko, I. V.; Orlova, A. O.; Maslov, V. G.; Fedorov, A. V.; Baranov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and quantum rods with sulfophthalocyanine molecules have been formed. Analysis of spectral and luminescent properties of solutions of the complexes has revealed that an increase in the number of molecules per one nanocrystal in a mixed solution results in a noticeable decrease in the intensity of the luminescence of the quantum dots and quantum rods. In addition, it has been found that, upon an increase in the concentration of sulfophthalocyanine molecules, the absorption spectra of the samples in the region of their first absorption band have signs of formation of nonluminiscent aggregates of sulfophthalocyanine molecules. Analysis of the absorption spectra of the mixed solutions has made it possible to demonstrate that the complexes with the quantum rods have a content of the sulfophthalocyanine aggregates significantly lower than the complexes with the quantum dots.

  15. An autocatalytic radical chain pathway in formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-03-28

    Evidence of an autocatalytic radical chain pathway has been reported in formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol in acetonitrile at 298 K. The radical chain reaction is initiated by hydrogen abstraction from isopropanol by the iron(IV)-oxo complex. PMID:23423328

  16. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  17. Interleukin-1β-induced Reduction of CD44 Ser-325 Phosphorylation in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Promotes CD44 Homomeric Complexes, Binding to Ezrin, and Extended, Monocyte-adhesive Hyaluronan Coats*

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Tiina; Oikari, Sanna; Takabe, Piia; Rilla, Kirsi; Kärnä, Riikka; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) attracts leukocytes to sites of inflammation. One of the recruitment mechanisms involves the formation of extended, hyaluronan-rich pericellular coats on local fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells. In the present work, we studied how IL-1β turns on the monocyte adhesion of the hyaluronan coat on human keratinocytes. IL-1β did not influence hyaluronan synthesis or increase the amount of pericellular hyaluronan in these cells. Instead, we found that the increase in the hyaluronan-dependent monocyte binding was associated with the CD44 of the keratinocytes. Although IL-1β caused a small increase in the total amount of CD44, a more marked impact was the decrease of CD44 phosphorylation at serine 325. At the same time, IL-1β increased the association of CD44 with ezrin and complex formation of CD44 with itself. Treatment of keratinocyte cultures with KN93, an inhibitor of calmodulin kinase 2, known to phosphorylate Ser-325 in CD44, caused similar effects as IL-1β (i.e. homomerization of CD44 and its association with ezrin) and resulted in increased monocyte binding to keratinocytes in a hyaluronan-dependent way. Overexpression of wild type CD44 standard form, but not a corresponding CD44 mutant mimicking the Ser-325-phosphorylated form, was able to induce monocyte binding to keratinocytes. In conclusion, treatment of human keratinocytes with IL-1β changes the structure of their hyaluronan coat by influencing the amount, post-translational modification, and cytoskeletal association of CD44, thus enhancing monocyte retention on keratinocytes. PMID:25809479

  18. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation. PMID:22634003

  19. Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fractures Interaction in Complex Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, Olga; Weng, Xiaowei; Gu, Hongren; Wu, Ruiting

    2013-05-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. A method for computing the stress shadow from fracture branches in a complex hydraulic fracture network (HFN) based on an enhanced 2D displacement discontinuity method with correction for finite fracture height is implemented in UFM and is presented in detail including approach validation and examples. The influence of stress shadow effect from the HFN generated at previous treatment stage on the HFN propagation and shape at new stage is also discussed.

  20. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  1. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  2. Adhesion- and Degranulation-Promoting Adapter Protein Promotes CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Resident Memory Formation and Function during an Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Fiege, Jessica K; Beura, Lalit K; Burbach, Brandon J; Shimizu, Yoji

    2016-09-15

    During acute infections, naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into effector T cells, most of which undergo contraction after pathogen clearance. A small population of CD8 T cells persists as memory to protect against future infections. We investigated the role of adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in promoting CD8 T cell responses to a systemic infection. Naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells lacking ADAP exhibited a modest expansion defect early after Listeria monocytogenes or vesicular stomatitis virus infection but comparable cytolytic function at the peak of response. However, reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient CD8 T cells were present in the spleen after the peak of the response. ADAP deficiency resulted in a greater frequency of CD127(+) CD8 memory precursors in secondary lymphoid organs during the contraction phase. Reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient killer cell lectin-like receptor G1(-) CD8 resident memory T (TRM) cell precursors were present in a variety of nonlymphoid tissues at the peak of the immune response, and consequently the total numbers of ADAP-deficient TRM cells were reduced at memory time points. TRM cells that did form in the absence of ADAP were defective in effector molecule expression. ADAP-deficient TRM cells exhibited impaired effector function after Ag rechallenge, correlating with defects in their ability to form T cell-APC conjugates. However, ADAP-deficient TRM cells responded to TGF-β signals and recruited circulating memory CD8 T cells. Thus, ADAP regulates CD8 T cell differentiation events following acute pathogen challenge that are critical for the formation and selected functions of TRM cells in nonlymphoid tissues. PMID:27521337

  3. Temperature and salt effects on the formation of preinitiation complexes between RNA polymerase and phage DNA.

    PubMed

    Escarmis, C; Domingo, E; Warner, R C

    1975-08-21

    The influence of temperature and KCl concentration on the formation of rifampicin-resistant preinitiation complexes by holo RNA polymerase has been compared for T4 DNA and Azotobacter phage A21 DNA. The sharp transition with respect to temperature between an inactive complex of polymerase and DNA and a preinitiation complex reflects an equilibrium between the two complexes, the position of which depends on the temperature and the salt concentration. The transition is shifted to higher temperatures by increasing the KCl concentration. The position of this transition is characteristically different for T4 and A21 DNA. The midpoint for A21 DNA is about 15 degrees C above that for T4 at 0.006 M KCl. At 0.15 M KCl the transition for A21 DNA cannot be observed below 37 degrees C. This difference is responsible for the apparent inhibition of a21 dna transcription by KCl and for the low template activity of A21 DNA under the conditions of the standard assay. Both holo and core RNA polymerases are able to form complexes with A21 DNA that are resistant to attack by rifampicin. The second-order rate constant for the inactivation of the complex with the core enxyme is three times greater than that for the complex with the holoenzyme. PMID:1100115

  4. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  5. Formation equilibria of nickel complexes with glycyl-histidyl-lysine and two synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Conato, Chiara; Kozłowski, Henryk; Swiatek-Kozłowska, Jolanta; Młynarz, Piotr; Remelli, Maurizio; Silvestri, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Complex-formation equilibria between the Ni(II) ion and the natural tripeptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine have been investigated. Two synthetic analogues, where the histidine residue has been substituted with L-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (L-Spinacine) and L-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinolin-3-carboxylic acid (Tic), respectively, have been considered, as well. Different experimental techniques have been employed: potentiometry, calorimetry, visible spectrophotometry and CD spectroscopy. Structural hypotheses on the main complex species are suggested. Evidences on the formation of tetrameric species with the first ligand are shown. No involvement of the side-chain amino group of lysine residue in metal ion coordination was found. PMID:14659644

  6. Stress-dependent nucleolin mobilization mediated by p53-nucleolin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Daniely, Yaron; Dimitrova, Diana D; Borowiec, James A

    2002-08-01

    We recently discovered that heat shock causes nucleolin to relocalize from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, whereupon it binds replication protein A and inhibits DNA replication initiation. We report that nucleolin mobilization also occurs following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and treatment with camptothecin. Mobilization was selective in that another nucleolar marker, upstream binding factor, did not relocalize in response to IR. Nucleolin relocalization was dependent on p53 and stress, the latter initially stimulating nucleolin-p53 complex formation. Nucleolin relocalization and complex formation in vivo were independent of p53 transactivation but required the p53 C-terminal regulatory domain. Nucleolin and p53 also interact directly in vitro, with a similar requirement for p53 domains. These data indicate a novel p53-dependent mechanism in which cell stress mobilizes nucleolin for transient replication inhibition and DNA repair. PMID:12138209

  7. Microbial growth and biofilm formation in geologic media is detected with complex conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Caroline A.; Atekwana, Estella; Atekwana, Eliot; Slater, Lee D.; Rossbach, Silvia; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2006-09-01

    Complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) were obtained from biostimulated sand-packed columns to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on the electrical properties of porous media. Microbial growth was verified by direct microbial counts, pH measurements, and environmental scanning electron microscope imaging. Peaks in imaginary (interfacial) conductivity in the biostimulated columns were coincident with peaks in the microbial cell concentrations extracted from sands. However, the real conductivity component showed no discernible relationship to microbial cell concentration. We suggest that the observed dynamic changes in the imaginary conductivity (σ″) arise from the growth and attachment of microbial cells and biofilms to sand surfaces. We conclude that complex conductivity techniques, specifically imaginary conductivity measurements are a proxy indicator for microbial growth and biofilm formation in porous media. Our results have implications for microbial enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, bioremediation, and astrobiology studies.

  8. Unique behaviour of dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complexes bearing pincer ligand towards catalytic formation of ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Arashiba, Kazuya; Kuriyama, Shogo; Sasada, Akira; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    It is vital to design effective nitrogen fixation systems that operate under mild conditions, and to this end we recently reported an example of the catalytic formation of ammonia using a dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complex bearing a pincer ligand, where up to twenty three equivalents of ammonia were produced based on the catalyst. Here we study the origin of the catalytic behaviour of the dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complex bearing the pincer ligand with density functional theory calculations, based on stoichiometric and catalytic formation of ammonia from molecular dinitrogen under ambient conditions. Comparison of di- and mono-molybdenum systems shows that the dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum core structure plays a critical role in the protonation of the coordinated molecular dinitrogen in the catalytic cycle. PMID:24769530

  9. Factor Xa dimerization competes with prothrombinase complex formation on platelet-like membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koklic, Tilen; Chattopadhyay, Rima; Majumder, Rinku; Lentz, Barry R

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) molecules on activated platelet membrane surface is a crucial event in blood coagulation. Binding of PS to specific sites on factor Xa (fXa) and factor Va (fVa) promotes their assembly into a complex that enhances proteolysis of prothrombin by approximately 10⁵. Recent studies demonstrate that both soluble PS and PS-containing model membranes promote formation of inactive fXa dimers at 5 mM Ca²⁺. In the present study, we show how competition between fXa dimerization and prothrombinase formation depends on Ca²⁺ and lipid membrane concentrations. We used homo-FRET measurements between fluorescein-E-G-R-chloromethylketone (CK)-Xa [fXa irreversibly inactivated by alkylation of the active site histidine residue with FEGR (FEGR-fXa)] and prothrombinase activity measurements to reveal the balance between fXa dimer formation and fXa-fVa complex formation. Changes in FEGR-fXa dimer homo-FRET with addition of fVa to model-membrane-bound FEGR-fXa unambiguously demonstrated that formation of the FEGR-fXa-fVa complex dissociated the dimer. Quantitative global analysis according to a model for protein interaction equilibria on a surface provided an estimate of a surface constant for fXa dimer dissociation (K(fXa×fXa)(d, σ)) approximately 10-fold lower than K(fXa×fVa)(d,σ) for fXa-fVa complex. Experiments performed using activated platelet-derived microparticles (MPs) showed that competition between fXa dimerization and fXa-fVa complex formation was even more prominent on MPs. In summary, at Ca²⁺ concentrations found in the maturing platelet plug (2-5 mM), fVa can compete fXa off of inactive fXa dimers to significantly amplify thrombin production, both because it releases dimer inhibition and because of its well-known cofactor activity. This suggests a hitherto unanticipated mechanism by which PS-exposing platelet membranes can regulate amplification and propagation of blood coagulation. PMID:25572019

  10. Electron Bihole Complex Formation in Neutralization of Ne{sup +} on LiF(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Khemliche, H.; Villette, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Momeni, A.; Roncin, P.

    2001-06-18

    Neutralization of low keV Ne{sup +} ions at a LiF(001) surface is studied in a grazing incidence geometry. The combination of energy loss and electron spectroscopy in coincidence reveals two neutralization channels of comparable importance. Besides the Auger process, the Ne{sup +} neutralization can proceed via peculiar target excitation, corresponding to the formation of an electron bihole complex termed trion.

  11. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, R. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Bazanov, M. I.; Semeikin, A. S.

    2009-05-01

    The energy of combustion of cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin was determined in an isothermic-shell liquid calorimeter with a stationary calorimetric bomb. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of the complex were calculated, -Δ c H o = 27334.06 ± 50.98 kJ/mol and Δf H o = 3062.90 ± 50.97 kJ/mol.

  12. DNA strand exchange stimulated by spontaneous complex formation with cationic comb-type copolymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Jong; Akaike, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2002-10-30

    Cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) composed of a polycation backbone and water-soluble side chains accelerate by 4-5 orders the DNA strand exchange reaction (SER) between double helical DNA and its homologous single-strand DNA. The accelerating effect is considered due to alleviation of counterion association during transitional intermediate formation in sequential displacement pathway. CCCs stabilize not only matured hybrids but also the nucleation complex to accelerate hybridization. PMID:12392411

  13. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2–59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  14. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2-59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  15. Display format and highlight validity effects on search performance using complex visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Mckay, Tim; O'Brien, Kevin M.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    Display format and highlight validity were shown to affect visual display search performance; however, these studies were conducted on small, artificial displays of alphanumeric stimuli. A study manipulating these variables was conducted using realistic, complex Space Shuttle information displays. A 2x2x3 within-subjects analysis of variance found that search times were faster for items in reformatted displays than for current displays. The significant format by highlight validity interaction showed that there was little difference in response time to both current and reformatted displays when the highlight validity was applied; however, under the non or invalid highlight conditions, search times were faster with reformatted displays. Benefits of highlighting and reformatting displays to enhance search and the necessity to consider highlight validity and format characteristics in tandem for predicting search performance are discussed.

  16. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Tribello, Gareth A; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-07-01

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed. PMID:27269363

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  18. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed. PMID:27269363

  19. ESI formation of a Meisenheimer complex from tetryl and its unusual dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Cécile; Dossmann, Héloïse; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-03-01

    The reactivity of the explosive tetryl (N-methyl-N,2,4,6-tetranitroaniline; Mw = 287 u) was studied using electrospray ionization in negative mode. The main species detected in the spectrum corresponds to the ion observed at m/z 318 (previously assumed to be the odd-electron ion [tetryl + HNO](-•), C7H6O9N6). In this study, we show using D-labeling combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry that this species corresponds to an even-electron anion (i.e. C8H8O9N5), resulting from the formation of a Meisenheimer complex between tetryl and the methanol used as the solvent. Fragmentation of this complex under CID conditions revealed an unexpected fragment: the formation of a 2,4,6-trinitrophenoxide anion at m/z 228. (18)O-labeling combined with quantum chemical calculations helped us better understand the reaction pathways and mechanisms involved in the formation of this product ion. This occurs via a transition state leading to a SN2-type reaction, consequently evolving toward an ion-dipole complex. The latter finally dissociates into deprotonated picric acid. PMID:23494785

  20. Novel checkpoint response to genotoxic stress mediated by nucleolin-replication protein a complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung; Dimitrova, Diana D; Carta, Kristine M; Saxena, Anjana; Daras, Mariza; Borowiec, James A

    2005-03-01

    Human replication protein A (RPA), the primary single-stranded DNA-binding protein, was previously found to be inhibited after heat shock by complex formation with nucleolin. Here we show that nucleolin-RPA complex formation is stimulated after genotoxic stresses such as treatment with camptothecin or exposure to ionizing radiation. Complex formation in vitro and in vivo requires a 63-residue glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) domain located at the extreme C terminus of nucleolin, with this domain sufficient to inhibit DNA replication in vitro. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies demonstrate that the nucleolin-RPA interaction after stress occurs both in the nucleoplasm and in the nucleolus. Expression of the GAR domain or a nucleolin mutant (TM) with a constitutive interaction with RPA is sufficient to inhibit entry into S phase. Increasing cellular RPA levels by overexpression of the RPA2 subunit minimizes the inhibitory effects of nucleolin GAR or TM expression on chromosomal DNA replication. The arrest is independent of p53 activation by ATM or ATR and does not involve heightened expression of p21. Our data reveal a novel cellular mechanism that represses genomic replication in response to genotoxic stress by inhibition of an essential DNA replication factor. PMID:15743838

  1. The LINC complex component Sun4 plays a crucial role in sperm head formation and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Elisabeth; Link, Jana; Beck, Carolin; Scheuerle, Stefanie; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT LINC complexes are evolutionarily conserved nuclear envelope bridges, physically connecting the nucleus to the peripheral cytoskeleton. They are pivotal for dynamic cellular and developmental processes, like nuclear migration, anchoring and positioning, meiotic chromosome movements and maintenance of cell polarity and nuclear shape. Active nuclear reshaping is a hallmark of mammalian sperm development and, by transducing cytoskeletal forces to the nuclear envelope, LINC complexes could be vital for sperm head formation as well. We here analyzed in detail the behavior and function of Sun4, a bona fide testis-specific LINC component. We demonstrate that Sun4 is solely expressed in spermatids and there localizes to the posterior nuclear envelope, likely interacting with Sun3/Nesprin1 LINC components. Our study revealed that Sun4 deficiency severely impacts the nucleocytoplasmic junction, leads to mislocalization of other LINC components and interferes with the formation of the microtubule manchette, which finally culminates in a globozoospermia-like phenotype. Together, our study provides direct evidence for a critical role of LINC complexes in mammalian sperm head formation and male fertility. PMID:26621829

  2. Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.; Gerbeleu, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in solution has been studied spectrophotometrically in the pH range 4-10. Stepwise formation of three types of complexes, with composition NpO/sub 2/HA, NpO/sub 2/A/sup -/, and NpOHA/sup 2 -/, has been demonstrated with salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L) and salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q) at t = 25 +/- 1/sup 0/C and ..mu.. = 0.05. The logarithmic stability constants of the first two complexes are 5.14 +/- 0.06, 11.85 +/- 0.04 and 8.42 +/- 0.09, 13.33 +/- 0.015 for H/sub 2/L and H/sub 2/Q, respectively; equilibrium constants for the formation of hydroxo complexes of the form NpO/sub 2/OHL/sup 2 -/ and NpO/sub 2/OHQ/sup 2 -/ were also determined, and found to be equal to (2.23 +/-0.37) x 10/sup -5/ and (5.02 +/- 0.9) x 10/sup -5/, respectively. In the case of S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide (H/sub 2/Z), only one type of complex is formed under these experimental conditions, namely, NpO/sub 2/Z/sup -/, with a logarithmic stability constant of 4.78 +/- 0.03. Dissociation constants for H/sub 2/Q and H/sub 2/Z were also determined.

  3. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  4. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules during Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  5. Disruption of PF4/H multimolecular complex formation with a minimally anticoagulant heparin (ODSH)

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Manali V.; Quintana Diez, Pedro M.; Marcus, Stephen; Qi, Rui; Espinasse, Benjamin; Wiesner, Mark R.; Pempe, Elizabeth; Liu, Jian; Monroe, Dougald M.; Arepally, Gowthami M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have shown that ultra-large complexes (ULCs) of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and heparin (H) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT), an immune-mediated disorder caused by PF4/H antibodies. Because antigenic PF4/H ULCs assemble through non-specific electrostatic interactions, we reasoned that disruption of charge-based interactions can modulate the immune response to antigen. We tested a minimally anticoagulant compound (2-O, 3-O desulfated heparin or ODSH) with preserved charge to disrupt PF4/H complex formation and immunogenicity. We show that ODSH disrupts complexes when added to pre-formed PF4/H ULCs and prevents ULC formation when incubated simultaneously with PF4 and UFH. In other studies, we show that excess ODSH reduces HIT antibody (Ab) binding in immunoassays and that PF4/ODSH complexes do not cross-react with HIT Abs. When ODSH and UFH are mixed at equimolar concentrations, we show that there is a negligible effect on amount of protamine required for heparin neutralization and reduced immunogenicity of PF4/UFH in the presence of ODSH. Taken together, these studies suggest that ODSH can be used concurrently with UFH to disrupt PF4/H charge interactions and provides a novel strategy to reduce antibody mediated complications in HIT. PMID:22318669

  6. Structure formation in metal complex/polymer hybrid nanomaterials prepared by miniemulsion.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Christoph P; Jagielski, Nicole; Heller, Jeannine; Hinderberger, Dariush; Spiess, Hans W; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Weiss, Clemens K; Landfester, Katharina

    2011-11-01

    Polymer/complex hybrid nanostructures were prepared using a variety of hydrophobic metal β-diketonato complexes. The mechanism of structure formation was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in the liquid phase. Structure formation is attributed to an interaction between free coordination sites of metal β-diketonato complexes and coordinating anionic surfactants. Lamellar structures are already present in the miniemulsion. By subsequent polymerization the lamellae can be embedded in a great variety of different polymeric matrices. The morphology of the lamellar structures, as elucidated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), can be controlled by the choice of anionic surfactant. Using sodium alkylsulfates and sodium dodecylphosphate, "nano-onions" are formed, while sodium carboxylates lead to "kebab-like" structures. The composition of the hybrid nanostructures can be described as bilayer lamellae, embedded in a polymeric matrix. The metal complexes are separated by surfactant molecules which are arranged tail-to-tail; by increasing the carbon chain length of the surfactant the layer distance of the structured nanomaterial can be adjusted between 2 and 5 nm. PMID:21977909

  7. Formation and fate of a complete 31-protein RNA polymerase II transcription preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenji; Calero, Guillermo; Brown, Christopher R; Liu, Xin; Davis, Ralph E; Boeger, Hinrich; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-03-01

    Whereas individual RNA polymerase II (pol II)-general transcription factor (GTF) complexes are unstable, an assembly of pol II with six GTFs and promoter DNA could be isolated in abundant homogeneous form. The resulting complete pol II transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) contained equimolar amounts of all 31 protein components. An intermediate in assembly, consisting of four GTFs and promoter DNA, could be isolated and supplemented with the remaining components for formation of the PIC. Nuclease digestion and psoralen cross-linking mapped the PIC between positions -70 and -9, centered on the TATA box. Addition of ATP to the PIC resulted in quantitative conversion to an open complex, which retained all 31 proteins, contrary to expectation from previous studies. Addition of the remaining NTPs resulted in run-off transcription, with an efficiency that was promoter-dependent and was as great as 17.5% with the promoters tested. PMID:23303183

  8. Mössbauer study of peroxynitrito complex formation with FeIII-chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homonnay, Zoltan; Buszlai, Peter; Nádor, Judit; Sharma, Virender K.; Kuzmann, Erno; Vértes, Attila

    2012-03-01

    The reaction of the μ-oxo-diiron(III)-L complex (L = EDTA, ethylene diamine tetraacetate, HEDTA, hydroxyethyl ethylene diamine triacetate, and CyDTA, cyclohexane diamine tetraacetate) with peroxynitrite in alkaline solution was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using rapid-freezing technique. These complexes yield an (L)FeIII( η 2-O2)^{3-} complex ion when they react with hydrogen peroxide and the formation of the peroxide adduct results in a deep purple coloration of the solution. The same color appears when the reaction occurs with peroxinitrite. Although spectrophotometry indicated some difference between the molar extinction coefficients of the peroxo and the peroxinitrito adducts, the Mössbauer parameters proved to be the same within experimental error. It is concluded that the peroxynitrite ion decomposes when reacting with FeIII(L) and the peroxo adduct forms.

  9. Effects of Adhesion Dynamics and Substrate Compliance on the Shape and Motility of Crawling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling of eukaryotic cells moving on substrates is an extraordinarily complex task: many physical processes, such as actin polymerization, action of motors, formation of adhesive contacts concomitant with both substrate deformation and recruitment of actin etc., as well as regulatory pathways are intertwined. Moreover, highly nontrivial cell responses emerge when the substrate becomes deformable and/or heterogeneous. Here we extended a computational model for motile cell fragments, based on an earlier developed phase field approach, to account for explicit dynamics of adhesion site formation, as well as for substrate compliance via an effective elastic spring. Our model displays steady motion vs. stick-slip transitions with concomitant shape oscillations as a function of the actin protrusion rate, the substrate stiffness, and the rates of adhesion. Implementing a step in the substrate’s elastic modulus, as well as periodic patterned surfaces exemplified by alternating stripes of high and low adhesiveness, we were able to reproduce the correct motility modes and shape phenomenology found experimentally. We also predict the following nontrivial behavior: the direction of motion of cells can switch from parallel to perpendicular to the stripes as a function of both the adhesion strength and the width ratio of adhesive to non-adhesive stripes. PMID:23741334

  10. Extended Maxwell Garnett formalism for composite adhesives for microwave-assisted adhesion of polymer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, B.; Lakhtakia, A. )

    1993-01-01

    Adhesives with dielectric loss are needed for microwave-assisted joining of polymeric substances. The dielectric loss in an otherwise suitable adhesive may be enhanced by doping it with fine metallic particles. Here we use a recently extended Maxwell Garnett formalism to estimate the complex dielectric constant of a metal-doped composite adhesive, with specific focus on the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the composite adhesive. 14 refs.

  11. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  12. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  13. Linear free energy relationship rate constants and basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in positronium-glycine complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongti; Liang, Jiachang; Du, Youming; Cao, Chun; Yin, Dinzhen; Wang, Shuying; Zhang, Tianbao

    1987-06-01

    Complex formation between positronium and glycine derivatives in solution is discussed and the complex reaction rate constants obtained by means of a positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer with BaF 2 detectors. Rate constants mainly depend on the conjugation effect at the benzene ring and the induction effect of the substituents at the phenyl. There is a linear free energy relationship between rate constants and basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in orthopositronium-glycine complex formation.

  14. Structural Complexities Influencing Biostratigraphic Interpretations of the Permian Nansen Formation type-section, Ellesmere Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M.; Guest, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Carboniferous to Permian aged Nansen Formation is a cyclic carbonate shelf deposit and potential hydrocarbon reservoir. This formation is the thickest, most widespread carbonate sequence in the Sverdrup Basin. Deformed during the Eurekan Orogeny, the Nansen Fm. is topographically prominent and responsible for the rugged topography on Axel Heiburg and Ellesmere Island. The type-section for the Nansen Fm. is located on the north side of Hare Fiord, along Girty Creek. At this location there is an estimated stratigraphic thickness of 2 km. Due to easier access most of the stratigraphic work has been completed on nearby glacially exposed sections that traverse parallel to Girty Creek along glacial margins. Extensive biostratigraphy was completed on a glacier section to the west, however, in a glacier section to the east of Girty Creek, structural complexities appear to be repeating sections of the formation. Here, the Nansen formation is bounded by two regional reverse faults. This has produced duplex structures, with clearly exposed stacked horses, footwall synclines, and truncations. By projecting the structures observed along the eastern glacier section to the western glacier section that was used for biostratigraphic studies, it is clear that these structures would affect biostratigraphic interpretations. It was previously noted by biostratigraphers that thrust faults appear to be repeating sections of the Nansen formation. However by correlating all observed faults with the biostratigraphy, we can determine the extent to which the faulting has affected the interpretations, and whether all faults or stratigraphic repetitions are accounted for.

  15. Influence of Substrate Complexity on the Diastereoselective Formation of Spiroiminodihydantoin and Guanidinohydantoin from Chromate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Gremaud, Julia N.; Martin, Brooke D.; Sugden, Kent D.

    2009-01-01

    Chromate is a human carcinogen with a poorly defined mechanism of DNA damage. In vitro and prokaryotic studies have shown that DNA damage may occur via the formation of the hydantoin lesions guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) from further oxidation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG). The unusual structure of these lesions coupled with their enhanced mutagenicity make them attractive for study with regard to their role in chromate-induced cancer. We have studied the formation of Gh versus Sp and their associated diastereomers following oxidation by model Cr(V) complexes and from in situ chromate reduction by ascorbate and glutathione. Identification of the two optically assigned diastereomers of Sp (R-Sp, S-Sp) as well as the two diastereomers of Gh, (Gh1 and Gh2; not yet optically assigned) were carried out using increasingly sterically hindered substrates (nucleoside → ssDNA → dsDNA). Lesion formation and diastereomeric preference was found to be highly oxidant- and substrate-dependent. The Ir(IV) positive control showed a shift from near equal levels of Gh and Sp, and near equal levels of all four diastereomers in the nucleoside, to all Gh formation in dsDNA, with a 5-fold enhancement in Gh2 over Gh1. The two model Cr(V) complexes used in this study, Cr(V)-salen and Cr(V)-ehba, showed opposite trends going from nucleoside to dsDNA with Cr(V)-salen giving enhanced Sp formation (with mainly R-Sp formed) and the Cr(V)-ehba having an oxidation profile nearly identical to that of Ir(IV). The two chromate reduction systems, Cr6+/ascorbate and Cr6+/glutathione, designed to model the intracellular reduction of chromate, showed lower levels of oxidation in all substrates. Notable in this group was the shift in the formation of the lesions to essentially all Sp for the Cr6+/ascorbate system with the most sterically hindered substrate, dsDNA. These results, when coupled with the known diastereomeric preference for excision of hydantoin lesions by

  16. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  17. Molybdenum Hydride and Dihydride Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with a Pendant Amine: Formation of Complexes With Bound Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-07-06

    CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes (PNP = (R2PCH2)2NMe, R = Et or Ph) were synthesized by displacement of two CO ligands of CpMo(CO)3H by the PNP ligand; these complexes were characterized by IR and variable temperature 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes are formed as mixture of cis and trans-isomers. Both cis-CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and trans-CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical oxidation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H in CH3CN are both irreversible at slow scan rates and quasi-reversible at higher scan rates, with E1/2 = -0.36 V (vs. Cp2Fe+/0) for CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and E1/2 = -0.18 V for CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H. Hydride abstraction from CpMo(CO)(PNP)H with [Ph3C]+[A]- (A = B(C6F5)4 or BArF4; [ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]) afforded “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes that feature the amine bound to the metal. Displacement of the κ3 Mo-N bond by CD3CN gives [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(CD3CN)]+. The kinetics of this reaction were studied by NMR spectroscopy, providing the activation parameters ΔH‡ = 22.1 kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = 1.89 cal/(mol·K), Ea = 22.7 kcal/mol. Protonation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H affords [CpMo(CO)(κ2-PEtNMePEt)(H)2]+ as a Mo dihydride complex, which loses H2 to generate [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PEtNMePEt)]+ at room temperature. CpMo(CO)(dppp)H (dppp = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) was studied as a Mo diphosphine analogue without a pendant amine, and the product of protonation of this complex gives [CpMo(CO)(dppp)(H)2]+. Our results show that the pendant amine has a strong driving force to form stable “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes, and also promotes hydrogen elimination from [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(H)2]+ complexes by formation of Mo-N dative bond. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by

  18. In vivo dynamics of chromatin-associated complex formation in mammalian nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Martijn J.; Bernas, Tytus; Dinant, Christoffel; Goedvree, Feliks A.; Manders, Erik M. M.; Volker, Marcel; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel

    2004-01-01

    Chromatin is the substrate for many processes in the cell nucleus, including transcription, replication, and various DNA repair systems, all of which require the formation of multiprotein machineries on the chromatin fiber. We have analyzed the kinetics of in vivo assembly of the protein complex that is responsible for nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Assembly is initiated by UV irradiation of a small area of the cell nucleus, after which the accumulation of GFP-tagged NER proteins in the DNA-damaged area is measured, reflecting the establishment of the dual-incision complex. The dynamic behavior of two NER proteins, ERCC1-XPF and TFIIH, was studied in detail. Results show that the repair complex is assembled with a rate of ≈30 complexes per second and is not diffusion limited. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence that not only binding of TFIIH, but also its helicase activity, is required for the recruitment of ERCC1-XPF. These studies give quantitative insight into the de novo assembly of a chromatin-associated protein complex in living cells. PMID:15520397

  19. Spectrophotometric and AAS determination of ramipril and enalapril through ternary complex formation.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Magda M; Shalaby, Abdalla A; Abdellatef, Hisham E; Hosny, Mervat M

    2002-04-15

    Two sensitive, spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures are developed for the determination of two antihypertensive agents (enalapril maleate and ramipril). The spectrophotometric procedures for the two cited drugs are based on ternary complex formation. The first ternary complex (copper(II), eosin, and enalapril) was estimated by two methods; the first depends on its extraction with chloroform measuring at 533.4 nm. Beer's law was obeyed in concentration range from 56 to 112 microg ml(-1). The second method for the same complex depends on its direct measurement after addition of methylcellulose as surfactant at the pH value 5 at 558.8 nm. The concentration range is from 19 to 32 microg ml(-1). The second ternary complex (iron(III), thiocyanate, and ramipril) was extracted with methylene chloride, measuring at 436.6 nm, with a concentration range 60-132 microg ml(-1). The direct atomic absorption spectrometric method through the quantitative determination of copper or iron content of the complex was also investigated for the purpose of enhancing the sensitivity of the determination. The spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures hold their accuracy and precision well when applied to the determination of ramipril and enalapril dosage forms. PMID:11929674

  20. Revised nomenclature and stratigraphic relationships of the Fredericksburg Complex and Quantico Formation of the Virginia Piedmont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlides, Louis

    1980-01-01

    The Fredericksburg Complex, in part a migmatitic terrane in northeast Virginia, is subdivided on the basis of lithology, as well as aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data, into two metamorphic suites. These suites are separated by the northeast-trending Spotsylvania lineament, a rectilinear geophysical feature that is probably the trace of an old fault zone. East of the lineament, the Po River Metamorphic Suite, of Proterozoic Z and (or) early Paleozoic age, consists dominantly of biotite gneiss, generally augen gneiss, and lesser amounts of hornblende gneiss and mica schist. West of the Spotsylvania lineament is the Ta River Metamorphic Suite, composed mostly of amphibolite and amphibole gneiss. However, to the southwest, along its strike belt, the Ta River contains abundant biotite gneiss and mica schist. Both the Ta River and Po River contain abundant foliated granitoid and pegmatoid bodies as concordant tabular masses and as crosscutting dikes; these rocks are considered part of the Ta River and Po River Metamorphic Suites. The amphibolitic Holly Corner Gneiss is interpreted to be a western allochthonous equivalent of the Ta River. Both the Ta River and Holly Corner are considered to be coeval, eastern, distal facies of the Lower Cambrian(?) Chopawamsic Formation. The Paleozoic Falls Run Granite Gneiss intrudes the Ta River Metamorphic Suite and the Holly Corner Gneiss; locally the Falls Run is interpreted to have been transported westward with the Holly Corner after intrusion. The Quantico Formation, in the core of the Quantico-Columbia synclinorium, rests with angular unconformity along its northwest and southeast limbs, respectively, on the Chopawamsic Formation and the Ta River Metamorphic Suite. The Quantico Formation is assigned the same Late Ordovician age and similar stratigraphic position as the Arvonia Slate of the Arvonia syncline. The youngest rocks of the area are the granitoid and pegmatoid bodies of the Falmouth Intrusive Suite. They consist of

  1. Maturation of suprathreshold auditory nerve activity involves cochlear CGRP-receptor complex formation.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Ian M; Bussey-Gaborski, Rhiannon; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Luebke, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    In adult animals, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is contained in cochlear efferent fibers projecting out to the cochlea, and contributes to increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity in the adult auditory nerve. Similarly, CGRP applied to the lateral-line organ (hair cell organ) increases afferent nerve activity in adult frogs (post-metamorphic day 30), yet this increase is developmentally delayed from post-metamorphic day 4-30. In this study, we discovered that there was also a developmental delay in increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity auditory nerve between juvenile and adult mice similar to what had been observed previously in frog. Moreover, juvenile mice with a targeted deletion of the αCGRP gene [CGRP null (-/-)] did not show a similar developmental increase in nerve activity, suggesting CGRP signaling is involved. This developmental delay is not due to a delay in CGRP expression, but instead is due to a delay in receptor formation. We observed that the increase in sound-evoked nerve activity is correlated with increased formation of cochlear CGRP receptors, which require three complexed proteins (CLR, RAMP1, RCP) to be functional. CGRP receptor formation in the cochlea was incomplete at 1 month of age (juvenile), but complete by 3 months (adult), which corresponded to the onset of suprathreshold enhancement of sound-evoked activity in wild-type animals. Taken together, these data support a model for cochlear function that is enhanced by maturation of CGRP receptor complexes. PMID:27440744

  2. Carbon Dioxide Influence on the Thermal Formation of Complex Organic Molecules in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Duvernay, F.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Chiavassa, T.; Cottin, H.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H2O, NH3, CO2, H2CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. Formation of host-guest complexes of β-cyclodextrin and perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Karoyo, Abdalla H; Borisov, Alex S; Wilson, Lee D; Hazendonk, Paul

    2011-08-11

    Structural characterization and dynamic properties of solid-state inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were investigated by (19)F/(13)C solid-state and (19)F/(1)H solution NMR spectroscopy. The complexes in the solid state were prepared using dissolution and slow cool methods, where thermal analyses (DSC and TGA), PXRD, and FT-IR results provided complementary support that inclusion complexes were formed between β-CD and PFOA with variable stoichiometry and inclusion geometry. (19)F DP (direct polarization) and (13)C CP (cross-polarization) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) solids NMR, along with (19)F/(1)H solution NMR were used to characterize the complexes in the solid and solution phases, respectively. The dynamics of the guest molecules in the inclusion complexes (ICs) were studied using variable temperature (VT) (19)F DP/MAS NMR experiments in the solid state. The guest molecules were observed to be in several different molecular environments, providing strong evidence of variable host-guest stoichiometry and inclusion geometry, in accordance with the preparation method of the complex and the conformational preference of PFOA. It was concluded from PXRD that β-CD and PFOA form inclusion complexes with "channel-type" structures. Variable spin rate (VSR) (19)F DP/MAS NMR was used to assess the phase purity of the complexes, and it was revealed that slow cooling resulted in relatively pure phases. In the solution state, (1)H and (19)F NMR complexation-induced chemical shifts (CISs) of β-CD and PFOA, respectively, provided strong support for the formation of 1:1 and 2:1 β-CD/PFOA inclusion complexes. The dynamics of the guest molecule in the β-CD/PFOA complexes in D(2)O solutions were probed using VT (19)F NMR and revealed some guest conformational and exchange dynamics as a function of temperature and the relative concentrations of the host and guest. PMID:21688796

  4. Model of formation of the Khibiny-Lovozero ore-bearing volcanic-plutonic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzamastsev, A. A.; Arzamastseva, L. V.; Zhirova, A. M.; Glaznev, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the large Paleozoic ore-magmatic system in the northeastern Fennoscandian Shield comprising the Khibiny and Lovozero plutons, the Kurga intrusion, volcanic rocks, and numerous alkaline dike swarms. As follows from the results of deep drilling and 3D geophysical simulation, large bodies of rocks pertaining to the ultramafic alkaline complex occur at the lower level of the ore-magmatic system. Peridotite, pyroxenite, melilitolite, melteigite, and ijolite occupy more than 50 vol % of the volcanic-plutonic complex within the upper 15 km accessible to gravity exploration. The proposed model represents the ore-magmatic system as a conjugate network of mantle magmatic sources localized at different depth levels and periodically supplying the melts belonging to the two autonomous groups: (1) ultramafic alkaline rocks with carbonatites and (2) alkali syenites-peralkaline syenites, which were formed synchronously having a common system of outlet conduits. With allowance for the available isotopic datings and new geochronological evidence, the duration of complex formation beginning from supply of the first batches of melt into calderas and up to postmagmatic events, expressed in formation of late pegmatoids, was no less than 25 Ma.

  5. Complex formation of Am(III) and Am(IV) with phosphate ions in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    The first dissociation constant of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile solution (K/sub 1//sup 0/ = 1.75/centered dot/10/sup /minus/13/) and the constant of formation of H(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup /minus// dimers (K/sub d//sup 0/ = 8/centered dot/10/sup 2/) were determined by the method of pH-potentiometry. The complex formation of Am(III) in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.05-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was investigated by a spectrophotometric method; the stability constants of the complexes AmH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2+/ (/beta//sub 1//sup III/ = 1.0/centered dot/10/sup 12/) and Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/ (/beta//sub 2//sup III/ = 4.3/centered dot/10/sup 24/) were determined. The formal potentials of the couple Am/sup (IV)//Am/sup (III)/ in 0.3-1.9 M solutions of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile were measured, and the stability constant of the phosphate complex of tetravalent americium Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 3//sup +/ (/beta//sub 3//sup IV/ = 2.5/centered dot/10/sup 46/) was calculated according to the value of the shift of the potential relative to the standard.

  6. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:26869299

  7. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  8. Selective repression of light harvesting complex 2 formation in Rhodobacter azotoformans by light under semiaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huiying; Zhao, Chungui; Li, Kai; Yang, Suping

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem formation in anaerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (APB) is repressed by oxygen but is de-repressed when oxygen tension decreases. Under semiaerobic conditions, the synthesis of photopigments and pigment protein complexes in Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides are repressed by light. AppA, a blue-light receptor, mediates this regulation. In the present study, it was showed that the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll, carotenoid, and pigment protein complexes in Rba. azotoformans 134K20 was significantly repressed by oxygen. Oxygen exposure also led to a conversion of spheroidene to spheroidenone. In semiaerobically growing cells, light irradiation resulted in a decrease in the formation of photosystem, and blue light was found to be the most effective light source. Blue light reduced the contents of bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid slightly, but had negligible effects on light harvesting complex (LH) 1 content, whereas the content of LH2 was significantly decreased indicating that blue light selectively repressed the synthesis of LH2 in semiaerobically growing 134K20. It was concluded that, similar to Rba. sphaeroides, a blue light receptor presented in strain 134K20 played important roles in its light-dependent repression. A possible mechanism involved in controlling the differential inhibitory of blue light on the synthesis of photosystem was discussed. PMID:26193456

  9. Drop formation, pinch-off dynamics and liquid transfer of simple and complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinic, Jelena; Sharma, Vivek

    Liquid transfer and drop formation processes underlying jetting, spraying, coating, and printing - inkjet, screen, roller-coating, gravure, nanoimprint hot embossing, 3D - often involve formation of unstable columnar necks. Capillary-driven thinning of such necks and their pinchoff dynamics are determined by a complex interplay of inertial, viscous and capillary stresses for simple, Newtonian fluids. Micro-structural changes in response to extensional flow field that arises within the thinning neck give rise to additional viscoelastic stresses in complex, non- Newtonian fluids. Using FLOW-3D, we simulate flows realized in prototypical geometries (dripping and liquid bridge stretched between two parallel plates) used for studying pinch-off dynamics and influence of microstructure and viscoelasticity. In contrast with often-used 1D or 2D models, FLOW-3D allows a robust evaluation of the magnitude of the underlying stresses and extensional flow field (both uniformity and magnitude). We find that the simulated radius evolution profiles match the pinch-off dynamics that are experimentally-observed and theoretically-predicted for model Newtonian fluids and complex fluids.

  10. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss. PMID:25906363

  11. Influence of structural features of carrageenan on the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Volod'ko, A V; Davydova, V N; Glazunov, V P; Likhatskaya, G N; Yermak, I M

    2016-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) of carrageenans (CG)-κ-, κ/β-, λ-and x-CG with chitosan were obtained. The formation of PEC was detected by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and by centrifugation in a Percoll gradient. The influence of the structural peculiarities of CG on its interaction with chitosan was studied. The results of centrifugation showed that x-CG with a high degree of sulphation (SD) was completely bound to chitosan, unlike low SD κ-CG and κ/β-CG. Binding constant values showed there was a high affinity of CG for chitosan. CG with flexible macromolecule conformation and high SD exhibited the greatest binding affinity for chitosan. The full-atomic 3D-structures of the PEC κ-CG: chitosan in solution have been obtained by the experiments in silico for the first time. The amino groups of chitosan make the largest contribution to the energy of the complex formation by means of hydrogen and ionic bonds. The most probable complexes have stoichiometries of 1:1 and 1:1.5. PMID:26712704

  12. Implication of complex vertebral malformation and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency DNA-based testing on disease frequency in the Holstein population.

    PubMed

    Schütz, E; Scharfenstein, M; Brenig, B

    2008-12-01

    Two inherited lethal disorders, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and complex vertebral malformation (CVM), play a major role in breeding of Holstein cattle. Both inherited diseases are based on single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been known for 12 and 7 yr, respectively. A total of 25,753 cattle were genotyped for BLAD (18,200 tests) and CVM (14,493 tests) in our laboratory since the beginning of the genotyping programs for these diseases. Based on founder effects, the CVM mutation is thought to be linked to milk production. The BLAD was genotyped using RFLP until 2001; then a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay on a LightCycler was used, as for CVM genotyping. By using single nucleotide polymorphism-aided breeding, the allelic frequency of the BLAD and CVM mutations in the active sire population was reduced from 9.4% in 1997 to 0.3% in 2007 (BLAD) and from 8.3% in 2002 to 2.3% in 2007 (CVM), with calculated half-life of the mutant allele of 2.1 yr for BLAD and 3.6 yr for CVM. An observed increase of BLAD frequency in 1999 could be attributed to the massive use of a BLAD-positive sire tested falsely negative in another laboratory. These data show that marker-assisted selection is capable of substantially reducing the frequency of a mutation within a period of not more than 5 yr. The different selection strategies against the lethal recessive allele in CVM and BLAD are reflected in the different reduction rates of the specific allele frequencies. PMID:19038961

  13. Screening for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase, complex vertebral malformation, bovine citrullinaemia, and factor XI deficiency in Holstein cows reared in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), complex vertebral malformation (CVM), bovine citrullinaemia (BC) and factor XI deficiency (FXID) are autosomal recessive hereditary disorders, which have had significant economic impact on dairy cattle breeding worldwide. In this study, 350 Holstein cows reared in Turkey were screened for BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID genotypes to obtain an indication on the importance of these defects in Turkish Holsteins. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained from blood and the amplicons of BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID were obtained by using PCR. PCR products were digested with TaqI, AvaI and AvaII restriction enzymes for BLAD, DUMPS, and BC, respectively. These digested products and PCR product of FXID were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis stained with ethidium bromide. CVM genotypes were detected by DNA sequencing. Additionally, all genotypes were confirmed by DNA sequencing to determine whether there was a mutant allele or not. Results Fourteen BLAD, twelve CVM and four FXID carriers were found among the 350 Holstein cows examined, while carriers of DUMPS and BC were not detected. The mutant allele frequencies were calculated as 0.02, 0.017, and 0.006 for BLAD, CVM and FXID, respectively with corresponding carrier prevalence of 4.0% (BLAD), 3.4% (CVM) and 1.2% (FXID). Conclusion This study demonstrates that carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are present in the Turkish Holstein population, although at a low frequency. The actual number of clinical cases is unknown, but sporadic cases may appear. As artificial insemination is widely used in dairy cattle breeding, carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are likely present within the population of breeding sires. It is recommended to screen breeding sires for these defective genes in order to avoid an unwanted spread within the population. PMID:20929557

  14. The C. elegans EMAP-like protein, ELP-1 is required for touch sensation and associates with microtubules and adhesion complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hueston, Jennifer L; Herren, Gina Purinton; Cueva, Juan G; Buechner, Matthew; Lundquist, Erik A; Goodman, Miriam B; Suprenant, Kathy A

    2008-01-01

    Background The founding member of the EMAP-like protein family is the Echinoderm Microtubule-Associated Protein (EMAP), so-named for its abundance in sea urchin, starfish, and sand dollar eggs. The EMAP-like protein family has five members in mammals (EML1 through EML5) and only one in both Drosophila (ELP-1) and C. elegans (ELP-1). Biochemical studies of sea urchin EMAP and vertebrate EMLs implicate these proteins in the regulation of microtubule stability. So far, however, the physiological function of this protein family remains unknown. Results We examined the expression pattern of C. elegans ELP-1 by means of transgenic gene expression in living embryos and adults, and by immunolocalization with an ELP-1-specific antibody in fixed tissues. In embryos, ELP-1 is expressed in the hypodermis. In larvae and adults, ELP-1 is expressed in the body wall, spermatheca and vulval muscles, intestine, and hypodermal seam cells. In muscle, ELP-1 is associated with adhesion complexes near the cell surface and is bound to a criss-crossing network of microtubules in the cytoplasm. ELP-1 is also expressed in a subset of mechanoreceptor neurons, including the ray neurons in the male tail, microtubule-rich touch receptor neurons, and the six ciliated IL1 neurons. This restricted localization in the nervous system implies that ELP-1 plays a role in mechanotransmission. Consistent with this idea, decreasing ELP-1 expression decreases sensitivity to gentle touch applied to the body wall. Conclusion These data imply that ELP-1 may play an important role during the transmission of forces and signals between the body surface and both muscle cells and touch receptor neurons. PMID:19014691

  15. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  16. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to

  17. The intermediate filament protein vimentin binds specifically to a recombinant integrin {alpha}2/{beta}1 cytoplasmic tail complex and co-localizes with native {alpha}2/{beta}1 in endothelial cell focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kreis, Stephanie; Schoenfeld, Hans-Joachim; Melchior, Chantal; Steiner, Beat; Kieffer, Nelly . E-mail: kieffer@cu.lu

    2005-04-15

    Integrin receptors are crucial players in cell adhesion and migration. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with their short {alpha} and {beta} cytoplasmic tails will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which integrins mediate bi-directional signaling across the plasma membrane. Integrin {alpha}2{beta}1 is a major collagen receptor but to date, only few proteins have been shown to interact with the {alpha}2 cytoplasmic tail or with the {alpha}2{beta}1 complex. In order to identify novel binding partners of a {alpha}2{beta}1cytoplasmic domain complex, we have generated recombinant GST-fusion proteins, incorporating the leucine zipper heterodimerization cassettes of Jun and Fos. To ascertain proper functionality of the recombinant proteins, interaction with natural binding partners was tested. GST-{alpha}2 and GST-Jun {alpha}2 bound His-tagged calreticulin while GST-{beta}1 and GST-Fos {beta}1 proteins bound talin. In screening assays for novel binding partners, the immobilized GST-Jun {alpha}2/GST-Fos {beta}1 heterodimeric complex, but not the single subunits, interacted specifically with endothelial cell-derived vimentin. Vimentin, an abundant intermediate filament protein, has previously been shown to co-localize with {alpha}v{beta}3-positive focal contacts. Here, we provide evidence that this interaction also occurs with {alpha}2{beta}1-enriched focal adhesions and we further show that this association is lost after prolonged adhesion of endothelial cells to collagen.

  18. Struvite crystal growth inhibition by trisodium citrate and the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa; Olszynski, Marcin

    2015-05-01

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the crystallization of struvite was studied. To evaluate such an effect an experiment of struvite growth from artificial urine was performed. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation. The crystallization process was induced by the addition of aqueous ammonia solution to mimic the bacterial activity. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that trisodium citrate increases induction time with respect to struvite formation and decreases the growth efficiency of struvite. The inhibitory effect of trisodium citrate on the nucleation and growth of struvite is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. Such an analysis demonstrates that the inhibitory effect is related with the fact that trisodium citrate binds NH4 + and Mg2+ ions in the range of pH from 7 to 9.5 characteristic for struvite precipitation. The most important is the MgCit- complex whose concentration strongly depends on an increase in pH rather than on an increase in citrate concentrations.

  19. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  20. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  1. Formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with diethylaminoethyl dextran: charge ratio and molar mass effect.

    PubMed

    Le Cerf, Didier; Pepin, Anne Sophie; Niang, Pape Momar; Cristea, Mariana; Karakasyan-Dia, Carole; Picton, Luc

    2014-11-26

    The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) between carboxymethyl pullulan and DEAE Dextran, was investigated, in dilute solution, with emphasis on the effect of charge density (molar ratio or pH) and molar masses. Electrophoretic mobility measurements have evidenced that insoluble PECs (neutral electrophoretic mobility) occurs for charge ratio between 0.6 (excess of polycation) and 1 (stoichiometry usual value) according to the pH. This atypical result is explained by the inaccessibility of some permanent cationic charge when screened by pH dependant cationic ones (due to the Hoffman alkylation). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicates an endothermic formation of PEC with a binding constant around 10(5) L mol(-1). Finally asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled on line with static multi angle light scattering (AF4/MALS) evidences soluble PECs with very large average molar masses and size around 100 nm, in agreement with scrambled eggs multi-association between various polyelectrolyte chains. PMID:25256478

  2. Adhesions and Adhesiolysis: The Role of Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kavic, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Adhesions commonly result from abdominal and pelvic surgical procedures and may result in intestinal obstruction, infertility, chronic pain, or complicate subsequent operations. Laparoscopy produces less peritoneal trauma than does conventional laparotomy and may result in decreased adhesion formation. We present a review of the available data on laparoscopy and adhesion formation, as well as laparoscopic adhesiolysis. We also review current adjuvant techniques that may be used by practicing laparoscopists to prevent adhesion formation. Database: A Medline search using “adhesions,” “adhesiolysis,” and “laparoscopy” as key words was performed for English-language articles. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Discussion: The majority of studies indicate that laparoscopy may reduce postoperative adhesion formation relative to laparotomy. However, laparoscopy by itself does not appear to eliminate adhesions completely. A variety of adjuvant materials are available to surgeons, and the most recent investigation has demonstrated significant potential for intraperitoneal barriers. Newer technologies continue to evolve and should result in clinically relevant reductions in adhesion formation. PMID:12113430

  3. Magnetically Regulated Star Formation in Three Dimensions: The Case of the Taurus Molecular Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2008-11-01

    We carry out three-dimensional MHD simulations of star formation in turbulent, magnetized clouds, including ambipolar diffusion and feedback from protostellar outflows. The calculations focus on relatively diffuse clouds threaded by a strong magnetic field capable of resisting severe tangling by turbulent motions and retarding global gravitational contraction in the cross field direction. They are motivated by observations of the Taurus molecular cloud complex (and, to a lesser extent, Pipe Nebula), which shows an ordered large-scale magnetic field, as well as elongated condensations that are generally perpendicular to the large-scale field. We find that stars form in earnest in such clouds when enough material has settled gravitationally along the field lines that the mass-to-flux ratios of the condensations approach the critical value. Only a small fraction (of order 1% or less) of the nearly magnetically critical, condensed material is turned into stars per local free-fall time, however. The slow star formation takes place in condensations that are moderately supersonic; it is regulated primarily by magnetic fields, rather than turbulence. The quiescent condensations are surrounded by diffuse halos that are much more turbulent, as observed in the Taurus complex. Strong support for magnetic regulation of star formation in this complex comes from the extremely slow conversion of the already condensed, relatively quiescent C18O gas into stars, at a rate 2 orders of magnitude below the maximum, free-fall value. We analyze the properties of dense cores, including their mass spectrum, which resembles the stellar initial mass function.

  4. Charge-transfer complex formation in gelation: the role of solvent molecules with different electron-donating capacities.

    PubMed

    Basak, Shibaji; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    A naphthalenediimide (NDI)-based synthetic peptide molecule forms gels in a particular solvent mixture (chloroform/aromatic hydrocarbon, 4:1) through charge-transfer (CT) complex formation; this is evident from the corresponding absorbance and fluorescence spectra at room temperature. Various aromatic hydrocarbon based solvents, including benzene, toluene, xylene (ortho, meta and para) and mesitylene, have been used for the formation of the CT complex. The role of different solvent molecules with varying electron-donation capacities in the formation of CT complexes has been established through spectroscopic and computational studies. PMID:24677404

  5. Effect of fat type in baked bread on amylose-lipid complex formation and glycaemic response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Evelyn; Zhou, Weibiao; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of amylose-lipid complexes (ALC) had been associated with reduced starch digestibility. A few studies have directly characterised the extent of ALC formation with glycaemic response. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of using fats with varying degree of saturation and chain length on ALC formation as well as glycaemic and insulinaemic responses after consumption of bread. Healthy men consumed five test breads in a random order: control bread without any added fats (CTR) and breads baked with butter (BTR), coconut oil (COC), grapeseed oil (GRP) or olive oil (OLV). There was a significant difference in glycaemic response between the different test breads (P=0·002), primarily due to COC having a lower response than CTR (P=0·016), but no significant differences between fat types were observed. Insulinaemic response was not altered by the addition of fats/oils. Although BTR was more insulinotropic than GRP (P<0·05), postprandial β-cell function did not differ significantly. The complexing index (CI), a measure of ALC formation, was significantly higher for COC and OLV compared with BTR and GRP (P<0·05). CI was significantly negatively correlated with incremental AUC (IAUC) of change in blood glucose concentrations over time (IAUCglucose) (r -0·365, P=0·001). Linear regression analysis showed that CI explained 13·3 % of the variance and was a significant predictor of IAUCglucose (β=-1·265, P=0·001), but IAUCinsulin did not predict IAUCglucose. Our study indicated that a simple way to modulate glycaemic response in bread could lie in the choice of fats/oils, with coconut oil showing the greatest attenuation of glycaemic response. PMID:27102847

  6. Altering wettability to recover more oil from tight formations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Patrick V.; Bryan, Charles R.; Thyne, Geoffrey; Li, Huina

    2016-06-03

    We describe here a method for chemically modifying fracturing fluids and overflushes to chemically increase oil recovery from tight formations. Oil wetting of tight formations is usually controlled by adhesion to illite, kerogen, or both; adhesion to carbonate minerals may also play a role. Oil-illite adhesion is sensitive to salinity, dissolved divalent cation content, and pH. We measure oil-rock adhesion with middle Bakken formation oil and core to verify a surface complexation model of reservoir wettability. The agreement between the model and experiments suggests that wettability trends in tight formations can be quantitatively predicted and that fracturing fluid and overflushmore » compositions can be individually tailored to increase oil recovery.« less

  7. Formation of charge-transfer-complex in organic:metal oxides systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. P.; Kang, Y.; Liu, T. L.; Jin, Z. H.; Jiang, N.; Lu, Z. H.

    2013-04-01

    It is found that composite systems consisting of 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) form an IR absorption band around 847 nm. It is also found that the vibrational modes of the CBP, as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, are quenched upon the formation of charge-transfer-complex (CTC) between CBP and MoO3. By examining several sets of organic:metal oxides systems, we discovered that the IR absorption band of the CTCs follow two distinct mechanisms depending on the nature and location of the HOMOs in the organic molecules.

  8. Ionically Crosslinked Polymer Networks for Underwater Adhesion and Long-Term Controlled Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Patrick G.

    Underwater adhesives have several potential applications in industry as well as in medicine. Much of the recent research in this area has focused on adhesive preparation from biological or custom-designed biomimetic polymers. As a simpler alternative, we have recently shown that ionically crosslinked, gel-like underwater adhesive complexes can be prepared by the mixing of the readily-available and inexpensive polyelectrolyte, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), with commonly-used multivalent anions, pyrophosphate (PPi) and tripolyphosphate (TPP). Remarkably, these gel-like complexes adhere to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates under water with tensile adhesive strength considerably greater than that of Scotch Permanent Double Sided Tape (up to ˜400 kPa vs. ˜85 kPa when used as a pressure-sensitive adhesives) and due to the reversible nature of the ionic crosslinks, self-heal when torn. These complexes also exhibit very high storage moduli (greater than 100 kPa), indicative of a very high crosslink density. The high crosslink density allow these gel-like complexes to also entrap and deliver small molecule payloads over multiple-month timescales. Moreover, their formation and rheological/adhesion properties can be controlled using external stimuli (pH and ionic strength). In this thesis we characterize formation and rheological/adhesion properties of gel-like PAH/PPi and PAH/TPP complexes the through the use of dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, rheology and tensile adhesion tests. We also describe their sensitivity to pH and ionic strength, and explain how the complexes can be dissolved on demand by raising or lowering the ambient pH, and can form spontaneously by increasing the NaCl concentration (which can be used for developing injectable underwater adhesive formulations). Finally, we demonstrate the ability of these adhesives to release small molecule payloads over multiple-month timescales by characterizing their ability to take up and

  9. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of cationic polymer/DNA complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Bassi, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Pezzoli, Daniele; Volonterio, Alessandro; Candiani, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Since DNA is not internalized efficiently by cells, the success of gene therapy depends on the availability of carriers to efficiently deliver genetic material into target cells. Gene delivery vectors can be broadly categorized into viral and non-viral ones. Non-viral gene delivery systems are represented by cationic lipids and polymers rely on the basics of supramolecular chemistry termed "self-assembling": at physiological pH, they are cations and spontaneously form lipoplexes (for lipids) and polyplexes (for polymers) complexing nucleic acids. In this scenario, cationic polymers are commonly used as non-viral vehicles. Their effectiveness is strongly related to key parameters including DNA binding ability and stability in different environments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I (DNA dye) was carried out to characterize cationic polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) formation dispersed in aqueous solution. Both fluorescence amplitude and lifetime proved to be very sensitive to the polymer/DNA ratio (N/P ratio, +/-).

  10. Modified bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to study the inhibition of transcription complex formation by JAZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    The jasmonate (JA) ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana repress JA signaling and negatively regulate the JA responses. Recently, JAZ proteins have been found to inhibit the transcriptional function of several transcription factors, among which the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) (GLABRA3 [GL3], ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 [EGL3], and TRANSPARENT TESTA8 [TT8]) and R2R3-MYB (GL1 and MYB75) that can interact with each other to form bHLH-MYB complexes and further control gene expression. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is a widely used technique to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Here we describe a modified BiFC experimental procedure to study the inhibition of the formation of the bHLH (GL3)-MYB (GL1) complex by JAZ proteins. PMID:23615997

  11. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel. PMID:25379879

  12. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  13. Ubiquitination of p27 is regulated by Cdk-dependent phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Montagnoli, Alessia; Fiore, Francesca; Eytan, Esther; Carrano, Andrea C.; Draetta, Giulio F.; Hershko, Avram; Pagano, Michele

    1999-01-01

    The cellular abundance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Activation of p27 degradation is seen in proliferating cells and in many types of aggressive human carcinomas. p27 can be phosphorylated on threonine 187 by Cdks, and cyclin E/Cdk2 overexpression can stimulate the degradation of wild-type p27, but not of a threonine 187-to-alanine p27 mutant [p27(T187A)]. However, whether threonine 187 phosphorylation stimulates p27 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome system or an alternative pathway is still not known. Here, we demonstrate that p27 ubiquitination (as assayed in vivo and in an in vitro reconstituted system) is cell-cycle regulated and that Cdk activity is required for the in vitro ubiquitination of p27. Furthermore, ubiquitination of wild-type p27, but not of p27(T187A), can occur in G1-enriched extracts only upon addition of cyclin E/Cdk2 or cyclin A/Cdk2. Using a phosphothreonine 187 site-specific antibody for p27, we show that threonine 187 phosphorylation of p27 is also cell-cycle dependent, being present in proliferating cells but undetectable in G1 cells. Finally, we show that in addition to threonine 187 phosphorylation, efficient p27 ubiquitination requires formation of a trimeric complex with the cyclin and Cdk subunits. In fact, cyclin B/Cdk1 which can phosphorylate p27 efficiently, but cannot form a stable complex with it, is unable to stimulate p27 ubiquitination by G1 extracts. Furthermore, another p27 mutant [p27(CK−)] that can be phosphorylated by cyclin E/Cdk2 but cannot bind this kinase complex, is refractory to ubiquitination. Thus throughout the cell cycle, both phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation act as signals for the ubiquitination of a Cdk inhibitor. PMID:10323868

  14. Cadmium(II) N-acetylcysteine complex formation in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Amini, Zahra; Parmar, Karnjit; Kang, Eun Young

    2011-12-21

    The complex formation between Cd(II) ions and N-acetylcysteine (H(2)NAC) in aqueous solution was investigated using Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption and (113)Cd NMR spectroscopic techniques. Two series of 0.1 M Cd(II) solutions with the total N-acetylcysteine concentration c(H2NAC) varied between 0.2-2 M were studied at pH 7.5 and 11.0, respectively. At pH = 11 a novel mononuclear [Cd(NAC)(4)](6-) complex with the average Cd-S distance 2.53(2) Å and the chemical shift δ((113)Cd) = 677 ppm was found to dominate at a concentration of the free deprotonated ligand [NAC(2-)] > 0.1 M, consistent with our previous reports on cadmium tetrathiolate complex formation with cysteine and glutathione. At pH 7.5 much higher ligand excess ([HNAC(-)] > 0.6 M) is required to make this tetrathiolate complex the major species. The (113)Cd NMR spectrum of a solution containing c(Cd(II)) = 0.5 M and c(H2NAC) = 1.0 M measured at 288 K showed three broad signals at 421, 583 and 642 ppm, which can be attributed to CdS(3)O(3), CdS(3)O and CdS(4) coordination sites, respectively, in oligomeric Cd(II)-NAC species with single thiolate bridges between the cadmium ions. PMID:22012146

  15. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; Choi, Youngsok; Erdin, Serpil Uckac; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Kloc, Malgorzata; Yang, Fang; Wang, P Jeremy; Meistrich, Marvin L; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2010-11-01

    Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/) (-)) testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/) (-) testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/) (-) ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/) (-) oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. PMID:21079677

  16. Asymmetrical Macromolecular Complex Formation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 2 (LPA2) Mediates Gradient Sensing in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca2+ puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca2+ puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  17. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  18. Asymmetrical macromolecular complex formation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 (LPA2) mediates gradient sensing in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2014-12-26

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca(2+) puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca(2+) puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  19. E-ring conformation has a key role in cleavable complex formation: homocamptothecin versus camptothecins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvier, D.; Chourpa, I.; Maizieres, M.; Riou, J.-F.; Dauchez, M.; Alix, A. J. P.; Manfait, M.

    2003-06-01

    Homocamptothecin (hCPT) is a new camptothecin (CPT) derivative with a seven-membered β-hydroxylactone E-ring. This modification provides higher lactone stability and did not impair its activity against topoisomerase I (top1), but rather appears to improve it compared to CPT. Such lactone modification was unexpected regarding the previous structure-activity relationship data inside the CPT series, and may have crucial mechanistic implications in the ternary cleavable complex formation. In this study, the detailed characterization of the E-ring homologation and lactone/carboxylate conversion, self-aggregation, influence of pH and polarity of the molecular environment have been performed for hCPT by frequency-domain fluorescence. The real-time spectrofluorometry confirmed the enhanced stability of hCPT. We have also investigated the E-ring status of hCPT within the top1 ternary complex with DNA, and with top1 or DNA binary complexes. Unlike CPT, no modification of the (β-hydroxy-) lactone-carboxylate conversion rates was observed, suggesting that E-ring opening is not required for cleavable complex stabilization in presence of hCPT. Comparison of the two structures by molecular modeling revealed similar conformation and steric volumes between the β-hydroxylactone ring conformation of hCPT and the opened ring of CPT. The lack of hCPT E-ring opening was discussed in the light of these molecular modeling results.

  20. Formation and function of the Rbl2p-beta-tubulin complex.

    PubMed

    Archer, J E; Magendantz, M; Vega, L R; Solomon, F

    1998-03-01

    The yeast protein Rbl2p suppresses the deleterious effects of excess beta-tubulin as efficiently as does alpha-tubulin. Both in vivo and in vitro, Rbl2p forms a complex with beta-tubulin that does not contain alpha-tubulin, thus defining a second pool of beta-tubulin in the cell. Formation of the complex depends upon the conformation of beta-tubulin. Newly synthesized beta-tubulin can bind to Rbl2p before it binds to alpha-tubulin. Rbl2p can also bind beta-tubulin from the alpha/beta-tubulin heterodimer, apparently by competing with alpha-tubulin. The Rbl2p-beta-tubulin complex has a half-life of approximately 2.5 h and is less stable than the alpha/beta-tubulin heterodimer. The results of our experiments explain both how excess Rbl2p can rescue cells overexpressing beta-tubulin and how it can be deleterious in a wild-type background. They also suggest that the Rbl2p-beta-tubulin complex is part of a cellular mechanism for regulating the levels and dimerization of tubulin chains. PMID:9488492

  1. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT-rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. PMID:25311862

  2. Hedgehog induces formation of PKA-Smoothened complexes to promote Smoothened phosphorylation and pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted glycoprotein that binds its receptor Patched to activate the G protein-coupled receptor-like protein Smoothened (Smo). In Drosophila, protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates and activates Smo in cells stimulated with Hh. In unstimulated cells, PKA phosphorylates and inhibits the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci). Here, we found that in cells exposed to Hh, the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) bound to the juxtamembrane region of the C terminus of Smo. PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo further enhanced its association with PKAc to form stable kinase-substrate complexes that promoted the PKA-mediated trans-phosphorylation of Smo dimers. We identified multiple basic residues in the C-terminus of Smo that were required for interaction with PKAc, Smo phosphorylation, and Hh pathway activation. Hh induced a switch from the association of PKAc with a cytosolic complex of Ci and the kinesin-like protein Costal2 (Cos2) to a membrane-bound Smo-Cos2 complex. Thus, our study uncovers a previously uncharacterized mechanism for regulation of PKA activity and demonstrates that the signal-regulated formation of kinase-substrate complexes plays a central role in Hh signal transduction. PMID:24985345

  3. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A 'stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications. PMID:25474162

  4. Adhesion of yeast cells to different porous supports, stability of cell-carrier systems and formation of volatile by-products.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2012-12-01

    The aim of our research was to study how the conditions of immobilization influence cell attachment to two different ceramic surfaces: hydroxylapatite and chamotte tablets. Three fermentative yeast strains, namely brewery TT, B4 (ale, lager) and distillery Bc15a strains belonging to Saccharomyces spp., and one strain of Debaryomyces occidentalis Y500/5 of weak fermentative nature, but with high amylolytic activity due to extracellular α-amylase and glucoamylase, were used in this study. Different media, including cell starvation, were applied for immobilization of yeast strains as well as different phases of cell growth. Immobilization of selected yeasts on a hydroxylapatite carrier was rather weak. However, when incubation of starved yeast cells was conducted in the minimal medium supplemented by calcium carbonate, the scale of immobilization after 24 h was higher, especially for the D. occidentalis strain. Adhesion to hydroxylapatite carriers in wort broth was of reversible character and better results of adhesion were observed in the case of another ceramic carrier-chamotte. The number of immobilized cells was about 10(6)-10(7) per tablet and cell adhesion was stable during the whole fermentation process. The comparison of the volatile products that were formed during fermentation did not show any significant qualitative and quantitative differences between the free and the immobilized cells. This is the first time when a cheap, porous chamotte surface has been applied to yeast adhesion and fermentation processes. PMID:22903785

  5. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-11-15

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions.

  6. A focal adhesion protein-based mechanochemical checkpoint regulates cleft progression during branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daley, William P.; Kohn, Joshua M.; Larsen, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Cleft formation is the initial step of branching morphogenesis in many organs. We previously demonstrated that ROCK 1 regulates a non-muscle myosin II-dependent mechanochemical checkpoint to transition initiated clefts to progressing clefts in developing submandibular salivary glands. Here, we report that ROCK-mediated integrin activation and subsequent formation of focal adhesion complexes comprise this mechanochemical checkpoint. Inhibition of ROCK1 and non-muscle myosin II activity decreased integrin β1 activation in the cleft region and interfered with localization and activation of focal adhesion complex proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK activity also prevented cleft progression, by disrupting recruitment of the focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and subsequent fibronectin assembly in the cleft region while decreasing ERK1/2 activation. These results demonstrate that inside-out integrin signaling leading to a localized recruitment of active FAK-containing focal adhesion protein complexes generates a mechanochemical checkpoint that facilitates progression of branching morphogenesis. PMID:22016182

  7. Study of ground state EDA complex formation between [70]fullerene and a series of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Nayak, Sandip K.; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Banerjee, Manas; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2002-01-01

    [70]fullerene has been shown to form 1:1 EDA complex with anthracene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and acenaphthene in CCl 4 medium. Charge transfer (CT) bands have been detected in all the cases. Isosbestic points have been observed in the cases of phenanthrene and acenaphthene complexes. Ionisation potentials of the donors and CT transition energies have been found to correlate in accordance with Mulliken equation and from this correlation the electron affinity of C 70 has been found to be 2.59 eV. Enthalpies and entropies of formation of the complexes have been estimated from the formation constants of the complexes determined spectrophotometrically at three different temperatures.

  8. Extraction of pyridines into fluorous solvents based on hydrogen bond complex formation with carboxylic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Geib, Steven; Weber, Stephen G

    2007-04-15

    A molecular receptor embedded in a 'poor-solvent' receiving phase, such as a fluorous phase, should offer the ideal medium for selective extraction and sensing. The limited solubility of most solutes in fluorous phases enhances selectivity by reducing the extraction of unwanted matrix components. Thus, receptor-doped fluorous phases may be ideal extraction media. Unfortunately, sufficient data do not exist to judge the capability of this approach. The solubilities of very few nonfluorous solutes are known. As far as we are aware, such important quantities as the strength of a hydrogen bond in a fluorous environment are not known. Thus, it is currently impossible to predict whether a particular receptor/solute complex based on a particular set of noncovalent interactions will provide enough thermodynamic stabilization to extract the solute into the fluorous phase. In this work, fluorous carboxylic acids (a carboxylic acid-terminated perfluoropolypropylene oxide called Krytox and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA)) were used as receptors and substituted pyridines as solutes to show that the fluorous receptor dramatically enhances the liquid-liquid extraction of the polar substrates from chloroform into perfluorohexanes. The method of continuous variations was used to determine the receptor-pyridine complex stoichiometry of 3:1. The free energies of formation of the 3:1 complexes from one pyridine and 3/2 H-bonded cyclic dimers of the fluorous carboxylic acid are -30.4 (Krytox) and -37.3 kJ mol-1 (PFDA). The free energy required to dissociate the dimer in perfluorohexanes is +16.5 kJ mol-1 (Krytox). The crystal structure of the complex showed a 1:1 stoichiometry with a mixed strong-weak hydrogen-bonded motif. Based on the stoichiometry, crystal structure, and UV and IR spectroscopic shifts, we propose that the 3:1 complex has four hydrogen bonds and the carboxylic acid transfers a proton to pyridine. The resulting pyridinium carboxylate N+H-O- hydrogen bond is accompanied

  9. Phase Transition in Postsynaptic Densities Underlies Formation of Synaptic Complexes and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Menglong; Shang, Yuan; Araki, Yoichi; Guo, Tingfeng; Huganir, Richard L; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-25

    Postsynaptic densities (PSDs) are membrane semi-enclosed, submicron protein-enriched cellular compartments beneath postsynaptic membranes, which constantly exchange their components with bulk aqueous cytoplasm in synaptic spines. Formation and activity-dependent modulation of PSDs is considered as one of the most basic molecular events governing synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. In this study, we discover that SynGAP, one of the most abundant PSD proteins and a Ras/Rap GTPase activator, forms a homo-trimer and binds to multiple copies of PSD-95. Binding of SynGAP to PSD-95 induces phase separation of the complex, forming highly concentrated liquid-like droplets reminiscent of the PSD. The multivalent nature of the SynGAP/PSD-95 complex is critical for the phase separation to occur and for proper activity-dependent SynGAP dispersions from the PSD. In addition to revealing a dynamic anchoring mechanism of SynGAP at the PSD, our results also suggest a model for phase-transition-mediated formation of PSD. PMID:27565345

  10. Paleobiology of a Neoproterozoic tidal flat/lagoonal complex: the Draken Conglomerate Formation, Spitsbergen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.; Mark, J.

    1991-01-01

    Carbonates and rare shales of the ca 700-800 Ma old Draken Conglomerate Formation, northeastern Spitsbergen, preserve a record of environmental variation within a Neoproterozoic tidal flat/lagoon complex. Forty-two microfossil taxa have been recognized in Draken rocks, and of these, 39 can be characterized in terms of their paleoenvironmental distributions along a gradient from the supratidal zone to permanently submerged lagoons. Supratidal to subtidal trends include: increasing microbenthic diversity, increasing abundance and diversity of included allochthonous (presumably planktonic) elements, decreasing sheath thickness of mat-building organisms (with significant taphonomic consequences), and an increasing sediment/fossil ratio in fossiliferous rocks. Five principal and several minor biofacies can be distinguished. The paleoecological resolution obtainable in the Draken Conglomerate Formation rivals that achieved for most Phanerozoic fossil deposits. It documents the complexity and diversity of Proterozoic coastal ecosystems and indicates that both environment and taphonomy need to be taken into explicit consideration in attempts to understand evolutionary trends in early fossil record. Three species, Coniunctiophycus majorinum, Myxococcoides distola, and M. chlorelloidea, are described as new; Siphonophycus robustum, Siphonophycus septatum, and Gorgonisphaeridium maximum are proposed as new combinations.

  11. PROSTAGLANDIN E2 MODIFIES SMAD2 AND PROMOTES SMAD2-SMAD4 COMPLEX FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Chen, Chen; Sorokin, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    We report that PGE2 promotes Smad2-Smad4 complex formation and this phenomenon could be blocked by DIDS, an anion transporter inhibitor. Our data suggest that PGE2 had no effects on Smad2 phosphorylation, suggesting that PGE2-mediated Smad2-Smad4 complex formation is independent of TGF-β signaling and that PGE2 induced Smad2 modification which is different from TGF-β-mediated phosphorylation. We demonstrate that in primary human glomerular mesangial cells PGE2 caused modification of Smad2 as detected by Smad2N antibody, raised against a peptide near the N-terminus of Smad2. We hypothesize that Smad2 protein is post-translationaly modified by PGE2. Direct evidence of Smad2 modification by PGE2 was achieved by avidin pulldown assay which showed that endogenous Smad2 and recombinant Smad2 protein were attached by biotin-labeled PGE2. Taken together, our results provided evidence that post-translational modification of Smad2 could be a mechanism for the action of PGE2 in the pathogenesis of human pathologies. PMID:24613014

  12. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  13. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  14. In Vitro Colonization of the Muscle Extracellular Matrix Components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: The Influence of Growth Medium, Temperature and pH on Initial Adhesion and Induction of Biofilm Formation by Collagens I and III

    PubMed Central

    Chagnot, Caroline; Agus, Allison; Renier, Sandra; Peyrin, Frédéric; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-α2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed. PMID:23516631

  15. In vitro colonization of the muscle extracellular matrix components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: the influence of growth medium, temperature and pH on initial adhesion and induction of biofilm formation by collagens I and III.

    PubMed

    Chagnot, Caroline; Agus, Allison; Renier, Sandra; Peyrin, Frédéric; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-α2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed. PMID:23516631

  16. Formation of Neoproterozoic metamorphic complex during oblique convergence (Eastern Desert, Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Wallbrecher, E.; Khudeir, A. A.; Abu el Ela, F.; Dallmeyer, D. R.

    1996-10-01

    Major portions of the Pan-African Orogen in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were formed by island-arc accretion in the Neoproterozoic. These areas are characterized by their lack of major crustal thickening. Metamorphic core complexes occur parallel to the strike of the Eastern Desert Orogen. These domes exhibit polyphase metamorphism and deformation in contrast to the structurally overlying nappes which include ophiolitic melanges and island-arc volcanic rocks. These nappes show northwest directed, orogen-parallel thrusting in the internal parts and west to southwest directed imbrication in the external parts of the orogen. Structures related to exhumation of the metamorphic core complexes partition into different displacement paths localized within a crustal-scale wrench corridor of the Najd fault system. Northwest trending orogen-parallel, sinistral strike-slip faults define the western and eastern margins of the domes. North and south dipping low-angle normal faults developed along the northern and southern margins of the domes and form extensional bridges between them. {40Ar}/{39Ar} ages obtained from syntectonic muscovites within the shear zones gave Neoproterozoic ages of 595.9±0.5 and 588.2±0.3 Ma. The synchronous activity of strike-slip and normal faults suggests a regional east-west shortening which was accomodated by deep-level basal decollement beneath the metamorphic core complexes and a coeval northwest-southeast, orogen-parallel extension. This extension was accompanied by intramontane molasse sedimentation and emplacement of calc-alkaline plutons. Since the rapid exhumation of gneisses in the core complexes cannot be explained by thickening of the crust, the authors favour a model which calls for enhanced heat flow along the Najd fault system which would have enabled the formation of syn-extensional plutonism and triggered the exhumation of the metamorphic core complexes. Lateral buoyancy forces were concentrated within the Najd wrench corridor and

  17. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  18. Nucleoprotein complex formation by the enhancer binding protein nifA.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Kolb, A; Cannon, W; Buck, M

    1997-09-01

    The nitrogen fixation protein NifA is a member of the protein family activating transcription by the alternative eubacterial sigmaN (sigma54) RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Binding sites for NifA, upstream activator sequences (UASs), are remotely located. Interaction between holoenzyme bound in a closed promoter complex and NiFA is facilitated by bending of the intervening DNA by integration host factor (IHF). We have examined NifA contact with the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifH promoter UAS in the presence and absence of holoenzyme and IHF. Footprints with UV light were made on 5-BrdU-substituted DNA and DNase I and laser UV footprints on conventional DNA templates. Results establish that the consensus thymidine residues of the UAS motif 5'-TGT are in close proximity to NifA. Reactivity suggests that each UAS thymidine is not structurally equivalent. Titration of NifA binding to the UAS in the presence or absence of the closed promoter complex indicates that the interaction of NifA wi