Science.gov

Sample records for adhesion ecm-receptor interaction

  1. ECM receptors in neuronal structure, synaptic plasticity, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kerrisk, Meghan E; Cingolani, Lorenzo A; Koleske, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    During central nervous system development, extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors and their ligands play key roles as guidance molecules, informing neurons where and when to send axonal and dendritic projections, establish connections, and form synapses between pre- and postsynaptic cells. Once stable synapses are formed, many ECM receptors transition in function to control the maintenance of stable connections between neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. These receptors bind to and are activated by ECM ligands. In turn, ECM receptor activation modulates downstream signaling cascades that control cytoskeletal dynamics and synaptic activity to regulate neuronal structure and function and thereby impact animal behavior. The activities of cell adhesion receptors that mediate interactions between pre- and postsynaptic partners are also strongly influenced by ECM composition. This chapter highlights a number of ECM receptors, their roles in the control of synapse structure and function, and the impact of these receptors on synaptic plasticity and animal behavior.

  2. ECM receptors in neuronal structure, synaptic plasticity, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kerrisk, Meghan E.; Cingolani, Lorenzo A.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    During central nervous system development, extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors and their ligands play key roles as guidance molecules, informing neurons where and when to send axonal and dendritic projections, establish connections, and form synapses between pre- and postsynaptic cells. Once stable synapses are formed, many ECM receptors transition in function to control the maintenance of stable connections between neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. These receptors bind to and are activated by ECM ligands. In turn, ECM receptor activation modulates downstream signaling cascades that control cytoskeletal dynamics and synaptic activity to regulate neuronal structure and function and thereby impact animal behavior. The activities of cell adhesion receptors that mediate interactions between pre- and post-synaptic partners are also strongly influenced by ECM composition. This chapter highlights a number of ECM receptors, their roles in the control of synapse structure and function, and the impact of these receptors on synaptic plasticity and animal behavior. PMID:25410355

  3. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  4. Adhesive interactions between vesicles in the strong adhesion limit

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Arun; Anderson, Travers H.; Leal, L. Gary; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the adhesive interaction energy between a pair of vesicles in the strong adhesion limit, in which bending forces play a negligible role in determining vesicle shape compared to forces due to membrane stretching. Although force-distance or energy distance relationships characterizing adhesive interactions between fluid bilayers are routinely measured using the surface forces apparatus, the atomic force microscope and the biomembrane force probe, the interacting bilayers in these methods are supported on surfaces (e.g. mica sheet) and cannot be deformed. However, it is known that in a suspension, vesicles composed of the same bilayer can deform by stretching or bending, and can also undergo changes in volume. Adhesively interacting vesicles can thus form flat regions in the contact zone, which will result in an enhanced interaction energy as compared to rigid vesicles. The focus of this paper is to examine the magnitude of the interaction energy between adhesively interacting, deformed vesicles relative to free, undeformed vesicles as a function of the intervesicle separation. The modification of the intervesicle interaction energy due to vesicle deformability can be calculated knowing the undeformed radius of the vesicles, R0, the bending modulus kb, the area expansion modulus Ka, and the adhesive minimum WP(0) and separation DP(0) in the energy of interaction between two flat bilayers, which can be obtained from the force-distance measurements made using the above supported-bilayer methods. For vesicles with constant volumes, we show that adhesive potentials between non-deforming bilayers such as ∣WP(0)∣∼5×10−4mJ/m2, which are ordinarily considered weak in colloidal physics literature, can result in significantly deep (>10×) energy minima due to increase in vesicle area and flattening in the contact region. If the osmotic expulsion of water across the vesicles driven by the tense, stretched membrane in the presence of an osmotically active

  5. Ultraweak sugar-sugar interactions for transient cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Pincet, F; Le Bouar, T; Zhang, Y; Esnault, J; Mallet, J M; Perez, E; Sinaÿ, P

    2001-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are rarely considered in biologically relevant situations such as cell recognition and adhesion. One Ca(2+)-mediated homotypic interaction between two Lewis(x) determinants (Le(x)) has been proposed to drive cell adhesion in murine embryogenesis. Here, we confirm the existence of this specific interaction by reporting the first direct quantitative measurements in an environment akin to that provided by membranes. The adhesion between giant vesicles functionalized with Le(x) was obtained by micropipette aspiration and contact angle measurements. This interaction is below the thermal energy, and cell-cell adhesion will require a large number of molecules, as illustrated by the Le(x) concentration peak observed at the cell membranes during the morula stage of the embryo. This adhesion is ultralow and therefore difficult to measure. Such small interactions explain why the concept of specific interactions between carbohydrates is often neglected. PMID:11222296

  6. Roles of an extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor and ECM processing enzymes in demyelinating canine distemper encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Alldinger, S; Gröters, S; Miao, Q; Fonfara, S; Kremmer, E; Baumgärtner, W

    2006-04-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. Due to the central nervous system (CNS) tropism of the virus and associated neuropathological changes, demyelinating canine distemper encephalitis (CDE) represents a relevant model for human demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. The present review decribes the role of CD44 antigen (CD44), the principle cell surface receptor for hyaluronate and extracellular matrix (ECM) processing enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs]) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) in the pathogenesis of demyelination. In acute and subacute CDE, a plaque-associated CD44 up-regulation is found that parallels astrocyte activation. Likewise, MMPs and TIMPs are prominently up-regulated in these lesions and are expressed mostly by astrocytes and microglia. In chronic lesions, CD44 expression declines together with the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive astrocytes. In addition, in this plaque type, CD44 is expressed on the cell membrane of perivascular mononuclear cells. In this phase, a decrease of MMP and TIMP expressions apart from MMP-11, -12, and -13 is obvious. In summary, CD44 and MMPs might be associated with the onset of demyelination and may interact to initiate ECM disturbances. Ligation of CD44 in the early phase may induce chemokines and cytokines and hence initiate and perpetuate the inflammatory process. In the chronic phase, it is conceivable that a MMP-TIMP imbalance may be the motor for lesion progression with a simultaneous influx of CD44-positive activated immune cells.

  7. Adhesive interactions of biologically inspired soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Travers Heath

    Improving our fundamental understanding of the surface interactions between complex materials is needed to improve existing materials and products as well as develop new ones. The object of this research was to apply the measurements of fundamental surface interactions to real world problems facing chemical engineers and materials scientists. I focus on three systems of biologically inspired soft condensed matter, with an emphasis on the adhesive interactions between them. The formation of phospholipid bilayers of the neutral lipid, dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) on silica surfaces from vesicles in aqueous solutions was investigated. The process involves five stages: vesicle adhesion to the substrate surfaces, steric interactions with neighboring vesicles, rupture, spreading via hydrophobic fusion of bilayer edges, and ejection of excess lipid, trapped water and ions into the solution. The forces between DMPC bilayers and silica were measured in the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA) in phosphate buffered saline. The adhesion energy was found to be much stronger than the expected adhesion predicted by van der Waals interactions, likely due to an attractive electrostatic interaction. The effects of non-adsorbing cationic polyelectrolytes on the interactions between supported cationic surfactant bilayers were studied using the SFA. Addition of polyelectrolyte has a number of effects on the interactions including the induction of a depletion-attraction and screening of the double-layer repulsion. Calculations are made that allow for the conversion of the adhesion energy measured in the SFA to the overall interaction energy between vesicles in solution, which determines the stability behavior of vesicle dispersions. Mussels use a variety of dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (DOPA) rich proteins specifically tailored to adhering to wet surfaces. The SFA was used to study the role of DOPA on the adhesive properties of these proteins to TiO 2 and mica using both real mussel

  8. Role of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions in gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Stewart, Katherine M E; Penlidis, Alexander

    2014-09-06

    Geckos, which are capable of walking on walls and hanging from ceilings with the help of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical fibrils (setae) on their toe pads, have become the main prototype in the design and fabrication of fibrillar dry adhesives. As the unique fibrillar feature of the toe pads of geckos allows them to develop an intimate contact with the substrate the animal is walking on or clinging to, it is expected that the toe setae exchange significant numbers of electric charges with the contacted substrate via the contact electrification (CE) phenomenon. Even so, the possibility of the occurrence of CE and the contribution of the resulting electrostatic interactions to the dry adhesion of geckos have been overlooked for several decades. In this study, by measuring the magnitude of the electric charges, together with the adhesion forces, that gecko foot pads develop in contact with different materials, we have clarified for the first time that CE does contribute effectively to gecko adhesion. More importantly, we have demonstrated that it is the CE-driven electrostatic interactions which dictate the strength of gecko adhesion, and not the van der Waals or capillary forces which are conventionally considered as the main source of gecko adhesion.

  9. Multiparticle adhesive dynamics. Interactions between stably rolling cells.

    PubMed Central

    King, M R; Hammer, D A

    2001-01-01

    A novel numerical simulation of adhesive particles (cells) reversibly interacting with an adhesive surface under flow is presented. Particle--particle and particle--wall hydrodynamic interactions in low Reynolds number Couette flow are calculated using a boundary element method that solves an integral representation of the Stokes equation. Molecular bonds between surfaces are modeled as linear springs and stochastically formed and broken according to postulated descriptions of force-dependent kinetics. The resulting simulation, Multiparticle Adhesive Dynamics, is applied to the problem of selectin-mediated rolling of hard spheres coated with leukocyte adhesion molecules (cell-free system). Simulation results are compared to flow chamber experiments performed with carbohydrate-coated spherical beads rolling on P-selectin. Good agreement is found between theory and experiment, with the main observation being a decrease in rolling velocity with increasing concentration of rolling cells or increasing proximity between rolling cells. Pause times are found to increase and deviation motion is found to decrease as pairs of rolling cells become closer together or align with the flow. PMID:11463626

  10. Interactions between adhesion and friction—I. Theoretical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, J. F.; Schultz, J.

    1997-01-01

    The relationships between adhesion and friction are investigated, considering that there is a third thin layer separating the two sliding bodies, submitted to continuous damage; both solids are supposed linearly elastic, and the third body behaves as an elastoplastic damaged material. From a thermodynamic framework, three-dimensional coupled elasto-plastic damage evolution equations are derived. The gradient of the damage variable is introduced in the free energy of the intermediate layer, so that the model accounts for the intrinsic cohesion of the layer; nevertheless, it is assumed that the gradient is associated to a reversible behaviour. The three-dimensional friction model obtained is applicable to situations where the third body is either a polymeric or a metallic material. Using an asymptotic expansion method, a two-dimensional model of the third body is then derived; the limit solution of the asymptotic expansion is such that the displacement field varies linearly through the thickness of the layer—the stress field is constant—whereas the damage can vary. Assuming then that the damage is constant through the intermediate layer, a two-dimensional constitutive law for two bodies interacting through a thin third elastoplastic body is obtained, which accounts for adhesion effects. We lastly derive generalised friction laws including the effect of adhesion on friction, in which the friction coefficient is a function of a scalar adhesion variable.

  11. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  12. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  13. Real-time analysis of cell-surface adhesive interactions using thickness shear mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soonjin; Ergezen, Ertan; Lec, Ryszard; Barbee, Kenneth A

    2006-12-01

    The cell adhesion process and the molecular interactions that determine its kinetics were investigated using a thickness shear mode (TSM) sensor. The goal of this study was to correlate sensor readings with the progression of cell adhesion. In particular, the specific effects of receptor-mediated adhesion, the glycocalyx, and surface charge on initial cell-surface attachment and steady-state adhesion of endothelial cells were investigated. We found a strong correlation between resistance changes (DeltaR) and the development of cell adhesion strength by comparing the sensor readings with independently assessed cell adhesion. The result showed that integrin binding determines the kinetics of initial cell attachment while heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) modulates steady-state adhesion strength. Coating the sensor surface with the positively charged poly-d-lysine (PDL) enhanced the initial interaction with substratum. These data confirm our current understanding of the contribution of these three phenomena to the adhesion process. The real-time monitoring capability of this technique with high temporal resolution provides more detailed information on the kinetics of the different stages of the adhesion process. This technique has the potential to facilitate the evaluation of biomaterials and surface treatments used for implants and tissue-engineering scaffolds for their bioactive effects on the cell adhesion process.

  14. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-06

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air.

  15. Reciprocal Interactions between Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily and the Cytoskeleton in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites, and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function, and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail.

  16. Kinetics of membrane adhesion mediated by ligand-receptor interaction studied with a biomimetic system.

    PubMed Central

    Boulbitch, A; Guttenberg, Z; Sackmann, E

    2001-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the kinetics of adhesion of a single giant vesicle controlled by the competition between membrane-substrate interaction mediated by ligand-receptor interaction, gravitation, and Helfrich repulsion. To model the cell-tissue interaction, we doped the vesicles with lipid-coupled polymers (mimicking the glycocalix) and the reconstituted ligands selectively recognized by alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin-mediating specific attraction forces. The integrin was grafted on glass substrates to act as a target cell. The adhesion of the vesicle membrane to the integrin-covered surface starts with the spontaneous formation of a small (approximately 200 nm) domain of tight adhesion, which then gradually grows until the whole adhesion area is in the state of tight adhesion. The time of adhesion varies from few tens of seconds to about one hour depending on the ligand and lipopolymer concentration. At small ligand concentrations, we observed the displacement xi of the front of tight adhesion following the square root law xi approximately t(1/2), whereas, at high concentrations, we found a linear law xi approximately t. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the t(1/2)-regime is dominated by diffusion of ligands, and the xi approximately t-regime by the kinetics of ligands-receptors association. PMID:11606287

  17. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  18. Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B supports lymphocyte rolling and adhesion through interaction with alpha4beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf J; Hardt, Katja; Hatting, Max; Bistrian, Roxana; Diehl, Sandra; Radeke, Heinfried H; Podda, Maurizio; Schön, Michael P; Kaufmann, Roland; Henschler, Reinhard; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Santoso, Sentot; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2009-10-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), JAM-B and JAM-C have been implicated in leucocyte transmigration. As JAM-B binds to very late activation antigen (VLA)-4, a leucocyte integrin that contributes to rolling and firm adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells through binding to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, we hypothesized that JAM-B is also involved in leucocyte rolling and firm adhesion. To test this hypothesis, intravital microscopy of murine skin microvasculature was performed. Rolling interactions of murine leucocytes were significantly affected by blockade of JAM-B [which reduced rolling interactions from 9.1 +/- 2.6% to 3.2 +/- 1.2% (mean +/- standard deviation)]. To identify putative ligands, T lymphocytes were perfused over JAM-B-coated slides in a dynamic flow chamber system. JAM-B-dependent rolling and sticking interactions were observed at low shear stress [0.3 dyn/cm(2): 220 +/- 71 (mean +/- standard deviation) versus 165 +/- 88 rolling (P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney rank sum test) and 2.6 +/- 1.3 versus 1.0 +/- 0.7 sticking cells/mm(2)/min (P = 0.026; Mann-Whitney rank sum test) on JAM-B- compared with baseline], but not at higher shear forces (1.0 dyn/cm(2)). As demonstrated by antibody blocking experiments, JAM-B-mediated rolling and sticking of T lymphocytes was dependent on alpha4 and beta1 integrin, but not JAM-C expression. To investigate whether JAM-B-mediated leucocyte-endothelium interactions are involved in a disease-relevant in vivo model, adoptive transfer experiments in 2,4,-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced contact hypersensitivity reactions were performed in mice in the absence or in the presence of a function-blocking JAM-B antibody. In this model, JAM-B blockade during the sensitization phase impaired the generation of the immune response to DNFB, which was assessed as the increase in ear swelling in untreated, DNFB-challenged mice, by close to 40% [P = 0.037; analysis of variance (anova)]. Overall, JAM-B appears to

  19. Effects of curvature and cell-cell interaction on cell adhesion in microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yan, W W; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2010-10-01

    It has been found that both circulating blood cells and tumor cells are more easily adherent to curved microvessels than straight ones. This motivated us to investigate numerically the effect of the curvature of the curved vessel on cell adhesion. In this study, the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and the cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. The adhesive dynamics model involved the effect of receptor-ligand bonds between circulating cells and endothelial cells (ECs). It is found that the curved vessel would increase the simultaneous bond number, and the probability of cell adhesion is increased consequently. The interaction between traveling cells would also affect the cell adhesion significantly. For two-cell case, the simultaneous bond number of the rear cell is increased significantly, and the curvature of microvessel further enhances the probability of cell adhesion.

  20. Twist2 promotes kidney cancer cell proliferation and invasion by regulating ITGA6 and CD44 expression in the ECM-receptor interaction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao-jie; Tao, Jing; Sheng, Lu; Hu, Xin; Rong, Rui-ming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tong-yu

    2016-01-01

    Twist2 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family and plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Growing evidence has proven that Twist2 is involved in tumor progression; however, the role of Twist2 in human kidney cancer and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of Twist2 in kidney cancer cells and tissues. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assay were analyzed using the Cell Count Kit-8, flow cytometry, wound healing, and Transwell analysis, respectively. In this study, we showed that Twist2 was upregulated in human kidney cancer tissues compared with normal kidney tissues. Twist2 promoted cell proliferation, inhibited cell apoptosis, and augmented cell migration and invasion in human kidney-cancer-derived cells in vitro. Twist2 also promoted tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, we found that the knockdown of Twist2 decreased the levels of ITGA6 and CD44 expression. This result indicates that Twist2 may promote migration and invasion of kidney cancer cells by regulating ITGA6 and CD44 expression. Therefore, our data demonstrated that Twist2 is involved in kidney cancer progression. The identification of the role of Twist2 in the migration and invasion of kidney cancer provides a potential appropriate treatment for human kidney cancer. PMID:27099513

  1. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2. PMID:27588115

  2. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2.

  3. Arg interacts with cortactin to promote adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusion.

    PubMed

    Lapetina, Stefanie; Mader, Christopher C; Machida, Kazuya; Mayer, Bruce J; Koleske, Anthony J

    2009-05-04

    The molecular mechanisms by which the Abelson (Abl) or Abl-related gene (Arg) kinases interface with the actin polymerization machinery to promote cell edge protrusions during cell-matrix adhesion are unclear. In this study, we show that interactions between Arg and the Arp2/3 complex regulator cortactin are essential to mediate actin-based cell edge protrusion during fibroblast adhesion to fibronectin. Arg-deficient and cortactin knockdown fibroblasts exhibit similar defects in adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusion, which can be restored via reexpression of Arg and cortactin. Arg interacts with cortactin via both binding and catalytic events. The cortactin Src homology (SH) 3 domain binds to a Pro-rich motif in the Arg C terminus. Arg mediates adhesion-dependent phosphorylation of cortactin, creating an additional binding site for the Arg SH2 domain. Mutation of residues that mediate Arg-cortactin interactions abrogate the abilities of both proteins to support protrusions, and the Nck adapter, which binds phosphocortactin, is also required. These results demonstrate that interactions between Arg, cortactin, and Nck1 are critical to promote adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusions.

  4. Monocyte adhesion to endothelium in simian immunodeficiency virus-induced AIDS encephalitis is mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1/alpha 4 beta 1 integrin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Sasseville, V. G.; Newman, W.; Brodie, S. J.; Hesterberg, P.; Pauley, D.; Ringler, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Because the mechanisms associated with recruitment of monocytes to brain in AIDS encephalitis are unknown, we used tissues from rhesus monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) to examine the relative contributions of various adhesion pathways in mediating monocyte adhesion to endothelium from encephalitic brain. Using a modified Stamper and Woodruff tissue adhesion assay, we found that the human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and the B cell line, Ramos, preferentially bound to brain vessels from monkeys with AIDS encephalitis. Using a combined tissue adhesion/immunohistochemistry approach, these cells only bound to vessels expressing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Furthermore, pretreatment of tissues with antibodies to VCAM-1 or cell lines with antibodies to VLA-4 (CD49d) inhibited adhesion by more than 70%. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/beta 2 integrin interactions were not significant in mediating cell adhesion to the vasculature in encephalitic simian brain using a cell line (JY) capable of binding rhesus monkey ICAM-1. In addition, selectin-mediated interactions did not significantly contribute to cell binding to encephalitic brain as there was no immunohistochemical expression of E-selectin and P-selectin in either normal or encephalitic brain, nor was there a demonstrable adhesive effect from L-selectin using L-selectin-transfected 300.19 cells on simian encephalitic brain. These results demonstrate that using the tissue adhesion assay, THP-1, U937, and Ramos cells bind to vessels in brain from animals with AIDS encephalitis using VCAM-1/alpha 4 beta 1 integrin interactions and suggest that VCAM-1 and VLA-4 may be integral for monocyte recruitment to the central nervous system during the development of AIDS encephalitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7507300

  5. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  6. Western blot analysis of adhesive interactions under fluid shear conditions: the blot rolling assay.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting has proven to be an important technique in the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions (i.e., by ligand blotting) and for identifying molecules mediating cell attachment (i.e., by cell blotting). Conventional ligand blotting and cell blotting methods employ non-dynamic (static) incubation conditions, whereby molecules or cells of interest are placed in suspension and overlaid on membranes. However, many cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions occur under fluid shear conditions, and shear stress itself mediates and/or facilitates the engagement of these physiologically appropriate receptors and ligands. Notably, shear forces critically influence the adhesion of circulating cells and platelets to vessel walls in physiologic cell migration and hemostasis, as well as in inflammatory and thrombotic disorders, cancer metastasis, and atherosclerosis. Use of non-dynamic blotting conditions to analyze such interactions can introduce bias, overtly missing relevant effectors and/or exaggerating the relative role(s) of non-physiologic adhesion molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed a new technique for identifying binding interactions under fluid shear conditions, the "blot rolling assay." Using this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis, transferred to a membrane that is rendered semitransparent, and the membrane is then incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Under controlled flow conditions, cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber and interactions with individual immobilized molecules (bands) can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecule(s) supporting adhesion under fluid shear can then be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. This method thus allows for the identification, within a complex

  7. Western blot analysis of adhesive interactions under fluid shear conditions: the blot rolling assay.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Western blotting has proven to be an important technique in analysis of receptor-ligand interactions (i.e., by ligand blotting) and for identifying molecules mediating cell attachment (i.e., by cell blotting). Conventional ligand blotting and cell blotting methods employ nondynamic (static) incubation conditions, whereby molecules or cells of interest are placed in suspension and overlaid on membranes. However, many cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions occur under fluid shear conditions, and shear stress itself mediates and/or facilitates the engagement of these physiologically appropriate receptors and ligands. Notably, shear forces critically influence the adhesion of circulating cells and platelets to vessel walls in physiologic cell migration and hemostasis, as well as in inflammatory and thrombotic disorders, cancer metastasis, and atherosclerosis. Use of nondynamic blotting conditions to analyze such interactions can introduce bias, overtly missing relevant effectors and/or exaggerating the relative role(s) of nonphysiologic adhesion molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed a new technique for identifying binding interactions under fluid shear conditions, the "blot rolling assay." Using this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis, transferred to a membrane that is rendered semi-transparent, and the membrane is then incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Under controlled flow conditions, cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber and interactions with individual immobilized molecules (bands) can be visualized in real-time. The substrate molecule(s) supporting adhesion under fluid shear can then be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. This method thus allows for the identification, within a complex mixture

  8. CXCL13-CXCR5 Interaction and Prostate Cancer Cell Firm Adhesion and Bone Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0562 TITLE: CXCL13- CXCR5 Interaction and...9 May 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CXCL13- CXCR5 Interaction and Prostate Cancer Cell Firm 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Adhesion and Bone Metastasis 5b... CXCR5 . The ligand for this receptor is CXCL13, which is expressed by stromal cells and an important chemokine that B cells use to navigate lymphatic

  9. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  10. Viscous-poroelastic interaction as mechanism to create adhesion in frogs' toe pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulchinsky, A.; Gat, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    The toe pads of frogs consist of soft hexagonal structures and a viscous liquid contained between and within the hexagonal structures. It has been hypothesized that this configuration creates adhesion by allowing for long range capillary forces, or alternatively, by allowing for exit of the liquid and thus improving contact of the toe pad. In this work we suggest interaction between viscosity and elasticity as a mechanism to create temporary adhesion, even in the absence of capillary effects or van der Waals forces. We initially illustrate this concept experimentally by a simplified configuration consisting of two surfaces connected by a liquid bridge and elastic springs. We then utilize poroelastic mixture theory and model frog's toe pads as an elastic porous medium, immersed within a viscous liquid and pressed against a rigid rough surface. The flow between the surface and the toe pad is modeled by the lubrication approximation. Inertia is neglected and analysis of the elastic-viscous dynamics yields a governing partial differential equation describing the flow and stress within the porous medium. Several solutions of the governing equation are presented and show a temporary adhesion due to stress created at the contact surface between the solids. This work thus may explain how some frogs (such as the torrent frog) maintain adhesion underwater and the reason for the periodic repositioning of frogs' toe pads during adhesion to surfaces.

  11. Biotin-Avidin Based Universal Cell-Matrix Interaction for Promoting Three-Dimensional Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Jia; Feng, Chuanliang

    2015-09-23

    To promote cell adhesion in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for avoiding cell anoikis, which is one of the most important issues for fundamental cell biology. Herein, a biotin-avidin based universal cell-matrix interaction for different types of cells is developed in order to achieve the promoted adhesion in 3D ECM. For the purpose, biotinylated nanofibrous hydrogels are constructed by coassembling 1,4-benzyldicarboxamide (C2) based non-biotinylated and biotinylated supramolecular gelators. The used cells are modified by avidin (AV-cells) through biotinylating cells and then interacting with avidin. After in situ encapsulating AV-cells in the hydrogels, the adhered amount can be increased by tens of percent even with adding several percentages of the biotinylated C2 gelators in the coassembly due to the specific biotin-avidin interaction. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirms that AV-cells can proliferate without varying gene expression and denaturation. Compared with the interaction between RGD and cells, this avidin-biotin interaction should be much more universal and it is feasible to be employed to promote cell adhesion for most types of cells in 3D matrix.

  12. A study of single drug particle adhesion interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eve, J K; Patel, N; Luk, S Y; Ebbens, S J; Roberts, C J

    2002-05-15

    This paper aims to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to characterise the interaction forces between micronized salbutamol particles, an active ingredient frequently used in metered dose inhalers, and also to glass, lactose and a fluoropolymer. The methodology used involves challenging a salbutamol functionalized AFM tip to the surfaces of interest and measuring the force experienced by the cantilever as a function of tip-sample separation. Analysis of this force-distance data allows quantification of the particle-substrate adhesion. This study yields a ranking of adhesion as glass>lactose>salbutamol>polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). An increase in the interaction force between the salbutamol particle and PTFE on repeated contact due to tribocharging is also observed.

  13. Adhesive interactions of N-cadherin limit the recruitment of microtubules to cell-cell contacts through organization of actomyosin.

    PubMed

    Plestant, Charlotte; Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Seddiki, Rima; Nguyen, Emmanuelle; Ladoux, Benoit; Mège, René-Marc

    2014-04-15

    Adhesive interactions of cadherins induce crosstalk between adhesion complexes and the actin cytoskeleton, allowing strengthening of adhesions and cytoskeletal organization. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, and microtubules (MTs) might be involved, as for integrin-mediated cell-extracellular-matrix adhesions. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between N-cadherin and MTs by analyzing the influence of N-cadherin engagement on MT distribution and dynamics. MTs progressed less, with a lower elongation rate, towards cadherin adhesions than towards focal adhesions. Increased actin treadmilling and the presence of an actomyosin contractile belt, suggested that actin relays inhibitory signals from cadherin adhesions to MTs. The reduced rate of MT elongation, associated with reduced recruitment of end-binding (EB) proteins to plus ends, was alleviated by expression of truncated N-cadherin, but was only moderately affected when actomyosin was disrupted. By contrast, destabilizing actomyosin fibers allowed MTs to enter the adhesion area, suggesting that tangential actin bundles impede MT growth independently of MT dynamics. Blocking MT penetration into the adhesion area strengthened cadherin adhesions. Taken together, these results establish a crosstalk between N-cadherin, F-actin and MTs. The opposing effects of cadherin and integrin engagement on actin organization and MT distribution might induce bias of the MT network during cell polarization.

  14. Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction.

    PubMed

    Craig, David H; Haimovich, Beatrice; Basson, Marc D

    2007-12-01

    Physical forces including pressure, strain, and shear can be converted into intracellular signals that regulate diverse aspects of cell biology. Exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulates colon cancer cell adhesion by a beta(1)-integrin-dependent mechanism that requires an intact cytoskeleton and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. alpha-Actinin facilitates focal adhesion formation and physically links integrin-associated focal adhesion complexes with the cytoskeleton. We therefore hypothesized that alpha-actinin may be necessary for the mechanical response pathway that mediates pressure-stimulated cell adhesion. We reduced alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 expression with isoform-specific small interfering (si)RNA. Silencing of alpha-actinin-1, but not alpha-actinin-4, blocked pressure-stimulated cell adhesion in human SW620, HT-29, and Caco-2 colon cancer cell lines. Cell exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulated alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and alpha-actinin-1 interaction with FAK and/or Src, and enhanced FAK phosphorylation at residues Y397 and Y576. The requirement for alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation in the pressure response was investigated by expressing the alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation mutant Y12F in the colon cancer cells. Expression of Y12F blocked pressure-mediated adhesion and inhibited the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 with FAK and Src, as well as FAK activation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated reduction of alpha-actinin-1 eliminated the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 and Src with beta(1)-integrin receptor, as well as FAK-Src complex formation. These results suggest that alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation at Y12 plays a crucial role in pressure-activated cell adhesion and mechanotransduction by facilitating Src recruitment to beta(1)-integrin, and consequently the association of FAK with Src, to enhance FAK phosphorylation.

  15. Adhesive activity of Lu glycoproteins is regulated by interaction with spectrin

    SciTech Connect

    An, Xiuli; Gauthier, Emilie; Zhang, Xihui; Guo, Xinhua; Anstee, David; Mohandas, Narla; Anne Chasis, Joel

    2008-03-18

    The Lutheran (Lu) and Lu(v13) blood group glycoproteins function as receptors for extracellular matrix laminins. Lu and Lu(v13) are linked to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton through a direct interaction with spectrin. However, neither the molecular basis of the interaction nor its functional consequences have previously been delineated. In the present study, we defined the binding motifs of Lu and Lu(v13) on spectrin and identified a functional role for this interaction. We found that the cytoplasmic domains of both Lu and Lu(v13) bound to repeat 4 of the spectrin chain. The interaction of full-length spectrin dimer to Lu and Lu(v13) was inhibited by repeat 4 of {alpha}-spectrin. Further, resealing of this repeat peptide into erythrocytes led to weakened Lu-cytoskeleton interaction as demonstrated by increased detergent extractability of Lu. Importantly, disruption of the Lu-spectrin linkage was accompanied by enhanced cell adhesion to laminin. We conclude that the interaction of the Lu cytoplasmic tail with the cytoskeleton regulates its adhesive receptor function.

  16. Load sharing in bioinspired fibrillar adhesives with backing layer interactions and interfacial misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacca, Mattia; Booth, Jamie A.; Turner, Kimberly L.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Bio-inspired fibrillar adhesives rely on the utilization of short-range intermolecular forces harnessed by intimate contact at fibril tips. The combined adhesive strength of multiple fibrils can only be utilized if equal load sharing (ELS) is obtained at detachment. Previous investigations have highlighted that mechanical coupling of fibrils through a compliant backing layer gives rise to load concentration and the nucleation and propagation of interfacial flaws. However, misalignment of the adhesive and contacting surface has not been considered in theoretical treatments of load sharing with backing layer interactions. Alignment imperfections are difficult to avoid for a flat-on-flat interfacial configuration. In this work we demonstrate that interfacial misalignment can significantly alter load sharing and the kinematics of detachment in a model adhesive system. Load sharing regimes dominated by backing layer interactions and misalignment are revealed, the transition between which is controlled by the misalignment angle, fibril separation, and fibril compliance. In the regime dominated by misalignment, backing layer deformation can counteract misalignment giving rise to improved load sharing when compared to an identical fibrillar array with a rigid backing layer. This result challenges the conventional belief that stiffer (and thinner) backing layers consistently reduce load concentration among fibrils. Finally, we obtain analytically the fibril compliance distribution required to harness backing layer interactions to obtain ELS. Through fibril compliance optimization, ELS can be obtained even with misalignment. However, since misalignment is typically not deterministic, it is of greater practical significance that the array optimized for perfect alignment exhibits load sharing superior to that of a homogeneous array subject to misalignment. These results inform the design of fibrillar arrays with graded compliance capable of exhibiting improved load sharing

  17. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Modjeski, Kristina L.; Ture, Sara K.; Field, David J.; Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis-associated pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a large scaffolding protein that localizes and organizes interacting proteins in other cells, such as neurons. We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. Western blots confirmed the mass spectrometry findings that GRIP1 interacts with GPIbα, GPIbβ, and 14-3-3. Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. PMID:27631377

  18. Contact probing of stretched membranes and adhesive interactions: graphene and other two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodich, Feodor M.; Galanov, Boris A.

    2016-11-01

    Contact probing is the preferable method for studying mechanical properties of thin two-dimensional (2D) materials. These studies are based on analysis of experimental force-displacement curves obtained by loading of a stretched membrane by a probe of an atomic force microscope or a nanoindenter. Both non-adhesive and adhesive contact interactions between such a probe and a 2D membrane are studied. As an example of the 2D materials, we consider a graphene crystal monolayer whose discrete structure is modelled as a 2D isotropic elastic membrane. Initially, for contact between a punch and the stretched circular membrane, we formulate and solve problems that are analogies to the Hertz-type and Boussinesq frictionless contact problems. A general statement for the slope of the force-displacement curve is formulated and proved. Then analogies to the JKR (Johnson, Kendall and Roberts) and the Boussinesq-Kendall contact problems in the presence of adhesive interactions are formulated. General nonlinear relations among the actual force, displacements and contact radius between a sticky membrane and an arbitrary axisymmetric indenter are derived. The dimensionless form of the equations for power-law shaped indenters has been analysed, and the explicit expressions are derived for the values of the pull-off force and corresponding critical contact radius.

  19. Viscous-elastic interaction as a mechanism to create adhesion in frogs' toe pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Amir; Tulchinsky, Arie

    2013-11-01

    The toe pads of frogs consist of soft hexagonal structures and a network of channels between and within the soft structures, containing a viscous liquid. It has been hypothesized that this configuration creates adhesion by allowing for long range capillary forces, or alternatively, that the channel network allows for exit of the viscous liquid and thus improve contact of the toe pad. In this work we suggest interaction between viscous flow and elastic forces as a mechanism to create temporary adhesion, even in the absence of capillary or van der Waals forces. We study the dynamics of a solid body covered with an array of protruding elastic cylinders, immersed within a viscous liquid, and pressed against a flat surface. Inertia is neglected and the elastic-viscous dynamics yield the governing differential equation describing the relative motion between the body and the surface. The compressed elastic cylinders apply a force acting to separate the solid body from the surface. The relative motion between the body and the surface creates a viscous flow and pressure field resisting the elastic force and significantly reducing the speed of separation. We show that the viscous-elastic interaction can prevent motion tangential and normal to the surface and can create temporary adhesion.

  20. Contact probing of stretched membranes and adhesive interactions: graphene and other two-dimensional materials

    PubMed Central

    Galanov, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Contact probing is the preferable method for studying mechanical properties of thin two-dimensional (2D) materials. These studies are based on analysis of experimental force–displacement curves obtained by loading of a stretched membrane by a probe of an atomic force microscope or a nanoindenter. Both non-adhesive and adhesive contact interactions between such a probe and a 2D membrane are studied. As an example of the 2D materials, we consider a graphene crystal monolayer whose discrete structure is modelled as a 2D isotropic elastic membrane. Initially, for contact between a punch and the stretched circular membrane, we formulate and solve problems that are analogies to the Hertz-type and Boussinesq frictionless contact problems. A general statement for the slope of the force–displacement curve is formulated and proved. Then analogies to the JKR (Johnson, Kendall and Roberts) and the Boussinesq–Kendall contact problems in the presence of adhesive interactions are formulated. General nonlinear relations among the actual force, displacements and contact radius between a sticky membrane and an arbitrary axisymmetric indenter are derived. The dimensionless form of the equations for power-law shaped indenters has been analysed, and the explicit expressions are derived for the values of the pull-off force and corresponding critical contact radius. PMID:27956879

  1. The interaction of polyphenols with bilayers: conditions for increasing bilayer adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Huh, N W; Porter, N A; McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A

    1996-01-01

    Because proteins and other molecules with a high polyphenol content are commonly involved in adhesion processes, we are investigating the interactions between polyphenols and biological materials. A naturally occurring polyphenol that binds a variety of proteins and lipids is tannic acid (TA), which contains five digallic acid residues covalently linked to a central D-glucose. A previous study has shown that TA increases the adhesion between apposing phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers and over a very narrow concentration range collapses the interbilayer fluid space from about 15 A to 5 A. To determine the chemical requirements a polyphenolic molecule must possess to increase bilayer adhesion, we have synthesized several simpler TA analogs that vary in their size, shape, and number of gallic acid and hydroxyl groups. X-ray diffraction, absorbance, binding, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate the interaction of these polyphenolic molecules with egg PC (EPC) and dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) bilayers. Of these synthetic polyphenols, only penta-O-galloyl-alpha-D-glucose (PGG) was able to completely mimic the effects of TA by collapsing the interbilayer fluid space from 15 A to 5 A, decreasing the dipole potential by about 300 mV, increasing the transition enthalpy of DPPC liposomes, and inducing an interdigitated phase in DPPC. Binding studies indicated that the fluid space was reduced to 5 A at an EPC:PGG mole ratio of 5:1. We conclude that these polyphenols collapse the fluid space of PC bilayers because they 1) are amphipathic and partition into the bilayers interfacial region, 2) are long enough to span the interbilayer space, 3) contain several gallic acids distributed so that they can partition simultaneously into apposing bilayers, and 4) have sufficient gallic acid residues to interact with all lipid headgroups and cover the bilayer surface. Under these conditions we conclude that the polyphenols from interbilayer bridges. We

  2. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    PubMed Central

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P < 0.05); no significance was found between ADSE and XE (P > 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P < 0.05). The bonding interface of SB showed the most intense silver uptake. SE and ADSE showed more favorable hybridization quality than that observed for ADP and XE. Conclusions: The bond strength and hybridization quality were affected by the interaction form of the adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  3. N-Cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Brian D.; Mui, Keeley L.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Caliari, Steven R.; Mehta, Kush D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    During mesenchymal development, the microenvironment gradually transitions from one that is rich in cell-cell interactions to one that is dominated by cell-extracellular-matrix (ECM) interactions. Because these cues cannot readily be decoupled in vitro or in vivo, how they converge to regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mechanosensing is not fully understood. Here, we show that a hyaluronic acid hydrogel system enables, across a physiological range of ECM stiffness, the independent co-presentation of the HAVDI adhesive motif from the EC1 domain of N-Cadherin and the RGD adhesive motif from fibronectin. Decoupled presentation of these cues revealed that HAVDI ligation (at constant RGD ligation) reduced the contractile state and thereby nuclear YAP/TAZ localization in MSCs, resulting in altered interpretation of ECM stiffness and subsequent changes in downstream cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings reveal that, in an evolving developmental context, HAVDI/N-Cadherin interactions can alter stem cell perception of the stiffening extracellular microenvironment. PMID:27525568

  4. Macromolecular depletion as a determinant of RBC adhesive interactions: why blood is thicker than water.

    PubMed

    Neu, Björn; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2014-01-01

    If a surface is in contact with a solution containing macromolecules or proteins, and the loss of configurational entropy of these molecules at the surface is not balanced by adsorption energy, a polymer-poor layer will develop near the surface. If two such layers overlap, an attractive force develops due to the osmotic pressure difference between these depletion zones and the bulk phase. Recent studies have shown that depletion interaction plays a major role in red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and hence it is a major determinate of blood flow stability; depletion interaction also markedly affects RBC adhesion to vascular endothelial cells. Understanding and quantitating factors that regulate depletion in vivo are thus of importance, yet made difficult since only very small changes of the cell surface (e.g., glycocalyx thickness) such as seen during RBC aging can lead to massive changes of depletion interaction and hence cell-cell adhesion. It is suggested that insight into the in vivo relevance of depletion mechanisms may lead to an improved understanding of how and why blood flow is altered in many diseases, and may also provide new biomarkers (e.g., surface properties) that will aid in the development of novel or improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  5. N-cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgrove, Brian D.; Mui, Keeley L.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Caliari, Steven R.; Mehta, Kush D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-12-01

    During mesenchymal development, the microenvironment gradually transitions from one that is rich in cell-cell interactions to one that is dominated by cell-ECM (extracellular matrix) interactions. Because these cues cannot readily be decoupled in vitro or in vivo, how they converge to regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mechanosensing is not fully understood. Here, we show that a hyaluronic acid hydrogel system enables, across a physiological range of ECM stiffness, the independent co-presentation of the HAVDI adhesive motif from the EC1 domain of N-cadherin and the RGD adhesive motif from fibronectin. Decoupled presentation of these cues revealed that HAVDI ligation (at constant RGD ligation) reduced the contractile state and thereby nuclear YAP/TAZ localization in MSCs, resulting in altered interpretation of ECM stiffness and subsequent changes in downstream cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings reveal that, in an evolving developmental context, HAVDI/N-cadherin interactions can alter stem cell perception of the stiffening extracellular microenvironment.

  6. Flexible polyacrylamide substrata for the analysis of mechanical interactions at cell-substratum adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beningo, Karen A.; Lo, Chun-Min; Wang, Yu-Li

    2002-01-01

    We have described a powerful tool for the study of mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment. Although the approach has already been used in a variety of ways to measure traction forces and to characterize active and passive responses of cultured cells to mechanical stimulation, it can be extended easily and combined with other microscopic approaches, including fluorescent analog imaging (Beningo et al., 2001), photobleaching, calcium imaging, micromanipulation, and electrophysiology. This method will be particularly useful for studying the functions of various components at focal adhesions, and the effects of mechanical forces on focal adhesion-mediated signal transduction. In addition, the method can be extended to a 3D setting, e.g., by sandwiching cultured cells between two layers of polyacrylamide to create an environment mimicking that in the tissue of a multicellular organism. Whereas chemical interactions between cells and the environment have been investigated extensively, many important questions remain as to the role of physical forces in cellular functions and the interplay between chemical and physical mechanisms of communication. The present approach, as well as other approaches capable of probing physical interactions, should fill in this important gap in the near future.

  7. Construction of gene/protein interaction networks for primary myelofibrosis and KEGG pathway-enrichment analysis of molecular compounds.

    PubMed

    Sun, C G; Cao, X J; Zhou, C; Liu, L J; Feng, F B; Liu, R J; Zhuang, J; Li, Y J

    2015-12-08

    The objective of this study was the development of a gene/protein interaction network for primary myelofibrosis based on gene expression, and the enrichment analysis of KEGG pathways underlying the molecular complexes in this network. To achieve this, genes involved in primary myelofibrosis were selected from the OMIM database. A gene/protein interaction network for primary myelofibrosis was obtained through Cytoscape with the literature mining performed using the Agilent Literature Search plugin. The molecular complexes in the network were detected by ClusterViz plugin and KEGG pathway enrichment of molecular complexes was performed using DAVID online. We found 75 genes associated with primary myelofibrosis in the OMIM database. The gene/protein interaction network of primary myelofibrosis contained 608 nodes, 2086 edges, and 4 molecular complexes with a correlation integral value greater than 4. Molecular complexes involved in KEGG pathways are related to cytokine regulation, immune function regulation, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell adhesion molecules, and other biological behavior of tumors, which can provide a reliable direction for the treatment of primary myelofibrosis and the bioinformatic foundation for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  8. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion.

  9. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  10. Structural Basis of Latrophilin - FLRT - UNC5 Interaction in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue C.; Nazarko, Olha V.; Sando, Richard; Salzman, Gabriel S.; Li, Nan-Sheng; Südhof, Thomas C.; Araç, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are cell-adhesion molecules with emerging functions in cortical development and synapse formation. Their extracellular regions interact with LPHNs to mediate synapse development, and with UNC5/Netrin receptors to control the migration of neurons in the developing cortex. Here, we present the crystal structures of FLRT3 in isolation and in complex with LPHN3. The FLRT3/LPHN3 structure reveals that LPHN3 binds to FLRT3 at a distinct site from UNC5. Structure-based mutations specifically disrupt FLRT3/LPHN3 binding, but do not disturb their interactions with other proteins or their cell-membrane localization. Thus, they can be used as molecular tools to dissect the functions of FLRTs and LPHNs in vivo. Our results suggest that UNC5 and LPHN3 can simultaneously bind to FLRT3 forming a trimeric complex and that FLRT3 may form trans-synaptic complexes with both LPHN3 and UNC5. These findings provide molecular insights for understanding the role of cell-adhesion proteins in synapse function. PMID:26235030

  11. Interfacial Interaction between Transmembrane Ocular Mucins and Adhesive Polymers and Dendrimers Analyzed by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Noiray, M.; Briand, E.; Woodward, A. M.; Argüeso, P.; Molina Martínez, I. T.; Herrero-Vanrell, R.; Ponchel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Development of the first in vitro method based on biosensor chip technology designed for probing the interfacial interaction phenomena between transmembrane ocular mucins and adhesive polymers and dendrimers intended for ophthalmic administration. Methods The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used. A transmembrane ocular mucin surface was prepared on the chip surface and characterized by QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The mucoadhesive molecules tested were: hyaluronic acid (HA), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), chitosan (Ch) and polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM). Results While Ch originated interfacial interaction with ocular transmembrane mucins, for HA, CMC and HPMC, chain interdiffusion seemed to be mandatory for bioadherence at the concentrations used in ophthalmic clinical practise. Interestingly, PAMAM dendrimers developed permanent interfacial interactions with transmembrane ocular mucins whatever their surface chemical groups, showing a relevant importance of co-operative effect of these multivalent systems. Polymers developed interfacial interactions with ocular membrane-associated mucins in the following order: Ch(1 %) > G4PAMAM-NH2(2 %) = G4PAMAM-OH(2 %) > G3.5PAMAM-COOH(2 %)≫ CMC(0.5 %) = HA(0.2 %) = HPMC(0.3 %). Conclusions The method proposed is useful to discern between the mucin-polymer chemical interactions at molecular scale. Results reinforce the usefulness of chitosan and den-drimers as polymers able to increase the retention time of drugs on the ocular surface and hence their bioavailability. PMID:22565639

  12. Noncontact Adhesion and Mechanical Properties Characterization of Nano and Micro-Scale Structures Interacting with Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi Vahdat, Armin

    At nano/micrometer scales, adhesion, a weak intermolecular interaction (van der Waals force), compared to several other type of forces often dominates the deformation and mechanics of nano/micro-scale structures. Accurate adhesion characterization of nano/micro-scale particles and thin-films (nm-scale) with various substrates is critically important in various industries. In semiconductor industries, understanding and characterizing particle-substrate adhesion bond and interfacial adhesion of thin films plays a critical role in fabricating defect-free structures. In this dissertation, ultrasonic-based techniques along with novel mathematical models are introduced to accurate adhesion energy characterization of nano/micro-scale particles and thin-films (Graphene layer is used as thin-film) in a non-contact manner. In the case of nano/micro-scale particles adhesion characterization, particle-substrate adhesion bond is characterized based on complex vibrational dynamics of micro-spherical particles on flat substrates subjected to ultrasonic base excitations. In the thin-films adhesion characterization case, the interfacial adhesion energy between thin films and various substrates is extracted based on the micro-spherical particles complex dynamics affected by the presence of thin-films on the vibrating substrates. Also in order to study the anisotropic adhesion properties and the rolling dynamic of nano/micro-scale particles as the most important dynamic in particle removal techniques, a novel non-contact manipulation/transport technique is introduced. In this technique, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) fields are employed to roll the particles on dry substrates in a non-contact manner in order to eliminate the inaccuracies and undesirable property modifications of contact-based techniques. Adhesion and mechanics of nano/micro-scale objects is affected by the viscoelastic properties of the contacting materials. Therefore, a novel and non-destructive technique along with a

  13. cis Interaction of the Cell Adhesion Molecule CEACAM1 with Integrin β3

    PubMed Central

    Brümmer, Jens; Ebrahimnejad, Alireza; Flayeh, Raid; Schumacher, Udo; Löning, Thomas; Bamberger, Ana-Maria; Wagener, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    CEACAM1 is a cell adhesion molecule that has been implicated in a number of physiological processes (eg, tumor suppressor in epithelial tissues, potent angiogenic factor in microvessel formation, microbial receptor in human granulocytes and epithelial cells). The mechanism of CEACAM1 action is still largely unresolved but recent findings demonstrated that the cytoplasmic CEACAM1 domain is linked indirectly to the actin-based cytoskeleton. We have isolated integrin β3 as an associated protein using CEACAM1 tail affinity purification. This association depends on phosphorylation of Tyr-488 in the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed in vivo colocalization of both molecules in human granulocytes and epithelial cells. Furthermore, the concentrated colocalization at the tumor-stroma interface of invading melanoma masses suggests a functional role of CEACAM1-integrin β3 interaction in melanoma invasion. Moreover, colocalization of the two adhesion molecules is also found at the apical surface of glandular cells of pregnancy endometrium. Colocalization of CEACAM1 and integrin β3 at the transitional zone from proliferative to invasive extravillous trophoblast of the maternal-fetal interface supports a role for CEACAM1/integrin β3 complexes in cell invasion. PMID:11485912

  14. Phosphomannosyl receptors may participate in the adhesive interaction between lymphocytes and high endothelial venules

    SciTech Connect

    Stoolman, L.M.; Tenforde, T.S.; Rosen, S.D.

    1984-10-01

    Normal and malignant lymphocytes can migrate from the bloodstream into lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. This process helps distribute normal lymphocytes throughout the lymphoid system and may provide a portal of entry for circulating malignant cells. An adhesive interaction between lymphocytes and the endothelium of postcapillary venules is the first step in the migratory process. The authors have recently shown that the simple sugars L-fucose and D-mannose, and an L-fucose-rich polysaccharide (fucoidin), can inhibit this adhesive interaction in vitro. The authors now report that mannose-6-phosphate, the structurally related sugar fructose-1-phosphate, and a phosphomannan, core polysaccharide from the yeast Hansenula holstii (PPME) are also potent inhibitors. Mannose-6-phosphate and fructose-1-phosphate were potent inhibitors of lymphocyte attachment (one-half maximal inhibition at 2-3 mM). Mannose-1-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate had slight inhibitory activity, while glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and galactose-6-phosphate had no significant activity (at 10 mM). In addition, the phosphomannan core polysaccharide was a potent inhibitor (one-half maximal inhibition at 10-20 ..mu..g/ml); dephosphorylation with alkaline phosphatase resulted in loss of its inhibitory activity. Preincubation of the lymphocytes, but not the lymph node frozen sections, with PPME resulted in persistent inhibition of binding. Neither the monosaccharides nor the polysaccharide suppressed protein synthesis nor decreased the viability of the lymphocytes. Furthermore, inhibitory activity did not correlate with an increase in negative charge on the lymphocyte surface (as measured by cellular electrophoresis). 27 references, 7 figures.

  15. Identification of novel MYO18A interaction partners required for myoblast adhesion and muscle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian-Meng; Cheng, Xiao-Ning; Li, Shang-Qi; Heller, Stefan; Xu, Zhi-Gang; Shi, De-Li

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional myosin MYO18A that contains a PDZ domain is required for muscle integrity during zebrafish development. However, the mechanism by which it functions in myofibers is not clear. The presence of a PDZ domain suggests that MYO18A may interact with other partners to perform muscle-specific functions. Here we performed double-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation to identify MYO18A-interacting proteins, and have identified p190RhoGEF and Golgin45 as novel partners for the MYO18A PDZ domain. We have also identified Lurap1, which was previously shown to bind MYO18A. Functional analyses indicate that, similarly as myo18a, knockdown of lurap1, p190RhoGEF and Golgin45 by morpholino oligonucleotides disrupts dystrophin localization at the sarcolemma and produces muscle lesions. Simultaneous knockdown of myo18a with either of these genes severely disrupts myofiber integrity and dystrophin localization, suggesting that they may function similarly to maintain myofiber integrity. We further show that MYO18A and its interaction partners are required for adhesion of myoblasts to extracellular matrix, and for the formation of the Golgi apparatus and organization of F-actin bundles in myoblast cells. These findings suggest that MYO18A has the potential to form a multiprotein complex that links the Golgi apparatus to F-actin, which regulates muscle integrity and function during early development. PMID:27824130

  16. E. coli interactions, adhesion and transport in alumino-silica clays.

    PubMed

    Wei, Houzhen; Yang, Guang; Wang, Boya; Li, Runwei; Chen, Gang; Li, Zhenze

    2017-03-08

    Bacterial adhesion and transport in the geological formation are controlled by their mutual complex interactions, which have been quantified by the traditional and extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory as well as direct atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. In this research, the DLVO forces calculated based on the independently determined bacterial and porous media surface thermodynamic properties were compared with those of AFM measurements. Although differences in the order of several magnitudes existed, forces obtained from both ways could explain the observations of E. coli attachment to alumino-silica clays evaluated in laboratory columns under saturated and steady-state flow conditions. E. coli deposition in alumino-silica clays was simulated using a two-site convection-dispersion transport model against E. coli transport breakthrough curves, which was then linked to the interactions forces. By exploring the differences of the two force measurements, it was concluded that the thermodynamic calculations could complement the direct force measurements in describing bacterial interactions with the surrounding environment and the subsequent transport in the porous media.

  17. Unc5B Interacts with FLRT3 and Rnd1 to Modulate Cell Adhesion in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Karaulanov, Emil; Böttcher, Ralph T.; Stannek, Peter; Wu, Wei; Rau, Marlene; Ogata, Souichi; Cho, Ken W. Y.; Niehrs, Christof

    2009-01-01

    The FLRT family of transmembrane proteins has been implicated in the regulation of FGF signalling, neurite outgrowth, homotypic cell sorting and cadherin-mediated adhesion. In an expression screen we identified the Netrin receptors Unc5B and Unc5D as high-affinity FLRT3 interactors. Upon overexpression, Unc5B phenocopies FLRT3 and both proteins synergize in inducing cell deadhesion in Xenopus embryos. Morpholino knock-downs of Unc5B and FLRT3 synergistically affect Xenopus development and induce morphogenetic defects. The small GTPase Rnd1, which transmits FLRT3 deadhesion activity, physically and functionally interacts with Unc5B, and mediates its effect on cell adhesion. The results suggest that FLRT3, Unc5B and Rnd1 proteins interact to modulate cell adhesion in early Xenopus development. PMID:19492039

  18. Pressure sensitive microparticle adhesion through biomimicry of the pollen-stigma interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Qu, Zihao; Meredith, J Carson

    2016-03-21

    Many soft biomimetic synthetic adhesives, optimized to support macroscopic masses (∼kg), have been inspired by geckos, insects and other animals. Far less work has investigated bioinspired adhesion that is tuned to micro- and nano-scale sizes and forces. However, such adhesive forces are extremely important in the adhesion of micro- and nanoparticles to surfaces, relevant to a wide range of industrial and biological systems. Pollens, whose adhesion is critical to plant reproduction, are an evolutionary-optimized system for biomimicry to engineer tunable adhesion between particles and micro-patterned soft matter surfaces. In addition, the adhesion of pollen particles is relevant to topics as varied as pollinator ecology, transport of allergens, and atmospheric phenomena. We report the first observation of structurally-derived pressure-sensitive adhesion of a microparticle by using the sunflower pollen and stigma surfaces as a model. This strong, pressure-sensitive adhesion results from interlocking between the pollen's conical spines and the stigma's receptive papillae. Inspired by this behavior, we fabricated synthetic polymeric patterned surfaces that mimic the stigma surface's receptivity to pollen. These soft mimics allow the magnitude of the pressure-sensitive response to be tuned by adjusting the size and spacing of surface features. These results provide an important new insight for soft material adhesion based on bio-inspired principles, namely that ornamented microparticles and micro-patterned surfaces can be designed with complementarity that enable a tunable, pressure-sensitive adhesion on the microparticle size and length scale.

  19. Chemical Interaction Analysis of an Adhesive Containing 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate (10-MDP) With the Dentin in Noncarious Cervical Lesions.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bmb; Ulbaldini, Alm; Sato, F; Baesso, M L; Bento, A C; Andrade, Lhc; Lima, S M; Pascotto, R C

    2017-02-03

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical bonds of a self-etch 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) adhesive to natural noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) and compare them with those occurring in sclerotic dentin in artificially prepared defects (APDs). Four human teeth with natural NCCLs on the buccal surface were selected. Artificial defects matching the natural lesions were prepared on the lingual surface of the same teeth serving as control. Micro-Raman (MR) spectroscopy was used to quantify mineral content in natural NCCLs and in APDs. Fourier transform infrared-photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) readouts were taken before and after adhesive application to analyze the protein matrix/mineral (M:M) ratio and chemical interactions between 10-MDP adhesive and dentin. The MR and FTIR-PAS spectra collected from natural NCCLs demonstrated a larger area of the band (961 cm(-1), PO4) and lower M:M ratio, respectively, characterizing a hypermineralized dentin, compared with APDs. FTIR-PAS demonstrated emergence of a peak (1179 cm(-1), P=O) in spectra after adhesive treatment, demonstrating a more intense chemical interaction in natural NCCLs. The results demonstrated that chemical bonding of 10-MDP adhesive to natural NCCLs is more intense, due to the hypermineralized surface, and suggest that it is unnecessary to remove the hypermineralized layer with burs, as this may decrease the chemical bonding potential of 10-MDP.

  20. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor-β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co-cultured adhesive potential of Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc-1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc-1 cells. The expression of TNF-α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, and also in

  1. Interactions of CuO nanoparticles with the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa: adhesion, uptake, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Chenchen; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-11-01

    The potential adverse effects of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly attracted attention. Combining electron microscopic and toxicological investigations, we determined the adhesion, uptake, and toxicity of CuO NPs to eukaryotic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. CuO NPs were toxic to C. pyrenoidosa, with a 72 h EC50 of 45.7 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy showed that CuO NPs were attached onto the surface of the algal cells and interacted with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excreted by the organisms. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that EPS layer of algae was thickened by nearly 4-fold after CuO NPs exposure, suggesting a possible protective mechanism. In spite of the thickening of EPS layer, CuO NPs were still internalized by endocytosis and were stored in algal vacuoles. TEM and electron diffraction analysis confirmed that the internalized CuO NPs were transformed to Cu2O NPs (d-spacing, ∼0.213 nm) with an average size approximately 5 nm. The toxicity investigation demonstrated that severe membrane damage was observed after attachment of CuO NPs with algae. Reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial depolarization were also noted upon exposure to CuO NPs. This work provides useful information on understanding the role of NPs-algae physical interactions in nanotoxicity.

  2. Cross-Phosphorylation and Interaction between Src/FAK and MAPKAP5/PRAK in Early Focal Adhesions Controls Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Sheila Figel; Gelman, Irwin H

    2015-01-01

    P38-regulated and activated kinase (PRAK/MAPKAPK5) is a serine/threonine kinase which lies downstream of the p38 and ERK3/4 MAP kinase pathways. PRAK plays diverse roles in the processes of cell growth, nutrient starvation response, programmed cell death, senescence and motility. PRAK has been shown to both promote and inhibit cell motility in different contexts. The pro-motility functions of PRAK are attributed mainly to cytoskeletal rearrangement occurring downstream of its phosphorylated substrate HSP27; however, it was recently shown that PRAK is required for motility in endothelial cells upstream of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Along with Src, FAK functions as a mediator of motility signaling through the phosphorylation of substrates in focal adhesions. Here, we show that PRAK, initially identified as a FAK substrate in an in situ/ kinase overlay assay, is a Src substrate, the phosphorylation of which directs PRAK to focal adhesions. Focal adhesion localization of PRAK was not found to affect cell motility, however transient over expression of PRAK inhibited motility in HeLa cells. This effect requires PRAK kinase activity and proceeds through an impairment of FAK activation via phosphorylation on Y861. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that PRAK is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, localizes to focal adhesions, and interacts physically with and can phosphorylate FAK/Src. Further we provide a novel mechanism for the inhibition of motility downstream of PRAK. PMID:26042227

  3. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  4. Silicon addition to hydroxyapatite increases nanoscale electrostatic, van der Waals, and adhesive interactions.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jennifer; Dean, Delphine; Patel, Nelesh; Botelho, Claudia; Best, Serena; Santos, José D; Lopes, Maria A; Bonfield, William; Ortiz, Christine

    2006-08-01

    The normal intersurface forces between nanosized probe tips functionalized with COO(-)-terminated alkanethiol self-assembling monolayers and dense, polycrystalline silicon-substituted synthetic hydroxyapatite (SiHA) and phase pure hydroxyapatite (HA) were measured via a nanomechanical technique called chemically specific high-resolution force spectroscopy. A significantly larger van der Waals interaction was observed for the SiHA compared to HA; Hamaker constants (A) were found to be A(SiHA) = 35 +/- 27 zJ and A(HA) = 13 +/- 12 zJ. Using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approximation, which assumes linear additivity of the electrostatic double layer and van der Waals components, and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann surface charge model for electrostatic double-layer forces, the surface charge per unit area, sigma (C/m(2)), was calculated as a function of position for specific nanosized areas within individual grains. SiHA was observed to be more negatively charged than HA with sigma(SiHA) = -0.024 +/- 0.013 C/m(2), two times greater than sigma(HA) = -0.011 +/- 0.006 C/m(2). Additionally, SiHA was found to have increased surface adhesion (0.7 +/- 0.3 nN) compared to HA (0.5 +/- 0.3 nN). The characterization of the nanoscale variations in surface forces of SiHA and HA will enable an improved understanding of the initial stages of bone-biomaterial bonding.

  5. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  6. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  7. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part B: SEM/ESCA analysis of fracture surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B.; Widyani, E.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion was studied with emphasis on the characterization of surface oxide layers, the analysis of fracture surfaces, and the interaction of matrices and fibers. A number of surface features of the fractured lap shear samples were noted in the SEM photomicrographs including the beta phase alloy of the Ti 6-4 adherend, the imprint of the adherend on the adhesive failure surface, increased void density for high temperature samples, and the alumina filler particles. Interfacial failure of some of the fractured lap shear samples is invariably characterized by the appearance of an ESCA oxygen photopeak at 530.3 eV assigned to the surface oxide layer of Ti 6-4 adherend. The effect of grit blasting on carbon fiber composites is evident in the SEM analysis. A high surface fluorine concentration on the composite surface is reduced some ten fold by grit blasting.

  8. Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy study of physicochemical interaction between human dentin and etch-&-rinse adhesives in a simulated moist bond technique.

    PubMed

    Ubaldini, Adriana L M; Baesso, Mauro L; Sehn, Elizandra; Sato, Francielle; Benetti, Ana R; Pascotto, Renata C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide the physicochemical interactions at the interfaces between two commercial etch-&-rinse adhesives and human dentin in a simulated moist bond technique. Six dentin specimens were divided into two groups (n=3) according to the use of two different adhesive systems: (a) 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydrate (4-META), and (b) HEMA. The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy was performed before and after dentin treatment with 37% phosphoric acid, with adhesive systems and also for the adhesive systems alone. Acid-conditioning resulted in a decalcification pattern. Adhesive treated spectra subtraction suggested the occurrence of chemical bonding to dentin expressed through modifications of the OH stretching peak (3340 cm(-1)) and symmetric CH stretching (2900 cm(-1)) for both adhesives spectra; a decrease of orthophosphate absorption band (1040 to 970 cm(-1)) for adhesive A and a better resolved complex band formation (1270 to 970 cm(-1)) for adhesive B were observed. These results suggested the occurrence of chemical bonding between sound human dentin and etch-&-rinse adhesives through a clinical typical condition.

  9. A model to calculate the average interaction energy and adhesion force between petroleum asphaltenes and some metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Rodriguez, A; Alvarez-Ramirez, F; Cruz, S A; Lira-Galeana, C

    2006-09-15

    A model is proposed to account for the interaction energy and adhesion force between petroleum asphaltenes and metallic surfaces. It is assumed that the total molecule-surface interaction potential may be constructed through superposition of corresponding interactions with a relevant number of atomic layers forming the substrate and resorting to the Lindhard continuum planar potential (CPP) approximation, which requires only of knowledge of binary molecule-atom interactions. Molecular mechanics (MM) calculations are performed to generate the average binary interaction between the asphaltene molecule and an atom in the substrate, which in turn is represented by a parameterized analytical--physically sound--expression. The resulting CPP yields an analytical expression representing the interaction between the asphaltene molecule and each substrate layer. To validate the method, pilot calculations are performed for a sample asphaltene molecule with a fixed orientation relative to metallic surfaces of iron, aluminum, and chromium. Comparison between corresponding CPP and MM calculations for the asphaltene-plane (A-P) and asphaltene-substrate (A-S) interactions indicate reasonable agreement pointing to the adequacy of the CPP method to represent molecule-surface interactions. Also, the effect of a surrounding (i.e., solvent) medium is addressed with the use of a dielectric constant, epsilon, incorporated in the molecule-atom potential. Finally, a discussion is presented on the applicability of the method to generate an analytical universal expression for asphaltene-metallic wall interactions.

  10. Murine junctional adhesion molecules JAM-B and JAM-C mediate endothelial and stellate cell interactions during hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, Edith; Bayer, Monika; Ehser, Janine; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Imhof, Beat A; Christen, Urs

    2016-07-03

    Classical junctional adhesion molecules JAM-A, JAM-B and JAM-C influence vascular permeability, cell polarity as well as leukocyte recruitment and immigration into inflamed tissue. As the vasculature becomes remodelled in chronically injured, fibrotic livers we aimed to determine distribution and role of junctional adhesion molecules during this pathological process. Therefore, livers of naïve or carbon tetrachloride-treated mice were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to localize all 3 classical junctional adhesion molecules. Hepatic stellate cells and endothelial cells were isolated and subjected to immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry to determine localization and functionality of JAM-B and JAM-C. Cells were further used to perform contractility and migration assays and to study endothelial tubulogenesis and pericytic coverage by hepatic stellate cells. We found that in healthy tissue, JAM-A was ubiquitously expressed whereas JAM-B and JAM-C were restricted to the vasculature. During fibrosis, JAM-B and JAM-C levels increased in endothelial cells and JAM-C was de novo generated in myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells. Soluble JAM-C blocked contractility but increased motility in hepatic stellate cells. Furthermore, soluble JAM-C reduced endothelial tubulogenesis and endothelial cell/stellate cell interaction. Thus, during liver fibrogenesis, JAM-B and JAM-C expression increase on the vascular endothelium. More importantly, JAM-C appears on myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells linking them as pericytes to JAM-B positive endothelial cells. This JAM-B/JAM-C mediated interaction between endothelial cells and stellate cells stabilizes vessel walls and may control the sinusoidal diameter. Increased hepatic stellate cell contraction mediated by JAM-C/JAM-C interaction may cause intrahepatic vasoconstriction, which is a major complication in liver cirrhosis.

  11. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  12. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  13. The interaction between Staphylococcus aureus SdrD and desmoglein 1 is important for adhesion to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Askarian, Fatemeh; Ajayi, Clement; Hanssen, Anne-Merethe; van Sorge, Nina M.; Pettersen, Ingvild; Diep, Dzung B.; Sollid, Johanna U. E.; Johannessen, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is known as a frequent colonizer of the skin and mucosa. Among bacterial factors involved in colonization are adhesins such as the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs). Serine aspartate repeat containing protein D (SdrD) is involved in adhesion to human squamous cells isolated from the nose. Here, we identify Desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) as a novel interaction partner for SdrD. Genetic deletion of sdrD in S. aureus NCTC8325-4 through allelic replacement resulted in decreased bacterial adherence to Dsg1- expressing HaCaT cells in vitro. Complementary gain-of-function was demonstrated by heterologous expression of SdrD in Lactococcus lactis, which increased adherence to HaCaT cells. Also ectopic expression of Dsg1 in HEK293 cells resulted in increased adherence of S. aureus NCTC8325-4 in vitro. Increased adherence of NCTC8325-4, compared to NCTC8325-4ΔsdrD, to the recombinant immobilized Dsg1 demonstrated direct interaction between SdrD and Dsg1. Specificity of SdrD interaction with Dsg1 was further verified using flow cytometry and confirmed binding of recombinant SdrD to HaCaT cells expressing Dsg1 on their surface. These data demonstrate that Dsg1 is a host ligand for SdrD. PMID:26924733

  14. The atomic nature of polymer-metal interactions in adhesion, friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Adhesion experiments with polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyimide contacting tungsten indicate that the polymers bond chemically to the clean metal surface. Polymer chain fragments which transfer to the surface of tungsten in field ion microscopy adhesion studies are highly oriented. Auger emission spectroscopy of PTFE transfer films to various metal surfaces indicates that the PTFE is bonded to the metal surface via the carbon atom. With PTFE in sliding contact with different orientations of aluminum, metal orientation is found to influence surfaces in sliding. The lowest friction and least amount of surface damage is detected on the highest atomic density (111) plane. The friction process itself can initiate polymer film formation from simple organic molecules.

  15. Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) – p130Cas Interactions Promote Adhesion Disassembly and Invasion in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Allison M.; Wilson, Ashley L.; Guerrero, Michael S.; Thomas, Keena S.; Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, A. Rick; Bouton, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion turnover is critical for cell motility and invasion. We previously demonstrated that the adaptor molecule Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) promotes adhesion disassembly and breast tumor cell invasion. One of two established binding partners of BCAR3 is the adaptor molecule, p130Cas. In this study, we sought to determine whether signaling through the BCAR3/Cas complex was responsible for the cellular functions of BCAR3. We show that the entire pool of BCAR3 is in complex with Cas in invasive breast tumor cells and that these proteins co-localize in dynamic cellular adhesions. While accumulation of BCAR3 in adhesions did not require Cas binding, a direct interaction between BCAR3 and Cas was necessary for efficient dissociation of BCAR3 from adhesions. The dissociation rates of Cas and two other adhesion molecules, α-actinin and talin, were also significantly slower in the presence of a Cas-binding mutant of BCAR3, suggesting that turnover of the entire adhesion complex was delayed under these conditions. As was the case for adhesion turnover, BCAR3-Cas interactions were found to be important for BCAR3-mediated breast tumor cell chemotaxis toward serum and invasion in Matrigel. Previous work demonstrated that BCAR3 is a potent activator of Rac1, which in turn is an important regulator of adhesion dynamics and invasion. However, in contrast to wildtype BCAR3, ectopic expression of the Cas-binding mutant of BCAR3 failed to induce Rac1 activity in breast cancer cells. Together, these data show that the ability of BCAR3 to promote adhesion disassembly, tumor cell migration and invasion, and Rac1 activity is dependent on its ability to bind to Cas. The activity of BCAR3-Cas complexes as a functional unit in breast cancer is further supported by the co-expression of these molecules in multiple subtypes of human breast tumors. PMID:27109104

  16. The interaction between uPAR and vitronectin triggers ligand-independent adhesion signalling by integrins

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Schulte, Carsten; Buttiglione, Valentina; De Lorenzi, Valentina; Piontini, Andrea; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Madsen, Chris D; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a non-integrin vitronectin (VN) cell adhesion receptor linked to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid anchor. Through structure–function analyses of uPAR, VN and integrins, we document that uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to VN triggers a novel type of integrin signalling that is independent of integrin–matrix engagement. The signalling is fully active on VN mutants deficient in integrin binding site and is also efficiently transduced by integrins deficient in ligand binding. Although integrin ligation is dispensable, signalling is crucially dependent upon an active conformation of the integrin and its association with intracellular adaptors such as talin. This non-canonical integrin signalling is not restricted to uPAR as it poses no structural constraints to the receptor mediating cell attachment. In contrast to canonical integrin signalling, where integrins form direct mechanical links between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, the molecular mechanism enabling the crosstalk between non-integrin adhesion receptors and integrins is dependent upon membrane tension. This suggests that for this type of signalling, the membrane represents a critical component of the molecular clutch. PMID:25168639

  17. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part A: Surface characterization of titanium dioxide, titantium and titanium 6% Al to 4% V powders: Interaction with water, hydrogen chloride and polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The titanium dioxide surface is discussed. Polymer adhesive are also discussed. Titanium powders are considered. Characterization techniques are also considered. Interactions with polymers, water vapor, and HCl are reported. Adsorbents are characterized.

  18. The atomic nature of polymer-metal interactions in adhesion, friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of the solid polymers PTFE and polyimide in contact with various metals were studied using field ion microscopy, Auger emission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that the polymers will transfer to a clean tungsten surface on simple tough contact, forming a chemical bond. With PTFE, it is hypothesized that the bonding is of the carbon to the metal surface, while with the polyimide, both oxygen and carbon bonding to the tungsten surface are possible. In sliding contact, the friction process itself can initiate polymer film formation. The formation of such films has been suggested as a form of extreme pressure lubrication.

  19. Mechanisms and Functions of Vinculin Interactions with Phospholipids at Cell Adhesion Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Tina; Brown, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein vinculin is a major regulator of cell adhesion and attaches to the cell surface by binding to specific phospholipids. Structural, biochemical, and biological studies provided much insight into how vinculin binds to membranes, what components it recognizes, and how lipid binding is regulated. Here we discuss the roles and mechanisms of phospholipids in regulating the structure and function of vinculin and of its muscle-specific metavinculin splice variant. A full appreciation of these processes is necessary for understanding how vinculin regulates cell motility, migration, and wound healing, and for understanding of its role in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26728462

  20. Direct Ca2+-dependent Heterophilic Interaction between Desmosomal Cadherins, Desmoglein and Desmocollin, Contributes to Cell–Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chitaev, Nikolai A.; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.

    1997-01-01

    Human fibrosarcoma cells, HT-1080, feature extensive adherens junctions, lack mature desmosomes, and express a single known desmosomal protein, Desmoglein 2 (Dsg2). Transfection of these cells with bovine Desmocollin 1a (Dsc1a) caused dramatic changes in the subcellular distribution of endogenous Dsg2. Both cadherins clustered in the areas of the adherens junctions, whereas only a minor portion of Dsg2 was seen in these areas in the parental cells. Deletion mapping showed that intact extracellular cadherin-like repeats of Dsc1a (Arg1-Thr170) are required for the translocation of Dsg2. Deletion of the intracellular C-domain that mediates the interaction of Dsc1a with plakoglobin, or the CSI region that is involved in the binding to desmoplakin, had no effect. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments of cell lysates stably expressing Dsc1a with anti-Dsc or -Dsg antibodies demonstrate that the desmosomal cadherins, Dsg2 and Dsc1a, are involved in a direct Ca2+-dependent interaction. This conclusion was further supported by the results of solid phase binding experiments. These showed that the Dsc1a fragment containing cadherin-like repeats 1 and 2 binds directly to the extracellular portion of Dsg in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The contribution of the Dsg/ Dsc interaction to cell–cell adhesion was tested by coculturing HT-1080 cells expressing Dsc1a with HT-1080 cells lacking Dsc but expressing myc-tagged plakoglobin (MPg). In the latter cells, MPg and the endogenous Dsg form stable complexes. The observed specific coimmunoprecipitation of MPg by anti-Dsc antibodies in coculture indicates that an intercellular interaction between Dsc1 and Dsg is involved in cell–cell adhesion. PMID:9214392

  1. Vinculin-p130Cas interaction is critical for focal adhesion dynamics and mechano-transduction.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2014-03-01

    Adherent cells, when mechanically stressed, show a wide range of responses including large-scale changes in their mechanical behaviour and gene expression pattern. This is in part facilitated by activating the focal adhesion (FA) protein p130Cas through force-induced conformational changes that lead to the phosphorylation by src family kinases. Janostiak et al. [Janostiak et al. Cell Mol Life Sci (2013) DOI 10.1007/s00018-013-1450-x] have reported that the phosphorylation site Y12 on the SH3 domain of p130Cas modulates the binding with vinculin, a prominent mechano-coupling protein in FAs. Tension changes in FAs (due to the anchorage of the SH3 domain and C-terminal) bring about an extension of the substrate domain of p130Cas by unmasking the phosphorylation sites. These observations demonstrate that vinculin is an important modulator of the p130Cas-mediated mechano-transduction pathway in cells. The central aim should be now to test that vinculin is critical for p130Cas incorporation into the focal adhesion complex and for transmitting forces to the p130Cas molecule.

  2. PLGA nanometer surface features manipulate fibronectin interactions for improved vascular cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Derick C; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2007-06-01

    The largest cause of mortality in the Western world is atherosclerotic vascular disease. Many of these diseases require synthetic vascular grafts; however, their patency rate is only 30% in small (<6 mm) diameter vascular grafts after 5 years of implantation. In an effort to increase small diameter vascular graft success, researchers have been designing random nanostructured surface features which enhance vascular cell functions. However, for the present study, highly-controllable, nanostructured features on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces were formulated. To create ordered nanostructured roughness on PLGA surfaces, either 500, 200, or 100 nm polystyrene nanospheres were separately placed onto mica. These were then used as a template for creating an inverse poly(dimethylsiloxane) mold which was utilized to cast PLGA. Compared to all other PLGA films formulated, AFM results demonstrated greater initial fibronectin spreading on PLGA which possessed spherical 200 nm features. Compared to smooth PLGA, PLGA with 500 or 100 nm surface features, results further showed that PLGA with 200 nm spherical features promoted vascular cell (specifically, endothelial, and smooth muscle cell) adhesion. In this manner, the present study demonstrated a specific nanometer surface feature size that promoted fibronectin spreading and subsequent vascular cell adhesion; criteria critical to vascular graft success.

  3. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges (Porifera): an ancestor cell-cell adhesion event based on the carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Coutinho, Cristiano C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2009-08-01

    Marine sponges (Porifera) are ancient and simple eumetazoans. They constitute key organisms in the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals. We now demonstrated that pure sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges are responsible for the species-specific cell-cell interaction in these invertebrates. This conclusion was based on the following observations: (1) each species of marine sponge has a single population of sulfated polysaccharide, which differ among the species in their sugar composition and sulfate content; (2) sulfated polysaccharides from sponge interact with each other in a species-specific way, as indicated by an affinity chromatography assay, and this interaction requires calcium; (3) homologous, but not heterologous, sulfated polysaccharide inhibits aggregation of dissociated sponge cells; (4) we also observed a parallel between synthesis of the sulfated polysaccharide and formation of large aggregates of sponge cells, known as primmorphs. Once aggregation reached a plateau, the demand for the de novo synthesis of sulfated polysaccharides ceased. Heparin can mimic the homologous sulfated polysaccharide on the in vitro interaction and also as an inhibitor of aggregation of the dissociated sponge cells. However, this observation is not relevant for the biology of the sponge since heparin is not found in the invertebrate. In conclusion, marine sponges display an ancestor event of cell-cell adhesion, based on the calcium-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

  4. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  5. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 interacts with adhesion complexes and promotes cell migration, survival, and anchorage independent growth.

    PubMed

    Frisan, Teresa; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Dryselius, Rikard; Masucci, Maria G

    2012-12-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme of unknown function that is highly expressed in neurons and overexpressed in several human cancers. UCH-L1 has been implicated in the regulation of phenotypic properties associated with malignant cell growth but the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. By comparing cells expressing catalytically active or inactive versions of UCH-L1, we found that the active enzyme enhances cell adhesion, spreading, and migration; inhibits anoikis; and promotes anchorage independent growth. UCH-L1 accumulates at the motile edge of the cell membrane during the initial phases of adhesion, colocalizes with focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p120-catenin, and vinculin, and enhances the formation of focal adhesions, which correlates with enhanced FAK activation. The involvement of UCH-L1 in the regulation of focal adhesions and adherens junctions is supported by coimmunoprecipitation with key components of these complexes, including FAK, paxillin, p120-catenin, β-catenin, and vinculin. UCH-L1 stabilizes focal adhesion signaling in the absence of adhesion, as assessed by reduced caspase-dependent cleavage of FAK following cell detachment and sustained activity of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings offer new insights on the molecular interactions through which the deubiquitinating enzyme regulates the survival, proliferation, and metastatic potential of malignant cells.

  6. Interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule-5 positive elements and their surroundings in the rodent visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Emily A; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Gahmberg, Carl G; Tian, Li; Majewska, Ania K

    2013-11-01

    The telencephalon-associated intercellular adhesion molecule 5 (Telencephalin; ICAM-5) regulates dendritic maturation, a process dependent on extracellular proteases in the developing brain. Using transmission electron microscopy, we have reported previously that ICAM-5 is localized primarily in dendritic protrusions during a period of robust synaptogenesis (P14 in mouse visual cortex). As dendritic protrusions mature (P28), ICAM-5 immuno-reactivity shifts from dendritic protrusions into dendritic shafts. ICAM-5 immuno-reactivity does not shift in animals lacking the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a protease shown to regulate ICAM-5 cleavage. Cleaved ICAM-5 (soluble fraction; sICAM-5) has been shown to bind to a number of receptors located in neighboring structures, resulting in a variety of downstream signaling events, including enhanced neurotransmission. Here, we investigated the potential MMP-regulated ICAM-5 signaling by examining the relationship between ICAM-5 immuno-positive elements and the structures that directly neighbor them.

  7. Expression of COX-2 in platelet-monocyte interactions occurs via combinatorial regulation involving adhesion and cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Dan A.; Tolley, Neal D.; Bemis-Standoli, Kristi; Martinez, Mark L.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Morrow, Jason D.; Prescott, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    Tight regulation of COX-2 expression is a key feature controlling eicosanoid production in atherosclerosis and other inflammatory syndromes. Adhesive interactions between platelets and monocytes occur in these conditions and deliver specific signals that trigger inflammatory gene expression. Using a cellular model of monocyte signaling induced by activated human platelets, we identified the central posttranscriptional mechanisms that regulate timing and magnitude of COX-2 expression. Tethering of monocytes to platelets and to purified P-selectin, a key adhesion molecule displayed by activated platelets, induces NF-κB activation and COX-2 promoter activity. Nevertheless, COX-2 mRNA is rapidly degraded, leading to aborted protein synthesis. Time-dependent signaling of monocytes induces a second phase of transcript accumulation accompanied by COX-2 enzyme synthesis and eicosanoid production. Here, generation of IL-1β, a proinflammatory cytokine, promoted stabilization of COX-2 mRNA by silencing of the AU-rich mRNA decay element (ARE) in the 3′-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the mRNA. Consistent with observed mRNA stabilization, activated platelets or IL-1β treatment induced cytoplasmic accumulation and enhanced ARE binding of the mRNA stability factor HuR in monocytes. These findings demonstrate that activated platelets induce COX-2 synthesis in monocytes by combinatorial signaling to transcriptional and posttranscriptional checkpoints. These checkpoints may be altered in disease and therefore useful as targets for antiinflammatory intervention. PMID:16998585

  8. Infection of orthopedic implants with emphasis on bacterial adhesion process and techniques used in studying bacterial-material interactions.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marta; Monteiro, Fernando J; Ferraz, Maria P

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they are the principal causative agents of two major types of infection affecting bone: septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, which involve the inflammatory destruction of joint and bone. Bacterial adhesion is the first and most important step in implant infection. It is a complex process influenced by environmental factors, bacterial properties, material surface properties and by the presence of serum or tissue proteins. Properties of the substrate, such as chemical composition of the material, surface charge, hydrophobicity, surface roughness and the presence of specific proteins at the surface, are all thought to be important in the initial cell attachment process. The biofilm mode of growth of infecting bacteria on an implant surface protects the organisms from the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. The research for novel therapeutic strategies is incited by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This work will provide an overview of the mechanisms and factors involved in bacterial adhesion, the techniques that are currently being used studying bacterial-material interactions as well as provide insight into future directions in the field.

  9. In vitro biocompatibility and cellular interactions of a chitosan/dextran-based hydrogel for postsurgical adhesion prevention.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Manal A; Cabral, Jaydee D; Brooks, Heather J L; McConnell, Michelle A; Fitzpatrick, Clare; Hanton, Lyall R; Moratti, Stephen C

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we report the in vitro biocompatibility and cellular interactions of a chitosan/dextran-based (CD) hydrogel and its components as determined by mutagenicity, cytotoxicity, cytokine/chemokine response, and wound healing assays. The CD hydrogel, developed for postsurgical adhesion prevention in ear, nose, and throat surgeries, was shown by previously published experiments in animal and human trials to be effective. The hydrogel was synthesized from the reaction between succinyl chitosan (SC) and oxidized dextran (DA). Cytotoxicity was assessed in an xCELLigence system and cytokine/chemokine responses were measured by ELISA in human macrophage, nasopharyngeal epithelial, and dermal fibroblast cells. A wound healing model utilized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. CD hydrogel and DA were nonmutagenic in the Ames test. CD hydrogel showed moderate cytotoxicity for the cell lines, DA being the cytotoxic component. Some inhibition of wound healing occurred due to the cytotoxic nature of DA. Cells cultured with CD hydrogel showed no increase in TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-8 levels. It is hypothesized that the cytotoxicity of DA is moderated when reacted with SC and that CD hydrogel inhibits unwanted fibroblastic invasion preventing scarring and adhesions. Together with the previously published human and animal trial data, the results indicate CD hydrogel is biocompatible in the setting of endoscopic sinus surgery. This work represents the first study of CD hydrogel with human cell lines and provides essential information for its future application in biomedicine.

  10. Dynamic and Static Interactions between p120 Catenin and E-Cadherin Regulate the Stability of Cell-Cell Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Lee, Seung-Hye; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guang-Yao; Smith, Matthew J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-04-26

    The association of p120 catenin (p120) with the juxtamembrane domain (JMD) of the cadherin cytoplasmic tail is critical for the surface stability of cadherin-catenin cell-cell adhesion complexes. Here, we present the crystal structure of p120 isoform 4A in complex with the JMD core region (JMD{sub core}) of E-cadherin. The p120 armadillo repeat domain contains modular binding pockets that are complementary to electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the JMD{sub core}. Single-residue mutations within the JMD{sub core}-binding site of p120 abolished its interaction with E- and N-cadherins in vitro and in cultured cells. These mutations of p120 enabled us to clearly differentiate between N-cadherin-dependent and -independent steps of neuronal dendritic spine morphogenesis crucial for synapse development. NMR studies revealed that p120 regulates the stability of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by associating with the majority of the JMD, including residues implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Hakai-dependent ubiquitination of E-cadherin, through its discrete dynamic and static binding sites.

  11. Infection of orthopedic implants with emphasis on bacterial adhesion process and techniques used in studying bacterial-material interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Marta; Monteiro, Fernando J.; Ferraz, Maria P.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they are the principal causative agents of two major types of infection affecting bone: septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, which involve the inflammatory destruction of joint and bone. Bacterial adhesion is the first and most important step in implant infection. It is a complex process influenced by environmental factors, bacterial properties, material surface properties and by the presence of serum or tissue proteins. Properties of the substrate, such as chemical composition of the material, surface charge, hydrophobicity, surface roughness and the presence of specific proteins at the surface, are all thought to be important in the initial cell attachment process. The biofilm mode of growth of infecting bacteria on an implant surface protects the organisms from the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. The research for novel therapeutic strategies is incited by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This work will provide an overview of the mechanisms and factors involved in bacterial adhesion, the techniques that are currently being used studying bacterial-material interactions as well as provide insight into future directions in the field. PMID:23507884

  12. Zyxin phosphorylation at serine 142 modulates the zyxin head-tail interaction to alter cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Call, Greg S; Chung, Jarom Y; Davis, John A; Price, Braden D; Primavera, Tyler S; Thomson, Nick C; Wagner, Mark V; Hansen, Marc D H

    2011-01-21

    Zyxin is an actin regulatory protein that is concentrated at sites of actin-membrane association, particularly cell junctions. Zyxin participates in actin dynamics by binding VASP, an interaction that occurs via proline-rich N-terminal ActA repeats. An intramolecular association of the N-terminal LIM domains at or near the ActA repeats can prevent VASP and other binding partners from binding full-length zyxin. Such a head-tail interaction likely accounts for how zyxin function in actin dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration can be regulated by the cell. Since zyxin binding to several partners, via the LIM domains, requires phosphorylation, it seems likely that zyxin phosphorylation might alter the head-tail interaction and, thus, zyxin activity. Here we show that zyxin point mutants at a known phosphorylation site, serine 142, alter the ability of a zyxin fragment to directly bind a separate zyxin LIM domains fragment protein. Further, expression of the zyxin phosphomimetic mutant results in increased localization to cell-cell contacts of MDCK cells and generates a cellular phenotype, namely inability to disassemble cell-cell contacts, precisely like that produced by expression of zyxin mutants that lack the entire regulatory LIM domain region. These data suggest that zyxin phosphorylation at serine 142 results in release of the head-tail interaction, changing zyxin activity at cell-cell contacts.

  13. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  14. Raver1 Interactions with Vinculin and RNA Suggest a Feed-Forward Pathway in Directing mRNA to Focal Adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Yogesha, S.D.; Izard, Tina; Scripps

    2009-09-11

    The translational machinery of the cell relocalizes to focal adhesions following the activation of integrin receptors. This response allows for rapid, local production of components needed for adhesion complex assembly and signaling. Vinculin links focal adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton following its activation by integrin signaling, which severs intramolecular interactions of vinculin's head and tail (Vt) domains. Our vinculin:raver1 crystal structures and binding studies show that activated Vt selectively interacts with one of the three RNA recognition motifs of raver1, that the vinculin:raver1 complex binds to F-actin, and that raver1 binds selectively to RNA, including a sequence found in vinculin mRNA. Further, mutation of residues that mediate interaction of raver1 with vinculin abolish their colocalization in cells. These findings suggest a feed-forward model where vinculin activation at focal adhesions provides a scaffold for recruitment of raver1 and its mRNA cargo to facilitate the production of components of adhesion complexes.

  15. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  16. Visualization of CD2 interaction with LFA-3 and determination of the two-dimensional dissociation constant for adhesion receptors in a contact area

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Many adhesion receptors have high three-dimensional dissociation constants (Kd) for counter-receptors compared to the KdS of receptors for soluble extracellular ligands such as cytokines and hormones. Interaction of the T lymphocyte adhesion receptor CD2 with its counter- receptor, LFA-3, has a high solution-phase Kd (16 microM at 37 degrees C), yet the CD2/LFA-3 interaction serves as an effective adhesion mechanism. We have studied the interaction of CD2 with LFA-3 in the contact area between Jurkat T lymphoblasts and planar phospholipid bilayers containing purified, fluorescently labeled LFA-3. Redistribution and lateral mobility of LFA-3 were measured in contact areas as functions of the initial LFA-3 surface density and of time after contact of the cells with the bilayers. LFA-3 accumulated at sites of contact with a half-time of approximately 15 min, consistent with the previously determined kinetics of adhesion strengthening. The two-dimensional Kd for the CD2/LFA-3 interaction was 21 molecules/microns 2, which is lower than the surface densities of CD2 on T cells and LFA-3 on most target or stimulator cells. Thus, formation of CD2/LFA-3 complexes should be highly favored in physiological interactions. Comparison of the two-dimensional (membrane- bound) and three-dimensional (solution-phase) KdS suggest that cell- cell contact favors CD2/LFA-3 interaction to a greater extent than that predicted by the three-dimensional Kd and the intermembrane distance at the site of contact. LFA-3 molecules in the contact site were capable of lateral diffusion in the plane of the phospholipid bilayer and did not appear to be irreversibly trapped in the contact area, consistent with a rapid off-rate. These data provide insights into the function of low affinity interactions in adhesion. PMID:8636222

  17. Cell/surface interactions and adhesion on bioactive glass 45S5.

    PubMed

    Levy, S; Van Dalen, M; Agonafer, S; Soboyejo, W O

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of surface texture (smooth versus rough) on cell/surface interactions on the bioactive glass, 45S5. The cell surface interactions associated with cell spreading are studied using cell culture experiments. Subsequent energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is also used to reveal the distributions of calcium, phosphorous, sodium and oxygen on the surfaces of the bioactive glasses. The implications of the results are then discussed for the applications of textured bioactive glasses in medicine.

  18. A human colon carcinoma cell line exhibits adhesive interactions with P-selectin under fluid flow via a PSGL-1-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, D. J.; Ding, H.; Atkinson, W. J.; Vachino, G.; Camphausen, R. T.; Cumming, D. A.; Luscinskas, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    It has been postulated that endothelial cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment play a role in metastasis. Using an in vitro flow model, we studied the adhesion of the human colon carcinoma cell line KM12-L4 to P-selectin, an inducible endothelial-expressed adhesion molecule involved in leukocyte recruitment. Recombinant forms of P-selectin and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing P-selectin supported attachment and rolling of KM12-L4 cells at 1 to 2 dynes/cm2. The adhesive interactions to P-selectin were abolished by pretreatment of the KM12-L4 cells with neuraminidase but were unaltered by pretreatment of the KM12-L4 cells with O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase, an enzyme that cleaves mucin type glycoproteins such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). PSGL-1 is the only counter-receptor for P-selectin known to mediate myeloid cell adhesion to P-selectin under flow. Flow cytometric and Northern blot analyses revealed that KM12-L4 cells did not express PSGL-1 and monoclonal antibody PL1, a function-blocking monoclonal antibody to PSGL-1, had no inhibitory effect on KM12-L4 adhesion to P-selectin under flow. Compared with HL-60 cells, which express PSGL-1, the KM12-L4 cells exhibited a slightly lower rate of attachment to P-selectin and rolled at a significantly higher velocity. In summary, KM12-L4 human colon carcinoma cells interact with P-selectin, under flow, through a PSGL-1-independent adhesion pathway. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8909255

  19. The interaction between LYVE-1 with hyaluronan on the cell surface may play a role in the diversity of adhesion to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Liu, Hua; He, Yiqing; Liu, Yiwen; Yang, Cuixia; Zhou, Muqing; Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Lian; Hu, Jiajie; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a simple disaccharide unit, can polymerize and is considered a primary component of the extracellular matrix, which has a wide range of biological functions. In recent years, HA was found on the surface of tumor cells. According to previous reports, differing HA content on the cell surface of tumor cells is closely related to lymph node metastases, but the mechanisms mediating this process remained unclear. This research intended to study the surface content of HA on tumor cells and analyze cell adhesive changes caused by the interaction between HA and its lymphatic endothelial receptor (LYVE-1). We screened and observed high HA content on HS-578T breast cells and low HA content on MCF-7 breast cells through particle exclusion, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry experiments. The expression of LYVE-1, the lymph-vessel specific HA receptor, was consistent with our previous report and enhanced the adhesion of HA(high)-HS-578T cells to COS-7(LYVE-1(+)) through HA in cell static adhesion and dynamic parallel plate flow chamber experiments. MCF-7 breast cells contain little HA on the surface; however, our results showed little adhesion difference between MCF-7 cells and COS-7(LYVE-1(+)) and COS-7(LYVE-1(-)) cells. Similar results were observed concerning the adhesion of HS-578T cells or MCF-7 cells to SVEC4-10 cells. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that the cell surface HA content of high transfer tumor cells was rich, and we visualized the cross-linking of HA cable structures, which may activate LYVE-1 on lymphatic endothelial cells, promoting tumor adhesion. In summary, high-low cell surface HA content of tumor cells through the interaction with LYVE-1 leads to adhesion differences.

  20. Collagen remodeling by phagocytosis is determined by collagen substrate topology and calcium-dependent interactions of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA in cell adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arora, P. D.; Wang, Y.; Bresnick, A.; Dawson, J.; Janmey, P. A.; McCulloch, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We examine how collagen substrate topography, free intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i, and the association of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMIIA) at collagen adhesions are regulated to enable collagen phagocytosis. Fibroblasts plated on planar, collagen-coated substrates show minimal increase of [Ca2+]i, minimal colocalization of gelsolin and NMMIIA in focal adhesions, and minimal intracellular collagen degradation. In fibroblasts plated on collagen-coated latex beads there are large increases of [Ca2+]i, time- and Ca2+-dependent enrichment of NMMIIA and gelsolin at collagen adhesions, and abundant intracellular collagen degradation. NMMIIA knockdown retards gelsolin recruitment to adhesions and blocks collagen phagocytosis. Gelsolin exhibits tight, Ca2+-dependent binding to full-length NMMIIA. Gelsolin domains G4–G6 selectively require Ca2+ to interact with NMMIIA, which is restricted to residues 1339–1899 of NMMIIA. We conclude that cell adhesion to collagen presented on beads activates Ca2+ entry and promotes the formation of phagosomes enriched with NMMIIA and gelsolin. The Ca2+ -dependent interaction of gelsolin and NMMIIA in turn enables actin remodeling and enhances collagen degradation by phagocytosis. PMID:23325791

  1. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  2. CREG1 Interacts with Sec8 to Promote Cardiomyogenic Differentiation and Cell-Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Qi, Yanmei; Li, Shaohua; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Saadat, Siavash; Hsu, June; Rahimi, Saum A; Lee, Leonard Y; Yan, Chenghui; Tian, Xiaoxiang; Han, Yanling

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the regulation of cell-cell interactions during the formation of compact myocardial structures is important for achieving true cardiac regeneration through enhancing the integration of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes into the recipient myocardium. In this study, we found that cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes 1 (CREG1) is highly expressed in both embryonic and adult hearts. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses demonstrated that CREG1 is required for differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell into cardiomyocytes and the formation of cohesive myocardium-like structures in a cell-autonomous fashion. Furthermore, CREG1 directly interacts with Sec8 of the exocyst complex, which tethers vesicles to the plasma membrane. Site-directed mutagenesis and rescue of CREG1 knockout ES cells showed that CREG1 binding to Sec8 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation and cohesion. Mechanistically, CREG1, Sec8, and N-cadherin colocalize at intercalated discs in vivo and are enriched at cell-cell junctions in cultured cardiomyocytes. CREG1 overexpression enhances the assembly of adherens and gap junctions. By contrast, its knockout inhibits the Sec8-N-cadherin interaction and induces their degradation. These results suggest that the CREG1 binding to Sec8 enhances the assembly of intercellular junctions and promotes cardiomyogenesis. Stem Cells 2016.

  3. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  4. IL-17 and insulin/IGF1 enhance adhesion of prostate cancer cells to vascular endothelial cells through CD44-VCAM-1 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Parajuli, Keshab R.; Qu, Yine; Mei, Jiandong; Chen, Zhiquan; Zhang, Hui; Khismatullin, Damir B.; You, Zongbing

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extravasation is a critical step in cancer metastasis, in which adhesion of intravascular cancer cells to the vascular endothelial cells is controlled by cell surface adhesion molecules. The role of interleukin-17 (IL-17), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in adhesion of prostate cancer cells to the vascular endothelial cells is unknown, which is the subject of the present study. METHODS Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP, and C4-2B) were analyzed for expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), integrins, and cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) using flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. The effects of IL-17, insulin and IGF1 on VCAM-1 expression and adhesion of prostate cancer cells to HUVECs were examined. The interaction of VCAM-1 and CD44 was assessed using immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS Insulin and IGF1 acted with IL-17 to increase VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs. PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP, and C4-2B cells expressed β1 integrin but not α4 integrin. CD44 was expressed by PC-3 and DU-145 cells but not by LNCaP or C4-2B cells. When HUVECs were treated with IL-17, insulin or IGF1, particularly with a combination of IL-17 and insulin (or IGF1), adhesion of PC-3 and DU-145 cells to HUVECs was significantly increased. In contrast, adhesion of LNCaP and C4-2B cells to HUVECs was not affected by treatment of HUVECs with IL-17 and/or insulin/IGF1. CD44 expressed in PC-3 cells physically bound to VCAM-1 expressed in HUVECs. CONCLUSIONS CD44-VCAM-1 interaction mediates the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and HUVECs. IL-17 and insulin/IGF1 enhance adhesion of prostate cancer cells to vascular endothelial cells through increasing VCAM-1 expression in the vascular endothelial cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 may act with insulin/IGF1 to promote prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:25683512

  5. S-linked protein homocysteinylation: identifying targets based on structural, physicochemical and protein-protein interactions of homocysteinylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Silla, Yumnam; Sundaramoorthy, Elayanambi; Talwar, Puneet; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2013-05-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine, a thiol-containing amino acid is associated with a wide spectrum of disease conditions. A majority (>80 %) of the circulating homocysteine exist in protein-bound form. Homocysteine can bind to free cysteine residues in the protein or could cleave accessible cysteine disulfide bonds via thiol disulfide exchange reaction. Binding of homocysteine to proteins could potentially alter the structure and/or function of the protein. To date only 21 proteins have been experimentally shown to bind homocysteine. In this study we attempted to identify other proteins that could potentially bind to homocysteine based on the criteria that such proteins will have significant 3D structural homology with the proteins that have been experimentally validated and have solvent accessible cysteine residues either with high dihedral strain energy (for cysteine-cysteine disulfide bonds) or low pKa (for free cysteine residues). This analysis led us to the identification of 78 such proteins of which 68 proteins had 154 solvent accessible disulfide cysteine pairs with high dihedral strain energy and 10 proteins had free cysteine residues with low pKa that could potentially bind to homocysteine. Further, protein-protein interaction network was built to identify the interacting partners of these putative homocysteine binding proteins. We found that the 21 experimentally validated proteins had 174 interacting partners while the 78 proteins identified in our analysis had 445 first interacting partners. These proteins are mainly involved in biological activities such as complement and coagulation pathway, focal adhesion, ECM-receptor, ErbB signalling and cancer pathways, etc. paralleling the disease-specific attributes associated with hyperhomocysteinemia.

  6. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  7. Molecular-scale tribology of amorphous carbon coatings: effects of film thickness, adhesion, and long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, G T; Mikulski, Paul T; Harrison, Judith A

    2002-06-19

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to investigate the atomic-scale friction and wear when hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) counterfaces are in sliding contact with diamond (111) surfaces coated with amorphous, hydrogen-free carbon films. Two films, with approximately the same ratio of sp(3)-to-sp(2) carbon, but different thicknesses, have been examined. Both systems give a similar average friction in the load range examined. Above a critical load, a series of tribochemical reactions occur resulting in a significant restructuring of the film. This restructuring is analogous to the "run-in" observed in macroscopic friction experiments and reduces the friction. The contribution of adhesion between the probe (counterface) and the sample to friction was examined by varying the saturation of the counterface. Decreasing the degree of counterface saturation, by reducing the hydrogen termination, increases the friction. Finally, the contribution of long-range interactions to friction was examined by using two potential energy functions that differ only in their long-range forces to examine friction in the same system.

  8. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  9. The deposition of anti-adhesive ultra-thin teflon-like films and their interaction with polymers during hot embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszewski, R. W.; Schift, H.; Schnyder, B.; Schneuwly, A.; Gröning, P.

    1999-04-01

    The chemical and physical interactions of ultra-thin teflon-like films at interfaces are a surface science problem with many technological implications. Such films are the material of choice for protective layers and anti-adhesive coatings. During the replication of microstructures in polymers by hot embossing, interfacial forces between the master and the replica need to be reduced by an anti-adhesive layer, in order to ensure a clean demolding process. In this work, we investigated two different teflon-like films, one obtained by ion sputtering, and the other by plasma polymerization. Using both deposition methods, we deposited thin fluorinated films on nickel substrates and conducted depth-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements for a detailed comparison. In a subsequent step, nickel surfaces covered by both anti-adhesive coatings were hot embossed into two different polymers. The chemical composition of both the anti-adhesive film and the polymer replicas was monitored, as a function of the number of embossings made with the same Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-treated nickel stamp. During the embossing process, a transfer of material was found to occur from the teflon-like film to the embossed polymer, consisting of fluorinated entities or small polymer chains. The influence of the operating parameters on these phenomena was also investigated and resulted in a better understanding of the film/polymer interactions under pressure and at high temperature.

  10. Gordon Conference on Microbial Adhesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    immunity against certain pathogens, the role of exopolysaccharides in adhesion and the role of lectin-glycolipid interactions in adhesion. Have...pathogenesis? What governs the specificity of p; exopolysaccharides in adhesion to surfaces? This session emphasized the molecular aspects of

  11. Regulation of cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and Rac-1 by integrin linked kinase.

    PubMed

    Boulter, Etienne; Grall, Dominique; Cagnol, Sébastien; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2006-07-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors of the integrin family initiate changes in cell shape and motility by recruiting signaling components that coordinate these events. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is one such partner of beta1 integrins that participates in dynamic rearrangement of cell-matrix adhesions and cell spreading by mechanisms that are not well understood. To further elucidate the role of ILK in these events, we engineered a chimeric molecule comprising ILK fused to a membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein (ILK-GFP-F). ILK-GFP-F is highly enriched in cell-matrix adhesions, and its expression in fibroblasts leads to an accumulation of focal adhesions (2-5 microm) and elongated adhesions (>5 microm). ILK-GFP-F enhances cell spreading on fibronectin and induces a constitutive increase in the levels of GTP-bound Rac-1. Conversely, ILK knock-down by siRNA transfection decreases active Rac-1. Endogenous ILK was found to associate with PKL (paxillin kinase linker) and the Rac/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor betaPIX. Further, expression of a dominant negative betaPIX mutant reversed the increase in active Rac-1 levels of ILK-GFP-F-expressing cells, thus placing betaPIX in the pathway leading from ILK to Rac-1 activation. However, expression of constitutively active Rac only partially restores the spreading defects of ILK-depleted cells, suggesting that an additional ILK-dependent signal is required for cell spreading.

  12. Inhibition of adhesive interaction between multiple myeloma and bone marrow stromal cells by PPARgamma cross talk with NF-kappaB and C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Hua; Yang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Xiaohu; Farrar, William L

    2007-12-15

    Binding of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) triggers expression of adhesive molecules and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), promoting MM cell growth, survival, drug resistance, and migration, which highlights the possibility of developing and validating novel anti-MM therapeutic strategies targeting MM cells-host BMSC interactions and their sequelae. Recently, we have found that expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands can potently inhibit IL-6-regulated MM cell growth. Here we demonstrate that PPARgamma agonists 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone significantly suppress cell-cell adhesive events, including expression of adhesion molecules and IL-6 secretion from BMSCs triggered by adhesion of MM cells, as well as overcome drug resistance by a PPARgamma-dependent mechanism. The synthetic and natural PPARgamma agonists have diverging and overlapping mechanisms blocking transactivation of transcription factors NF-kappaB and 5'-CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta). Both 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone blocked C/EBPbeta transcriptional activity by forming PPARgamma complexes with C/EBPbeta. 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone also blocked NF-kappaB activation by recruiting the coactivator PGC-1 from p65/p50 complexes. In addition, 15-d-PGJ2 had a non-PPARgamma-dependent effect by inactivation of phosphorylation of IKK and IkappaB. These studies provide the framework for PPARgamma-based pharmacological strategies targeting adhesive interactions of MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment.

  13. Receptor-like Molecules on Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells Interact with an Adhesion Factor from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yosuke; Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Satoh, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri, mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor. MapA is expressed in L. reuteri strains and adheres to piglet gastric mucus, collagen type I, and human intestinal epithelial cells such as Caco-2. The aim of this study was to identify molecules that mediate the attachment of MapA from L. reuteri to the intestinal epithelial cell surface by investigating the adhesion of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. MapA-binding receptor-like molecules were detected in Caco-2 cell lysates by 2D-PAGE. Two proteins, annexin A13 (ANXA13) and paralemmin (PALM), were identified by MALDI TOF-MS. The results of a pull-down assay showed that MapA bound directly to ANXA13 and PALM. Fluorescence microscopy studies confirmed that MapA binding to ANXA13 and PALM was colocalized on the Caco-2 cell membrane. To evaluate whether ANXA13 and PALM are important for MapA adhesion, ANXA13 and PALM knockdown cell lines were established. The adhesion of MapA to the abovementioned cell lines was reduced compared with that to wild-type Caco-2 cells. These knockdown experiments established the importance of these receptor-like molecules in MapA adhesion.

  14. Biomimetic design of platelet adhesion inhibitors to block integrin α2β1-collagen interactions: II. Inhibitor library, screening, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yan

    2014-04-29

    Platelet adhesion on collagen mediated by integrin α2β1 has been proven important in arterial thrombus formation, leading to an exigent demand on development of potent inhibitors for the integrin α2β1-collagen binding. In the present study, a biomimetic design strategy of platelet adhesion inhibitors was established, based on the affinity binding model of integrin proposed in part I. First, a heptapeptide library containing 8000 candidates was designed to functionally mimic the binding motif of integrin α2β1. Then, each heptapeptide in the library was docked onto a collagen molecule for the assessment of its affinity, followed by a screening based on its structure similarity to the original structure in the affinity binding model. Eight candidates were then selected for further screening by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thereafter, three candidates chosen from MD simulations were separately added into the physiological saline containing separated integrin and collagen, to check their abilities for blocking the integrin-collagen interaction using MD simulations. Of these three candidates, significant inhibition was observed in the presence of LWWNSYY. Finally, the binding affinity of LWWNSYY for collagen was demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Moreover, significant inhibition of platelet adhesion in the presence of LWWNSYY has been experimentally validated. This work has thus developed an effective strategy for the biomimetic design of peptide-based platelet adhesion inhibitors.

  15. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  16. Extended interaction of β1 integrin subunit-deficient cells (GD25) with surfaces modified with fibronectin-derived peptides: culture optimization, adhesion and cytokine panel studies

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Heather; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2008-01-01

    The modification of biomaterials with extracellular matrix-mimicking factors to influence the cellular response through mainly integrin-mediated signaling is a common technique. The inherent limitations of antibody-inhibition studies necessitate the use of complementary methods to block integrin function to confirm cell–surface interaction. In this study, we employed a β1 integrin-deficient cell line, GD25, to investigate the role of β1 subunit in cell adhesion and subsequent cytokine (granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor -1, regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted, tumor necrosis factor-α) release kinetics in the presence of tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (sIPN) modified with fibronectin (FN)-mimic peptides (RGD, PHSRN). Culture conditions (i.e. seeding density, medium, serum supplementation) were optimized for long-term observation. Differences in cell adhesion, cell viability and cytokine release behavior were dependent on the presence of the β1 integrin subunit, FN, sIPN cast method and peptide identity. By comparing two complementary techniques for assaying integrin function, we observed both similarities (i.e. decreased adhesion to FN-absorbed TCPS and increased IL-1β release at 96 h) and differences (i.e. no difference in adhesion or IL-1β release in the presence of sIPN surfaces) when the function of the β1 subunit was blocked in cell adhesion and signaling in the presence of biomaterials. PMID:18514047

  17. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  18. Moesin interacts with the cytoplasmic region of intercellular adhesion molecule-3 and is redistributed to the uropod of T lymphocytes during cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Serrador, J M; Alonso-Lebrero, J L; del Pozo, M A; Furthmayr, H; Schwartz-Albiez, R; Calvo, J; Lozano, F; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    1997-09-22

    During activation, T lymphocytes become motile cells, switching from a spherical to a polarized shape. Chemokines and other chemotactic cytokines induce lymphocyte polarization with the formation of a uropod in the rear pole, where the adhesion receptors intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), ICAM-3, and CD44 redistribute. We have investigated membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that play a key role in the redistribution of adhesion receptors to the uropod. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the ERM proteins radixin and moesin localized to the uropod of human T lymphoblasts treated with the chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed, and secreted), a polarization-inducing agent; radixin colocalized with arrays of myosin II at the neck of the uropods, whereas moesin decorated the most distal part of the uropod and colocalized with ICAM-1, ICAM-3, and CD44 molecules. Two other cytoskeletal proteins, beta-actin and alpha-tubulin, clustered at the cell leading edge and uropod, respectively, of polarized lymphocytes. Biochemical analysis showed that moesin coimmunoprecipitates with ICAM-3 in T lymphoblasts stimulated with either RANTES or the polarization- inducing anti-ICAM-3 HP2/19 mAb, as well as in the constitutively polarized T cell line HSB-2. In addition, moesin is associated with CD44, but not with ICAM-1, in polarized T lymphocytes. A correlation between the degree of moesin-ICAM-3 interaction and cell polarization was found as determined by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis done in parallel. The moesin-ICAM-3 interaction was specifically mediated by the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-3 as revealed by precipitation of moesin with a GST fusion protein containing the ICAM-3 cytoplasmic tail from metabolically labeled Jurkat T cell lysates. The interaction of moesin with ICAM-3 was greatly diminished when RANTES-stimulated T lymphoblasts were pretreated with the myosin-disrupting drug butanedione monoxime, which

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Disturbance of adhesion upon ablation of thin films by laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedenev, A. V.; Lipatov, E. I.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Orlovskii, Viktor M.; Shulepov, M. A.; Koval', N. N.; Goncharenko, I. M.

    2004-04-01

    The effect of IR and UV laser pulses on thin metal and composite films on glass substrates as a function of the energy density is studied. Upon irradiation by ~300-ns laser pulses with a nonuniform energy-density distribution over the laser-beam cross section, the characteristic regions can be distinguished on the film surface. The dimensions of these regions correlate with the energy distribution in the beam and correspond to the evaporation, melting, and damage conditions caused by thermal stresses. For a uniform energy-density distribution over the laser-beam cross section and a pulse duration of ~20 ns, the adhesion of metal and composite films to glass was disturbed due to induced thermal stresses without substrate melting. The threshold laser-energy densities required for disturbing the adhesion of titanium, titanium nitride, zirconium, niobium, and stainless-steel films on glass substrates are measured. Numerical estimates of the surface temperature and thermal stresses caused by heating show that the film adhesion to a substrate can be overcome by expending a small fraction of the energy, while most of the energy of thermal stresses goes to the formation of cracks and the kinetic energy of escaping film fragments. It is suggested to use pulsed laser radiation to roughly estimate the adhesion of metal and composite films to glass substrates.

  20. Solution structure of the focal adhesion adaptor PINCH LIM1 domain and characterization of its interaction with the integrin-linked kinase ankyrin repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, A; Yang, Y; Wu, C; Qin, J

    2001-02-16

    PINCH is a recently identified adaptor protein that comprises an array of five LIM domains. PINCH functions through LIM-mediated protein-protein interactions that are involved in cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. The LIM1 domain of PINCH interacts with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), thereby mediating focal adhesions via a specific integrin/ILK signaling pathway. We have solved the NMR structure of the PINCH LIM1 domain and characterized its binding to ILK. LIM1 contains two contiguous zinc fingers of the CCHC and CCCH types and adopts a global fold similar to that of functionally distinct LIM domains from cysteine-rich protein and cysteine-rich intestinal protein families with CCHC and CCCC zinc finger types. Gel-filtration and NMR experiments demonstrated a 1:1 complex between PINCH LIM1 and the ankyrin repeat domain of ILK. A chemical shift mapping experiment identified regions in PINCH LIM1 that are important for interaction with ILK. Comparison of surface features between PINCH LIM1 and other functionally different LIM domains indicated that the LIM motif might have a highly variable mode in recognizing various target proteins.

  1. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  2. Leaders in cell adhesion: an interview with Richard Hynes, pioneer of cell-matrix interactions. Interview by Pamela Cowin.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Richard

    2013-12-01

    On a recent visit Richard O Hynes, FRS, HHMI, Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT, graciously agreed to be interviewed in person for the first in Cell Communication and Adhesion's series on "Leaders in Cell Adhesion". In this interview we discussed three things: 1) the early role of family, mentors, and luck on his career path; 2) his major discoveries of fibronectin, integrins and the evolution of extracellular matrix proteins; and 3) his role in, and thoughts on, current science policy. This interview reveals his characteristic calmness and infectious optimism, his spontaneous and down to earth sense of humor, and his great ability to place scientific questions in perspective. The interview, carried out on April 30(th) 2013 is reported here verbatim with only minor editing for clarity.

  3. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  4. The mucin epiglycanin on TA3/Ha carcinoma cells prevents alpha 6 beta 4- mediated adhesion to laminin and kalinin and E-cadherin-mediated cell- cell interaction

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    TA3/Ha murine mammary carcinoma cells grow in suspension, do not adhere to extracellular matrix molecules, but do adhere to hepatocytes and form liver metastases upon intraportal injection. Recently we showed that the integrin alpha 6 beta 4 on the TA3/Ha cells is involved in adhesion to hepatocytes. However, despite high cell surface levels of alpha 6 beta 4, TA3/Ha cells do not adhere to the alpha 6 beta 4 ligands laminin and kalinin. Here we show that this is due to the mucin epiglycanin that is highly expressed on TA3/Ha cells. Some monoclonal antibodies generated against epiglycanin induced capping of most of the epiglycanin molecules. TA3/Ha cells treated with these mAb did adhere to laminin and kalinin, and an epithelial monolayer was formed on kalinin, with alpha 6 beta 4 localized in HD1-containing hemidesmosome- like structures and E-cadherin at the cell-cell contact sites. Similar results were obtained after treatment of TA3/Ha cells with O- sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase which removes all epiglycanin. In addition, the enzyme induced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell aggregation. Both treatments also enhanced the adhesion to hepatocytes, but given the potent antiadhesive effect of epiglycanin it is remarkable that nontreated TA3/Ha cells adhere to hepatocytes at all. We found that during this interaction, epiglycanin was redistributed. We conclude that epiglycanin can completely prevent both intercellular and matrix adhesion, but that this effect can be overcome in certain intercellular interactions because of the induced redistribution of the mucin. PMID:7528749

  5. Dual interaction of JAM-C with JAM-B and alpha(M)beta2 integrin: function in junctional complexes and leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lamagna, Chrystelle; Meda, Paolo; Mandicourt, Guillaume; Brown, James; Gilbert, Robert J C; Jones, E Yvonne; Kiefer, Friedemann; Ruga, Pilar; Imhof, Beat A; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2005-10-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) have been recently described as interendothelial junctional molecules and as integrin ligands. Here we show that JAM-B and JAM-C undergo heterophilic interaction in cell-cell contacts and that JAM-C is recruited and stabilized in junctional complexes by JAM-B. In addition, soluble JAM-B dissociates soluble JAM-C homodimers to form JAM-B/JAM-C heterodimers. This suggests that the affinity of JAM-C monomers to form dimers is higher for JAM-B than for JAM-C. Using antibodies against JAM-C, the formation of JAM-B/JAM-C heterodimers can be abolished. This liberates JAM-C from its vascular binding partner JAM-B and makes it available on the apical side of vessels for interaction with its leukocyte counter-receptor alpha(M)beta2 integrin. We demonstrate that the modulation of JAM-C localization in junctional complexes is a new regulatory mechanism for alpha(M)beta2-dependent adhesion of leukocytes.

  6. Biomimetic design of platelet adhesion inhibitors to block integrin α2β1-collagen interactions: I. Construction of an affinity binding model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Sun, Yan

    2014-04-29

    Platelet adhesion on a collagen surface through integrin α2β1 has been proven to be significant for the formation of arterial thrombus. However, the molecular determinants mediating the integrin-collagen complex remain unclear. In the present study, the dynamics of integrin-collagen binding and molecular interactions were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) analysis. Hydrophobic interaction is identified as the major driving force for the formation of the integrin-collagen complex. On the basis of the MD simulation and MM-PBSA results, an affinity binding model (ABM) of integrin for collagen is constructed; it is composed of five residues, including Y157, N154, S155, R288, and L220. The ABM has been proven to capture the major binding motif contributing 84.8% of the total binding free energy. On the basis of the ABM, we expect to establish a biomimetic design strategy of platelet adhesion inhibitors, which would be beneficial for the development of potent peptide-based drugs for thrombotic diseases.

  7. Thermodynamic evidence for Ca2+-mediated self-aggregation of Lewis X gold glyconanoparticles. A model for cell adhesion via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Eaton, Peter; Barrientos, Africa G; Menéndez, Margarita; Penadés, Soledad

    2005-05-04

    Thermodynamic evidence for the selective Ca(2+)-mediated self-aggregation via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of gold glyconanoparticles functionalized with the disaccharides lactose (lacto-Au) and maltose (malto-Au), or the biologically relevant trisaccharide Lewis X (Le(X)-Au), was obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation process was also directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. It was shown in the case of the trisaccharide Lewis X that the Ca(2+)-mediated aggregation is a slow process that takes place with a decrease in enthalpy of 160 +/- 30 kcal mol(-)(1), while the heat evolved in the case of lactose and maltose glyconanoparticles was very low and thermal equilibrium was quickly achieved. Measurements in the presence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) cations confirm the selectivity for Ca(2+) of Le(X)-Au glyconanoparticles. The relevance of this result to cell-cell adhesion process mediated by carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions is discussed.

  8. Fire-Retardant Epoxy Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing epoxy is fire-retardant and translucent. Intended as adhesive for laminated plastic sheets, new material bonds well to titanium dioxide-filled plastic film, which ordinarily shows little surface interaction with adhesives. Fire retardancy has been demonstrated, and smoke density is low enough to avoid smoke obscuration.

  9. The interaction between carrier rugosity and carrier payload, and its effect on drug particle redispersion from adhesive mixtures during inhalation.

    PubMed

    Dickhoff, B H J; de Boer, A H; Lambregts, D; Frijlink, H W

    2005-01-01

    The effectiveness of press-on forces (defined as the adhesive forces between drug and carrier particles) in relation to carrier payload as the result of collisions between carrier particles during the mixing process of an adhesive mixture, has been investigated. Three different carriers of the same size fraction (250-355 microm), but with completely different surface rugosity were studied. It could be shown that this effectiveness depends on the carrier rugosity. The fraction of drug detached from the carrier particles during inhalation appeared to decrease faster with increasing carrier payload for crystalline carriers than for granular carriers. Apparently, increasing the volume of the carrier surface cavities increases the drug mass that can find shelter from the press-on forces during mixing. By measuring the size distribution in the aerosol, it could also be shown that the press-on forces may increase the size of the particles that are detached. This seems to be the result of drug particle re-agglomeration on the carrier surface during mixing. On the other hand, when press-on forces are highly ineffective, an increase in the size of detached particles may also be the result of incomplete break-up of natural drug agglomerates. Finally, it could be shown that when the press-on forces are highly effective, the effect of mixing time is small.

  10. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0751 (Pallilysin) Reveals a Non-canonical Lipocalin Fold That Mediates Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix Components and Interactions with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Kao, Wei-Chien; Lin, Yi-Pin; Ebady, Rhodaba; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Treponema pallidum disseminates widely throughout the host and extravasates from the vasculature, a process that is at least partially dependent upon the ability of T. pallidum to interact with host extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Defining the molecular basis for the interaction between T. pallidum and the host is complicated by the intractability of T. pallidum to in vitro culturing and genetic manipulation. Correspondingly, few T. pallidum proteins have been identified that interact directly with host components. Of these, Tp0751 (also known as pallilysin) displays a propensity to interact with the ECM, although the underlying mechanism of these interactions remains unknown. Towards establishing the molecular mechanism of Tp0751-host ECM attachment, we first determined the crystal structure of Tp0751 to a resolution of 2.15 Å using selenomethionine phasing. Structural analysis revealed an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a profile of short conserved regions consistent with a non-canonical lipocalin fold. Using a library of native and scrambled peptides representing the full Tp0751 sequence, we next identified a subset of peptides that showed statistically significant and dose-dependent interactions with the ECM components fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV. Intriguingly, each ECM-interacting peptide mapped to the lipocalin domain. To assess the potential of these ECM-coordinating peptides to inhibit adhesion of bacteria to host cells, we engineered an adherence-deficient strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to heterologously express Tp0751. This engineered strain displayed Tp0751 on its surface and exhibited a Tp0751-dependent gain-of-function in adhering to human umbilical vein endothelial cells that was inhibited in the presence of one of the ECM-interacting peptides (p10). Overall, these data provide the first structural insight into the

  11. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  12. PED/PEA-15 interacts with the 67 kD laminin receptor and regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Formisano, Pietro; Ragno, Pia; Pesapane, Ada; Alfano, Daniela; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Rea, Vincenza Elena Anna; Giusto, Raffaella; Rossi, Francesca W; Beguinot, Francesco; Rossi, Guido; Montuori, Nunzia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kD (PED/PEA-15) is an anti-apoptotic protein whose expression is increased in several human cancers. In addition to apoptosis, PED/PEA-15 is involved in the regulation of other major cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and glucose metabolism. To further understand the functions of this protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening using PED/PEA-15 as a bait and identified the 67 kD high-affinity laminin receptor (67LR) as an interacting partner. 67 kD laminin receptor is a non-integrin cell-surface receptor for the extracellular matrix (ECM), derived from the dimerization of a 37 kD cytosolic precursor (37LRP). The 67LR is highly expressed in human cancers and widely recognized as a molecular marker of metastatic aggressiveness. The molecular interaction of PED/PEA-15 with 67LR was confirmed by pull-down experiments with recombinant His-tagged 37LRP on lysates of PED/PEA-15 transfected HEK-293 cells. Further, overexpressed or endogenous PED/PEA-15 was co-immunoprecipitated with 67LR in PED/PEA-15-transfected HEK-293 cells and in U-373 glioblastoma cells, respectively. PED/PEA-15 overexpression significantly increased 67LR-mediated HEK-293 cell adhesion and migration to laminin that, in turn, determined PED/PEA-15 phosphorylation both in Ser-104 and Ser-116, thus enabling cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. PED/PEA-15 ability to induce cell responses to ECM-derived signals through interaction with 67LR may be of crucial importance for tumour cell survival in a poor microenvironment, thus favouring the metastatic spread and colonization. PMID:21895963

  13. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  14. Genetic analysis of a Drosophila neural cell adhesion molecule: interaction of fasciclin I and Abelson tyrosine kinase mutations.

    PubMed

    Elkins, T; Zinn, K; McAllister, L; Hoffmann, F M; Goodman, C S

    1990-02-23

    Drosophila fasciclin I is a homophilic cell adhesion molecule expressed in the developing embryo on the surface of a subset of fasciculating CNS axons, all PNS axons, and some nonneuronal cells. We have identified protein-null mutations in the fasciclin I (fas I) gene, and show that these mutants are viable and do not display gross defects in nervous system morphogenesis. The Drosophila Abelson (abl) proto-oncogene homolog encodes a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is expressed during embryogenesis primarily in developing CNS axons; abl mutants show no gross defects in CNS morphogenesis. However, embryos doubly mutant for fas I and abl display major defects in CNS axon pathways, particularly in the commissural tracts where expression of these two proteins normally overlaps. The double mutant shows a clear defect in growth cone guidance; for example, the RP1 growth cone (normally fas I positive) does not follow its normal path across the commissure.

  15. Expression and polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on human intestinal epithelia: consequences for CD11b/CD18-mediated interactions with neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Parkos, C. A.; Colgan, S. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Nusrat, A.; Liang, T. W.; Springer, T. A.; Madara, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epithelial dysfunction and patient symptoms in inflammatory intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease correlate with migration of neutrophils (PMN) across the intestinal epithelium. In vitro modeling of PMN transepithelial migration has revealed distinct differences from transendothelial migration. By using polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), PMN transepithelial migration has been shown to be dependent on the leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1), but not on CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1). Since intercellular adhesion molecule-I (ICAM-1) is an important endothelial counterreceptor for these integrins, its expression in intestinal epithelia and role in PMN-intestinal epithelial interactions was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A panel of antibodies against different domains of ICAM-1, polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), and natural human colonic epithelia were used to examine the polarity of epithelial ICAM-1 surface expression and the functional role of ICAM-1 in neutrophil-intestinal epithelial adhesive interactions. RESULTS: While no surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected on unstimulated T84 cells, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) elicited a marked expression of ICAM-1 that selectively polarized to the apical epithelial membrane. Similarly, apically restricted surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected in natural human colonic epithelium only in association with active inflammation. With or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, physiologically directed (basolateral-to-apical) transepithelial migration of PMN was unaffected by blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to ICAM-1. In contrast, PMN migration across IFN gamma-stimulated monolayers in the reverse (apical-to-basolateral) direction was inhibited by anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Adhesion studies revealed that T84 cells adhered selectively to purified CD11b/CD18 and such adherence, with or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, was unaffected by ICAM-1 m

  16. Self-Adjustable Adhesion of Polyampholyte Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chanchal Kumar; Guo, Hong Lei; Sun, Tao Lin; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Masakazu; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-02

    Developing nonspecific, fast, and strong adhesives that can glue hydrogels and biotissues substantially promotes the application of hydrogels as biomaterials. Inspired by the ubiquitous adhesiveness of bacteria, it is reported that neutral polyampholyte hydrogels, through their self-adjustable surface, can show rapid, strong, and reversible adhesion to charged hydrogels and biological tissues through the Coulombic interaction.

  17. Inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 interaction leads to decreased survival in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, Elizabeth A; Ma, Xiaojie; Stewart, Jerry E; Megison, Michael; Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena V

    2014-03-01

    Neuroblastoma continues to be a devastating childhood solid tumor and is responsible for over 15% of all childhood cancer-related deaths. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) are protein tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in a number of human cancers, including neuroblastoma. These two kinases can directly interact and provide survival signals to cancer cells. In this study, we utilized siRNA to VEGFR-3 to demonstrate the biologic importance of this kinase in neuroblastoma cell survival. We also used confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation to show that FAK and VEGFR-3 bind in neuroblastoma. Finally, employing a 12-amino-acid peptide (AV3) specific to VEGFR-3, we showed that the colocalization between FAK and VEGFR-3 could be disrupted, and that disruption resulted in decreased neuroblastoma cell survival. These studies provide insight to the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction in neuroblastoma and demonstrate its importance in this tumor type. Focusing upon the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction may provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of new strategies for treatment of neuroblastoma.

  18. Neutrophil elastase cleavage of the gC1q domain impairs the EMILIN1-α4β1 integrin interaction, cell adhesion and anti-proliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Maiorani, Orlando; Pivetta, Eliana; Capuano, Alessandra; Modica, Teresa Maria Elisa; Wassermann, Bruna; Bucciotti, Francesco; Colombatti, Alfonso; Doliana, Roberto; Spessotto, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix glycoprotein EMILIN1 exerts a wide range of functions mainly associated with its gC1q domain. Besides providing functional significance for adhesion and migration, the direct interaction between α4β1 integrin and EMILIN1-gC1q regulates cell proliferation, transducing net anti-proliferative effects. We have previously demonstrated that EMILIN1 degradation by neutrophil elastase (NE) is a specific mechanism leading to the loss of functions disabling its regulatory properties. In this study we further analysed the proteolytic activity of NE, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP on EMILIN1 and found that MMP-3 and MT1-MMP partially cleaved EMILIN1 but without affecting the functional properties associated with the gC1q domain, whereas NE was able to fully impair the interaction of gC1q with the α4β1 integrin by cleaving this domain outside of the E933 integrin binding site. By a site direct mutagenesis approach we mapped the bond between S913 and R914 residues and selected the NE-resistant R914W mutant still able to interact with the α4β1 integrin after NE treatment. Functional studies showed that NE impaired the EMILIN1-α4β1 integrin interaction by cleaving the gC1q domain in a region crucial for its proper structural conformation, paving the way to better understand NE effects on EMILIN1-cell interaction in pathological context. PMID:28074935

  19. Further NMR-spectroscopic studies of interaction of phospholipid liposomes with methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) in dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Komoda, Y

    1993-06-01

    To determine how MDP interacts with liposomes, the chemical shifts of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/MDP and dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (DLEA)/cholesterol (CS)/MDP liposomes were studied by NMR spectroscopy using a D2O buffer solution at pH 7.0 as a model for biological membranes. Proton chemical shifts of MDP enhanced shielding in DPPC liposomes together with an increase in the mobility of DPPC. However, MDP signals were not observed in DLEA/CS liposomes due to saturation. It is known that an ionized chemical does not lead to increased permeability of cell membranes composed of a lipid bilayer. However, MDP, which is ionized at pH 7.0, had a large interaction with the liposome systems. This appeared to arise from hydrophobic interaction between deca methylene groups of MDP and acyl chains of phospholipid.

  20. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  1. Influence of hypothermia and subsequent rewarming upon leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of Junctional-Adhesion-Molecules A and B

    PubMed Central

    Bogert, Nicolai V.; Werner, Isabella; Kornberger, Angela; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Keller, Till; Stock, Ulrich A.; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Patients with risks of ischemic injury, e.g. during circulatory arrest in cardiac surgery, or after resuscitation are subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. For aortic surgery, the body is traditionally cooled down to 18 °C and then rewarmed to body temperature. The role of hypothermia and the subsequent rewarming process on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of junctional-adhesion-molecules is not clarified yet. Thus, we investigated in an in-vitro model the influence of temperature modulation during activation and transendothelial migration of leukocytes through human endothelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the expression of JAMs in the rewarming phase. Exposure to low temperatures alone during transmigration scarcely affects leukocyte extravasation, whereas hypothermia during treatment and transendothelial migration improves leukocyte-endothelial interactions. Rewarming causes a significant up-regulation of transmigration with falling temperatures. JAM-A is significantly modulated during rewarming. Our data suggest that transendothelial migration of leukocytes is not only modulated by cell-activation itself. Activation temperatures and the rewarming process are essential. Continued hypothermia significantly inhibits transendothelial migration, whereas the rewarming process enhances transmigration strongly. The expression of JAMs, especially JAM-A, is strongly modulated during the rewarming process. Endothelial protection prior to warm reperfusion and mild hypothermic conditions reducing the difference between hypothermia and rewarming temperatures should be considered. PMID:26912257

  2. Theory of adhesion: role of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J; Scaraggi, M

    2014-09-28

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ∼ u(-n), n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  3. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  4. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  5. The influence of cross-linking on protein-protein interactions in a marine adhesive: the case of two byssus plaque proteins from the blue mussel.

    PubMed

    Fant, Camilla; Elwing, Hans; Höök, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between two proteins, Mefp-1 and Mefp-2, from the byssal plaque of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique. The challenge in using a surface-sensitive technique to investigate the interaction between two strongly adhesive proteins was met by coupling a biotinylated version of one of the proteins (b-Mefp-1) to an inert two-dimensional arrangement of streptavidin (SA) formed on top of a biotin-doped supported phospholipid bilayer. The interaction between Mefp-1 and Mefp-2 was further investigated by addition of Mefp-2 to SA-coupled b-Mefp-1, where the latter was either in the native state or cross-linked using sodium periodate (NaIO(4)), Cu(2+), or mushroom tyrosinase. With this coupling strategy it is shown that a requirement for attraction between the two proteins is that tyrosinase is used as the cross-linking agent of b-Mefp-1. By inhibiting the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase it is also shown that enzymatic activity is required for both efficient binding of tyrosinase to SA-coupled b-Mefp-1 as well as for the subsequent binding of Mefp-2. In contrast, spontaneous adsorption of Mefp-1 to a methyl-terminated (thiolated) gold surface followed by addition of Mefp-2 results in binding of Mefp-2 for all cross-linking agents. This suggests that cross-linking of Mefp-1 adsorbed on a solid surface induces structural changes in the adsorbed protein layer, resulting in exposure of free surface patches on which Mefp-2 binds.

  6. Alkaloids as inhibitors of malate synthase from Paracoccidioides spp.: receptor-ligand interaction-based virtual screening and molecular docking studies, antifungal activity, and the adhesion process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fausto Guimaraes; Neto, Benedito Rodrigues da Silva; Gonçalves, Ricardo Lemes; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; Freitas, Carla Dos Santos; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-09-01

    Paracoccidioides is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Malate synthase plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity and virulence of various fungi, such as those that are human pathogens. Thus, an inhibitor of this enzyme may be used as a powerful antifungal without side effects in patients once these enzymes are absent in humans. Here, we searched for compounds with inhibitory capacity against the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides species (PbMLS). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of PbMLS was determined using the I-TASSER server. Compounds were selected from the ZINC database. Based on the mechanism underlying the interaction of the compounds with PbMLS, it was possible to identify β-carboline moiety as a standard key structure. The compounds with β-carboline moiety that are available in our laboratories were investigated. A total of nine alkaloid compounds were selected. The primary mechanisms of interaction of the alkaloid compounds in the binding pocket of PbMLS were identified and compared with the mechanism of interaction of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We discovered that the amphipathic nature of the compounds, concomitant with the presence of β-carboline moiety, was crucial for their stability in the binding pocket of PbMLS. In addition, the importance of a critical balance of the polar and nonpolar contacts of the compounds in this region was observed. Four β-carboline alkaloid compounds showed the ability to inhibit recombinant PbMLS (PbMLSr) activity, Paracoccidioides species growth, and adhesion of the fungus and PbMLSr to the extracellular matrix components. The cytotoxicity of the alkaloids was also evaluated.

  7. Alkaloids as Inhibitors of Malate Synthase from Paracoccidioides spp.: Receptor-Ligand Interaction-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Studies, Antifungal Activity, and the Adhesion Process

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fausto Guimaraes; Neto, Benedito Rodrigues da Silva; Gonçalves, Ricardo Lemes; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; Freitas, Carla dos Santos; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Malate synthase plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity and virulence of various fungi, such as those that are human pathogens. Thus, an inhibitor of this enzyme may be used as a powerful antifungal without side effects in patients once these enzymes are absent in humans. Here, we searched for compounds with inhibitory capacity against the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides species (PbMLS). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of PbMLS was determined using the I-TASSER server. Compounds were selected from the ZINC database. Based on the mechanism underlying the interaction of the compounds with PbMLS, it was possible to identify β-carboline moiety as a standard key structure. The compounds with β-carboline moiety that are available in our laboratories were investigated. A total of nine alkaloid compounds were selected. The primary mechanisms of interaction of the alkaloid compounds in the binding pocket of PbMLS were identified and compared with the mechanism of interaction of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We discovered that the amphipathic nature of the compounds, concomitant with the presence of β-carboline moiety, was crucial for their stability in the binding pocket of PbMLS. In addition, the importance of a critical balance of the polar and nonpolar contacts of the compounds in this region was observed. Four β-carboline alkaloid compounds showed the ability to inhibit recombinant PbMLS (PbMLSr) activity, Paracoccidioides species growth, and adhesion of the fungus and PbMLSr to the extracellular matrix components. The cytotoxicity of the alkaloids was also evaluated. PMID:26124176

  8. Synthetic Mucin-Like Glycopeptides as Versatile Tools to Measure Effects of Glycan Structure/Density/Position on the Interaction with Adhesion/Growth-Regulatory Galectins in Arrays.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Gerard; Hinou, Hiroshi; Garcia-Martin, Fayna; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-01-03

    Functional pairing of cellular glycoconjugates with tissue lectins is a highly selective process, whose determinative factors have not yet been fully delineated. Glycan structure and modes of presentation, that is, its position and density, can contribute to binding, as different members of a lectin family can regulate degrees of responsiveness to these factors. Using a peptide repeat sequence motif of the glycoprotein mucin-1, the principle of introducing synthetic (glyco)peptides with distinct variations in these three parameters to an array-based screening of tissue lectins is illustrated. Interaction profiles of seven adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins cover the range from intense signals with core 2 pentasaccharides and core 1 binding for galectins-3 and -5 to a lack of binding for galectin-1 and also the galectin-related protein, which was included as a negative control. Remarkably, the two tandem-repeat-type galectins-4 and -8 were distinguished by core 1 sialylation, as the two separated domains were. These results encourage further synthetic elaboration of the glycopeptide library and testing of the network of natural galectins and rationally engineered variants of the lectins.

  9. Interactions between lipid-free apolipoprotein-AI and a lipopeptide incorporating the RGDS cell adhesion motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, V.; Hamley, I. W.; Reza, M.; Ruokolainen, J.

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of a designed bioactive lipopeptide C16-GGGRGDS, comprising a hexadecyl lipid chain attached to a functional heptapeptide, with the lipid-free apoliprotein, Apo-AI, is examined. This apolipoprotein is a major component of high density lipoprotein and it is involved in lipid metabolism and may serve as a biomarker for cardiovascular disease and Alzheimers' disease. We find via isothermal titration calorimetry that binding between the lipopeptide and Apo-AI occurs up to a saturation condition, just above equimolar for a 10.7 μM concentration of Apo-AI. A similar value is obtained from circular dichroism spectroscopy, which probes the reduction in α-helical secondary structure of Apo-AI upon addition of C16-GGGRGDS. Electron microscopy images show a persistence of fibrillar structures due to self-assembly of C16-GGGRGDS in mixtures with Apo-AI above the saturation binding condition. A small fraction of spheroidal or possibly ``nanodisc'' structures was observed. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data for Apo-AI can be fitted using a published crystal structure of the Apo-AI dimer. The SAXS data for the lipopeptide/Apo-AI mixtures above the saturation binding conditions can be fitted to the contribution from fibrillar structures coexisting with flat discs corresponding to Apo-AI/lipopeptide aggregates.

  10. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  11. PAK5 mediates cell: cell adhesion integrity via interaction with E-cadherin in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmad Fahim; Oskay Halacli, Sevil; Babteen, Nouf; De Piano, Mario; Martin, Tracey A; Jiang, Wen G; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Wells, Claire M

    2017-03-24

    Urothelial bladder cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing an estimated 150 000 deaths per year. Whilst non-muscle-invasive bladder tumours can be effectively treated, with high survival rates, many tumours recur, and some will progress to muscle-invasive disease with a much poorer long-term prognosis. Thus, there is a pressing need to understand the molecular transitions occurring within the progression of bladder cancer to an invasive disease. Tumour invasion is often associated with a down-regulation of E-cadherin expression concomitant with a suppression of cell:cell junctions, and decreased levels of E-cadherin expression have been reported in higher grade urothelial bladder tumours. We find that expression of E-cadherin in a panel of bladder cancer cell lines correlated with the presence of cell:cell junctions and the level of PAK5 expression. Interestingly, exogenous PAK5 has recently been described to be associated with cell:cell junctions and we now find that endogenous PAK5 is localised to cell junctions and interacts with an E-cadherin complex. Moreover, depletion of PAK5 expression significantly reduced junctional integrity. These data suggest a role for PAK5 in maintaining junctional stability and we find that, in both our own patient samples and a commercially available dataset, PAK5mRNA levels are reduced in human bladder cancer compared with normal controls. Taken together, the present study proposes that PAK5 expression levels could be used as a novel prognostic marker for bladder cancer progression.

  12. Increased Excitatory Synaptic Transmission of Dentate Granule Neurons in Mice Lacking PSD-95-Interacting Adhesion Molecule Neph2/Kirrel3 during the Early Postnatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Junyeop D.; Choi, Su-Yeon; Cho, Yi Sul; Choi, Tae-Yong; Park, Jong-Sil; Cutforth, Tyler; Chung, Woosuk; Park, Hanwool; Lee, Dongsoo; Kim, Myeong-Heui; Lee, Yeunkum; Mo, Seojung; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Kim, Hyun; Ko, Jaewon; Choi, Se-Young; Bae, Yong Chul; Shen, Kang; Kim, Eunjoon; Han, Kihoon

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants and point mutations of NEPH2 (also called KIRREL3) gene encoding an immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily adhesion molecule have been linked to autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability and neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome, but the physiological roles of Neph2 in the mammalian brain remain largely unknown. Neph2 is highly expressed in the dentate granule (DG) neurons of the hippocampus and is localized in both dendrites and axons. It was recently shown that Neph2 is required for the formation of mossy fiber filopodia, the axon terminal structure of DG neurons forming synapses with GABAergic neurons of CA3. In contrast, however, it is unknown whether Neph2 also has any roles in the postsynaptic compartments of DG neurons. We here report that, through its C-terminal PDZ domain-binding motif, Neph2 directly interacts with postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, an abundant excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein. Moreover, Neph2 protein is detected in the brain PSD fraction and interacts with PSD-95 in synaptosomal lysates. Functionally, loss of Neph2 in mice leads to age-specific defects in the synaptic connectivity of DG neurons. Specifically, Neph2−/− mice show significantly increased spontaneous excitatory synaptic events in DG neurons at postnatal week 2 when the endogenous Neph2 protein expression peaks, but show normal excitatory synaptic transmission at postnatal week 3. The evoked excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity of medial perforant pathway (MPP)-DG synapses are also normal in Neph2−/− mice at postnatal week 3, further confirming the age-specific synaptic defects. Together, our results provide some evidence for the postsynaptic function of Neph2 in DG neurons during the early postnatal period, which might be implicated in neurodevelopmental and cognitive disorders caused by NEPH2 mutations. PMID:28381988

  13. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  14. Ethanol neuronotoxicity in the embryonic chick brain in ovo and in culture: interaction of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

    PubMed

    Kentroti, S; Rahman, H; Grove, J; Vernadakis, A

    1995-12-01

    to exhibit intense NCAM staining. Ethanol-induced changes in the developmental profile of NCAM expression (i.e. increased sialation) in cerebral hemispheres correspond temporally with the shift in neuronal phenotype from cholinergic to catecholaminergic and GABAergic which we have reported previously. Changes in the normal pattern of cellular contact and interaction as a result of altered NCAM expression may influence establishment of neurotransmitter phenotype. Findings from this study support the view that NCAM may be involved both directly and indirectly in shaping of the CNS during development and we speculate that ethanol neuroembryotoxicity uncouples this relationship.

  15. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  16. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    PubMed

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  17. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  18. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  19. Characterization of Drosophila GDNF Receptor-Like and Evidence for Its Evolutionarily Conserved Interaction with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM)/FasII

    PubMed Central

    Kallijärvi, Jukka; Stratoulias, Vassilis; Virtanen, Kristel; Hietakangas, Ville; Heino, Tapio I.; Saarma, Mart

    2012-01-01

    Background Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands are secreted growth factors distantly related to the TGF-β superfamily. In mammals, they bind to the GDNF family receptor α (Gfrα) and signal through the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the Ret-Gfr-Gdnf signaling system, we have cloned and characterized the first invertebrate Gfr-like cDNA (DmGfrl) from Drosophila melanogaster and generated a DmGfrl mutant allele. Results We found that DmGfrl encodes a large GPI-anchored membrane protein with four GFR-like domains. In line with the fact that insects lack GDNF ligands, DmGfrl mediated neither Drosophila Ret phosphorylation nor mammalian RET phosphorylation. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that DmGfrl is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems throughout Drosophila development, but, surprisingly, DmGfrl and DmRet expression patterns were largely non-overlapping. We generated a DmGfrl null allele by genomic FLP deletion and found that both DmGfrl null females and males are viable but display fertility defects. The female fertility defect manifested as dorsal appendage malformation, small size and reduced viability of eggs laid by mutant females. In male flies DmGfrl interacted genetically with the Drosophila Ncam (neural cell adhesion molecule) homolog FasII to regulate fertility. Conclusion Our results suggest that Ret and Gfrl did not function as an in cis receptor-coreceptor pair before the emergence of GDNF family ligands, and that the Ncam-Gfr interaction predated the in cis Ret-Gfr interaction in evolution. The fertility defects that we describe in DmGfrl null flies suggest that GDNF receptor-like has an evolutionarily ancient role in regulating male fertility and a previously unrecognized role in regulating oogenesis. Significance These results shed light on the evolutionary aspects of the structure, expression and function of Ret-Gfrα and Ncam-Gfrα signaling

  20. Adhesion layer-bottom electrode interaction during BaxSr1-xTiO3 growth as a limiting factor for device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Markus; Vorobiev, Andrei; Zeng, Lunjie; Gevorgian, Spartak; Olsson, Eva

    2012-06-01

    Changes in bottom electrode morphology and adhesion layer composition upon deposition of BaxSr1-xTiO3 (BSTO) at elevated temperatures have been found, which have a negative impact on acoustic wave resonator device performance. The difference between nominal and actual adhesion layer composition are explained by grain boundary diffusion of Ti or W and their oxidation by in-diffusing oxygen, which leads to an increased interface roughness between the Pt bottom electrode and the BSTO. It is shown, that room-temperature deposited TiO2 diffusion barriers fail to protect against Ti oxidation and diffusion. Also W adhesion layers are prone to this phenomenon, which limits their ability to act as high temperature resistant adhesion layers for bottom electrodes for ferroelectric thin films.

  1. Using immuno-scanning electron microscopy for the observation of focal adhesion-substratum interactions at the nano- and microscale in S-phase cells.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Manus J P; Richards, R Geoff; Dalby, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that the nano/microtopography of a biomaterial in vivo is of first importance in influencing focal adhesion formation and subsequent cellular behaviour. When considering next-generation biomaterials, where the material's ability to elicit a regulated cell response will be key to device success, focal adhesion analysis is an useful indicator of cytocompatibility and can be used to determine functionality. Here, a methodology is described to allow simultaneous high-resolution imaging of focal adhesion sites and the material topography using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, through the use of BrdU pulse labelling and immunogold detection, S-phase cells can be selected from a near-synchronised population of cells to remove artefacts due to cell cycle phase. This is a key factor in adhesion quantification as there is natural variation in focal adhesion density as cells progress through the cell cycle, which can skew the quantitative analysis of focal adhesion formation on fabricated biomaterials.

  2. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. PMID:27406562

  3. Human mast cell progenitors use alpha4-integrin, VCAM-1, and PSGL-1 E-selectin for adhesive interactions with human vascular endothelium under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Joshua A; Mellor, Elizabeth A; Perkins, Brandy; Lim, Yaw-Chyn; Luscinskas, Francis W

    2002-04-15

    Mast cells (MCs) are central to asthma and other allergic diseases, and for responses to infection and tissue injuries. MCs arise from committed progenitors (PrMCs) that migrate from the circulation to tissues by incompletely characterized mechanisms, and differentiate in situ in perivascular connective tissues of multiple organs. PrMCs derived in vitro from human cord blood were examined for adhesion molecule expression and their ability to adhere to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under conditions that mimic physiologic shear flow. The PrMCs expressed alpha(4)beta(1), low levels of beta7, and the beta2-integrins alphaLbeta2 and alphaMbeta2. The PrMCs also expressed PSGL-1, but not L-selectin. At low (0.5 dynes/cm(2)-1.0 dynes/cm(2)) shear stress, PrMCs attached and rolled on recombinant E-selectin and P-selectin and VCAM-1. An anti-PSGL-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) blocked essentially all adhesion to P-selectin but reduced adhesion to E-selectin by only 40%, suggesting PrMCs express other ligands for E-selectin. PrMCs adhered strongly to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-activated HUVECs, whereas adhesion to interleukin 4 (IL-4)-activated HUVECs was lower. PrMC adhesion to IL-4-activated HUVECs was totally alpha4-integrin- and VCAM-1-dependent. Adhesion to TNF-alpha-activated HUVECs was blocked by 50% by mAbs against alpha4-integrin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, or PSGL-1, whereas combinations of mAbs to alpha4-integrin plus PSGL-1, or VCAM-1 plus E-selectin, blocked adhesion by greater than 70%. Thus, PrMCs derived in vitro predominantly use alpha4-integrin, VCAM-1, PSGL-1, and other ligands that bind E-selectin for adhesion to cytokine-activated HUVEC monolayers. These observations may explain the abundance of MCs at sites of mucosal inflammation, where VCAM-1 and E-selectin are important inducible receptors.

  4. Kinin B1 receptor regulates interactions between neutrophils and endothelial cells by modulating the levels of Mac-1, LFA-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Carlos D; Matus, Carola E; Pavicic, Francisca; Sarmiento, Jose; Hidalgo, Maria A; Burgos, Rafael A; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Bhoola, Kanti D; Ehrenfeld, Pamela

    2015-04-01

    Kinins are pro-inflammatory peptides that mimic the cardinal features of inflammation. We examined the concept that expression levels of endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and neutrophil integrins Mac-1 and LFA-1 are modulated by the kinin B1 receptor (B1R) agonist, Lys-des[Arg(9)]bradykinin (LDBK). Stimulation of endothelial cells with LDBK increased the levels of ICAM-1 mRNA transcripts/protein, and also of E-selectin and platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1. ICAM-1 levels increased in a magnitude comparable with that produced by TNF-α. This stimulatory effect was reduced when endothelial cells, which had been previously transfected with a B1R small interfering RNA, were stimulated with LDBK, under comparable conditions. Similarly, LDBK produced a significant increase in protein levels of LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins in human neutrophils, an effect that was reversed by pretreatment of cells with 10 µg/ml cycloheximide or a B1R antagonist. Functional experiments performed with post-confluent monolayers of endothelial cells stimulated with LDBK and neutrophils primed with TNF-α, and vice versa, resulted in enhanced adhesiveness between both cells. Neutralizing Abs to ICAM-1 and Mac-1 reduced the adhesion between them. Our results indicate that kinin B1R is a novel modulator that promotes adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, critically enhancing the movement of neutrophils from the circulation to sites of inflammation.

  5. Hydroxyapatite-Coated Sillicone Rubber Enhanced Cell Adhesion and It May Be through the Interaction of EF1β and γ-Actin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-ming; Wang, Yi-cheng; Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Xin; Lei, Ze-yuan; Fan, Dong-li

    2014-01-01

    Silicone rubber (SR) is a common soft tissue filler material used in plastic surgery. However, it presents a poor surface for cellular adhesion and suffers from poor biocompatibility. In contrast, hydroxyapatite (HA), a prominent component of animal bone and teeth, can promote improved cell compatibility, but HA is an unsuitable filler material because of the brittleness in mechanism. In this study, using a simple and economical method, two sizes of HA was applied to coat on SR to counteract the poor biocompatibility of SR. Surface and mechanical properties of SR and HA/SRs confirmed that coating with HA changes the surface topology and material properties. Analysis of cell proliferation and adhesion as well as measurement of the expression levels of adhesion related molecules indicated that HA-coated SR significantly increased cell compatibility. Furthermore, mass spectrometry proved that the biocompatibility improvement may be related to elongation factor 1-beta (EF1β)/γ-actin adjusted cytoskeletal rearrangement. PMID:25386892

  6. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  7. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  8. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  9. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  10. Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) supports adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells through interaction with RGD-binding integrins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yueqing; Hu Xiaobo; Tian Ruiyang; Wei Wangui; Hu Wei; Chen Xia; Han Wei; Chen Huayou; Gong Yi . E-mail: ygong@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-08-18

    Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) is a newly identified member of angiopoietin-related proteins (ARPs)/angiopoietin-like proteins (Angptls). AGF has been considered as a novel growth factor in accelerating cutaneous wound healing, as it is capable of stimulating keratinocytes proliferation as well as angiogenesis. But in our paper, we demonstrate that AGF stimulates keratinocytes proliferation only at high protein concentration, however, it can potently promote adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirm that the adhesion and migration cellular events are mediated by RGD-binding integrins, most possibly the {alpha}{sub v}-containing integrins, by in vitro inhibition assays using synthetic competitive peptides. Our results strongly suggest that AGF is an integrin ligand as well as a mitogenic growth factor and theoretically participates in cutaneous wound healing in a more complex mechanism.

  11. Direct and Rapid Analysis of the Adhesion of Bacteria to Solid Surfaces: Interaction of Fluorescently Labeled Rhodococcus Strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) Cells with Titanium-Rich Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fleminger, G.; Shabtai, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A fluorimetric assay which enables direct and accurate analysis of the adhesion of bacteria to solid particles was developed. The assay is based on labeling of the bacteria with fluorescamine, which reacts with primary amino groups on the cell surface to yield a yellow fluorescence that is easily detectable by both fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. As an example, fluorescent labeling of Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) cells enabled the detection and quantitative determination of their adsorption to TiO(inf2) and coal fly ash particles. Exposure of the cells to 10% acetone during the labeling reaction affected neither their viability nor their ability to adhere to these particles. Only a small fraction (^sim2%) of the total cell protein was labeled by fluorescamine upon staining of intact bacterial cells, which may indicate preferential labeling of certain proteins. Specificity studies carried out with the fluorescence assay confirmed previous findings that Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 cells possess high affinities for TiO(inf2), ZnO, and coal fly ash and low affinities for other metal oxides. In principle, the newly developed fluorimetric assay may be used for determination of cell adhesion to any solid matrix by either microscopic examination or epifluorescence measurements. In the present work, the adhesion of several other microorganisms to TiO(inf2) particles was tested as well, but their ability to adhere to these particles was significantly lower than that of Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 cells. PMID:16535188

  12. Direct and Rapid Analysis of the Adhesion of Bacteria to Solid Surfaces: Interaction of Fluorescently Labeled Rhodococcus Strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) Cells with Titanium-Rich Particles.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Shabtai, Y

    1995-12-01

    A fluorimetric assay which enables direct and accurate analysis of the adhesion of bacteria to solid particles was developed. The assay is based on labeling of the bacteria with fluorescamine, which reacts with primary amino groups on the cell surface to yield a yellow fluorescence that is easily detectable by both fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. As an example, fluorescent labeling of Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) cells enabled the detection and quantitative determination of their adsorption to TiO(inf2) and coal fly ash particles. Exposure of the cells to 10% acetone during the labeling reaction affected neither their viability nor their ability to adhere to these particles. Only a small fraction (;sim2%) of the total cell protein was labeled by fluorescamine upon staining of intact bacterial cells, which may indicate preferential labeling of certain proteins. Specificity studies carried out with the fluorescence assay confirmed previous findings that Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 cells possess high affinities for TiO(inf2), ZnO, and coal fly ash and low affinities for other metal oxides. In principle, the newly developed fluorimetric assay may be used for determination of cell adhesion to any solid matrix by either microscopic examination or epifluorescence measurements. In the present work, the adhesion of several other microorganisms to TiO(inf2) particles was tested as well, but their ability to adhere to these particles was significantly lower than that of Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 cells.

  13. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  14. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  15. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  16. Adhesion-induced receptor segregation and adhesion plaque formation: A model membrane study.

    PubMed Central

    Kloboucek, A; Behrisch, A; Faix, J; Sackmann, E

    1999-01-01

    A model system to study the control of cell adhesion by receptor-mediated specific forces, universal interactions, and membrane elasticity is established. The plasma membrane is mimicked by reconstitution of homophilic receptor proteins into solid supported membranes and, together with lipopolymers, into giant vesicles with the polymers forming an artificial glycocalix. The homophilic cell adhesion molecule contact site A, a lipid-anchored glycoprotein from cells of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, is used as receptor. The success of the reconstitution, the structure and the dynamics of the model membranes are studied by various techniques including film balance techniques, micro fluorescence, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, electron microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy. The interaction of the functionalized giant vesicles with the supported bilayer is studied by reflection interference contrast microscopy, and the adhesion strength is evaluated quantitatively by a recently developed technique. At low receptor concentrations adhesion-induced receptor segregation in the membranes leads to decomposition of the contact zone between membranes into domains of strong (receptor-mediated) adhesion and regions of weak adhesion while continuous zones of strong adhesion form at high receptor densities. The adhesion strengths (measured in terms of the spreading pressure S) of the various states of adhesion are obtained locally by analysis of the vesicle contour near the contact line in terms of elastic boundary conditions of adhesion: the balance of tensions and moments. The spreading pressure of the weak adhesion zones is S approximately 10(-9) J/m(2) and is determined by the interplay of gravitation and undulation forces whereas the spreading pressure of the tight adhesion domains is of the order S approximately 10(-6) J/m(2). PMID:10512849

  17. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  18. Ice adhesions in relation to freeze stress.

    PubMed

    Olien, C R; Smith, M N

    1977-10-01

    In freezing, competitive interaction between ice and hydrophilic plant substances causes an energy of adhesion to develop through the interstitial liquid. The thermodynamic basis for the adhesion energy is discussed, with estimates of the energies involved. In this research, effects of adhesion energy were observed microscopically in conjunction with energies of crystallization and frost desiccation. The complex character of ice in intact crown tissue of winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the problems of sectioning frozen tissue without producing artifacts led to an alternative study of single barley cells in a mesh of ice and cell wall polymers. Adhesions between ice, cell wall polymers, and the plasmalemma form a complexly interacting system in which the pattern of crystallization is a major factor in determination of stress and injury.

  19. Flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins from Limonium brasiliense inhibit the adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis to epithelial host cells by interaction with gingipains.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Caleare, Angelo; Hensel, Andreas; Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Pinha, Andressa Blainski; Panizzon, Gean Pier; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Petereit, Frank; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2017-03-11

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a pathogen strongly involved in chronic and aggressive forms of periodontitis. Natural products, mainly polyphenols, have been described for advanced treatment of periodontitis by inhibition of the bacterial adhesion of P. gingivalis to the epithelial host cells. An acetone:water extract (LBE) from the rhizomes of Limonium brasiliense (Boiss.) Kuntze was tested under in vitro conditions for potential antiadhesive effects against P. gingivalis to human KB cells and for inhibition of the proteolytic activity of gingipains, the main virulence factor of P. gingivalis. LBE≤100μg/mL had no cytotoxicity against the bacteria and did not influence the cell physiology of human epithelial KB cells. At 100μg/mL LBE reduced the adhesion of P. gingivalis to KB cells significantly by about 80%. LBE at 20μg/mL reduced the proteolytic activity of the arginin-specific Rgp gingipain by about 75%. Chemical profiling of LBE indicated the presence of gallic acid, epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate and samarangenins A and B as lead compounds. UHPLC by using MS and UV detection displays a suitable method for quality control of the extract for identification and quantification of the lead compounds.

  20. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Thomas, Susan N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell–cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner. PMID:26349809

  1. Single-molecule mechanics of mussel adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin; Scherer, Norbert F.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2006-08-01

    The glue proteins secreted by marine mussels bind strongly to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments in which most adhesives function poorly. Studies of these functionally unique proteins have revealed the presence of the unusual amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), which is formed by posttranslational modification of tyrosine. However, the detailed binding mechanisms of dopa remain unknown, and the chemical basis for mussels' ability to adhere to both inorganic and organic surfaces has never been fully explained. Herein, we report a single-molecule study of the substrate and oxidation-dependent adhesive properties of dopa. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of a single dopa residue contacting a wet metal oxide surface reveal a surprisingly high strength yet fully reversible, noncovalent interaction. The magnitude of the bond dissociation energy as well as the inability to observe this interaction with tyrosine suggests that dopa is critical to adhesion and that the binding mechanism is not hydrogen bond formation. Oxidation of dopa, as occurs during curing of the secreted mussel glue, dramatically reduces the strength of the interaction to metal oxide but results in high strength irreversible covalent bond formation to an organic surface. A new picture of the interfacial adhesive role of dopa emerges from these studies, in which dopa exploits a remarkable combination of high strength and chemical multifunctionality to accomplish adhesion to substrates of widely varying composition from organic to metallic. 3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine | atomic force microscopy | mussel adhesive protein

  2. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  3. TgrC1 mediates cell-cell adhesion by interacting with TgrB1 via mutual IPT/TIG domains during development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoqun; Wu, Xiangfu; Piao, Ruihan; Siu, Chi-Hung

    2013-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion plays crucial roles in cell differentiation and morphogenesis during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The heterophilic adhesion protein TgrC1 (Tgr is transmembrane, IPT, IG, E-set, repeat protein) is expressed during cell aggregation, and disruption of the tgrC1 gene results in the arrest of development at the loose aggregate stage. We have used far-Western blotting coupled with MS to identify TgrB1 as the heterophilic binding partner of TgrC1. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down studies showed that TgrB1 and TgrC1 are capable of binding with each other in solution. TgrB1 and TgrC1 are encoded by a pair of adjacent genes which share a common promoter. Both TgrB1 and TgrC1 are type I transmembrane proteins, which contain three extracellular IPT/TIG (immunoglobulin, plexin, transcription factor-like/transcription factor immunoglobulin) domains. Antibodies raised against TgrB1 inhibit cell reassociation at the post-aggregation stage of development and block fruiting body formation. Ectopic expression of TgrB1 and TgrC1 driven by the actin15 promoter leads to heterotypic cell aggregation of vegetative cells. Using recombinant proteins that cover different portions of TgrB1 and TgrC1 in binding assays, we have mapped the cell-binding regions in these two proteins to Lys(537)-Ala(783) in TgrB1 and Ile(336)-Val(360) in TgrC1, corresponding to their respective TIG3 and TIG2 domain.

  4. Notch signaling-mediated cell-to-cell interaction is dependent on E-cadherin adhesion in adult rat anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Batchuluun, Khongorzul; Azuma, Morio; Yashiro, Takashi; Kikuchi, Motoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rat anterior pituitary is composed of hormone-producing cells, non-hormone-producing cells (referred to as folliculostellate cells) and marginal layer cells. In the adult rat, progenitor cells of hormone-producing cells have recently been reported to be maintained within this non-hormone-producing cell population. In tissue, non-hormone-producing cells construct homophilic cell aggregates by the differential expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. We have previously shown that Notch signaling, a known regulator of progenitor cells in a number of organs, is activated in the cell aggregates. We now investigate the relationship between Notch signaling and E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in the pituitary gland. Immunohistochemically, Notch signaling receptor Notch2 and the ligand Jagged1 were localized within E-cadherin-positive cells in the marginal cell layer and in the main part of the anterior lobe, whereas Notch1 was localized in E-cadherin-positive and -negative cells. Activation of Notch signaling within E-cadherin-positive cells was confirmed by immunostaining of the Notch target HES1. Notch2 and Jagged1 were always co-localized within the same cells suggesting that homologous cells have reciprocal effects in activating Notch signaling. When the E-cadherin function was inhibited by exposure to a monoclonal antibody (DECMA-1) in primary monolayer cell culture, the percentage of HES1-positive cells among Notch2-positive cells was less than half that of the control. The present results suggest that E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment is necessary for the activation of Notch signaling in the anterior pituitary gland but not for the expression of the Notch2 molecule.

  5. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  6. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  7. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  8. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  9. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  10. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  11. Adhesion of gels by silica particle.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hidekazu; Hara, Yusuke; Maeda, Shingo; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2014-03-06

    In this study, a method for achieving adhesion between two positively charged gels with high mechanical strength was developed. By utilizing a silica particle dispersion as a binder, the gels easily adhered to each other and remained stable for up to 11 days when immersed in aqueous solution. The adhesion force between the two positively charged semi-interpenetrating network gels with the silica particle was measured to be up to approximately 20 kPa, which is around 10 times larger than that with a charged polymer-rich liquid as a cross-linker (approximately 1.5 kPa). It was demonstrated that the adhesion force was a result of two types of interactions: an electrostatic attractive force between the cationic gel surface and hydrogen bonding among the silica particles. In addition, it was shown that the adhesion force was dependent on solution pH, which was attributed to changes in the charge of the silica particles.

  12. Regulation of integrin-mediated adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Daniel V.; Calderwood, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane adhesion receptors that couple the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular environment and bidirectionally relay signals across the cell membrane. These processes are critical for cell attachment, migration, differentiation, and survival, and therefore play essential roles in metazoan development, physiology, and pathology. Integrin-mediated adhesions are regulated by diverse factors, including the conformation-specific affinities of integrin receptors for their extracellular ligands, the clustering of integrins and their intracellular binding partners into discrete adhesive structures, mechanical forces exerted on the adhesion, and the intracellular trafficking of integrins themselves. Recent advances shed light onto how the interaction of specific intracellular proteins with the short cytoplasmic tails of integrins controls each of these activities. PMID:26189062

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  14. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Christian; Brandt, Simone; Ahmed, Niyaz; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-09-15

    Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates) after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS) with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL) led to reduced binding to 3'-sialyl lactose, sialylated Le(a) and Le(x). A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation) indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  15. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  16. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-28

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  17. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  18. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  19. Nanorough titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus via nano adhesion points.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Roth, Martin; Yu, Wenqi; Horn, Uwe; Bossert, Jörg; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Microbial adhesion to natural and synthetic materials surfaces is a key issue e.g. in food industry, sewage treatment and most importantly in the biomedical field. The current development and progress in nanoscale structuring of materials surfaces to control microbial adhesion requires an advanced understanding of the microbe-material-interaction. This study aimed to investigate the nanostructure of the microbe-material-interface and link it to microbial adhesion kinetics as function of titanium surface nanoroughness to gain new insight into controlling microbial adhesion via materials' surface nanoroughness. Adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was statistically significantly reduced (p≤0.05) by 55.6 % and 40.5 %, respectively, on physical vapor deposited titanium thin films with a nanoroughness of 6nm and the lowest surface peak density compared to 2nm with the highest surface peak density. Cross-sectioning of the microbial cells with a focused ion beam (FIB) and SEM imaging provided for the first time direct insight into the titanium-microbe-interface. High resolution SEM micrographs gave evidence that the surface peaks are the loci of initial contact between the microbial cells and the material's surface. In a qualitative model we propose that the initial microbial adhesion on nanorough surfaces is controlled by the titanium surface peak density via nano adhesion points. This new understanding will help towards the design of materials surfaces for controlling microbial adhesion.

  20. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  1. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  2. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-02

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  3. Epoxy Nanocomposites—Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  4. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  5. Soluble Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule is detectable in plasma of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and modulates cellular interaction with laminin-511 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Yamato; Miwa, Takahiro; Tanimizu, Naoki; Kadoya, Yuichi; Ogawa, Takaho; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2014-10-15

    Lutheran (Lu), an immunoglobulin superfamily transmembrane receptor, is also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM). Lu/B-CAM is a specific receptor for laminin α5, a subunit of laminin-511 (LM-511) that is a major component of basement membranes in various tissues. Our previous study showed that Lu/B-CAM was cleaved by MT1-MMP and released from cell surfaces. In this study we examined the soluble Lu/B-CAM in culture media and in plasma of mice bearing HuH-7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and patients with HCC. Two HCC cell lines, HepG2 and HuH-7, released Lu/B-CAM into the culture media. Although Lu/B-CAM was cleaved by MT1-MMP in HuH-7 cells, HepG2 cells released Lu/B-CAM in a MMP-independent manner. The concentration of Lu/B-CAM released into mouse plasma correlated with tumor size. Moreover the soluble Lu/B-CAM in plasma of HCC patients was significantly decreased after resection of the tumor. Immunohistochemical studies showed that although the expression of Lu/B-CAM was observed in most HCCs, MT1-MMP was not always expressed in tumor tissues, suggesting that a part of Lu/B-CAM in plasma of HCC patients was also released in a MMP-independent manner. In vitro studies showed that the soluble Lu/B-CAM released from HCC cells bound to LM-511. Moreover the soluble Lu/B-CAM influenced cell migration on LM-511. These results suggest that soluble Lu/B-CAM serves as not only a novel marker for HCC but also a modulator in tumor progression.

  6. Probing adhesion forces at the molecular scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.C.; Houston, J.E.; Michalske, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of adhesion forces at the molecular scale, such as those discussed here, are necessary to understand macroscopic boundary-layer behavior such as adhesion, friction, wear, lubrication, and many other important phenomena. The authors` recent interfacial force microscopy (IFM) studies have provided detailed information about the mechanical response of both self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films and the underlying substrates. In addition, they recently demonstrated that the IFM is useful for studying the chemical nature of such films. In this talk, the authors discuss a new method for studying surface interactions and chemical reactions using the IFM. To quantitatively measure the work of adhesion and bond energies between two organic thin films, they modify both a Au substrate and a Au probe with self-assembling organomercaptan molecules having either the same or different end groups (-CH{sub 3}, -NH{sub 2}, and -COOH), and then analyze the force-versus-displacement curves (force profiles) that result from the approach to contact of the two surfaces. Their results show that the magnitude of the adhesive forces measured between methyl-methyl interactions are in excellent agreement with van der Waals calculations using Lifshitz theory and previous experimentally determined values. Moreover, the measured peak adhesive forces scale as expected for van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and acid-base interactions.

  7. Adhesion in hydrogels and model glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvendiren, Murat

    Two main topics are addressed in this dissertation: (1) adhesion in hydrogels; (2) interfacial interactions between model glassy polymers. A self-assembly technique for the formation of hydrogels from acrylic triblock copolymer solutions was developed, based on vapor phase solvent exchange. Structure formation in the gels was characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, and swelling was measured in controlled pH buffer solutions. Strong gels are formed with polymer weight fractions between 0.01 and 0.15, and with shear moduli between 0.6 kPa and 3.5 kPa. Adhesive functionality, based on 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA) was also incorporated into the triblock copolymers. The effect of DOPA concentration on gel formation and swelling was investigated in detail. The adhesive properties of DOPA-functionalized hydrogels on TiO2 were investigated with an axisymmetric adhesion method. It was shown that the presence of DOPA enhances the adhesive properties of the hydrogels, but that the effect is minimized at pH values below 10, where the DOPA groups are hydrophobic. Thin film membranes were produced in order to study the specific interactions between DOPA and TiO2 and DOPA and tissue, using a membrane inflation method. The presence of DOPA in the membranes enhances the adhesion on TiO 2 and tissue, although adhesion to tissue requires that the DOPA groups be oxidized while in contact with the tissue of interest. Porous hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were formed by adding salt crystals to the triblock copolymer solution prior to solvent exchange. Salt was then leached out by immersing the gel into water. Structures of the porous hydrogels were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. These hydrogels were shown to be suitable for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. Diffusion-mediated adhesion between two component miscible polymer systems having very different glassy temperatures was also investigated. Axisymmetric

  8. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  9. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  10. CD44 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in lipid rafts promotes hyaluronan-mediated Ca2+ signaling leading to nitric oxide production and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2004-04-15

    In this study, we have showed that aortic endothelial cells (GM7372A cell line) express CD44v10 [a hyaluronan (HA) receptor], which is significantly enriched in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts (characterized as caveolin-rich plasma membrane microdomains). HA binding to CD44v10 promotes recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein, ankyrin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor into cholesterol-containing lipid rafts. The ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ankyrin is responsible for binding IP3 receptor to CD44v10 at lipid rafts and subsequently triggering HA/CD44v10-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilization leading to a variety of endothelial cell functions such as nitric oxide (NO) production, cell adhesion and proliferation. Further analyses indicate (i) disruption of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol from the membranes of GM7372A cells (using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin treatment) or (ii) interference of endogenous ankyrin binding to CD44 and IP3 receptor using overexpression of ARD fragments (by transfecting cells with ARDcDNA) not only abolishes ankyrin/IP3 receptor accumulation into CD44v10/cholesterol-containing lipid rafts, but also blocks HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD44v10 interaction with ankyrin and IP3 receptor in cholesterol-containing lipid rafts plays an important role in regulating HA-mediated Ca2+ signaling and endothelial cell functions such as NO production, cell adhesion and proliferation.

  11. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  12. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  13. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  14. Adhesive Bonding for Shelters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    weru uvaluated, the type of etch bath " sweetener " and the type of rinse\\water used. The type of etch bath " sweetener " was found to have a dramatic effect...EA9601NW Adhesives on 50521134 Bare Adherenas 39 13 Stress-Durability Behavior Sun-mary 40 14 Effect of Ltch Bath Sweetening Alloy on Interracial Durability...34"’ -,,• , •’• •"• " ,,,,, 9 Adhesive/Primer/Adherend Alloy/Surface Preparation Combinations Adherend OFPL Sweetening Rinse Adhesive:Primer Alloy Alloy

  15. Adhesion of oil to kaolinite in water.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Evgenia V; Fogden, Andrew

    2010-12-15

    Uniform coats of kaolinite particles on a flat glass substrate were prepared to be sufficiently smooth and thin to allow reliable measurement of contact angles of captive crude oil drops in a range of salt solutions, without any particle removal. The contact angle hysteresis was used to infer the extent of oil adhesion via rupture of the intervening water film and anchoring of charged groups to kaolinite. For sodium chloride solutions, adhesion decreases monotonically with pH and/or salinity, with strong adhesion only manifested under acidic conditions with salinity at most 0.1 M. Calcium chloride solutions at pH around 6 switch from strong adhesion in the range 0.001-0.01 M to weak adhesion at higher concentrations. For all mixtures of sodium and calcium chlorides investigated, a total ionic strength above 0.1 M guarantees a weak adhesion of oil to kaolinite. Results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations of electrostatic interactions, with H(+) and Ca(2+) being potential-determining ions for both interfaces.

  16. Bistability of cell adhesion in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-09-07

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area-bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms.

  17. Coordinated Interaction of Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM) nd Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) with Dynamic TUBB3 Mediates Netrin-1-Induced Axon Branching

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huai; Shao, Qiangqiang; Qu, Chao; Yang, Tao; Dwyer, Trisha; Liu, Guofa

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of actin and microtubule (MT) dynamics in neurons is implicated in guidance cue-dependent axon outgrowth, branching and pathfinding. Although the role of MTs in axon guidance has been well known, how extracellular guidance signals engage MT behavior in axon branching remains unclear. Previously, we have shown that TUBB3, the most dynamic β-tubulin isoform in neurons, directly binds to DCC to regulate MT dynamics in Netrin-1-mediated axon guidance. Here, we report that TUBB3 directly interacted with another Netrin-1 receptor DSCAM and Netrin-1 increased this interaction in primary neurons. MT dynamics were required for Netrin-1-promoted association of DSCAM with TUBB3. Knockdown of either DSCAM or DCC or addition of a function blocking anti-DCC antibody mutually blocked Netrin-1-induced interactions, suggesting that DSCAM interdependently coordinated with DCC in Netrin-1-induced binding to TUBB3. Both DSCAM and DCC were partially colocalized with TUBB3 in the axon branch and the axon branching point of primary neurons and Netrin-1 increased these colocalizations. Netrin-1 induced the interaction of endogenous DSCAM with polymerized TUBB3 in primary neurons and Src family kinases (SFKs) were required for regulating this binding. Knockdown of DSCAM only, DCC only or both was sufficient to block Netrin-1-induced axon branching of E15 mouse cortical neurons. Knocking down TUBB3 inhibited Netrin-1 induced axon branching as well. These results suggest that DSCAM collaborates with DCC to regulate MT dynamics via direct binding to dynamic TUBB3 in Netrin-1-induced axon branching. PMID:25754961

  18. Focal adhesion molecule Kindlin-1 mediates activation of TGF-β signaling by interacting with TGF-βRI, SARA and Smad3 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jinfeng; Du, Juan; Wang, Yunling; Yang, Mingzi; Gao, Jianchao; Wei, Xiaofan; Fang, Weigang; Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-11-15

    Kindlin-1, an integrin-interacting protein, has been implicated in TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Kindlin-1 regulation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling remains elusive. Here, we reported that Kindlin-1 is an important mediator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling by showing that Kindlin-1 physically interacts with TGF-β receptor I (TβRI), Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) and Smad3. Kindlin-1 is required for the interaction of Smad3 with TβRI, Smad3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and finally the activation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway. Functionally, Kindlin-1 promoted colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and was also required for CRC cell migration and invasion via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Kindlin-1 was found to be increased with the CRC progression from stages I to IV. Importantly, raised expression level of Kindlin-1 correlates with poor outcome in CRC patients. Taken together, we demonstrated that Kindlin-1 promotes CRC progression by recruiting SARA and Smad3 to TβRI and thereby activates TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. Thus, Kindlin-1 is a novel regulator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and may also be a potential target for CRC therapeutics.

  19. Structural basis of the interaction between the putative adhesion-involved and iron-regulated FrpD and FrpC proteins of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Sviridova, Ekaterina; Rezacova, Pavlina; Bondar, Alexey; Veverka, Vaclav; Novak, Petr; Schenk, Gundolf; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana; Bumba, Ladislav

    2017-01-01

    The iron-regulated protein FrpD from Neisseria meningitidis is an outer membrane lipoprotein that interacts with very high affinity (Kd ~ 0.2 nM) with the N-terminal domain of FrpC, a Type I-secreted protein from the Repeat in ToXin (RTX) protein family. In the presence of Ca2+, FrpC undergoes Ca2+ -dependent protein trans-splicing that includes an autocatalytic cleavage of the Asp414-Pro415 peptide bond and formation of an Asp414-Lys isopeptide bond. Here, we report the high-resolution structure of FrpD and describe the structure-function relationships underlying the interaction between FrpD and FrpC1-414. We identified FrpD residues involved in FrpC1-414 binding, which enabled localization of FrpD within the low-resolution SAXS model of the FrpD-FrpC1-414 complex. Moreover, the trans-splicing activity of FrpC resulted in covalent linkage of the FrpC1-414 fragment to plasma membrane proteins of epithelial cells in vitro, suggesting that formation of the FrpD-FrpC1-414 complex may be involved in the interaction of meningococci with the host cell surface. PMID:28084396

  20. Focal adhesion molecule Kindlin-1 mediates activation of TGF-β signaling by interacting with TGF-βRI, SARA and Smad3 in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunling; Yang, Mingzi; Gao, Jianchao; Wei, Xiaofan; Fang, Weigang; Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    Kindlin-1, an integrin-interacting protein, has been implicated in TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Kindlin-1 regulation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling remains elusive. Here, we reported that Kindlin-1 is an important mediator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling by showing that Kindlin-1 physically interacts with TGF-β receptor I (TβRI), Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) and Smad3. Kindlin-1 is required for the interaction of Smad3 with TβRI, Smad3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and finally the activation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway. Functionally, Kindlin-1 promoted colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and was also required for CRC cell migration and invasion via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Kindlin-1 was found to be increased with the CRC progression from stages I to IV. Importantly, raised expression level of Kindlin-1 correlates with poor outcome in CRC patients. Taken together, we demonstrated that Kindlin-1 promotes CRC progression by recruiting SARA and Smad3 to TβRI and thereby activates TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. Thus, Kindlin-1 is a novel regulator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and may also be a potential target for CRC therapeutics. PMID:27776350

  1. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  2. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  3. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  4. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  5. The chemistry of stalked barnacle adhesive (Lepas anatifera)

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Morrison, Liam; Lynch, Edward P.; Grunwald, Ingo; von Byern, Janek; Power, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    The results of the first chemical analysis of the adhesive of Lepas anatifera, a stalked barnacle, are presented. A variety of elements were identified in scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) of the adhesive, including Na, Mg, Ca, Cl, S, Al, Si, K and Fe; however, protein–metal interactions were not detected in Raman spectra of the adhesive. Elemental signatures from SEM-EDS of L. anatifera adhesive glands were less varied. Phosphorous was mostly absent in adhesive samples; supporting previous studies showing that phosphoserines do not play a significant role in adult barnacle adhesion. Disulfide bridges arising from Cys dimers were also investigated; Raman analysis showed weak evidence for S–S bonds in L. anatifera. In addition, there was no calcium carbonate signal in the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of L. anatifera adhesive, unlike several previous studies in other barnacle species. Significant differences were observed between the Raman spectra of L. anatifera and Balanus crenatus; these and a range of Raman peaks in the L. anatifera adhesive are discussed. Polysaccharide was detected in L. anatifera adhesive but the significance of this awaits further experiments. The results demonstrate some of the diversity within barnacle species in the chemistry of their adhesives. PMID:25657841

  6. The chemistry of stalked barnacle adhesive (Lepas anatifera).

    PubMed

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Morrison, Liam; Lynch, Edward P; Grunwald, Ingo; von Byern, Janek; Power, Anne Marie

    2015-02-06

    The results of the first chemical analysis of the adhesive of Lepas anatifera, a stalked barnacle, are presented. A variety of elements were identified in scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) of the adhesive, including Na, Mg, Ca, Cl, S, Al, Si, K and Fe; however, protein-metal interactions were not detected in Raman spectra of the adhesive. Elemental signatures from SEM-EDS of L. anatifera adhesive glands were less varied. Phosphorous was mostly absent in adhesive samples; supporting previous studies showing that phosphoserines do not play a significant role in adult barnacle adhesion. Disulfide bridges arising from Cys dimers were also investigated; Raman analysis showed weak evidence for S-S bonds in L. anatifera. In addition, there was no calcium carbonate signal in the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of L. anatifera adhesive, unlike several previous studies in other barnacle species. Significant differences were observed between the Raman spectra of L. anatifera and Balanus crenatus; these and a range of Raman peaks in the L. anatifera adhesive are discussed. Polysaccharide was detected in L. anatifera adhesive but the significance of this awaits further experiments. The results demonstrate some of the diversity within barnacle species in the chemistry of their adhesives.

  7. Adhesion of mussel foot proteins to different substrate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qingye; Danner, Eric; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Mussel foot proteins (mfps) have been investigated as a source of inspiration for the design of underwater coatings and adhesives. Recent analysis of various mfps by a surface forces apparatus (SFA) revealed that mfp-1 functions as a coating, whereas mfp-3 and mfp-5 resemble adhesive primers on mica surfaces. To further refine and elaborate the surface properties of mfps, the force–distance profiles of the interactions between thin mfp (i.e. mfp-1, mfp-3 or mfp-5) films and four different surface chemistries, namely mica, silicon dioxide, polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene, were measured by an SFA. The results indicate that the adhesion was exquisitely dependent on the mfp tested, the substrate surface chemistry and the contact time. Such studies are essential for understanding the adhesive versatility of mfps and related/similar adhesion proteins, and for translating this versatility into a new generation of coatings and (including in vivo) adhesive materials. PMID:23173195

  8. Work of adhesion and separation between soft elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Nanshu

    2015-03-01

    The JKR (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts) method is widely used to measure the work of adhesion between soft materials. In this paper, the JKR theory is summarized and three dimensionless parameters are proposed to design a proper JKR experiment. The work of adhesion and the work of separation between two commonly used soft elastomers PDMS (Sylgard 184) and Ecoflex 0300 are obtained with the measured pull-in and pull-off forces using a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). The effect of crosslinking density and solvent extraction are examined. It is found that the pull-in adhesion stays more or less constant for all contact pairs we measured. While the effect of crosslinking density is not significant for pristine PDMS, it is very obvious that the higher self-adhesion can be found in less crosslinked PDMS after solvent extraction. Such an effect is even more drastic for PDMS-to-Ecoflex adhesion. A unified adhesion mechanism is proposed to explain these complex adhesion behaviors. It is concluded that the chain-matrix interaction is the most effective adhesion mechanism compared to chain-chain or matrix-matrix interactions and the three interactions are exclusive to each other. This work is supported by the NSF CMMI award under Grant No. 1301335.

  9. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  10. Protein conformation as a regulator of cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2014-04-14

    The dynamic regulation of cell-matrix adhesion is essential for tissue homeostasis and architecture, and thus numerous pathologies are linked to altered cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and ECM scaffold. The molecular machinery involved in cell-matrix adhesion is complex and involves both sensory and matrix-remodelling functions. In this review, we focus on how protein conformation controls the organization and dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion. The conformational changes in various adhesion machinery components are described, including examples from ECM as well as cytoplasmic proteins. The discussed mechanisms involved in the regulation of protein conformation include mechanical stress, post-translational modifications and allosteric ligand-binding. We emphasize the potential role of intrinsically disordered protein regions in these processes and discuss the role of protein networks and co-operative protein interactions in the formation and consolidation of cell-matrix adhesion and extracellular scaffolds.

  11. Integrin-dependent translocation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase to the cytoskeleton of thrombin-activated platelets involves specific interactions of p85 alpha with actin filaments and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Thrombin-induced accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2) but not of PtdIns(3,4,5,)P3 is strongly correlated with the relocation to the cytoskeleton of 29% of the p85 alpha regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PtdIns 3-kinase) and is accompanied by a significant increase in PtdIns 3-kinase activity in this subcellular fraction. Actually, PtdIns(3,4)P2 accumulation and PtdIns 3-kinase, pp60c-src, and p125FAK translocations as well as aggregation were concomitant events occurring with a distinct lag after actin polymerization. The accumulation of PtdIns(3,4)P2 and the relocalization of PtdIns 3-kinase to the cytoskeleton were both dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation, integrin signaling, and aggregation. Furthermore, although p85 alpha was detected in anti- phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates obtained from the cytoskeleton of thrombin-activated platelets, we failed to demonstrate tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoskeletal p85 alpha. Tyrphostin treatment clearly reduced its presence in this subcellular fraction, suggesting a physical interaction of p85 alpha with a phosphotyrosyl protein. These data led us to investigate the proteins that are able to interact with PtdIns 3-kinase in the cytoskeleton. We found an association of this enzyme with actin filaments: this interaction was spontaneously restored after one cycle of actin depolymerization-repolymerization in vitro. This association with F-actin appeared to be at least partly indirect, since we demonstrated a thrombin-dependent interaction of p85 alpha with a proline-rich sequence of the tyrosine-phosphorylated cytoskeletal focal adhesion kinase, p125FAK. In addition, we show that PtdIns 3-kinase is significantly activated by the p125FAK proline-rich sequence binding to the src homology 3 domain of p85 alpha subunit. This interaction may represent a new mechanism for PtdIns 3-kinase activation at very specific areas of the cell and indicates that the focal contact-like areas

  12. Adhesion of photon-driven molecular motors to surfaces via 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions: effect of interfacial interactions on molecular motion.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Landaluce, Tatiana Fernández; Rudolf, Petra; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-01-25

    We report the attachment of altitudinal light-driven molecular motors to surfaces using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions. Molecular motors were designed containing azide or alkyne groups for attachment to alkyne- or azide-modified surfaces. Surface attachment was characterized by UV-vis, IR, XPS, and ellipsometry measurements. Surface-bound motors were found to undergo photochemical and thermal isomerizations consistent with unidirectional rotation in solution. Confinement at a surface was found to reduce the rate of the thermal isomerization process. The rate of thermal isomerization was also dependent on the surface coverage of the motors. In solution, changes in the UV-vis signal that accompany thermal isomerization can be fit with a single monoexponential decay. In contrast, thermal isomerization of the surface-bound motors does not follow a single monoexponential decay and was found to fit a biexponential decay. Both one- and two-legged motors were attached to surfaces. The kinetics of thermal isomerization was not affected by the valency of attachment, indicating that the changes in kinetics from solution to surface systems are related to interactions between the surface-bound motors.

  13. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  14. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  15. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  16. Temperature-Dependent Adhesion of Graphene Suspended on a Trench.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Zapperi, Stefano

    2016-01-13

    Graphene deposited over a trench has been studied in the context of nanomechanical resonators, where experiments indicate adhesion of the graphene sheet to the trench boundary and sidewalls leads to self-tensioning; however, this adhesion is not well understood. We use molecular dynamics to simulate graphene deposited on a trench and study how adhesion to the sidewalls depends on substrate interaction, temperature, and curvature of the edge of the trench. Over the range of parameters we study, the depth at the center of the sheet is approximately linear in substrate interaction strength and temperature but not trench width, and we explain this using a one-dimensional model for the sheet configuration.

  17. Acid-base properties of adhesive dental polymers.

    PubMed

    Morra, M

    1993-11-01

    The surface energetics of three resins (polymethylmethacrylate, polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate, and Bis-GMA/triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate) commonly used in adhesive interactions with tooth hard tissues were evaluated according to the Fowkes acid-base theory of interfacial interactions. From the measurement of the contact angle of test acidic and basic liquids on the sample surfaces, the acid-base contribution to the work of adhesion was evaluated. Results show that polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate is a comparatively strong Lewis base, a finding that can explain the important role played by this material in the formulation of dentin adhesive.

  18. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  19. Advanced Surface Treatments and Adhesive Bonding Testing Schemes of Ceramic Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    2000]. Silane or other adhesion promoters coupled with structural adhesive formulations tailored for specific applications have vastly improved the...interactions of common adhesion promoters, such as silane coupling agents, have not been explored in the case of ceramic substrates. Performing an adhesive...cleaning procedures, silane coupling agent application, and surface drying. For surface cleaning, samples were degreased with an acetone rinse and grit

  20. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  1. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  2. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  3. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  4. Natural Underwater Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Ransom, Todd C; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)(3) coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  5. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  6. Self-assembled Nano-layering at the Adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Yoshihara, K; Nagaoka, N; Hayakawa, S; Torii, Y; Ogawa, T; Osaka, A; Meerbeek, B Van

    2012-04-01

    According to the 'Adhesion-Decalcification' concept, specific functional monomers within dental adhesives can ionically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Such ionic bonding has been demonstrated for 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) to manifest in the form of self-assembled 'nano-layering'. However, it remained to be explored if such nano-layering also occurs on tooth tissue when commercial MDP-containing adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) were applied following common clinical application protocols. We therefore characterized adhesive-dentin interfaces chemically, using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and ultrastructurally, using (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM). Both adhesives revealed nano-layering at the adhesive interface, not only within the hybrid layer but also, particularly for Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), extending into the adhesive layer. Since such self-assembled nano-layering of two 10-MDP molecules, joined by stable MDP-Ca salt formation, must make the adhesive interface more resistant to biodegradation, it may well explain the documented favorable clinical longevity of bonds produced by 10-MDP-based adhesives.

  7. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  8. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts.

    PubMed

    Torres, J R; Jay, G D; Kim, K-S; Bothun, G D

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  9. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  10. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  11. Natural tissue microenvironmental conditions modulate adhesive material performance.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Nuria; Shitreet, Sagi; Abraham, Eytan; Stanley, Butch; Edelman, Elazer R; Artzi, Natalie

    2012-10-30

    We designed and optimized tissue-responsive adhesive materials by matching material and tissue properties. A two-component material based on dextran aldehyde and dendrimer amine provides a cohesive gel through aldehyde-amine cross-linking and an adhesive interface created by a dextran aldehyde-selective reaction with tissue amines. By altering aldehyde-amine chemistry, we examined how variations in tissue surfaces (serosal amine density in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) affect interactions with adhesive materials of varied compositions (aldehyde content). Interestingly, the same adhesive formulation reacts differentially with the three regions of the small intestine as a result of variation in the tissue amine density along the intestinal tract, affecting the tissue-material interfacial morphology, adhesion strength, and adhesive mechanical properties. Whereas tissues provide chemical anchors for interaction with materials, we were able to tune the adhesion strength for each section of the small intestine tissue by altering the adhesive formulation using a two-component material with flexible variables aimed at controlling the aldehyde/amine ratio. This tissue-specific approach should be applied to the broad spectrum of biomaterials, taking into account specific microenvironmental conditions in material design.

  12. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  13. Alterations in Adhesion, Transport, and Membrane Characteristics in an Adhesion-Deficient Pseudomonad

    PubMed Central

    DeFlaun, M. F.; Oppenheimer, S. R.; Streger, S.; Condee, C. W.; Fletcher, M.

    1999-01-01

    A stable adhesion-deficient mutant of Burkholderia cepacia G4, a soil pseudomonad, was selected in a sand column assay. This mutant (ENV435) was compared to the wild-type strain by examining the adhesion of the organisms to silica sand and their transport through two aquifer sediments that differed in their sand, silt, and clay contents. We compared the longitudinal transport of the wild type and the adhesion mutant to the transport of a conservative chloride tracer in 25-cm-long glass columns. The transport of the wild-type strain was severely retarded compared to the transport of the conservative tracer in a variety of aquifer sediments, while the adhesion mutant and the conservative tracer traveled at similar rates. An intact sediment core study produced similar results; ENV435 was transported at a faster rate and in much greater numbers than G4. The results of hydrophobic interaction chromatography revealed that G4 was significantly more hydrophobic than ENV435, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed significant differences in the lipopolysaccharide O-antigens of the adhesion mutant and the wild type. Differences in this cell surface polymer may explain the decreased adhesion of strain ENV435. PMID:9925613

  14. The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Stephanie J.; Lostchuck, Emily; Goult, Benjamin T.; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Fairchild, Michael J.; López-Ceballos, Pablo; Calderwood, David A.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development. PMID:25393120

  15. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  16. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  17. The role of material properties in adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When two solid surfaces are brought into contact strong adhesive bond forces can develop between the materials. The magnitude of the forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between solids is addressed from a theoretical consideration of the electronic nature of the surfaces and experimentally relating bond forces to the nature of the interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties correlated with adhesion include, atomic or molecular orientation, reconstruction and segregation as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where dissimilar solids are in contact the contribution of each is considered as is the role of their interactive chemistry on bond strength. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation and state. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers and diamond. They are reviewed both in single and polycrystalline form. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  18. Discovery of Low Mucus Adhesion Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge of medical and consumer import. Here, using a high throughput platform (HTP) with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1 hr static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited the significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 hr. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen-bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of PEG monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g/mol to 1100 g/mol, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R2 = 0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized HSP plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces. PMID:23072828

  19. Discovery of low mucus adhesion surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2013-02-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous, and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge. Here, using a high throughput platform with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1h static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 h. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g mol⁻¹ to 1100 g mol⁻¹, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R²=0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized Hansen solubility parameter plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces.

  20. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  1. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  2. Interference of functional monomers with polymerization efficiency of adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hanabusa, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Momoi, Yasuko; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-04-01

    The degree of conversion (DC) of camphorquinone/amine-based adhesives is affected by acidic functional monomers as a result of inactivation of the amine co-initiator through an acid-base reaction. During bonding, functional monomers of self-etch adhesives chemically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Here, we tested in how far the latter interaction of functional monomers with HAp counteracts the expected reduction in DC of camphorquinone/amine-based adhesives. The DC of three experimental adhesive formulations, containing either of the two functional monomers [10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) or 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic acid anhydride (4-META)] or no functional monomer (no-FM; control), was measured with and without HAp powder added to the adhesive formulations. Both the variables 'functional monomer' and 'HAp' were found to be significant, with the functional monomer reducing the DC and HAp counteracting this effect. It is concluded that the functional monomers 10-MDP and 4-META interfere with the polymerization efficiency of adhesives. This interference is less prominent in the presence of HAp, which would clinically correspond to when these two functional monomers of the adhesive simultaneously interact with HAp in tooth tissue.

  3. Hydrolytic stability of self-etch adhesives bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Koshiro, K; Yoshida, Y; De Munck, J; Nagakane, K; Suzuki, K; Sano, H; Van Meerbeek, B

    2005-12-01

    Functional monomers chemically interact with hydroxyapatite that remains within submicron hybrid layers produced by mild self-etch adhesives. The functional monomer 10-MDP interacts most intensively with hydroxyapatite, and its calcium salt appeared most hydrolytically stable, as compared with 4-MET and phenyl-P. We investigated the hypothesis that additional chemical interaction of self-etch adhesives improves bond stability. The micro-tensile bond strength (muTBS) of the 10-MDP-based adhesive did not decrease significantly after 100,000 cycles, but did after 50,000 and 30,000 cycles, respectively, for the 4-MET-based and the phenyl-P-based adhesives. Likewise, the interfacial ultrastructure was unchanged after 100,000 thermocycles for the 10-MDP-based adhesive, while that of both the 4-MET- and phenyl-P-based adhesives contained voids and less-defined collagen. The findings of this study support the concept that long-term durability of adhesive-dentin bonds depends on the chemical bonding potential of the functional monomer.

  4. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  5. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  6. The structure of cell-matrix adhesions: the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Hanein, Dorit; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2012-02-01

    Adhesions between the cell and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mechanosensitive multi-protein assemblies that transmit force across the cell membrane and regulate biochemical signals in response to the chemical and mechanical environment. These combined functions in force transduction, signaling and mechanosensing contribute to cellular phenotypes that span development, homeostasis and disease. These adhesions form, mature and disassemble in response to actin organization and physical forces that originate from endogenous myosin activity or external forces by the extracellular matrix. Despite advances in our understanding of the protein composition, interactions and regulation, our understanding of matrix adhesion structure and organization, how forces affect this organization, and how these changes dictate specific signaling events is limited. Insights across multiple structural levels are acutely needed to elucidate adhesion structure and ultimately the molecular basis of signaling and mechanotransduction. Here we describe the challenges and recent advances and prospects for unraveling the structure of cell-matrix adhesions and their response to force.

  7. Ceramic Adhesive for High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Everett G.

    1987-01-01

    Fused-silica/magnesium-phosphate adhesive resists high temperatures and vibrations. New adhesive unaffected by extreme temperatures and vibrations. Assuring direct bonding of gap filters to tile sidewalls, adhesive obviates expensive and time-consuming task of removal, treatment, and replacement of tiles.

  8. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  9. Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

  10. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  11. Stress evolution in a conductive adhesive during curing and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuhai

    2000-10-01

    There is increasing interest in using conductive adhesives, which are composites of polymers and conductive fillers, as replacements for solder in different types of microelectronic assemblies. However, conductive adhesives still suffer from several deficiencies, such as unstable electrical conductivity and inadequate adhesion. The reliability of the conductive adhesive joints is always one of the major considerations during their design and operation, and the curing and thermal stresses generated in polymers and composites during curing, cooling and thermal cycling play a very important role in determining reliability. Because of the mismatch in the mechanical properties between the conductive adhesive and the substrate, appreciable curing and thermal stress is generated during manufacturing, which may be detrimental to the reliability of conductive adhesive joints. In this dissertation, an interactive linear viscoelastic model which considers interaction between the initial gel network and the other networks that form during curing is proposed to simulate stress and volume shrinkage during the thermoset curing process, and an effective method for measuring volume shrinkage during the thermoset cure is developed. A systematic experimental study of the material properties of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix during the curing and cooling processes has been conducted. Based on these experimental data, stresses generated during several spatially homogeneous curing and cooling processes of the conductive adhesive and its epoxy matrix are also calculated. It is found that the conductive adhesive possesses mechanical properties which are substantially different from those of the constituents, and that the conductive adhesive has a relaxation process which is similar to its matrix and generates appreciable curing and thermal stresses during curing and cooling. Finally, a processing procedure designed to provide desired residual stresses is discussed.

  12. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-06-01

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  13. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  14. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  15. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  16. Ice Adhesions in Relation to Freeze Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Olien, C. R.; Smith, Myrtle N.

    1977-01-01

    In freezing, competitive interaction between ice and hydrophilic plant substances causes an energy of adhesion to develop through the interstitial liquid. The thermodynamic basis for the adhesion energy is discussed, with estimates of the energies involved. In this research, effects of adhesion energy were observed microscopically in conjunction with energies of crystallization and frost desiccation. The complex character of ice in intact crown tissue of winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the problems of sectioning frozen tissue without producing artifacts led to an alternative study of single barley cells in a mesh of ice and cell wall polymers. Adhesions between ice, cell wall polymers, and the plasmalemma form a complexly interacting system in which the pattern of crystallization is a major factor in determination of stress and injury. Images PMID:16660124

  17. [Fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Sadowska, Marta; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare disease with insidious course. It causes damage of the spinal cord and nerve roots. The causes of adhesive arachnoiditis include earlier traumatic injury of the spinal cord, surgery, intrathecal administration of therapeutic substances (e.g. anaesthetics, chemotherapy) or contrast media, bleeding, and inflammation. It can also be idiopathic or iatrogenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old patient with fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis which was provoked by spinal surgery and caused severe neurological disability with profound, progressive, flaccid paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The electromyography (EMG) showed serious damage of nerves of both lower limbs at the level of motor roots L2-S2 and damage of the motor neuron at the level of Th11-Th12 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral and thoracic part of the spinal cord demonstrated cystic liquid spaces in the lumen of the dural sac in the bottom part of the cervical spine and at the Th2-Th10 level, modelling the lateral and anterior surface of the cord. Because of the vast lesions, surgery could not be performed. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation brought only a small clinical improvement.

  18. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  19. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  20. Plasticizers Increase Adhesion of the Deteriogenic Fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to Polyvinyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jeremy S.; Van der Mei, Henny C.; Nixon, Marianne; Eastwood, Ian M.; Greenhalgh, Malcolm; Read, Simon J.; Robson, Geoffrey D.; Handley, Pauline S.

    1999-01-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing the plasticizers dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and dioctyl adipate (DOA). A quantitative adhesion assay using image analysis identified fundamental differences in the mechanism of adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to these substrata. Adhesion to pPVC was greater than that to uPVC by a maximum of 280% after a 4-h incubation with 108 blastospores ml−1. That plasticizers enhance adhesion to PVC was confirmed by incorporating a dispersion of both DOA and DOP into the blastospore suspension. Adhesion to uPVC was increased by up to 308% in the presence of the dispersed plasticizers. Hydrophobic interactions were found to dominate adhesion to uPVC because (i) a strong positive correlation was observed between substratum hydrophobicity (measured by using a dynamic contact angle analyzer) and adhesion to a range of unplasticized polymers including uPVC, and (ii) neither the pH nor the electrolyte concentration of the suspension buffer, both of which influence electrostatic interactions, affected adhesion to uPVC. In contrast, adhesion to pPVC is principally controlled by electrostatic interactions. Enhanced adhesion to pPVC occurred despite a relative reduction of 13° in the water contact angle of pPVC compared to that of uPVC. Furthermore, adhesion to pPVC was strongly dependent on both the pH and electrolyte concentration of the suspension medium, reaching maximum levels at pH 8 and with an electrolyte concentration of 10 mM NaCl. Plasticization with DOP and DOA therefore increases adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to pPVC through an interaction mediated by electrostatic forces. PMID:10427051

  1. Adhesive barnacle peptides exhibit a steric-driven design rule to enhance adhesion between asymmetric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Raman, Sangeetha; Malms, Lukas; Utzig, Thomas; Shrestha, Buddha Ratna; Stock, Philipp; Krishnan, Shankar; Valtiner, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Barnacles exhibit superior underwater adhesion simply through sequencing of the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, without post processing or using special amino acids. Here, we measure and discuss the molecular interaction of two distinct and recurring short peptide sequences (Bp1 and Bp2) inspired from the surface binding 19kDa protein from the barnacle attachment interface. Using self-assembled monolayer (SAMs) of known physical and chemical properties on molecularly smooth gold substrates in 5mM NaCl at pH 7.3, (1) the adsorption mechanisms of the barnacle inspired peptides are explored using quartz crystal microbalance, and (2) adhesion mediating properties are measured using the surface force apparatus. The hydrophobic Bp1 peptide with a cysteine residue adsorbs irreversibly onto Au surfaces due to thiol bond formation, while on hydrophobic CH3 SAM surface, the interactions are hydrophobic in nature. Interestingly, Bp2 that contains both hydrophobic and protonated amine units exhibits asymmetric bridging with an exceptionally high adhesion energy up to 100mJ/m(2) between mica and both gold and CH3 SAM. Surprisingly on hydrophilic surfaces such as COOH- or OH-SAMs both peptides fail to show any interactions, implying the necessity of surface charge to promote bridging. Our results provide insights into the molecular aspects of manipulating and utilizing barnacle-mediated peptides to promote or inhibit underwater adhesion.

  2. Multi-scale models for cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yinghao; Chen, Jiawen; Xie, Zhong-Ru

    2014-03-01

    The interactions of membrane receptors during cell adhesion play pivotal roles in tissue morphogenesis during development. Our lab focuses on developing multi-scale models to decompose the mechanical and chemical complexity in cell adhesion. Recent experimental evidences show that clustering is a generic process for cell adhesive receptors. However, the physical basis of such receptor clustering is not understood. We introduced the effect of molecular flexibility to evaluate the dynamics of receptors. By delivering new theory to quantify the changes of binding free energy in different cellular environments, we revealed that restriction of molecular flexibility upon binding of membrane receptors from apposing cell surfaces (trans) causes large entropy loss, which dramatically increases their lateral interactions (cis). This provides a new molecular mechanism to initialize receptor clustering on the cell-cell interface. By using the subcellular simulations, we further found that clustering is a cooperative process requiring both trans and cis interactions. The detailed binding constants during these processes are calculated and compared with experimental data from our collaborator's lab.

  3. Extracellular matrix-specific focal adhesions in vascular smooth muscle produce mechanically active adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Hill, Michael A.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the physiological control of tissue blood flow and vascular resistance. To test whether force applied to specific extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin interactions could induce myogenic-like mechanical activity at focal adhesion sites, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to apply controlled forces to specific ECM adhesion sites on arteriolar VSMCs. The tip of AFM probes were fused with a borosilicate bead (2∼5 μm) coated with fibronectin (FN), collagen type I (CNI), laminin (LN), or vitronectin (VN). ECM-coated beads induced clustering of α5- and β3-integrins and actin filaments at sites of bead-cell contact indicative of focal adhesion formation. Step increases of an upward (z-axis) pulling force (800∼1,600 pN) applied to the bead-cell contact site for FN-specific focal adhesions induced a myogenic-like, force-generating response from the VSMC, resulting in a counteracting downward pull by the cell. This micromechanical event was blocked by cytochalasin D but was enhanced by jasplakinolide. Function-blocking antibodies to α5β1- and αvβ3-integrins also blocked the micromechanical cell event in a concentration-dependent manner. Similar pulling experiments with CNI, VN, or LN failed to induce myogenic-like micromechanical events. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mechanical force applied to integrin-FN adhesion sites induces an actin-dependent, myogenic-like, micromechanical event. Focal adhesions formed by different ECM proteins exhibit different mechanical characteristics, and FN appears of particular relevance in its ability to strongly attach to VSMCs and to induce myogenic-like, force-generating reactions from sites of focal adhesion in response to externally applied forces. PMID:18495809

  4. Plasma treated polyethylene grafted with adhesive molecules for enhanced adhesion and growth of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rimpelová, Silvie; Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Lemerová, Helena; Švorčík, Václav; Ruml, Tomáš

    2013-04-01

    The cell-material interface plays a crucial role in the interaction of cells with synthetic materials for biomedical use. The application of plasma for tailoring polymer surfaces is of abiding interest and holds a great promise in biomedicine. In this paper, we describe polyethylene (PE) surface tuning by Ar plasma irradiating and subsequent grafting of the chemically active PE surface with adhesive proteins or motives to support cell attachment. These simple modifications resulted in changed polymer surface hydrophilicity, roughness and morphology, which we thoroughly characterized. The effect of our modifications on adhesion and growth was tested in vitro using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 cell line). We demonstrate that the plasma treatment of PE had a positive effect on the adhesion, spreading, homogeneity of distribution and moderately on proliferation activity of NIH 3T3 cells. This effect was even more pronounced on PE coated with biomolecules.

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening via Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Kristin E.; Dumbauld, David W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell–ECM forces. PMID:19297531

  6. Bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons: role of asphaltenes and resins.

    PubMed

    Warne Zoueki, Caroline; Ghoshal, Subhasis; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2010-08-01

    The influence of asphaltenes and resins on bacterial adhesion to model crude oils was examined using a modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay. Well-controlled bacterial adhesion experiments were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7) using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida and four model crude oil systems containing up to four representative hydrocarbon compounds found in crude oils. The model crude oils were designed to independently evaluate the influence of asphaltenes and resins on hydrocarbon surface charge (i.e., electrophoretic mobility) and on bacterial adhesion to the liquid hydrocarbon phase. Asphaltenes and resins were found to make the hydrocarbon droplet surface charge less negative (or more positive) and to generally decrease microbial adhesion to the hydrocarbon. The experimental results were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria-hydrocarbon interactions based on the classical or extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek interaction energy profiles calculated from measured physicochemical properties of the microorganisms and hydrocarbons. Model calculations considering the role of steric repulsion in bacteria-hydrocarbon interactions suggest that the decreased adhesion behavior in the presence of asphaltenes and resins may be linked to a mechanism of steric hindrance.

  7. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  8. Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Dolan, R A

    1993-06-01

    Forty-one cases of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis are presented. The key points are, first, that lumbar disc lesions, their investigations and surgical treatment and the use of nonabsorbable contrast materials are the most common etiological factors and, secondly, that operation is the best treatment. It is our contention that the majority of patients so treated do experience some improvement in what otherwise can be an unbearable amount of pain and disability. The use of adsorbable, nonirritative contrast materials such as Iohexol Parenteral will result in a marked reduction in the frequency of occurrence of arachnoiditis.

  9. CYANOACRYLATE ADHESIVES IN EYE WOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    adhesives. The following adhesives were tested: methyl, isobutyl, n-butyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, n-decyl, -trifluoroisopropyl 2- cyanoacrylate , and...Biobond. Of these, methyl and -trifluoroisopropyl cyanoacrylates are not well tolerated by eye tissues. Biobond sets too slowly, and does not seem... cyanoacrylate is the best adhesive found so far when tissue tolerance, tensile strength, and ability to seal eye perforations (alone and with silicone rubber patches) are the criteria. (Author)

  10. Durability of Adhesively Bonded Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-11

    frequently. Significant technology improvements have occurred In surface treatment, primers, joint analyses, adhesives and process controls. These have...clearly established the Initial cost savings potential for adhesive bonding. While this approach addresses the adequacy of joints early in service, there...processes with those changes which occur as a result of residual stress or cyclic loading in the adhesive joint 074-2R-bh 1 To fill a small part of this

  11. Adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens onto nanophase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Thomas J.; Tong, Zonghua; Liu, Jin; Banks, M. Katherine

    2005-07-01

    Nanobiotechnology is a growing area of research, primarily due to the potentially numerous applications of new synthetic nanomaterials in engineering/science. Although various definitions have been given for the word 'nanomaterials' by many different experts, the commonly accepted one refers to nanomaterials as those materials which possess grains, particles, fibres, or other constituent components that have one dimension specifically less than 100 nm. In biological applications, most of the research to date has focused on the interactions between mammalian cells and synthetic nanophase surfaces for the creation of better tissue engineering materials. Although mammalian cells have shown a definite positive response to nanophase materials, information on bacterial interactions with nanophase materials remains elusive. For this reason, this study was designed to assess the adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens on nanophase compared to conventional grain size alumina substrates. Results provide the first evidence of increased adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens on alumina with nanometre compared to conventional grain sizes. To understand more about the process, polymer (specifically, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid or PLGA) casts were made of the conventional and nanostructured alumina surfaces. Results showed similar increased Pseudomonas fluorescens capture on PLGA casts of nanostructured compared to conventional alumina as on the alumina itself. For these reasons, a key material property shown to enhance bacterial adhesion was elucidated in this study for both polymers and ceramics: nanostructured surface features.

  12. Hot melt adhesive attachment pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzill, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Gleason, J. R.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hot melt adhesive attachment pad for releasably securing distinct elements together is described which is particularly useful in the construction industry or a spatial vacuum environment. The attachment pad consists primarily of a cloth selectively impregnated with a charge of hot melt adhesive, a thermo-foil heater, and a thermo-cooler. These components are securely mounted in a mounting assembly. In operation, the operator activates the heating cycle transforming the hot melt adhesive to a substantially liquid state, positions the pad against the attachment surface, and activates the cooling cycle solidifying the adhesive and forming a strong, releasable bond.

  13. N-Glycosylation at the SynCAM (Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule) Immunoglobulin Interface Modulates Synaptic Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    A Fogel; Y Li; Q Wang; T Lam; Y Modis; T Biederer

    2011-12-31

    Select adhesion molecules connect pre- and postsynaptic membranes and organize developing synapses. The regulation of these trans-synaptic interactions is an important neurobiological question. We have previously shown that the synaptic cell adhesion molecules (SynCAMs) 1 and 2 engage in homo- and heterophilic interactions and bridge the synaptic cleft to induce presynaptic terminals. Here, we demonstrate that site-specific N-glycosylation impacts the structure and function of adhesive SynCAM interactions. Through crystallographic analysis of SynCAM 2, we identified within the adhesive interface of its Ig1 domain an N-glycan on residue Asn(60). Structural modeling of the corresponding SynCAM 1 Ig1 domain indicates that its glycosylation sites Asn(70)/Asn(104) flank the binding interface of this domain. Mass spectrometric and mutational studies confirm and characterize the modification of these three sites. These site-specific N-glycans affect SynCAM adhesion yet act in a differential manner. Although glycosylation of SynCAM 2 at Asn(60) reduces adhesion, N-glycans at Asn(70)/Asn(104) of SynCAM 1 increase its interactions. The modification of SynCAM 1 with sialic acids contributes to the glycan-dependent strengthening of its binding. Functionally, N-glycosylation promotes the trans-synaptic interactions of SynCAM 1 and is required for synapse induction. These results demonstrate that N-glycosylation of SynCAM proteins differentially affects their binding interface and implicate post-translational modification as a mechanism to regulate trans-synaptic adhesion.

  14. On the Adhesion performance of a single electrospun fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baji, Avinash; Zhou, Limin; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yang, Zhifang; Yao, Haimin

    2015-01-01

    The micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures found on the feet of spiders and geckos function as adhesion devices which allow them to adhere to both molecularly smooth and rough surfaces. This adhesion has been argued to arise from intermolecular forces, such as van der Waals (vdW) force, acting at the interface between any two materials in contact. Thus, it is possible to mimic their adhesion using synthetic nanostructured analogs. Herein, we report the first successful pull-off force measurements on a single electrospun fiber and show the potential of using electrospinning to fabricate adhesive analogs. A single fiber is glued to the atomic force microscope cantilever, and its adhesion to a metal substrate is studied by recording the pull-off force/displacement curves. The measured adhesive force of ~18 nN matches closely that of their biological counterparts. Similar to natural structures, the adhesive mechanism of these electrospun structures is controlled by vdW interactions.

  15. Sticky Matrix: Adhesion Mechanism of the Staphylococcal Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin.

    PubMed

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Feuillie, Cécile; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Kucharíková, Soňa; Lasa, Iñigo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The development of bacterial biofilms on surfaces leads to hospital-acquired infections that are difficult to fight. In Staphylococci, the cationic polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) forms an extracellular matrix that connects the cells together during biofilm formation, but the molecular forces involved are unknown. Here, we use advanced force nanoscopy techniques to unravel the mechanism of PIA-mediated adhesion in a clinically relevant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of the structure, adhesion, and elasticity of bacteria expressing PIA shows that the cells are surrounded by a soft and adhesive matrix of extracellular polymers. Cell surface softness and adhesion are dramatically reduced in mutant cells deficient for the synthesis of PIA or under unfavorable growth conditions. Single-cell force spectroscopy demonstrates that PIA promotes cell-cell adhesion via the multivalent electrostatic interaction with polyanionic teichoic acids on the S. aureus cell surface. This binding mechanism rationalizes, at the nanoscale, the well-known ability of PIA to strengthen intercellular adhesion in staphylococcal biofilms. Force nanoscopy offers promising prospects for understanding the fundamental forces in antibiotic-resistant biofilms and for designing anti-adhesion compounds targeting matrix polymers.

  16. Nano-scale adhesion in multilayered drug eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima

    2013-02-01

    Using stainless steel 316L for drug-eluting stents needs specific surface finishing due to corrosion phenomena that take place on the metal surface upon prolonged contact with human tissue. Poly (o-chloro-p-xylylene) (Parylene C) is one of the inert and biocompatible materials that are used for 316L coating with γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane as an adhesion promoter. In this study, a combination of atomic force microscopy experiments and contact theories have been used to quantify the work of adhesion between parylene C/316L and silane added parylene C/316L. An atomistic simulation has been used, first, to investigate and compare the adhesion at the room temperature with the experiments and then, to investigate the effect of aqueous environment with higher temperature, inside the body, on the adhesion between layers in the structure of drug eluting stent. The simulation results of simplified model for 316L are in good agreement with the experimental results and suggest that the week affiliation between this polymer and 316L is mainly due to Van der Waals interactions. The effect of temperature on the adhesion is found to be regressive and as the water molecules permeate the polymer the adhesion decreases. They also imply that the effect of silane on the adhesion between parylene C and steel is modest.

  17. Molecular determinants of bacterial adhesion monitored by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Razatos, Anneta; Ong, Yea-Ling; Sharma, Mukul M.; Georgiou, George

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and the subsequent formation of biofilm are major concerns in biotechnology and medicine. The initial step in bacterial adhesion is the interaction of cells with a surface, a process governed by long-range forces, primarily van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. The precise manner in which the force of interaction is affected by cell surface components and by the physiochemical properties of materials is not well understood. Here, we show that atomic force microscopy can be used to analyze the initial events in bacterial adhesion with unprecedented resolution. Interactions between the cantilever tip and confluent monolayers of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli mutants exhibiting subtle differences in cell surface composition were measured. It was shown that the adhesion force is affected by the length of core lipopolysaccharide molecules on the E. coli cell surface and by the production of the capsular polysaccharide, colanic acid. Furthermore, by modifying the atomic force microscope tip we developed a method for determining whether bacteria are attracted or repelled by virtually any biomaterial of interest. This information will be critical for the design of materials that are resistant to bacterial adhesion. PMID:9736689

  18. Structural basis of adhesive binding by desmocollins and desmogleins

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Brasch, Julia; Lasso, Gorka; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsen, Goran; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions that impart strength to vertebrate tissues. Their dense, ordered intercellular attachments are formed by desmogleins (Dsgs) and desmocollins (Dscs), but the nature of trans-cellular interactions between these specialized cadherins is unclear. Here, using solution biophysics and coated-bead aggregation experiments, we demonstrate family-wise heterophilic specificity: All Dsgs form adhesive dimers with all Dscs, with affinities characteristic of each Dsg:Dsc pair. Crystal structures of ectodomains from Dsg2 and Dsg3 and from Dsc1 and Dsc2 show binding through a strand-swap mechanism similar to that of homophilic classical cadherins. However, conserved charged amino acids inhibit Dsg:Dsg and Dsc:Dsc interactions by same-charge repulsion and promote heterophilic Dsg:Dsc interactions through opposite-charge attraction. These findings show that Dsg:Dsc heterodimers represent the fundamental adhesive unit of desmosomes and provide a structural framework for understanding desmosome assembly. PMID:27298358

  19. High-affinity DNA base analogs as supramolecular, nanoscale promoters of macroscopic adhesion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cyrus A; Jones, Amanda R; Briggs, Ellen M; Novitsky, Eric J; Kuykendall, Darrell W; Sottos, Nancy R; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2013-05-15

    Adhesion phenomena are essential to many biological processes and to synthetic adhesives and manufactured coatings and composites. Supramolecular interactions are often implicated in various adhesion mechanisms. Recently, supramolecular building blocks, such as synthetic DNA base-pair mimics, have drawn attention in the context of molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular polymers. These reversible, hydrogen-bonding interactions have been studied extensively for their adhesive capabilities at the nano- and microscale, however, much less is known about their utility for practical adhesion in macroscopic systems. Herein, we report the preparation and evaluation of supramolecular coupling agents based on high-affinity, high-fidelity quadruple hydrogen-bonding units (e.g., DAN·DeUG, Kassoc = 10(8) M(-1) in chloroform). Macroscopic adhesion between polystyrene films and glass surfaces modified with 2,7-diamidonaphthyridine (DAN) and ureido-7-deazaguanine (DeUG) units was evaluated by mechanical testing. Structure-property relationships indicate that the designed supramolecular interaction at the nanoscale plays a key role in the observed macroscopic adhesive response. Experiments probing reversible adhesion or self-healing properties of bulk samples indicate that significant recovery of initial strength can be realized after failure but that the designed noncovalent interaction does not lead to healing during the process of adhesion loss.

  20. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  1. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  2. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0-100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  3. Relationship between neuronal migration and cell-substratum adhesion: laminin and merosin promote olfactory neuronal migration but are anti- adhesive

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Regulation by the extracellular matrix (ECM) of migration, motility, and adhesion of olfactory neurons and their precursors was studied in vitro. Neuronal cells of the embryonic olfactory epithelium (OE), which undergo extensive migration in the central nervous system during normal development, were shown to be highly migratory in culture as well. Migration of OE neuronal cells was strongly dependent on substratum- bound ECM molecules, being specifically stimulated and guided by laminin (or the laminin-related molecule merosin) in preference to fibronectin, type I collagen, or type IV collagen. Motility of OE neuronal cells, examined by time-lapse video microscopy, was high on laminin-containing substrata, but negligible on fibronectin substrata. Quantitative assays of adhesion of OE neuronal cells to substrata treated with different ECM molecules demonstrated no correlation, either positive or negative, between the migratory preferences of cells and the strength of cell-substratum adhesion. Moreover, measurements of cell adhesion to substrata containing combinations of ECM proteins revealed that laminin and merosin are anti-adhesive for OE neuronal cells, i.e., cause these cells to adhere poorly to substrata that would otherwise be strongly adhesive. The evidence suggests that the anti- adhesive effect of laminin is not the result of interactions between laminin and other ECM molecules, but rather an effect of laminin on cells, which alters the way in which cells adhere. Consistent with this view, laminin was found to interfere strongly with the formation of focal contacts by OE neuronal cells. PMID:1918163

  4. Minimal synthetic cells to study integrin-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Frohnmayer, Johannes P; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Eberhard, Christian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Mollenhauer, Christine; Boehm, Heike; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-10-12

    To shed light on cell-adhesion-related molecular pathways, synthetic cells offer the unique advantage of a well-controlled model system with reduced molecular complexity. Herein, we show that liposomes with the reconstituted platelet integrin αIIb β3 as the adhesion-mediating transmembrane protein are a functional minimal cell model for studying cellular adhesion mechanisms in a defined environment. The interaction of these synthetic cells with various extracellular matrix proteins was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The data indicated that integrin was functionally incorporated into the lipid vesicles, thus enabling integrin-specific adhesion of the engineered liposomes to fibrinogen- and fibronectin-functionalized surfaces. Then, we were able to initiate the detachment of integrin liposomes from these surfaces in the presence of the peptide GRGDSP, a process that is even faster with our newly synthesized peptide mimetic SN529, which specifically inhibits the integrin αIIb β3 .

  5. Effect of osteopontin on the initial adhesion of dental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L; Sutherland, Duncan S; Städler, Brigitte

    2012-12-28

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in numerous infections of the human body, including dental caries. While conventional therapy of biofilm diseases aims at eradication and mechanical removal of the biofilms, recent therapeutic approaches target the mechanisms of biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion in particular. The effect of bovine milk osteopontin, a highly phosphorylated whey protein, on adhesion of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Actinomyces naeslundii, three prominent colonizers in dental biofilms, to saliva-coated surfaces was investigated. While adhesion of A. naeslundii was not affected by osteopontin, a strong, dose-dependent reduction in the number of adhering S. mitis was shown. No difference in bacterial adhesion was observed for caseinoglycomacropeptide, another phosphorylated milk protein. Osteopontin did not affect bacterial viability, but changed bacterial surface hydrophobicity, and may be suggested to prevent the adhesins of S. mitis from interacting with their salivary receptors. The antiadhesive effect of osteopontin may be useful for caries prevention.

  6. Biological microstructures with high adhesion and friction. Numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. L.; Filippov, A. E.; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the course of biological evolution, many classes of living creatures have developed highly effective adhesive mechanisms that allow them to attach to various kinds of surfaces having different physical natures and topographies. The most famous instance of this is the gecko pad, but many similar examples are found in animals of different sizes and evolutionary lineages. In recent decades, such adhesive structures have become the objects of intensive theoretical and experimental studies, partly due to research aimed at developing and producing artificial surfaces with similar adhesive properties. Here, we present a review of research on biological structures with high adhesion and high friction. We focus our attention on one particular class of such structures: systems with elastic fibers interacting with rough surfaces. Other structurally similar systems are discussed as well.

  7. Controlling adhesion force by means of nanoscale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Rao, Akshata; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2011-08-16

    Control of adhesion is a crucial aspect in the design of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices. To understand the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness, a roughness gradient has been employed. Monomodal roughness gradients were fabricated by means of silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼12 nm) to produce substrates with varying nanoparticle density. Pull-off force measurements on the gradients were performed using (polyethylene) colloidal-probe microscopy under perfluorodecalin, in order to restrict interactions to van der Waals forces. The influence of normal load on pull-off forces was studied and the measured forces compared with existing Hamaker-approximation-based models. We observe that adhesion force reaches a minimum value at an optimum particle density on the gradient sample, where the mean particle spacing becomes comparable with the diameter of the contact area with the polyethylene sphere. We also observe that the effect on adhesion of increasing the normal load depends on the roughness of the surface.

  8. Fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion in natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, L. Q. N.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fuentes, C.; van Vuure, A. W.; Verpoest, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interface between natural fibers and thermoplastic matrices is studied, in which fiber-matrix wetting analysis and interfacial adhesion are investigated to obtain a systematic understanding of the interface. In wetting analysis, the surface energies of the fibers and the matrices are estimated using their contact angles in test liquids. Work of adhesion is calculated for each composite system. For the interface tests, transverse three point bending tests (3PBT) on unidirectional (UD) composites are performed to measure interfacial strength. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization on the fibers is also carried out to obtain more information about the surface chemistry of the fibers. UD composites are examined to explore the correlation between the fiber-matrix interface and the final properties of the composites. The results suggest that the higher interfacial adhesion of the treated fiber composites compared to untreated fiber composites can be attributed to higher fiber-matrix physico-chemical interaction corresponding with the work of adhesion.

  9. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  10. Adhesions: pathogenesis and prevention-panel discussion and summary.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, L; Risberg, B; Beck, D E; Burns, J W; Chegini, N; diZerega, G S; Ellis, H

    1997-01-01

    adhesion formation and prevention abounds in a variety of avenues of investigation, including: 1) identification on a molecular level of the components involved in adhesiogenesis and their interactions; 2) clarification of the role of fibrin and fibrinolysis in adhesion formation; 3) standardization of design in preclinical and clinical studies of adhesion formation and prevention; 4) delineation of the relationship between adhesion formation and adhesive complications; and 5) elucidation of efficient, site-specific methods of prophylactic drug delivery. Currently, it seems logical to focus preventive research on development of barriers, fibrinolytic drugs, and selected agents such as phospholipids. The major strategies for adhesion prevention or reduction are adjusting surgical practice and applying adjuvants. Surgeons should adjust their major practices by: 1) becoming aware of the potential adhesive complications of a procedure; 2) minimizing the invasiveness of surgery; and 3) minimizing surgical trauma, ischemia, exposure to intestinal contents, introduction of foreign material into the body, and the use of talc- or starch-containing gloves. Available adjuvants include a newly developed by hyaluronic acid-phosphate-buffered saline solution applied intraoperatively to protect peritoneal surfaces from indirect surgical trauma and three mechanical barriers. One of these, a bioresorbable membrane consisting of hyaluronic acid and carboxymethylcellulose, has demonstrated efficacy and safety in both general and gynecological surgery. The other two barriers, one made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and one developed from oxidized regenerated cellulose, are indicated only for use in gynecological surgery.

  11. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  12. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-23

    pressure-activated adhesive is nearly complete. A 2:1 ratio of microcapsules:gorilla glue and a 1.5% dibutyltin diacetate concentration produced adhesion...Table I below. The best performers generally had between 1% and 1.5% dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA). They also had a 2:1 ratio (vol/wt) of microcapsules

  13. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  14. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  15. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  16. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  17. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  18. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  19. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  20. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  1. Propulsion by directional adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Prakash, Manu

    2008-03-01

    The rough, hairy integument of water-walking arthropods is well known to be responsible for their water-repellency; we here consider its additional propulsive role. We demonstrate that the tilted flexible leg hairs of water-walking arthropods render the leg cuticle directionally anisotropic: contact lines advance most readily towards the leg tips. The dynamical role of the resulting unidirectional adhesion is explored, and yields new insight into the manner in which water-walking arthropods generate thrust, glide and leap from the free surface. We thus provide new rationale for the fundamental topological difference in the roughness on plants and insects, and suggest novel directions for biomimetic design of smart, hydrophobic surfaces.

  2. Membrane adhesion and the formation of heterogeneities: biology, biophysics, and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V. D.; O’Halloran, T.J.; Shindell, O.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane adhesion is essential to many vital biological processes. Sites of membrane adhesion are often associated with heterogeneities in the lipid and protein composition of the membrane. These heterogeneities are thought to play functional roles by facilitating interactions between proteins. However, the causal links between membrane adhesion and membrane heterogeneities are not known. Here we survey the state of the field and indicate what we think are understudied areas ripe for development. PMID:25866854

  3. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  4. The adhesive properties of coacervated recombinant hybrid mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Song, Young Hoon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    Marine mussels attach to substrates using adhesive proteins. It has been suggested that complex coacervation (liquid-liquid phase separation via concentration) might be involved in the highly condensed and non-water dispersed adhesion process of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, as purified natural MAPs are difficult to obtain, it has not been possible to experimentally validate the coacervation model. In the present work, we demonstrate complex coacervation in a system including recombinant MAPs and hyaluronic acid (HA). Our recombinant hybrid MAPs, fp-151 and fp-131, can be produced in large quantities, and are readily purified. We observed successful complex coacervation using cationic fp-151 or fp-131, and an anionic HA partner. Importantly, we found that highly condensed complex coacervates significantly increased the bulk adhesive strength of MAPs in both dry and wet environments. In addition, oil droplets were successfully engulfed using a MAP-based interfacial coacervation process, to form microencapsulated particles. Collectively, our results indicate that a complex coacervation system based on MAPs shows superior adhesive properties, combined with additional valuable features including liquid/liquid phase separation and appropriate viscoelasticity. Our microencapsulation system could be useful in the development of new adhesive biomaterials, including self-adhesive microencapsulated drug carriers, for use in biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  5. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications.

  6. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  7. Bacterial Adhesion to Hexadecane (Model NAPL)-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S.; Zoueki, C. R.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    The rates of biodegradation of NAPLs have been shown to be influenced by the adhesion of hydrocarbon- degrading microorganisms as well as their proximity to the NAPL-water interface. Several studies provide evidence for bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation at alkane- or crude oil-water interfaces, but there is a significant knowledge gap in our understanding of the processes that influence initial adhesion of bacteria on to NAPL-water interfaces. In this study bacterial adhesion to hexadecane, and a series of NAPLs comprised of hexadecane amended with toluene, and/or with asphaltenes and resins, which are the surface active fractions of crude oils, were examined using a Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The microorganisms employed were Mycobacterium kubicae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida, which are hydrocarbon degraders or soil microorganisms. MATH assays as well as electrophoretic mobility measurements of the bacterial cells and the NAPL droplet surfaces in aqueous solutions were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7). Asphaltenes and resins were shown to generally decrease microbial adhesion. Results of the MATH assay were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria- hydrocarbon interactions based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) model of free energy of interaction between the cell and NAPL droplets. In this model the free energy of interaction between two colloidal particles is predicted based on electrical double layer, van der Waals and hydrophobic forces. It is likely that the steric repulsion between bacteria and NAPL surfaces, caused by biopolymers on bacterial surfaces and aphaltenes and resins at the NAPL-water interface contributed to the decreased adhesion compared to that predicted by the XDLVO model.

  8. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  9. Poloxamer 188 reduces normal and phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in dextran solutions.

    PubMed

    Koo, Stephanie; Yang, Yang; Neu, Björn

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) has been correlated with vascular complications in diseases such as sickle cell anemia and diabetes. Poloxamer 188 (P188) has been clinically tested to treat vaso-occlusion. However, the underlying mechanism(s) have not been clarified, making a methodical application difficult. In this study, we investigate how and to what extent P188 reduces RBC adhesion to ECs in plasma-like solutions. RBC adhesion to ECs is studied in solutions containing dextran, which is known to induce adhesion via macromolecular depletion interaction. It is demonstrated that P188 itself does not induce adhesion of normal RBCs to ECs but significantly reduces the adhesion in solutions containing high molecular mass-dextran. In addition, it is shown that P188 can reduce the adhesion of RBCs with enhanced exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS). Measurements of the electrophoretic mobility indicate that P188 increases the local viscosity inside the electric double layer of RBCs. Based on these results this study suggests that P188 reduces macromolecular depletion interaction, via penetrating into the depletion layer. Taking into consideration that dextran mimics the effects of pro-adhesive non-adsorbing plasma proteins and macromolecules, our study therefore suggests a mechanism for the adhesion reducing effect of P188 and should thus be of potential value for a detailed understanding of how cell-cell interactions in pathological conditions can be reduced.

  10. Enhancing Adhesion: Relative Merits of Different Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, L. S.; Pater, R.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesive performance is improved mainly by manipulation of the bimaterials interface zone, which is only a few molecules thick. There are three approaches to enhancement of interfacial adhesion at the molecular level. They are 1) changing the nonchemically bonded interactions across the interface from weak ones to strong ones, 2) making the true interfacial area much larger than the simple geometric area, and 3) inducing chemical bonding between the two materials forming the interface. Our goal this summer was to question some of the built-in assumptions contained within these approaches and to determine the most promising approach, both theoretically and practically, for enhancing adhesion in NASA structures. Our computations revealed that all three of these approaches have, in theory, the potential to enhance molecular adhesion approximately ten-fold. Experiments, however, revealed that this excellent level of enhancement is not likely to be reached in practice. Each approach was found to be severely limited by practical problems. In addition, some of the built-in assumptions associated with these approaches were found to be insufficient or inadequate. The first approach, changing the nonchemically bonded interactions from weak to strong, Is an example of one containing inadequate assumptions. The extensive literature on intermolecular interactions, based on solution studies, shows that certain functional group pairs interact much more strongly than others. It has always been assumed that these data can be reliably extended to systems where only one member of the pair is in solution and the other Is contained in a solid surface. Our experiments this summer demonstrated that solution data do not adequately predict the strength of functional group interaction at the solid-liquid interface. Furthermore, the strong solvents needed to dissolve the monomers or polymers to which the functional groups of interest are attached compete successfully with the solid surface

  11. Use of cyanoacrylate adhesives in general surgery.

    PubMed

    García Cerdá, David; Ballester, Antonio Martín; Aliena-Valero, Alicia; Carabén-Redaño, Anna; Lloris, José M

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a review of the use of cyanoacrylate adhesives (CA) in general surgery and digestive surgery, studies the mechanisms of action and interactions of CAs in adherent tissues, and compiles data on the latest experimental and clinical applications. More than seven million traumatic injuries are estimated to occur every year, and between 26 and 90 million surgical procedures using different techniques are performed to close the resulting wounds. Traditional methods not only are both useful and effective, but also have some drawbacks. This review covers a considerable number of surgical procedures for which CAs had satisfactory results. The adhesive facilitated the healing of very diverse tissues, such as solid organs, vascular tissue or the abdominal wall. In other cases, no significant differences were found when CA was compared to traditional methods, with the adhesive standing out as a simple and reliable solution. The number of procedures in which CA was detrimental was very low. This review also collects and describes these. In conclusion, the surgical fields and procedures in which CA was successfully used are highly diverse. This review will allow physicians to determine which techniques were first used experimentally, but finally settled in clinical practice as feasible alternatives to standard treatments.

  12. Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions in connective tissue remodeling and osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Moursi, A.; Zimmerman, D.; Lull, J.; Damsky, C.

    1995-01-01

    The differentiaton of bone cells is a complex multistep process. Bone is somewhat unusual in that it is very actively and continually remodeled in the adult and that maintenance of its mass in the mature organism is exquisitely sensitive to mechanical as well as chemical signals. Bone is also unique because it consists of a very large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized. The integrin family of ECM receptors has been shown to play an important role in tissue morphogenesis in several systems. Our studies on the regulation of matrix remodeling enzymes by integrins in rabbit synovial fibroblasts show that two b1 integrin fibronectin (FN) receptor complexes (alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1) cooperate in detecting subtle changes in the composition of the ECM. As a result of signal transduction by these integrins, the levels of mRNA and protein for several members of the metalloproteinase family are regulated in these cells. We have also used antibody and RGD peptide perturbation studies to determine the significance of cell/ECM interactions to normal osteogenesis. We found that interactions between the cell binding domain of FN and integrins are required for both normal morphogenesis and gene expression in cultured osteoblasts that differentiate to form bone-like tissue in culture. These data lead us to propose that beta 1 integrins play an important role in osteoblast differentiation as well as in bone remodeling.

  13. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  14. Contractility Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening Through Focal Adhesion Kinase and Assembly of Vinculin-Containing Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, David W.; Shin, Heungsoo; Gallant, Nathan D.; Michael, Kristin E.; Radhakrishna, Harish; García, Andrés J.

    2010-01-01

    Actin-myosin contractility modulates focal adhesion assembly, stress fiber formation, and cell migration. We analyzed the contributions of contractility to fibroblast adhesion strengthening using a hydrodynamic adhesion assay and micropatterned substrates to control cell shape and adhesive area. Serum addition resulted in adhesion strengthening to levels 30–40% higher than serum-free cultures. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase or Rho-kinase blocked phosphorylation of myosin light chain to similar extents and eliminated the serum-induced enhancements in strengthening. Blebbistatin-induced inhibition of myosin II reduced serum-induced adhesion strength to similar levels as those obtained by blocking myosin light chain phosphorylation. Reductions in adhesion strengthening by inhibitors of contractility correlated with loss of vinculin and talin from focal adhesions without changes in integrin binding. In vinculin-null cells, inhibition of contractility did not alter adhesive force, whereas controls displayed a 20% reduction in adhesion strength, indicating that the effects of contractility on adhesive force are vinculin-dependent. Furthermore, in cells expressing FAK, inhibitors of contractility reduced serum-induced adhesion strengthening as well as eliminated focal adhesion assembly. In contrast, in the absence of FAK, these inhibitors did not alter adhesion strength or focal adhesion assembly. These results indicate that contractility modulates adhesion strengthening via FAK-dependent, vinculin-containing focal adhesion assembly. PMID:20205236

  15. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  16. Adhesion molecules in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Geboes, K.; Al-Kharashi, S.; Tabbara, K.; Missotten, L.; Desmet, V.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Adhesion molecules play a key role in the selective recruitment of different leucocyte population to inflammatory sites. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of adhesion molecules in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC).
METHODS—The presence and distribution of adhesion molecules were studied in 14 conjunctival biopsy specimens from seven patients with active VKC and in four normal conjunctival biopsy specimens. We used a panel of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3), lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1). In addition, a panel of mAbs were used to characterise the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, ICAM-1 was expressed on the vascular endothelium only, LFA-1 and ICAM-3 on epithelial and stromal mononuclear cells , and VLA-4 on stromal mononuclear cells. The expression of VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was absent. The number of cells expressing adhesion molecules was found to be markedly increased in all VKC specimens. This was concurrent with a heavy inflammatory infiltrate. Strong ICAM-1 expression was induced on the basal epithelial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, ICAM-1 was expressed on stromal mononuclear cells. LFA-1 and ICAM-3 were expressed on the majority of epithelial and stromal infiltrating mononuclear cells. VLA-4 expression was noted on stromal mononuclear cells. Compared with controls, VKC specimens showed significantly more ICAM-3+, LFA-1+, and VLA-4+ cells. VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 were induced on the vascular endothelial cells.
CONCLUSIONS—Increased expression of adhesion molecules may play an important role in the pathogenesis of VKC.

 PMID

  17. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  18. Temperature-Dependent Adhesion of Graphene Suspended on a Trench

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene deposited over a trench has been studied in the context of nanomechanical resonators, where experiments indicate adhesion of the graphene sheet to the trench boundary and sidewalls leads to self-tensioning; however, this adhesion is not well understood. We use molecular dynamics to simulate graphene deposited on a trench and study how adhesion to the sidewalls depends on substrate interaction, temperature, and curvature of the edge of the trench. Over the range of parameters we study, the depth at the center of the sheet is approximately linear in substrate interaction strength and temperature but not trench width, and we explain this using a one-dimensional model for the sheet configuration. PMID:26652939

  19. Supramolecular polymer adhesives: advanced materials inspired by nature.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Christian; Weder, Christoph; de Espinosa, Lucas Montero

    2016-01-21

    Due to their dynamic, stimuli-responsive nature, non-covalent interactions represent versatile design elements that can be found in nature in many molecular processes or materials, where adaptive behavior or reversible connectivity is required. Examples include molecular recognition processes, which trigger biological responses or cell-adhesion to surfaces, and a broad range of animal secreted adhesives with environment-dependent properties. Such advanced functionalities have inspired researchers to employ similar design approaches for the development of synthetic polymers with stimuli-responsive properties. The utilization of non-covalent interactions for the design of adhesives with advanced functionalities such as stimuli responsiveness, bonding and debonding on demand capability, surface selectivity or recyclability is a rapidly emerging subset of this field, which is summarized in this review.

  20. Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Kong, X H; Ruan, M; Ma, F M; Jiang, Y F; Liu, M Z; Chen, Y; Zuo, X H

    2010-10-28

    General characteristics of waxes, adhesives and lubricants as well as the recent fundamental investigations on their physical and mechanical behaviour are introduced. The current R&D status for new type/generation of waxes, adhesives and lubricants from natural products is reviewed, with an emphasis on their tribological applications. In particular, some crucial issues and challenges relating to technological improvement and materials development are discussed. Based on the current predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental concerns, prospective research on the development of green waxes, adhesives and lubricants is suggested.

  1. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  2. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  3. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  4. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  5. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani, Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Single cell patterning holds important implications for biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. The challenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hosting only single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period of time. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses a covalently-bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells with improved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viability on gold patterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that cell adhesion is regulated by the type, availability and stability of effective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound short peptides would promote cell spreading and thus, single cell adhesion and viability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlying mechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion and prolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparing cellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on three model surfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin, physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently-bound Lys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and binding properties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin in producing adhesion of only single cells, while the covalently bound peptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosis of adhered cells. Controlling cell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis and viability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materials interaction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays of single cells. PMID:17371055

  6. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  7. Carbon nanotube based gecko inspired self-cleaning adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ajayan, Pulickel; Ali, Dhinojwala

    2008-03-01

    Wall climbing organisms like geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without use of any viscoelastic material. The hairy structure found in gecko feet allows them to obtain intimate contact over a large area thus allowing then to adhere using van der Waals interactions. Not only high adhesion, the geometry of the hairs makes gecko feet self cleaning, thus allowing them to walk continuously without worrying about loosing adhesive strength. Such properties if mimicked synthetically could form basis of a new class of materials, which, unlike conventional adhesives would show two contradictory properties, self cleaning and high adhesion. Such materials would form essential component of applications like wall climbing robot. We tried to synthesize such material using micropatterened vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. When dealing with large areas, probability of defects in the structure increase, forming patterns instead of using uniform film of carbon nanotubes helps to inhibit crack propagation, thus gives much higher adhesive strength than a uniform film. When carbon nanotube patterns with optimized aspect ratio are used, both high adhesion and self cleaning properties are observed.

  8. Adhesion of Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis on a Planar Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; Joy, David Charles; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion of spores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and spherical silica particles on surfaces was experimentally and theoretically investigated in this study. Topography analysis via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy indicates that Bt spores are rod shaped, {approx}1.3 {mu}m in length and {approx}0.8 {mu}m in diameter. The adhesion force of Bt spores and silica particles on gold-coated glass was measured at various relative humidity (RH) levels by AFM. It was expected that the adhesion force would vary with RH because the individual force components contributing to the adhesion force depend on RH. The adhesion force between a particle and a planar surface in atmospheric environments was modeled as the contribution of three major force components: capillary, van der Waals, and electrostatic interaction forces. Adhesion force measurements for Bt spore (silica particle) and the gold surface system were comparable with calculations. Modeling results show that there is a critical RH value, which depends on the hydrophobicity of the materials involved, below which the water meniscus does not form and the contribution of the capillary force is zero. As RH increases, the van der Waals force decreases while the capillary force increases to a maximum value.

  9. Electrostatic adhesion of multiple non-uniformly charged dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, B. A.; Whitney, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle adhesion measurements can be as much as one order of magnitude higher than theoretical calculations. This discrepancy has ignited a debate as to the nature of the physics occurring with microscopic particle adhesion. Attempts to bring calculations closer to measured results have produced models that include multiple particle interactions, dielectric polarization, and non-uniform charge. Individually, each of these models can only produce a 2× to 5× enhancement in predicted adhesion force over simple Coulombic attraction. In this correspondence, an analytical model of electrostatic particle forces is developed, which allows for independent assignment of dielectric constant and non-uniform surface charge distribution to an arbitrary number of particles. Because the model can include an image plane, it is ideal for electrostatic adhesion calculations. Application to a monolayer of printed toner particles predicts nearly an order of magnitude increase in adhesion force over Coulombic attraction. These results are the first analytical results to place predictions of charged particle adhesion on the same order of magnitude with measurements.

  10. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Palecek, Amanda M; Argenbright, Clayton W; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  11. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Palecek, Amanda M.; Argenbright, Clayton W.; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics. PMID:26696412

  12. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  13. Hemodynamic aspects of reduced platelet adhesion on bioinspired microstructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tam Thanh; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Maenz, Stefan; Gastrock, Gunter; Settmacher, Utz; Jandt, Klaus D; Zanow, Jürgen; Lüdecke, Claudia; Bossert, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Occlusion by thrombosis due to the absence of the endothelial cell layer is one of the most frequent causes of failure of artificial vascular grafts. Bioinspired surface structures may have a potential to reduce the adhesion of platelets contributing to hemostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic aspects of platelet adhesion, the main cause of thrombosis, on bioinspired microstructured surfaces mimicking the endothelial cell morphology. We tested the hypothesis that platelet adhesion is statistically significantly reduced on bioinspired microstructured surfaces compared to unstructured surfaces. Platelet adhesion as a function of the microstructure dimensions was investigated under flow conditions on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Platelet adhesion was statistically significantly reduced (by up to 78%; p≤0.05) on the microstructured PDMS surfaces compared to that on the unstructured control surface. Finite element method (FEM) simulations of blood flow dynamic revealed a micro shear gradient on the microstructure surfaces which plays a pivotal role in reducing platelet adhesion. On the surfaces with the highest differences of the shear stress between the top of the microstructures and the ground areas, platelet adhesion was reduced most. In addition, the microstructures help to reduce the interaction strength between fluid and surfaces, resulting in a larger water contact angle but no higher resistance to flow compared to the unstructured surface. These findings provide new insight into the fundamental mechanisms of reducing platelet adhesion on microstructured bioinspired surfaces and may lay the basis for the development of innovative next generation artificial vascular grafts with reduced risk of thrombosis.

  14. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  15. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwight, D. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of composites as adherends was studied. Several other variables were studied by fractography: aluminum powder adhesive filler, fiber glass cloth scrim or adhesive carrier, new adhesives PPQ-413 and LARC-13, and strength-test temperature. When the new results were juxtaposed with previous work, it appeared that complex interactions between adhesive, adherend, bonding, and testing conditions govern the observed strength and fracture-surface features. The design parameters likely to have a significant effect upon strength-test results are listed.

  16. Intercellular adhesion molecule-4 and CD36 are implicated in the abnormal adhesiveness of sickle cell SAD mouse erythrocytes to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Trang-Tan, Marie-Marcelle; Vilela-Lamego, Camilo; Picot, Julien; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Cartron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormal adhesiveness of red blood cells to endothelium has been implicated in vaso-occlusive crisis of sickle cell disease. The present study examined whether the SAD mouse model exhibits the same abnormalities of red blood cell adhesion as those found in human sickle cell disease. Design and Methods The repertoire of adhesive molecules on murine erythrocytes and bEnd.3 microvascular endothelial cells was determined by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies or by western blotting. Adhesion was investigated in dynamic conditions and measured at different shear stresses. Results CD36, CD47 and intercellular adhesion molecular-4, but not Lutheran blood group antigen/basal cell adhesion molecule, are present on mouse mature erythrocytes. α4β1 are not expressed on SAD and wild type reticulocytes. Endothelial bEnd.3 cells express αVβ3, α4β1, CD47, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and Lutheran blood group antigen/basal cell adhesion molecule, but not CD36. Adhesion of SAD red cells is: (i) 2- to 3-fold higher than that of wild type red cells; (ii) further increased on platelet activating factor-activated endothelium; (iii) not stimulated by epinephrine; (iv) inhibited after treating the endothelium with a peptide reproducing one of the binding sequences of mouse intercellular adhesion molecular-4, or with mon-oclonal antibody against murine αv integrin; and (v) inhibited after pretreatment of red blood cells with anti-mouse CD36 monoclonal antibodies. The combination of treatments with intercellular adhesion molecular-4 peptide and anti-CD36 monoclonal antibodies eliminates excess adhesion of SAD red cells. The phosphorylation state of intercellular adhesion molecular-4 and CD36 is probably not involved in the over-adhesiveness of SAD erythrocytes. Conclusions Intercellular adhesion molecular-4/αvβ3 and CD36/thrombospondin interactions might contribute to the abnormally high adhesiveness of SAD red cells. The SAD mouse is a valuable animal model

  17. Testing Adhesive Bonds to Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive tool simple and inexpensive. Easy-to-use tool nondestructively tests strength of adhesive bond between cloth and straight rigid edge. Developed for testing advanced flexible reusable surface insulation.

  18. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2016-07-12

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  19. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  20. Lymphocyte adhesion-dependent calcium signaling in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) can undergo dramatic phenotypic and functional alterations in response to humoral and cellular stimuli. These changes promote endothelial participation in the inflammatory response through active recruitment of immune effector cells, increased vascular permeability, and alteration in vascular tone. In an attempt to define early events in lymphocyte-mediated EC signaling, we investigated cytosolic-free calcium (Ca2+) changes in single, Fluo-3- labeled human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), using an ACAS interactive laser cytometer. Of all lymphocyte subsets tested, allogeneic CD3-, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells uniquely elicited oscillatory EC Ca2+ signals in cytokine (interleukin [IL]-1- or tumor necrosis factor [TNF])-treated ECs. The induction of these signals required avid intercellular adhesion, consisted of both Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular influx, and was associated with EC inositol phosphate (IP) generation. Simultaneous recording of NK and EC Ca2+ signals using two-color fluorescence detection revealed that, upon adhesion, NK cells flux prior to EC. Lymphocyte Ca2+ buffering with 1,2-bis-5-methyl-amino- phenoxylethane-N,N,N'-tetra-acetoxymethyl acetate (MAPTAM) demonstrated that lymphocyte fluxes are, in fact, prerequisites for the adhesion- dependent EC signals. mAb studies indicate that the beta 2 integrin- intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 adhesion pathway is critically involved. However, ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of IL-1- mediated ICAM-1 hyperinduction had no effect on EC Ca2+ signaling in lymphocyte-EC conjugates, indicating that additional cytokine-induced EC alteration is required. These experiments combine features of lymphocyte-endothelial interactions, intercellular adhesion, EC cytokine activation and transmembrane signaling. The results implicate the IP/Ca2+ second messenger pathway in EC outside-in signaling induced by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and suggest that these signals may play a

  1. Strong adhesion and cohesion of chitosan in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Lim, Chanoong; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-11-19

    Chitosan, a load-bearing biomacromolecule found in the exoskeletons of crustaceans and insects, is a promising biopolymer for the replacement of synthetic plastic compounds. Here, surface interactions mediated by chitosan in aqueous solutions, including the effects of pH and contact time, were investigated using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Chitosan films showed an adhesion to mica for all tested pH ranges (3.0-8.5), achieving a maximum value at pH 3.0 after a contact time of 1 h (Wad ~ 6.4 mJ/m(2)). We also found weak or no cohesion between two opposing chitosan layers on mica in aqueous buffer until the critical contact time for maximum adhesion (chitosan-mica) was reached. Strong cohesion (Wco ~ 8.5 mJ/m(2)) between the films was measured with increasing contact times up to 1 h at pH 3.0, which is equivalent to ~60% of the strongest, previously reported, mussel underwater adhesion. Such time-dependent adhesion properties are most likely related to molecular or molecular group reorientations and interdigitations. At high pH (8.5), the solubility of chitosan changes drastically, causing the chitosan-chitosan (cohesion) interaction to be repulsive at all separation distances and contact times. The strong contact time and pH-dependent chitosan-chitosan cohesion and adhesion properties provide new insight into the development of chitosan-based load-bearing materials.

  2. Strong adhesion and cohesion of chitosan in aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Woog; Lim, Chanoong; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan, a load-bearing biomacromolecule found in the exoskeletons of crustaceans and insects, is a promising biopolymer for the replacement of synthetic plastic compounds. Here, surface interactions mediated by chitosan in aqueous solutions, including the effects of pH and contact time, were investigated using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Chitosan films showed an adhesion to mica for all tested pH ranges (3.0–8.5), achieving a maximum value at pH 3.0 after a contact time of 1 hr (Wad ~6.4 mJ/m2). We also found weak or no cohesion between two opposing chitosan layers on mica in aqueous buffer until the critical contact time for maximum adhesion (chitosan-mica) was reached. Strong cohesion (Wco ~8.5 mJ/m2) between the films was measured with increasing contact times up to 1 hr at pH 3.0, which is equivalent to ~60% of the strongest, previously reported, mussel underwater adhesion. Such time-dependent adhesion properties are most likely related to molecular or molecular group reorientations and interdigitations. At high pH (8.5), the solubility of chitosan changes drastically, causing the chitosan-chitosan (cohesion) interaction to be repulsive at all separation distances and contact times. The strong contact time and pH-dependent chitosan-chitosan cohesion and adhesion properties provide new insight into the development of chitosan based load-bearing materials. PMID:24138057

  3. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-27

    technology is the use of pressure sensitive microcapsules , which release reactive amine crosslinkers into an adhesive putty when pressed against the surface...CLEANING AGENT RHEOLOGY 3 3.3 PRESSURE-ACTIVATED ADHESIVE 5 3.3.1 PROCESSING IMPROVEMENTS 5 3.3.2 MICROCAPSULE DIAMETER 5 3.3.3 MICROCAPSULE /RESIN...to attain a reasonable shelf life (- l wk.). The microcapsule diameter has been halved in order to improve mixing in the pressure-activated

  4. Multi-Scale Biomimetic Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-10

    Objectives: Same as originally stated 3. Status of Effort: Over the life of this grant, significant technical contributions have been made. When this...department of Defense as well, broadening our goals. 4. Accomplishments/New Findings (over the life of the grant): The mechanism of adhesion in the gecko...enabling microrobotics to explore extraterrestrial surfaces or harsh climates otherwise not accessible to man. In contrast to the adhesion seen in a rest

  5. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding.

  6. Decreased cell adhesion promotes angiogenesis in a Pyk2-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Colette J.; Raghavan, Srivatsan; Xu, Zhe; Baranski, Jan D.; Yu, Xiang; Wozniak, Michele A.; Miller, Jordan S.; Gupta, Mudit; Buckbinder, Leonard; Chen, Christopher S.

    2011-08-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by both soluble growth factors and cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). While cell adhesion via integrins has been shown to be required for angiogenesis, the effects of quantitative changes in cell adhesion and spreading against the ECM remain less clear. Here, we show that angiogenic sprouting in natural and engineered three-dimensional matrices exhibited a biphasic response, with peak sprouting when adhesion to the matrix was limited to intermediate levels. Examining changes in global gene expression to determine a genetic basis for this response, we demonstrate a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced upregulation of genes associated with vascular invasion and remodeling when cell adhesion was limited, whereas cells on highly adhesive surfaces upregulated genes associated with proliferation. To explore a mechanistic basis for this effect, we turned to focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a central player in adhesion signaling previously implicated in angiogenesis, and its homologue, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2). While FAK signaling had some impact, our results suggested that Pyk2 can regulate both gene expression and endothelial sprouting through its enhanced activation by VEGF in limited adhesion contexts. We also demonstrate decreased sprouting of tissue explants from Pyk2-null mice as compared to wild type mice as further confirmation of the role of Pyk2 in angiogenic sprouting. These results suggest a surprising finding that limited cell adhesion can enhance endothelial responsiveness to VEGF and demonstrate a novel role for Pyk2 in the adhesive regulation of angiogenesis.

  7. p120-catenin and β-catenin differentially regulate cadherin adhesive function.

    PubMed

    Oas, Rebecca G; Nanes, Benjamin A; Esimai, Chimdimnma C; Vincent, Peter A; García, Andrés J; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2013-03-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, the major adherens junction adhesion molecule in endothelial cells, interacts with p120-catenin and β-catenin through its cytoplasmic tail. However, the specific functional contributions of the catenins to the establishment of strong adhesion are not fully understood. Here we use bioengineering approaches to identify the roles of cadherin-catenin interactions in promoting strong cellular adhesion and the ability of the cells to spread on an adhesive surface. Our results demonstrate that the domain of VE-cadherin that binds to β-catenin is required for the establishment of strong steady-state adhesion strength. Surprisingly, p120 binding to the cadherin tail had no effect on the strength of adhesion when the available adhesive area was limited. Instead, the binding of VE-cadherin to p120 regulates adhesive contact area in a Rac1-dependent manner. These findings reveal that p120 and β-catenin have distinct but complementary roles in strengthening cadherin-mediated adhesion.

  8. Method and Apparatus for the Quantification of Particulate Adhesion Forces on Various Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Connell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitigation strategies for lunar dust adhesion have typically been limited to qualitative analysis. This technical memorandum describes the generation and operation of an adhesion testing device capable of quantitative assessment of adhesion forces between particulates and substrates. An aerosolization technique is described to coat a surface with a monolayer of particulates. Agitation of this surface, via sonication, causes particles to dislodge and be gravitationally fed into an optical particle counter. Experimentally determined adhesion force values are compared to forces calculated from van der Waals interactions and are used to calculate the work of adhesion using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory. Preliminary results indicate that a reduction in surface energy and available surface area, through topographical modification, improve mitigation of particulate adhesion.

  9. Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors: elusive hybrids come of age.

    PubMed

    Simundza, Julia; Cowin, Pamela

    2013-12-01

    Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most recently identified and least understood subfamily of GPCRs. Adhesion GPCRs are characterized by unusually long ectodomains with adhesion-related repeats that facilitate cell- cell and cell-cell matrix contact, as well as a proteolytic cleavage site-containing domain that is a structural hallmark of the family. Their unusual chimeric structure of adhesion-related ectodomain with a seven-pass transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic signaling makes these proteins highly versatile in mediating cellular signaling in response to extracellular adhesion or cell motility events. The ligand binding and cytoplasmic signaling modes for members of this family are beginning to be elucidated, and recent studies have demonstrated critical roles for Adhesion GPCRs in planar polarity and other important cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during development and morphogenesis, as well as heritable diseases and cancer.

  10. Silorane adhesive system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro Júnior, Sylvio; Andrada, Mauro Amaral Caldeira de

    2014-01-01

    Silorane-based composite resin requires a specific adhesive system: a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Clinical protocols are well established and are based on the principles of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. In this paper, we present a clinical application of the silorane adhesive system in a class-II restoration using silorane-based composite resin.

  11. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  12. Integrin-mediated adhesion complex

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau

    2010-01-01

    The integrin-mediated adhesion machinery is the primary cell-matrix adhesion mechanism in Metazoa. The integrin adhesion complex, which modulates important aspects of the cell physiology, is composed of integrins (alpha and beta subunits) and several scaffolding and signaling proteins. Integrins appeared to be absent in all non-metazoan eukaryotes so-far analyzed, including fungi, plants and choanoflagellates, the sister-group to Metazoa. Thus, integrins and, therefore, the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling mechanism was considered a metazoan innovation. Recently, a broad comparative genomic analysis including new genome data from several unicellular organisms closely related to fungi and metazoans shattered previous views. The integrin adhesion and signaling complex is not specific to Metazoa, but rather it is present in apusozoans and holozoan protists. Thus, this important signaling and adhesion system predated the origin of Fungi and Metazoa, and was subsequently lost in fungi and choanoflagellates. This finding suggests that cooption played a more important role in the origin of Metazoa than previously believed. Here, we hypothesize that the integrin adhesome was ancestrally involved in signaling. PMID:21057645

  13. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  14. [Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, C; Reis, F C

    1998-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis, an inflammatory process involving all three meningeal layers as well as the nerve roots, is a cause of persistent symptoms in 6% to 16% of postoperative patients. Although spinal surgery is the most common antecedent associated with arachnoiditis, multiple causes have been reported, including infection, intrathecal steroids or anesthetic agents, trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and ionic myelographic contrast material--both oil soluble and water soluble. In the past, oil-based intrathecal contrast agents (Pantopaque) were associated with arachnoiditis especially when this material was introduced into the thecal sac and mixed with blood. Arachnoiditis is apparently rarely idiopathic. The pathogenesis of spinal arachnoiditis is similar to the repair process of serous membranes, such as the peritoneum, with a negligible inflammatory cellular exudate and a prominent fibrinous exudate. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis of the lower spine is a myelographic diagnosis. The myelographic findings of arachnoiditis were divided into two types by Jorgensen et al. In type 1, "the empty thecal sac" appearance, there is homogeneous filling of the thecal sac with either absence of or defects involving nerve root sleeve filling. In type 2 arachnoiditis, there are localized or diffuse filling defects within the contrast column. MRI has demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of arachnoiditis. The appearance of arachnoiditis on MRI can be assigned to three main groups. The MRI findings in group I are a conglomeration of adherent roots positioned centrally in the thecal sac. Patients in group II show roots peripherally adherent to the meninges--the so called empty sac. MRI findings in group III are a soft tissue mass within the subarachnoid space. It corresponds to the type 2 categorization defined by Jorgensen et al, where as the MRI imaging types I and II correspond to the myelographic type 1.

  15. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Gecko-inspired Fibrillar Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongkwan

    Over the last decade, geckos' remarkable ability to stick to and climb surfaces found in nature has motivated a wide range of scientific interest in engineering gecko-mimetic surface for various adhesive and high friction applications. The high adhesion and friction of its pads have been attributed to a complex array of hairy structures, which maximize surface area for van der Waals interaction between the toes and the counter-surface. While advances in micro- and nanolithography technique have allowed fabrication of increasingly sophisticated gecko mimetic surfaces, it remains a challenge to produce an adhesive as robust as that of the natural gecko pads. In order to rationally design gecko adhesives, understanding the contact behavior of fibrillar interface is critical. The first chapter of the dissertation introduces gecko adhesion and its potential applications, followed by a brief survey of gecko-inspired adhesives. Challenges that limit the performance of the current adhesives are presented. In particular, it is pointed out that almost all testing of gecko adhesives have been on clean, smooth glass, which is ideal for adhesion due to high surface energy and low roughness. Surfaces in application are more difficult to stick to, so the understanding of failure modes in low energy and rough surfaces is important. The second chapter presents a fabrication method for thermoplastic gecko adhesive to be used for a detailed study of fibrillar interfaces. Low-density polyethylene nanofibers are replicated from a silicon nanowire array fabricated by colloidal lithography and metal-catalyzed chemical etching. This process yields a highly ordered array of nanofibers over a large area with control over fiber diameter, length, and number density. The high yield and consistency of the process make it ideal for a systematic study on factors that affect adhesion and friction of gecko adhesives. The following three chapters examine parameters that affect macroscale friction of

  17. Modeling material interfaces with hybrid adhesion method

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas Taylor; Qu, Jianmin; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-01-27

    A molecular dynamics simulation approach is presented to approximate layered material structures using discrete interatomic potentials through classical mechanics and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This method isolates the energetic contributions of the system into two pure material layers and an interfacial region used to simulate the adhesive properties of the diffused interface. The strength relationship of the adhesion contribution is calculated through small-scale separation calculations and applied to the molecular surfaces through an inter-layer bond criterion. By segregating the contributions into three regions and accounting for the interfacial excess energies through the adhesive surface bonds, it is possiblemore » to model each material with an independent potential while maintaining an acceptable level of accuracy in the calculation of mechanical properties. This method is intended for the atomistic study of the delamination mechanics, typically observed in thin-film applications. Therefore, the work presented in this paper focuses on mechanical tensile behaviors, with observations in the elastic modulus and the delamination failure mode. To introduce the hybrid adhesion method, we apply the approach to an ideal bulk copper sample, where an interface is created by disassociating the force potential in the middle of the structure. Various mechanical behaviors are compared to a standard EAM control model to demonstrate the adequacy of this approach in a simple setting. In addition, we demonstrate the robustness of this approach by applying it on (1) a Cu-Cu2O interface with interactions between two atom types, and (2) an Al-Cu interface with two dissimilar FCC lattices. These additional examples are verified against EAM and COMB control models to demonstrate the accurate simulation of failure through delamination, and the formation and propagation of dislocations under loads. Finally, the results conclude that by modeling the energy

  18. Thrombomodulin promotes focal adhesion kinase activation and contributes to angiogenesis by binding to fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yun-Yan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Ma, Chih-Yuan; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Cell adhesion molecules interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and increase cell adhesion and migration during angiogenesis. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a cell surface transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in endothelial cells. However, the function and significance of TM in cell-matrix interactions and angiogenesis remain unclear. Here, we first demonstrated that recombinant lectin-like domain of TM interacts with an ECM protein, fibronectin, and identified the N-terminal 70-kDa domain of fibronectin as the TM-binding site. Exogenous expression of TM in TM-deficient A2058 melanoma cells enhanced cell adhesion and migration on fibronectin and invasion on Matrigel. In addition, TM increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 production. In mice bearing subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors, immunofluorescence analysis indicated that TM was highly expressed and co-localized with fibronectin on the tumor vasculature. The interaction between TM and fibronectin in tumor blood vessels was also validated by the proximity ligation assay. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, up-regulation of TM by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a tumor angiogenic factor, promoted cell adhesion and tube formation, whereas TM knockdown by RNA interference attenuated VEGF-induced cell adhesion and tube formation. In summary, TM promotes angiogenesis by enhancing cell adhesion, migration, and FAK activation through interaction with fibronectin. TM may represent a novel target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:27602495

  19. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  20. FLRT Structure: Balancing Repulsion and Cell Adhesion in Cortical and Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; del Toro, Daniel; Nagel, Daniel; Cop, Florian; Härtl, Ricarda; Ruff, Tobias; Seyit-Bremer, Gönül; Harlos, Karl; Border, Ellen Clare; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are broadly expressed proteins with the unique property of acting as homophilic cell adhesion molecules and as heterophilic repulsive ligands of Unc5/Netrin receptors. How these functions direct cell behavior and the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. Here we use X-ray crystallography to reveal the distinct structural bases for FLRT-mediated cell adhesion and repulsion in neurons. We apply this knowledge to elucidate FLRT functions during cortical development. We show that FLRTs regulate both the radial migration of pyramidal neurons, as well as their tangential spread. Mechanistically, radial migration is controlled by repulsive FLRT2-Unc5D interactions, while spatial organization in the tangential axis involves adhesive FLRT-FLRT interactions. Further, we show that the fundamental mechanisms of FLRT adhesion and repulsion are conserved between neurons and vascular endothelial cells. Our results reveal FLRTs as powerful guidance factors with structurally encoded repulsive and adhesive surfaces. PMID:25374360

  1. ADHESION AND DE-ADHESION MECHANISMS AT POLYMER/METAL INTERFACES: Mechanistic Understanding Based on In Situ Studies of Buried Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmeier, G.; Stratmann, M.

    2005-08-01

    The review highlights the state-of-the-art research regarding the application of modern in situ spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques to improve the understanding of the interaction of organic molecules with metal surfaces. We also consider the chemical and electrochemical processes that lead to a de-adhesion of polymers from metal surfaces. Spectroscopic techniques such as surface-enhanced infrared or Raman spectroscopy provide molecular understanding of organic molecules and water at buried metal surfaces. This information is complementary to adhesion studies by means of atomic force microscopy and de-adhesion studies of polymer layers from metals by means of a scanning Kelvin probe. Adhesion and de-adhesion mechanisms are discussed, especially those involving humid and corrosive environments, which are the predominant and most important for metal/polymer composites in engineering applications.

  2. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  3. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  4. Comparative study on adhesive performance of functional monomers.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Nagakane, K; Fukuda, R; Nakayama, Y; Okazaki, M; Shintani, H; Inoue, S; Tagawa, Y; Suzuki, K; De Munck, J; Van Meerbeek, B

    2004-06-01

    Mild self-etch adhesives demineralize dentin only partially, leaving hydroxyapatite around collagen within a submicron hybrid layer. We hypothesized that this residual hydroxyapatite may serve as a receptor for chemical interaction with the functional monomer and, subsequently, contribute to adhesive performance in addition to micro-mechanical hybridization. We therefore chemically characterized the adhesive interaction of 3 functional monomers with synthetic hydroxyapatite, using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. We further characterized their interaction with dentin ultra-morphologically, using transmission electron microscopy. The monomer 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) readily adhered to hydroxyapatite. This bond appeared very stable, as confirmed by the low dissolution rate of its calcium salt in water. The bonding potential of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic acid (4-MET) was substantially lower. The monomer 2-methacryloxyethyl phenyl hydrogen phosphate (phenyl-P) and its bond to hydroxyapatite did not appear to be hydrolytically stable. Besides self-etching dentin, specific functional monomers have additional chemical bonding efficacy that is expected to contribute to their adhesive potential to tooth tissue.

  5. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael J; Steen, Paul H

    2010-02-23

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials.

  6. [Adhesion molecules and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Hopps, E; Caimi, G

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a significant role in leukocyte migration across the endothelium and are also involved in regulating immune system. It is shown that diabetic patients have an increase of soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sICAM-2, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sP-selectin) considered an integral part of inflammatory state. This inflammation is responsible for the increased cardiovascular risk of these patients. There is a close link between hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, coagulopathy and inflammation and between these factors and the vascular damage. Various studies have showed the potential role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of diabetic vasculopathy. They promote leukocyte recruitment, which is one of the initial steps in the genesis of atherosclerotic plaque. Adhesion molecules are also involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 1; sICAM-1 would have a particular immunomodulatory role in the process of destroying beta-cells and could be used as a subclinical marker of insulitis. Plasma levels of soluble adhesion molecules correlate with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity; they are associated with the development of nephropathy, retinopathy, myocardial infarction, stroke and obliterant peripheral arterial disease in diabetic type 1 and 2. Given the role of these molecules in endothelial dysfunction genesis and tissue damage associated with diabetes, they could constitute a therapeutic target for the prevention of genesis and progression of chronic complications of diabetic disease.

  7. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  8. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  9. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  10. Effect of operator variability on microleakage with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Emel; Yazici, A. Ruya; Aksoy, Burak; Karabulut, Erdem; Ozgunaltay, Gul; Dayangac, Berrin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of operator variability on microleakage with different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 standardized Class V cavities were prepared on facial and lingual of 90 extracted human premolar teeth and randomly assigned to five groups according to the adhesive systems used (n = 36): Prime and Bond NT (PB), Single Bond (SB), Futura Bond NR, Xeno III (XE) and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (LP). The adhesive groups were then further subdivided into three operator groups according to level of clinical experience (n = 12): An undergraduate student, a research assistant and a faculty member. All cavities were restored with same composite resin. The restored teeth were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5-55°C) then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin and measured for leakage under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Significant inter-operator variation was found in the enamel margins in the XE group with significantly higher microleakage when used by the undergraduate student (P < 0.05). Although no significant differences in microleakage were found between adhesive systems for the research assistant and faculty member (P > 0.05), significant differences were observed between PB and LP, PB and XE, SB and LP and SB and XE in the enamel margins for the undergraduate student (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Microleakage of adhesive systems is more dependent on interactions between the operator and adhesive material than on the choice of adhesive material. PMID:24966730

  11. Complex coacervates as a foundation for synthetic underwater adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Wang, Ching Shuen; Shao, Hui

    2011-09-14

    Complex coacervation was proposed to play a role in the formation of the underwater bioadhesive of the Sandcastle worm (Phragmatopoma californica) based on the polyacidic and polybasic nature of the glue proteins and the balance of opposite charges at physiological pH. Morphological studies of the secretory system suggested that the natural process does not involve complex coacervation as commonly defined. The distinction may not be important because electrostatic interactions likely play an important role in the formation of the sandcastle glue. Complex coacervation has also been invoked in the formation of adhesive underwater silk fibers of caddisfly larvae and the adhesive plaques of mussels. A process similar to complex coacervation, that is, condensation and dehydration of biopolyelectrolytes through electrostatic associations, seems plausible for the caddisfly silk. This much is clear, the sandcastle glue complex coacervation model provided a valuable blueprint for the synthesis of a biomimetic, water-borne, underwater adhesive with demonstrated potential for repair of wet tissue.

  12. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  13. A theory of adhesion at a bimetallic interface - Overlap effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary calculation of the chemical bonding adhesive interaction between metal surfaces is provided. In this first theory the Hohenberg and Kohn formalism is used to give the bimetallic adhesive binding energy versus separation. The close-packed planes of Al, Mg, and Zn are considered. The effect of simple overlap of the metal-vacuum distributions is determined. The importance of registry between contact surfaces is ascertained. A minimum in the binding energy curve is exhibited for all combinations. The theoretical predictions agree with trends in bond strengths taken from available experimental data. An insight into the mechanisms involved in metallic transfer is given. The relationship between adhesive energies, cohesive energies, and surface energies is discussed.

  14. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  15. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  16. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  17. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1978-03-01

    Late sequelae (adhesive arachnoiditis) have been reported following myelography with the oily contrast medium (Pantopaque) and with the ionic water-soluble contrast media methiodal sodium (Abrodil, Conturex, Kontrast U) meglumine iothalamate (Conray Meglumine) and meglumine iocarmate (Bis-Conray, Dimer-X). Adhesive arachnoiditis has not yet been reported after the use of the nonionic water-soluble contrast medium metrizamide (Amipaque). Thus, this is considered the contrast medium of choice for lumbar myelography. Using the recommended dose of 10 ml with an iodine concentration of 170 mg/ml for this examination, adhesive arachnoiditis is unlikely to occur. Increased osmolality of spinal fluid after injection of contrast medium is related to increased frequency of arachnoiditis.

  18. Mechanics of Nascent Cell Adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2009-03-01

    Cells have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical and biochemical cues from their environment. In neurons, the binding and restraint of transmembrane cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) can trigger acute periods of axon growth. Preceding growth, the cell must create a stiff mechanical linkage between the CAM and the cytoskeleton. Using holographic optical tweezers, we manipulate CAM-coated beads on the membrane of the cell. We investigate the dynamics of the mechanical properties of this linkage as a function of time, applied force, and CAM density. We find that CAM-coated beads exhibit stochastic intermittent binding to the cytoskeleton. In time, we observed that the adhesions stiffen and their mechanical properties depend on the applied force. Treatment of cells with small molecules that alter cytoskeletal dynamics are used to probe the roles of actin filament assembly and myosin motor activity in adhesion formation.

  19. The conveyor belt hypothesis for thymocyte migration: participation of adhesion and de-adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Villa-Verde, D M; Calado, T C; Ocampo, J S; Silva-Monteiro, E; Savino, W

    1999-05-01

    Thymocyte differentiation is the process by which bone marrow-derived precursors enter the thymus, proliferate, rearrange the genes and express the corresponding T cell receptors, and undergo positive and/or negative selection, ultimately yielding mature T cells that will represent the so-called T cell repertoire. This process occurs in the context of cell migration, whose cellular and molecular basis is still poorly understood. Kinetic studies favor the idea that these cells leave the organ in an ordered pattern, as if they were moving on a conveyor belt. We have recently proposed that extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, among others, produced by non-lymphoid cells both in the cortex and in the medulla, would constitute a macromolecular arrangement allowing differentiating thymocytes to migrate. Here we discuss the participation of both molecules with adhesive and de-adhesive properties in the intrathymic T cell migration. Functional experiments demonstrated that galectin-3, a soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin secreted by thymic microenvironmental cells, is a likely candidate for de-adhesion proteins by decreasing thymocyte interaction with the thymic microenvironment.

  20. Variability of the Influence of Physicochemical Factors Affecting Bacterial Adhesion to Polystyrene Substrata

    PubMed Central

    McEldowney, Sharron; Fletcher, Madilyn

    1986-01-01

    The role of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and solid and liquid surface tensions in the adhesion of four bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter cloacae, Chromobacterium sp., and Flexibacter sp.) to hydrophobic polystyrene petri dishes and to more hydrophilic polystyrene tissue culture dishes was investigated. The effect of electrostatic interactions was investigated by determining the effects of different electrolyte solutions on attachment to and of different electrolyte and pH solutions on detachment from the polystyrene substrate. The significance of solid and liquid surface tensions and hydrophobic interactions was investigated by measuring the effects of different surfactants (including a concentration series of dimethyl sulfoxide) on adhesion and detachment. Adhesion varied with bacterial species, substratum, and electrolyte type and concentration, with no apparent correlation between adhesion and electrolyte valence or concentration. The influence of different pH and detergent solutions on bacterial detachment also varied with species, substratum, pH, and detergent type; however, the greatest degree of detachment of all strains from the surfaces was produced by detergent treatment. The results suggest that adhesion cannot be attributed to any one type of adhesive interaction. There was some evidence for both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, but neither interaction could wholly account for the data. PMID:16347145

  1. Biostability of the Proanthocyanidins-Dentin Complex and Adhesion Studies.

    PubMed

    Leme-Kraus, A A; Aydin, B; Vidal, C M P; Phansalkar, R M; Nam, J W; McAlpine, J; Pauli, G F; Chen, S; Bedran-Russo, A K

    2017-04-01

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPACs) are potent and renewable natural bioactives possible to be refined into chemically standardized mixtures for biological applications. Herein, we found that multiscale interactions of OPACs with the dentin matrix create tight biointerfaces with hydrophobic methacrylate adhesives on wet surfaces. An enriched mixture of OPACs, with a known phytochemical profile, was produced from grape seed crude extract ( Vitis vinifera; enriched grape seed extract [e-GSE]) and applied to dentin matrices to determine changes to the mechanical properties and biodegradability of the dentin matrix and favorable resin adhesion mechanisms. Methods included a 3-point flexural test, quantification of hydroxyproline (collagen solubilization), static and dynamic nanomechanical analyses, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength, and micropermeability at the adhesive interface. The e-GSE-modified dentin matrix exhibited remarkably low collagen solubilization and sustained the bulk elastic properties over 12 mo. Tan δ findings reveal a more elastic-like behavior of the e-GSE-modified dentin matrix, which was not affected by H-bond destabilization by urea. Dentin-methacrylate biointerfaces with robust and stable adhesion were created on e-GSE-primed dentin surfaces, leading to a dramatic decrease of the interfacial permeability. Standardized OPAC mixtures provide a new mechanism of adhesion to type I collagen-rich tissues that does not rely on hydrophilic monomers. The bioadhesion mechanism involves physicochemical modifications to the dentin matrix, reduced tissue biodegradation, and bridging to methacrylate resins.

  2. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Owen L.; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  3. Reduction of water surface tension significantly impacts gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; McClung, Brandon; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The gecko adhesive system is dependent on weak van der Waals interactions that are multiplied across thousands of fine hair-like structures (setae) on geckos' toe pads. Due to the requirements of van der Waals forces, we expect that any interruption between the setae and substrate, such as a water layer, will compromise adhesion. Our recent results suggest, however, that the air layer (plastron) surrounding the superhydrophobic toe pads aid in expelling water at the contact interface and create strong shear adhesion in water when in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. To test the function of the air plastron, we reduced the surface tension of water using two surfactants, a charged anionic surfactant and a neutral nonionic surfactant. We tested geckos on three substrates: hydrophilic glass and two hydrophobic surfaces, glass with a octadecyl trichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer (OTS-SAM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). We found that the anionic surfactant inhibited the formation of the air plastron layer and significantly reduced shear adhesion to all three substrates. Interestingly, the air plastron was more stable in the nonionic surfactant treatments than the anionic surfactant treatments and we found that geckos adhered better in the nonionic surfactant than in the anionic surfactant on OTS-SAM and PTFE but not on glass. Our results have implications for the evolution of a superhydrophobic toe pad and highlight some of the challenges faced in designing synthetic adhesives that mimic geckos' toes.

  4. Charge displacement by adhesion and spreading of a cell.

    PubMed

    Svetlicić, V; Ivosević, N; Kovac, S; Zutić, V

    2001-01-01

    The potentiostatic control of surface charge density and interfacial tension of an electrode immersed in an aqueous electrolyte solution offers a possibility for direct studies of non-specific interactions in cell adhesion. Unicellular marine alga, Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyceae) of micrometer size and flexible cell envelope was used as a model cell and 0.1 M NaCl as supporting electrolyte. The dropping mercury electrode acted as in situ adhesion sensor and the electrochemical technique of chronoamperometry allowed measurement of the spread cell-electrode interface area and the distance of the closest approach of a cell. The adhesion and spreading of a single cell at the mercury electrode causes a displacement of counter-ions from the electrical double layer over a broad range of the positive and negative surface charge densities (from +16.0 to -8.2 microC/cm2). The flow of compensating current reflects the dynamics of adhesive contact formation and subsequent spreading of a cell. The adhesion and spreading rates are enhanced by the hydrodynamic regime of electrode's growing fluid interface. The distance of the closest approach of an adherent cell is smaller or equal to the distance of the outer Helmholz plane within the electrical double layer, i.e. 0.3-0.5 nm. There is a clear evidence of cell rupture for the potentials of maximum attraction as the area of the contact interface exceeded up to 100 times the cross-section area of a free cell.

  5. Adhesion properties of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus kefiri to gastrointestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Carasi, Paula; Ambrosis, Nicolás M; De Antoni, Graciela L; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, María C; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the mucus-binding properties of aggregating and non-aggregating potentially probiotic strains of kefir-isolated Lactobacillus kefiri, using different substrates. All the strains were able to adhere to commercial gastric mucin (MUCIN) and extracted mucus from small intestine (SIM) and colon (CM). The extraction of surface proteins from bacteria using LiCl or NaOH significantly reduced the adhesion of three selected strains (CIDCA 8348, CIDCA 83115 and JCM 5818); although a significant proportion (up to 50%) of S-layer proteins were not completely eliminated after treatments. The surface (S-layer) protein extracts from all the strains of Lb. kefiri were capable of binding to MUCIN, SIM or CM, and no differences were observed among them. The addition of their own surface protein extract increased adhesion of CIDCA 8348 and 83115 to MUCIN and SIM, meanwhile no changes in adhesion were observed for JCM 5818. None of the seven sugars tested had the ability to inhibit the adhesion of whole bacteria to the three mucus extracts. Noteworthy, the degree of bacterial adhesion reached in the presence of their own surface protein (S-layer) extract decreased to basal levels in the presence of some sugars, suggesting an interaction between the added sugar and the surface proteins. In conclusion, the ability of these food-isolated bacteria to adhere to gastrointestinal mucus becomes an essential issue regarding the biotechnological potentiality of Lb. kefiri for the food industry.

  6. Differential adhesion of microspheres mediated by DNA hybridization I: experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Milam, Valeria T; Graves, David J; Hammer, Daniel A

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a novel method to study collective behavior of multiple hybridized DNA chains by measuring the adhesion of DNA-coated micron-scale beads under hydrodynamic flow. Beads coated with single-stranded DNA probes are linked to surfaces coated with single target strands through DNA hybridization, and hydrodynamic shear forces are used to discriminate between strongly and weakly bound beads. The adhesiveness of microspheres depends on the strength of interaction between DNA chains on the bead and substrate surfaces, which is a function of the degree of DNA chain overlap, the fidelity of the match between hybridizing pairs, and other factors that affect the hybridization energy, such as the salt concentration in the hybridization buffer. The force for bead detachment is linearly proportional to the degree of chain overlap. There is a detectable drop in adhesion strength when there is a single base mismatch in one of the hybridizing chains. The effect of single nucleotide mismatch was tested with two different strand chemistries, with mutations placed at several different locations. All mutations were detectable, but there was no comprehensive rule relating the drop in adhesive strength to the location of the defect. Since adhesiveness can be coupled to the strength of overlap, the method holds promise to be a novel methodology for oligonucleotide detection.

  7. Iron sucrose accelerates early atherogenesis by increasing superoxide production and upregulating adhesion molecules in CKD.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2014-11-01

    High-dose intravenous iron supplementation is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Our study investigated the causative role of iron sucrose in leukocyte-endothelium interactions, an index of early atherogenesis, and subsequent atherosclerosis in the mouse remnant kidney model. We found that expression levels of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and adhesion of U937 cells increased in iron-treated human aortic endothelial cells through upregulated NADPH oxidase (NOx) and NF-κB signaling. We then measured mononuclear-endothelial adhesion and atherosclerotic lesions of the proximal aorta in male C57BL/6 mice with subtotal nephrectomy, male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with uninephrectomy, and sham-operated mice subjected to saline or parenteral iron loading. Iron sucrose significantly increased tissue superoxide production, expression of tissue cell adhesion molecules, and endothelial adhesiveness in mice with subtotal nephrectomy. Moreover, iron sucrose exacerbated atherosclerosis in the aorta of ApoE(-/-) mice with uninephrectomy. In patients with CKD, intravenous iron sucrose increased circulating mononuclear superoxide production, expression of soluble adhesion molecules, and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion compared with healthy subjects or untreated patients. In summary, iron sucrose aggravated endothelial dysfunction through NOx/NF-κB/CAM signaling, increased mononuclear-endothelial adhesion, and exacerbated atherosclerosis in mice with remnant kidneys. These results suggest a novel causative role for therapeutic iron in cardiovascular complications in patients with CKD.

  8. Fibrinogen matrix deposited on the surface of biomaterials acts as a natural anti-adhesive coating.

    PubMed

    Safiullin, Roman; Christenson, Wayne; Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Kadirov, Marsil K; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-10-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on the luminal surface of biomaterials is a critical early event during the interaction of blood with implanted vascular graft prostheses which determines their thrombogenicity. We have recently identified a nanoscale process by which fibrinogen modifies the adhesive properties of various surfaces for platelets and leukocytes. In particular, adsorption of fibrinogen at low density promotes cell adhesion while its adsorption at high density results in the formation of an extensible multilayer matrix, which dramatically reduces cell adhesion. It remains unknown whether deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of vascular graft materials produces this anti-adhesive effect. Using atomic force spectroscopy, single cell force spectroscopy, and standard adhesion assays with platelets and leukocytes, we have characterized the adhesive and physical properties of the contemporary biomaterials, before and after coating with fibrinogen. We found that uncoated PET, PTFE and ePTFE exhibited high adhesion forces developed between the AFM tip or cells and the surfaces. Adsorption of fibrinogen at the increasing concentrations progressively reduced adhesion forces, and at ≥2 μg/ml all surfaces were virtually nonadhesive. Standard adhesion assays performed with platelets and leukocytes confirmed this dependence. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying thrombogenicity of vascular grafts.

  9. Study of the Influence of Particle Velocity on Adhesive Strength of Cold Spray Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Fukanuma, H.

    2012-06-01

    The adhesion mechanism of deposit/substrate interface prepared by the cold spray method is not fully understood at present. It seems that the adhesion strength is mainly determined by the mechanical (including the plastic deformation of particle and substrate) and thermal interaction between particle and substrate when the particles impact onto the substrate with a high velocity. In order to understand the adhesion mechanism, a novel adhesive strength test was developed to measure the higher bonding strength of cold sprayed coatings in this study. The method breaks through the limits imposed by glue strength in the conventional adhesive strength test, and it can be used to measure the coatings with a higher adhesive strength. The particle velocity was obtained with DPV-2000 measurement and CFD simulation. The relationships between the adhesion strength of deposits/substrate interface and particle velocity were discussed. The results show that stronger adhesion strength can be obtained with the increase of particle velocity. There are two available ways to improve the adhesion strength. One is to increase the temperature of working gas, and another is to employ helium gas as the working gas instead of nitrogen gas.

  10. Cadherin-based intercellular adhesions organize epithelial cell–matrix traction forces

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Aaron F.; Che, Yonglu; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill M.; Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Revilla, Stephen F.; Niessen, Carien M.; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R.; Horsley, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of cross talk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell–cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is sufficient to recreate the spatial rearrangement of traction forces observed experimentally with varying strength of cadherin-based adhesions. This work defines the importance of cadherin-based cell–cell adhesions in coordinating mechanical activity of epithelial cells and has implications for the mechanical regulation of epithelial tissues during development, homeostasis, and disease. PMID:23277553

  11. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  12. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  13. Study of cell-matrix adhesion dynamics using surface plasmon resonance imaging ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hwa; Chegal, Won; Doh, Junsang; Cho, Hyun Mo; Moon, Dae Won

    2011-04-06

    The interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, termed cell-matrix adhesions, importantly governs multiple cellular phenomena. Knowledge of the functional dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion could provide critical clues for understanding biological phenomena. We developed surface plasmon resonance imaging ellipsometry (SPRIE) to provide high contrast images of the cell-matrix interface in unlabeled living cells. To improve the contrast and sensitivity, the null-type imaging ellipsometry technique was integrated with an attenuated total reflection coupler. We verified that the imaged area of SPRIE was indeed a cell-matrix adhesion area by confocal microscopy imaging. Using SPRIE, we demonstrated that three different cell types exhibit distinct features of adhesion. SPRIE was applied to diverse biological systems, including during cell division, cell migration, and cell-cell communication. We imaged the cell-matrix anchorage of mitotic cells, providing the first label-free imaging of this interaction to our knowledge. We found that cell-cell communication can alter cell-matrix adhesion, possibly providing direct experimental evidence for cell-cell communication-mediated changes in cell adhesion. We also investigated shear-stress-induced adhesion dynamics in real time. Based on these data, we expect that SPRIE will be a useful methodology for studying the role of cell-matrix adhesion in important biological phenomena.

  14. Degradation mechanisms and stability forecasting and adhesion contacts of metal films with binary dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarova, S.; Nemirovsky, Y.; Simanovskis, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors present their conception of degradation and stability on the adhesion contacts of metal films with binary nonmetallic crystals. There are numerous works devoted to the atomic scale determination of adhesion forces and development of adhesion interaction laws. But in the real life the kinetic processes, taking place on the adhesion contact, can lead to such dramatic changes in adhesion strength values that the initial adhesion characteristics do not worth much for practice. Sometimes, adhesion contact with a metal which supposed to be highly adhesive failes in a short period of aging time. What the authors have learned from their studies of the contact processes is that in many cases the aging could not be separately addressed to the individual properties of film metal or to those of the substrate material. It depends mainly on the relationships between the parameters of interacting pair. The question is: what parameters should be taken into account to explain degradation phenomena and to predict them? The purpose of the present work is to show how the relative chemical activity of film metal and substrate cation affects the contact degradation in a vacuum and in different environmental conditions.

  15. Zonadhesin is essential for species specificity of sperm adhesion to the egg zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Steve; Wilson, Michael D; Wagner, Rebecca; Hunt, Peter; Gertsenstein, Marina; Nagy, Andras; Lobe, Corrinne; Koop, Ben F; Hardy, Daniel M

    2010-08-06

    Interaction of rapidly evolving molecules imparts species specificity to sperm-egg recognition in marine invertebrates, but it is unclear whether comparable interactions occur during fertilization in any vertebrate species. In mammals, the sperm acrosomal protein zonadhesin is a rapidly evolving molecule with species-specific binding activity for the egg zona pellucida (ZP). Here we show using null mice produced by targeted disruption of Zan that zonadhesin confers species specificity to sperm-ZP adhesion. Sperm capacitation selectively exposed a partial von Willebrand D domain of mouse zonadhesin on the surface of living, motile cells. Antibodies to the exposed domain inhibited adhesion of wild-type spermatozoa to the mouse ZP but did not inhibit adhesion of spermatozoa lacking zonadhesin. Zan(-/-) males were fertile, and their spermatozoa readily fertilized mouse eggs in vitro. Remarkably, however, loss of zonadhesin increased adhesion of mouse spermatozoa to pig, cow, and rabbit ZP but not mouse ZP. We conclude that zonadhesin mediates species-specific ZP adhesion, and Zan(-/-) males are fertile because their spermatozoa retain adhesion capability that is not species-specific. Mammalian sperm-ZP adhesion is therefore molecularly robust, and species-specific egg recognition by a protein in the sperm acrosome is conserved between invertebrates and vertebrates, even though the adhesion molecules themselves are unrelated.

  16. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    PubMed

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel).

  17. Regulation of cellular interactions with laminin by integrin cytoplasmic domains: the A and B structural variants of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin differentially modulate the adhesive strength, morphology, and migration of macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, L M; Mercurio, A M

    1994-01-01

    Several integrin alpha subunits have structural variants that are identical in their extracellular and transmembrane domains but that differ in their cytoplasmic domains. The functional significance of these variants, however, is unknown. In the present study, we examined the possibility that the A and B variants of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin laminin receptor differ in function. For this purpose, we expressed the alpha 6A and alpha 6B cDNAs, as well as a truncated alpha 6 cDNA (alpha 6-delta CYT) in which the cytoplasmic domain sequence was deleted after the GFFKR pentapeptide, in P388D1 cells, an alpha 6 deficient macrophage cell line. Populations of stable alpha 6A, alpha 6B, and alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants that expressed equivalent levels of cell surface alpha 6 were obtained by fluorescence-activated cell sorter and shown to form heterodimers with endogenous beta 1 subunits. Upon attachment to laminin, the alpha 6A transfectants extended numerous pseudopodia. In contrast, the alpha 6B transfectants remained rounded and extended few processes. The transfectants were also examined for their ability to migrate toward a laminin substratum using Transwell chambers. The alpha 6A transfectants were three- to fourfold more migratory than the alpha 6B transfectants. The alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants did not attach to laminin in normal culture medium, but they did attach in the presence of Mn2+. The alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants migrated to a lesser extent than either the alpha 6A or alpha 6B transfectants in the presence of Mn2+. The alpha 6 transfectants differed significantly in the concentration of substratum bound laminin required for half-maximal adhesion in the presence of Mn2+:alpha 6A (2.1 micrograms/ml), alpha 6B (6.3 micrograms/ml), and alpha 6-delta CYT (8.8 micrograms/ml). Divalent cation titration studies revealed that these transfectants also differed significantly in both the [Ca2+] and [Mn2+] required to obtain half-maximal adhesion to laminin

  18. Nuclear Signaling from Cadherin Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Pierre D.; Maher, Meghan T.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell–cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of “outside-in” or “inside-out” signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure–function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell–cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell–cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  19. Adhesion of biofilms to inert surfaces: A molecular level approach directed at the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Baty, A M; Frølund, B; Geesey, G G; Langille, S; Quintero, E J; Suci, P A; Weiner, R M

    1996-01-01

    Protein/ligand interactions involved in mediating adhesion between microorganisms and biological surfaces have been well-characterized in some cases (e.g. pathogen/host interactions). The strategies microorganisms employ for attachment to inert surfaces have not been so clearly elucidated. An experimental approach is presented which addresses the issues from the point of view of molecular interactions occurring at the interface.

  20. Modeling the formation of cell-matrix adhesions on a single 3D matrix fiber.

    PubMed

    Escribano, J; Sánchez, M T; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-11-07

    Cell-matrix adhesions are crucial in different biological processes like tissue morphogenesis, cell motility, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These interactions that link cell cytoskeleton and matrix fibers are built through protein clutches, generally known as adhesion complexes. The adhesion formation process has been deeply studied in two-dimensional (2D) cases; however, the knowledge is limited for three-dimensional (3D) cases. In this work, we simulate different local extracellular matrix properties in order to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that regulate the formation of cell-matrix adhesions in 3D. We aim to study the mechanical interaction of these biological structures through a three dimensional discrete approach, reproducing the transmission pattern force between the cytoskeleton and a single extracellular matrix fiber. This numerical model provides a discrete analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of the different phenomena, such as protein clutches unbinding or protein unfolding.

  1. HIV-1 gp120 Glycoprotein Interacting with Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN) Down-Regulates Tight Junction Proteins to Disrupt the Blood Retinal Barrier and Increase Its Permeability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi-Wen; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Shengfang; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Tai-Sheng; Jin, Xia; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2016-10-28

    Approximately 70% of HIV-1 infected patients acquire ocular opportunistic infections and manifest eye disorders during the course of their illness. The mechanisms by which pathogens invade the ocular site, however, are unclear. Under normal circumstances, vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which possess a well developed tight junction complex, form the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) to prevent pathogen invasion. We hypothesize that disruption of the BRB allows pathogen entry into ocular sites. The hypothesis was tested using in vitro models. We discovered that human RPE cells could bind to either HIV-1 gp120 glycoproteins or HIV-1 viral particles. Furthermore, the binding was mediated by dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on RPE cells. Upon gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, cellular NF-κB signaling was triggered, leading to the induction of matrix metalloproteinases, which subsequently degraded tight junction proteins and disrupted the BRB integrity. DC-SIGN knockdown or prior blocking with a specific antibody abolished gp120-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and reduced the degradation of tight junction proteins. This study elucidates a novel mechanism by which HIV, type 1 invades ocular tissues and provides additional insights into the translocation or invasion process of ocular complication-associated pathogens.

  2. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  3. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  4. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 viii FINAL REPORT List of Acronyms ACN Acetonitrile ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials BPA Bisphenol...the oven and immediately cooled to room temperature. Approximately 1.0 mL of acetonitrile ( ACN ) was added to each vial using a glass syringe. The

  5. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  6. Quantification of E. coli adhesion to polyamides and polystyrene with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thio, Beng Joo Reginald; Meredith, J Carson

    2008-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure adhesion forces between E. coli bacteria and surfaces consisting of a series of polyamides and polystyrene, materials that are prominent in carpeting, upholstery, and other indoor surfaces. Bioparticle adhesion to such surfaces in air is poorly understood, yet these interactions are thought to play a key role in their accumulation and release as indoor air pollutants. The polymers employed were polyamide 6 (PA6), polyamide 6,6 (PA66), polyamide 12 (PA12) and polystyrene (PS). We report the interaction forces between immobilized E. coli and AFM tips coated with each polymer. The adhesion forces for the tip-bacterial interactions were in the range between 2.9 and 6.7 nN, which is of the same magnitude as the polymer-polymer interactions for the same series of polymers. Polystyrene had stronger adhesion with E. coli than any of the three polyamides, by an average factor of 1.4. The work of adhesion and Hamaker constants of the probe-surface interactions were calculated using a square-pyramid flat-surface model developed previously. A drag-force analysis suggests that model spheres with the same adhesion force as E. coli-poly(amide) (F approximately 4 nN) will remain adherent under normal foot traffic (F approximately 0.2 nN), but will release during vacuum cleaning (F>or=30 nN).

  7. Nucleation and Growth of Integrin Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Atilgan, Erdinç; Ovryn, Ben

    2009-01-01

    We present a model that provides a mechanistic understanding of the processes that govern the formation of the earliest integrin adhesions ex novo from an approximately planar plasma membrane. Using an analytic analysis of the free energy of a dynamically deformable membrane containing freely diffusing receptors molecules and long repeller molecules that inhibit integrins from binding with ligands on the extracellular matrix, we predict that a coalescence of polymerizing actin filaments can deform the membrane toward the extracellular matrix and facilitate integrin binding. Monte Carlo simulations of this system show that thermally induced membrane fluctuations can either zip-up and increase the radius of a nucleated adhesion or unzip and shrink an adhesion, but the fluctuations cannot bend the ventral membrane to nucleate an adhesion. To distinguish this integrin adhesion from more mature adhesions, we refer to this early adhesion as a nouveau adhesion. PMID:19413961

  8. Tape-Smoothing Tool For Adhesion Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1992-01-01

    Small tool smoothes adhesive tape uniformly to ensure consistency and repeatability of tape-peel tests of adhesion of paint to substrate. Includes resilient pad covered with tough, smooth fabric. Internal spring regulates force applied to tape.

  9. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  10. Microfluidic adhesion induced by subsurface microstructures.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2007-10-12

    Natural adhesives in the feet of different arthropods and vertebrates show strong adhesion as well as excellent reusability. Whereas the hierarchical structures on the surface are known to have a substantial effect on adhesion, the role of subsurface structures such as the network of microchannels has not been studied. Inspired by these bioadhesives, we generated elastomeric layers with embedded air- or oil-filled microchannels. These adhesives showed remarkable enhancement of adhesion ( approximately 30 times), which results from the crack-arresting properties of the microchannels, together with the surface stresses caused by the capillary force. The importance of the thickness of the adhesive layer, channel diameter, interchannel spacing, and vertical position within the adhesive has been examined for developing an optimal design of this microfluidic adhesive.

  11. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  12. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  13. Inhibition of cell adhesion by xARVCF indicates a regulatory function at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Reintsch, Wolfgang E; Mandato, Craig A; McCrea, Pierre D; Fagotto, François

    2008-09-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of cadherins is thought to regulate the strength and dynamics of cell-cell adhesion. Part of its regulatory activity has been attributed to a membrane-proximal region, the juxtamembrane domain (JMD), and its interaction with members of the p120 catenin subfamily. We show that titration of xARVCF, a member of this family, to the plasma membrane disrupts adhesion in the early embryo. Adhesion can be restored by coexpression of constitutively active Rac, suggesting that intracellular signaling is the primary cause in the loss of adhesion phenotype. Our observations suggest that the recruitment of p120 type catenins to the plasma membrane by the cadherin cytoplasmic tail may create protein complexes, which actively modulate the adhesion "status" of embryonic cells.

  14. Nanoscale characterization of vesicle adhesion by normalized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    We recently proposed a straightforward fluorescence microscopy technique to study adhesion of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles. This technique is based on dual observations which combine epi-fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy: TIRF images are normalized by epi-fluorescence ones. By this way, it is possible to map the membrane/substrate separation distance with a nanometric resolution, typically ~20 nm, with a maximal working range of 300-400 nm. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that this technique is useful to quantify vesicle adhesion from ultra-weak to strong membrane-surface interactions. Thus, we have examined unspecific and specific adhesion conditions. Concerning unspecific adhesion, we have controlled the strength of electrostatic forces between negatively charged vesicles and various functionalized surfaces which exhibit a positive or a negative effective charge. Specific adhesion was highlighted with lock-and-key forces mediated by the well defined biotin/streptavidin recognition.

  15. Nonlinear adhesion dynamics of confined lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Tung; Le Goff, Thomas; Pierre-Louis, Olivier

    Lipid membranes, which are ubiquitous objects in biological environments are often confined. For example, they can be sandwiched between a substrate and the cytoskeleton between cell adhesion, or between other membranes in stacks, or in the Golgi apparatus. We present a study of the nonlinear dynamics of membranes in a model system, where the membrane is confined between two flat walls. The dynamics derived from the lubrication approximation is highly nonlinear and nonlocal. The solution of this model in one dimension exhibits frozen states due to oscillatory interactions between membranes caused by the bending rigidity. We develope a kink model for these phenomena based on the historical work of Kawasaki and Otha. In two dimensions, the dynamics is more complex, and depends strongly on the amount of excess area in the system. We discuss the relevance of our findings for experiments on model membranes, and for biological systems. Supported by the grand ANR Biolub.

  16. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin is a device intended for topical closure of surgical incisions, including laparoscopic incisions, and simple traumatic lacerations that have easily approximated skin edges. Tissue adhesives...

  17. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  18. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics). PMID:28287647

  19. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  20. Bridging Adhesion of Mussel-Inspired Peptides: Role of Charge, Chain Length, and Surface Type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of marine mussels provide attractive design paradigms for engineering synthetic polymers that can serve as high performance wet adhesives and coatings. Although the role of Dopa in promoting adhesion between mussels and various substrates has been carefully studied, the context by which Dopa mediates a bridging or nonbridging macromolecular adhesion to surfaces is not understood. The distinction is an important one both for a mechanistic appreciation of bioadhesion and for an intelligent translation of bioadhesive concepts to engineered systems. On the basis of mussel foot protein-5 (Mfp-5; length 75 res), we designed three short, simplified peptides (15–17 res) and one relatively long peptide (30 res) into which Dopa was enzymatically incorporated. Peptide adhesion was tested using a surface forces apparatus. Our results show that the short peptides are capable of weak bridging adhesion between two mica surfaces, but this adhesion contrasts with that of full length Mfp-5, in that (1) while still dependent on Dopa, electrostatic contributions are much more prominent, and (2) whereas Dopa surface density remains similar in both, peptide adhesion is an order of magnitude weaker (adhesion energy Ead ∼ −0.5 mJ/m2) than full length Mfp-5 adhesion. Between two mica surfaces, the magnitude of bridging adhesion was approximately doubled (Ead ∼ −1 mJ/m2) upon doubling the peptide length. Notably, the short peptides mediate much stronger adhesion (Ead ∼ −3.0 mJ/m2) between mica and gold surfaces, indicating that a long chain length is less important when different interactions are involved on each of the two surfaces. PMID:25540823

  1. Bridging adhesion of mussel-inspired peptides: role of charge, chain length, and surface type.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Gebbie, Matthew A; Tan, Yerpeng; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-27

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of marine mussels provide attractive design paradigms for engineering synthetic polymers that can serve as high performance wet adhesives and coatings. Although the role of Dopa in promoting adhesion between mussels and various substrates has been carefully studied, the context by which Dopa mediates a bridging or nonbridging macromolecular adhesion to surfaces is not understood. The distinction is an important one both for a mechanistic appreciation of bioadhesion and for an intelligent translation of bioadhesive concepts to engineered systems. On the basis of mussel foot protein-5 (Mfp-5; length 75 res), we designed three short, simplified peptides (15-17 res) and one relatively long peptide (30 res) into which Dopa was enzymatically incorporated. Peptide adhesion was tested using a surface forces apparatus. Our results show that the short peptides are capable of weak bridging adhesion between two mica surfaces, but this adhesion contrasts with that of full length Mfp-5, in that (1) while still dependent on Dopa, electrostatic contributions are much more prominent, and (2) whereas Dopa surface density remains similar in both, peptide adhesion is an order of magnitude weaker (adhesion energy E(ad) ∼ -0.5 mJ/m(2)) than full length Mfp-5 adhesion. Between two mica surfaces, the magnitude of bridging adhesion was approximately doubled (E(ad) ∼ -1 mJ/m(2)) upon doubling the peptide length. Notably, the short peptides mediate much stronger adhesion (E(ad) ∼ -3.0 mJ/m(2)) between mica and gold surfaces, indicating that a long chain length is less important when different interactions are involved on each of the two surfaces.

  2. Bio-inspired adhesion: local chemical environments impact adhesive stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2014-03-01

    3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) is an amino acid that is naturally synthesized by marine mussels and exhibits the unique ability to strongly bind to surfaces in aqueous environments. However, the Dopa functional group undergoes auto-oxidation to a non-adhesive quinone form in neutral to basic pH conditions, limiting the utilization of Dopa in biomedical applications. In this work, we performed direct surface force measurements with in situ electrochemical control across a Dopa-rich native mussel foot protein (mfp-5), as well as three simplified model peptide sequences. We find that the neighboring peptide residues can significantly impact the redox stability of Dopa functional groups, with lysine residues imparting a substantial degree of Dopa redox stabilization. Surprisingly, the local chemical environments only minimally impact the magnitude of the adhesion forces measured between molecularly-smooth mica and gold surfaces. Our results provide molecular level insight into approaches that can be used to mitigate the detrimental impact of Dopa auto-oxidation, thus suggesting new molecular design strategies for improving the performance of Dopa-based underwater adhesives.

  3. Mobile and immobile adhesion of staphylococcal strains to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boks, Niels P; Kaper, Hans J; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2009-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis adheres to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in similar numbers, but in different modes. Real-time observation of staphylococcal adhesion under a shear rate of 15 s(-1) revealed different adhesion dynamics on both substrata. The number of adsorption and desorption events to achieve a similar number of adhering bacteria was twofold higher on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass. Moreover, 22% of all staphylococci on glass slid over the surface prior to adhering on a fixed site ("mobile adhesion mode"), but mobile adhesion was virtually absent (1%) on DDS-coated glass. Sliding preceded desorption on hydrophilic glass in about 20% of all desorption events, while on hydrophobic DDS-coated glass 2% of all staphylococci desorbed straight from their adhesion site. Since acid-base interactions between the staphylococci and a hydrophobic DDS-coating are attractive, it is suggested that these interactions facilitate a closer approach of the bacteria and therewith enhance immobile adhesion at local, high affinity sites. Alternatively, if the local site is low affinity, this may lead to desorption. In the absence of attractive acid-base interactions, as on hydrophilic glass, bacteria can be captured in the minimum of the DLVO-interaction energy curve, but this does not prevent them from sliding under flow at a fixed distance from a substratum surface until immobilization or desorption at or from a local high or low affinity site, respectively.

  4. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  5. Adhesive Force of a Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae, to a Flat Smooth Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Katsumi; Egashira, Kai; Toukai, Tadashi; Ogushi, Jun

    The adhesion of a spider mite to a surface of a flat smooth plate is investigated as a model for micromachine parts to adhere to and move on such surfaces. The measurement of adhesive force is carried out under various conditions in which plate material, surface roughness of a plate and environmental humidity are differed. The adhesion mechanism is also discussed. Of the forces acting between a spider mite and a surface, one from dispersion interaction is the most dominant because (1) there is a high correlation between the adhesive force and the dispersion force component of surface energy with adhesive forces of 8.2µN for glass, 9.7µN for mica, 9.9µN for silicon and 12.1µN for gold, and because (2) high humidity and high surface roughness reduce the adhesive force. For strong adhesion based on work of adhesion, spider mites have tenent hairs with a bell-shaped end.

  6. Elastic coupling of nascent apCAM adhesions to flowing actin networks.

    PubMed

    Mejean, Cecile O; Schaefer, Andrew W; Buck, Kenneth B; Kress, Holger; Shundrovsky, Alla; Merrill, Jason W; Dufresne, Eric R; Forscher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Adhesions are multi-molecular complexes that transmit forces generated by a cell's acto-myosin networks to external substrates. While the physical properties of some of the individual components of adhesions have been carefully characterized, the mechanics of the coupling between the cytoskeleton and the adhesion site as a whole are just beginning to be revealed. We characterized the mechanics of nascent adhesions mediated by the immunoglobulin-family cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is known to interact with actin filaments. Using simultaneous visualization of actin flow and quantification of forces transmitted to apCAM-coated beads restrained with an optical trap, we found that adhesions are dynamic structures capable of transmitting a wide range of forces. For forces in the picoNewton scale, the nascent adhesions' mechanical properties are dominated by an elastic structure which can be reversibly deformed by up to 1 µm. Large reversible deformations rule out an interface between substrate and cytoskeleton that is dominated by a number of stiff molecular springs in parallel, and favor a compliant cross-linked network. Such a compliant structure may increase the lifetime of a nascent adhesion, facilitating signaling and reinforcement.

  7. Episialin (MUC1) overexpression inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Episialin (MUC1) is a transmembrane molecule with a large mucin-like extracellular domain protruding high above the cell surface. The molecule is located at the apical side of most glandular epithelial cells, whereas in carcinoma cells it is often present at the entire surface and it is frequently expressed in abnormally large quantities. We have previously shown that overexpression of episialin reduces cell- cell interactions. Here we show that the integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix of transfectants of a melanoma cell line (A375), a transformed epithelial cell line (MDCK-ras-e) and a human breast epithelial cell line (HBL-100) is reduced by high levels of episialin. This reduction can be reversed by inducing high avidity of the beta 1 integrins by mAb TS2/16 (at least for beta 1-mediated adhesion). The adhesion can also be restored by redistribution of episialin on the cell surface by monoclonal antibodies into patches or caps. Similarly, capping of episialin on ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells, growing in suspension, caused adherence and spreading of these cells. We propose that there is a delicate balance between adhesion and anti-adhesion forces in episialin expressing cells, which can be shifted towards adhesion by strengthening the integrin-mediated adhesion, or towards anti-adhesion by increasing the level of expression of episialin. PMID:7698991

  8. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus) adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003). Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064). Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant. PMID:25984475

  9. Attenuation of leukocyte adhesion by recombinant TNF-binding protein after hemorrhagic shock in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maier, Marcus; Ströbele, Hubert; Voges, Jaqueline; Bauer, Clemens; Marzi, Ingo

    2003-05-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury involves a large number of humoral and cellular mediators that activate leukocytes that subsequently migrate to local tissues. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha may be one of the most important mediators of this post-shock inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the influence of a recombinant Type I (55 kDa) TNF-binding protein (TNF-BP) on leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the liver after hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats (40 mmHg for 90 min) and a standardized resuscitation regimen was applied. At the time of resuscitation, animals were treated intravenously with either TNF-BP 4 mg/kg or placebo. The liver microcirculation was investigated using intravital fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry at 5 h and 48 h after reperfusion. At 5 h, treatment with TNF-BP significantly reduced temporary leukocyte adhesion in the liver sinusoids as well as mean adhesion time of leukocytes in the hepatic central vein. In contrast, after 48 h, permanent leukocyte adhesion in the central hepatic vein was significantly reduced in the group receiving TNF-BP, whereas temporary leukocyte adhesion and mean adhesion time did not differ between the two groups. Both types of leukocyte adhesion, rolling adhesion after 5 h and firm adhesion after 48 h, were reduced in the group treated with TNF-BP, thereby suggesting a long-lasting anti-inflammatory effect.

  10. Modeling of adhesion in tablet compression - I. atomic force microscopy and molecular simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Li, T.; Bateman, S. D.; Erck, R.; Morris, K. R.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.; Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp.

    2003-04-01

    Adhesion problems during tablet manufacturing have been observed to be dependent on many formulation and process factors including the run time on the tablet press. Consequently, problems due to sticking may only become apparent towards the end of the development process when a prolonged run on the tablet press is attempted for the first time. It would be beneficial to predict in a relative sense if a formulation or new chemical entity has the potential for adhesion problems early in the development process. It was hypothesized that favorable intermolecular interaction between the drug molecules and the punch face is the first step or criterion in the adhesion process. Therefore, the rank order of adhesion during tablet compression should follow the rank order of these energies of interaction. The adhesion phenomenon was investigated using molecular simulations and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three model compounds were chosen from a family of profen compounds. Silicon nitride AFM tips were modified by coating a 20-nm iron layer on the surfaces by sputter coating. Profen flat surfaces were made by melting and recrystallization. The modified AFM probe and each profen surface were immersed in the corresponding profen saturated water during force measurements using AFM. The work of adhesion between iron and ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen in vacuum were determined to be -184.1, -2469.3, -17.3 mJ {center_dot} m-2, respectively. The rank order of the work of adhesion between iron and profen compounds decreased in the order: ketoprofen > ibuprofen > flurbiprofen. The rank order of interaction between the drug molecules and the iron superlattice as predicted by molecular simulation using Cerius2 is in agreement with the AFM measurements. It has been demonstrated that Atomic Force Microscopy is a powerful tool in studying the adhesion phenomena between organic drug compounds and metal surface. The study has provided insight into the adhesion problems

  11. Ocular surface sealants and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Subir Singh

    2006-07-01

    Tissue adhesives, both synthetic and biologic, have a long history of use in ophthalmology. Cyanoacrylate-based glues have traditionally been the most widely used glues for various purposes. They have been specially useful for treating corneal perforations and have had significantly improved long-term outcomes. More recently, fibrin-based glues have gained a major role as a suture substitute for attaching biologic tissues and as surface sealants. The literature supports expanded use of fibrin glue in this fashion. Other new agents, such as polyethyelene glycols, have been underutilized and hold promise, especially as surface protectants. Numerous other glues are being developed and show promise as ocular surface sealants and protective membranes. Advances in knowledge about tissue adhesives are leading to more effective and efficient ophthalmic care.

  12. Particle adhesion in powder coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Wankum, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Williams, S.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Electrostatic powder coating is a widely used industrial painting process. It has three major advantages: (1) it provides high quality durable finish, (2) the process is environmentally friendly and does not require the use of organic solvents, and (3) it is economically competitive. The adhesion of electrostatically deposited polymer paint particles on the grounded conducting substrate depends upon many parameters: (a) particle size and shape distributions, (b) electrostatic charge distributions, (c) electrical resistivity, (d) dielectric strength of the particles, (e) thickness of the powder film, (f) presence and severity of the back corona, and (g) the conductivity and surface properties of the substrate. The authors present a model on the forces of deposition and adhesion of corona charged particles on conducting substrates.

  13. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  14. Adhesive mechanisms in cephalopods: a review.

    PubMed

    von Byern, Janek; Klepal, Waltraud

    2006-01-01

    Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pair (Sepia), in the dorsal epidermis (Euprymna), or in the dorsal mantle side and partly on the fins (Idiosepius). Adhesion in Sepia is induced by suction of dermal structures on the mantle, while for Nautilus, Euprymna and Idiosepius adhesion is probably achieved by chemical substances. Histochemical studies indicate that in Nautilus and Idiosepius secretory cells that appear to be involved in adhesion stain for carbohydrates and protein, whilst in Euprymna only carbohydrates are detectable. De-adhesion is either achieved by muscle contraction of the tentacles and mantle (Nautilus and Sepia) or by secretion of substances (Euprymna). The de-adhesive mechanism used by Idiosepius remains unknown.

  15. Center or periphery? Modeling the effects of focal adhesion placement during cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Aravind R.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesions are often observed at the cell’s periphery. We provide an explanation for this observation using a system-level mathematical model of a cell interacting with a two-dimensional substrate. The model describes the biological cell as a hypoelastic continuum material whose behavior is coupled to a deformable, linear elastic substrate via focal adhesions that are represented by collections of linear elastic attachments between the cell and the substrate. The evolution of the focal adhesions is coupled to local intracellular stresses which arise from mechanical cell-substrate interactions. Using this model we show that the cell has at least three mechanisms through which it can control its intracellular stresses: focal adhesion position, size, and attachment strength. We also propose that one reason why focal adhesions are typically located on the cell periphery instead of its center is because peripheral focal adhesions allow the cell to be more sensitive to changes in the microenvironment. This increased sensitivity is caused by the fact that peripherally located focal adhesions allow the cells to modulate its intracellular properties over a much larger portion of the cell area. PMID:28158263

  16. Adhesive systems: important aspects related to their composition and clinical use

    PubMed Central

    SILVA E SOUZA JUNIOR, Mario Honorato; CARNEIRO, Karina Gama Kato; LOBATO, Marcelo Figueiredo; SILVA E SOUZA, Patrícia de Almeida Rodrigues; de GÓES, Mário Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This literature review article addresses the types and the main components of different etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems available in the market, and relates them to their function, possible chemical interactions and influence of handling characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images are presented to characterize the interface between adhesives and dentin. Adhesive systems have been recently classified according to their adhesion approaches in etch-and-rinse, self-etch and glass ionomer. The etch-andrinse systems require a specific acid-etch procedure and may be performed in two or three steps. Self-etch systems employ acidic monomers that demineralize and impregnate dental substrates almost at the same time. These systems are separated in one or two steps. Some advantages and deficiencies were noted for etch-and-rinse and self-etch approaches, mainly for the simplified ones due to some chemical associations and interactions. The SeM micrographs illustrate different relationships between adhesive systems and dental structures, particularly dentin. The knowledge of composition, characteristics and mechanisms of adhesion of each adhesive system is of fundamental importance to permit the adoption of ideal bonding strategies under clinical conditions. PMID:20856995

  17. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    technology is the use of pressure sensitive microcapsules , which release reactive amine crosslinkers into an adhesive putty when pressed against the...PROIECT GOALS AND OBIECTIVES 2 2 KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 3.1 KICKOFF MEETING 3 3.2 AMINE MICROENCAPSULATION 3 3.3 CAUSTIC CLEANING AGENT 5 3.4...caustic, and the abrasive brush. We successfully synthesized amine-filled microcapsules and a dry mixture of caustic ingredients that only activate when

  18. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  19. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  20. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ralph Robert

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  1. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  2. Super-complexes of adhesion GPCRs and neural guidance receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Verity A.; Mehmood, Shahid; Chavent, Matthieu; Roversi, Pietro; Carrasquero, Maria; del Toro, Daniel; Seyit-Bremer, Goenuel; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M.; Comoletti, Davide; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Latrophilin adhesion-GPCRs (Lphn1–3 or ADGRL1–3) and Unc5 cell guidance receptors (Unc5A–D) interact with FLRT proteins (FLRT1–3), thereby promoting cell adhesion and repulsion, respectively. How the three proteins interact and function simultaneously is poorly understood. We show that Unc5D interacts with FLRT2 in cis, controlling cell adhesion in response to externally presented Lphn3. The ectodomains of the three proteins bind cooperatively. Crystal structures of the ternary complex formed by the extracellular domains reveal that Lphn3 dimerizes when bound to FLRT2:Unc5, resulting in a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 (FLRT2:Unc5D:Lphn3). This 1:1:2 complex further dimerizes to form a larger ‘super-complex' (2:2:4), using a previously undescribed binding motif in the Unc5D TSP1 domain. Molecular dynamics simulations, point-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry demonstrate the stability and molecular properties of these complexes. Our data exemplify how receptors increase their functional repertoire by forming different context-dependent higher-order complexes. PMID:27091502

  3. Super-complexes of adhesion GPCRs and neural guidance receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Verity A.; Mehmood, Shahid; Chavent, Matthieu; Roversi, Pietro; Carrasquero, Maria; Del Toro, Daniel; Seyit-Bremer, Goenuel; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M.; Comoletti, Davide; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Latrophilin adhesion-GPCRs (Lphn1-3 or ADGRL1-3) and Unc5 cell guidance receptors (Unc5A-D) interact with FLRT proteins (FLRT1-3), thereby promoting cell adhesion and repulsion, respectively. How the three proteins interact and function simultaneously is poorly understood. We show that Unc5D interacts with FLRT2 in cis, controlling cell adhesion in response to externally presented Lphn3. The ectodomains of the three proteins bind cooperatively. Crystal structures of the ternary complex formed by the extracellular domains reveal that Lphn3 dimerizes when bound to FLRT2:Unc5, resulting in a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 (FLRT2:Unc5D:Lphn3). This 1:1:2 complex further dimerizes to form a larger `super-complex' (2:2:4), using a previously undescribed binding motif in the Unc5D TSP1 domain. Molecular dynamics simulations, point-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry demonstrate the stability and molecular properties of these complexes. Our data exemplify how receptors increase their functional repertoire by forming different context-dependent higher-order complexes.

  4. CdiA promotes receptor-independent intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Zachary C; Townsley, Loni; Wallace, Adam B; King, Andrew; Van der Woude, Marjan W; Low, David A; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Hayes, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    CdiB/CdiA proteins mediate inter-bacterial competition in a process termed contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI). Filamentous CdiA exoproteins extend from CDI(+) cells and bind specific receptors to deliver toxins into susceptible target bacteria. CDI has also been implicated in auto-aggregation and biofilm formation in several species, but the contribution of CdiA-receptor interactions to these multi-cellular behaviors has not been examined. Using Escherichia coli isolate EC93 as a model, we show that cdiA and bamA receptor mutants are defective in biofilm formation, suggesting a prominent role for CdiA-BamA mediated cell-cell adhesion. However, CdiA also promotes auto-aggregation in a BamA-independent manner, indicating that the exoprotein possesses an additional adhesin activity. Cells must express CdiA in order to participate in BamA-independent aggregates, suggesting that adhesion could be mediated by homotypic CdiA-CdiA interactions. The BamA-dependent and BamA-independent interaction domains map to distinct regions within the CdiA filament. Thus, CdiA orchestrates a collective behavior that is independent of its growth-inhibition activity. This adhesion should enable 'greenbeard' discrimination, in which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate with one another based on a single shared trait. This kind-selective social behavior could provide immediate fitness benefits to bacteria that acquire the systems through horizontal gene transfer.

  5. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  6. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness.

  7. Single-cell force spectroscopy as a technique to quantify human red blood cell adhesion to subendothelial laminin.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Jamie L; Partola, Kostyantyn; Zhang, Jing; Andemariam, Biree; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-12-18

    Single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assay, enables quantitative study of cell adhesion while maintaining the native state of surface receptors in physiological conditions. Human healthy and pathological red blood cells (RBCs) express a large number of surface proteins which mediate cell-cell interactions, or cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In particular, RBCs adhere with high affinity to subendothelial matrix laminin via the basal cell adhesion molecule and Lutheran protein (BCAM/Lu). Here, we established SCFS as an in vitro technique to study human RBC adhesion at baseline and following biochemical treatment. Using blood obtained from healthy human subjects, we recorded adhesion forces from single RBCs attached to AFM cantilevers as the cell was pulled-off of substrates coated with laminin protein. We found that an increase in the overall cell adhesion measured via SCFS is correlated with an increase in the resultant total force measured on 1 µm(2) areas of the RBC membrane. Further, we showed that SCFS can detect significant changes in the adhesive response of RBCs to modulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Lastly, we identified variability in the RBC adhesion force to laminin amongst the human subjects, suggesting that RBCs maintain diverse levels of active BCAM/Lu adhesion receptors. By using single-cell measurements, we established a powerful new method for the quantitative measurement of single RBC adhesion with specific receptor-mediated binding.

  8. Study of the time effect on the strength of cell-cell adhesion force by a novel nano-picker

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} A nano-picker is developed for single cell adhesion force measurement. {yields} The adhesion of picker-cell has no influence to the cell-cell measurement result. {yields} Cell-cell adhesion force has a rise at the first few minutes and then becomes constant. -- Abstract: Cell's adhesion is important to cell's interaction and activates. In this paper, a novel method for cell-cell adhesion force measurement was proposed by using a nano-picker. The effect of the contact time on the cell-cell adhesion force was studied. The nano-picker was fabricated from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever by nano fabrication technique. The cell-cell adhesion force was measured based on the deflection of the nano-picker beam. The result suggests that the adhesion force between cells increased with the increasing of contact time at the first few minutes. After that, the force became constant. This measurement methodology was based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. It can realize both the observation and manipulation of a single cell at nanoscale. The quantitative and precise cell-cell adhesion force result can be obtained by this method. It would help us to understand the single cell interaction with time and would benefit the research in medical and biological fields potentially.

  9. Direct adhesive measurements between wood biopolymer model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Johansson, Erik; Wågberg, Lars; Pettersson, Torbjörn

    2012-10-08

    For the first time the dry adhesion was measured for an all-wood biopolymer system using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The polydimethylsiloxane hemisphere was successfully surface-modified with a Cellulose I model surface using layer-by-layer assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose and polyethyleneimine. Flat surfaces of cellulose were equally prepared on silicon dioxide substrates, and model surfaces of glucomannan and lignin were prepared on silicon dioxide using spin-coating. The measured work of adhesion on loading and the adhesion hysteresis was found to be very similar between cellulose and all three wood polymers, suggesting that the interaction between these biopolymers do not differ greatly. Surface energy calculations from contact angle measurements indicated similar dispersive surface energy components for the model surfaces. The dispersive component was dominating the surface energy for all surfaces. The JKR work of adhesion was lower than that calculated from contact angle measurements, which partially can be ascribed to surface roughness of the model surfaces and overestimation of the surface energies from contact angle determinations.

  10. Therapeutic Targeting of Eosinophil Adhesion and Accumulation in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between β1 integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of α4β1 integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

  11. Potentialities of ultrasounds for the nondestructive evaluation of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Myrdycz, A; Lefebvre, F; Ouaftouh, M; Monchau, F; Callens, D; Hildebrand, H F

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the potentialities of ultrasounds to investigate the mechanical properties of a cell/substrate interface. The adhesion process plays a major role in the development of osteoblastic cells on various substrates used in orthopedic applications such as metals, bioceramics, etc. Particularly, cell adherence appears to be a critical factor in the colonization process. High-frequency and low-power ultrasounds seem to be an appropriate tool for a nondestructive evaluation of interface properties. First, we present the results obtained with bulk longitudinal and shear waves under an arbitrary incidence over an aluminum-adhesive interface. This study was performed for an industrial application of bonding. The results clearly show the sensitivity of shear waves for the evaluation of the adhesion quality owing to the shear solicitations at the interface they induce. A model of ultrasound interactions with a boundary subject to varying degrees of adhesion has been developed and compared to the experiments. Second, we investigated osteoblastic cell cultures with a high-frequency acoustic microscope working at 50 MHz. The images obtained in the shear mode reveal a better contrast than those obtained in the longitudinal mode. For the time being, these results are qualitative, and theoretical models have to be developed according to the point of view of biologists.

  12. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic “seeds,” circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation. PMID:22837985

  13. Force nanoscopy of cell mechanics and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-05-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to mechanical stimuli in their environment and have several evolved mechanisms to sense and respond to these cues. It is becoming increasingly recognized that many cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, possess a diverse set of proteins to translate mechanical cues into biochemical signalling and to mediate cell surface interactions such as cell adhesion. Moreover, the mechanical properties of cells are involved in regulating cell function as well as serving as indicators of disease states. Importantly, the recent development of biophysical tools and nanoscale methods has facilitated a deeper understanding of the role that physical forces play in modulating cell mechanics and cell adhesion. Here, we discuss how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been used to investigate cell mechanics and cell adhesion at the single-cell and single-molecule levels. This knowledge is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and mechanoresponse in living cells. While pushing living cells with the AFM tip provides a means to quantify their mechanical properties and examine their response to nanoscale forces, pulling single surface proteins with a functionalized tip allows one to understand their role in sensing and adhesion. The combination of these nanoscale techniques with modern molecular biology approaches, genetic engineering and optical microscopies provides a powerful platform for understanding the sophisticated functions of the cell surface machinery, and its role in the onset and progression of complex diseases.

  14. High-speed platelet adhesion under conditions of rapid flow.

    PubMed Central

    Polanowska-Grabowska, R; Gear, A R

    1992-01-01

    The recognition of exposed collagen by circulating platelets is an initial step in the formation of the hemostatic plug or a thrombus after vascular injury. Theoretical calculations of the speed of platelet function required for effective hemostasis have suggested very short reaction times. However, it is not known how fast platelets can adhere to collagen under arterial flow conditions or which membrane proteins are involved. We have used a continuous-flow, microaffinity column linked to a resistive-particle counter to detect platelet adhesion. Adhesion of human platelets to native type I collagen was extremely rapid, with exponential half-times as short as 240 ms, and was nearly complete by 2 s. This RGD-independent process was not associated with platelet aggregation or secretion. The monoclonal antibody 6F1 directed against the glycoprotein Ia/IIa complex inhibited adhesion, suggesting that this complex plays an important role in the initial phases of platelet-collagen interaction under flow conditions. In addition, divalent cations were required for adhesion, as indicated by inhibition with EDTA in plasma and the dependence on Mg2+ for washed platelets. Images PMID:1631056

  15. Influence of cement type and thickness on polyfiber post adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoğlu, Emel; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Yilmaz, Zeliha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the effect of two different post space diameters and related resin cement film thicknesses on the bond strength of a polyfiber post. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 premolars were randomly divided into two according to the post space diameter: 1.1 mm and 1.5 mm. Then each group was divided into three sub-groups according to luting cement used: RelyX U100, Panavia F2.0/ED primer, Clearfil SA cement. Spirapost was then luted into the canal using luting cements. Two slices were obtained from each root specimen. Push-out tests were performed. Data was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Connover post-hoc and Mann-Whitney U-test (P < 0.05). Results: Push-out bond strength was found to vary significantly according to type of adhesive system and post space diameter size (P < 0.05). The self-adhesive resin cement RelyX U100 had significantly higher bond strengths compared with the other adhesive system (P < 0.05). The self-etch adhesive system (Panavia F2.0) showed significantly lower bond strengths compared with the other systems (P < 0.05). There was a significant interaction between the luting systems and post space diameter (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The increases in post space diameter significantly reduced the bond strength of Spirapost to root dentine for both groups. PMID:24944450

  16. Involvement of oxidative stress and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanida, Satoshi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mizushima, Takashi; Sasaki, Makoto; Shimura, Takaya; Kamiya, Takeshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Joh, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease involves excessive immune effects of inflammatory cells against gut microbes. In genetically predisposed individuals, these effects are considered to contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of mucosal injury. Oxidative stress is a fundamental tissue-destructive mechanisms that can occur due to the reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen metabolites which are released in abundance from numerous inflammatory cells that have extravasated from lymphatics and blood vessels to the lamina propria. This extravasation is mediated by interactions between adhesion molecules including mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 on the surface of lymphocytes or neutrophils and their ligands on endothelial cells. Thus, reactive oxygen species and adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. The present review focuses on the involvement of oxidative stress and adhesion molecules, in particular mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1, in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21373262

  17. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature.

  18. Single Cell Force Spectroscopy for Quantification of Cellular Adhesion on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Wayne B.

    Cell adhesion is an important aspect of many biological processes. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has made it possible to quantify the forces involved in cellular adhesion using a technique called single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). AFM based SCFS offers versatile control over experimental conditions for probing directly the interaction between specific cell types and specific proteins, surfaces, or other cells. Transmembrane integrins are the primary proteins involved in cellular adhesion to the extra cellular matix (ECM). One of the chief integrins involved in the adhesion of leukocyte cells is alpha Mbeta2 (Mac-1). The experiments in this dissertation quantify the adhesion of Mac-1 expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK Mac-1), platelets, and neutrophils cells on substrates with different concentrations of fibrinogen and on fibrin gels and multi-layered fibrinogen coated fibrin gels. It was shown that multi-layered fibrinogen reduces the adhesion force of these cells considerably. A novel method was developed as part of this research combining total internal reflection microscopy (TIRFM) with SCFS allowing for optical microscopy of HEK Mac-1 cells interacting with bovine serum albumin (BSA) coated glass after interacting with multi-layered fibrinogen. HEK Mac-1 cells are able to remove fibrinogen molecules from the multi-layered fibrinogen matrix. An analysis methodology for quantifying the kinetic parameters of integrin-ligand interactions from SCFS experiments is proposed, and the kinetic parameters of the Mac-1 fibrinogen bond are quantified. Additional SCFS experiments quantify the adhesion of macrophages and HEK Mac-1 cells on functionalized glass surfaces and normal glass surfaces. Both cell types show highest adhesion on a novel functionalized glass surface that was prepared to induce macrophage fusion. These experiments demonstrate the versatility of AFM based SCFS, and how it can be applied to address many questions in cellular biology offering

  19. Micromanipulation of adhesion of phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate-stimulated T lymphocytes to planar membranes containing intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed Central

    Tözeren, A; Mackie, L H; Lawrence, M B; Chan, P Y; Dustin, M L; Springer, T A

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental methodology to determine the physical strength of cell adhesion to a planar membrane containing one set of adhesion molecules. In particular, the T lymphocyte adhesion due to the interaction of the lymphocyte function associated molecule 1 on the surface of the cell, with its counter-receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on the planar membrane, was investigated. A micromanipulation method and mathematical analysis of cell deformation were used to determine (a) the area of conjugation between the cell and the substrate and (b) the energy that must be supplied to detach a unit area of the cell membrane from its substrate. T lymphocytes stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) conjugated strongly with the planar membrane containing purified ICAM-1. The T lymphocytes attached to the planar membrane deviated occasionally from their round configuration by extending pseudopods but without changing the size of the contact area. These adherent cells were dramatically deformed and then detached when pulled away from the planar membrane by a micropipette. Detachment occurred by a gradual decrease in the radius of the contact area. The physical strength of adhesion between a PMA-stimulated T lymphocyte and a planar membrane containing 1,000 ICAM-1 molecules/micron 2 was comparable to the strength of adhesion between a cytotoxic T cell and its target cell. The comparison of the adhesive energy density, measured at constant cell shape, with the model predictions suggests that the physical strength of cell adhesion may increase significantly when the adhesion bonds in the contact area are immobilized by the actin cytoskeleton. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:1358239

  20. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  1. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  2. Molecular mechanisms regulating CD13-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mallika; Gerber, Claire; Rahman, M Mamunur; Vernier, Kaitlyn M; Pereira, Flavia E; Subramani, Jaganathan; Caromile, Leslie A; Shapiro, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    CD13/Aminopeptidase N is a transmembrane metalloproteinase that is expressed in many tissues where it regulates various cellular functions. In inflammation, CD13 is expressed on myeloid cells, is up-regulated on endothelial cells at sites of inflammation and mediates monocyte/endothelial adhesion by homotypic interactions. In animal models the lack of CD13 alters the profiles of infiltrating inflammatory cells at sites of ischaemic injury. Here, we found that CD13 expression is enriched specifically on the pro-inflammatory subset of monocytes, suggesting that CD13 may regulate trafficking and function of specific subsets of immune cells. To further dissect the mechanisms regulating CD13-dependent trafficking we used the murine model of thioglycollate-induced sterile peritonitis. Peritoneal monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells were significantly decreased in inflammatory exudates from global CD13KO animals when compared with wild-type controls. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of wild-type and CD13KO primary myeloid cells, or wild-type myeloid cells pre-treated with CD13-blocking antibodies into thioglycollate-challenged wild-type recipients demonstrated fewer CD13KO or treated cells in the lavage, suggesting that CD13 expression confers a competitive advantage in trafficking. Similarly, both wild-type and CD13KO cells were reduced in infiltrates in CD13KO recipients, confirming that both monocytic and endothelial CD13 contribute to trafficking. Finally, murine monocyte cell lines expressing mouse/human chimeric CD13 molecules demonstrated that the C-terminal domain of the protein mediates CD13 adhesion. Therefore, this work verifies that the altered inflammatory trafficking in CD13KO mice is the result of aberrant myeloid cell subset trafficking and further defines the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:24627994

  3. Swelling equilibrium of dentin adhesive polymers formed on the water-adhesive phase boundary: Experiments and micromechanical model

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    During their application to the wet, oral environment, dentin adhesives can experience phase separation and composition change which can compromise the quality of the hybrid layer formed at the dentin-adhesive interface. The chemical composition of polymer phases formed in the hybrid layer can be represented using a ternary water-adhesive phase diagram. In this paper, these polymer phases have been characterized using a suite of mechanical tests and swelling experiments. The experimental results were evaluated using granular micromechanics based model that incorporates poro-mechanical effects and polymer-solvent thermodynamics. The variation of the model parameters and model-predicted polymer properties has been studied as a function of composition along the phase boundary. The resulting structure-property correlations provide insight into interactions occurring at the molecular level in the saturated polymer system. These correlations can be used for modeling the mechanical behavior of hybrid layer, and are expected to aid in the design and improvement of water-compatible dentin adhesive polymers. PMID:24076070

  4. Generation of shear adhesion map using SynVivo synthetic microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ashley M; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Pant, Kapil

    2014-05-25

    Cell/particle adhesion assays are critical to understanding the biochemical interactions involved in disease pathophysiology and have important applications in the quest for the development of novel therapeutics. Assays using static conditions fail to capture the dependence of adhesion on shear, limiting their correlation with in vivo environment. Parallel plate flow chambers that quantify adhesion under physiological fluid flow need multiple experiments for the generation of a shear adhesion map. In addition, they do not represent the in vivo scale and morphology and require large volumes (~ml) of reagents for experiments. In this study, we demonstrate the generation of shear adhesion map from a single experiment using a microvascular network based microfluidic device, SynVivo-SMN. This device recreates the complex in vivo vasculature including geometric scale, morphological elements, flow features and cellular interactions in an in vitro format, thereby providing a biologically realistic environment for basic and applied research in cellular behavior, drug delivery, and drug discovery. The assay was demonstrated by studying the interaction of the 2 µm biotin-coated particles with avidin-coated surfaces of the microchip. The entire range of shear observed in the microvasculature is obtained in a single assay enabling adhesion vs. shear map for the particles under physiological conditions.

  5. Towards the modeling of nanoindentation of virus shells: Do substrate adhesion and geometry matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Arthur; Dragnea, Bogdan; Tayachi, Manel; Temam, Roger

    2016-12-01

    Soft nanoparticles adsorbing at surfaces undergo deformation and buildup of elastic strain as a consequence of interfacial adhesion of similar magnitude with constitutive interactions. An example is the adsorption of virus particles at surfaces, a phenomenon of central importance for experiments in virus nanoindentation and for understanding of virus entry. The influence of adhesion forces and substrate corrugation on the mechanical response to indentation has not been studied. This is somewhat surprising considering that many single-stranded RNA icosahedral viruses are organized by soft intermolecular interactions while relatively strong adhesion forces are required for virus immobilization for nanoindentation. This article presents numerical simulations via finite elements discretization investigating the deformation of a thick shell in the context of slow evolution linear elasticity and in presence of adhesion interactions with the substrate. We study the influence of the adhesion forces in the deformation of the virus model under axial compression on a flat substrate by comparing the force-displacement curves for a shell having elastic constants relevant to virus capsids with and without adhesion forces derived from the Lennard-Jones potential. Finally, we study the influence of the geometry of the substrate in two-dimensions by comparing deformation of the virus model adsorbed at the cusp between two cylinders with that on a flat surface.

  6. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. Th