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Sample records for adhesion migration invasion

  1. Altering FAK-Paxillin Interactions Reduces Adhesion, Migration and Invasion Processes

    PubMed Central

    Deramaudt, Thérèse B.; Dujardin, Denis; Noulet, Fanny; Martin, Sophie; Vauchelles, Romain; Takeda, Ken; Rondé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role in signal transduction pathways initiated at sites of integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Thus, FAK is involved in many aspects of the metastatic process including adhesion, migration and invasion. Recently, several small molecule inhibitors which target FAK catalytic activity have been developed by pharmaceutical companies. The current study was aimed at addressing whether inhibiting FAK targeting to focal adhesions (FA) represents an efficient alternative strategy to inhibit FAK downstream pathways. Using a mutagenesis approach to alter the targeting domain of FAK, we constructed a FAK mutant that fails to bind paxillin. Inhibiting FAK-paxillin interactions led to a complete loss of FAK localization at FAs together with reduced phosphorylation of FAK and FAK targets such as paxillin and p130Cas. This in turn resulted in altered FA dynamics and inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Moreover, the migration properties of cells expressing the FAK mutant were reduced as compared to FAK-/- cells. This was correlated with a decrease in both phospho-Src and phospho-p130Cas levels at FAs. We conclude that targeting FAK-paxillin interactions is an efficient strategy to reduce FAK signalling and thus may represent a target for the development of new FAK inhibitors. PMID:24642576

  2. High extracellular pressure promotes gastric cancer cell adhesion, invasion, migration and suppresses gastric cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Su, Changlei; Zhang, Bomiao; Liu, Wenzhi; Zheng, Hongqun; Sun, Lingyu; Tong, Jinxue; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Liang, Hongyan; Xue, Li; Zhang, Qifan

    2016-08-01

    Slightly increased pressure stimulates tumor cell adhesion and proliferation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of high pressure on gene expression and the biological behavior of gastric cancer cells. After incubation for 30 min at 37˚C under ambient and increased pressure, one portion of SGC7901 cells was used for cell proliferation and apoptosis assays, cell cycle analysis, adhesion invasion or migration assays. The other portion of cells was harvested for detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID1), sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and E-cadherin expression by western blotting or RT-PCR. In addition, we investigated the effects of high pressure on SGC7901 cell ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy. We found that the adhesion fold under increased pressure of 760 and 1,520 mmHg was 2.39±1.05 (P<0.05) and 2.47±0.85 (P<0.01) as compared with the control, respectively. The invasion fold was 3.42±2.06 (P<0.05) and 5.13±2.49 (P<0.01) as compared with the control, respectively. The migration was 1.65±0.20 (P<0.001) and 2.53±0.50 (P<0.001) as compared with the control, respectively. At increased pressure, MMP-2 and ID1 expression increased significantly, while the expression of SHH decreased significantly. However, we did not find significant change in proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle or ultrastructure of the SGC7901 cells under high pressure. In conclusion, high pressure promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of SGC7901 cells. Moreover, the present study suggests that the pressure-augmented invasion and migration may be related to the increase in MMP-2 expression. Moreover, high pressure may suppress SGC7901 cell differentiation, which may result from the change in SHH and ID1 expression. PMID:27278077

  3. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  4. CCN3 (NOV) regulates proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SHUAI; LIU, ZHENG; BI, DONGBIN; YUAN, XAODONG; LIU, XIAOWEN; DING, SENTAI; LU, JIAJU; NIU, ZHIHONG

    2012-01-01

    The CCN3/nephroblastoma overexpressed gene belongs to the CCN family of genes that encode secreted proteins involved in a variety of processes including tumorigenesis. Altered expression of CCN3 has been observed in human nephroblastoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), suggesting that CCN3 plays a role in kidney tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of CCN3 in clear cell RCC biology. In particular, we studied the expression of CCN3 in 32 pairs of RCC tissues and corresponding normal kidney tissues using immunohistochemistry. The CCN3 gene was transfected into the 786-O cell line and the behaviors of stably transfected clones were analyzed. Results showed the expression of CCN3 was lower in RCC tissues compared to corresponding normal kidney tissues and the expression of CCN3 was inversely correlated with the Ki67 index. CCN3-expressing clones exhibited significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Furthermore, CCN3-transfected 786-O cells exhibited increased adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, migration and invasion in Matrigel. Our data indicated that CCN3 plays an anti-proliferative role in clear cell RCC cells and promotes the adhesion, migration and invasion of clear cell RCC cells. PMID:22783399

  5. Recombinant hirudin suppresses the viability, adhesion, migration and invasion of Hep-2 human laryngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Lv, Mei; Xu, Erdong; Shao, Fangyu; Feng, Ya; Yang, Jingru; Shi, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant hirudin (rH) is a highly potent and specific inhibitor of thrombin, and has been shown to inhibit the growth and metastasis of several types of cancers in experimental tumor models. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects and explore the underlying mechanisms of rH in Hep-2 human laryngeal carcinoma (LC) cells. Hep-2 cells were treated with various concentrations of rH for 24 h. The cell viability was evaluated by a water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST) assay. The adhesion ability of the cells was evaluated by cell adhesion to fibronectin. Cell migration and invasion were measured with the Boyden chamber assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33324 fluorescence staining. A chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay was used to assess the effects of rH on angiogenesis in vivo. Western blotting was used to detect the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF-R), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (Bad) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) proteins. rH significantly inhibited the cell viability and induced apoptosis in LC Hep-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, as compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as control. These results were accompanied by a decrease in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and an increase in the pro-apoptotic protein Bad. Moreover, rH dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion, migration and invasion of the Hep-2 cells, compared to the vehicle PBS. In addition, rH robustly suppressed angiogenesis in the CAM assay. Importantly, the expression of adhesion and angiogenesis-associated proteins FAK and VEGF-R was significantly downregulated by rH in a dose-dependent manner. The present findings demonstrate that rH exerts antitumor effects in Hep-2 human laryngeal cancer cells via multiple mechanisms and suggests that targeting thrombin by rH is a potential strategy for the treatment of LC. PMID:25592110

  6. TRPV2 Mediates Adrenomedullin Stimulation of Prostate and Urothelial Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Lehen’kyi, V’yacheslav; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level. PMID:23741410

  7. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells. PMID:27452906

  8. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  9. Effect of junctional adhesion molecule-2 expression on cell growth, invasion and migration in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, HUISHAN; YU, HEFEN; MARTIN, TRACEY A.; ZHANG, YUXIANG; CHEN, GANG; JIANG, WEN G.

    2016-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAMs) family belongs to the immunoglobulin subfamily involved in the formation of tight junctions (TJ) in both endothelial and epithelial cells. Aberrant expression of JAM-2 is associated with cancer progression but little work has been carried out in discovering how this affects changes in cell behaviour. The present study aimed to examine the expression of JAM-2 in human colon cancer specimens and cell lines and its role in the development of colon cancer. JAM-2 expression in human colon cancer specimens (normal, n=75; cancer, n=94) and cell lines was analysed using quantitative real-time PCR and conventional RT-PCR. Colon cancer cells were stably transfected with a mammalian expression vector to overexpress JAM-2-Flag. The effect on growth, adhesion and migration following overexpression of JAM-2 was then investigated using in vitro models. TJ function was assessed using a trans-epithelial resistance assay (TER, with an EVOM voltammeter). JAM-2 was lowly expressed in colon cancer cells such as RKO, HT115. JAM-2 overexpression in RKO cells (RKO-JAM-2) and HT115 cells (HT115-JAM-2) showed retarded adhesion (P<0.05). An in vivo tumour model showed that RKO-JAM-2 had significantly reduced growth (P<0.05), invasion (P<0.05) and migration (P<0.05) as well as in HT115-JAM-2, except on proliferation and migration. Expression of JAM-2 resulted in a significant increase in TER and decrease in permeability of polarized monolayers (P<0.05). Further analysis of JAM-2 transcript levels against clinical aspects demonstrated that the decreasing JAM-2 expression correlated to disease progression, metastasis and poor survival. Taken together, JAM-2 may function as a putative tumour suppressor in the progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer. PMID:26782073

  10. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC. PMID:25379783

  11. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  12. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin β3 via SMAD2/3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin βB subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin (βB dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin β3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin β3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin β3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers. PMID:26384307

  13. Slit2‑Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E‑cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2‑Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2‑Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2‑Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti‑human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2‑Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E‑cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E‑cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2‑Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E‑cadherin. PMID:27431199

  14. The membrane-cytoskeletal protein 4.1N is involved in the process of cell adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyu; Shi, Xiaofang; Liu, Xin; Shi, Yu; Zhou, Qingqing; Liu, Xilong; Li, Li; Ji, Xiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Qi, Yuanming; Kang, Qiaozhen

    2012-10-01

    Protein 4.1N belongs to the protein 4.1 superfamily that links transmembrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton. Recent evidence has shown that protein 4.1 is important in tumor suppression. However, the functions of 4.1N in the metastasis of breast cancer are largely unknown. In the present study, MCF-7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with various metastatic abilities were employed. Protein 4.1N was found to be expressed in poorly metastatic MCF-7 and middle metastatic T-47D cell lines, and was predominantly associated with cell-cell junctions. However, no 4.1N expression was detected in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, re-expression of 4.1N in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited cell adhesion, migration and invasion. The results suggest that protein 4.1N is a negative regulator of cell metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:23170136

  15. The membrane-cytoskeletal protein 4.1N is involved in the process of cell adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    JI, ZHENYU; SHI, XIAOFANG; LIU, XIN; SHI, YU; ZHOU, QINGQING; LIU, XILONG; LI, LI; JI, XIANG; GAO, YANFENG; QI, YUANMING; KANG, QIAOZHEN

    2012-01-01

    Protein 4.1N belongs to the protein 4.1 superfamily that links transmembrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton. Recent evidence has shown that protein 4.1 is important in tumor suppression. However, the functions of 4.1N in the metastasis of breast cancer are largely unknown. In the present study, MCF-7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with various metastatic abilities were employed. Protein 4.1N was found to be expressed in poorly metastatic MCF-7 and middle metastatic T-47D cell lines, and was predominantly associated with cell-cell junctions. However, no 4.1N expression was detected in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, re-expression of 4.1N in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited cell adhesion, migration and invasion. The results suggest that protein 4.1N is a negative regulator of cell metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:23170136

  16. Using real-time impedance-based assays to monitor the effects of fibroblast-derived media on the adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Catríona M; Herranz Ors, Carmen; Kiely, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating cell proliferation, migration and invasion are central to understanding tumour progression and metastasis. The local tumour microenvironment contributes to the transformed phenotype in cancer by providing specific environmental cues that alter the cells behaviour and promotes metastasis. Fibroblasts have a strong association with cancer and in recent times there has been some emphasis in designing novel therapeutic strategies that alter fibroblast behaviour in the tumour microenvironment. Fibroblasts produce growth factors, chemokines and many of the proteins laid down in the ECM (extracellular matrix) that promote angiogenesis, inflammation and tumour progression. In this study, we use a label-free RTCA (real-time cell analysis) platform (xCELLigence) to investigate how media derived from human fibroblasts alters cancer cell behaviour. We used a series of complimentary and novel experimental approaches to show HCT116 cells adhere, proliferate and migrate significantly faster in the presence of media from human fibroblasts. As well as this, we used the xCELLigence CIM-plates system to show that HCT116 cells invade matrigel layers aggressively when migrating towards media derived from human fibroblasts. These data strongly suggest that fibroblasts have the ability to increase the migratory and invasive properties of HCT116 cells. This is the first study that provides real-time data on fibroblast-mediated migration and invasion kinetics of colon cancer cells. PMID:24935351

  17. Antcin K, an Active Triterpenoid from the Fruiting Bodies of Basswood-Cultivated Antrodia cinnamomea, Inhibits Metastasis via Suppression of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lai, Chiao-I; Su, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-05-13

    Previous research demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract from Antrodia cinnamomea suppresses the invasive potential of human breast and hepatoma cells, but the effective compounds are not identified. The main bioactive compounds of A. cinnamomea are ergostane-type triterpenoids, and the content of antcin K is the highest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimetastatic activity and mechanisms of antcin K purified from the fruiting body of basswood-cultivated A. cinnamomea on human liver cancer Hep 3B cells. The results showed that adhesion, migration, and invasion of Hep 3B cells were effectively inhibited by antcin K within 24 h of treatment. Antcin K not only reduced the protein expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 but also down-regulated vimentin and up-regulated E-cadherin in Hep 3B cells. In depth investigation for the molecular mechanism revealed that antcin K could reduce the protein expression of integrin β1, β3, α5, and αv and suppress phosphorylation of FAK, Src, PI3K, AKT, MEK, ERK, and JNK. These results suggested that antcin K was able to inhibit the metastasis of human hepatoma cells through suppression of integrin-mediated adhesion, migration, and invasion. Coupled with these findings, antcin K has a good potential to reduce the risk of liver cancer metastasis. PMID:25911944

  18. Force transmission during adhesion-independent migration.

    PubMed

    Bergert, Martin; Erzberger, Anna; Desai, Ravi A; Aspalter, Irene M; Oates, Andrew C; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2015-04-01

    When cells move using integrin-based focal adhesions, they pull in the direction of motion with large, ∼100 Pa, stresses that contract the substrate. Integrin-mediated adhesions, however, are not required for in vivo confined migration. During focal adhesion-free migration, the transmission of propelling forces, and their magnitude and orientation, are not understood. Here, we combine theory and experiments to investigate the forces involved in adhesion-free migration. Using a non-adherent blebbing cell line as a model, we show that actin cortex flows drive cell movement through nonspecific substrate friction. Strikingly, the forces propelling the cell forward are several orders of magnitude lower than during focal-adhesion-based motility. Moreover, the force distribution in adhesion-free migration is inverted: it acts to expand, rather than contract, the substrate in the direction of motion. This fundamentally different mode of force transmission may have implications for cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions during migration in vivo. PMID:25774834

  19. Fibroblast surface-associated FGF-2 promotes contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion through FGFR-SRC signaling and integrin αvβ5-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Knuchel, Sarah; Anderle, Pascale; Werfelli, Patricia; Diamantis, Eva; Rüegg, Curzio

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts were reported to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion by secreting motility factors and extracellular matrix processing enzymes. Less is known whether fibroblasts may induce CRC cancer cell motility by contact-dependent mechanisms. To address this question we characterized the interaction between fibroblasts and SW620 and HT29 colorectal cancer cells in 2D and 3D co-culture models in vitro. Here we show that fibroblasts induce contact-dependent cancer cell elongation, motility and invasiveness independently of deposited matrix or secreted factors. These effects depend on fibroblast cell surface-associated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) -2. Inhibition of FGF-2 or FGF receptors (FGFRs) signaling abolishes these effects. FGFRs activate SRC in cancer cells and inhibition or silencing of SRC in cancer cells, but not in fibroblasts, prevents fibroblasts-mediated effects. Using an RGD-based integrin antagonist and function-blocking antibodies we demonstrate that cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts requires integrin αvβ5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fibroblasts induce cell-contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D and 3D conditions in vitro through fibroblast cell surface-associated FGF-2, FGF receptor-mediated SRC activation and αvβ5 integrin-dependent cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts. The FGF-2-FGFRs-SRC-αvβ5 integrin loop might be explored as candidate therapeutic target to block colorectal cancer invasion. PMID:25973543

  20. Epithelia migration: A spatiotemporal interplay between contraction and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris; Pinto, Inês Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues represent 60% of the cells that form the human body and where more than 90% of all cancers derived. Epithelia transformation and migration involve altered cell contractile mechanics powered by an actomyosin-based cytoskeleton and influenced by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. A balance between contractile and adhesive forces regulates a large number of cellular and tissue properties crucial for epithelia migration and tumorigenesis. In this review, the forces driving normal epithelia transformation into highly motile and invasive cells and tissues will be discussed. PMID:26176587

  1. CD44-mediated Adhesion to Hyaluronic Acid Contributes to Mechanosensing and Invasive Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yushan; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronic acid (HA), makes up a significant portion of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM). Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly invasive brain tumor, is associated with aberrant HA secretion, tissue stiffening, and overexpression of the HA receptor CD44. Here, transcriptomic analysis, engineered materials, and measurements of adhesion, migration, and invasion were used to investigate how HA/CD44 ligation contributes to the mechanosensing and invasive motility of GBM tumor cells, both intrinsically and in the context of RGD/integrin adhesion. Analysis of transcriptomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals up-regulation of transcripts associated with HA/CD44 adhesion. CD44 suppression in culture reduces cell adhesion to HA on short time scales (0.5h post-incubation) even if RGD is present, whereas maximal adhesion on longer time scales (3h) requires both CD44 and integrins. Moreover, time-lapse imaging demonstrates that cell adhesive structures formed during migration on bare HA matrices are more short-lived than cellular protrusions formed on surfaces containing RGD. Interestingly, adhesion and migration speed were dependent on HA hydrogel stiffness, implying that CD44-based signaling is intrinsically mechanosensitive. Finally, CD44 expression paired with an HA-rich microenvironment maximized three-dimensional invasion, whereas CD44 suppression or abundant integrin-based adhesion limited it. These findings demonstrate that CD44 transduces HA-based stiffness cues, temporally precedes integrin-based adhesion maturation, and facilitates invasion. PMID:24962319

  2. Nucleophosmin Mutants Promote Adhesion, Migration and Invasion of Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells through MMPs Up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Jingrong; Shao, Huiyuan; Chen, Xianchun; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Quan, Jing; Zou, Qin; Jin, Hongjun; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1) has been defined as a unique subgroup in the new classification of myeloid neoplasm, and the AML patients with mutated NPM1 frequently present extramedullary infiltration, but how NPM1 mutants regulate this process remains elusive. In this study, we found that overexpression of type A NPM1 gene mutation (NPM1-mA) enhanced the adhesive, migratory and invasive potential in THP-1 AML cells lacking mutated NPM1. NPM1-mA had up-regulated expression and gelatinolytic matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 activity, as assessed by real-time PCR, western blotting and gelatin zymography. Following immunoprecipitation analysis to identify the interaction of NPM1-mA with K-Ras, we focused on the effect of NPM1-mA overexpression on the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling axis and showed that NPM1-mA increased the MEK and ERK phosphorylation levels, as evaluated by western blotting. Notably, a specific inhibitor of the ERK/MAPK pathway (PD98059), but not p38/MAPK, JNK/MAPK or PI3-K/AKT inhibitors, markedly decreased the cell invasion numbers in a transwell assay. Further experiments demonstrated that blocking the ERK/MAPK pathway by PD98059 resulted in reduced MMP-2/9 protein levels and MMP-9 activity. Additionally, NPM1-mA overexpression had down-regulated gene expression and protein production of tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) in THP-1 cells. Furthermore, evaluation of gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that MMP-2 was overexpressed in AML patient samples with NPM1 mutated and high MMP-2 expression associated with leukemic skin infiltration. Taken together, our results reveal that NPM1 mutations contribute to the invasive potential of AML cells through MMPs up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK signaling pathway activation and offer novel insights into the potential role of NPM1 mutations in leukemogenesis. PMID:26884713

  3. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  4. Directing cell migration using micropatterned and dynamically adhesive polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patricia; Gautrot, Julien E; Connelly, John T

    2014-06-01

    Micropatterning techniques, such as photolithography and microcontact printing, provide robust tools for controlling the adhesive interactions between cells and their extracellular environment. However, the ability to modify these interactions in real time and examine dynamic cellular responses remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a novel strategy to create dynamically adhesive, micropatterned substrates, which afford precise control of cell adhesion and migration over both space and time. Specific functionalization of micropatterned poly(ethylene glycol methacrylate) (POEGMA) brushes with synthetic peptides, containing the integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, was achieved using thiol-yne coupling reactions. RGD activation of POEGMA brushes promoted fibroblast adhesion, spreading and migration into previously non-adhesive areas, and migration speed could be tuned by adjusting the surface ligand density. We propose that this technique is a robust strategy for creating dynamically adhesive biomaterial surfaces and a useful assay for studying cell migration. PMID:24508539

  5. In vitro Cell Migration and Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V.

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup. PMID:24962652

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  7. α-Actinin-4 Enhances Colorectal Cancer Cell Invasion by Suppressing Focal Adhesion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tesshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2015-01-01

    α-Actinins (ACTNs) are known to crosslink actin filaments at focal adhesions in migrating cells. Among the four isoforms of mammalian ACTNs, ACTN1 and ACTN4 are ubiquitously expressed. Recently, ACTN4 was reported to enhance cancer cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanism by which ACTN4 drives these malignant phenotypes remains unclear. Here, we show that ACTN4, but not ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions in DLD-1 cells, leading to the rapid turnover of focal adhesions. Interestingly, zyxin (ZYX) assembly to focal adhesions was markedly decreased in ACTN4-expressing DLD-1 cells, while the recruitment of paxillin (PAX) occurred normally. On the other hand, in ACTN1-expressing DLD-1 cells, PAX and ZYX were normally recruited to focal adhesions, suggesting that ACTN4 specifically impairs focal adhesion maturation by inhibiting the recruitment of ZYX to focal complexes. Using purified recombinant proteins, we found that ZYX binding to ACTN4 was defective under conditions where ZYX binding to ACTN1 was observed. Furthermore, Matrigel invasion of SW480 cells that express high endogenous levels of ACTN4 protein was inhibited by ectopic expression of ACTN1. Altogether, our results suggest that ZYX defective binding to ACTN4, which occupies focal adhesions instead of ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions, resulting in the enhancement of cell motility and invasion. PMID:25860875

  8. FAK competes for Src to promote migration against invasion in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolli-Bouhafs, K; Sick, E; Noulet, F; Gies, J-P; De Mey, J; Rondé, P

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most deadly cancers because of its high propensity to metastasis, a process that requires migration and invasion of tumor cells driven by the regulated formation of adhesives structures like focal adhesions (FAs) and invasive structures like invadopodia. FAK, the major kinase of FAs, has been implicated in many cellular processes, including migration and invasion. In this study, we investigated the role of FAK in the regulation of invasion. We report that suppression of FAK in B16F10 melanoma cells led to increased invadopodia formation and invasion through Matrigel, but impaired migration. These effects are rescued by FAK WT but not by FAKY397F reexpression. Invadopodia formation requires local Src activation downstream of FAK and in a FAK phosphorylation-dependant manner. FAK deletion correlates with increased phosphorylation of Tks-5 (tyrosine kinase substrate with five SH3 domain) and reactive oxygen species production. In conclusion, our data show that FAK is able to mediate opposite effects on cell migration and invasion. Accordingly, beneficial effects of FAK inhibition are context dependent and may depend on the cell response to environmental cues and/or on the primary or secondary changes that melanoma experienced through the invasion cycle. PMID:25118939

  9. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type. PMID:25333694

  10. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type. PMID:25333694

  11. Nestin is a novel target for suppressing pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yoko; Naito, Zenya; Kawahara, Kiyoko; Nakazawa, Nando; Korc, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Nestin, is a class VI intermediate filament (IF) that is expressed in 30% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases, and its expression in PDAC positively correlates with peripancreatic invasion. An expression vector carrying a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting nestin was stably transfected into PANC-1 and PK-45H human pancreatic cancer cells, which express high nestin levels. Alterations in morphology and alignment of actin filaments and α-tubulin were examined by phase-contrast and immunocytochemistry. Effects on cell growth, migration in scratch and Boyden chamber assays, invasion, cell adhesion, and in vivo growth were determined. Differences in mRNA levels were examined by arrays. Nestin shRNA-transfected cells exhibited decreased nestin expression, a sheet-like appearance with tight cell-cell adhesion, increased expression of filamentous F-actin and E-cadherin, and attenuated migration and invasion, both of which were enhanced following nestin re-expression. Expression of α-tubulin, and in vitro cell growth and adhesion were not altered by nestin downregulation, whereas hepatic metastases were decreased. Thus, nestin plays important roles in pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis by selectively modulating the expression of actin and cell adhesion molecules, and may therefore be a novel therapeutic target in PDAC. PMID:21258211

  12. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. Stem Cells 2016;34:948-959. PMID:26727165

  13. Mechanotransduction at focal adhesions: integrating cytoskeletal mechanics in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are complex plasma membrane-associated macromolecular assemblies that serve to physically connect the actin cytoskeleton to integrins that engage with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). FAs undergo maturation wherein they grow and change composition differentially to provide traction and to transduce the signals that drive cell migration, which is crucial to various biological processes, including development, wound healing and cancer metastasis. FA-related signalling networks dynamically modulate the strength of the linkage between integrin and actin and control the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we have summarized a number of recent investigations exploring how FA composition is affected by the mechanical forces that transduce signalling networks to modulate cellular function and drive cell migration. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how force governs adhesion signalling provides insights that will allow the manipulation of cell migration and help to control migration-related human diseases. PMID:23551528

  14. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  15. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in mechanosensing during fibroblast migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Hanks, S. K.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase localized at focal adhesions and is believed to mediate adhesion-stimulated effects. Although ablation of FAK impairs cell movement, it is not clear whether FAK might be involved in the guidance of cell migration, a role consistent with its putative regulatory function. We have transfected FAK-null fibroblasts with FAK gene under the control of the tetracycline repression system. Cells were cultured on flexible polyacrylamide substrates for the detection of traction forces and the application of mechanical stimulation. Compared with control cells expressing wild-type FAK, FAK-null cells showed a decrease in migration speed and directional persistence. In addition, whereas FAK-expressing cells responded to exerted forces by reorienting their movements and forming prominent focal adhesions, FAK-null cells failed to show such responses. Furthermore, FAK-null cells showed impaired responses to decreases in substrate flexibility, which causes control cells to generate weaker traction forces and migrate away from soft substrates. Cells expressing Y397F FAK, which cannot be phosphorylated at a key tyrosine site, showed similar defects in migration pattern and force-induced reorientation as did FAK-null cells. However, other aspects of F397-FAK cells, including the responses to substrate flexibility and the amplification of focal adhesions upon mechanical stimulation, were similar to that of control cells. Our results suggest that FAK plays an important role in the response of migrating cells to mechanical input. In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr-397 is required for some, but not all, of the functions of FAK in cell migration.

  16. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Owen L; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D; del Álamo, Juan C

    2015-05-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  17. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Owen L.; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  18. CLCA2, a target of the p53 family, negatively regulates cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Koyama, Ryota; Maruyama, Reo; Hirano, Takehiro; Tamura, Miyuki; Sugisaka, Jun; Suzuki, Hiromu; Idogawa, Masashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Tokino, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 transcriptionally regulates a number of genes that are involved in cell-cycle inhibition, apoptosis and the maintenance of genetic stability. Recent studies suggest that p53 also contributes to the regulation of cell migration and invasion. Here, we show that human chloride channel accessory-2 (CLCA2) is a target gene of the p53 family (p53, p73 and p63). CLCA2 is induced by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. The p53 family proteins activate the CLCA2 promoter by binding directly to the conserved consensus p53-binding site present in the CLCA2 promoter. In terms of function, ectopic expression of CLCA2 inhibited cancer cell migration. In contrast, silencing CLCA2 with siRNA stimulated cancer cell migration and invasion. We also found that inactivation of CLCA2 enhanced the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), as well as its promoter activation. A small-molecule FAK inhibitor reduced the effect of CLCA2 siRNA on cell migration and invasion, suggesting that CLCA2 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of the FAK signaling pathway. Furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between CLCA2 and FAK expression in 251 human breast cancer tissues. These results strongly suggest that CLCA2 is involved in the p53 tumor suppressor network and has a significant effect on cell migration and invasion. PMID:22990203

  19. Semaphorin signals in cell adhesion and cell migration: functional role and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Andrea; Fazzari, Pietro; Tamagnone, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Cell migration is pivotal in embryo development and in the adult. During development a wide range of progenitor cells travel over long distances before undergoing terminal differentiation. Moreover, the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and of the cardiovascular system involves remodelling compact cell layers and sprouting of new tubular branches. In the adult, cell migration is essential for leucocytes involved in immune response. Furthermore, invasive and metastatic cancer cells have the distinctive ability to overcome normal tissue boundaries, travel in and out of blood vessels, and settle down in heterologous tissues. Cell migration normally follows strict guidance cues, either attractive, or inhibitory and repulsive. Semaphorins are a wide family of signals guiding cell migration during development and in the adult. Recent findings have established that semaphorin receptors, the plexins, govern cell migration by regulating integrin-based cell substrate adhesion and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, via specific monomeric GTPases. Plexins furthermore recruit tyrosine kinases in receptor complexes, which allows switching between multiple signaling pathways and functional outcomes. In this article, we will review the functional role of semaphorins in cell migration and the implicated molecular mechanisms controlling cell adhesion. PMID:17607949

  20. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  1. EphB2 activity plays a pivotal role in pediatric medulloblastoma cell adhesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Arend H.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F.A.; Hulleman, Esther; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yang, Hui; Scherpen, Frank J.G.; Kampen, Kim R.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Kamps, Willem A.; Diks, Sander H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; de Bont, Eveline S.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Eph/ephrin signaling has been implicated in various types of key cancer-enhancing processes, like migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis. In medulloblastoma, invading tumor cells characteristically lead to early recurrence and a decreased prognosis. Based on kinase-activity profiling data published recently, we hypothesized a key role for the Eph/ephrin signaling system in medulloblastoma invasion. In primary medulloblastoma samples, a significantly higher expression of EphB2 and the ligand ephrin-B1 was observed compared with normal cerebellum. Furthermore, medulloblastoma cell lines showed high expression of EphA2, EphB2, and EphB4. Stimulation of medulloblastoma cells with ephrin-B1 resulted in a marked decrease in in vitro cell adhesion and an increase in the invasion capacity of cells expressing high levels of EphB2. The cell lines that showed an ephrin-B1–induced phenotype possessed increased levels of phosphorylated EphB2 and, to a lesser extent, EphB4 after stimulation. Knockdown of EphB2 expression by short hairpin RNA completely abolished ephrin ligand–induced effects on adhesion and migration. Analysis of signal transduction identified p38, Erk, and mTOR as downstream signaling mediators potentially inducing the ephrin-B1 phenotype. In conclusion, the observed deregulation of Eph/ephrin expression in medulloblastoma enhances the invasive phenotype, suggesting a potential role in local tumor cell invasion and the formation of metastases. PMID:22723427

  2. Baicalein inhibits the migration and invasive properties of human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Teng, Chun-Yuh; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Huang, Hai-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Huang, Chih-Yang; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hwang, Jin-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Flavonoids have been demonstrated to exert health benefits in humans. We investigated whether the flavonoid baicalein would inhibit the adhesion, migration, invasion, and growth of human hepatoma cell lines, and we also investigated its mechanism of action. The separate effects of baicalein and baicalin on the viability of HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep1 cells were investigated for 24 h. To evaluate their invasive properties, cells were incubated on matrigel-coated transwell membranes in the presence or absence of baicalein. We examined the effect of baicalein on the adhesion of cells, on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), protein kinase C (PKC), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and on tumor growth in vivo. We observed that baicalein suppresses hepatoma cell growth by 55%, baicalein-treated cells showed lower levels of migration than untreated cells, and cell invasion was significantly reduced to 28%. Incubation of hepatoma cells with baicalein also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to matrigel, collagen I, and gelatin-coated substrate. Baicalein also decreased the gelatinolytic activities of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased phosphorylated I-kappa-B (IKB)-{beta}. In addition, baicalein reduced the phosphorylation levels of PKC{alpha} and p38 proteins, which regulate invasion in poorly differentiated hepatoma cells. Finally, when SK-Hep1 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of baicalein induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results demonstrate the anticancer properties of baicalein, which include the inhibition of adhesion, invasion, migration, and proliferation of human hepatoma cells in vivo. - Highlight: > Baicalein inhibits several essential steps in the onset of metastasis.

  3. Identification of genes regulating migration and invasion using a new model of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the complex, multistep process of metastasis remains a major challenge in cancer research. Metastasis models can reveal insights in tumor development and progression and provide tools to test new intervention strategies. Methods To develop a new cancer metastasis model, we used DU145 human prostate cancer cells and performed repeated rounds of orthotopic prostate injection and selection of subsequent lymph node metastases. Tumor growth, metastasis, cell migration and invasion were analyzed. Microarray analysis was used to identify cell migration- and cancer-related genes correlating with metastasis. Selected genes were silenced using siRNA, and their roles in cell migration and invasion were determined in transwell migration and Matrigel invasion assays. Results Our in vivo cycling strategy created cell lines with dramatically increased tumorigenesis and increased ability to colonize lymph nodes (DU145LN1-LN4). Prostate tumor xenografts displayed increased vascularization, enlarged podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels and invasive margins. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression profiles that correlated with metastatic potential. Using gene network analysis we selected 3 significantly upregulated cell movement and cancer related genes for further analysis: EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), ITGB4 (integrin β4) and PLAU (urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)). These genes all showed increased protein expression in the more metastatic DU145-LN4 cells compared to the parental DU145. SiRNA knockdown of EpCAM, integrin-β4 or uPA all significantly reduced cell migration in DU145-LN4 cells. In contrast, only uPA siRNA inhibited cell invasion into Matrigel. This role of uPA in cell invasion was confirmed using the uPA inhibitors, amiloride and UK122. Conclusions Our approach has identified genes required for the migration and invasion of metastatic tumor cells, and we propose that our new in vivo model system will be a powerful

  4. Adhesion and invasion of bovine endothelial cells by Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A; Gottstein, B; Kaufmann, H

    1996-02-01

    Neospora caninum is a recently identified coccidian parasite which was, until 1988, misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. It causes paralysis and death in dogs and neonatal mortality and abortion in cattle, sheep, goats and horses. The life-cycle of Neospora has not yet been elucidated. The only two stages identified so far are tissue cysts and intracellularly dividing tachyzoites. Very little is known about the biology of this species. We have set up a fluorescence-based adhesion/invasion assay in order to investigate the interaction of N. caninum tachyzoites with bovine aorta endothelial (BAE) cells in vitro. Treatment of both host cells and parasites with metabolic inhibitors determined the metabolic requirements for adhesion and invasion. Chemical and enzymatic modifications of parasite and endothelial cell surfaces were used in order to obtain information on the nature of cell surface components responsible for the interaction between parasite and host. Electron microscopical investigations defined the ultrastructural characteristics of the adhesion and invasion process, and provided information on the intracellular development of the parasites. PMID:8851858

  5. dysfusion Transcriptional Control of Drosophila Tracheal Migration, Adhesion, and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Crews, Stephen T.

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila dysfusion basic-helix-loop-helix-PAS transcription factor gene is expressed in specialized fusion cells that reside at the tips of migrating tracheal branches. dysfusion mutants were isolated, and genetic analysis of live embryos revealed that mutant tracheal branches migrate to close proximity but fail to recognize and adhere to each other. Misexpression of dysfusion throughout the trachea further indicated that dysfusion has the ability to both inhibit cell migration and promote ectopic tracheal fusion. Nineteen genes whose expression either increases or decreases in fusion cells during development were analyzed in dysfusion mutant embryos. dysfusion upregulates the levels of four genes, including the shotgun cell adhesion protein gene and the zona pellucida family transmembrane protein gene, CG13196. Misexpression experiments with CG13196 result in ectopic tracheal fusion events, suggesting that it also encodes a cell adhesion protein. Another target gene of dysfusion is members only, which inhibits protein nuclear export and influences tracheal fusion. dysfusion also indirectly downregulates protein levels of Trachealess, an important regulator of tracheal development. These results indicate that fusion cells undergo dynamic changes in gene expression as they switch from migratory to fusion modes and that dysfusion regulates a discrete, but important, set of these genes. PMID:16914738

  6. Physical Biology in Cancer. 4. Physical cues guide tumor cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Stroka, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    As tumor cells metastasize from the primary tumor location to a distant secondary site, they encounter an array of biologically and physically heterogeneous microenvironments. While it is well established that biochemical signals guide all stages of the metastatic cascade, mounting evidence indicates that physical cues also direct tumor cell behavior, including adhesion and migration phenotypes. Physical cues acting on tumor cells in vivo include extracellular matrix mechanical properties, dimensionality, and topography, as well as interstitial flow, hydrodynamic shear stresses, and local forces due to neighboring cells. State-of-the-art technologies have recently enabled us and other researchers to engineer cell microenvironments that mimic specific physical properties of the cellular milieu. Through integration of these engineering strategies, along with physics, molecular biology, and imaging techniques, we have acquired new insights into tumor cell adhesion and migration mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the extravasation and invasion stages of the metastatic cascade. We first discuss the physical role of the endothelium during tumor cell extravasation and invasion and how contractility of endothelial and tumor cells contributes to the ability of tumor cells to exit the vasculature. Next, we examine how matrix dimensionality and stiffness coregulate tumor cell adhesion and migration beyond the vasculature. Finally, we summarize how tumor cells translate and respond to physical cues through mechanotransduction. Because of the critical role of tumor cell mechanotransduction at various stages of the metastatic cascade, targeting signaling pathways involved in tumor cell mechanosensing of physical stimuli may prove to be an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. PMID:24133064

  7. Sortilin is associated with breast cancer aggressiveness and contributes to tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Séverine; Pundavela, Jay; Demont, Yohann; Faulkner, Sam; Keene, Sheridan; Attia, John; Jiang, Chen Chen; Zhang, Xu Dong; Walker, Marjorie M.; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal membrane protein sortilin has been reported in a few cancer cell lines, but its expression and impact in human tumors is unclear. In this study, sortilin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a series of 318 clinically annotated breast cancers and 53 normal breast tissues. Sortilin was detected in epithelial cells, with increased levels in cancers, as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.0088). It was found in 79% of invasive ductal carcinomas and 54% of invasive lobular carcinomas (p < 0.0001). There was an association between sortilin expression and lymph node involvement (p = 0.0093), suggesting a relationship with metastatic potential. In cell culture, sortilin levels were higher in cancer cell lines compared to non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells and siRNA knockdown of sortilin inhibited cancer cell adhesion, while proliferation and apoptosis were not affected. Breast cancer cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by sortilin knockdown, with a decrease in focal adhesion kinase and SRC phosphorylation. In conclusion, sortilin participates in breast tumor aggressiveness and may constitute a new therapeutic target against tumor cell invasion. PMID:25871389

  8. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M.; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  9. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  10. Collective cell migration induced by mechanical stress and substrate adhesiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köpf, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress normal to the boundary of a tissue sheet can arise in both constrained as well as unconstrained epithelial layers through pushing and pulling of surrounding tissue and substrate adhesiveness, respectively. A continuum model is used to investigate how such stress influences the epithelial dynamics. Four types of spreading and motility can be identified: a uniformly stretched stationary state, uniform sheet migration, active stress compensation by polarization close to the boundary, and a wormlike progression by deformation waves. Analytical and numerical solutions are presented along with bifurcation diagrams using normal stress and active force as control parameters.

  11. The disintegrin tzabcanin inhibits adhesion and migration in melanoma and lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Saviola, Anthony J; Burns, Patrick D; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Integrins play an essential role in cancer survival and invasion, and they have been major targets in drug development and design. Disintegrins are small (4-16kDa) viperid snake venom proteins that exhibit a canonical integrin-binding site (often RGD). These non-enzymatic proteins inhibit integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, making them potential candidates as therapeutics in cancer and numerous other human disorders. The present study examined the cytotoxic, anti-adhesion, and anti-migration effects of a recently characterized disintegrin, tzabcanin, towards melanoma (A-375) and lung (A-549) cancer cell lines. Tzabcanin inhibits adhesion of both cells lines to vitronectin and exhibited very weak cytotoxicity towards A-375 cells; however, it had no effect on cell viability of A-549 cells. Further, tzabcanin significantly inhibited migration of both cell lines in cell scratch/wound healing assays. Flow cytometric analysis indicates that both A-375 and A-549 cell lines express integrin αvβ3, a critical integrin in tumor motility and invasion, and a major receptor of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin. Flow cytometric analysis also identified αvβ3 as a binding site of tzabcanin. These results suggest that tzabcanin may have utility in the development of anticancer therapies, or may be used as a biomarker to detect neoplasms that over-express integrin αvβ3. PMID:27060015

  12. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2–16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2–16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  13. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2-16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47(phox), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2-16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  14. Bradykinin promotes migration and invasion of human immortalized trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Having demonstrated that the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) is expressed in cells that participate in trophoblast invasion in humans and guinea-pigs, we investigated the role of bradykinin (BK) on cell migration and invasion in the HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cell line using wound healing and invasion assays. First, we documented that HTR-8/SVneo cells expressed kallikrein, B2R, B1R, MMP-2 and MMP-9 using immunocytochemistry. Incubation with BK (10.0 microMol/L) for 18 hours increased the migration index 3-fold in comparison to controls or to cells preincubated with the B2R antagonist HOE-140. BK (10.0 microMol/L) incubation yielded a similar number of proliferating and viable cells as controls, therefore the enhanced closure of the wound cannot be attributed to proliferating cells. Incubation with BK (10.0 microMol/L) for 18 hours increased the invasion index 2-fold in comparison to controls or to cells preincubated with the antagonist of the B2R. Neither the B1R ligand Lys-des-Arg9 BK, nor its antagonist Lys-(des-Arg9-Leu8), modified migration and invasion. Further support for the stimulatory effect of B2R activation on migration and invasion is provided by the 3-fold increase in the number of filopodia per cell versus controls or cells preincubated with the B2R antagonist. Bradykinin had no effect on the cellular protein content of the B2R, nor the MMP-9 and MMP-2 gelatinase activity in the culture media varied after incubation with BK. This study adds bradykinin-acting on the B2R-to the stimuli of trophoblast migration and invasion, an effect that should be integrated to other modifications of the kallikrein-kinin system in normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:21729302

  15. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  16. An assessment of invasion risk from assisted migration.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jillian M; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2008-06-01

    To reduce the risk of extinction due to climate change, some ecologists have suggested human-aided translocation of species, or assisted migration (AM), to areas where climate is projected to become suitable. Such intentional movement, however, may create new invasive species if successful introductions grow out of control and cause ecologic or economic damage. We assessed this risk by surveying invasive species in the United States and categorizing invaders based on origin. Because AM will involve moving species on a regional scale within continents (i.e., range shifts), we used invasive species with an intracontinental origin as a proxy for species that would be moved through AM. We then determined whether intracontinental invasions were more prevalent or harmful than intercontinental invasions. Intracontinental invasions occurred far less frequently than invasions from other continents, but they were just as likely to have had severe effects. Fish and crustaceans pose a particularly high threat of intracontinental invasion. We conclude that the risk of AM to create novel invasive species is small, but assisted species that do become invasive could have large effects. Past experience with species reintroductions may help inform policy regarding AM. PMID:18577085

  17. Platelet‑rich plasma promotes the migration and invasion of synovial fibroblasts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shanshan; Yang, Binzhou; Shang, Chen; Ma, Zhongshuang; Tang, Zizheng; Liu, Guiping; Shen, Weigan; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is blood plasma that has been enriched with platelets, and the number of platelets is correlated with rheumatoid activity. PRP is a concentrated source of autologous platelets, and contains several different growth factors and cytokines, including platelet‑derived growth factor, transforming growth factor‑β and insulin‑like growth factor‑1, which stimulate healing of bone and soft tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by synovial hyperplasia, cell activation, articular inflammation and invasion of the synovium into the adjacent bone and cartilage. The adhesion of fibroblast‑like synoviocytes (FLSs) onto the extracellular matrix (ECM), migration and invasion are important for the erosion and destruction of the articular cartilage of patients with RA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of PRP on the adhesion, migration and invasion of RA‑FLSs. Scratch and Transwell migration assays determined that PRP at a concentration of 2 and 5% significantly enhanced the migration ability of RA‑FLSs. Treatment of RA‑FLSs with 2 and 5% PRP promoted the adhesion and invasion of the cells. Additionally, the immunofluorescence assay revealed that PRP induced a decrease in the number of centrally located stress fibers and led to an increase in the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia in the detectable leading edge protrusions in RA‑FLSs. In addition, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis determined that PRP upregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑1 (MMP‑1). In conclusion, the promotion of RA‑FLS cell migration, invasion and adhesion on the ECM by PRP may be modulated through the upregulation of MMP‑1 expression and the induction of actin cytoskeletal reorganization. PMID:27431382

  18. Cell-surface GRP78 facilitates colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Yarui; Li, Hanqing; Xiao, Hong; Fu, Rong; Zhao, Chao; Wu, Haili; Li, Zhuoyu

    2013-05-01

    Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum as a molecular chaperone. It has also been found on the membranes of some cancer cells, acting as a receptor for a wide variety of ligands. However, its presence on colorectal cancer (CRC) cell surface and its role in CRC metastatic progression remain elusive. Here we reported that GRP78 was predominantly present in the form of clustering aggregates on CRC cell surfaces, and its surface abundance was strongly correlated with CRC differentiation stage. Interestingly, we observed that cell-surface GRP78 had an interaction with the ECM adhesion molecule β1-integrin and was involved in cell-matrix adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Moreover, the present data also implicated that surface GRP78 promoted the cell invasion process, and this effect was at least partly mediated through its association with uPA-uPAR protease system. Together, our data suggests that surface GRP78 promotes CRC cell migration and invasion by regulating cell-matrix adhesion and ECM degradation, which is independent of its signaling receptor function. PMID:23485528

  19. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazão, Tiago F; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and have critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA-mediated interference screen, we identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We found that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via the kinases OXSR1 and STK39 and the ion co-transporter SLC12A2. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway previously known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration. PMID:27400149

  20. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Lu, Na; Guo, Qinglong

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  1. HOXA10 controls proliferation, migration and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Manoela; Bitu, Carolina C; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Cervigne, Nilva K; Graner, Edgard; Manninen, Aki; Salo, Tuula; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    Although HOX genes are best known for acting in the regulation of important events during embryogenesis, including proliferation, differentiation and migration, alterations in their expression patterns have been frequently described in cancers. In previous studies we analyzed the expression profile of the members of the HOX family of homeobox genes in oral samples of normal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and identified differently expressed genes such as HOXA10. The present study aimed to validate the increased expression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and to investigate the effects arising from its knockdown in OSCC cells. The levels of HOXA10 mRNA were determined in human OSCC samples and cell lines by quantitative PCR, and HOXA10-mediated effects on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion were studied in HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells by using retrovirus-mediated RNA interference. Higher expression of HOXA10 mRNA was observed in OSCC cell lines and in tumor tissues compared to normal controls. HOXA10 knockdown significantly reduced the proliferation of the tumor cells which was accompanied by increased levels of p21. HOXA10 silencing also significantly induced the expression of EMT markers and enhanced the adhesion, migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells. No effects on cell death were observed after HOXA10 knockdown. The results of the current study confirm the overexpression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and further demonstrate that its expression is functionally associated with several important biological processes related to oral tumorigenesis, such as proliferation, migration and invasion. PMID:26097543

  2. Ion channels and transporters in tumour cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a central component of the metastatic cascade requiring a concerted action of ion channels and transporters (migration-associated transportome), cytoskeletal elements and signalling cascades. Ion transport proteins and aquaporins contribute to tumour cell migration and invasion among other things by inducing local volume changes and/or by modulating Ca2+ and H+ signalling. Targeting cell migration therapeutically bears great clinical potential, because it is a prerequisite for metastasis. Ion transport proteins appear to be attractive candidate target proteins for this purpose because they are easily accessible as membrane proteins and often overexpressed or activated in cancer. Importantly, a number of clinically widely used drugs are available whose anticipated efficacy as anti-tumour drugs, however, has now only begun to be evaluated. PMID:24493750

  3. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  4. Migrastatin Analogues Inhibit Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V.; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. Results Our results showed that two of six fully synthetic analogues of migrastatin: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Conclusion Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in

  5. Simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton and decreases cardiac fibroblast adhesion, migration and viability.

    PubMed

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Avalos, Yennifer; Garcia, Lorena; Chiong, Mario; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-03-29

    Statins reduce the isoprenoids farnesyl and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, essential intermediates, which control a diversity of cellular events such as cytoskeleton integrity, adhesion, migration and viability. Cardiac fibroblasts are the major non-myocyte cell constituent in the normal heart, and play a key role in the maintenance of extracellular matrix. The effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast processes previously mentioned remain unknown. Our aims were to investigate the effects of simvastatin on cytoskeleton structure and focal adhesion complex assembly and their relationships with cell adhesion, migration and viability in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. To this end, cells were treated with simvastatin for 24 h and changes in actin cytoskeleton, levels of vimentin and paxillin as well as their subcellular localization were analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cell adhesion to plastic or collagen coated dishes, migration in Transwell chambers, and cell viability were analyzed after simvastatin treatment. Our results show that simvastatin disrupts actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion complex evaluated by phalloidin stain and immunocytochemistry for paxillin and vinculin. All these effects occurred by a cholesterol synthesis-independent mechanism. Simvastatin decreased cell adhesion, migration and viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, simvastatin decreased angiotensin II-induced phospho-paxillin levels and cell adhesion. We concluded that simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton integrity and focal adhesion complex assembly in cultured cardiac fibroblasts by a cholesterol-independent mechanism and consequently decreases cell migration, adhesion and viability. PMID:22306966

  6. Isoliquiritigenin inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells: possible mediation by decreased JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Cho, Han Jin; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Moon, Aree; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-09-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL, 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone), which is found in licorice, shallot and bean sprouts, is a potent antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ISL treatment on the migration, invasion and adhesion characteristics of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. DU145 cells were cultured in the presence of 0-20 micromol/L ISL with or without 10 microg/L epidermal growth factor (EGF). ISL inhibited basal and EGF-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion dose dependently. ISL decreased EGF-induced secretion of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but increased TIMP-2 secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, ISL decreased the protein levels of integrin-alpha2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and mRNA levels of uPA, MMP-9, VEGF, ICAM and integrin-alpha2. Furthermore, basal and EGF-induced activator protein (AP)-1 binding activity and phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Jun and Akt were decreased after ISL treatment. However, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not altered. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited basal and EGF-induced secretion of uPA, VEGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-1, as well as AP-1 DNA binding activity and cell migration. These results provide evidence for the role of ISL as a potent antimetastatic agent, which can markedly inhibit the metastatic and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells. The inhibition of JNK/AP-1 signaling may be one of the mechanisms by which ISL inhibits cancer cell invasion and migration. PMID:18824345

  7. SENP1 regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang-Ming, Yan; Zhi-Qiang, Xu; Ting, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan; Li-Qun, Yuan; Ming-Cui, Fu; Hong-Liang, Xia; Xu, Cao; Yun, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is an embryonic solid tumor derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and accounts for 11% of childhood cancers and around 15% of cancer deaths in children. SUMOylation and deSUMOylation are dynamic mechanisms regulating a spectrum of protein activities. The SUMO proteases (SENP) remove SUMO conjugate from proteins, and their expression is deregulated in diverse cancers. However, nothing is known about the role of SENPs in NBL. In the present study, we found that SENP1 expression was significantly high in metastatic NB tissues compared with primary NB tissues. Overexpression of SENP1 promoted NB cells migration and invasion. Inhibition of SENP1 could significantly suppress NB cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that SENP1 could regulate the expression of CDH1, MMP9, and MMP2. In summary, the data presented here indicate a significant role of SENP1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in NB and suppress SENP1 expression as promising candidates for novel treatment strategies of NB. PMID:25816890

  8. Thyroid hormone regulates adhesion, migration and matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity via αvβ3 integrin in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Keren; Flint, Nir; Shalev, Shachar; Erez, Daniel; Baharal, Tal; Davis, Paul J; Hercbergs, Aleck; Ellis, Martin; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2014-08-15

    Thyroid hormone (3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, T3; L-thyroxine, T4) enhances cancer cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis via a discrete receptor located near the RGD recognition site on αvβ3 integrin. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticulate formulation interfere with binding of T3/T4 to the integrin. This integrin is overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM) and other cancers. MM cells interact with αvβ3 integrin to support growth and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes active in tissue remodeling and cancer. The association between integrins and MMPs secretion and action is well established. In the current study, we examined the effects of thyroid hormone on myeloma cell adhesion, migration and MMP activity. We show that T3 and T4 increased myeloma adhesion to fibronectin and induced αvβ3 clustering. In addition, the hormones induced MMP-9 expression and activation via αvβ3 and MAPK induction. Bortezomib, a standard myeloma treatment, caused a decrease in activity/quantity of MMPs and thyroid hormone opposed this effect. RGD peptide and tetrac impaired the production of MMP-9 in cell lines and in primary BM cells from myeloma patients. In conclusion, thyroid hormone-dependent regulation via αvβ3 of myeloma cell adhesion and MMP-9 production may play a role in myeloma migration and progression. PMID:25071016

  9. Thyroid hormone regulates adhesion, migration and matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity via αvβ3 integrin in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Keren; Flint, Nir; Shalev, Shachar; Erez, Daniel; Baharal, Tal; Davis, Paul J.; Hercbergs, Aleck; Ellis, Martin; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (3,5,3′-triiodothyronine, T3; L-thyroxine, T4) enhances cancer cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis via a discrete receptor located near the RGD recognition site on αvβ3 integrin. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticulate formulation interfere with binding of T3/T4 to the integrin. This integrin is overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM) and other cancers. MM cells interact with αvβ3 integrin to support growth and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes active in tissue remodeling and cancer. The association between integrins and MMPs secretion and action is well established. In the current study, we examined the effects of thyroid hormone on myeloma cell adhesion, migration and MMP activity. We show that T3 and T4 increased myeloma adhesion to fibronectin and induced αvβ3 clustering. In addition, the hormones induced MMP-9 expression and activation via αvβ3 and MAPK induction. Bortezomib, a standard myeloma treatment, caused a decrease in activity/quantity of MMPs and thyroid hormone opposed this effect. RGD peptide and tetrac impaired the production of MMP-9 in cell lines and in primary BM cells from myeloma patients. In conclusion, thyroid hormone-dependent regulation via αvβ3 of myeloma cell adhesion and MMP-9 production may play a role in myeloma migration and progression. PMID:25071016

  10. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J.; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K.; Hilenski, Lula L.; Terada, Lance S.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Lassègue, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  11. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization.

    PubMed

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P; Lyle, Alicia N; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K; Hilenski, Lula L; Terada, Lance S; Dawson, Michelle R; Lassègue, Bernard; Griendling, Kathy K

    2014-10-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  12. Focal adhesion kinase-dependent focal adhesion recruitment of SH2 domains directs SRC into focal adhesions to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Chung; Chen, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Wenshin Yu, Helen; Chen, Yin-Quan; Chiou, Arthur; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration requires dynamical control of the protein complex within focal adhesions (FAs) and this control is regulated by signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation. We screened the SH2 domains present in tyrosine-specific kinases and phosphatases found within FAs, including SRC, SHP1 and SHP2, and examined whether these enzymes transiently target FAs via their SH2 domains. We found that the SRC_SH2 domain and the SHP2_N-SH2 domain are associated with FAs, but only the SRC_SH2 domain is able to be regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The FAK-dependent association of the SRC_SH2 domain is necessary and sufficient for SRC FA targeting. When the targeting of SRC into FAs is inhibited, there is significant suppression of SRC-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK; this results in an inhibition of FA formation and maturation and a reduction in cell migration. This study reveals an association between FAs and the SRC_SH2 domain as well as between FAs and the SHP2_N-SH2 domains. This supports the hypothesis that the FAK-regulated SRC_SH2 domain plays an important role in directing SRC into FAs and that this SRC-mediated FA signaling drives cell migration. PMID:26681405

  13. S100P interacts with integrin α7 and increases cancer cell migration and invasion in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hung, Jen-Yu; Liang, Yung-Yu; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Lu, Chi-Yu; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-10-01

    S100P, a Ca2+ binding protein, has been shown to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, its functional character in lung cancer remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that S100P increases cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in lung cancer cells. Ectopic expression of S100P increases migration, invasion and EMT in less invasive CL1-0 lung cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of S100P suppressed migration and invasion, and caused a reversion of EMT in highly invasive lung cancer cells. These effects were transduced by increasing the interaction of S100P with integrin α7, which activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT. Blocking FAK significantly decreased S100P-induced migration by decreasing Src and AKT activation, whereas inhibiting AKT reduced S100P upregulation on ZEB1 expression. Further study has indicated that S100P knockdown prevents the spread of highly metastatic human lung cancer in animal models. This study therefore suggests that S100P represents a critical activator of lung cancer metastasis. Detection and targeted treatment of S100P-expressing cancer is an attractive therapeutic strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:26320193

  14. S100P interacts with integrin α7 and increases cancer cell migration and invasion in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hung, Jen-Yu; Liang, Yung-Yu; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Lu, Chi-Yu; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-01-01

    S100P, a Ca2+ binding protein, has been shown to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, its functional character in lung cancer remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that S100P increases cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in lung cancer cells. Ectopic expression of S100P increases migration, invasion and EMT in less invasive CL1-0 lung cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of S100P suppressed migration and invasion, and caused a reversion of EMT in highly invasive lung cancer cells. These effects were transduced by increasing the interaction of S100P with integrin α7, which activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT. Blocking FAK significantly decreased S100P-induced migration by decreasing Src and AKT activation, whereas inhibiting AKT reduced S100P upregulation on ZEB1 expression. Further study has indicated that S100P knockdown prevents the spread of highly metastatic human lung cancer in animal models. This study therefore suggests that S100P represents a critical activator of lung cancer metastasis. Detection and targeted treatment of S100P-expressing cancer is an attractive therapeutic strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:26320193

  15. The role of endocytic Rab GTPases in regulation of growth factor signaling and the migration and invasion of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Porther, N; Barbieri, MA

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is characterized pathologically by uncontrolled cell invasion, proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. It is a multistep process that encompasses the modulation of membrane permeability and invasion, cell spreading, cell migration and proliferation of the extracellular matrix, increase in cell adhesion molecules and interaction, decrease in cell attachment and induced survival signals and propagation of nutrient supplies (blood vessels). In cancer, a solid tumor cannot expand and spread without a series of synchronized events. Changes in cell adhesion receptor molecules (e.g., integrins, cadherin-catenins) and protease expressions have been linked to tumor invasion and metastasis. It has also been determined that ligand-growth factor receptor interactions have been associated with cancer development and metastasis via the endocytic pathway. Specifically, growth factors, which include IGF-1 and IGF-2 therapy, have been associated with most if not all of the features of metastasis. In this review, we will revisit some of the key findings on perhaps one of the most important hallmarks of cancer metastasis: cell migration and cell invasion and the role of the endocytic pathway in mediating this phenomenon PMID:26317377

  16. Migration and invasion is inhibited by silencing ROR1 and ROR2 in chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Henry, C E; Llamosas, E; Djordjevic, A; Hacker, N F; Ford, C E

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer survival remains poor despite recent advances in our understanding of genetic profiles. Unfortunately, the majority of ovarian cancer patients have recurrent disease after chemotherapy and lack other treatment options. Wnt signalling has been extensively implicated in cancer progression and chemoresistance. Therefore, we investigated the previously described Wnt receptors ROR1 and ROR2 as regulators of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in a clinically relevant cell line model. The parental A2780- and cisplatin-resistant A2780-cis cell lines were used as a model of ovarian cancer chemoresistance. Proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion were measured after transient overexpression of ROR1 and ROR2 in the parental A2780 cell line, and silencing of ROR1 and ROR2 in the A2780-cis cell line. Here we show that ROR1 and ROR2 expression is increased in A2780-cis cells, alongside β-catenin-independent Wnt targets. Knockdown of ROR1 and ROR2 significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion and simultaneous knockdown of ROR1 and ROR2 significantly sensitised cells to cisplatin, whilereas ROR overexpression in the parental cell line increased cell invasion. Therefore, ROR1 and ROR2 have the potential as novel drug targets in metastatic and recurrent ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27239958

  17. 3'3-Diindolylmethane inhibits migration, invasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by suppressing FAK signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Xue; Chen, Li-Ping; Sun, Min-Ying; Li, Jun-Tao; Liu, Hua-Zhang; Zhu, Wei

    2015-09-15

    Late stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually has a low survival rate because it has high potential of metastases and there is no effective cure. 3'3-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is the major product of the acid-catalyzed oligomerization of indole-3-carbinol present in cruciferous vegetables. DIM has been proved to exhibit anticancer properties. In this study, we explored the effects and molecular mechanisms of anti-metastasis of DIM on HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. We chose two HCC cell lines SMMC-7721 and MHCC-97H that have high potential of invasion. The results showed that DIM inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of these two cell lines in vitro. In addition, in vivo study demonstrated that DIM significantly decreased the volumes of SMMC-7721 orthotopic liver tumor and suppressed lung metastasis in nude mice. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is found over activated in HCC cells. We found that DIM decreased the level of phospho-FAK (Tyr397) both in vitro and in vivo. DIM inhibition of phospho-FAK (Tyr397) led to down-regulation of MMP2/9 and decreased potential of metastasis. DIM also repressed the migration and invasion induced by vitronectin through inactivation of FAK pathway and down-regulation of MMP2/9 in vitro. We also found that pTEN plays a role in down-regulation of FAK by DIM. These results demonstrated that DIM blocks HCC cell metastasis by suppressing tumor cell migration and invasion. The anti-metastasis effect of DIM could be explained to be its down-regulated expression and activation of MMP2/9 partly induced by up-regulation of pTEN and inhibition of phospho-FAK (Tyr397). PMID:26068982

  18. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  19. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  20. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  1. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  2. Mechanics in Mechanosensitivity of Cell Adhesion and its Roles in Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; He, Shijie; Ji, Baohua

    2012-12-01

    Cells sense and respond to external stimuli and properties of their environment through focal adhesion complexes (FACs) to regulate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including cell migration. Currently, the basic principles in mechanics of the mechanosensitivity of cell adhesion and migration have not been fully understood. In this paper, an FEM-based mechano-chemical coupling model is proposed for studying the cell migration behaviors in which the dynamics of stability of FACs and the effect of cell shape on cell traction force distribution are considered. We find that the driving force of cell migration is produced by the competition of stability of cell adhesion between the cell front and cell rear, which consequently controls the speed of cell migration. We show that the rigidity gradient of matrix can bias this competition which allows cell to exhibit a durotaxis behavior, i.e. the larger the gradient, the higher the cell speed.

  3. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  4. Distinct Roles of Frontal and Rear Cell-Substrate Adhesions in Fibroblast MigrationV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Munevar, Steven; Wang, Yu-li; Dembo, Micah

    2001-01-01

    Cell migration involves complex physical and chemical interactions with the substrate. To probe the mechanical interactions under different regions of migrating 3T3 fibroblasts, we have disrupted cell-substrate adhesions by local application of the GRGDTP peptide, while imaging stress distribution on the substrate with traction force microscopy. Both spontaneous and GRGDTP-induced detachment of the trailing edge caused extensive cell shortening, without changing the overall level of traction forces or the direction of migration. In contrast, disruption of frontal adhesions caused dramatic, global loss of traction forces before any significant shortening of the cell. Although traction forces and cell migration recovered within 10–20 min of transient frontal treatment, persistent treatment with GRGDTP caused the cell to develop traction forces elsewhere and reorient toward a new direction. We conclude that contractile forces of a fibroblast are transmitted to the substrate through two distinct types of adhesions. Leading edge adhesions are unique in their ability to transmit active propulsive forces. Their functions cannot be transferred directly to existing adhesions upon detachment. Trailing end adhesions create passive resistance during cell migration and readily redistribute their loads upon detachment. Our results indicate the distinct nature of mechanical interactions at the leading versus trailing edges, which together generate the mechanical interactions for fibroblast migration. PMID:11739792

  5. Curcumin suppresses migration and invasion of human endometrial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QIAN; GAO, QING; CHEN, KUNLUN; WANG, YIDONG; CHEN, LIJUAN; LI, XU

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has historically been used in anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and molecular mechanism of curcumin in endometrial carcinoma (EC) are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin and the associated mechanism(s) in EC. Based on assays carried out in EC cell lines, it was observed that curcumin inhibited EC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, following treatment with curcumin for 24 h, there was a decrease in the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 as well as proteinase activity in EC cells. Moreover, curcumin treatment significantly decreased the levels of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. MEK1 overexpression partially blocked the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin. Combined treatment with ERK inhibitor U0126 and curcumin resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP-2/-9 expression; the invasive capabilities of HEC-1B cells were also inhibited. In conclusion, curcumin inhibits tumor cell migration and invasion by reducing the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 via the suppression of the ERK signaling pathway, suggesting that curcumin is a potential therapeutic agent for EC. PMID:26622667

  6. TIMP3 regulates osteosarcoma cell migration, invasion, and chemotherapeutic resistances.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiu-Guo; Li, Yan; Mo, Hui-Min; Li, Kang; Lin, Du; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Zhao, Jie; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to limit degradation of the extracellular matrix. Low levels of TIMP3 have been demonstrated in cancer tissues at advanced clinical stages, with positive distant metastasis and chemotherapeutic resistance. We examined the role of TIMP3 in osteosarcoma (OS) cell invasiveness and chemoresistance. TIMP3 was overexpressed or knocked down in the human OS cell lines Saos2 and MG63. Cell migration and invasion capacities were then evaluated using Transwell assays, and resistance to cisplatin was assessed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to investigate activation of signaling pathways downstream of TIMP3. Overexpression of TIMP3 inhibited the migration and invasion of Saos2 and MG63 cells, while knockdown of TIMP3 had the opposite effect. Cell survival after exposure to cisplatin was inhibited by TIMP3 overexpression in both Saos2 and MG63 cells. Consistently, downregulation of TIMP3 gene expression significantly decreased the sensitivity of OS cells to cisplatin treatment. MMP1, MMP2, Bcl-2, and Akt1 were all downregulated following TIMP3 overexpression, while Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were upregulated. TIMP3 knockdown had opposite effects on the regulation of these genes. Taken together, our findings suggest TIMP3 as a new target for inhibition of OS progression and chemotherapeutic resistance. PMID:26749283

  7. Macrophages modulate migration and invasion of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  8. Macrophages Modulate Migration and Invasion of Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  9. Roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases in cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cai

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a number of E3 ubiquitin ligases, including Cbl, Smurf1, Smurf2, HDM2, BCA2, SCF(beta-TRCP) and XRNF185, play important roles in cell adhesion and migration. Cbl negatively regulates cell adhesion via alpha integrin and Rap1 and inhibits actin polymerization by ubiquitinating mDab1 and WAVE2. Smurf1 regulates cell migration through ubiquitination of RhoA, talin head domain and hPEM2, while Smurf2 ubiquitinates Smurf1, TGFbeta type I receptor and RaplB to modulate cell migration and adhesion. HDM2 negatively regulates cell migration by targeting NFAT (a transcription factor) for ubiquitination and degradation, while SCF(beta-TRCP) ubiquitinates Snail (a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin) to inhibit cell migration. TRIM32 promotes cell migration through ubiquitination of Abl interactor 2 (Abi2), a tumor suppressor. RNF5 and XRNF185 modulate cell migration by ubiquitinating paxillin. Thus, these E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate cell adhesion and (or) migration through ubiquitination of their specific substrates. PMID:20009572

  10. Disentangling Membrane Dynamics and Cell Migration; Differential Influences of F-actin and Cell-Matrix Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Jacob M.; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Endrias Ganebo, Bereket; Gong, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is heavily interconnected with plasma membrane protrusion and retraction (collectively termed “membrane dynamics”). This makes it difficult to distinguish regulatory mechanisms that differentially influence migration and membrane dynamics. Yet such distinctions may be valuable given evidence that cancer cell invasion in 3D may be better predicted by 2D membrane dynamics than by 2D cell migration, implying a degree of functional independence between these processes. Here, we applied multi-scale single cell imaging and a systematic statistical approach to disentangle regulatory associations underlying either migration or membrane dynamics. This revealed preferential correlations between membrane dynamics and F-actin features, contrasting with an enrichment of links between cell migration and adhesion complex properties. These correlative linkages were often non-linear and therefore context-dependent, strengthening or weakening with spontaneous heterogeneity in cell behavior. More broadly, we observed that slow moving cells tend to increase in area, while fast moving cells tend to shrink, and that the size of dynamic membrane domains is independent of cell area. Overall, we define macromolecular features preferentially associated with either cell migration or membrane dynamics, enabling more specific interrogation and targeting of these processes in future. PMID:26248038

  11. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  12. Rap2a is a novel target gene of p53 and regulates cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Xia; Zhang, Ding-Guo; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Pei, Dong-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a critical regulator of the cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Recent evidences suggest that p53 may contribute to the regulation of cell invasion and migration. Rap2a, a member of the small GTPase superfamily, mediates diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, migration and proliferation through various signaling pathways. In this study, we identify that Rap2a is a novel target of p53 and is induced upon DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. Upon DNA damage, p53 directly binds to the promoter of Rap2a and activates its transcription. We show that Rap2a is significantly upregulated in many types of tumors. In addition, the ectopic expression of Rap2a enhances the migration and invasive ability of cancer cells and increases activities of matrix metalloproteinase MMP2 and MMP9. In contrast, the inactivation of Rap2a inhibits cell invasion and activities of MMP2 and MMP9. We also show that Rap2a regulates the phosphorylation level of Akt. Collectively, our results show that ectopic expression of Rap2a has a key role in enhancing migration, invasion and metastasis by upregulating p-Akt. PMID:25728512

  13. Differential DNA methylome profiling of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas suggesting tumour invasion is correlated with cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ye; Zhou, Xinyao; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Xie, Tao; Huang, Yuying; Zhao, Xinzhi; Zhang, Xiaobiao

    2016-08-01

    Global and gene-specific changes to the epigenome are hallmarks of most tumours including those of pituitary origin, and this fact might offer important clues about diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We performed global DNA methylation screening with 6 invasive and 6 noninvasive nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (PA) to investigate whether DNA methylation was associated with the invasion of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. An additional seven PAs were included as an independent cohort to validate the initial results. Five thousand nine hundred thirty-one CpGs were selected (△β ≥0.15 and p value ≤0.01) as differentially methylated sites (DMSs). The hypomethylated DMSs in the invasive PAs were significantly more than the hypermethylated sites. Cluster analysis of 339 CpGs (△β ≥0.25 and p value ≤0.001) demonstrated a complete distinction between the invasive and noninvasive nonfunctioning groups. GO analysis of the three hundred seven corresponding genes shown they were involved in homophilic cell adhesion, cell-cell adhesion, cell adhesion and biological adhesion. The mRNA expression of GALNT9 which contain a validated DMS was significantly downregulated in invasive group. Our findings indicate that the differential DNA methylome profiling of invasive and noninvasive nonfunctioning PAs suggesting tumour invasion is correlated with cell adhesion. PMID:27168190

  14. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  15. MicroRNA-148a inhibits breast cancer migration and invasion by directly targeting WNT-1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian; He, Miao; Ma, Meng-Tao; Wu, Hui-Zhe; Yu, Zhao-Jin; Guan, Shu; Jiang, Long-Yang; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Da-Di; Jin, Feng; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-03-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway influences embryonic development, cell polarity and adhesion, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function as important regulators of the tumorigenesis and metastasis. In the present study, we aimed to find novel targets and mechanisms of microRNA-148a (miR-148a) in regulating the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. In the present study, miR-148a was found downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The ectopic miR-148a expression inhibited the migration and invasion of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that WNT-1, one of the ligands of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, was a direct target of miR-148a. The overexpression of miR-148a reduced the mRNA and protein expression levels of WNT-1, also decreased the expression levels of the key components of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, including β-catenin, metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and T-cell factor-4 (TCF-4) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the data showed that the expression of WNT-1 was significantly higher in human breast cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal tissues and the expression of miR-148a was negatively correlated with the WNT-1 expression in human breast cancer tissues. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-148a can suppress the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells by targeting WNT-1 and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and this will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26707142

  16. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  17. Tumor cell migration and invasion are regulated by expression of variant integrin glycoforms

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Faheem M; Seales, Eric C; Clem, William C; Hennessy, Kristin M; Zhuo, Ya; Bellis, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    The ST6Gal-I glycosyltransferase, which adds α2-6-linked sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in colon adenocarcinoma, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor cell invasiveness. Previously we reported that forced expression of oncogenic ras in HD3 colonocytes causes upregulation of ST6Gal-I, leading to increased α2-6 sialylation of β1 integrins. To determine whether ras-induced sialylation is involved in promoting the tumor cell phenotype, we used shRNA to downregulate ST6Gal-I in ras-expressors, and then monitored integrin-dependent responses. Here we show that forced ST6Gal-I downregulation, leading to diminished α2-6 sialylation of integrins, inhibits cell adhesion to collagen-I, a β1 ligand. Correspondingly, collagen binding is reduced by enzymatic removal of cell surface sialic acids from ras-expressors with high ST6Gal-I levels (i.e., no shRNA). Cells with forced ST6Gal-I downregulation also exhibit decreased migration on collagen-I and diminished invasion through Matrigel. Importantly, GD25 cells, which lack β1 integrins (and ST6Gal-I), do not demonstrate differential invasiveness when forced to express ST6Gal-I, suggesting that the effects of variant sialylation are mediated specifically by β1 integrins. The observation that cell migration and invasion can be blocked in oncogenic ras-expressing cells by forcing ST6Gal-I downregulation implicates differential sialylation as an important ras effector, and also suggests that ST6Gal-I is a promising therapeutic target. PMID:18703050

  18. ODAM is a predictor for biomedical recurrence and inhibits the migration and invasion of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun; Wu, Jie-Ying; Hou, Guo-Liang; Lu, Min-Hua; Shi, Zhi; Di, Jin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic ameloblast associated protein (ODAM) is a protein contributed to cell adhesion and has been shown to express in normal prostate tissue, but the expression and significance of ODAM in prostate cancer remain unknown. In this study, we detected the protein expressions of ODAM in 88 prostate cancer tissues with immunohistochemical staining, and found that 53 cases (60.2%) was high expression of ODAM, which was shown in the cytoplasm and paranuclear regions. Furthermore, low expression of ODAM was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, preoperative PSA and Gleason score, but not with mean age, follow-up duration, PSM rate and distribution of pathological T stage. Additionally, our results of multivariate analysis showed that low ODAM expression was an independent predictor of biomedical recurrence, while the positive lymph node metastasis, Gleason score, and preoperative PSA were not the independent risks for biomedical recurrence. Overexpression of ODAM did not inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells PC3, but significant suppressed their invasion and migration with decrease of the protein levels of MMP-2. These results suggest that ODAM is a predictor for biomedical recurrence and inhibits the migration and invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:27158359

  19. Pleiotrophin Exerts Its Migration and Invasion Effect through the Neuropilin-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Elahouel, Rania; Blanc, Charly; Carpentier, Gilles; Frechault, Sophie; Cascone, Ilaria; Destouches, Damien; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a pleiotropic growth factor that exhibits angiogenic properties and is involved in tumor growth and metastasis. Although it has been shown that PTN is expressed in tumor cells, few studies have investigated its receptors and their involvement in cell migration and invasion. Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is a receptor for multiple growth factors that mediates cell motility and plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumor progression. Here we provide evidence for the first time that NRP-1 is crucial for biological activities of PTN. We found that PTN interacted directly with NRP-1 through its thrombospondin type-I repeat domains. Importantly, binding of PTN to NRP-1 stimulated the internalization and recycling of NRP-1 at the cell surface. Invalidation of NRP-1 by RNA interference in human carcinoma cells inhibited PTN-induced intracellular signaling of the serine-threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein MAP kinase, and focal adhesion kinase pathways. Accordingly, NRP-1 silencing or blocking by antibody inhibited PTN-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell migration and tumor cell invasion. These results suggest that NRP-1/PTN interaction provides a novel mechanism for controlling the response of endothelial and tumoral cells to PTN and may explain, at least in part, how PTN contributes to tumor angiogenesis and cancer progression. PMID:26408254

  20. Pleiotrophin exerts its migration and invasion effect through the neuropilin-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Elahouel, Rania; Blanc, Charly; Carpentier, Gilles; Frechault, Sophie; Cascone, Ilaria; Destouches, Damien; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina

    2015-08-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a pleiotropic growth factor that exhibits angiogenic properties and is involved in tumor growth and metastasis. Although it has been shown that PTN is expressed in tumor cells, few studies have investigated its receptors and their involvement in cell migration and invasion. Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is a receptor for multiple growth factors that mediates cell motility and plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumor progression. Here we provide evidence for the first time that NRP-1 is crucial for biological activities of PTN. We found that PTN interacted directly with NRP-1 through its thrombospondin type-I repeat domains. Importantly, binding of PTN to NRP-1 stimulated the internalization and recycling of NRP-1 at the cell surface. Invalidation of NRP-1 by RNA interference in human carcinoma cells inhibited PTN-induced intracellular signaling of the serine-threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein MAP kinase, and focal adhesion kinase pathways. Accordingly, NRP-1 silencing or blocking by antibody inhibited PTN-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell migration and tumor cell invasion. These results suggest that NRP-1/PTN interaction provides a novel mechanism for controlling the response of endothelial and tumoral cells to PTN and may explain, at least in part, how PTN contributes to tumor angiogenesis and cancer progression. PMID:26408254

  1. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    PubMed

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  2. LKB1 is required for adiponectin-mediated modulation of AMPK–S6K axis and inhibition of migration and invasion of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Taliaferro-Smith, L; Nagalingam, A; Zhong, D; Zhou, W; Saxena, NK; Sharma, D

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is widely known as an adipocytokine with therapeutic potential for its markedly protective function in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders, metabolic syndrome, systemic insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and more recently carcinogenesis. In the present study, we show that adiponectin inhibits adhesion, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Further analysis of the underlying molecular mechanisms revealed that adiponectin treatment increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and activity as evident by increased phosphorylation of downstream target of AMPK, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and inhibition of p70S6 kinase (S6K). Intriguingly, we discovered that adiponectin treatment increases the expression of tumor suppressor gene LKB1 in breast cancer cells. Overexpression of LKB1 in breast cancer cells further increased adiponectin-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK. Using isogenic LKB1 knockdown cell line pair, we found that LKB1 is required for adiponectin-mediated modulation of AMPK–S6K axis and more importantly, inhibition of adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Taken together these data present a novel mechanism involving specific upregulation of tumor suppressor gene LKB1 by which adiponectin inhibits adhesion, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings indicate the possibility of using adiponectin analogues to inhibit invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. PMID:19483724

  3. Artesunate attenuates glioma proliferation, migration and invasion by affecting cellular mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lian, Shizhong; Shi, Ruyi; Huang, Xun; Hu, Xiaoling; Song, Bin; Bai, Yinshan; Yang, Bin; Dong, Jinyao; Du, Zhijie; Zhang, Yanyan; Jia, Junmei; Ma, Ning; Guo, Geng; Wang, Mingyu

    2016-08-01

    Glioma is one of the most common malignant brain tumors. Current chemotherapy is far from providing satisfactory clinical outcomes for patients with glioma. More efficient drugs are urgently needed. Artesunate (ART) is clinically used as an anti-malarial agent and exhibits potent antiproliferative activity as a traditional Chinese medicine. In addition, ART has been shown to exert a profound cytotoxic effect on various tumor cell lines, presenting a novel candidate for cancer chemotherapy. However, its anticancer effect on glioma by altering cell biomechanical properties remains unclear. The present study aimed to identify the anticancer effects of ART on human glioma SHG44 cells by assessing cell proliferation, migration/invasion, the expression of claudin-1 and the biomechanical properties of ART-treated SHG44 cells. The proliferation of the SHG44 cells was assessed by MTT assay. The cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. For cell migration and invasion assays, the Transwell was used. The expression of the gene claudin-1 was detected by polymerase chain reaction. The cell membrane and biomechanical properties, as targets of ART action, were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). ART significantly inhibited the proliferation of SHG44 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After treatment with 30 mg/l ART, the level of cell apoptosis was significantly increased (from 6.88±0.062 to 23.7±4.16%). Furthermore, the cell migration and invasion abilities of the SHG44 cells were markedly inhibited after treatment with 30 mg/l ART. Compared with the control group (0 mg/l ART), the SHG44 cells treated with 30 mg/l ART exhibited upregulated expression of claudin-1, increased adhesive force (from 2,400±300 to 3,600±500 pN), increased high connection among SHG44 cells, increased cytomembrane roughness (from 0.118±0.011 to 0.269±0.015 µm) and reduced elasticity (from 23±8 to 3.5±1.1 MPa). The present study demonstrated that ART could

  4. A direct interaction between fascin and microtubules contributes to adhesion dynamics and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Villari, Giulia; Jayo, Asier; Zanet, Jennifer; Fitch, Briana; Serrels, Bryan; Frame, Margaret; Stramer, Brian M.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Parsons, Maddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fascin is an actin-binding and bundling protein that is highly upregulated in most epithelial cancers. Fascin promotes cell migration and adhesion dynamics in vitro and tumour cell metastasis in vivo. However, potential non-actin bundling roles for fascin remain unknown. Here, we show for the first time that fascin can directly interact with the microtubule cytoskeleton and that this does not depend upon fascin-actin bundling. Microtubule binding contributes to fascin-dependent control of focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration speed. We also show that fascin forms a complex with focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2) and Src, and that this signalling pathway lies downstream of fascin–microtubule association in the control of adhesion stability. These findings shed light on new non actin-dependent roles for fascin and might have implications for the design of therapies to target fascin in metastatic disease. PMID:26542021

  5. Running with neighbors: coordinating cell migration and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2015-10-01

    Coordinated movement of large groups of cells is required for many biological processes, such as gastrulation and wound healing. During collective cell migration, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions must be integrated so that cells maintain strong interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying substratum. Initiation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions at cell-cell junctions and integrin-based cell-ECM adhesions require integration of mechanical cues, dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and input from specific signaling cascades, including Rho family GTPases. Here, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the interplay between these pathways at cadherin-based and integrin-based adhesions during collective cell migration and highlight outstanding questions that remain in the field. PMID:26201843

  6. Met inactivation by S-allylcysteine suppresses the migration and invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer cells induced by hepatocyte growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Oyeon; Hwang, Hye-Sook; Lee, Bok-Soon; Oh, Young-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Past studies have reported that S-allylcysteine (SAC) inhibits the migration and invasion of cancer cells through the restoration of E-cadherin, the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and Slug protein expression, and inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, evidence is emerging that shows that ROS induced by radiation could increase Met activation. Following on these reports of SAC and Met, we investigated whether SAC could suppress Met activation. Materials and Methods Wound healing, invasion, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT), soft agar colony forming, western blotting, and gelatin zymography assays were performed in the human nasopharyngeal cancer cell lines HNE1 and HONE1 treated with SAC (0, 10, 20, or 40 mM) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Results This study showed that SAC could suppress the migration and invasion of HNE1 and HONE1 cell lines by inhibiting p-Met. An increase of migration and invasion induced by HGF and its decrease in a dose dependent manner by SAC in wound healing and invasion assays was observed. The reduction of p-Met by SAC was positively correlated with p-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK) and p-extracellular related kinase (p-ERK in both cell lines). SAC reduced Slug, MMP2, and MMP9 involved in migration and invasion with the inhibition of Met-FAK signaling. Conclusion These results suggest that SAC inhibited not only Met activation but also the downstream FAK, Slug, and MMP expression. Finally, SAC may be a potent anticancer compound for nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy. PMID:26756033

  7. Targeting the ROR1 and ROR2 receptors in epithelial ovarian cancer inhibits cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Claire; Llamosas, Estelle; Knipprath-Mészáros, Alexandra; Schoetzau, Andreas; Obermann, Ellen; Fuenfschilling, Maya; Caduff, Rosemarie; Fink, Daniel; Hacker, Neville; Ward, Robyn; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Ford, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    AIM In recent years, the Wnt signalling pathway has been implicated in epithelial ovarian cancer and its members have potential as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic targets. Here we investigated the role of two Wnt receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), ROR1 and ROR2, and their putative ligand, Wnt5a, in ovarian cancer. METHODS Immunohistochemistry for ROR2 was performed in a large patient cohort, including benign controls, borderline tumours and epithelial ovarian cancer. In addition, siRNA was used to silence ROR1, ROR2 and Wnt5a individually, and together, in two ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects on cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion were measured. RESULTS ROR2 expression is significantly increased in ovarian cancer patients compared to patients with benign disease. In vitro assays showed that silencing either receptor inhibits ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, and concurrently silencing both receptors has an even stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion. CONCLUSIONS ROR2 expression is increased in epithelial ovarian cancer, and silencing ROR2 and its sister receptor ROR1 has a strong inhibitory effect on the ability of ovarian cancer cells to proliferate, migrate and invade through an extracellular matrix. PMID:26515598

  8. Escin suppresses migration and invasion involving the alteration of CXCL16/CXCR6 axis in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpene saponins isolated from horse chestnut, has been reported to possess anticancer activity in many human cancer cells. However, the effect of escin on the metastasis has not been studied. The present study examined the effect of escin on the migration and invasion of AGS human gastric cancer cells. To examine the effects of escin on metastatic capacities of gastric cancer cells, AGS cells were cultured in the presence of 0-4 μmol/L escin. Escin inhibited cell migration and invasion in AGS cells. However, escin did not affect the viability of these cells at these concentrations. The chemokine receptor and its ligands play an important role in cancer metastasis. Escin decreased the production of soluble C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)16 but increased the expression of trans-membranous CXCL16. The expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR)6 was not affected by escin treatment. Exogenous CXCL16 reversed escin-induced migration inhibition. In addition, escin inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and Akt. These results demonstrate that escin inhibited the migration and invasion of AGS cells, which is associated with altered CXCL16/CXCR6 axis. These findings suggest that escin has potential as an antimetastatic agent in gastric cancer. PMID:24911042

  9. Arginine stimulates intestinal cell migration through a focal adhesion kinase dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, J M; Chen, W; Gookin, J; Wu, G Y; Fu, Q; Blikslager, A T; Rippe, R A; Argenzio, R A; Cance, W G; Weaver, E M; Romer, L H

    2004-01-01

    Background: l-Arginine is a nutritional supplement that may be useful for promoting intestinal repair. Arginine is metabolised by the oxidative deiminase pathway to form nitric oxide (NO) and by the arginase pathway to yield ornithine and polyamines. Aims: To determine if arginine stimulates restitution via activation of NO synthesis and/or polyamine synthesis. Methods: We determined the effects of arginine on cultured intestinal cell migration, NO production, polyamine levels, and activation of focal adhesion kinase, a key mediator of cell migration. Results: Arginine increased the rate of cell migration in a dose dependent biphasic manner, and was additive with bovine serum concentrate (BSC). Arginine and an NO donor activated focal adhesion kinase (a tyrosine kinase which localises to cell matrix contacts and mediates β1 integrin signalling) after wounding. Arginine stimulated cell migration was dependent on focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signalling, as demonstrated using adenovirus mediated transfection with a kinase negative mutant of FAK. Arginine stimulated migration was dependent on NO production and was blocked by NO synthase inhibitors. Arginine dependent migration required synthesis of polyamines but elevating extracellular arginine concentration above 0.4 mM did not enhance cellular polyamine levels. Conclusions: These results showed that l-arginine stimulates cell migration through NO and FAK dependent pathways and that combination therapy with arginine and BSC may enhance intestinal restitution via separate and convergent pathways. PMID:15016745

  10. Role of ErbB Receptors in Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Hubert, Pierre; Crémel, Gérard; Bennasroune, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors mediate their diverse biologic responses (regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival) by binding to and activating cell-surface receptors with intrinsic protein kinase activity named receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). About 60 RTKs have been identified and can be classified into more than 16 different receptor families. Their activity is normally tightly controlled and regulated. Overexpression of RTK proteins or functional alterations caused by mutations in the corresponding genes or abnormal stimulation by autocrine growth factor loops contribute to constitutive RTK signaling, resulting in alterations in the physiological activities of cells. The ErbB receptor family of RTKs comprises four distinct receptors: the EGFR (also known as ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2 (neu, HER2), ErbB3 (HER3) and ErbB4 (HER4). ErbB family members are often overexpressed, amplified, or mutated in many forms of cancer, making them important therapeutic targets. EGFR has been found to be amplified in gliomas and non-small-cell lung carcinoma while ErbB2 amplifications are seen in breast, ovarian, bladder, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, as well as several other tumor types. Several data have shown that ErbB receptor family and its downstream pathway regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and tumor invasion by modulating extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Recent findings indicate that ECM components such as matrikines bind specifically to EGF receptor and promote cell invasion. In this review, we will present an in-depth overview of the structure, mechanisms, cell signaling, and functions of ErbB family receptors in cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, we will describe in a last part the new strategies developed in anti-cancer therapy to inhibit ErbB family receptor activation. PMID:26635612

  11. Role of ErbB Receptors in Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Hubert, Pierre; Crémel, Gérard; Bennasroune, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors mediate their diverse biologic responses (regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival) by binding to and activating cell-surface receptors with intrinsic protein kinase activity named receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). About 60 RTKs have been identified and can be classified into more than 16 different receptor families. Their activity is normally tightly controlled and regulated. Overexpression of RTK proteins or functional alterations caused by mutations in the corresponding genes or abnormal stimulation by autocrine growth factor loops contribute to constitutive RTK signaling, resulting in alterations in the physiological activities of cells. The ErbB receptor family of RTKs comprises four distinct receptors: the EGFR (also known as ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2 (neu, HER2), ErbB3 (HER3) and ErbB4 (HER4). ErbB family members are often overexpressed, amplified, or mutated in many forms of cancer, making them important therapeutic targets. EGFR has been found to be amplified in gliomas and non-small-cell lung carcinoma while ErbB2 amplifications are seen in breast, ovarian, bladder, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, as well as several other tumor types. Several data have shown that ErbB receptor family and its downstream pathway regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and tumor invasion by modulating extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Recent findings indicate that ECM components such as matrikines bind specifically to EGF receptor and promote cell invasion. In this review, we will present an in-depth overview of the structure, mechanisms, cell signaling, and functions of ErbB family receptors in cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, we will describe in a last part the new strategies developed in anti-cancer therapy to inhibit ErbB family receptor activation. PMID:26635612

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid regulates adhesion molecules and enhances migration of human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thorlakson, Hong H; Schreurs, Olav; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2016-04-01

    Oral keratinocytes are connected via cell-to-cell adhesions to protect underlying tissues from physical and bacterial damage. Lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are a family of phospholipid mediators that have the ability to regulate gene expression, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cytokine/chemokine secretion, which mediate proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Several forms of LPA are found in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, but it is unknown how they affect human oral keratinocytes (HOK). The aim of the present study was therefore to examine how different LPA forms affect the expression of adhesion molecules and the migration and proliferation of HOK. Keratinocytes were isolated from gingival biopsies obtained from healthy donors and challenged with different forms of LPA. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression of adhesion molecules. Migration and proliferation assays were performed. Lysophosphatidic acids strongly promoted expression of E-cadherin and occludin mRNAs and translocation of E-cadherin protein from the cytoplasm to the membrane. Occludin and claudin-1 proteins were up-regulated by LPA. Migration of HOK in culture was increased, but proliferation was reduced, by the addition of LPA. This indicates that LPA can have a role in the regulation of the oral epithelial barrier by increasing the expression of adhesion molecules of HOK, by promotion of migration and by inhibition of proliferation. PMID:26913569

  13. Spatial anisotropy and heterogeneity in contractility and adhesion distribution may contribute to cell steering during migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya S S; Kolwankar, Subodh; George, Edna; Basu, Santanu K.; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M.

    2014-02-01

    Transition from random to persistent cell motility requires spatiotemporal organization of the cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. The influence of these two structures on cell steering can also be gleaned from trypsin de-adhesion experiments, wherein cells exposed to trypsin round up, exhibiting a combination of rotation and translation. Here, we present a model to evaluate the contributions of contractility and bond distribution to experimentally observed de-adhesion. We show that while asymmetry in bond distribution causes only cell translation, a combination of asymmetric bond distribution and non-uniform contractility is required for translation and rotation and may guide cell migration.

  14. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  15. Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of human lung carcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liangrui; Zheng, Junxian; Sun, Qianqian; Wei, Kemin; Hu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone (RTHF) is widely used as a traditional herb and has detoxification and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of RTHF on the growth and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and evaluated its mechanisms. A549 cells were treated with RTHF at various concentrations for different periods. In vitro Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and colony formation methods showed that RTHF had dose- and time-dependent antiproliferation effects on A549 cells. A cell adhesion assay showed that RTHF decreased A549 cell adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. Cell invasion and migration were investigated using the Transwell assay and observed using an inverted microscope; the results showed that cell metastasis was significantly lower in the treatment group than that in the control group (P<0.01). Expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The results showed that the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 decreased, while that of TIMP-2 increased significantly in the RTHF group when compared with the results of the control group. These results show that RTHF exhibits antigrowth and antimetastasis activity in lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing the expression of MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1 and increasing that of TIMP-2. PMID:26893573

  16. Rab5 is required in metastatic cancer cells for Caveolin-1-enhanced Rac1 activation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Ortiz, Rina; Díaz, Natalia; Leyton, Lisette; Stupack, Dwayne; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-06-01

    Rab5 is a small GTPase that regulates early endosome trafficking and other cellular processes, including cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, Rab5 promotes Rac1 activation and cancer cell migration, but little is known about the upstream regulators of Rab5. We have previously shown that the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) promotes Rac1 activation and migration of cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that CAV1 stimulates Rab5 activation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Expression of CAV1 in B16-F10 mouse melanoma and HT-29(US) human colon adenocarcinoma cells increased the GTP loading of Rab5, whereas shRNA-mediated targeting of endogenous CAV1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased Rab5-GTP levels. Accordingly, shRNA-mediated downregulation of Rab5 decreased CAV1-mediated Rac1 activation, cell migration and invasion in B16-F10 and HT-29(US) cells. Expression of CAV1 was accompanied by increased recruitment of Tiam1, a Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), to Rab5-positive early endosomes. Using the inhibitor NSC23766, Tiam1 was shown to be required for Rac1 activation and cell migration induced by CAV1 and Rab5. Mechanistically, we provide evidence implicating p85α (also known as PIK3R1), a Rab5 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), in CAV1-dependent effects, by showing that CAV1 recruits p85α, precluding p85α-mediated Rab5 inactivation and increasing cell migration. In summary, these studies identify a novel CAV1-Rab5-Rac1 signaling axis, whereby CAV1 prevents Rab5 inactivation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion. PMID:24659799

  17. Modulation of p75 neurotrophin receptor under hypoxic conditions induces migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Luo, Sheng-Jie; Lin, Chun-Liang; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2015-01-01

    p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has been reported to play important roles in various cancer types. However, the exact mechanism of tumorigenesis involving p75NTR is unknown. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the expression of p75NTR in malignant glioma and the impact on tumor cell migration and invasion. p75NTR and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression was down-regulated by short-hairpin RNA and up-regulated with expression vectors. By immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, we found that p75NTR was expressed in both human and rat malignant gliomas. Knockdown of p75NTR increased the expression of vimentin, vascular endothelial growth factor, Matrix metalloproteinase 9, and TWIST, and enhanced the invasion and migration abilities assessed by transwell assay in the C6 tumor cells. Inverse expressions of p75NTR and HIF-1α were detected in glioma cell lines under hypoxic conditions, while increased HIF-1α significantly downregulated the expression of p75NTR, suggesting a HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT pathway that may regulate glioma cells invasion and migration. Downregulation of p75NTR increased phosphorylation of Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Knockdown of p75NTR also dysregulated β-catenin-mediated cell junctions, and up-regulated the expressions of fibronectin and L1CAM in the cell-cell junctions, thus suggesting that p75NTR knockdown contributed to a more aggressive migration phenotype via FAK signaling pathway. Our studies suggested that modulation of p75NTR under hypoxic condition could enhance C6 cells migration and invasion by induction of EMT, and activation of the FAK pathway. The HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT axis may play a central role in glioma tumorigenesis. PMID:25527128

  18. MicroRNA‑451 inhibits neuroblastoma proliferation, invasion and migration by targeting macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Geng; Xu, Zhengwei; Hao, Dingjun

    2016-03-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most prevalent type of extracranial solid tumour in young children. To improve current understanding of the mechanisms, which modulate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration, investigations have focused on microRNAs (miRs), a class of small non‑coding RNAs, which post‑transcriptionally regulate gene expression during various crucial cell processes. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miR‑451 in NB. Human NB tissue and adjacent normal tissue were surgically removed, and the expression of miR‑451, and development and pathological characteristics of NB were investigated. The expression of miR‑451 was reduced in the NB tissue, compared with that in the adjacent tissue, and correlations between the reduction in miR‑451 and unfavourable variables included tumour size (P=0.0081), differentiation (P=0.0217), lymph node metastasis (P=0.0489), tumour‑node‑metastasis stage (0.0220) and distant metastases (P=0.0201). Transfection of the SK‑N‑SH and GI‑LA‑N NB cell lines with miR‑451 inhibited cell growth, invasion and migration. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was regulated directly by miR‑451 and was a critical mediator of the biological effects of miR‑451 in NB. The re‑expression of MIF markedly reversed the carcinogenic inhibitory property of miR‑451. These data provide a more detailed understanding of the essential role of miR‑451 in NB, which relies on regulation of the expression of MIF. PMID:26783235

  19. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  20. Loss of MLCK leads to disruption of cell-cell adhesion and invasive behavior of breast epithelial cells via increased expression of EGFR and ERK/JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Helfman, D M

    2016-08-25

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression is downregulated in breast cancer, including invasive ductal carcinoma compared with ductal breast carcinoma in situ and metastatic breast tumors. However, little is known about how loss of MLCK expression contributes to tumor progression. MLCK is a component of the actin cytoskeleton and its known role is the phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of myosin II. To gain insights into the role of MLCK in breast cancer, we perturbed its function using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or pharmacological inhibition in untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). Loss of MLCK by siRNAs led to increased cell migration and invasion, disruption of cell-cell adhesions and enhanced formation of focal adhesions at the leading edge of migratory cells. In addition, downregulation of MLCK cooperated with HER2 in MCF10A cells to promote cell migration and invasion and low levels of MLCK is associated with a poor prognosis in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Associated with these altered migratory behaviors were increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways in MLCK downregulated MCF10A cells. By contrast, inhibition of the kinase function of MLCK using pharmacological agents inhibited cell migration and invasion, and did not affect cellular adhesions. Our results show that loss of MLCK contributes to the migratory properties of epithelial cells resulting from changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, and increased epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings suggest that decreased expression of MLCK may have a critical role during tumor progression by facilitating the metastatic potential of tumor cells. PMID:26876209

  1. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shao-Yu; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essential for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement. PMID:27216888

  2. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei -Jen; Chen, Shao -Yu; Yang, Feng; et al

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essentialmore » for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.« less

  3. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-1C (PDE1C) drives cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rowther, Farjana B; Wei, Weinbin; Dawson, Timothy P; Ashton, Katherine; Singh, Anushree; Madiesse-Timchou, Mylene P; Thomas, D G T; Darling, John L; Warr, Tracy

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP & cGMP) are critical intracellular second messengers involved in the transduction of a diverse array of stimuli and their catabolism is mediated by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously detected focal genomic amplification of PDE1C in >90 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells suggesting a potential as a novel therapeutic target in these cells. In this report, we show that genomic gain of PDE1C was associated with increased expression in low passage GBM-derived cell cultures. We demonstrate that PDE1C is essential in driving cell proliferation, migration and invasion in GBM cultures since silencing of this gene significantly mitigates these functions. We also define the mechanistic basis of this functional effect through whole genome expression analysis by identifying down-stream gene effectors of PDE1C which are involved in cell cycle and cell adhesion regulation. In addition, we also demonstrate that Vinpocetine, a general PDE1 inhibitor, can also attenuate proliferation with no effect on invasion/migration. Up-regulation of at least one of this gene set (IL8, CXCL2, FOSB, NFE2L3, SUB1, SORBS2, WNT5A, and MMP1) in TCGA GBM cohorts is associated with worse outcome and PDE1C silencing down-regulated their expression, thus also indicating potential to influence patient survival. Therefore we conclude that proliferation, migration, and invasion of GBM cells could also be regulated downstream of PDE1C. PMID:25620587

  4. Mathematical model for the effects of adhesion and mechanics on cell migration speed.

    PubMed Central

    DiMilla, P A; Barbee, K; Lauffenburger, D A

    1991-01-01

    Migration of mammalian blood and tissue cells over adhesive surfaces is apparently mediated by specific reversible reactions between cell membrane adhesion receptors and complementary ligands attached to the substratum. Although in a number of systems these receptors and ligand molecules have been isolated and identified, a theory capable of predicting the effects of their properties on cell migration behavior currently does not exist. We present a simple mathematical model for elucidating the dependence of cell speed on adhesion-receptor/ligand binding and cell mechanical properties. Our model can be applied to propose answers to questions such as: does an optimal adhesiveness exist for cell movement? How might changes in receptor and ligand density and/or affinity affect the rate of migration? Can cell rheological properties influence movement speed? This model incorporates cytoskeletal force generation, cell polarization, and dynamic adhesion as requirements for persistent cell movement. A critical feature is the proposed existence of an asymmetry in some cell adhesion-receptor property, correlated with cell polarity. We consider two major alternative mechanisms underlying this asymmetry: (a) a spatial distribution of adhesion-receptor number due to polarized endocytic trafficking and (b) a spatial variation in adhesion-receptor/ligand bond strength. Applying a viscoelastic-solid model for cell mechanics allows us to represent one-dimensional locomotion with a system of differential equations describing cell deformation and displacement along with adhesion-receptor dynamics. In this paper, we solve these equations under the simplifying assumption that receptor dynamics are at a quasi-steady state relative to cell locomotion. Thus, our results are strictly valid for sufficiently slow cell movement, as typically observed for tissue cells such as fibroblasts. Numerical examples relevant to experimental systems are provided. Our results predict how cell speed might

  5. Thymosin β4 induces invasion and migration of human colorectal cancer cells through the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Zhengri; Hong, Chang-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ran; Choi, Chan; Park, Young-Kyu

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Tβ4 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer cells. • The overexpression of Tβ4 is correlated with stage of colorectal cancer. • Tβ4 stimulates cell adhesion, invasion, migration and EMT. • Tβ4 activates the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway. - Abstract: Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a 43-amino-acid peptide involved in many biological processes. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanism(s) of Tβ4 in cell invasion and migration remain unclear. In this study, we show that Tβ4 was significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and high levels of Tβ4 were correlated with stage of colorectal cancer, and that Tβ4 expression was associated with morphogenesis and EMT. Tβ4-upregulated cancer cells showed increased adhesion, invasion and migration activity, whereas Tβ4-downregulated cells showed decreased activities. We also demonstrated that Tβ4 interacts with ILK, which promoted the phosphorylation and activation of AKT, the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3β, the expression and nuclear localization of β-catenin, and integrin receptor activation. These results suggest that Tβ4 is an important regulator of the ILK/AKT/β-catenin/Integrin signaling cascade to induce cell invasion and migration in colorectal cancer cells, and is a potential target for cancer treatment.

  6. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin mediate human melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion of basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, J R; Iida, J; Fields, G B; McCarthy, J B

    1996-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion of basement membranes (BM) represents one of the critical steps in the metastatic process. Tumor cell recognition of individual BM matrix components may involve individual cell adhesion receptors, such as integrins or cell surface proteoglycans, or may involve a coordinate action of both types of receptors. In this study, we have focused on the identification of a cell surface CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin on human melanoma cells that are both directly involved in the in vitro invasion of reconstituted BM via a type IV collagen-dependent mechanism. Interfering with cell surface expression of human melanoma CSPG with either p-nitro-phenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside treatment or anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) preincubation (mAb) preincubation inhibits melanoma cell invasion through reconstituted BM. These treatments also strongly inhibit melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen, however, they are ineffective at inhibiting cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Purified melanoma cell surface CD44/CSPG, or purified chondroitin sulfate, bind to type IV collagen affinity columns, consistent with a role for CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions in mediating tumor cell invasion. In contrast, melanoma cell migration on laminin (LM) does not involve CD44/CSPG, nor does CD44/CSPG bind to LM, suggesting that CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions are specific in nature. Additionally, anti-alpha 2 and anti-beta 1 integrin mAbs are capable of blocking melanoma cell invasion of reconstituted BM. Both of these anti-integrin mAbs inhibit melanoma cell adhesion and migration on type IV collagen, whereas only anti-beta 1 mAb inhibits cell adhesion to LM. Collectively, these results indicate that melanoma cell adhesion to type IV collagen is an important consideration in invasion of reconstituted BM in vitro, and suggest that CD44/CSPG and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin may collaborate to promote human melanoma cell adhesion

  7. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  8. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  9. MMP-9-hemopexin domain hampers adhesion and migration of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burg-Roderfeld, M; Roderfeld, M; Wagner, S; Henkel, C; Grötzinger, J; Roeb, E

    2007-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-2 and MMP-9, are involved in colon cancer progression and metastasis due to their ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) components. In previous studies we described the MMP-9 hemopexin like domain (MMP-9-PEX) as an MMP-9 antagonist. In the present study it was examined whether recombinant MMP-9-PEX has an inhibitory effect on migration and adhesion of colorectal carcinoma cells. Furthermore, we searched for MMP-9 substrate binding sites within the MMP-9-PEX by surface plasmon resonance. Migration of SW620 and LS174 cells was investigated in a modified Boyden chamber assay. In the presence of 0.2 microg/ml MMP-9-PEX migration of SW620 was decreased by 34%, while addition of 0.4 microg/ml diminished migration by 56%. Migration of LS174 cells was not affected by MMP-9-PEX. Adhesion studies were performed on 96-well plates coated with gelatin, collagen type I, and laminin, respectively. In the presence of MMP-9-PEX, adhesion of SW620 cells to these coating substrates was significantly inhibited. Surface plasmon resonance studies revealed binding of collagen type I and IV, elastin, and fibrinogen to proMMP-9 as well as to MMP-9-PEX. However, equilibrium constants (Kd) indicated a higher affinity of proMMP-9 to the matrix proteins. This could indicate that there is more than one binding site for matrix components within the entire proMMP-9 molecule. Since migration and adhesion of metastatic colorectal carcinoma cells were reduced by MMP-9-PEX, this recombinant MMP-9 antagonist might be of therapeutical interest. PMID:17332939

  10. Polycomb group gene BMI1 controls invasion of medulloblastoma cells and inhibits BMP-regulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common intracranial childhood malignancy and a genetically heterogeneous disease. Despite recent advances, current therapeutic approaches are still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent molecular profiling has suggested the stratification of medulloblastoma from one single disease into four distinct subgroups namely: WNT Group (best prognosis), SHH Group (intermediate prognosis), Group 3 (worst prognosis) and Group 4 (intermediate prognosis). BMI1 is a Polycomb group repressor complex gene overexpressed across medulloblastoma subgroups but most significantly in Group 4 tumours. Bone morphogenetic proteins are morphogens belonging to TGF-β superfamily of growth factors, known to inhibit medulloblastoma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Results Here we demonstrate that human medulloblastoma of Group 4 characterised by the greatest overexpression of BMI1, also display deregulation of cell adhesion molecules. We show that BMI1 controls intraparenchymal invasion in a novel xenograft model of human MB of Group 4, while in vitro assays highlight that cell adhesion and motility are controlled by BMI1 in a BMP dependent manner. Conclusions BMI1 controls MB cell migration and invasion through repression of the BMP pathway, raising the possibility that BMI1 could be used as a biomarker to identify groups of patients who may benefit from a treatment with BMP agonists. PMID:24460684

  11. Effects of the knockdown of death-associated protein 3 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ahmad M A; Ye, Lin; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-05-01

    The death-associated protein 3 (DAP3) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP3 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we intended to determine the role of DAP3 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, and performed growth, adhesion, invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of post-wound migration of the cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, death ligand signal enhancer (DELE), IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS1), cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sub-lines. The knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 had significantly increased adhesion and decreased growth when compared to the controls. Furthermore, invasion and migration were significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231DAP3kd cells vs. the controls. The expression of caspase 9 and IPS1, known components of the apoptosis pathway, were significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP3kd cells (p=0.05 and p=0.003, respectively). We conclude that DAP3 silencing contributes to breast carcinogenesis by increasing cell adhesion, migration and invasion. It is possible that this may be due to the activity of focal adhesion kinase further downstream of the anoikis pathway. Further research in this direction would be beneficial in increasing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying human breast cancer. PMID:25738636

  12. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  13. Micro-environmental control of cell migration – myosin IIA is required for efficient migration in fibrillar environments through control of cell adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Kutys, Matthew L.; Conti, Mary Anne; Matsumoto, Kazue; Adelstein, Robert S.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) into aligned fibrils or fibril-like ECM topographies promotes rapid migration in fibroblasts. However, the mechanisms of cell migration that are altered by these changes in micro-environmental topography remain unknown. Here, using 1D fibrillar migration as a model system for oriented fibrillar 3D matrices, we find that fibroblast leading-edge dynamics are enhanced by 1D fibrillar micropatterns and demonstrate a dependence on the spatial positioning of cell adhesions. Although 1D, 2D and 3D matrix adhesions have similar assembly kinetics, both 1D and 3D adhesions are stabilized for prolonged periods, whereas both paxillin and vinculin show slower turnover rates in 1D adhesions. Moreover, actin in 1D adhesions undergoes slower retrograde flow than the actin that is present in 2D lamellipodia. These data suggest an increase in mechanical coupling between adhesions and protrusive machinery. Experimental reduction of contractility resulted in the loss of 1D adhesion structure and stability, with scattered small and unstable adhesions, and an uncoupling of adhesion protein-integrin stability. Genetic ablation of myosin IIA (MIIA) or myosin IIB (MIIB) isoforms revealed that MIIA is required for efficient migration in restricted environments as well as adhesion maturation, whereas MIIB helps to stabilize adhesions beneath the cell body. These data suggest that restricted cell environments, such as 1D patterns, require cellular contraction through MIIA to enhance adhesion stability and coupling to integrins behind the leading edge. This increase in mechanical coupling allows for greater leading-edge protrusion and rapid cell migration. PMID:22328520

  14. TGF-β1 promotes the migration and invasion of bladder carcinoma cells by increasing fascin1 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naiwen; Bi, Xiaojun; Zeng, Yu; Zhu, Yuyan; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Xuejie; Bi, Jianbin; Kong, Chuize

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional cytokine that is reported to regulate cellular motility and invasive capability during tumor progression. Fascin1, an actin-bundling protein, increases cell motility, migration and adhesion. To investigate the function of TGF-β1 and test whether fascin1 is an important mediator of the tumor response to TGF-β1 in bladder carcinoma cells, real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to test changes in fascin1 expression after TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) treatment in T24 and BIU87 cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique was performed to silence fascin1. Cell viability and biological behavior changes were evaluated by cell growth (MTT), wound-healing and Matrigel invasion assays. In the present study, we found that the mRNA and protein levels of fascin1 in the T24 and BIU87 cells were significantly increased after 10 ng/ml TGF-β1 treatment (p<0.05). The proliferation of T24 cells (p=0.005) was also significantly increased, while no significant change was observed in BIU87 cells (p=0.318). In addition, the migratory and invasive potential of the two cell lines were promoted. Furthermore, we successfully silenced fascin1, and observed that fascin1 siRNA significantly attenuated the migration and invasiveness induced by TGF-β1. The findings suggested that TGF-β1 can promote invasion and migration of T24 and BIU87 bladder carcinoma cells, and the increase in fascin1 expression may be the key point of this impact of TGF-β1. PMID:27350089

  15. Retrograde Fluxes of Focal Adhesion Proteins in Response to Cell Migration and Mechanical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei-hui

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mechanical signals mediated by the extracellular matrix play an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes; yet, how cells respond to mechanical stimuli remains elusive. Using live cell fluorescence imaging, we found that actin filaments, in association with a number of focal adhesion proteins, including zyxin and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, undergo retrograde fluxes at focal adhesions in the lamella region. This flux is inversely related to cell migration, such that it is amplified in fibroblasts immobilized on micropatterned islands. In addition, the flux is regulated by mechanical signals, including stretching forces applied to flexible substrates and substrate stiffness. Conditions favoring the flux share the common feature of causing large retrograde displacements of the interior actin cytoskeleton relative to the substrate anchorage site, which may function as a switch translating mechanical input into chemical signals, such as tyrosine phosphorylation. In turn, the stimulation of actin flux at focal adhesions may function as part of a feedback mechanism, regulating structural assembly and force production in relation to cell migration and mechanical load. The retrograde transport of associated focal adhesion proteins may play additional roles in delivering signals from focal adhesions to the interior of the cell. PMID:17804814

  16. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  17. Adhesion and migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes across human brain microvessel endothelial cells are differentially regulated by endothelial cell adhesion molecules and modulate monolayer permeability.

    PubMed

    Wong, Donald; Prameya, Rukmini; Dorovini-Zis, Katerina

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms by which polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) cross the human blood-brain barrier have not been fully elucidated. Using a well characterized in vitro model of the human BBB, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules on the adhesion and transendothelial migration of PMN across primary cultures of human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC). A small number of PMN (0.06%) adhered to unstimulated HBMEC, and the basal adhesion was not affected by anti-adhesion molecule antibodies. Treatment of HBMEC with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha resulted in increased PMN adhesion that was significantly inhibited by blocking antibodies to E-selectin and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1 or PECAM-1. A very small number of adherent PMN migrated across unstimulated HBMEC monolayers. Migration increased 2 to 20 fold following stimulation of HBMEC with TNF-alpha. Monoclonal antibody blocking studies showed that PMN used ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, E-selectin or PECAM-1 to move across activated monolayers. Anti-adhesion molecule antibodies did not diminish the basal PMN migration. Ultrastructurally, PMN often aggregated on top and between adjacent endothelial cells and adhered by first extending pseudopodia along the apical endothelial surface. They then flattened and inserted themselves between endothelial cells in order to migrate across the monolayers. At the end of the migration period, the cultures resumed their continuity with no evidence of disruption. Transendothelial migration of PMN decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance and increased the permeability to horseradish peroxidase, which penetrated alongside the migrating leukocytes. A blocking antibody to ICAM-1 that greatly decreased migration, had no effect on the permeability changes. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms that regulate the entry of PMN into the brain and the increased permeability of the BBB in CNS inflammation. PMID:17291598

  18. Expression and Contributions of TRPM7 and KCa2.3/SK3 Channels to the Increased Migration and Invasion of Microglia in Anti-Inflammatory Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Roger; Wong, Raymond; Schlichter, Lyanne C.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia rapidly respond to CNS injury and disease and can assume a spectrum of activation states. While changes in gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators have been extensively described after classical (LPS-induced) and alternative (IL4-induced) microglial activation, less is known about acquired de-activation in response to IL10. It is important to understand how microglial activation states affect their migration and invasion; crucial functions after injury and in the developing CNS. We reported that LPS-treated rat microglia migrate very poorly, while IL4-treated cells migrate and invade much better. Having discovered that the lamellum of migrating microglia contains a large ring of podosomes – microscopic structures that are thought to mediate adhesion, migration and invasion – we hypothesized that IL4 and IL10 would differentially affect podosome expression, gene induction, migration and invasion. Further, based on the enrichment of the KCa2.3/SK3 Ca2+-activated potassium channel in microglial podosomes, we predicted that it regulates migration and invasion. We found both similarities and differences in gene induction by IL4 and IL10 and, while both cytokines increased migration and invasion, only IL10 affected podosome expression. KCa2.3 currents were recorded in microglia under all three activation conditions and KCNN3 (KCa2.3) expression was similar. Surprisingly then, of three KCa2.3 inhibitors (apamin, tamapin, NS8593), only NS8593 abrogated the increased migration and invasion of IL4 and IL10-treated microglia (and invasion of unstimulated microglia). This discrepancy was explained by the observed block of TRPM7 currents in microglia by NS8593, which occurred under all three activation conditions. A similar inhibition of both migration and invasion was seen with a TRPM7 inhibitor (AA-861) that does not block KCa2.3 channels. Thus, we conclude that TRPM7 (not KCa2.3) contributes to the enhanced ability of microglia to migrate and

  19. Effects of osthole on migration and invasion in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dapeng; Gu, Tianwei; Wang, Ting; Tang, Qingjiu; Ma, Changyan

    2010-01-01

    Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, is extracted from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri Cusson. Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and the leading cause of death in women. Recent studies have shown that Osthole has anti-tumor activity. However, the effects of Osthole on the migration and invasion of cancer cells have not yet been reported. Here, we found that Osthole is effective in inhibiting the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells by wound healing and transwell assays. Luciferase and zymography assays revealed that Osthole effectively inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-2 promoter and enzyme activity, which might be one of the causes that lead to the inhibition of migration and invasion by Osthole. This is the first report on the inhibitory function of Osthole in migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Our findings indicate a need for further evaluation of Osthole in breast cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention. PMID:20622464

  20. Inhibition of silibinin on migration and adhesion capacity of human highly metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, by evaluation of β1-integrin and downstream molecules, Cdc42, Raf-1 and D4GDI.

    PubMed

    Dastpeyman, Mohadeseh; Motamed, Nasrin; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Kia, Vahid; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a property of malignant cancer cells that requires integrins which with their downstream molecules participate in a number of signaling events in cells with pivotal roles in malignancy, migration and invasion of tumor cells. Silibinin, a flavonoid antioxidant from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L.), has attracted attention in the last decades for chemoprevention and chemotherapy of tumor cells. In the present study, the effect of silibinin on migration and adhesion capacity of MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line, was investigated by evaluation of β1-integrin and its important downstream molecules. MTT, migration and adhesion assays were performed to evaluate the silibinin effects on proliferation, migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the influence of the silibinin on the expression of β1-integrin, Raf-1, Cdc42 and D4-GDI mRNAs was assessed by RT-PCR. Results showed significant dose-dependent inhibitory effect of silibinin on proliferation, migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells. It significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc42 and D4-GDI mRNAs but had no statistically significant effect on the expression of β1-integrin and Raf-1 mRNAs although it indirectly but effectively modulated β1-integrin signaling pathway and RAF1 function. In conclusion, the results showed the silibinin effectson reducing the rate of metastasis, migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 to distant organs. PMID:22101790

  1. Exendin-4 induces cell adhesion and differentiation and counteracts the invasive potential of human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Paola; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Squecco, Roberta; Cellai, Ilaria; Fibbi, Benedetta; Marone, Ilaria Maddalena; Giuliani, Corinna; Modi, Giulia; Francini, Fabio; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Peri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Exendin-4 is a molecule currently used, in its synthetic form exenatide, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exendin-4 binds and activates the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R), thus inducing insulin release. More recently, additional biological properties have been associated to molecules that belong to the GLP-1 family. For instance, Peptide YY and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide have been found to affect cell adhesion and migration and our previous data have shown a considerable actin cytoskeleton rearrangement after exendin-4 treatment. However, no data are currently available on the effects of exendin-4 on tumor cell motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of this molecule on cell adhesion, differentiation and migration in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS. We first demonstrated, by Extra Cellular Matrix cell adhesion arrays, that exendin-4 increased cell adhesion, in particular on a vitronectin substrate. Subsequently, we found that this molecule induced a more differentiated phenotype, as assessed by i) the evaluation of neurite-like protrusions in 3D cell cultures, ii) the analysis of the expression of neuronal markers and iii) electrophysiological studies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exendin-4 reduced cell migration and counteracted anchorage-independent growth in neuroblastoma cells. Overall, these data indicate for the first time that exendin-4 may have anti-tumoral properties. PMID:23990978

  2. Pyk2 Controls Integrin-Dependent CTL Migration through Regulation of De-Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Samuel M S; Ostergaard, Hanne L

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) is required for T cell adhesion to ICAM-1; however, the mechanism by which it regulates adhesion remains unexplored. Pyk2 function in murine CTL clones and activated ex vivo CD8(+) T cells was disrupted by pharmacological inhibition, knockdown of expression with small interfering RNA, or expression of the dominant-negative C-terminal domain. We found that Pyk2 is not absolutely required for adhesion of CTL to ICAM-1, but rather delays the initial adhesion. Disruption of Pyk2 function caused cells to display an unusual elongated appearance after 1 h on ICAM-1, consistent with abnormally strong adhesion. Furthermore, the random mobility of CTL on ICAM-1 was severely compromised using all three methods of disrupting Pyk2 function. Live-cell imaging studies revealed that the decreased migration is the result of a defect in the detachment from ICAM-1 at the trailing edge when Pyk2 function is inhibited. Examination of Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation in normal polarized cells demonstrated that Pyk2 phosphorylated at Y579 and Y580 preferentially localizes to the leading edge, whereas Y881-phosphorylated Pyk2 is enriched at the trailing edge, suggesting that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 is spatially regulated in migrating CTL. Additionally, inhibition of Pyk2 caused cells to form multiple LFA-1-rich tails at the trailing edge, most likely resulting from a defect in LFA-1 release required for forward movement. Our results show that Pyk2 contributes to CTL migration by regulating detachment of CTL at the trailing edge, which could explain why Pyk2 is important for chemotactic and migratory responses. PMID:27456486

  3. Effect of DAPK1 gene on proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yong; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Pan, De-Biao; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing; Xu, Sheng-Qian

    2014-01-01

    DAPK1 can induce apoptosis in several cells; to determine the effect of DAPK1 would provide a new potential therapeutic strategy for treating pancreatic cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DAPK1 gene on proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line and explore the possible mechanisms. In our study, DAPK1 over-expressed cells were established by using the lentiviral transfection method, and DAPK1 obviously increased in BxPC-3 cells after transient transfection. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to determine the BxPC-3 cells proliferation after transfection. Apoptosis of the BxPC-3 cells was determined by using flow cytometry analysis. In addition, cell adhesion assay and in vitro invasion assay were performed. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions of caspase-3, DAPK1, VEGF, PEDF, MMP2, AKT, P-AKT, P-ERK, Bcl2, and Bax. Our results demonstrated that DAPK1 gene over-expression can suppress the proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line, and the possible mechanisms may be correlated to induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, down-regulations of MMP-2 and VEGF, up-regulations of PEDF, through the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathways. PMID:25550789

  4. The interplay of cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Driscoll, Meghan; Parent, Carole A.; Gupta, S. K.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration often involves notable cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesions and highly coordinated motion of touching cells. We focus on the interplay between cell–substrate adhesion and cell–cell adhesion. We show that the loss of cell-surface contact does not significantly alter the dynamic pattern of protrusions and retractions of fast migrating amoeboid cells (Dictyostelium discoideum), but significantly changes their ability to adhere to other cells. Analysis of the dynamics of cell shapes reveals that cells that are adherent to a surface may coordinate their motion with neighbouring cells through protrusion waves that travel across cell–cell contacts. However, while shape waves exist if cells are detached from surfaces, they do not couple cell to cell. In addition, our investigation of actin polymerization indicates that loss of cell-surface adhesion changes actin polymerization at cell–cell contacts. To further investigate cell–cell/cell–substrate interactions, we used optical micromanipulation to form cell–substrate contact at controlled locations. We find that both cell-shape dynamics and cytoskeletal activity respond rapidly to the formation of cell–substrate contact. PMID:25165597

  5. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G.; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J.

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology. PMID:26809067

  6. Tumor suppressive microRNA-218 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through targeting laminin-332 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Nohata, Nijiro; Kikkawa, Naoko; Enokida, Hideki; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hidaka, Hideo; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Seki, Naohiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent our microRNA (miRNA) expression signature revealed that expression of microRNA-218 (miR-218) was reduced in cancer tissues, suggesting a candidate of tumor suppressor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-218 and its mediated moleculer pathways in HNSCC. Restoration of miR-218 in cancer cells led to significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion activities in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SAS). Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-218 transfectants and in silico database analysis showed that focal adhesion pathway was a promising candidate of miR-218 target pathways. The laminins are an important and biologically active part of the basal lamina, the function of that are various such as influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion as well as proliferation and cell survival. Interestingly, all components of laminin-332 (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) are listed on the candidate genes in focal adhesion pathway. Furthermore, we focused on LAMB3 which has a miR-218 target site and gene expression studies and luciferase reporter assays showed that LAMB3 was directly regulated by miR-218. Silencing study of LAMB3 demonstrated significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion. In clinical specimens with HNSCC, the expression levels of laminin-332 were significantly upregulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Our analysis data showed that tumor suppressive miR-218 contributes to cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating focal adhesion pathway, especially laminin-332. Tumor suppressive miRNA-mediated novel cancer pathways provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis. PMID:23159910

  7. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  8. METTL13 is downregulated in bladder carcinoma and suppresses cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Guojun; Kong, Chuize; Zhan, Bo; Dong, Xiao; Man, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer has increased in the last few decades, thus novel markers for early diagnosis and more efficacious treatment are urgently needed. It found that METTTL13 protein is aberrant expression in variety of human cancers and METTL13 was involved in oncogenic pathways. However, the role of METTL13 has been unexplored in bladder cancer to date. Here, expression of METTL13 was lower in bladder cancer tissue samples and cancer cell lines than in normal bladder tissue and cell lines. METTL13 was downregulated in the late stages of the disease and was maintained at low level throughout the tumor progression process based on tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging. Further research suggested that METTL13 negatively regulates cell proliferation in bladder cancer and reinstates G1/S checkpoint via the coordinated downregulation of CDK6, CDK4 and CCND1, decreased phosphorylation of Rb and subsequent delayed cell cycle progression. Moreover, METTL13-dependent inhibition of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion is mediated by downregulation of FAK (Focal adhesion kinase) phosphorylation, AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene) phosphorylation, β-catenin expression and MMP-9 expression. These integrated efforts have identified METTL13 as a tumor suppressor and might provide promising approaches for bladder cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:26763933

  9. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:22074556

  10. In vivo selection for spine-derived highly metastatic lung cancer cells is associated with increased migration, inflammation and decreased adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Zhang, Jishen; Li, Shichang; Wei, Haifeng; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Leqin; Jin, Rongrong; Li, Zhenxi; Zhou, Wang; Ding, JianDong; Chu, Jianjun; Jia, Lianshun; Jia, Qi; Tan, Chengjun; Liu, Mingyao; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-01-01

    We developed a murine spine metastasis model by screening five metastatic non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (PC-9, A549, NCI-H1299, NCI-H460, H2030). A549 cells displayed the highest tendency towards spine metastases. After three rounds of selection in vivo, we isolated a clone named A549L6, which induced spine metastasis in 80% of injected mice. The parameters of the A549L6 cell spinal metastatic mouse models were consistent with clinical spine metastasis features. All the spinal metastatic mice developed symptoms of nerve compression after 40 days. A549L6 cells had increased migration, invasiveness and decreased adhesion compared to the original A549L0 cells. In contrast, there was no significant differences in cell proliferation, apoptosis and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. Comparative transcriptomic analysis and Real-time PCR analysis showed that expression of signaling molecules regulating several tumor properties including migration (MYL9), metastasis (CEACAM6, VEGFC, CX3CL1, CST1, CCL5, S100A9, IGF1, NOTCH3), adhesion (FN1, CEACAM1) and inflammation (TRAF2, NFκB2 and RelB) were altered in A549L6 cells. We suggest that migration, adhesion and inflammation related genes contribute to spine metastatic capacity. PMID:26090868

  11. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) regulates polarized neutrophil transendothelial cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M.; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarised migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial cell migration; TEM) in a luminal to abluminal direction. Using real-time confocal imaging we report that neutrophils can exhibit disrupted polarised TEM (“hesitant” and “reverse”) in vivo. These events were noted in inflammation following ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterised by reduced expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) from EC junctions, and were enhanced by EC JAM-C blockade or genetic deletion. The results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarised neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM neutrophils can contribute to dissemination of systemic inflammation. PMID:21706006

  12. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  13. Inhibition by Tyroserleutide (YSL) on the Invasion and Adhesion of the Mouse Melanoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi; Che, Xu-chun; Lu, Rong; Zheng, Min-na; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Li, Jin-ping; Jian, Xu; Shi, Lin-xi; Liu, Jun-yan; Gao, Wen-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Tyroserleutide (YSL) is an active, low-molecular-weight polypeptide, comprised of three amino acids, that has shown antitumor effects on human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the inhibition of YSL on invasion and adhesion of the mouse B16-F10 melanoma cell line by injecting B16-F10 cells into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice to establish an experimental lung metastasis model. YSL inhibited B16-F10 cell metastasis to lung, reducing the number and area of metastasis lesions. When we treated B16-F10 cells with YSL (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL) in vitro, we found that YSL inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 cells with a 28.11% rate of inhibition. YSL significantly decreased the adhesiveness of B16-F10 cells to Matrigel with a 29.15% inhibition rate; YSL also significantly inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 cells, producing an inhibition of 35.31%. By analyses with Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, we found that YSL markedly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 in B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that YSL inhibits the growth, invasion, and adhesion of B16-F10 cells. PMID:17515953

  14. Effect of bovine lactoferricin on enteropathogenic Yersinia adhesion and invasion in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Di Biase, Assunta Maria; Tinari, Antonella; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Antonini, Giovanni; Valenti, Piera; Conte, Maria Pia; Superti, Fabiana

    2004-05-01

    Bovine lactoferricin, a pepsin-generated antimicrobial peptide from bovine lactoferrin active against a wide range of bacteria, was tested for its ability to influence the adhesion and invasion of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in HEp-2 cells. The addition of non-cytotoxic and non-bactericidal concentrations of lactoferricin to cell monolayers before infection, under different bacterial growth experimental conditions, was ineffective or resulted in about a 10-fold increase in bacterial adhesion, whereas, in bacteria grown in conditions allowing maximal inv gene expression, a 10-fold inhibition of cell invasion by lactoferricin was observed. To confirm that the anti-invasive activity of lactoferricin was exerted against invasin-mediated bacterial entry, experiments were also performed utilizing Escherichia coli strain HB101 (pRI203), harbouring the inv gene from Y. pseudotuberculosis, which allows penetration of mammalian cells. Under these experimental conditions, lactoferricin was able to inhibit bacterial entry into epithelial cells, demonstrating that this peptide acts on inv-mediated Yersinia species invasion. As the inv gene product is the most important virulence factor in enteropathogenic Yersinia, being responsible for bacterial adherence and penetration within epithelial cells of the intestinal lumen and for the subsequent colonization of regional lymph nodes, these data provide additional information on the protective role of lactoferricin against bacterial infection. PMID:15096550

  15. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-01-01

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  16. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-03-22

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  17. The potassium–chloride cotransporter 2 promotes cervical cancer cell migration and invasion by an ion transport-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Akerman, Colin J; Newey, Sarah E; Pan, Jiliu; Clinch, Nicholas W V; Jacob, Yves; Shen, Meng-Ru; Wilkins, Robert J; Ellory, J Clive

    2011-01-01

    Abstract K+–Cl− cotransporters (KCCs) play a fundamental role in epithelial cell function, both in the context of ionic homeostasis and also in cell morphology, cell division and locomotion. Unlike other ubiquitously expressed KCC isoforms, expression of KCC2 is widely considered to be restricted to neurons, where it is responsible for maintaining a low intracellular chloride concentration to drive hyperpolarising postsynaptic responses to the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. Here we report a novel finding that KCC2 is widely expressed in several human cancer cell lines including the cervical cancer cell line (SiHa). Membrane biotinylation assays and immunostaining showed that endogenous KCC2 is located on the cell membrane of SiHa cells. To elucidate the role of KCC2 in cervical tumuorigenesis, SiHa cells with stable overexpression or knockdown of KCC2 were employed. Overexpression of KCC2 had no significant effect on cell proliferation but dramatically suppressed cell spreading and stress fibre organization, while knockdown of KCC2 showed opposite effects. In addition, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)-induced cell migration and invasiveness were significantly increased by overexpression of KCC2. KCC2-induced cell migration and invasion were not dependent on KCC2 transport function since overexpression of an activity-deficient mutant KCC2 still increased IGF-1-induced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, overexpression of KCC2 significantly diminished the number of focal adhesions, while knockdown of KCC2 increased their number. Taken together, our data establish that KCC2 expression and function are not restricted to neurons and that KCC2 serves to increase cervical tumourigenesis via an ion transport-independent mechanism. PMID:21911617

  18. Effects of titanium nanoparticles on adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanhua; Cai, Kaiyong; Li, Jinghua; Chen, Xiuyong; Lai, Min; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhong; Ding, Xingwei; Xu, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of nanoscale wear particles derived from titanium/titanium alloy-based implants on integration of bone. Here we report the potential impact of titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the cellular level to the molecular level in the Wistar rat. Methods A series of TiO2 nanoparticles (14 nm, 108 nm, and 196 nm) were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results The TiO2 nanoparticles had negative effects on cell viability, proliferation, and the cell cycle of MSC in a dose-dependent and size-dependent manner. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the effects of particle internalization on adhesion, spreading, and morphology of MSC. The integrity of the cell membrane, cytoskeleton, and vinculin of MSC were negatively influenced by large TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion The Transwell migration assay and a wound healing model suggested that TiO2 nanoparticles had a strong adverse impact on cell migration as particle size increased (P < 0.01). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase, gene expression of osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN), and mineralization measurements indicate that the size of the TiO2 nanoparticles negatively affected osteogenic differentiation of MSC. PMID:24101871

  19. Autophagy induction impairs migration and invasion by reversing EMT in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Myriam; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Lepore, Francesca; Corazzari, Marco; Caldarola, Sara; Valacca, Cristina; Faienza, Fiorella; Esposito, Vincenzo; Limatola, Cristina; Cecconi, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Cell migration and invasion are highly regulated processes involved in both physiological and pathological conditions. Here we show that autophagy modulation regulates the migration and invasion capabilities of glioblastoma (GBM) cells. We observed that during autophagy occurrence, obtained by nutrient deprivation or by pharmacological inhibition of the mTOR complexes, GBM migration and chemokine-mediated invasion were both impaired. We also observed that SNAIL and SLUG, two master regulators of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process), were down-regulated upon autophagy stimulation and, as a consequence, we found a transcriptional and translational up-regulation of N- and R-cadherins. Conversely, in BECLIN 1-silenced GBM cells, an increased migration capability and an up-regulation of SNAIL and SLUG was observed, with a resulting decrease in N- and R-cadherin mRNAs. ATG5 and ATG7 down-regulation also resulted in an increased migration and invasion of GBM cells combined to an up-regulation of the two EMT regulators. Finally, experiments performed in primary GBM cells from patients largely confirmed the results obtained in established cell cultures. Overall, our results indicate that autophagy modulation triggers a molecular switch from a mesenchymal phenotype to an epithelial-like one in GBM cellular models. Since the aggressiveness and lethality of GBM is defined by local invasion and resistance to chemotherapy, we believe that our evidence provides a further rationale for including autophagy/mTOR-based targets in the current therapeutical regimen of GBM patients. PMID:26022108

  20. Interleukin-21 induces migration and invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xing, R; Jin, Y; Sun, L; Yang, L; Li, C; Li, Z; Liu, X; Zhao, J

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial fibroblast hyperplasia and bone erosion. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) play a pivotal role in RA pathogenesis through aggressive migration and matrix invasion, and certain proinflammatory cytokines may affect synoviocyte invasion. Whether interleukin (IL)-21 influences this process remains controversial. Here, we evaluated the potential regulatory effect of IL-21 on the migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in RA-FLS. We found that IL-21 promoted the migration, invasion and MMP (MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13) production in RA-FLS. Moreover, IL-21 induced activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathways, and blockage of these pathways [PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) inhibitor LY294002, STAT-3 inhibitor STA-21 and ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059] attenuated IL-21-induced migration and secretion of MMP-3 and MMP-9. In conclusion, our results suggest that IL-21 promotes migration and invasion of RA-FLS. Therefore, therapeutic strategies targeting IL-21 might be effective for the treatment of RA. PMID:26646950

  1. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  2. Casticin Inhibits A375.S2 Human Melanoma Cell Migration/Invasion through Downregulating NF-κB and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zih-Yun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Fan, Ming-Jen; Ko, Yang-Ching; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-01-01

    Casticin is one of the main components from Fructus Viticis, which is widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent. The mechanism of how casticin affects melanoma cell migration and invasion is still not well known. Here we studied the anti-metastasis effects of casticin on A375.S2 melanoma cells by using a non-lethal concentration. First; we used an adhesion assay to test the A375.S2 cells' adhesion ability after treatment with casticin. We next investigated the cell migration ability after casticin treatment by using a wound healing assay to prove that the migration of A375.S2 cells can be inhibited by casticin and double checked the results using the transwell-migration assay. The suppressive effects on matrix metalloproteinase-2; and -9 (MMP-2; and -9) activities were examined by gelatin zymography. Furthermore, western blotting was used to investigate the protein level changes in A375.S2 cells. We found that p-EGFR; Ras and p-ERK1/2 are decreased by casticin, indicating that casticin can down-regulate the migration and invasion ability of A375.S2 cells via the p-EGFR/Ras/p-ERK pathway. The NF-κB p65 and p-ERK levels in nuclear proteins are also decreased by treatment with casticin. An EMSA assay also discovered that the NF-κB p65 and DNA interaction is decreased. NF-κB p65 protein level was examined by immunofluorescence staining and also decreased. Our findings suggest that casticin has anti-metastatic potential by decreasing the invasiveness of A375.S2 cells. We also found that casticin suppressed A375.S2 cell proliferation and cell adhesion ability, but did not affect cell death, as examined using cytometry and a collagen adhesion assay. Based on these observations, casticin could be used as an inhibitor of migration and invasion of human melanoma cells in the future. PMID:27007357

  3. Tetanus neurotoxin-mediated cleavage of cellubrevin impairs epithelial cell migration and integrin-dependent cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Gavard, Julie; Irinopoulou, Theano; Mège, René-Marc; Galli, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    A role for endocytosis and exocytosis in cell migration has been proposed but not yet demonstrated. Here, we show that cellubrevin (Cb), an early endosomal v-SNARE, mediates trafficking in the lamellipod of migrating epithelial cells and partially colocalizes with markers of focal contacts. Expression of tetanus neurotoxin, which selectively cleaves Cb, significantly reduced the speed of migrating epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of tetanus neurotoxin enhanced the adhesion of epithelial cells to collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and E-cadherin; altered spreading on collagen; and impaired the recycling of β1 integrins. These results suggest that Cb-dependent membrane trafficking participates in cell motility through the regulation of cell adhesion. PMID:15851685

  4. Isoalantolactone inhibits the migration and invasion of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells via suppression of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Li; Feng, Liang; Zhang, Zhenhai; Song, Jie; Liu, Dan; Jia, Xiaobin

    2016-09-01

    Isoalantolactone is a bioactive sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the flowering plant Inula helenium L. This study was conducted to assess the anti-migratory and anti-invasive activities of isoalantolactone in MDA-MB-231 cells, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Wound-healing and Transwell chambers assays demonstrated that isoalantolactone inhibited the adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. The activity and expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were downregulated by isoalantolactone in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, isoalantolactone markedly decreased the p-p38 MAPK level, whereas no significant change in p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 was noted. The downregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression and suppression of in vitro invasion might be associated with the blockade of p38 MAPK activation. Furthermore, isoalantolactone blocked the translocation of NF-κB p65 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. These results revealed that isoalantolactone inhibited the adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells via suppression of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway, and isoalantolactone might be an alternative treatment for breast cancer. PMID:27461575

  5. Biomolecular modification of carbon nanotubes for studies of cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2011-12-01

    We report a strategy for tailoring and patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for biospecific cell studies. We synthesized a new electroactive hydroquinone terminated pyrene molecule to tailor CNTs. These modified CNTs can be oxidized and chemoselectively reacted with oxyamine tethered ligands to generate various ligand tethered CNTs. A cell adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD) is immobilized to the CNTs and a new microfluidic patterning method is employed to generate multiplex patterned surfaces for biospecific cell adhesion and migration studies. This work demonstrates the integration of a new functionalization strategy to immobilize a variety of ligands to CNTs for a range of potential drug delivery, tissue imaging and cellular behavior studies and a microfluidic patterning strategy for generating complex high-throughput surfaces for biotechnological and cell based assay applications.

  6. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  7. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  8. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Esther; vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M.; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lehnherr, André; Rieder, Philip; Keller, Philip J.; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Gesemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In this study we have analyzed the function of the MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2A (MDGA2A) protein in zebrafish cranial motoneuron development. MDGA2A is prominently expressed in distinct clusters of cranial motoneurons, especially in the ones of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Analyses of MDGA2A knockdown embryos by light sheet and confocal microscopy revealed impaired migration and aberrant axonal outgrowth of these neurons; suggesting that adhesive interactions mediated by MDGA2A are required for the proper arrangement and outgrowth of cranial motoneuron subtypes. PMID:25572423

  9. Caveolin-1 mutants P132L and Y14F are dominant negative regulators of invasion, migration and aggregation in H1299 lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shatz, Maria; Lustig, Gila; Reich, Reuven; Liscovitch, Mordechai

    2010-06-10

    Caveolin-1 is an essential protein constituent of caveolae. Accumulating evidence indicates that caveolin-1 may act as a positive regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the function of caveolin-1 in human lung cancer cells. Caveolin-1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and reduced focal adhesion kinase (Fak) phosphorylation. Matrix invasion and cell migration as well as expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases were attenuated following caveolin-1 RNAi-mediated knockdown or overexpression of Y14F and P132L mutants, demonstrating dominant-negative activity of these mutants. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy revealed that caveolin-1 and its mutants P132L and Y14F are localized to the trailing edge of migrating cells during both random and directed cell movement, implying an active role of caveolin-1 in the migration process. Suppression of caveolin-1 function greatly elevated the percentage of H1299 cells exhibiting focal adhesions. In addition, cell aggregation was increased by wild type caveolin-1 and attenuated by both P132L and Y14F mutants. Overexpression of wild type caveolin-1 increased caveolae density, however, P132L and Y14F mutants did not affect caveolae formation, suggesting that in this respect that the mutants do not act in a dominant negative manner, and that effects of caveolin-1 on caveolae and cell invasion, migration, focal adhesion and aggregation, are separable. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of caveolin-1 in cell motility, invasiveness and aggregation, therefore, expanding our understanding of the tumor-promoting activities of caveolin-1 in advanced-stage cancer.

  10. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  11. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  12. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lautscham, Lena A.; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R.; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L.; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C.; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness. PMID:26331248

  13. Overexpression of engulfment and cell motility 1 promotes cell invasion and migration of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiarui; Liu, Guoqing; Miao, Xiongying; Hua, Songwen; Zhong, Dewu

    2011-05-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1 (Elmo1) has been linked to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells. The use of Elmo1 inhibitors is currently being evaluated in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the molecular mechanisms of their therapeutic effect have yet to be determined. Elmo1 expression in HCC tissue samples from 131 cases and in 5 HCC cell lines was determined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. To functionally characterize Elmo1 in HCC, Elmo1 expression in the HCCLM3 cell line was blocked by siRNA. Cell migration was measured by wound healing and transwell migration assays in vitro. Elmo1 overexpression was significantly correlated with cell invasion and the poor prognosis of HCC. Elmo1-siRNA-treated HCCLM3 cells demonstrated a reduction in cell migration. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the suppression of Elmo1 expression inhibits cell invasion in HCC. PMID:22977532

  14. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β sustains invasion of glioblastoma via the focal adhesion kinase, Rac1, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Chikano, Yuri; Domoto, Takahiro; Furuta, Takuya; Sabit, Hemragul; Kitano-Tamura, Ayako; Pyko, Ilya V; Takino, Takahisa; Sai, Yoshimichi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Sato, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2015-02-01

    The failure of current treatment options for glioblastoma stems from their inability to control tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Biologically targeted therapies offer great hope and one promising target is glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), implicated in various diseases, including cancer. We previously reported that inhibition of GSK3β compromises the survival and proliferation of glioblastoma cells, induces their apoptosis, and sensitizes them to temozolomide and radiation. Here, we explore whether GSK3β also contributes to the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma. The effects of GSK3β inhibition on migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells were examined by wound-healing and Transwell assays, as well as in a mouse model of glioblastoma. We also investigated changes in cellular microarchitectures, cytoskeletal components, and proteins responsible for cell motility and invasion. Inhibition of GSK3β attenuated the migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells in vitro and that of tumor cells in a mouse model of glioblastoma. These effects were associated with suppression of the molecular axis involving focal adhesion kinase, guanine nucleotide exchange factors/Rac1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Changes in cellular phenotypes responsible for cell motility and invasion were also observed, including decreased formation of lamellipodia and invadopodium-like microstructures and alterations in the subcellular localization, and activity of Rac1 and F-actin. These changes coincided with decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our results confirm the potential of GSK3β as an attractive therapeutic target against glioblastoma invasion, thus highlighting a second role in this tumor type in addition to its involvement in chemo- and radioresistance. PMID:25504636

  15. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound promotes chondrogenic progenitor cell migration via focal adhesion kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kee W; Ding, Lei; Seol, Dongrim; Lim, Tae-Hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2014-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been studied frequently for its beneficial effects on the repair of injured articular cartilage. We hypothesized that these effects are due to stimulation of chondrogenic progenitor cell (CPC) migration toward injured areas of cartilage through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. CPC chemotaxis in bluntly injured osteochondral explants was examined by confocal microscopy, and migratory activity of cultured CPCs was measured in transwell and monolayer scratch assays. FAK activation by LIPUS was analyzed in cultured CPCs by Western blot. LIPUS effects were compared with the effects of two known chemotactic factors: N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. LIPUS significantly enhanced CPC migration on explants and in cell culture assays. Phosphorylation of FAK at the kinase domain (Tyr 576/577) was maximized by 5 min of exposure to LIPUS at a dose of 27.5 mW/cm(2) and frequency of 3.5 MHz. Treatment with fMLF, but not HMBG1, enhanced FAK activation to a degree similar to that of LIPUS, but neither fMLF nor HMGB1 enhanced the LIPUS effect. LIPUS-induced CPC migration was blocked by suppressing FAK phosphorylation with a Src family kinase inhibitor that blocks FAK phosphorylation. Our results imply that LIPUS might be used to promote cartilage healing by inducing the migration of CPCs to injured sites, which could delay or prevent the onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:24612644

  16. Expression of Nucleophosmin/NPM1 correlates with migration and invasiveness of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine the expression level of Nucleophosmin (NPM1) protein in colon cancer tissues and to investigate the potential role of NPM1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasiveness. Methods Immunohistochemical assay was performed to examine the expression pattern of NPM1 in 31 groups of colonic carcinoma samples, including colon tumors, adjacent normal tissues, and matched metastatic lymph nodes from the same patients. Small interfering RNA technique and exogenous expression of wild type NPM1 methods were used to further verify the function of NPM1. Results High-expression of NPM1 correlates with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0003) and poor survival rate of human colon cancer patients (P = 0.017). SiRNA-mediated reduction of NPM1 was also shown to inhibit the migration and invasiveness of metastatic colon cancer HCT116 cell line. In addition, the exogenous expression of NPM1 in HT29 cells, a NPM1 low expression and low invasive colon cancer cell line, enhanced cell migration and invasiveness along with increased cell proliferation. Conclusions The current study uncovered the critical role of NPM1 in the regulation of colon cancer cells migration and invasion, and NPM1 may serve as a potential marker for the prognosis of colon cancer patients. PMID:22631075

  17. PTK6 Promotes Cancer Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Dependent on ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Hiroaki; Basson, Marc D.; Ito, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 (PTK6) is a non-receptor type tyrosine kinase that may be involved in some cancers. However, the biological role and expression status of PTK6 in pancreatic cancer is unknown. Therefore in this study, we evaluated the functional role of PTK6 on pancreatic cancer invasion. Five pancreatic cancer cell lines expressed PTK6 at varying levels. PTK6 expression was also observed in human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PTK6 suppression by siRNA significantly reduced both cellular migration and invasion (0.59/0.49 fold for BxPC3, 0.61/0.62 for Panc1, 0.42/0.39 for MIAPaCa2, respectively, p<0.05 for each). In contrast, forced overexpression of PTK6 by transfection of a PTK6 expression vector in Panc1 and MIAPaCa2 cells increased cellular migration and invasion (1.57/1.67 fold for Panc1, 1.44/1.57 for MIAPaCa2, respectively, p<0.05). Silencing PTK6 reduced ERK1/2 activation, but not AKT or STAT3 activation, while PTK6 overexpression increased ERK1/2 activation. U0126, a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2, completely abolished the effect of PTK6 overexpression on cellular migration and invasion. These results suggest that PTK6 regulates cellular migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer via ERK signaling. PTK6 may be a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24788754

  18. Abnormal cleavage of APP impairs its functions in cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Baiyang; Song, Bo; Zheng, Zhenhuan; Zhou, Fangfang; Lu, Guangyuan; Zhao, Nanming; Zhang, Xiufang; Gong, Yandao

    2009-02-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is expressed ubiquitously but its wrong cleavage only occurs in central nervous system. In this research, overexpression of wild type human APP695 was found to stimulate the adhesion and migration of N2a cells. In the cells co-transfected by familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD)-linked Swedish mutant of APP695 gene plus big up tri, openE9 deleted presenilin1 gene (N2a/Swe. big up tri, open9), however, this stimulating function was impaired compared to that in the cells co-transfected by Swedish mutant of APP695 gene plus dominant negative mutant of presenilin1 D385A gene (N2a/Swe.385). Furthermore, it was also found that the phosphorylation of FAK Tyr-861 and GSK-3beta Ser-9 was reduced in N2a/Swe.Delta9 cells, which can be possibly taken as a reasonable explanation for the underlying mechanism. Our results suggest that impaired cell adhesion and migration induced by abnormal cleavage of APP could contribute to the pathological effects in FAD brain. PMID:19056463

  19. Micropattern printing of adhesion, spreading, and migration peptides on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) films to promote endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Virginie; Laroche, Gaétan

    2005-01-01

    We report here the development of an original multistep micropatterning technique for printing peptides on surfaces, based on the ink-jet printer technology. Contrary to most micropatterning methods used nowadays, this technique is advantageous because it allows displaying 2D-arrays of multiple biomolecules. Moreover, this low cost procedure allies the advantages of computer-aided design with high flexibility and reproducibility. A Hewlett-Packard printer was modified to print peptide solutions, and Adobe Illustrator was used as the graphic-editing software to design high-resolution checkerboard-like micropatterns. In a first step, PTFE films were treated with ammonia plasma to introduce amino groups on the surface. These chemical functionalities were reacted with heterobifunctional cross-linker sulfo-succinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cycloexane-1-carboxylate (S-SMCC) to allow the subsequent surface covalent conjugation of various cysteine-modified peptides to the polymer substrate. These peptidic molecules containing RGD and WQPPRARI sequences were selected for their adhesive, spreading, and migrational properties toward endothelial cells. On one hand, our data demonstrated that the initial cell adhesion does not depend on the chemical structure and combination of the peptides covalently bonded either through conventional conjugation or micropatterning. On the other hand, spreading and migration of endothelial cells is clearly enhanced while coconjugating the GRGDS peptide in conjunction with WQPPRARI. This behavior is further improved by micropatterning these peptides on specific areas of the polymer surface. PMID:16173784

  20. Sympathetic stimulation facilitates thrombopoiesis by promoting megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilei; Du, Changhong; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhao, Gaomei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xinmiao; Li, Fengju; Zeng, Dongfeng; Chen, Fang; Wang, Song; Chen, Mo; Wang, Cheng; He, Ting; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-02-25

    The effect of sympathetic stimulation on thrombopoiesis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that both continual noise and exhaustive exercise elevate peripheral platelet levels in normal and splenectomized mice, but not in dopamine β-hydroxylase-deficient (Dbh(-/-)) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Further investigation demonstrates that sympathetic stimulation via NE or EPI injection markedly promotes platelet recovery in mice with thrombocytopenia induced by 6.0 Gy of total-body irradiation and in mice that received bone marrow transplants after 10.0 Gy of lethal irradiation. Unfavorably, sympathetic stress-stimulated thrombopoiesis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by increasing both the amount and activity of platelets in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro studies reveal that both NE and EPI promote megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation (PPF) in addition to the expansion of CD34(+) cells, thereby facilitating platelet production. It is found that α2-adrenoceptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation is involved in NE- and EPI-induced megakaryocyte adhesion and migration, and PPF is regulated by ERK1/2 activation-mediated RhoA GTPase signaling. Our data deeply characterize the role of sympathetic stimulation in the regulation of thrombopoiesis and reevaluate its physiopathological implications. PMID:26644453

  1. Stem cell differentiation increases membrane-actin adhesion regulating cell blebability, migration and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Sliogeryte, Kristina; Thorpe, Stephen D.; Lee, David A.; Botto, Lorenzo; Knight, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells regulates the interaction between the cell membrane and the actin cortex controlling cell behavior. Micropipette aspiration was used to measure the pressure required for membrane-cortex detachment which increased from 0.15 kPa in stem cells to 0.71 kPa following chondrogenic differentiation. This effect was associated with reduced susceptibility to mechanical and osmotic bleb formation, reduced migration and an increase in cell modulus. Theoretical modelling of bleb formation demonstrated that the increased stiffness of differentiated cells was due to the increased membrane-cortex adhesion. Differentiated cells exhibited greater F-actin density and slower actin remodelling. Differentiated cells also expressed greater levels of the membrane-cortex ezrin, radixin, moeisin (ERM) linker proteins which was responsible for the reduced blebability, as confirmed by transfection of stem cells with dominant active ezrin-T567D-GFP. This study demonstrates that stem cells have an inherently weak membrane-cortex adhesion which increases blebability thereby regulating cell migration and stiffness. PMID:25471686

  2. Collective epithelial cell sheet adhesion and migration on polyelectrolyte multilayers with uniform and gradients of compliance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jessica S; Schlenoff, Joseph B; Keller, Thomas C S

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMUs) are tunable thin films that could serve as coatings for biomedical implants. PEMUs built layer by layer with the polyanion poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) modified with a photosensitive 4-(2-hydroxyethoxy) benzophenone (PAABp) group and the polycation poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) are mechanically tunable by UV irradiation, which forms covalent bonds between the layers and increases PEMU stiffness. PAH-terminated PEMUs (PAH-PEMUs) that were uncrosslinked, UV-crosslinked to a uniform stiffness, or UV-crosslinked with an edge mask or through a neutral density optical gradient filter to form continuous compliance gradients were used to investigate how differences in PEMU stiffness affect the adhesion and migration of epithelial cell sheets from scales of the fish Poecilia sphenops (Black Molly) and Carassius auratus (Comet Goldfish). During the progressive collective cell migration, the edge cells (also known as 'leader' cells) in the sheets on softer uncrosslinked PEMUs and less crosslinked regions of the gradient formed more actin filaments and vinculin-containing adherens junctions and focal adhesions than formed in the sheet cells on stiffer PEMUs or glass. During sheet migration, the ratio of edge cell to internal cell (also known as 'follower' cells) motilities were greater on the softer PEMUs than on the stiffer PEMUs or glass, causing tension to develop across the sheet and periods of retraction, during which the edge cells lost adhesion to the substrate and regions of the sheet retracted toward the more adherent internal cell region. These retraction events were inhibited by the myosin II inhibitor Blebbistatin, which reduced the motility velocity ratios to those for sheets on the stiffer PEMUs. Blebbistatin also caused disassembly of actin filaments, reorganization of focal adhesions, increased cell spreading at the leading edge, as well as loss of edge cell-cell connections in epithelial cell sheets on all surfaces

  3. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  4. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  5. Adhesive and invasive capacities of Edwarsiella tarda isolated from South American sea lion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Araceli; Villanueva, María Paz; González, Mario; Fernández, Fabiola; Latif, Fadua; Flores, Sandra Nonier; Fernández, Heriberto

    2014-01-01

    Edwarsiella tarda is a zoonotic bacterium that can be isolated from humans, animals and the environment. Although E. tarda is primarily considered a fish pathogen, it is the only species of its genus considered to be pathogenic for humans as well. A survey of zoonotic intestinal bacteria in fresh feces from South American sea lions (SASL) Otaria flavescens, reported E. tarda as the most frequently isolated species. In this study, we used HEp-2 cells to establish in vitro the adherence and invasive ability of 17 E. tarda strains isolated from SASL fecal material. All the strains were able to adhere and invade HEp-2 cells with adhesion and invasion percentages ranging from 56 to 100% and 21 to 74%, respectively. Despite the expression of these pathogenic factors, further investigation is needed to determine whether this bacterium could play a role as primary pathogen for this and other species of pinnipeds. PMID:25477948

  6. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; DeVaney, Trevor; Zimmer, Andreas; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  7. Ampelopsin suppresses TNF-α-induced migration and invasion of U2OS osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Pengfei; Yang, Yubao; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, Liang; Li, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Ampelopsin has been suggested as a novel anticancer agent, however, there is no evidence regarding its direct effect on the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. The aims of the present study were to investigate the influence of ampelopsin on the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. Scratch wound healing and Transwell assays were used to measure the migratory and invasive activities of the cells, respectively. The protein and RNA levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were detected with western blot and RT-qPCR, respectively, following stimulation with tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF-α) and ampelopsin. The expression levels of phospho‑ and total-p38MAPK were detected using western blot analysis. Additionally, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38MAPK, was used to investigate the effect of TNF‑α and ampelopsin. The results demonstrated that TNF‑α upregulated the expression level of MMP‑2 and promoted the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. TNF‑α also activated the p38MAPK pathway, and SB203580 significantly inhibited the effect of TNF‑α on MMP‑2 expression. The application of ampelopsin abolished the effects of TNF‑α on the activation of the p38MAPK pathway and the expression of MMP‑2, and downregulated the migration and invasion of the osteosarcoma cells. These results demonstrated that ampelopsin inhibits the TNF‑α‑induced migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells, and that the effect of ampelopsin was mediated by p38MAPK/MMP‑2 signaling. PMID:27082056

  8. The epsin family of endocytic adaptors promotes fibrosarcoma migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Coon, Brian G; Burgner, John; Camonis, Jacques H; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2010-10-22

    Abnormalities in the process of endocytosis are classically linked to malignant transformation through the deficient down-regulation of signaling receptors. The present study describes a non-classical mechanism that does not require internalization by which endocytic proteins affect cell migration and basement membrane invasion. Specifically, we found that the endocytic adaptor epsin binds and regulates the biological properties of the signaling molecule RalBP1 (Ral-binding protein 1). Epsin interacted with the N terminus of RalBP1 via its characteristic epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. A combination of siRNA-mediated knock-down and transfection of siRNA-resistant constructs in fibrosarcoma cells demonstrated that impairment of the epsin-RalBP1 interaction led to cell migration and basement membrane invasion defects. We found the ENTH domain was necessary and sufficient to sustain normal cell migration and invasion. Because all the epsin endocytic motifs reside in the C-terminal part of the molecule, these results suggest that this novel regulatory circuit does not require endocytosis. In addition, cells depleted of epsin-RalBP1 complex displayed deficient activation of Rac1 and Arf6 suggesting a signaling function for this novel interaction. Further, overexpression of either epsin or RalBP1 enhanced migration and invasion of fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our results indicate that epsin regulates RalBP1 function in Rac1- and Arf6-dependent pathways to ultimately affect cell migration and invasion. We propose that the observed up-regulation of both epsin and RalBP1 in certain cancers contributes to their invasive characteristics. PMID:20709745

  9. The Epsin Family of Endocytic Adaptors Promotes Fibrosarcoma Migration and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Brian G.; Burgner, John; Camonis, Jacques H.; Aguilar, R. Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in the process of endocytosis are classically linked to malignant transformation through the deficient down-regulation of signaling receptors. The present study describes a non-classical mechanism that does not require internalization by which endocytic proteins affect cell migration and basement membrane invasion. Specifically, we found that the endocytic adaptor epsin binds and regulates the biological properties of the signaling molecule RalBP1 (Ral-binding protein 1). Epsin interacted with the N terminus of RalBP1 via its characteristic epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. A combination of siRNA-mediated knock-down and transfection of siRNA-resistant constructs in fibrosarcoma cells demonstrated that impairment of the epsin-RalBP1 interaction led to cell migration and basement membrane invasion defects. We found the ENTH domain was necessary and sufficient to sustain normal cell migration and invasion. Because all the epsin endocytic motifs reside in the C-terminal part of the molecule, these results suggest that this novel regulatory circuit does not require endocytosis. In addition, cells depleted of epsin-RalBP1 complex displayed deficient activation of Rac1 and Arf6 suggesting a signaling function for this novel interaction. Further, overexpression of either epsin or RalBP1 enhanced migration and invasion of fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our results indicate that epsin regulates RalBP1 function in Rac1- and Arf6-dependent pathways to ultimately affect cell migration and invasion. We propose that the observed up-regulation of both epsin and RalBP1 in certain cancers contributes to their invasive characteristics. PMID:20709745

  10. Oncogene ATAD2 promotes cell proliferation, invasion and migration in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Le; Li, Tianren; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Yi; Yao, Jihang; Dou, Lei; Guo, Kejun

    2015-05-01

    The ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 2 (ATAD2) is associated with many cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, invasion and migration. However, the molecular biological function of the ATAD2 gene in cervical cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore ATAD2 expression in cervical cancer, evaluate the relationship between the development of cervical cancer, metastasis and clinicopathological characteristics, and discuss the implications for its use in clinical treatment. Protein and mRNA expression of ATAD2 was examined in tissues and cell lines. Tumor tissues from 135 cases of cervical cancer were collected for evaluation of ATAD2 expression by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Prognostic significance was evaluated by the Cox hazards model and Kaplan-Meier survival method. HeLa and SiHa cells were transfected with two siRNAs targeting ATAD2. ATAD2 knockdown was used to analyze cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Cell viability was evaluated with the Cell Counting Κit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell invasion by a Transwell assay and cell migration by a wound healing/scratch migration assay. ATAD2 was shown to be highly expressed in cervical cancer tissues, both at the transcriptional and protein levels, and was correlated with poor patient survival (P<0.05). Knockdown of ATAD2 in the HeLa and SiHa cells was found to reduce the capacity for invasion and migration (P<0.05), and inhibited the growth and clonogenic potential of the HeLa and SiHa cell lines. Our results suggest that cervical cancer tissues may have highly expressed ATAD2, which is associated with tumor stage and lymph node status (P<0.05). Oncogene ATAD2 may play an important role in cervical cancer proliferation, invasion and migration. It could serve as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target for cervical cancer. PMID:25813398

  11. Netrin-1 regulates invasion and migration of mouse mammary epithelial cells overexpressing Cripto-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Strizzi, Luigi; Bianco, Caterina; Raafat, Ahmed; Abdallah, Wissam; Chang, Cindy; Raafat, Dina; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Shin; Sun, Youping; Normanno, Nicola; Callahan, Robert; Hinck, Lindsay; Salomon, David

    2005-10-15

    The neuronal guidance molecule, Netrin-1, has been suggested to play a role in the adhesion and migration of the mammary gland epithelium. Human and mouse Cripto-1 induce proliferation, migration, invasion and colony formation by epithelial cells in 3D matrices. Here we investigate whether Netrin-1 affects these Cripto-1-dependent activities in mouse mammary epithelial cells. Overexpression of Cripto-1 in EpH4 and HC-11 cells (EpH4/Cripto-1 or HC-11/Cripto-1) was associated with low expression of Netrin-1 and increased expression of its receptor Neogenin compared to that of wild-type cells. No change was observed in the expression of the other Netrin-1 receptor, UNC5H1. Treating EpH4/Cripto-1 or HC-11/Cripto-1 mammary cells with exogenous soluble Netrin-1 resulted in increased expression of E-cadherin and UNC5H1, decreased expression of vimentin and decreased activation of Akt as determined by western blotting. Colony formation by Eph4/Cripto-1 cells in 3D gels was significantly reduced in proximity to a Netrin-1 source, and mammary glands of transgenic mice overexpressing human Cripto-1 showed altered ductal growth in proximity to implanted Netrin-1-releasing pellets. Terminal end buds in the treated transgenic mice mammary glands also showed increased expression of E-cadherin and UNC5H1 and decreased expression of active Akt determined by immunohistochemistry. Together, these results suggest that regulation of Netrin-1 expression is important in regulating Cripto-1-dependent invasion and migration of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:16176936

  12. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  13. [Grape seed proanthocyanidins inhibits the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yehan; Ye, Xiufeng; Shi, Yao; Wang, Ke; Wan, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Objective To explore the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) on the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. Methods Trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to determine the cytotoxic effect of varying doses of GSPs on the BEAS-2B normal human pulmonary epithelial cells. After treated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 80 μg/mL GSP, the proliferation of A549 cells was detected by MTT assay; the invasion and migration of A549 cells were determined by Transwell(TM) assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. The levels of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), E-cadherin, N-cadherin in A549 cells treated with GSPs were detected by Western blotting. Results (0-40) μg/mL GSPs had no significant toxic effect on BEAS-2B cells, while 80 μg/mL GSPs had significant cytotoxicity to BEAS-2B cells. The proliferation of A549 cells was significantly inhibited within limited dosage in a dose-dependent manner, and the abilities of invasion and migration of A549 cells were also inhibited. Western blotting showed that the expression of EGFR and N-cadherin decreased, while E-cadherin increased after GSPs treatment. Conclusion GSPs could inhibit the abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of A549 cells, which might be related to the dow-regulation of EGFR and N-cadherin and the up-regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:26927375

  14. The NKD1/Rac1 feedback loop regulates the invasion and migration ability of hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Qing; Zhang, Kang; Jin, Jianbin; Zheng, Xuqing; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is complicated by aggressive migration and invasion, which contribute to the increased mortality of HCC patients. The NKD1 protein is abnormally expressed in many neoplasms and plays an important role in tumor progression. However, the regulation and underlying molecular mechanisms of NKD1 in HCC cell invasion and migration remain poorly understood. In the present study, ectopic expression of NKD1 in HCC cells attenuated migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo by down-regulating Rac1 expression level and activity, which affected the HCC cell cytoskeleton and E-cadherin expression. Mechanistic studies showed that NKD1 interacted with Rac1 in the cytoplasm and promoted its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Over-expression of Rac1 enhanced the transcription of the NKD1 gene and protein expression conversely owing to its negative regulation of EZH2. Analysis of clinical samples showed that abnormal expression of NKD1 and Rac1 was associated with the poor prognosis of HCC patients. In summary, our data indicate a new role for NKD1 as a regulator of HCC cell invasion and migration via a feedback loop involving Rac1. PMID:27231134

  15. The NKD1/Rac1 feedback loop regulates the invasion and migration ability of hepatocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Qing; Zhang, Kang; Jin, Jianbin; Zheng, Xuqing; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is complicated by aggressive migration and invasion, which contribute to the increased mortality of HCC patients. The NKD1 protein is abnormally expressed in many neoplasms and plays an important role in tumor progression. However, the regulation and underlying molecular mechanisms of NKD1 in HCC cell invasion and migration remain poorly understood. In the present study, ectopic expression of NKD1 in HCC cells attenuated migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo by down-regulating Rac1 expression level and activity, which affected the HCC cell cytoskeleton and E-cadherin expression. Mechanistic studies showed that NKD1 interacted with Rac1 in the cytoplasm and promoted its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Over-expression of Rac1 enhanced the transcription of the NKD1 gene and protein expression conversely owing to its negative regulation of EZH2. Analysis of clinical samples showed that abnormal expression of NKD1 and Rac1 was associated with the poor prognosis of HCC patients. In summary, our data indicate a new role for NKD1 as a regulator of HCC cell invasion and migration via a feedback loop involving Rac1. PMID:27231134

  16. Notch2 signaling contributes to cell growth, invasion, and migration in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Song, Min; Xie, Jian; Huang, Xiao-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Meng; Gan, Rui-Huan; Zhao, Yong; Lin, Li-Song; Chen, Jiang; Lin, Xu; Zheng, Da-Li; Lu, You-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have explored whether the Notch signaling pathway has a tumor-suppressive or an oncogenic role in various tumors; however, the role of the Notch signaling pathway in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is still unknown. In this study, we attempt to define the role of Notch2 signaling in cell growth, invasion, and migration in SACC. We compared Notch2 expression in clinical SACC samples with that of normal samples by using immunohistochemical staining. Then, we down-regulated Notch2 expression to observe the effect of Notch2 on proliferation, invasion, migration, and the expression of known target genes of Notch signal pathway. According to our results, Notch2 expression was higher in SACC tissues compared with normal tissues. Knockdown of Notch2 inhibited cell proliferation, invasion, and migration in vitro and down-regulated the expression of HEY2 and CCND1. The results of this study suggest that Notch2 has an essential role in the cell growth, invasion, and migration of SACC. Notch2 may therefore be a potential target gene for the treatment of SACC by interfering with cell growth and metastasis. PMID:26427670

  17. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  18. Extracellular Matrix Rigidity-dependent Sphingosine-1-phosphate Secretion Regulates Metastatic Cancer Cell Invasion and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Panseon; Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Jung, Jangho; Oh, Somi; Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment is critical for cancer progression via changes in cellular behavior including alteration of secreted molecules. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence exerted by the cancer microenvironment on secretion of molecules during cancer progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that secretion of spingsine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its regulator, SphK1 expression is dependent of the substrate rigidity, which is critical for the balance between cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Conditioned media (CM) of MDA-MB-231, an aggressive breast cancer cell obtained from soft substrate (~0.5 kPa) induced chemo-attractive invasion, while CM obtained from stiff substrate (~2.5 kPa) increased cell adhesion instead. We found that the expression of SphK1 is upregulated in the stiff substrate, resulting in an increase in S1P levels in the CM. We also found that upregulation of SphK1 expression in the stiff substrate is dominant in metastatic cancer cells but not in primary cancer cells. These results suggest that alterations in the mechanical environment of the ECM surrounding the tumor cells actively regulate cellular properties such as secretion, which in turn, may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:26877098

  19. Extracellular Matrix Rigidity-dependent Sphingosine-1-phosphate Secretion Regulates Metastatic Cancer Cell Invasion and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ko, Panseon; Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Jung, Jangho; Oh, Somi; Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment is critical for cancer progression via changes in cellular behavior including alteration of secreted molecules. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence exerted by the cancer microenvironment on secretion of molecules during cancer progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that secretion of spingsine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its regulator, SphK1 expression is dependent of the substrate rigidity, which is critical for the balance between cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Conditioned media (CM) of MDA-MB-231, an aggressive breast cancer cell obtained from soft substrate (~0.5 kPa) induced chemo-attractive invasion, while CM obtained from stiff substrate (~2.5 kPa) increased cell adhesion instead. We found that the expression of SphK1 is upregulated in the stiff substrate, resulting in an increase in S1P levels in the CM. We also found that upregulation of SphK1 expression in the stiff substrate is dominant in metastatic cancer cells but not in primary cancer cells. These results suggest that alterations in the mechanical environment of the ECM surrounding the tumor cells actively regulate cellular properties such as secretion, which in turn, may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:26877098

  20. Securin promotes migration and invasion via matrix metalloproteinases in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    YAN, HAICHENG; WANG, WEI; DOU, CHANGWU; TIAN, FUMING; QI, SONGTAO

    2015-01-01

    Human securin, encoded by pituitary tumor transforming gene 1, is implicated in several oncogenic processes in the pathogenesis of brain tumors, including glioma. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of securin on the migration and invasion of glioma cells. The results revealed that the overexpression of securin in glioma LN-229 cells significantly increased the invasion and transmigration abilities. By contrast, these abilities were significantly reduced by the downregulation of securin in glioma U373 cells. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that securin overexpression and downregulation significantly increased and decreased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9, respectively. These findings indicate a promotive role for securin in glioma migration and invasion, which may involve the action of matrix metalloproteinases. PMID:26137166

  1. Association between tensin 1 and p130Cas at focal adhesions links actin inward flux to cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhihai; Tan, Song Hui; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Kawauchi, Keiko; Araki, Keigo; Hirata, Hiroaki; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell migration is a highly dynamic process that plays pivotal roles in both physiological and pathological processes. We have previously reported that p130Cas supports cell migration through the binding to Src as well as phosphorylation-dependent association with actin retrograde flow at focal adhesions. However, it remains elusive how phosphorylated Cas interacts with actin cytoskeletons. We observe that the actin-binding protein, tensin 1, co-localizes with Cas, but not with its phosphorylation-defective mutant, at focal adhesions in leading regions of migrating cells. While a truncation mutant of tensin 1 that lacks the phosphotyrosine-binding PTB and SH2 domains (tensin 1-SH2PTB) poorly co-localizes or co-immunoprecitates with Cas, bacterially expressed recombinant tensin 1-SH2PTB protein binds to Cas in vitro in a Cas phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, exogenous expression of tensin 1-SH2PTB, which is devoid of the actin-interacting motifs, interferes with the Cas-driven cell migration, slows down the inward flux of Cas molecules, and impedes the displacement of Cas molecules from focal adhesions. Taken together, our results show that tensin 1 links inwardly moving actin cytoskeletons to phosphorylated Cas at focal adhesions, thereby driving cell migration. PMID:27029899

  2. Tetrandrine suppresses proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Kou, Bo; Ma, Zhen-Kun; Tang, Xiao-Shuang; Lv, Chuan; Ye, Min; Chen, Jia-Qi; Li, Lei; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET), a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts remarkable anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, little is known about the effect of TET on human prostate cancer cells, and the mechanism of function of TET on prostate cancer has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the effects of TET on the suppression of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. Inhibition of growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and clone formation assay, and flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect the induction of apoptosis. Activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, caspase-3, Akt, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, and Bax was analyzed by Western blotting. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay were used to evaluate the effect of TET on migration and invasion of cancer cells. TET inhibited the growth of DU145 and PC–3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cloning was inhibited in the presence of TET in DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET suppressed the migration of DU145 and PC-3 cells. Transwell invasion assay showed that TET significantly weakened invasion capacity of DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. In addition, TET induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner by activating the caspase cascade and inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signal pathway. The accumulating evidence suggests that TET could be a potential therapeutic candidate against prostate cancer in a clinical setting. PMID:25677131

  3. Decreased expression of ADAMTS-1 in human breast tumors stimulates migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a member of the ADAMTS family of metalloproteases. Here, we investigated mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses, and we addressed the role of ADAMTS-1 in regulating migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast tumor cell lines. Results In a series of primary breast tumors, we observed variable levels of ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression but lower levels of ADAMTS-1 protein expression in human breast cancers as compared to normal tissue, with a striking decrease observed in high-malignancy cases (triple-negative for estrogen, progesterone and Her-2). This result prompted us to analyze the effect of ADAMTS-1 knockdown in breast cancer cells in vitro. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 expression demonstrated increased migration, invasion and invadopodia formation. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of ADAMTS-1 may be related to VEGF, a growth factor involved in migration and invasion. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 showed increased VEGF concentrations in conditioned medium capable of inducing human endothelial cells (HUVEC) tubulogenesis. Furthermore, expression of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR2) was increased in MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to MCF7 cells. To further determine the relationship between ADAMTS-1 and VEGF regulating breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced expression of ADAMTS-1 were pretreated with a function-blocking antibody against VEGF and then tested in migration and invasion assays; both were partially rescued to control levels. Conclusions ADAMTS-1 expression was decreased in human breast tumors, and ADAMTS-1 knockdown stimulated migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast cancer cells in vitro. Therefore, this series of experiments suggests that VEGF is involved in the effects mediated by ADAMTS-1 in breast cancer cells. PMID

  4. Tetrandrine suppresses proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kou, Bo; Ma, Zhen-Kun; Tang, Xiao-Shuang; Lv, Chuan; Ye, Min; Chen, Jia-Qi; Li, Lei; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET), a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts remarkable anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, little is known about the effect of TET on human prostate cancer cells, and the mechanism of function of TET on prostate cancer has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the effects of TET on the suppression of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. Inhibition of growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and clone formation assay, and flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect the induction of apoptosis. Activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, caspase-3, Akt, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, and Bax was analyzed by Western blotting. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay were used to evaluate the effect of TET on migration and invasion of cancer cells. TET inhibited the growth of DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cloning was inhibited in the presence of TET in DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET suppressed the migration of DU145 and PC-3 cells. Transwell invasion assay showed that TET significantly weakened invasion capacity of DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. In addition, TET induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner by activating the caspase cascade and inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signal pathway. The accumulating evidence suggests that TET could be a potential therapeutic candidate against prostate cancer in a clinical setting. PMID:25677131

  5. Ceramide 1-phosphate regulates cell migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gangoiti, Patricia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Trueba, Miguel; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive and devastating disease characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Despite years of intense investigation, the prognosis of this type of cancer is poor and there is no efficacious treatment to overcome the disease. Using human PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, we demonstrate that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) increases pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. Treatment of these cells with selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt1, or mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTOR1), or with specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding these kinases, resulted in potent inhibition of C1P-induced cell migration and invasion. Likewise, the extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1-2), and the small GTPase RhoA, which regulates cytoskeleton reorganization, were also found to be implicated in C1P-stimulated ROCK1-dependent cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, pre-treatment of the cancer cells with pertussis toxin abrogated C1P-induced cell migration, suggesting the intervention of a Gi protein-coupled receptor in this process. Pancreatic cancer cells engineered to overexpress ceramide kinase (CerK), the enzyme responsible for C1P biosynthesis in mammalian cells, showed enhanced spontaneous cell migration that was potently blocked by treatment with the selective CerK inhibitor NVP-231, or by treatment with specific CerK siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of CerK with concomitant elevations in C1P enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C1P is a key regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, and suggest that targeting CerK expression/activity and C1P may be relevant factors for controlling pancreatic cancer cell dissemination. PMID:26707801

  6. Epigenetic modification suppresses proliferation, migration and invasion of urothelial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic approaches offer additional therapeutic options, including apoptosis induction, modification of cell cycle regulating proteins and the re-expression of pharmaceutical targets, such as hormone receptors. The present study analyzed the effect of the epigenetic modifiers 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and Trichostatin A on the proliferative, migratory and invasive behavior of four urinary bladder cancer cell lines (RT-4, RT-112, VMCUB-1 and T-24), and the expression of various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays revealed that treatment with the two epigenetic modifiers resulted in proliferation inhibition in all cell lines, and migration and invasion inhibition in RT-4, RT-112 and T-24 cell lines. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the mRNA expression of a broad selection of MMPs and their TIMPs was induced in all cell lines, and MMP-14 mRNA expression was suppressed in all cell lines, with the exception of RT-4. In conclusion, epigenetic modifications suppressed the motility and invasiveness of three out of four urothelial cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect on cell motility appears to be crucial for reduced invasive properties. However, even a broad spectrum of mRNA analysis does not sufficiently explain the loss of invasiveness, as it does not allow for functional conclusions. Further complex urothelial tumour models should be applied to investigate whether epigenetic therapeutic approaches may be an option in urothelial cancer. PMID:27602104

  7. Effect of the knockdown of death-associated protein 1 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ali; Baig, Ruqia Mehmood; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-03-01

    Death-associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP1 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we aimed to determine the role of DAP1 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sublines of MCF7 and MDA-MB‑231, and performed growth, adhesion and invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of the post-wound migration of cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, DELE, IPS1, cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sublines. Knockdown was associated with increased adhesion and migration, significantly so in the MDA-MB-231DAP1kd cell subline (p=0.029 and p=0.001, respectively). Growth in MCF7 cells showed a significant suppression on day 3 (p=0.029), followed by an increase in growth matching the controls on day 5. While no change in the apoptotic response to serum starvation could be attributed to DAP1 knockdown, the expression of known components of the apoptosis pathway (caspase 8) and cell cycle (p21) was significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP1kd cell subline (p≤0.05), while in MDA-MB-231DAP1kd the expression of a pro-apoptotic molecule, IPS1, was suppressed (p≤0.05). DAP1 may have an important role in cell adhesion, migration and growth in the context of breast cancer and has significant associations with the apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, we believe that delayed increase in growth observed in the MCF7DAP1kd cell subline may indicate activation of a strongly pro-oncogenic pathway downstream of DAP1. PMID:25530065

  8. LSD1-mediated epigenetic modification contributes to ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanxia; Wan, Xiaolei; Wei, Ye; Liu, Xiuwen; Lai, Wensheng; Zhang, Liuping; Jin, Jie; Wu, Chaoyang; Shao, Qixiang; Shao, Genbao; Lin, Qiong

    2016-06-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has been implicated in the process of tumor progression at various steps, but its role in epithelial-messenchymal transition (EMT) and the migration of ovarian cancer cells remains obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of LSD1 on ovarian cancer cell migration and the regulatory role of LSD1 in the expression of EMT markers. Inhibition of LSD1 expression impaired the migration and invasion of HO8910 ovarian cancer cells. In contrast, overexpression of LSD1 enhanced the cell migration and invasion of HO8910 cells. Mechanistic analyses showed that LSD1 promoted cell migration through induction of N-cadherin, vimentin, MMP-2 and inhibition of E-cadherin. Furthermore, LSD1 interacted with the promoter of E-cadherin and demethylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) at this region, downregulated E-cadherin expression, and consequently enhanced ovarian cancer cell migration. These data indicate that LSD1 acts as an epigenetic regulator of EMT and contributes to the metastasis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27109588

  9. Synaptopodin-2 induces assembly of peripheral actin bundles and immature focal adhesions to promote lamellipodia formation and prostate cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kai, FuiBoon; Fawcett, James P; Duncan, Roy

    2015-05-10

    Synaptopodin-2 (Synpo2), an actin-binding protein and invasive cancer biomarker, induces formation of complex stress fiber networks in the cell body and promotes PC3 prostate cancer cell migration in response to serum stimulation. The role of these actin networks in enhanced cancer cell migration is unknown. Using time-course analysis and live cell imaging of mock- and Synpo2-transduced PC3 cells, we now show that Synpo2 induces assembly of actin fibers near the cell periphery and Arp2/3-dependent lamellipodia formation. Lamellipodia formed in a non-directional manner or repeatedly changed direction, explaining the enhanced chemokinetic activity of PC3 cells in response to serum stimulation. Myosin contraction promotes retrograde flow of the Synpo2-associated actin filaments at the leading edge and their merger with actin networks in the cell body. Enhanced PC3 cell migration correlates with Synpo2-induced formation of lamellipodia and immature focal adhesions (FAs), but is not dependent on myosin contraction or FA maturation. The previously reported correlation between Synpo2-induced stress fiber assembly and enhanced PC3 cell migration therefore reflects the role of Synpo2 as a newly identified regulator of actin bundle formation and nascent FA assembly near the leading cell edge. PMID:25883213

  10. LOW-INTENSITY PULSED ULTRASOUND PROMOTES CHONDROGENIC PROGENITOR CELL MIGRATION VIA FOCAL ADHESION KINASE PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee W.; Ding, Lei; Seol, Dongrim; Lim, Tae-hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been frequently studied for its beneficial effects on the repair of injured articular cartilage. Here, we hypothesized that these effects are due to stimulation of chondrogenic progenitor cell (CPC) migration toward injured areas in cartilage through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. CPC chemotaxis in bluntly impacted osteochondral explants was examined by confocal microscopy and migratory activity of cultured CPCs was measured in trans-well and monolayer scratch assays. FAK activation by LIPUS was analyzed in cultured CPCs by western blot. LIPUS effects were compared with the effects of two known chemotactic factors; formylated-methionine peptides (fMLF), and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. LIPUS significantly enhanced CPC migration on explants and in cell culture assays. Phosphorylation of FAK at the kinase domain (Tyr 576/577) was maximized by 5 minute exposure to LIPUS at a dose of 27.5 mW/cm2 and at a frequency of 3.5 MHz. Treatment with fMLF, but not HMBG1 enhanced FAK activation to a degree similar to LIPUS, but neither fMLF nor HMGB1 enhanced the LIPUS effect. LIPUS-induced CPC migration was blocked by suppressing FAK phosphorylation with a Src family kinases (SFKs) inhibitor that blocks FAK phosphorylation. Our results imply that LIPUS might be utilized to promote cartilage healing by inducing the migration of CPCs to injured sites, which could delay or prevent the onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). PMID:24612644

  11. γδ Intraepithelial Lymphocyte Migration Limits Transepithelial Pathogen Invasion and Systemic Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Edelblum, Karen L.; Singh, Gurminder; Odenwald, Matthew A.; Lingaraju, Amulya; El Bissati, Kamal; McLeod, Rima; Sperling, Anne I.; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Intraepithelial lymphocytes that express the γδ T cell receptor (γδ IELs) limit pathogen translocation across the intestinal epithelium by unknown mechanisms. We investigated whether γδ IEL migration and interaction with epithelial cells promote mucosal barrier maintenance during enteric infection. Methods Salmonella typhimurium or Toxoplasma gondii were administered to γδ T cell-deficient (Tcrd KO), CD103-deficient (CD103 KO), or control TcrdEGFP C57BL/6 reporter mice. Intravital microscopy was used to visualize migration of GFP-tagged γδ T cells within the small intestinal mucosa of mice infected with DsRed-labeled S typhimurium. Mixed bone marrow chimeras were generated to assess the effects of γδ IEL migration on early pathogen invasion and chronic systemic infection. Results Morphometric analyses of intravital video microscopy data showed that γδ IELs rapidly localized to and remained near epithelial cells in direct contact with bacteria. Within 1 hr, greater numbers of T gondii or S typhimurium were present within mucosae of mice with migration-defective occludin KO γδ T cells, compared with controls. Pathogen invasion in Tcrd KO mice was quantitatively similar to that in mice with occludin-deficient γδ T cells, whereas invasion in CD103 KO mice, which have increased migration of γδ T cells into the lateral intercellular space, was reduced by 63%. Consistent with a role of γδ T cell migration in early host defense, systemic salmonellosis developed more rapidly and with greater severity in mice with occludin-deficient γδ IELs, relative to those with wild-type or CD103 KO γδ IELs. Conclusions In mice, intraepithelial migration to epithelial cells in contact with pathogens is essential to γδ IEL surveillance and immediate host defense. γδ IEL occludin is required for early surveillance that limits systemic disease. PMID:25747597

  12. CD26-mediated regulation of periostin expression contributes to migration and invasion of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komiya, Eriko; Ohnuma, Kei; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Hatano, Ryo; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD26-expressing MPM cells upregulate production of periostin. • The intracytoplasmic region of CD26 mediates the upregulation of periostin. • CD26 expression leads to nuclear translocation of Twist1 via phosphorylation of Src. • Secreted periostin enhances migration and invasion of MPM cells. - Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignancy arising from mesothelial lining of pleura. It is generally associated with a history of asbestos exposure and has a very poor prognosis, partly due to the lack of a precise understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with its malignant behavior. In the present study, we expanded on our previous studies on the enhanced motility and increased CD26 expression in MPM cells, with a particular focus on integrin adhesion molecules. We found that expression of CD26 upregulates periostin secretion by MPM cells, leading to enhanced MPM cell migratory and invasive activity. Moreover, we showed that upregulation of periostin expression results from the nuclear translocation of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1, a process that is mediated by CD26-associated activation of Src phosphorylation. While providing new and profound insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in MPM biology, these findings may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for MPM.

  13. Inhibition of Adhesion, Proliferation, and Invasion of Primary Endometriosis and Endometrial Stromal and Ovarian Carcinoma Cells by a Nonhyaluronan Adhesion Barrier Gel

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Stefan P.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Lermann, Johannes; Hackl, Janina; Fasching, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic disease of women in the reproductive age, defined as endometrial cells growing outside of the uterine cavity and associated with relapses. Relapses are hypothesized to correlate with incomplete surgical excision or result from nonrandom implantation of new endometrial implants in adjacent peritoneum. Thus, surgical excision could lead to free endometriotic cells or tissue residues, which readhere, grow, and invade into recurrent lesions. Barrier agents are frequently used to prevent postoperative adhesions. We tested if the absorbable cell adhesion barrier gel Intercoat consisting of polyethylene oxide and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose could inhibit cellular adhesion, proliferation, and invasion of primary endometriosis and endometrial cells. Due to an association of endometriosis with ovarian carcinoma, we tested two ovarian carcinoma cell lines. Prior to cell seeding, a drop of the barrier gel was placed in cell culture wells in order to test inhibition of adherence and proliferation or coated over a polymerized collagen gel to assay for prevention of invasion. Results showed that the barrier gel significantly inhibited cell adherence, proliferation, and invasion of endometriosis and endometrial stromal cells as well as ovarian carcinoma cells in culture. Our findings could help to prevent local cell growth/invasion and possible consequent recurrences. PMID:25785270

  14. Sinulariolide Suppresses Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Migration and Invasion by Inhibiting Matrix Metalloproteinase-2/-9 through MAPKs and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Jen; Neoh, Choo-Aun; Tsao, Chia-Yu; Su, Jui-Hsin; Li, Hsing-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Sinulariolide is an active compound isolated from the cultured soft coral Sinularia flexibilis. In this study, we investigate the migration and invasion effects of sinulariolide in hepatocellular carcinoma cell HA22T. Sinulariolide inhibited the migration and invasion effects of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of zymography assay showed that sinulariolide suppressed the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Moreover, protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were reduced by sinulariolide in a concentration-dependent manner. Sinulariolide also exerted an inhibitory effect on phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2). Taken together, these results demonstrated that sinulariolide could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration and invasion and alter HA22T cell metastasis by reduction of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA expression through the suppression of MAPKs, PI3K/Akt, and the FAK/GRB2 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that sinulariolide merits further evaluation as a chemotherapeutic agent for human hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26204832

  15. Sinulariolide Suppresses Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Migration and Invasion by Inhibiting Matrix Metalloproteinase-2/-9 through MAPKs and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Jen; Neoh, Choo-Aun; Tsao, Chia-Yu; Su, Jui-Hsin; Li, Hsing-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Sinulariolide is an active compound isolated from the cultured soft coral Sinularia flexibilis. In this study, we investigate the migration and invasion effects of sinulariolide in hepatocellular carcinoma cell HA22T. Sinulariolide inhibited the migration and invasion effects of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of zymography assay showed that sinulariolide suppressed the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Moreover, protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were reduced by sinulariolide in a concentration-dependent manner. Sinulariolide also exerted an inhibitory effect on phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2). Taken together, these results demonstrated that sinulariolide could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration and invasion and alter HA22T cell metastasis by reduction of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA expression through the suppression of MAPKs, PI3K/Akt, and the FAK/GRB2 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that sinulariolide merits further evaluation as a chemotherapeutic agent for human hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26204832

  16. Analgesic-antitumor peptide inhibits the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells by an upregulated VGSC β1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guili; Cui, Yong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Mingyi; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jinghai; Liu, Yanfeng

    2016-03-01

    Analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), one of the scorpion toxin polypeptides, has been shown to have an antitumor activity. Recombinant AGAP (rAGAP) was shown to affect the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells via a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) β1 subunit. The VGSC β1 subunit was validated as a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. rAGAP suppresses the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells but has no significant effect of human liver HL7702 cells without β1 subunit expression. rAGAP inhibits the migration and invasion of the cells when the VGSC β1 subunit is overexpressed in HL7702 cells. To explain these findings, VGSC β1 subunit messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were measured. The β1 subunit protein level was upregulated in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with rAGAP while there was no significant change in the mRNA level, so rAGAP might be an active component of the VGSC β1 subunit. PMID:26419595

  17. β-Catenin–regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor–dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin–mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury. PMID:24837430

  18. p62/IMP2 stimulates cell migration and reduces cell adhesion in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Francia, Giulio; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    p62/IMP2 is an oncofetal protein that is overexpressed in several types of cancer, and is a member of the family of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding proteins. We previously reported that high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody are present in sera from cancer patients, compared to healthy individuals. Here, we report the overexpression of p62/IMP2 in tumor tissues of 72 out of 104 cases of human breast cancer, and high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody in patients’ sera (in 63 out of 216 cases). To explore the role of p62/IMP2 in breast cancer progression, we generated p62/IMP2 transfected variants of two human breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231 and LM2-4. Using in vitro assays we found that overexpression of p62/IMP2 can increase cell migration, and reduce cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. A Human Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules qPCR array was performed with our generated variants, and it identified a group of mRNAs whose expression was altered with p62/IMP2 overexpression, including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA – which we show to be a p62/IMP2 binding partner. Overall, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which p62/IMP2 can contribute to breast cancer progression. PMID:26416451

  19. Inhibition of TRPM7 by carvacrol suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Barszczyk, Andrew; Turlova, Ekaterina; Deurloo, Marielle; Liu, Baosong; Yang, Burton B.; Rutka, James T.; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas are progressive brain tumors with devastating proliferative and invasive characteristics. Ion channels are the second largest target class for drug development. In this study, we investigated the effects of the TRPM7 inhibitor carvacrol on the viability, resistance to apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness of the human U87 glioblastoma cell line. The expression levels of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in U87 cells were detected by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 currents were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. An MTT assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments were used to evaluate cell migration and invasion. Protein levels of p-Akt/t-Akt, p-ERK1/2/t-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, MMP-2 and phosphorylated cofilin were also detected. TRPM7 mRNA and protein expression in U87 cells is higher than in normal human astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed that carvacrol blocks recombinant TRPM7 current in HEK293 cells and endogenous TRPM7-like current in U87 cells. Carvacrol treatment reduced the viability, migration and invasion of U87 cells. Carvacrol also decreased MMP-2 protein expression and promoted the phosphorylation of cofilin. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited the Ras/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Therefore, carvacrol may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of glioblastomas through its inhibition of TRPM7 channels. PMID:25965832

  20. FOXO1 inhibits Runx2 transcriptional activity and prostate cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Pan, Yunqian; Zheng, Li; Choe, Chungyoul; Lindgren, Bruce; Jensen, Eric D.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Cheng, Liang; Huang, Haojie

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients with regional lymph node involvement at radical prostatectomy often experience disease progression to other organs, with the bone as the predominant site. The transcription factor Runx2 plays an important role in bone formation and PCa cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here we demonstrated that the forkhead protein FOXO1, a key downstream effector of the tumor suppressor PTEN, inhibits the transcriptional activity of Runx2 in PCa cells. This inhibition was enhanced by PTEN but diminished by active Akt. FOXO1 bound to Runx2 in vitro and in vivo and suppressed Runx2’s activity independent of its transcriptional function. FOXO1 inhibited Runx2-promoted migration of PCa cells while silencing of endogenous FOXO1 enhanced PCa cell migration in a Runx2-dependent manner. Forced expression of FOXO1 also inhibited Runx2-promoted PCa cell invasion. Finally, we found that expression of PTEN and the level of FOXO1 in the nucleus is inversely correlated with expression of Runx2 in a cohort of PCa specimens from patients with lymph node and bone metastasis. These data reveal FOXO1 as a critical negative regulator of Runx2 in PCa cells. Inactivation of FOXO1 due to frequent loss of PTEN in PCa cells may leave the oncogenic activities of Runx2 unchecked, thereby driving promiscuous expression of Runx2 target genes involved in cell migration and invasion and favoring PCa progression. PMID:21505104

  1. Chordin-Like 1 Suppresses Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4-Induced Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Cyr-Depauw, Chanèle; Northey, Jason J; Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G; Dong, Zhifeng; Cory, Sean; Hallett, Michael; Rennhack, Jonathan P; Andrechek, Eran R; Siegel, Peter M

    2016-05-15

    ShcA is an important mediator of ErbB2- and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. We show that in the context of reduced ShcA levels, the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist chordin-like 1 (Chrdl1) is upregulated in numerous breast cancer cells following TGF-β stimulation. BMPs have emerged as important modulators of breast cancer aggressiveness, and we have investigated the ability of Chrdl1 to block BMP-induced increases in breast cancer cell migration and invasion. Breast cancer-derived conditioned medium containing elevated concentrations of endogenous Chrdl1, as well as medium containing recombinant Chrdl1, suppresses BMP4-induced signaling in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Live-cell migration assays reveal that BMP4 induces breast cancer migration, which is effectively blocked by Chrdl1. We demonstrate that BMP4 also stimulated breast cancer cell invasion and matrix degradation, in part, through enhanced metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 activity that is antagonized by Chrdl1. Finally, high Chrdl1 expression was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer. Together, our data reveal that Chrdl1 acts as a negative regulator of malignant breast cancer phenotypes through inhibition of BMP signaling. PMID:26976638

  2. Long form collapsin response mediator protein-1 promotes the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    HOU, HUIGE; CHEN, LIN; ZHA, ZHENGANG; CAI, SHAOHUI; TAN, MINGHUI; GUO, GUOQING; LIU, NING; SHE, GUORONG; XUN, SONGWEI

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that long form collapsin response mediator protein-1 (LCRMP-1) promotes the metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteosarcoma (OS) is a human cancer with a high potential for metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the role of LCRMP-1 in OS metastasis. The expression of LCRMP-1 in OS specimens and cell lines was evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Furthermore, the migration and invasion of OS cells with LCRMP-1-knockdown was investigated to examine the role of LCRMP-1 in OS metastasis. In addition, the expression of N-cadherin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are involved in cell migration, was evaluated using RT-qPCR. Increased expression of LCRMP-1 was observed in the OS tissues and cell lines, accompanied by the enhanced migration and invasion of the OS cells. LCRMP-1-knockdown resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of N-cadherin and MMPs, as well as inhibition of the migration and invasion of the OS cells. Overexpression of LCRMP-1 promoted OS metastasis. Therefore, LCRMP-1 may be a promising target for the effective treatment of OS. PMID:27347094

  3. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  4. Chinese herbal formula QHF inhibits liver cancer cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, TAO; WANG, QUAN; LI, YUNXIAO; HUANG, HEFEI; HU, WEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of the Chinese herbal formula QHF (Q, Qingrejiedu; H, Huoxuehuayu; and F, Fuzhengguben) on the migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells and to elucidate the potential molecular mechanisms involved. HepG2 cells were treated with various concentrations of QHF, and scratch and Transwell® migration assays were used to qualitatively analyze differences in the migration and invasion activity of these cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors were subsequently introduced in order to study the association between QHF and the invasion of HepG2 cells. The protein expression levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in HepG2 cells in the presence and absence of QHF were additionally determined using western blot analysis. The results showed that QHF significantly inhibited the proliferation of the HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, in addition to inhibiting cell movement, which reduced the ability of the cells to invade and migrate. Western blot analysis indicated that the effects of QHF on HCC HepG2 cells after 24 h were to significantly decrease the expression of phosphorylated- (p-)ERK and to increase the expression of p-p38 and p-JNK; however, the total quantity of ERK, p38 and JNK protein remained unchanged. The administration of an inhibitor of ERK altered p38 and JNK expression and promoted the anti-invasion effects of QHF, whereas p38 and JNK inhibitors only partially reversed this effect. The results of the present study indicate, therefore, that QHF is able to inhibit the migratory and invasive activity of HepG2 cells. A possible underlying mechanism involves the activation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathway and the attenuation of the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27284329

  5. RUNX3 Suppresses Migration, Invasion and Angiogenesis of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang; Mei, Pengjin; Liu, Hui; Li, Linlin; Pan, Zhenqiang; Wu, Yongping; Zheng, Junnian

    2013-01-01

    RUNX3 (runt-related transcription factor-3) is a known tumor suppressor gene which exhibits potent antitumor activity in several carcinomas. However, little is known about the role of RUNX3 in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). To investigate the clinical relevance of RUNX3 in RCC patients, immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the clinical relevance of RUNX3 in 75 RCC tissues and paired non-cancerous tissues by using tissue microarray (TMA). We also investigated the role of RUNX3 in RCC cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The RUNX3 expression was decreased dramatically in human RCC tissue. The RUNX3 expression was significantly correlated with tumor size (P<0.001), depth of invasion (P<0.001), and of TNM stage (P<0.001). Restoration of RUNX3 significantly decreased renal carcinoma cell migration and invasion capacity compared with controls. In addition, we found that overexpression of RUNX3 reduced the proliferation and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Gelatin zymography and Western blot showed that RUNX3 expression suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein level and enzyme activity. Western blot and ELISA showed that RUNX3 restoration inhibited the expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Taken together, our studies indicate that decreased expression of RUNX3 in human RCC tissue is significantly correlated with RCC progression. Restoration of RUNX3 expression significantly inhibits RCC cells migration, invasion and angiogenesis. These findings provide new insights into the significance of RUNX3 in migration, invasion and angiogenesis of RCC. PMID:23457532

  6. Dynamic control of cell adhesion on a stiffness-tunable substrate for analyzing the mechanobiology of collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masao; Sugawara, Michiko; Yamamoto, Shota; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Jun

    2016-06-24

    A method was developed for photocontrolling cell adhesion on a gel substrate with defined mechanical properties. Precise patterning of geometrically controlled cell clusters and their migration induction became possible by spatiotemporally controlled photo-irradiation of the substrate. The clusters exhibited unique collective motion that depended on substrate stiffness and cluster geometry. PMID:27048916

  7. Stochastic Model of Integrin-Mediated Signaling and Adhesion Dynamics at the Leading Edges of Migrating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cirit, Murat; Krajcovic, Matej; Choi, Colin K.; Welf, Erik S.; Horwitz, Alan F.; Haugh, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    Productive cell migration requires the spatiotemporal coordination of cell adhesion, membrane protrusion, and actomyosin-mediated contraction. Integrins, engaged by the extracellular matrix (ECM), nucleate the formation of adhesive contacts at the cell's leading edge(s), and maturation of nascent adhesions to form stable focal adhesions constitutes a functional switch between protrusive and contractile activities. To shed additional light on the coupling between integrin-mediated adhesion and membrane protrusion, we have formulated a quantitative model of leading edge dynamics combining mechanistic and phenomenological elements and studied its features through classical bifurcation analysis and stochastic simulation. The model describes in mathematical terms the feedback loops driving, on the one hand, Rac-mediated membrane protrusion and rapid turnover of nascent adhesions, and on the other, myosin-dependent maturation of adhesions that inhibit protrusion at high ECM density. Our results show that the qualitative behavior of the model is most sensitive to parameters characterizing the influence of stable adhesions and myosin. The major predictions of the model, which we subsequently confirmed, are that persistent leading edge protrusion is optimal at an intermediate ECM density, whereas depletion of myosin IIA relieves the repression of protrusion at higher ECM density. PMID:20195494

  8. Role of hepatitis C virus induced osteopontin in epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migration and invasion of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jawed; McRae, Steven; Mai, Thi; Banaudha, Krishna; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Waris, Gulam

    2014-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoprotein which has been linked to tumor progression and metastasis in a variety of cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous studies have shown that OPN is upregulated during liver injury and inflammation. However, the role of OPN in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced liver disease pathogenesis is not known. In this study, we determined the induction of OPN, and then investigated the effect of secreted forms of OPN in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion of hepatocytes. We show the induction of OPN mRNA and protein expression by HCV-infection. Our results also demonstrate the processing of precursor OPN (75 kDa) into 55 kDa, 42 kDa and 36 kDa forms of OPN in HCV-infected cells. Furthermore, we show the binding of secreted OPN to integrin αVβ3 and CD44 at the cell surface, leading to the activation of downstream cellular kinases such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, and Akt. Importantly, our results show the reduced expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and induction of mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin) in HCV-infected cells. We also show the migration and invasion of HCV-infected cells using wound healing assay and matrigel coated Boyden chamber. In addition, we demonstrate the activation of above EMT markers, and the critical players involved in OPN-mediated cell signaling cascade using primary human hepatocytes infected with Japanese fulminant hepatitis (JFH)-1 HCV. Taken together, these studies suggest a potential role of OPN in inducing chronic liver disease and HCC associated with chronic HCV infection. PMID:24498111

  9. uPAR-induced cell adhesion and migration: vitronectin provides the key

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Chris D.; Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Andolfo, Annapaola; Cunningham, Orla; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    Expression of the membrane receptor uPAR induces profound changes in cell morphology and migration, and its expression correlates with the malignant phenotype of cancers. To identify the molecular interactions essential for uPAR function in these processes, we carried out a complete functional alanine scan of uPAR in HEK293 cells. Of the 255 mutant receptors characterized, 34 failed to induce changes in cell morphology. Remarkably, the molecular defect of all of these mutants was a specific reduction in integrin-independent cell binding to vitronectin. A membrane-tethered plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, which has the same binding site in vitronectin as uPAR, replicated uPAR-induced changes. A direct uPAR–vitronectin interaction is thus both required and sufficient to initiate downstream changes in cell morphology, migration, and signal transduction. Collectively these data demonstrate a novel mechanism by which a cell adhesion molecule lacking inherent signaling capability evokes complex cellular responses by modulating the contact between the cell and the matrix without the requirement for direct lateral protein–protein interactions. PMID:17548516

  10. Sulforaphene Interferes with Human Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion through Inhibition of Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bao, Cheng; Kim, Min Chae; Chen, Jing; Song, Jieun; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Lee, Hong Jin

    2016-07-13

    Although inhibition of mammary tumorigenesis by isothiocyanates has been widely studied, little is known about the effects of sulforaphene on invasiveness of breast cancer. Here, sulforaphene significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of triple-negative SUM159 human breast cancer cells and suppressed the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9). The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, as an upstream signaling modulator, was significantly suppressed by sulforaphene. In particular, ciliary localization of Gli1 and its nuclear translocation were blocked by sulforaphene in a time-dependent manner. Consistently, downregulation of Hh signaling by vismodegib and Gli1 knockdown reduced the cellular migration and invasion as well as the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. These results indicate that the suppression of Hh/Gli1 signaling by sulforaphene may reduce the MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and cellular invasiveness of human breast cancer cells, suggesting the potential efficacy of sulforaphene against breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27327035

  11. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-03-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear. PMID:25589570

  12. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-01-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear. PMID:25589570

  13. Force Matters: Biomechanical Regulation of Cell Invasion and Migration in Disease.

    PubMed

    Kai, FuiBoon; Laklai, Hanane; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis, cancer, and various chronic fibrotic conditions are characterized by an increase in the migratory behavior of resident cells and the enhanced invasion of assorted exogenous cells across a stiffened extracellular matrix (ECM). This stiffened scaffold aberrantly engages cellular mechanosignaling networks in cells, which promotes the assembly of invadosomes and lamellae for cell invasion and migration. Accordingly, deciphering the conserved molecular mechanisms whereby matrix stiffness fosters invadosome and lamella formation could identify therapeutic targets to treat fibrotic conditions, and reducing ECM stiffness could ameliorate disease progression. PMID:27056543

  14. A monoclonal antibody directed against a human cell membrane antigen prevents cell substrate adhesion and tumor invasion.

    PubMed Central

    De Potter, C. R.; Schelfhout, A. M.; De Smet, F. H.; Van Damme, S.; de Ridder, L.; Dhont, E.; van Emmelo, J.

    1994-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to design mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can inhibit the invasion of breast cancer cells in the host tissue. Therefore, MAbs were raised against epitopes on the extracellular domain of SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells, and biological assays were performed to test the capability of the MAbs to inhibit cell substrate adhesion. MAb 14C5 bound an extracellular plasma membrane antigen of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and inhibited the cell substrate adhesion of these cells in vitro. The MAb delayed the adhesion of MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 cells on precultured embryonic heart fragments (PHFS). It inhibited the destruction of the PHF by MCF-7 cells and the invasion of the PHF by SK-BR-3 cells. The MAb reacted with an epitope on the cell membrane of in situ and invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast in immunohistochemistry. Poorly differentiated, highly invasive ductal carcinomas show extensive staining of long plasma membrane extensions. Normal multilayered epithelia, normal connective tissue, and tumors derived from these tissues as well as normal breast tissue were negative. From both cell lines a protein complex consisting of two subunits with molecular weight of 50 and 90 kd, respectively, was immunoprecipitated. It is concluded that the 14C5 antigen plays a role in cell substrate adhesion and subsequently also in invasion of breast cancer cells. The 14C5 MAb was able to inhibit cell substrate adhesion and invasion in vitro of breast cancer cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291615

  15. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  16. MicroRNA-183 suppresses retinoblastoma cell growth, invasion and migration by targeting LRP6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwen; Wang, Xiaochun; Li, Zhongji; Liu, Hongtao; Teng, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Our study demonstrates the downregulation of microRNA-183 (miR-183) in retinoblastoma (RB) tissues and RB cell lines compared with normal retinal tissues. The ectopic expression of miR-183 in the RB cell lines Y79, SO-RB50 and WERI-RB1 suppresses cell viability, migration and invasion. Furthermore, the Wnt co-receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) was identified as a new target of miR-183, and restoration of the expression of LRP6 rescues the effects induced by miR-183 in RB cells. These results indicate that miR-183 targets and downregulates LRP6 in the growth, migration and invasion of RB cells. PMID:24289859

  17. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA. PMID:22066472

  18. Pin1 promotes transforming growth factor-beta-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Isao; Chiang, Keng-Nan; Lai, Chen-Yu; He, Dongming; Wang, Guannan; Ramkumar, Romila; Uchida, Takafumi; Ryo, Akihide; Lu, Kunping; Liu, Fang

    2010-01-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological activities. It induces potent growth-inhibitory responses in normal cells but promotes migration and invasion of cancer cells. Smads mediate the TGF-beta responses. TGF-beta binding to the cell surface receptors leads to the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in their C terminus as well as in the proline-rich linker region. The serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in the linker region are followed by the proline residue. Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, recognizes phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motifs. Here we show that Smad2/3 interacts with Pin1 in a TGF-beta-dependent manner. We further show that the phosphorylated threonine 179-proline motif in the Smad3 linker region is the major binding site for Pin1. Although epidermal growth factor also induces phosphorylation of threonine 179 and other residues in the Smad3 linker region the same as TGF-beta, Pin1 is unable to bind to the epidermal growth factor-stimulated Smad3. Further analysis suggests that phosphorylation of Smad3 in the C terminus is necessary for the interaction with Pin1. Depletion of Pin1 by small hairpin RNA does not significantly affect TGF-beta-induced growth-inhibitory responses and a number of TGF-beta/Smad target genes analyzed. In contrast, knockdown of Pin1 in human PC3 prostate cancer cells strongly inhibited TGF-beta-mediated migration and invasion. Accordingly, TGF-beta induction of N-cadherin, which plays an important role in migration and invasion, is markedly reduced when Pin1 is depleted in PC3 cells. Because Pin1 is overexpressed in many cancers, our findings highlight the importance of Pin1 in TGF-beta-induced migration and invasion of cancer cells. PMID:19920136

  19. HOTAIR Interacting with MAPK1 Regulates Ovarian Cancer skov3 Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yiwei, Tang; Hua, Huang; Hui, Guo; Mao, Meng; Xiang, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of when silencing HOTAIR in ovarian cancer skov3 cells on proliferation, migration, and invasion, and to elucidate the mechanism by which this occurs. Material/Methods We detected the mRNA level of HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) and MAPK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) in ovarian cancer SKOV3, ES-2, OVCAR3, A2780, and COC1 cell lines. We detected the mRNA level of HOTAIR and MAPK1 in ovarian SKOV3 when transected with miR-1, miR-214-3p, or miR-330-5p. We detected the mRNA and protein level of MAPK1 when silencing HOTAIR. We detected the expression of HOTAIR when silencing MAPK1. Then we detected the proliferation, migration, and invasion in ovarian cancer skov3 after silencing HOTAIR or MAPK1. Results The expression of HOTAIR and MAPK1 in ovarian SKOV3, ES-2, and OVCAR3 increased compared with A2780 and COC1 cells (P<0.05). The mRNA level of HOTAIR and MAPK1 in ovarian SKOV3 decreased when transected with miR-1, miR-214-3p, or miR-330-5p compared to negative control (p<0.05). The mRNA and protein level of MAPK1 was decreased when silencing HOTAIR and the mRNA level of HOTAIR was decreased when silencing MAPK1 (p<0.05). The proliferation, migration, and invasion was inhibited in ovarian SKOV3 after silencing HOTAIR or MAPK1 (p<0.05). Conclusions HOTAIR can promote proliferation, migration, and invasion in ovarian SKOV3 cells as a competing endogenous RNA. PMID:26117268

  20. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Rohan, Thomas E; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B; Condeelis, John S; Oktay, Maja H

    2014-11-25

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding Mena(INV), an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down Mena(INV) or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that Mena(INV) and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and Mena(INV) may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25429076

  1. MACC1 mediates acetylcholine-induced invasion and migration by human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianling; Zhou, Rui; Wu, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Yang; Shi, Min

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) promotes the growth and metastasis of several cancers via its M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R). Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is an oncogene that is overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC) and plays an important role in GC progression, though it is unclear how MACC1 activity is regulated in GC. In this study, we demonstrated that ACh acts via M3Rs to promote GC cell invasion and migration as well as expression of several markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The M3R antagonist darifenacin inhibited GC cell activity in both the presence and absence of exogenous ACh, suggesting GC cells secrete endogenous ACh, which then acts in an autocrine fashion to promote GC cell migration/invasion. ACh up-regulated MACC1 in GC cells, and MACC1 knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effects of ACh on GC cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) served as an intermediate signal between ACh and MACC1. These findings suggest that ACh acts via a M3R/AMPK/MACC1 signaling pathway to promote GC cell invasion/migration, which provides insight into the mechanisms underlying GC growth and metastasis and may shed light on new targets for GC treatment. PMID:26919111

  2. Role of N-cadherin in proliferation, migration, and invasion of germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Hubertus; Küffer, Stefan; Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Strauβ, Arne; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Honecker, Friedemann; Behnes, Carl Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common malignancies in young men. Most patients with GCT can be cured with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, even in metastatic disease. In case of therapy resistance, prognosis is usually poor. We investigated the potential of N-cadherin inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the GCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2, TCam-2, and the cisplatin-resistant sublines NCCIT-R and NTERA-2R. Effects of a blocking antibody or siRNA against N-cadherin on proliferation, migration, and invasion were investigated. Mouse xenografts of GCT cell lines were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for N-cadherin expression. All investigated GCT cell lines were found to express N-cadherin protein in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of N-cadherin in vitro leads to a significant inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion. N-cadherin-downregulation leads to a significantly higher level of pERK. N-cadherin-inhibition resulted in significantly higher rates of apoptotic cells in caspase-3 staining. Expression of N-cadherin is preserved in cisplatin-resistant GCT cells, pointing to an important physiological role in cell survival. N-cadherin-downregulation results in a significant decrease of proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulates apoptosis in cisplatin-naive and resistant GCT cell lines. Therefore, targeting N-cadherin may be a promising therapeutic approach, particularly in cisplatin-resistant, therapy refractory and metastatic GCT. PMID:26451610

  3. Anterior gradient protein 2 promotes survival, migration and invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Through a transcriptome microarray analysis, we have isolated Anterior gradient protein 2 (AGR2) as a gene up-regulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). AGR2 is a disulfide isomerase over-expressed in several human carcinomas and recently linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here, we analyzed the expression of AGR2 in PTC and its functional role. Methods Expression of AGR2 was studied by immunohistochemistry and real time PCR in normal thyroids and in PTC samples. The function of AGR2 was studied by knockdown in PTC cells and by ectopic expression in non-transformed thyroid cells. The role of AGR2 in the ER stress was analyzed upon treatment of cells, expressing or not AGR2, with Bortezomib and analyzing by Western blot the expression levels of GADD153. Results PTC over-expressed AGR2 at mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of AGR2 in PTC cells induced apoptosis and decreased migration and invasion. Ectopic expression of AGR2 in non-transformed human thyroid cells increased migration and invasion and protected cells from ER stress induced by Bortezomib. Conclusions AGR2 is a novel marker of PTC and plays a role in thyroid cancer cell survival, migration, invasion and protection from ER stress. PMID:24976026

  4. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07270.001 PMID:26030852

  5. Expression of PAPPA2 in human fetomaternal interface and involvement in trophoblast invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Zhang, Z; Yu, S

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A 2 (PAPPA2) is a placental-enriched gene that is important for normal human placentation and defects in the gene can cause complications in pregnancy. Yet the exact expression pattern and role of PAPPA2 in the human fetomaternal interface are not clear. In this study, in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were employed to examine the spatial and temporal expression of PAPPA2 in the human fetomaternal interface. IHC results exhibited wide expression of PAPPA2 in the fetomaternal interface, with placental syncytiatrophoblast (STB) and extravillous trophoblast (EVT) showing strong expression and the cytotrophoblast (CTB) showing weak expression of PAPPA2. These results were confirmed by ISH. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot showed the elevation of PAPPA2 in first trimester EVT differentiation and term CTB spontaneous syncytialization. PAPPA2-siRNA transfection significantly depressed the invasion and migration ability of a trophoblast cell line (HTR8/SVneo) in a transwell migration and Matrigel invasion model compared to a negative control siRNA (P < 0.05), also revealing that matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) secretion is downregulated. This was confirmed using a human first trimester placental villi explant culture model. Our results reveal the spatial and temporal expression of PAPPA2 in the human fetomaternal interface and show the positive regulatory role of PAPPA2 in human trophoblast invasion and migration through the secretion of MMP9. PMID:27525857

  6. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  7. SRPX2 promotes cell migration and invasion via FAK dependent pathway in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Jingjing; Bi, Minghong; Han, Xiao; Han, Zhengquan; Wang, Hongya; Ou, Yimei

    2015-01-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein, X-linked 2, abbreviated as SRPX2, is a candidate downstream target protein for E2A-HLF and involved in disorders of language cortex and cognition. Recent studies have demonstrated that elevated SRPX2 exhibits crucial roles in gastric cancer, however, underlying clinical significance and biological function of SRPX2 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), remains unclear. Data from Oncomine database showed that higher SRPX2 expression is more commonly observed in PDAC compared with normal pancreatic duct, similar results were also found in 12 matched PDAC tissue samples, 7 PDAC cell lines and a tissue microarray containing 81 PDAC specimens as demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Besides, higher SRPX2 expression was closely correlated with advanced TNM stage. Silencing of endogenous SRPX2 expression reduced abilities of cell migration and invasion of PDAC cells. Further studies revealed that SRPX2 expression in PDAC tissues significantly correlated with the phosphorylation levels of FAK, indicating that FAK dependent pathway may be account for the effect of SRPX2 on cell migration and invasion in PDAC. Collectively, this study reveals that frequently elevated SRPX2 contributes to cell migration and invasion in PDAC and SRPX2-related pathways might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:26191169

  8. PFTK1 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression by Regulating Proliferation, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Yang, Qichang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Zhu, Junya; Shao, Mengting; Xiao, Jinzhang; Cao, Jie; Gu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shusen; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    PFTK1, also known as PFTAIRE1, CDK14, is a novel member of Cdc2-related serine/threonine protein kinases. Recent studies show that PFTK1 is highly expressed in several malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and involved in regulation of cell cycle, tumors proliferation, migration, and invasion that further influence the prognosis of tumors. However, the expression and physiological significance of PFTK1 in gastric cancer remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of PFTK1 by Western blot in 8 paired fresh gastric cancer tissues, nontumorous gastric mucosal tissues and immunohistochemistry on 161 paraffinembedded slices. High PFTK1 expression was correlated with the tumor grade, lymph node invasion as well as Ki-67. Through Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, flow cytometry, colony formation, wound healing and transwell assays, the vitro studies demonstrated that PFTK1 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, while PFTK1 knockdown led to the opposite results. Our findings for the first time supported that PFTK1 might play an important role in the regulation of gastric cancer proliferation, migration and would provide a novel promising therapeutic strategy against human gastric cancer. PMID:26488471

  9. PFTK1 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression by Regulating Proliferation, Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jia; Huang, Hua; Yang, Qichang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Zhu, Junya; Shao, Mengting; Xiao, Jinzhang; Cao, Jie; Gu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shusen; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    PFTK1, also known as PFTAIRE1, CDK14, is a novel member of Cdc2-related serine/threonine protein kinases. Recent studies show that PFTK1 is highly expressed in several malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and involved in regulation of cell cycle, tumors proliferation, migration, and invasion that further influence the prognosis of tumors. However, the expression and physiological significance of PFTK1 in gastric cancer remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of PFTK1 by Western blot in 8 paired fresh gastric cancer tissues, nontumorous gastric mucosal tissues and immunohistochemistry on 161 paraffinembedded slices. High PFTK1 expression was correlated with the tumor grade, lymph node invasion as well as Ki-67. Through Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, flow cytometry, colony formation, wound healing and transwell assays, the vitro studies demonstrated that PFTK1 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, while PFTK1 knockdown led to the opposite results. Our findings for the first time supported that PFTK1 might play an important role in the regulation of gastric cancer proliferation, migration and would provide a novel promising therapeutic strategy against human gastric cancer. PMID:26488471

  10. KIF1B promotes glioma migration and invasion via cell surface localization of MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyu; Han, Mingzhi; Chen, Weiliang; He, Ying; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Peng; Huang, Qibing; Gao, Liang; Qu, Xun; Li, Xingang

    2016-02-01

    Malignant glioma is notorious for its aggressiveness and poor prognosis, and the invasiveness of glioma cells is the major obstacle. Accumulating evidence indicates that kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) may play key roles in tumor invasiveness, but the mechanisms remained unresolved. Our previous study demonstrated that membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) was involved in Kinesin family member 1B (KIF1B)-modulated invasion of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, the role of KIF1B in glioma cell invasion and its relationship with MT1-MMP were explored in the present study. We found that aberrantly increased expression of KIF1B was associated with worse WHO pathological classification and Karnofsky performance status (KPS), which also showed a trend towards worse prognosis. In the transwell assay, knockdown of KIF1B using siRNA repressed U87MG and A172 glioma cell migration and invasion. Silencing KIF1B inhibited expression of membranal MT1-MMP; however, the amount of MT1-MMP in the whole cell lysate was not affected. In conclusion, targeting KIF1B may be an option for anti-invasive therapies targeting glioma. PMID:26576027

  11. PBX3 promotes migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Bo; Gu, Jin; Ji, Deng-Bo; Li, Zhao-Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX)3 in migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. METHODS: We detected PBX3 expression in five cell lines and surgical specimens from 111 patients with CRC using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We forced expression of PBX3 in low metastatic HT-29 and SW480 cells and knocked down expression of PBX3 in highly metastatic LOVO and HCT-8 cells. Wound healing and Boyden chamber assays were used to detect cell migration and invasion after altered expression of PBX3. Western blot was performed to detect the change of signaling molecule ERK1/2 following PBX3 overexpression. RESULTS: High level of PBX3 expression was correlated with the invasive potential of CRC cells, and significantly associated with lymph node invasion (P = 0.02), distant metastasis (P = 0.04), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.03) and poor overall survival of patients (P < 0.05). Ectopic expression of PBX3 in low metastatic cells was shown to promote migration and invasion, while inhibited PBX3 expression in highly metastatic cells suppressed migration and invasion. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was found to be one of the targeted molecules responsible for PBX3-induced CRC cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSION: PBX3 induces invasion and metastasis of CRC cells partially through activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:25561793

  12. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 adhesion to and invasion of A549 lung epithelial cells by natural extracts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ghada F; Elkhatib, Walid F; Noreddin, Ayman M

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonizes the lungs in cystic fibrosis (CF) and mechanically ventilated patients by binding to the cellular receptors on the surface of the lung epithelium. Studies have shown that blocking this interaction could be achieved with sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance is a probable drawback of such an intervention. The use of natural extracts to interfere with bacterial adhesion and invasion has recently gained substantial attention and is hypothesized to inhibit bacterial binding and consequently prevent or reduce pathogenicity. This study used an A549 lung epithelial cell infection model, and the results revealed that a combination of aqueous cranberry extract with ciprofloxacin could completely prevent the adhesion and invasion of P. aeruginosa PAO1 compared to the untreated control. All of the natural extracts (cranberry, dextran, and soybean extracts) and ciprofloxacin showed a significant reduction (P<0.0001) in P. aeruginosa PAO1 adhesion to and invasion of lung epithelial cells relative to the control. The cranberry, dextran, and soybean extracts could substantially increase the anti-adhesion and anti-invasion effects of ciprofloxacin to the averages of 100% (P<0.0001), 80% (P<0.0001), and 60% (P<0.0001), respectively. Those extracts might result in a lower rate of the development of bacterial resistance; they are relatively safe and inexpensive agents, and utilizing such extracts, alone or in combination with ciprofloxacin, as potential anti-adhesion and anti-invasion remedies, could be valuable in preventing or reducing P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:24894307

  13. New insights into the function of Cullin 3 in trophoblast invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Song; Huang, Xing; Tan, Yi; Zhu, Cheng; Wang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Haibin; Lin, Hai-Yan; Fu, Jiejun; Wang, Hongmei

    2015-08-01

    Cullin 3 (CUL3), a scaffold protein, assembles a large number of ubiquitin ligase complexes, similar to Skp1-Cullin 1-F-box protein complex. Several genetic models have shown that CUL3 is crucial for early embryonic development. Nevertheless, the role of CUL3 in human trophoblast function remains unclear. In this study, immunostaining revealed that CUL3 was strongly expressed in the villous cytotrophoblasts, the trophoblast column, and the invasive extravillous trophoblasts. Silencing CUL3 significantly inhibited the outgrowth of villous explant ex vivo and decreased invasion and migration of trophoblast HTR8/SVneo cells. Furthermore, CUL3 siRNA decreased pro-MMP9 activity and increased the levels of TIMP1 and 2. We also found that the level of CUL3 in the placental villi from pre-eclamptic patients was significantly lower as compared to that from their gestational age-matched controls. Moreover, in the lentiviral-mediated placenta-specific CUL3 knockdown mice, lack of CUL3 resulted in less invasive trophoblast cells in the maternal decidua. Taken together, these results suggest an essential role for CUL3 in the invasion and migration of trophoblast cells, and dysregulation of its expression may be associated with the onset of pre-eclampsia. PMID:26021998

  14. Deletion of inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1 (IP6K1) reduces cell migration and invasion, conferring protection from aerodigestive tract carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Rathan S; Kumar, Dharmika; Buwa, Natasha; Ganguli, Shubhra; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Bhandari, Rashna

    2016-08-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks), a family of enzymes found in all eukaryotes, are responsible for the synthesis of 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-IP7) from inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Three isoforms of IP6Ks are found in mammals, and gene deletions of each isoform lead to diverse, non-overlapping phenotypes in mice. Previous studies show a facilitatory role for IP6K2 in cell migration and invasion, properties that are essential for the early stages of tumorigenesis. However, IP6K2 also has an essential role in cancer cell apoptosis, and mice lacking this protein are more susceptible to the development of aerodigestive tract carcinoma upon treatment with the oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Not much is known about the functions of the equally abundant and ubiquitously expressed IP6K1 isoform in cell migration, invasion and cancer progression. We conducted a gene expression analysis on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking IP6K1, revealing a role for this protein in cell receptor-extracellular matrix interactions that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, cells lacking IP6K1 manifest defects in adhesion-dependent signaling, evident by lower FAK and Paxillin activation, leading to reduced cell spreading and migration. Expression of active, but not inactive IP6K1 reverses migration defects in IP6K1 knockout MEFs, suggesting that 5-IP7 synthesis by IP6K1 promotes cell locomotion. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration support the ability of cancer cells to achieve their complete oncogenic potential. Cancer cells with lower IP6K1 levels display reduced migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. When fed an oral carcinogen, mice lacking IP6K1 show reduced progression from epithelial dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. Thus, our data reveal that like IP6K2, IP6K1 is also involved in early cytoskeleton remodeling events during cancer progression. However, unlike IP6K2, IP6K1 is essential for 4NQO

  15. Annexin A2 Coordinates STAT3 to Regulate the Invasion and Migration of Colorectal Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Dianhui; Liu, Lin; Qiao, Fengli; Yang, Haishan; Cui, Lu; Liu, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to reveal the expression of STAT3 and Anxa 2 in CRC specimens and to investigate the effects of STAT3 and Anxa 2 signaling on the proliferation, invasion, and migration in CRC Caco-2 cells. Results demonstrated that both Anxa 2 and STAT3 were highly expressed in CRC specimens in both mRNA and protein levels, with or without phosphorylation (Tyrosine 23 in Anxa 2 and Tyrosine 705 in STAT3). And the upregulated Anxa 2 promoted the phosphorylation of STAT3 (Tyrosine 705) in CRC Caco-2 cells. The upregulated Anxa 2 promoted the proliferation, migration, and invasion of Caco-2 cells in vitro. Moreover, the STAT3 knockdown also repressed the proliferation, migration, and invasion of Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, the overexpressed Annexin A2 regulated the proliferation, invasion, and migration in CRC cells in an association with STAT3. PMID:27274723

  16. Role of metallothionein 1E in the migration and invasion of human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Kim, In-Young; Jeong, Young-Il; Jin, Shu-Guang; Pei, Jian; Wen, Min; Jang, Woo-Yeol

    2012-10-01

    Metallothionein 1E (MT1E) has been found to be highly expressed in motile cell lines. We investigated whether MT1E actually modulates the migration and invasion of human glioma cell lines and the types of factors that have an effect on MT1E. RNA differential display was performed using Genefishing™ technology in the human glioma cell lines U343MG-A, U87MG and U87MG-10'; the results were validated by RT-PCR and northern blot analysis, in order to detect possible genetic changes as the determining factors for migration ability in malignant glioma. MT1E was identified in U87MG, a highly motile cell line. The migration and invasion abilities of human glioma cell lines, and MT1E transfectants were investigated using simple scratch testing and Matrigel invasion assays. Morphological and cytoskeletal (actin, vimentin) changes were documented by light and confocal microscopy. The expression of MT1E in four glioma cell lines was assessed by RT-PCR and western blotting. In addition, the effects of MT1E on the activity of the NF-κB p50/p65 transcription factor, MMP-2 and -9 were examined by western blotting and zymography. The endogenous MT1E expression in the human glioma cell lines was statistically correlated with their migratory abilities and invasion. The U87-MT-AS cells became more round and had decreased stress fibers, compared with the U87MG cells. Endogenous MT1E expression in the four human glioma cell lines was directly correlated with migration. Two antisense MT1E-transfected cell lines showed decreased NF-κB p50 translocation into the nucleus, which led to decreased activity of MMP-9 in conditioned media. It may be postulated that MT1E can enhance the migration and invasion of human glioma cells by inducing MMP-9 inactivation via the upregulation of NF-κB p50. PMID:22843066

  17. Effect of methanolic and water extract of Leucobryum bowringii Mitt. on growth, migration and invasion of MCF 7 human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Manoj, G S; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Varghese, Saneesh; Murugan, K

    2012-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of methanol and water extract of L. bowringii. on the adhesion, migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities of MCF 7 human breast cancer cell line are reported. Cells were cultured with 10, 25, 50 microg/mL methanolic or water extract of L. bowringii. Culture medium containing 0.1% DMSO was used as a solvent control. Ultra structural analysis by electron microscopy revealed typical features of apoptosis. A remarkable dose-response parallelism was observed between methanolic extract with growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Fractionation of methanolic extract by RP-HPLC revealed a pool of phenolic acids. Hoechst 33342 staining assay reveals massive chromatin condensation and subsequent cleavage of structural components of nucleus. The results indicate that methanol extracts inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells partially through the inhibition of metallo proteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. Methanolic extract has more anti-metastatic effects in cell based assay than water extract. Clinical application of L. bowringii extract as a bioactive chemopreventive compound may be helpful in limiting breast carcinoma invasion and metastasis. PMID:23140017

  18. Leptin stimulates migration and invasion and maintains cancer stem-like properties in ovarian cancer cells: an explanation for poor outcomes in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Sumie; Abarzua-Catalan, Lorena; Trigo, César; Delpiano, Ana; Sanhueza, Cristobal; García, Karen; Ibañez, Carolina; Hormazábal, Katherine; Diaz, Daniela; Brañes, Jorge; Castellón, Enrique; Bravo, Erasmo; Owen, Gareth; Cuello, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    The evidence linking obesity with ovarian cancer remains controversial. Leptin is expressed at higher levels in obese women and stimulates cell migration in other epithelial cancers. Here, we explored the clinical impact of overweight/obesity on patient prognosis and leptin's effects on the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells. We assessed clinical outcomes in 70 ovarian cancer patients (33 healthy weight and 37 overweight) that were validated with an external cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Progression-free and overall survival rates were significantly decreased in overweight patients. Similarly, a worse overall survival rate was found in TCGA patients expressing higher leptin/OB-Rb levels. We explored serum and ascites leptin levels and OB-Rb expression in our cohort. Serum and ascites leptin levels were higher in overweight patients experiencing worse survival. OB-Rb was more highly expressed in ascites and metastases than in primary tumors. Leptin exposure increased cancer cell migration/invasion through leptin-mediated activation of JAK/STAT3, PI3/AKT and RhoA/ROCK and promoted new lamellipodial, stress-fiber and focal adhesion formation. Leptin also contributed to the maintenance of stemness and the mesenchymal phenotype in ovarian cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate that leptin stimulated ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, offering a potential explanation for the poor prognosis among obese women. PMID:26053184

  19. Leptin stimulates migration and invasion and maintains cancer stem-like properties in ovarian cancer cells: an explanation for poor outcomes in obese women.

    PubMed

    Kato, Sumie; Abarzua-Catalan, Lorena; Trigo, César; Delpiano, Ana; Sanhueza, Cristobal; García, Karen; Ibañez, Carolina; Hormazábal, Katherine; Diaz, Daniela; Brañes, Jorge; Castellón, Enrique; Bravo, Erasmo; Owen, Gareth; Cuello, Mauricio A

    2015-08-28

    The evidence linking obesity with ovarian cancer remains controversial. Leptin is expressed at higher levels in obese women and stimulates cell migration in other epithelial cancers. Here, we explored the clinical impact of overweight/obesity on patient prognosis and leptin's effects on the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells. We assessed clinical outcomes in 70 ovarian cancer patients (33 healthy weight and 37 overweight) that were validated with an external cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Progression-free and overall survival rates were significantly decreased in overweight patients. Similarly, a worse overall survival rate was found in TCGA patients expressing higher leptin/OB-Rb levels. We explored serum and ascites leptin levels and OB-Rb expression in our cohort. Serum and ascites leptin levels were higher in overweight patients experiencing worse survival. OB-Rb was more highly expressed in ascites and metastases than in primary tumors. Leptin exposure increased cancer cell migration/invasion through leptin-mediated activation of JAK/STAT3, PI3/AKT and RhoA/ROCK and promoted new lamellipodial, stress-fiber and focal adhesion formation. Leptin also contributed to the maintenance of stemness and the mesenchymal phenotype in ovarian cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate that leptin stimulated ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, offering a potential explanation for the poor prognosis among obese women. PMID:26053184

  20. Regulation of migration and invasion by Toll-like receptor-9 signaling network in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Mei, Xiao-Long; Shi, Zhi; Di, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in tumorigenesis and progress of prostate cancer. However, the function and mechanism of Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) in prostate cancer is not totally understood. Here, we found that high expression of TLR9 was associated with a higher probability of lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. Further in vitro functional study verified that silence of TLR9 inhibited migration and invasion of PC-3 cells, indicating expression of TLR9 involving in the migration and invasion of cancer cells. The data of microarray exhibited silence of TLR9 induced 205 genes with larger than 2-fold changes in expression levels, including 164 genes down-regulated and 41 genes up-regulated. Functional Gene Ontology (GO) processes annotation demonstrated that the top three scores of molecular and cellular functions were regulation of programmed cell death, regulation of locomotion and response to calcium ion. TLR9 signaling network analysis of the migration and invasion related genes identified several genes, like matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and interleukin 8 (IL8), formed the core interaction network based on their known biological relationships. A few genes, such as odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM), claudin 2 (CLDN2), gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) and Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 pseudogene 1 (ROCK1P1), so far have not been found to interact with the other genes. This study provided the foundation to discover the new molecular mechanism in signaling networks of invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer. PMID:26087186

  1. Rab25 upregulation correlates with the proliferation, migration, and invasion of renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jia, Qingzhu; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Ying

    2015-03-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common urological cancer with a poor prognosis. A recent cohort study revealed that the median survival of RCC patients was only 1.5 years and that <10% of the patients in the study survived up to 5 years. In tumor development, Rab GTPase are known to play potential roles such as regulation of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, communication, and drug resistance in multiple tumors. However, the correlation between Rabs expression and the occurrence, development, and metastasis of RCC remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases in RCC patients. Our results showed that high levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with RCC invasion classification (P < 0.01), lymph-node metastasis (P < 0.001), and pathological stage (P < 0.01). Conversely, in 786-O and A-498 cells, knocking down Rab25 protein expression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Our results also demonstrated that Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d, and further suggested that Rab25 upregulation in RCC is due to diminished expression of let-7d. These findings indicate that Rab25 might be a novel candidate molecule involved in RCC development, thus identifying a potential biological therapeutic target for RCC. - Highlights: • The transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases were analyzed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). • High levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with clinicopathological factors of RCC. • Knockdown of Rab25 protein expression reduced RCC cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d in RCC.

  2. ARMc8 indicates aggressive colon cancers and promotes invasiveness and migration of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiupeng; Fan, Chuifeng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Juanhan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated ARMc8 in promoting tumor formation in non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer; however, so far, no studies have revealed the expression pattern or cellular function of ARMc8 in colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to measure ARMc8 expression in 206 cases of colon cancer and matched adjacent normal colon tissue. Clinically important behaviors of cells, including invasiveness and migration, were evaluated after upregulation of ARMc8 expression in HT29 cells through gene transfection or downregulation of expression in LoVo cells using RNAi. We found that ARMc8 was primarily located in the membrane and cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression level was significantly higher in colon cancer in comparison to that in the adjacent normal colon tissues (p < 0.001). ARMc8 expression was closely related to TNM stage (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), and poor prognosis (p = 0.002) of colon cancer. The invasiveness and migration capacity of HT29 cells transfected with ARMc8 were significantly greater than those of control cells (p < 0.001), while ARMc8 siRNA treatment significantly reduced cell invasion and migration in LoVo cells (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we demonstrated that ARMc8 could upregulate the expression of MMP7 and snail and downregulate the expression of p120ctn and α-catenin. Therefore, ARMc8 probably enhanced invasiveness and metastatic capacity by affecting these tumor-associated factors, thereby playing a role in enhancing the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. ARMc8 is likely to become a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:26081621

  3. AHNAK is highly expressed and plays a key role in cell migration and invasion in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Abe, Masaaki; Hino, Okio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-02-01

    The worldwide incidence of the highly aggressive tumor mesothelioma is expected to increase. Mesothelioma is classified into three main histological subtypes: epithelioid, sarcomatoid and biphasic. Although the pathological diagnostic markers for epithelioid are established, to date no adequate marker for sarcomatoid mesothelioma has been found. Thus, a reliable diagnostic marker of sarcomatoid mesothelioma is necessary. In this study, to identify an unknown protein with 120 kDa expressed only in the mesothelioma cell line 211H, we conducted proteomic analysis and found five candidate proteins. One such protein, AHNAK, was highly expressed in all seven mesothelioma cell lines (211H, H28, H226, H2052, H2452, MESO1 and MESO4), but not in the mesothelial cell line MeT-5A by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, we confirmed high AHNAK expression not only in xenografts but also in human mesothelioma specimens including sarcomatoid, epithelioid and biphasic mesothelioma using immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that AHNAK has the potential to be a new marker for detecting mesothelioma. Since AHNAK is involved in cell migration and invasion in other metastatic tumor cells, we conducted migration and invasion assays in mesothelioma cell lines. The number of migrating cells in six of seven mesothelioma cell lines and the number of invading cells in all seven cell lines were significantly increased compared with those in MeT-5A. Knockdown of AHNAK significantly reduced the cell migration and invasion ability in all seven mesothelioma cell lines. These results support further clinical evaluation of the association of AHNAK and metastasis in mesothelioma. PMID:24253341

  4. CD93 and dystroglycan cooperation in human endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Maida, Marco; Bernardini, Giulia; Vannuccini, Silvia; Petraglia, Felice; Santucci, Annalisa; Orlandini, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CD93 is a transmembrane glycoprotein predominantly expressed in endothelial cells. Although CD93 displays proangiogenic activity, its molecular function in angiogenesis still needs to be clarified. To get molecular insight into the biological role of CD93 in the endothelium, we performed proteomic analyses to examine changes in the protein profile of endothelial cells after CD93 silencing. Among differentially expressed proteins, we identified dystroglycan, a laminin-binding protein involved in angiogenesis, whose expression is increased in vascular endothelial cells within malignant tumors. Using immunofluorescence, FRET, and proximity ligation analyses, we observed a close interaction between CD93 and β-dystroglycan. Moreover, silencing experiments showed that CD93 and dystroglycan promoted endothelial cell migration and organization into capillary-like structures. CD93 proved to be phosphorylated on tyrosine 628 and 644 following cell adhesion on laminin through dystroglycan. This phosphorylation was shown to be necessary for a proper endothelial migratory phenotype. Moreover, we showed that during cell spreading phosphorylated CD93 recruited the signaling protein Cbl, which in turn was phosphorylated on tyrosine 774. Altogether, our results identify a new signaling pathway which is activated by the cooperation between CD93 and dystroglycan and involved in the control of endothelial cell function. PMID:26848865

  5. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  6. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene inhibits adhesion and migration of human triple-negative breast cancer cells by suppressing β1 integrin function and surface protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hua; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kung, Po-Hsiung; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibits an aggressive clinical course by high metastatic potential. It is known that integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration are important for cancer metastasis. In the present study, a synthetic compound, 3, 4-methyenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene (MNS), significantly inhibited adhesion of TNBC cell lines to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The antimetastatic capacity of MNS was also observed through reducing TNBC cells migration and invasion without affecting cell viability. Confocal microscopy revealed that MNS disrupted the formation of focal adhesion complex and actin stress fiber networks. Consistent with this finding, MNS inhibited phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin as detected by Western blot analysis. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we found that MNS inhibited phosphorylation of FAK as a result of reducing β1 integrin activation and clustering. A cell-impermeable dithiol reagent, 2, 3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid abrogated all of MNS's actions, indicating that MNS may react with thiol groups of cell surface proteins that are involved in regulation of β1 integrin function as well as cell adhesion and migration. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been reported to be essential for the affinity modulation of β integrins. We also demonstrated that MNS inhibited PDI activity both in a pure enzyme system and in intact cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that MNS inhibits in vitro metastatic properties of TNBC cells through suppression of β1 integrin activation and focal adhesion signaling. Moreover, inhibition of surface PDI may contribute, at least in part, to the actions of MNS. These results suggest that MNS has a potential to be developed as an anticancer agent for treatment of TNBC. PMID:25593085

  7. A short-wavelength infrared emitting multimodal probe for non-invasive visualization of phagocyte cell migration in living mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Y; Komatsuzaki, A; Mori, Y; Ma, Q; Yoshioka, Y; Jin, T

    2014-11-28

    For the non-invasive visualization of cell migration in deep tissues, we synthesized a short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) emitting multimodal probe that contains PbS/CdS quantum dots, rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. This probe enables multimodal (SWIR fluorescence/magnetic resonance) imaging of phagocyte cell migration in living mice. PMID:25296382

  8. LKB1 kinase-dependent and -independent defects disrupt polarity and adhesion signaling to drive collagen remodeling during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Lee, Byoungkoo; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine/threonine kinase and a commonly mutated gene in lung adenocarcinoma. The majority of LKB1 mutations are truncations that disrupt its kinase activity and remove its C-terminal domain (CTD). Because LKB1 inactivation drives cancer metastasis in mice and leads to aberrant cell invasion in vitro, we sought to determine how compromised LKB1 function affects lung cancer cell polarity and invasion. Using three-dimensional models, we show that LKB1 kinase activity is essential for focal adhesion kinase–mediated cell adhesion and subsequent collagen remodeling but not cell polarity. Instead, cell polarity is overseen by the kinase-independent function of its CTD and more specifically its farnesylation. This occurs through a mesenchymal-amoeboid morphological switch that signals through the Rho-GTPase RhoA. These data suggest that a combination of kinase-dependent and -independent defects by LKB1 inactivation creates a uniquely invasive cell with aberrant polarity and adhesion signaling that drives invasion into the microenvironment. PMID:26864623

  9. Collective migration models: Dynamic monitoring of leader cells in migratory/invasive disease processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Zachary Steven

    Leader cells are a fundamental biological process that have only been investigated since the early 2000s. These cells have often been observed emerging at the edge of an artificial wound in 2D epithelial cell collective invasion, created with either a mechanical scrape from a pipette tip or from the removal of a plastic, physical blocker. During migration, the moving cells maintain cell-cell contacts, an important quality of collective migration; the leader cells originate from either the first or the second row, they increase in size compared to other cells, and they establish ruffled lamellipodia. Recent studies in 3D have also shown that cells emerging from an invading collective group that also exhibit leader-like properties. Exactly how leader cells influence and interact with follower cells as well as other cells types during collective migration, however, is another matter, and is a subject of intense investigation between many different labs and researchers. The majority of leader cell research to date has involved epithelial cells, but as collective migration is implicated in many different pathogenic diseases, such as cancer and wound healing, a better understanding of leader cells in many cell types and environments will allow significant improvement to therapies and treatments for a wide variety of disease processes. In fact, more recent studies on collective migration and invasion have broadened the field to include other cell types, including mesenchymal cancer cells and fibroblasts. However, the proper technology for picking out dynamic, single cells within a moving and changing cell population over time has severely limited previous investigation into leader cell formation and influence over other cells. In line with these previous studies, we not only bring new technology capable of dynamically monitoring leader cell formation, but we propose that leader cell behavior is more than just an epithelial process, and that it is a critical physiological

  10. Fibronectin-1 expression is increased in aggressive thyroid cancer and favors the migration and invasion of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sponziello, Marialuisa; Rosignolo, Francesca; Celano, Marilena; Maggisano, Valentina; Pecce, Valeria; De Rose, Roberta Francesca; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Durante, Cosimo; Filetti, Sebastiano; Damante, Giuseppe; Russo, Diego; Bulotta, Stefania

    2016-08-15

    In this study we analyzed the expression levels of markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in several papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) and the relation with tumor genotypes and clinicopathological characteristics. The role of fibronectin-1 (FN1) was investigated by analyzing the effects of FN1 silencing in two human thyroid cancer cell lines. Most of EMT markers were significantly over-expressed in a group of 36 PTCs. In particular, FN1 mRNA levels were higher in tumor vs non-tumor tissue (117.3, p < 0.001) and also in aggressive and BRAF(V600E) samples. Similar results were observed (and confirmed at the protein level) when FN1 expression was analyzed in a validation group of 50 PTCs and six lymph node (LN) metastases. Silencing of FN1 in TPC-1 and BCPAP thyroid cancer cells significantly reduced proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion in both cell lines. Collectively, our data indicate that FN1 overexpression is an important determinant of thyroid cancer aggressiveness. PMID:27173027

  11. Nogo-A inhibits the migration and invasion of human malignant glioma U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shu-Guang; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Song-Yuan; Li, Chun-Hao; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Nogo or reticulon-4 (RTN4), also known as neurite outgrowth inhibitor, is a member of the reticulon family of genes. Nogo-A, one of the three isoforms, is enriched in the central nervous system (CNS). The extracellular domain of Nogo-A, Nogo-66, has neurite growth inhibitory activity that is specific for neurons and is mediated by the Nogo receptor. However, most of its functions are not known yet. We investigated whether Nogo-A modulates the migration and invasion of a glioblastoma cell line, as well as the factors that have an effect on Nogo-A. The expression of Nogo-A was evaluated using western blotting and immunohistochemistry in human brain tumor specimens. U87MG cells were transfected with a sense-Nogo-A cDNA construct (U87-Nogo-A cells expressing Nogo-A) and an empty vector (U87MG-E cells not expressing Nogo-A). The migration and invasion abilities of these cells were investigated using simple scratch and Matrigel invasion assays. Morphologic and cytoskeletal changes were documented by confocal microscopy. The proliferation rate was estimated using doubling time assay. The effects of Nogo-A on Rho activity and phosphorylated cofilin were determined by a Rho activity assay and western blotting. Among primary brain tumors, Nogo-A expression was found in a higher percentage of oligodendrogliomas (90.0%) compared with the percentage in the glioblastomas (68.4%). In addition, the percentage in mixed gliomas was 42.9%, while it was not expressed in pituitary adenomas or schwannomas. The migration and invasion abilities of the U87-Nogo-A cells were decreased compared with the control. In the U87-Nogo-A cell line, Rho activity and phosphorylated cofilin expression were also decreased and morphology became more flat in comparison with the U87MG-E cell line. Nogo-A may inhibit the migration and invasion of human malignant glioma cells via the downregulation of RhoA-cofilin signaling. PMID:27109183

  12. Prion protein binding to HOP modulates the migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Lacerda, Tonielli Cristina Sousa; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Giudice, Fernanda Salgueiredo; Dias, Marcos Vinicios Salles; de Oliveira, Gabriela Pintar; Teixeira, Bianca Luise; Dos Santos, Tiago Goss; Martins, Vilma Regina

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies. The generation of conventional treatments has improved, but approximately 50 % of patients with CRC who undergo potentially curative surgery ultimately relapse and die, usually as a consequence of metastatic disease. Our previous findings showed that engagement of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its ligand HSP70/90 heat shock organizing protein (HOP) induces proliferation of glioblastomas. In addition, PrP(C) has been described as an important modulator of colorectal tumor growth. Here, we investigated the biological relevance of the PrP(C)-HOP interaction in CRC cells. We demonstrate that HOP induced the migration and invasion of CRC cell lines in a PrP(C)-dependent manner and that phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 pathway is a downstream mediator of these effects. Additionally, we show that a HOP peptide with the ability to bind PrP(C) and abolish the PrP(C)-HOP interaction inhibited the migration and invasion of CRC cells. Together, these data indicate that the disruption of the PrP(C)-HOP complex could be a potential therapeutic target for modulating the migratory and invasive cellular properties that lead to metastatic CRC. PMID:27112151

  13. Proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioma cells exposed to paclitaxel (Taxol) in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Terzis, A. J.; Thorsen, F.; Heese, O.; Visted, T.; Bjerkvig, R.; Dahl, O.; Arnold, H.; Gundersen, G.

    1997-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol), an anti-cancer drug derived from Taxus species, was tested for its anti-migrational, anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effect on two human glioma cell lines (GaMg and D-54Mg) grown as multicellular tumour spheroids. In addition, the direct effect of paclitaxel on glioma cells was studied using flow cytometry and scanning confocal microscopy. Both cell lines showed a dose-dependent growth and migratory response to paclitaxel. The GaMg cells were found to be 5-10 times more sensitive to paclitaxel than D-54Mg cells. Paclitaxel also proved to be remarkably effective in preventing invasion in a co-culture system in which tumour spheroids were confronted with fetal rat brain cell aggregates. Control experiments with Cremophor EL (the solvent of paclitaxel for clinical use) in this study showed no effect on tumour cell migration, cell proliferation or cell invasion. Scanning confocal microscopy of both cell lines showed an extensive random organization of the microtubules in the cytoplasm. After paclitaxel exposure, the GaMg and the D-54Mg cells exhibited a fragmentation of the nuclear material, indicating a possible induction of apoptosis. In line with this, flow cytometric DNA histograms showed an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle after 24 h of paclitaxel exposure. After 48 h, a deterioration of the DNA histograms was observed indicating nuclear fragmentation. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9192976

  14. Stress-induced CXCR4 Promotes Migration and Invasion of Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Krook, Melanie A.; Nicholls, Lauren A.; Scannell, Christopher A.; Chugh, Rashmi; Thomas, Dafydd G.

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer in pediatric patients. Although the primary cause of death in Ewing sarcoma is metastasis, the mechanism underlying tumor spread needs to be elucidated. To this end, the role of the CXCR4/SDF-1a chemokine axis as a mediator of Ewing sarcoma metastasis was investigated. CXCR4 expression status was measured in primary tumor specimens by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and in multiple cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR and flow cytometry. Migration and invasion of CXCR4-positive Ewing sarcoma cells towards CXCL12/SDF-1a were also determined. Interestingly, while CXCR4 status was disparate among Ewing sarcoma cells, ranging from absent to high-level expression; its expression was found to be highly dynamic and responsive to changes in the microenvironment. In particular, up-regulation of CXCR4 occurred in cells that were subjected to growth factor deprivation, hypoxia, and space constraints. This up-regulation of CXCR4 was rapidly reversed upon removal of the offending cellular stress conditions. Functionally, CXCR4-positive cells migrated and invaded towards an SDF-1a gradient and these aggressive properties were impeded by both the CXCR4 small molecule inhibitor AMD3100, and by knockdown of CXCR4. In addition, CXCR4-dependent migration and invasion were inhibited by small molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 and Rac1, mechanistically implicating these Rho-GTPases as downstream mediators of the CXCR4-dependent phenotype. PMID:24651452

  15. Rap2B promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Di, Jiehui; Cao, Huan; Tang, Juangjuan; Lu, Zheng; Gao, Keyu; Zhu, Zhesi; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    Rap2B, a member of the Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins, reportedly presents a high level of expression in various human tumors and plays a significant role in the development of tumor. However, the function of Rap2B in prostate cancer (PCa) remains unclear. We elucidated the stimulative role of Rap2B in PCa cell proliferation, migration and invasion by means of the CCK-8 cell proliferation assay, cell cycle analysis and transwell migration assay. Western blot analysis uncovered that elevated Rap2B leads to increased phosphorylation levels of FAK, suggesting that FAK-dependent pathway might be responsible for the effect of Rap2B on PCa cells migration and invasion. Inversely, FAK-specific inhibitor (PF-573228) can abort Rap2B-induced FAK phosphorylation. In vivo experiment confirmed that Rap2B positively regulated PCa growth and metastasis, as well as the expression of phosphorylated FAK. Collectively, these findings shed light on Rap2B as a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:27154636

  16. The inhibition of lamellar hydroxyapatite and lamellar magnetic hydroxyapatite on the migration and adhesion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun; Zuo, Guifu; Xiong, Guangyao; Luo, Honglin; Li, Qiuping; Ma, Chunying; Li, Deying; Gu, Feng; Ma, Yongjie; Wan, Yizao

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been reported to exhibit potent anti-tumor effects in some cancer cells. In our previous study, we have successfully synthesized two types of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, laminated hydroxyapatite (L-HAp) and laminated magnetic hydroxyapatite (LM-HAp). In this study, we wanted to investigate the effects of L-HAp and LM-HAp with various concentrations on human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell proliferation was assessed with a MTT colorimetric assay. Scratch and adhesion assays were used to detect the effects of these two materials on migration and adhesion. The expressions of integrin β1 and Akt were measured by Western blotting. Our results showed that L-HAp and LM-HAp had little cell cytotoxicity and significantly reduced cell mobility and adhesion. LM-HAp showed greater inhibitor ability on migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, results from western blotting showed that L-HAp and LM-HAp impacted the phosphorylation of integrin β1, but showed no regular impact on Akt. This study suggests that L-HAp and LM-HAp may be potential anti-tumor and delivery system for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24363068

  17. Promotion of Cell Migration by Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Is Enhanced by PSA in a Polysialyltransferase-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Feng; Wang, Xin; He, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule 140 (NCAM-140) is a glycoprotein and always highly polysialylated in cancer. Functions of polysialic acid (PSA) that binds to N-glycan termini on NCAM remain unclear. ldlD-14 cells, a CHO cell mutant deficient in UDP-Gal 4-epimerase, are useful for structural and functional studies of Gal-containing glycoproteins because their abnormal glycosylation can be converted to normal status by exogenous addition of galactose (Gal). We cloned the genes for NCAM-140 and for polysialyltransferases STX and PST (responsible for PSA synthesis) from normal murine mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and transfected them into ldlD-14 and human breast cancer cells MCF-7. The effect of PSA on NCAM-mediated cell proliferation, motility, migration and adhesion was studied. We found that NCAM-140 significantly promoted cell proliferation, motility and migration, while polysialylation of NCAM-140 catalyzed by STX, but not by PST, enhanced NCAM-mediated cell migration, but not cell proliferation or motility. In addition, PSA catalyzed by different polysialyltransferases affected the adhesion of NCAM to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. PMID:25885924

  18. Promotion of cell migration by neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is enhanced by PSA in a polysialyltransferase-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng; Wang, Xin; He, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule 140 (NCAM-140) is a glycoprotein and always highly polysialylated in cancer. Functions of polysialic acid (PSA) that binds to N-glycan termini on NCAM remain unclear. ldlD-14 cells, a CHO cell mutant deficient in UDP-Gal 4-epimerase, are useful for structural and functional studies of Gal-containing glycoproteins because their abnormal glycosylation can be converted to normal status by exogenous addition of galactose (Gal). We cloned the genes for NCAM-140 and for polysialyltransferases STX and PST (responsible for PSA synthesis) from normal murine mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and transfected them into ldlD-14 and human breast cancer cells MCF-7. The effect of PSA on NCAM-mediated cell proliferation, motility, migration and adhesion was studied. We found that NCAM-140 significantly promoted cell proliferation, motility and migration, while polysialylation of NCAM-140 catalyzed by STX, but not by PST, enhanced NCAM-mediated cell migration, but not cell proliferation or motility. In addition, PSA catalyzed by different polysialyltransferases affected the adhesion of NCAM to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. PMID:25885924

  19. Norstictic Acid Inhibits Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Migration, Invasion, and In Vivo Invasive Growth Through Targeting C-Met.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Hassan Y; Elsayed, Heba E; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M; Akl, Mohamed R; Bhattacharjee, Joydeep; Egbert, Susan; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem affecting the female population worldwide. The triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are characterized by malignant phenotypes, worse patient outcomes, poorest prognosis, and highest mortality rates. The proto-oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is usually dysregulated in TNBCs, contributing to their oncogenesis, tumor progression, and aggressive cellular invasiveness that is strongly linked to tumor metastasis. Therefore, c-Met is proposed as a promising candidate target for the control of TNBCs. Lichens-derived metabolites are characterized by their structural diversity, complexity, and novelty. The chemical space of lichen-derived metabolites has been extensively investigated, albeit their biological space is still not fully explored. The anticancer-guided fractionation of Usnea strigosa (Ach.) lichen extract led to the identification of the depsidone-derived norstictic acid as a novel bioactive hit against breast cancer cell lines. Norstictic acid significantly suppressed the TNBC MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, with minimal toxicity to non-tumorigenic MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Molecular modeling, Z'-LYTE biochemical kinase assay and Western blot analysis identified c-Met as a potential macromolecular target. Norstictic acid treatment significantly suppressed MDA-MB-231/GFP tumor growth of a breast cancer xenograft model in athymic nude mice. Lichen-derived natural products are promising resources to discover novel c-Met inhibitors useful to control TNBCs. PMID:26744260

  20. The effect of ROCK-1 activity change on the adhesive and invasive ability of Y79 retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common intraocular tumor in childhood worldwide. It is a deadly pediatric eye cancer. The main cause of death in Rb patients is intracranial and systemic metastasis. ROCK is the main downstream effector of Ras-homologous (Rho) family of GTPases which are involved in many cellular functions, such as cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Overexpression of ROCK promotes invasion and metastasis of many solid tumors. However, the effect of ROCK in Rb is largely unknown. Methods ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 mRNA expression in Y79 cell lines were examined by RT-PCR. Protein expression in the Y79 cell line were examined by western blot analyses. ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 siRNA were transfected into Y79 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay after exposure to ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632). We examined the effect of ROCK inhibitors (Y-27632, ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 siRNA) on Y79 cell adhesive capacity by cell adhesion assay. Cell invasion assay through matrigel was used to study the effect of ROCK inhibitors on Y79 cell invasive capacity. Results The expression of mRNA of ROCK-1 was more than that of ROCK-2 in the Y79 cell line. The protein expression levels of ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 were downregulated in the cells transfected with siRNA. Y-27632 treatment didn’t lead to any changes of Y79 cells proliferation. Adhesive ability of Y79 cells was enhanced following Y-27632 or ROCK-1 siRNA treatment. The invasive capacity of Y79 cells showed an inverse relationship with increasing Y-27632 concentration. Invasiveness of Y79 cells also decreased in Y79 cells transfected with ROCK-1 siRNA. However, there was no change in adhesive ability or invasive capacity in Y79 cells transfected with siRNA against ROCK-2. Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate that ROCK-1 protein plays a key role in regulating metastasis and invasion of Y79 cells, suggesting that the ROCK-1 dependent pathway may be a potential target for

  1. JAK2/STAT3 targeted therapy suppresses tumor invasion via disruption of the EGFRvIII/JAK2/STAT3 axis and associated focal adhesion in EGFRvIII-expressing glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qifan; Han, Lei; Dong, Yucui; Tian, Jing; Huang, Wei; Liu, Zhaoyu; Jia, Xiuzhi; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Jianning; Li, Xia; Kang, Chunsheng; Ren, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Background As a commonly mutated form of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII strongly promotes glioblastoma (GBM) tumor invasion and progression, but the mechanisms underlying this promotion are not fully understood. Methods Through gene manipulation, we established EGFRvIII-, wild-type EGFR-, and vector-expressing GBM cells. We used cDNA microarrays, bioinformatics analysis, target-blocking migration and invasion assays, Western blotting, and an orthotopic U87MG GBM model to examine the phenotypic shifts and treatment effects of EGFRvIII expression in vitro and in vivo. Confocal imaging, co-immunoprecipitation, and siRNA assays detected the focal adhesion-associated complex and their relationships to the EGFRvIII/JAK2/STAT3 axis in GBM cells. Results The activation of JAK2/STAT3 signaling is vital for promoting migration and invasion in EGFRvIII-GBM cells. AG490 or WP1066, the JAK2/STAT3 inhibitors, specifically destroyed EGFRvIII/JAK2/STAT3-related focal adhesions and depleted the activation of EGFR/Akt/FAK and JAK2/STAT3 signaling, thereby abolishing the ability of EGFRvIII-expressing GBM cells to migrate and invade. Furthermore, the RNAi silencing of JAK2 in EGFRvIII-expressing GBM cells significantly attenuated their ability to migrate and invade; however, as a result of a potential EGFRvIII-JAK2-STAT3 activation loop, neither EGFR nor STAT3 knockdown yielded the same effects. Moreover, AG490 or JAK2 gene knockdown greatly suppressed tumor invasion and progression in the U87MG-EGFRvIII orthotopic models. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that JAK2/STAT3 signaling is essential for EGFRvIII-driven migration and invasion by promoting focal adhesion and stabilizing the EGFRvIII/JAK2/STAT3 axis. Targeting JAK2/STAT3 therapy, such as AG490, may have potential clinical implications for the tailored treatment of GBM patients bearing EGFRvIII-positive tumors. PMID:24861878

  2. MiR-200c promotes bladder cancer cell migration and invasion by directly targeting RECK

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yidong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Peng; Yang, Chengdi; Tang, Jinyuan; Deng, Xiaheng; Yang, Xiao; Tao, Jun; Lu, Qiang; Li, Pengchao

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the dysregulation of certain microRNAs plays an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. MiR-200c exhibits a disordered expression in many tumors and presents dual roles in bladder cancer (BC). Therefore, the definite role of miR-200c in BC needs to be investigated further. Materials and methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to assess miR-200c expression. Cell invasion and migration were evaluated using wound healing and transwell assays. The luciferase reporter assay was used to identify the direct target of miR-200c. The expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK) in BC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues, as well as in BC cell lines, was detected through quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot assay, and immunohistochemistry. Results The miR-200c expression was significantly upregulated in the BC tissues compared with the adjacent nontumor tissues. The downregulation of miR-200c significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in the BC cell lines. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RECK was a direct target of miR-200c. The knockdown of RECK in the BC cell lines treated with anti-miR-200c elevated the previously attenuated cell migration and invasion. Conclusion Our findings indicated that miR-200c functions as oncogenes in BC and may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of BC. PMID:27574450

  3. c-Cbl regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Min Woo; Park, Ji Ho; Yoo, Hee Min; Yang, Seung Wook; Oh, Kyu Hee; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Park, Dong Eun; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chung, Chin Ha

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • c-Cbl ubiquitinates αPix for proteasome-mediated degradation. • C6 and A172 glioma cells lack c-Cbl, which leads to stabilization of αPix. • The accumulated αPix promotes migration and invasion of the cancer cells. • The lack of c-Cbl in the cells appears responsible for their malignant behavior. - Abstract: c-Cbl, a RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase, down-regulates receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGF receptor, and inhibits cell proliferation. Moreover, c-Cbl mutations are frequently found in patients with myeloid neoplasm. Therefore, c-Cbl is known as a tumor suppressor. αPix is expressed only in highly proliferative and mobile cells, including immune cells, and up-regulated in certain invasive tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we showed that c-Cbl serves as an ubiquitin E3 ligase for proteasome-mediated degradation of αPix, but not βPix. Remarkably, the rat C6 and human A172 glioma cells were unable to express c-Cbl, which leads to a dramatic accumulation of αPix. Depletion of αPix by shRNA markedly reduced the ability of the glioma cells to migrate and invade, whereas complementation of shRNA-insensitive αPix promoted it. These results indicate that c-Cbl negatively regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion and the lack of c-Cbl in the C6 and A172 glioma cells is responsible for their malignant behavior.

  4. Lidocaine inhibits the invasion and migration of TRPV6-expressing cancer cells by TRPV6 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Gou, Hui; Zhu, Jiang; Tian, Si; Yu, Lehua

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of pharmacological actions, acting as nerve blocks, and treating pain and cardiac arrhythmias via blocking of the sodium channel. The use of local anesthetics could reduce the possibility of cancer metastasis and recurrence following surgical tumor excision. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of lidocaine upon the invasion and migration of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 6 (TRPV6)-expressing cancer cells. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, prostatic cancer PC-3 cells and ovarian cancer ES-2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability was quantitatively determined by MTT assay. The migration of the cells was evaluated using the wound healing assay, and the invasion of the cells was assessed using a Transwell assay. Calcium (Ca2+) measurements were performed using a Fluo-3 AM fluorescence kit. The expression of TRPV6 mRNA and protein in the cells was determined by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results suggested that lidocaine inhibits the cell invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231, PC-3 and ES-2 cells at lower than clinical concentrations. The inhibitory effect of lidocaine on TRPV6-expressing cancer cells was associated with a reduced rate of calcium influx, and could occur partly as a result of the downregulation of TRPV6 expression. The use of appropriate local anesthetics may confer potential benefits in clinical practice for the treatment of patients with TRPV6-expressing cancer. PMID:27446413

  5. FGF19 Contributes to Tumor Progression in Gastric Cancer by Promoting Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Daqi; Tian, Ruihua; Shi, Hailong; Chen, Xiangming; Liu, Wenzhi; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Since patients are often diagnosed at a late stage, very few effective therapies are left in the arsenal. FGF19, as a hormone, has been reported to promote tumor growth in various types of cancer; however, its function in gastric cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we showed that FGF19 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FGF19 is able to enhance migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells. Given its great potency in gastric cancer progression, FGF19 may be an effective target of treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:27053348

  6. SphK1 promotes tumor cell migration and invasion in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Jianting; Xie, Ying; Yin, Junmei; Lu, Wei; Fang, Shi

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), which phosphorylates sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is overexpressed in various types of cancers and may act as an oncogene in tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the role of SphK1 in CRC patients. We studied the expression of SphK1 in 85 cases of CRC tissues by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and western blot. We also evaluated the effect of SphK1 on cell proliferation and invasion by MTT and transwell invasion assay. SphK1 is overexpressed in CRC tissues and cell lines, and upregulation of SphK1 correlated significantly with the following parameters: lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, and advanced TNM stage. SphK1 knockdown results in inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Inhibition of CRC cell migration and invasion is also evident through reversal of EMT by increases in E-cadherin expression and decreases in vimentin expression. In conclusion, SphK1 is associated with the proliferation and invasiveness of CRC cells and the SphK1 gene may contribute to a novel therapeutic approach against CRC. PMID:26662312

  7. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Teng, Yong; Liu, Haitao; Purohit, Sharad; Xu, Heng; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA’s antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer) cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA) and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1) with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1). However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3) were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA’s overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment. PMID:24260584

  8. Active migration into the subcellular space precedes Campylobacter jejuni invasion of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Alphen, Lieke B; Bleumink-Pluym, Nancy M C; Rochat, Klazina D; van Balkom, Bas W M; Wösten, Marc M S M; van Putten, Jos P M

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni invades mucosal cells via largely undefined and rather inefficient (0.01-2 bacteria per cell) mechanisms. Here we report a novel, highly efficient C. jejuni infection pathway resulting in 10-15 intracellular bacteria per cell within 3 h of infection. Electron microscopy, pulse-chase infection assays and time-lapse multiphoton laser confocal microscopy demonstrated that the mechanism involved active and rapid migration of the pathogen into the subcellular space (termed 'subvasion'), followed by bacterial entry ('invasion') at the cell basis. Efficient subvasion was maximal after repeated rounds of selection for the subvasive phenotype. Targeted mutagenesis indicated that the CadF, JlpA or PEB1 adhesins were not required. Dissection of the selected and parental phenotypes by SDS-PAGE yielded comparable capsule polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide profiles. Proteomics revealed reduced amounts of the chemotaxis protein CheW for the subvasive phenotype. Swarming assays confirmed that the selected phenotype exhibited altered migration behaviour. Introduction of a plasmid carrying chemotaxis genes into the subvasive strain yielded wild-type subvasion levels and migration behaviour. These results indicate that alterations in the bacterial migration machinery enable C. jejuni to actively penetrate the subcellular space and gain access to the cell interior with unprecedented efficiency. PMID:18052944

  9. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  10. Chemokine Receptor Type 4 Regulates Migration and Invasion of Trophectoderm Cell in the Human Blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Bao, Siyu; Li, Tianjie; Long, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jinjuan; Zhao, Hongcui; Ren, Yun; Zhao, Yue; Li, Rong; Tan, Tao; Yu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) has been suggested to regulate cell migration and invasion in human somatic cells. However, its role in human oocytes and embryos has not been investigated directly. Here we show that CXCR4 mRNA was initially expressed at the 4-cell stage, and its expression gradually increased until the blastocyst stage, whereas its protein was detectable only after the 8-cell stage. In addition, CXCR4 mRNA and protein were expressed in the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cell of the blastocyst. Furthermore, we collected embryos from women whose embryos had undergone successful implantation (SI) and those whose embryos had failed implantation (FI) in their fresh cycles. TE cells from the FI group had reduced CXCR4 mRNA expression relative to those from the SI group but not in the ICM. Through ICM replacement, we constructed mouse blastocysts in which Cxcr4 was specifically knocked down in TE cells to simulate the CXCR4 expression profile of human blastocysts from the FI group. In this case, we found that the implantation rate significantly decreased after transfer of reconstructed embryos. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that CXCR4 can induce cell apoptosis and migration mediated by Rho signaling. This hypothesis was confirmed by invasion and migration experiments, using a human trophoblast cell line. The present study is the first to explore the characteristics of CXCR4 expression using human oocytes and embryos and suggests that CXCR4 is required upstream of TE cell apoptosis and migration. CXCR4 expression is a potential biomarker to predict implantation competence during assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:27146031

  11. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA-CTD903 inhibits colorectal cancer invasion and migration by repressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling and predicts favorable prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zixu; Yu, Xihu; Ni, Beibei; Chen, Daici; Yang, Zihuan; Huang, Jintuan; Wang, Jianping; Chen, Dianke; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is essential for tumorigenesis and progression, but little is known about its roles and mechanisms in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to detect expression level and prognostic role of lncRNA‑CTD903 in CRC patients, which was selected based on one microarray data. The effects on cell invasion, migration and proliferation were investigated after silencing or overexpression of CTD903 in CRC cell lines. We also observed the EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) phenomenon and effect on cell adhesion. The associations between CTD903 and EMT markers, such as E-cadherin, N-cadherin, β-catenin, ZEB1, ZO-1, Snail, and Twist, were determined by western blotting. Our results showed lncRNA-CTD903 expression was strongly upregulated in 115 CRC patients, comparing to adjacent normal tissues. CTD903 was proven to be an independent predicted factor of favorable prognosis in CRC patients by using multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. After knockdown of CTD903 in RKO and SW480, both cell invasion and migration increased, and cells exhibited EMT-like appearance, along with reduced adhering ability. Moreover, overexpression of CTD903 in DLD1 and HCT116 reversed these phenotypes. Furthermore, downregulation of CTD903 enhanced Wnt/β-catenin activation and subsequently increased transcription factors (Twist and Snail) expression, along with increased mesenchymal marker Vimentin and decreased epithelial marker ZO-1 level, while overexpressed CTD903 confirmed these associations. In conclusion, this study shows that LncRNA-CTD903 acts as a tumor suppressor in CRC and can inhibit cell invasion and migration through repressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which plays important roles in EMT and CRC metastasis. PMID:27035092

  12. Gallic acid suppresses the migration and invasion of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-Ching; Huang, An-Cheng; Wu, Ping-Ping; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Meng, Menghsiao; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a natural diet or consumption of fruits or vegetables can decrease the risk of cancer development. Cancer cells can migrate to and invade other organs or tissues that cause more difficulty to treat them and this also results in the need for treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Gallic acid (GA) has been demonstrated to possess multiple biological activities including anticancer function. However, no report exist on GA inhibited invasion and migration of human prostate cancer cells. We investigated the effects of migration and invasion in GA-treated PC-3 human prostate cancer cells with a series of in vitro experiments. Boyden chamber transwell assay was used to examine the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. Western blotting, real-time PCR and gelatin zymography were used for determining the protein levels, gene expression and enzyme activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 in vitro. Results indicated that GA inhibited the invasion and migration of PC-3 cells and these effects are dose-dependent. GA inhibited the protein levels of MMP-2 and -9, son of sevenless homolog 1 (SOS1), growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB) p65, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, p-AKT (Thr308) and p-AKT (Ser473), but it promoted the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and AKT in PC-3 cells. GA also reduced the enzyme activities of MMP-2 and -9 in the examined cells. Moreover, the down-regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Ras homolog gene family, member A (Rho A) mRNA expression levels, and up-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP1) gene levels occurred in GA-treated PC-3 cells after 24 h treatment. Based on these observations, we suggest that GA might modulate through blocking the p38, JNK, PKC and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways and reducing the NF

  13. miR-154 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small cell lung cancer by targeting ZEB2

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XINGYU; YANG, ZHIGUANG; ZHANG, PENG; LIU, YUNPENG; SHAO, GUOGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRs) play critical roles in the development and progression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a previous study, the present authors demonstrated that miR-154 acts as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC; however, its underlying molecular mechanism and target in NSCLC remain poorly understood. In the present study, ectopic expression of miR-154 remarkably suppressed cell migration and invasion in NSCLC cells. Zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2) was identified as a direct target of miR-154 in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-154 could decrease the expression of ZEB2 at the messenger RNA and protein levels. Ectopic expression of miR-154 also increased the levels of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker, and decreased the levels of vimentin, a mesenchymal marker, which contributed to suppress epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to inhibit cell migration and invasion. In addition, downregulation of ZEB2 exerted similar effects to those caused by miR-154 overexpression on NSCLC cell migration and invasion, while upregulation of ZEB2 could significantly reverse the inhibitory effects on migration and invasion caused by miR-154 on NSCLC cells. These findings demonstrated that miR-154 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells by regulating EMT through targeting ZEB2, suggesting that miR-154 may be a potential anticancer therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:27347142

  14. CAPN 7 promotes the migration and invasion of human endometrial stromal cell by regulating matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) has been reported to be an important regulator of cell migration and invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in many diseases, such as cancer and endometriosis. Here, we found calcium-activated neutral protease 7 (CAPN 7) expression was markedly upregulated in the eutopic endometrium and endometrial stromal cells of women diagnosed with endometriosis. Our studies were carried out to detect the effects of CAPN 7 on human endometrial stromal cell (hESC) migration and invasion. Methods Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect the expression of CAPN 7 in endometriosis patients and normal fertile women. Scratch-wound-healing and invasion chamber assay were used to investigate the role of CAPN 7 in hESC migration and invasion. Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and zymography were carried out to detect the effect of CAPN 7 on the expressions and activity of MMP-2. Results CAPN 7 was markedly up-regulated in endometriosis, thereby promoting the migration and invasion of hESC. CAPN 7 overexpression led to increased expression of MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2); CAPN 7 knockdown reversed these changes. CAPN 7 increased MMP-2 activity by increasing the ratio of MMP-2 to TIMP-2. We also found that OA-Hy (an MMP-2 inhibitor) decreased the effects of CAPN 7 overexpression on hESC migration and invasion by approximately 50% and 55%, respectively. Additionally, a coimmunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that CAPN 7 interacted with activator protein 2α (AP-2α): an important transcription factor of MMP-2. Conclusions CAPN 7 promotes hESC migration and invasion by increasing the activity of MMP-2 via an increased ratio of MMP-2 to TIMP-2. PMID:23855590

  15. Silencing of HMGA2 promotes apoptosis and inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Wu, Ding; Tang, Run; Li, Xiang; Chen, Renfu; Xue, Song; Zhang, Chengjing; Sun, Xiaoqing

    2016-06-01

    The high mobility group protein A2 (HMGA2) has been demonstrated as an architectural transcription factor that is associated with pathogenesis of many malignant cancers; however, its role in prostate cancer cells remains largely unknown. To explore whether HMGA2 participates in the development and progression of prostate cancer, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted on human HMGA2 was transfected to suppress the HMGA2 expression in prostate cancer PC3 and DU145 cells, and then the cellular biology changes after decreased the expression of HMGA2 was examined. Our results showed that knockdown of HMGA2 markedly inhibited cell proliferation; this reduced cell proliferation was due to the promotion of cell apoptosis as the Bcl-xl was decreased, whereas Bax was up-regulated. In addition, we found that HMGA2 knockdown resulted in reduction of cell migration and invasion, as well as repressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and affected the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both cell types. We further found that decreased HMGA2 expression inhibited the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smad signalling pathway in cancer cells. In conclusion, our data indicated that HMGA2 was associated with apoptosis, migration and invasion of prostate cancer, which might be a promising therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:27240983

  16. Transferrin Promotes Endothelial Cell Migration and Invasion: Implication in Cartilage Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Carlevaro, Mariella F.; Albini, Adriana; Ribatti, Domenico; Gentili, Chiara; Benelli, Roberto; Cermelli, Silvia; Cancedda, Ranieri; Cancedda, Fiorella Descalzi

    1997-01-01

    During endochondral bone formation, avascular cartilage differentiates to hypertrophic cartilage that then undergoes erosion and vascularization leading to bone deposition. Resting cartilage produces inhibitors of angiogenesis, shifting to production of angiogenic stimulators in hypertrophic cartilage. A major protein synthesized by hypertrophic cartilage both in vivo and in vitro is transferrin. Here we show that transferrin is a major angiogenic molecule released by hypertrophic cartilage. Endothelial cell migration and invasion is stimulated by transferrins from a number of different sources, including hypertrophic cartilage. Checkerboard analysis demonstrates that transferrin is a chemotactic and chemokinetic molecule. Chondrocyte-conditioned media show similar properties. Polyclonal anti-transferrin antibodies completely block endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by purified transferrin and inhibit the activity produced by hypertrophic chondrocytes by 50–70% as compared with controls. Function-blocking mAbs directed against the transferrin receptor similarly reduce the endothelial migratory response. Chondrocytes differentiating in the presence of serum produce transferrin, whereas those that differentiate in the absence of serum do not. Conditioned media from differentiated chondrocytes not producing transferrin have only 30% of the endothelial cell migratory activity of parallel cultures that synthesize transferrin. The angiogenic activity of transferrins was confirmed by in vivo assays on chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane, showing promotion of neovascularization by transferrins purified from different sources including conditioned culture medium. Based on the above results, we suggest that transferrin is a major angiogenic molecule produced by hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral bone formation. PMID:9087450

  17. Quercetin suppresses cellular migration and invasion in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Chan, Chien-Yi; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Lee, Ming-Fen; Huang, Chun-Yin

    2016-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is often associated with a poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Hence, efficient inhibition of the EGFR signaling-mediated malignancy would improve survival rate. In a previous study, we demonstrated that quercetin appears to be a potent anti-tumorigenic agent through its inhibition of the EGFR/Akt pathway in oral cancer, but its anti-metastatic potential in HNSCC remains unclear [1]. Here, we have hypothesized that quercetin might be effective in metastatic inhibition in EGFR-overexpressing HNSCC cells. Quercetin treatment with 10 μM (half concentration of IC50) suppressed cell migration and invasion in EGFR-overexpressing HSC-3 and FaDu HNSCC cells. Quercetin also inhibited the colony growth of HSC-3 cells embedded in a Matrigel matrix. Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the secreted gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 are responsible for the degradation of gelatin in the extracellular matrix and type IV collagen in the basement membrane; and this degradation event is crucial for the migration from the origin and the invasion into the bone in HNSCC. Quercetin (10 μM) treatment also suppressed the expression and proteolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Taken together, our data indicate that quercetin is an effective anti-cancer agent against MMP-2- and MMP-9-mediated metastasis in EGFR-overexpressing HNSCC. PMID:27510965

  18. Siegesbeckia orientalis Extract Inhibits TGFβ1-Induced Migration and Invasion of Endometrial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Chang; Ling, Xue-Hua; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Wu, Jing-Mei; Wang, Chao-Ping; Yang, Jyh-Ferng; Fang, Li-Wen; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2016-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinoma typically exhibits aggressive metastasis and results in a poor prognosis. Siegesbeckia orientalis Linne is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb with several medicinal benefits, including the cytotoxicity against various cancers. This study investigates the inhibitory effects of S. orientalis ethanol extract (SOE) on the migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). The inhibitory effects were evaluated by determining wound healing and performing the Boyden chamber assay. This study reveals that SOE can inhibit TGFβ1-induced cell wound healing, cell migration, and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner in RL95-2 and HEC-1A endometrial cancer cells. SOE also reversed the TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including the loss of the cell-cell junction and the lamellipodia-like structures. Western blot analysis revealed that SOE inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and Akt, as well as the expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, and u-PA in RL95-2 cells dose-dependently. The results of this investigation suggest that SOE is a potential anti-metastatic agent against human endometrial tumors. PMID:27527140

  19. CCL25/CCR9 Signal Promotes Migration and Invasion in Hepatocellular and Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqi; Sun, Tong; Chen, Yuxi; Gong, Shu; Sun, Xiye; Zou, Fangdong; Peng, Rui

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is one of the most lethal diseases worldwide, and metastasis is the most common cause of patients' deaths. Identification and inhibition of markers involved in metastasis process in cancer cells are promising works to block metastasis and improve prognoses of patients. Chemokines are a superfamily of small, chemotactic cytokines, whose functions are based on interaction with corresponding receptors. It has been found that one of the functions of chemokines is to regulate migration and invasion abilities of lymphocytes, as well as cancer cells. Chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) regulates trafficking of lymphocytes and cancer cell lines when interacting with its exclusive ligand chemokine 25 (CCL25). However, the mechanisms of CCL25/CCR9 signal that regulates metastasis of cancer cells are not completely known yet. In this study, we stimulated or inhibited CCL25/CCR9 signal in breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) and hepatocellular cancer cell lines (HepG2 and HUH7), and found that CCL25/CCR9 signal resulted in different promotion of migration and invasion in different cell lines. These phenomena could be explained by selective regulation of several markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our findings suggested that CCL25/CCR9 signal may provide cancer cells with chemotactic abilities through influencing several EMT markers. PMID:27008282

  20. Ezrin regulates focal adhesion and invadopodia dynamics by altering calpain activity to promote breast cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Victoria; Szeto, Alvin; Ghaffari, Abdi; Greer, Peter A.; Côté, Graham P.; Elliott, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Up-regulation of the cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin frequently occurs in aggressive cancer types and is closely linked with metastatic progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms detailing how ezrin is involved in the invasive and metastatic phenotype remain unclear. Here we report a novel function of ezrin in regulating focal adhesion (FA) and invadopodia dynamics, two key processes required for efficient invasion to occur. We show that depletion of ezrin expression in invasive breast cancer cells impairs both FA and invadopodia turnover. We also demonstrate that ezrin-depleted cells display reduced calpain-mediated cleavage of the FA and invadopodia-associated proteins talin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and cortactin and reduced calpain-1–specific membrane localization, suggesting a requirement for ezrin in maintaining proper localization and activity of calpain-1. Furthermore, we show that ezrin is required for cell directionality, early lung seeding, and distant organ colonization but not primary tumor growth. Collectively our results unveil a novel mechanism by which ezrin regulates breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26246600

  1. Anti-invasive and anti-adhesive activities of a recombinant disintegrin, r-viridistatin 2, derived from the Prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis)

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Sara E.; Jia, Ying; Soto, Julio G.; Parral, Jessica; Cantu, Esteban; Brannon, Jeremy; Lardner, Kristina; Ramos, Carla J.; Seoane, Agustin I.; Sánchez, Elda E

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom disintegrins inhibit platelet aggregation and have anti-cancer activities. In this study, we report the cloning, expression, and functional activities of a recombinant disintegrin, r-viridistatin 2 (GenBank ID: JQ071899), from the Prairie rattlesnake. r-Viridistatin 2 was tested for anti-invasive and anti-adhesive activities against six different cancer cell lines (human urinary bladder carcinoma (T24), human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080), human skin melanoma (SK-Mel-28), human colorectal adenocarcinoma (CaCo-2), human breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) and murine skin melanoma (B16F10)). r-Viridistatin 2 shares 96% and 64% amino acid identity with two other Prairie rattlesnake medium-sized disintegrins, viridin and viridistatin, respectively. r-Viridistatin 2 was able to inhibit adhesion of T24, SK-MEL-28, HT-1080, CaCo-2 and MDA-MB-231 to various extracellular matrix proteins with different affinities. r-Viridistatin 2 decreased the ability of T24 and SK-MEL-28 cells to migrate by 62 and 96% respectively, after 24 h of incubation and the invasion of T24, SK-MEL-28, HT-1080 and MDA-MB-231 cells were inhibited by 80, 85, 65 and 64% respectively, through a reconstituted basement membrane using a modified Boyden chamber. Finally, r-viridistatin 2 effectively inhibited lung colonization of murine melanoma cells in BALB/c mice by 71%, suggesting that r-viridistatin 2 could be a potent anti-cancer agent in vivo. PMID:22465495

  2. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Kishimoto, Keishi; Kato, Ayumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Sato, Ryuichiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-03-10

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration.

  3. Inhibition of adhesion of enteroinvasive pathogens to human intestinal Caco-2 cells by Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB decreases bacterial invasion.

    PubMed

    Coconnier, M H; Bernet, M F; Kernéis, S; Chauvière, G; Fourniat, J; Servin, A L

    1993-07-01

    Salmonella typhimurium and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) were found to adhere to the brush border of differentiated human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells in culture, whereas Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes adhered to the periphery of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. All these enterovirulent strains invaded the Caco-2 cells. Using a heat-killed human Lactobacillus acidophilus (strain LB) which strongly adheres both to undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells, we have studied inhibition of cell association with and invasion within Caco-2 cells by enterovirulent bacteria. Living and heat-killed Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB inhibited both cell association and invasion of Caco-2 cells by enterovirulent bacteria in a concentration-dependent manner. The mechanism of inhibition of both adhesion and invasion appears to be due to steric hindrance of human enterocytic pathogen receptors by whole-cell lactobacilli rather than to a specific blockade of receptors. PMID:8354463

  4. The Proprotein Convertase Furin Contributes to Rhabdomyosarcoma Malignancy by Promoting Vascularization, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jaaks, Patricia; D’Alessandro, Valentina; Grob, Nicole; Büel, Sina; Hajdin, Katarina; Schäfer, Beat W.; Bernasconi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The proprotein convertase (PC) furin cleaves precursor proteins, an important step in the activation of many cancer-associated proteins. Substrates of furin and furin-like PCs play a role in proliferation, metastasis and invasion. Some of them are involved in the progression of the pediatric soft tissue sarcoma rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). In this study, we show that PCs, and in particular furin, are expressed in RMS cell lines. To investigate the functional role of furin, we generated RMS cell lines with modulated furin activity. Silencing or stable inhibition of furin delayed tumor growth in Rh30 and RD xenografts in vivo, and was correlated with lower microvessel density. Reduced furin activity also decreased migration and invasion abilities in vitro, and inhibition of furin in RMS cells diminished processing of IGF1R, VEGF-C, PDGF-B and MT1-MMP, leading to lower levels of mature proteins. Furthermore, we found that furin activity is required for proper IGF signaling in RMS cells, as furin silencing resulted in reduced phosphorylation of Akt upon IGF1 stimulation. Taken together, our results suggest that furin plays an important role in the malignant phenotype of RMS cells by activating proteins involved in tumor growth and vascularization, metastasis and invasion. PMID:27548722

  5. Lentivirus-mediated PHLDA2 overexpression inhibits trophoblast proliferation, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    JIN, FENG; QIAO, CHONG; LUAN, NANNAN; LI, HUI

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate trophoblast invasion and increased trophoblast apoptosis cause serious pregnancy complications. Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) has been linked to fetal size at birth and growth restriction in a number of studies. However, the impact of PHLDA2 on trophoblast function had not been studied previously, to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that primary trophoblasts isolated from placental villous tissues were positive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18), vimentin and human placental lactogen (hPL). JEG-3 cells and primary trophoblasts were infected with lentivirus overexpressing PHLDA2. RT-qPCR and western blot analysis detected high levels of PHLDA2. A Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay showed that PHLDA2 overexpression inhibited trophoblast proliferation. In addition, PHLDA2 significantly induced apoptosis, as evidenced by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst staining, along with activation of Bax and caspase-3 and also decreased Bcl-2 expression. Further investigation showed that PHLDA2 effectively induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria into the cytosol and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. PHLDA2 likely induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway. Wound healing and Transwell assays indicated that PHLDA2 overexpression efficiently suppressed cell migration and invasion. These data suggest that PHLDA2 plays an important role in the occurrence and development of pregnancy complications by promoting trophoblast apoptosis and suppressing cell invasion. PMID:26935516

  6. Problems in biology with many scales of length: Cell-cell adhesion and cell jamming in collective cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Adrian F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Park, Jin-Ah

    2016-04-10

    As do all things in biology, cell mechanosensation, adhesion and migration begin at the scale of the molecule. Collections of molecules assemble to comprise microscale objects such as adhesions, organelles and cells. And collections of cells in turn assemble to comprise macroscale tissues. From the points of view of mechanism and causality, events at the molecular scale are seen most often as being the most upstream and, therefore, the most fundamental and the most important. In certain collective systems, by contrast, events at many scales of length conspire to make contributions of equal importance, and even interact directly and strongly across disparate scales. Here we highlight recent examples in cellular mechanosensing and collective cellular migration where physics at some scale bigger than the cell but smaller than the tissue - the mesoscale - becomes the missing link that is required to tie together findings that might otherwise seem counterintuitive or even unpredictable. These examples, taken together, establish that the phenotypes and the underlying physics of collective cellular migration are far richer than previously anticipated. PMID:26546401

  7. Expression of DFak56, a Drosophila homolog of vertebrate focal adhesion kinase, supports a role in cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fox, George L.; Rebay, Ilaria; Hynes, Richard O.

    1999-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a highly conserved, cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that has been implicated in promoting cell migration and transmission of antiapoptotic signals in vertebrate cells. In cultured cells, integrin engagement with the extracellular matrix promotes the recruitment of FAK to focal contacts and increases in its phosphotyrosine content and kinase activity, suggesting FAK is an intracellular mediator of integrin signaling. We have identified a Drosophila FAK homolog, DFak56, that is 33% identical to vertebrate FAK, with the highest degree of homology in domains critical for FAK function, including the kinase and focal adhesion targeting domains, and several protein–protein interaction motifs. Furthermore, when expressed in NIH 3T3 cells, DFak56 both localizes to focal contacts and displays the characteristic elevation of phosphotyrosine content in response to plating the cells on fibronectin. During embryogenesis, DFak56 is broadly expressed, and it becomes elevated in the gut and central nervous system at later stages. Consistent with a role in cell migration, we also observe that DFak56 is abundant in the border cells of developing egg chambers before the onset of, and during, their migration. PMID:10611323

  8. Analytical tools for identification of non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from polyurethane adhesives in multilayer packaging materials and their migration into food simulants.

    PubMed

    Félix, Juliana S; Isella, Francesca; Bosetti, Osvaldo; Nerín, Cristina

    2012-07-01

    Adhesives used in food packaging to glue different materials can provide several substances as potential migrants, and the identification of potential migrants and migration tests are required to assess safety in the use of adhesives. Solid-phase microextraction in headspace mode and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and ChemSpider and SciFinder databases were used as powerful tools to identify the potential migrants in the polyurethane (PU) adhesives and also in the individual plastic films (polyethylene terephthalate, polyamide, polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyethylene/ethyl vinyl alcohol). Migration tests were carried out by using Tenax(®) and isooctane as food simulants, and the migrants were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. More than 63 volatile and semivolatile compounds considered as potential migrants were detected either in the adhesives or in the films. Migration tests showed two non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from PU adhesives that migrated through the laminates into Tenax(®) and into isooctane. Identification of these NIAS was achieved through their mass spectra, and 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione and 1,4,7-trioxacyclotridecane-8,13-dione were confirmed. Caprolactam migrated into isooctane, and its origin was the external plastic film in the multilayer, demonstrating real diffusion through the multilayer structure. Comparison of the migration values between the simulants and conditions will be shown and discussed. PMID:22526644

  9. The miR-130 family promotes cell migration and invasion in bladder cancer through FAK and Akt phosphorylation by regulating PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Hiroshi; Jingushi, Kentaro; Hirono, Takayuki; Ueda, Yuko; Kitae, Kaori; Nakata, Wataru; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Uemura, Motohide; Nonomura, Norio; Tsujikawa, Kazutake

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer causes an estimated 150,000 deaths per year worldwide. Although 15% of the recurrent bladder cancer becomes an invasive type, currently used targeted therapy for malignant bladder cancer is still not efficient. We focused on the miR-130 family (miR-130b, miR-301a, and miR-301b) that was significantly upregulated in bladder cancer specimens than that of the normal urothelial specimens. We analyzed the functional significance of miR-130 family using a 5637 bladder cancer cell line and revealed that miR-130 family of inhibitors suppressed cell migration and invasion by downregulating focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Akt phosphorylation. Mechanistic analyses indicate that the miR-130 family directly targets phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN), resulting in the upregulation of FAK and Akt phosphorylation. In clinical bladder cancer specimens, downregulation of PTEN was found to be closely correlated with miR-130 family expression levels. Overall, the miR-130 family has a crucial role in malignant progression of bladder cancer and thus the miR-130 family could be a promising therapeutic target for invasive bladder cancer. PMID:26837847

  10. Overexpression of dnIKK in mesenchymal stem cells leads to increased migration and decreased invasion upon TNFα stimulation.

    PubMed

    Haasters, Florian; Prall, Wolf Christian; Westphal, Ines; Böcker, Wolfgang; Padula, Daniela; Mutschler, Wolf; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias

    2013-06-28

    IκB kinase 2 (IKK-2) mediates tumor necrosis-factor α (TNFα) induced invasion of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) to sites of tissue injury. Suppressing IKK-2 activity leads to reduced expression of proteolytic enzymes and impaired invasive capacity. In order to further reveal mechanisms of hMSC recruitment, we here aimed to analyse the impact of IKK-2 on two-dimensional migration upon TNFα stimulation in contrast to three-dimensional invasion. An immortalized hMSC line (SCP-1) was transduced with a dominant-negative mutant of IκB kinase 2 (SCP-1 dnIKK). Migration was assessed using a linear-gradient chemotaxis chambers by time-lapse analysis. Invasive capacity through human extracellular matrix was analysed using transwell invasion assays. RT-PCR confirmed increased IKK-2 expression levels in SCP-1 dnIKK cells, while TNFα receptor I and II expression was not altered. Invasion upon TNFα stimulation was significantly reduced by 78% in SCP-1 dnIKK. In contrast, migration was significantly increased, represented by a 60% elevated forward migration index and a 2.1-fold higher mean dislocation of the center of mass towards TNFα. In conclusion, our data confirms the impact of IKK-2 in TNFα dependent hMSC recruitment. Interestingly, reducing IKK-2 function increases two-dimensional migration towards TNFα, while invasive capacity is impaired. These findings contribute to a deeper understanding of MSC's biological properties orchestrating the complex processes of stem cell recruitment and homing. PMID:23743204

  11. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  12. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-26

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14A(PD)) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14A(PD) cells. hCDC14A(PD) cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14A(PD) cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  13. RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion via interaction with N-WASP and hnRNPK

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Av, Amotz; Giladi, Nissim David; Lee, Hae Kyung; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Xiang, Cunli; Pauker, Maor H.; Barda-Saad, Mira; Poisson, Laila; Brodie, Chaya

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding normal brain tissue. RTVP-1 is highly expressed in GBM and regulates the migration and invasion of glioma cells. To further study RTVP-1 effects we performed a pull-down assay using His-tagged RTVP-1 followed by mass spectrometry and found that RTVP-1 was associated with the actin polymerization regulator, N-WASP. This association was further validated by co-immunoprecipitation and FRET analysis. We found that RTVP-1 increased cell spreading, migration and invasion and these effects were at least partly mediated by N-WASP. Another protein which was found by the pull-down assay to interact with RTVP-1 is hnRNPK. This protein has been recently reported to associate with and to inhibit the effect of N-WASP on cell spreading. hnRNPK decreased cell migration, spreading and invasion in glioma cells. Using co-immunoprecipitation we validated the interactions of hnRNPK with N-WASP and RTVP-1 in glioma cells. In addition, we found that overexpression of RTVP-1 decreased the association of N-WASP and hnRNPK. In summary, we report that RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell spreading, migration and invasion and that these effects are mediated via interaction with N-WASP and by interfering with the inhibitory effect of hnRNPK on the function of this protein. PMID:26305187

  14. Novel Suppressive Effects of Ketotifen on Migration and Invasion of MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ji; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Soo Youl; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rates associated with cancer reflect the metastatic spread of tumor cells from the site of their origin. Metastasis, in fact, is the cause of 90% of cancer deaths. Therefore, considerable effort is being made to inhibit metastasis. In the present study, we screened ketotifen for anti-migratory and anti-invasive activities against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cancer cells. Cancer cell migration and invasion were measured using multi-well chambers. Additionally, western blots were used to examine the effects of ketotifen on the expressions of CDC42, Rho, Rac, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). The results showed that ketotifen dose-dependently suppressed the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 cells. Ketotifen also suppressed the expressions of CDC42, Rac, and Rho, which, significantly, are involved in MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 cancer cell migration. Moreover, ketotifen suppressed the expression and activity of MMP-9, which is involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix leading to invasion. The overall data suggested that ketotifen suppresses the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 cancer cells via inhibition of CDC42, Rac, Rho, and MMP-9 expression. PMID:25489422

  15. Loss of AF6/afadin, a marker of poor outcome in breast cancer, induces cell migration, invasiveness and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Fournier, G; Cabaud, O; Josselin, E; Chaix, A; Adélaïde, J; Isnardon, D; Restouin, A; Castellano, R; Dubreuil, P; Chaffanet, M; Birnbaum, D; Lopez, M

    2011-09-01

    Afadin/AF6, an F-actin-binding protein, is ubiquitously expressed in epithelia and has a key role during development, through its regulatory role in cell-cell junction organization. Afadin loss of expression in 15% of breast carcinoma is associated with adverse prognosis and increased risk of metastatic relapse. To determine the role of afadin in breast cancer, we studied the functional consequences of afadin protein extinction using in vitro and in vivo models. Three different breast cancer cell lines representative of the major molecular subtypes were stably repressed for afadin expression (knockdown of afadin (afadin KD)) using RNA interference. Collective and individual migrations as well as Matrigel invasion were markedly increased in afadin KD cells. Heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1)-induced migration and invasion were increased by twofold in afadin KD cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of afadin in the afadin-negative T47D cell line inhibited spontaneous and HRG-β1-induced migrations. RAS/MAPK and SRC kinase pathways were activated in afadin KD cells. Activation levels positively correlated with migration and invasion strength. Use of MEK1/2 (U0126) and SRC kinases (SU6656) inhibitors reduced afadin-dependent migration and invasion. Afadin extinction in the SK-BR-3 cell line markedly accelerated tumor growth development in mouse mammary gland and lung metastasis formation. These results may explain why the loss of afadin expression in tumors correlates with high tumor size and poor metastasis-free survival in patients. PMID:21478912

  16. Amygdalin blocks the in vitro adhesion and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells by an integrin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Afschar, Masud; Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Tsaur, Igor; Mani, Jens; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-03-01

    Information about the natural compound amygdalin, which is employed as an antitumor agent, is sparse and thus its efficacy remains controversial. In this study, to determine whether amygdalin exerts antitumor effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, its impact on RCC metastatic activity was investigated. The RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, were exposed to amygdalin from apricot kernels, and adhesion to human vascular endothelium, immobilized collagen or fibronectin was investigated. The influence of amygdalin on chemotactic and invasive activity was also determined, as was the influence of amygdalin on surface and total cellular α and β integrin expression, which are involved in metastasis. We noted that amygdalin caused significant reductions in chemotactic activity, invasion and adhesion to endothelium, collagen and fibronectin. Using FACScan analysis, we noted that amygdalin also induced reductions, particularly in integrins α5 and α6, in all three cell lines. Functional blocking of α5 resulted in significantly diminished adhesion of KTC-26 and A498 to collagen and also in decreased chemotactic behavior in all three cell lines. Blocking α6 integrin significantly reduced chemotactic activity in all three cell lines. Thus, we suggest that exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibits metastatic spread and is associated with downregulation of α5 and α6 integrins. Therefore, we posit that amygdalin exerts antitumor activity in vitro, and this may be linked to integrin regulation. PMID:26781971

  17. MicroRNA-383 expression regulates proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dawei; Ma, Pengju; Gao, Guojun; Gui, Yongkun; Niu, Xiaolu; Jin, Baozhe

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate microRNA-383 (miR-383) expression level in glioma cells and its influences on proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis, and cell cycle in glioma cells. miR-383 expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Thirty BALB/c-nu mice were randomly assigned into three groups: U87-miR-383 group, vector-control group, and blank group. Tumorigenicity experiment was conducted to confirm the function of miR-383. U251 and U87 glioma cells were divided into three groups: non-transfected control cells (NT group), glioma cells transfected with miR-383 (miR-383 group), and glioma cells transfected with negative sequence (NC group). Transfection efficiency was measured by qRT-PCR. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect cell proliferation. Cell migration and invasion were examined by utilizing a Transwell chamber. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The qRT-PCR results revealed that miR-383 expression was down-regulated in human glioma cells, and was negatively related to the pathological grading of glioma. The rates of tumor growth in vector-control group and blank group were significantly faster than that in U87-miR-383 group, and the average tumor volume and weight in vector-control group and blank group were increased as compared with U87-miR-383 group. Additionally, miR-383 levels in miR-383 group were higher than those in NT group and NC group. CCK-8 assay indicated lower cell viability in miR-383 group as compared with NT group and NC group. Flow cytometry implied that the percentages of cells in miR-383 group reduced, while the cell apoptosis rate enhanced compared with NT group and NC group. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-383 expression is down-regulated in glioma cells, inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, affecting the cell cycle, and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:25936342

  18. Cyclin Y regulates the proliferation, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyuan; Shi, Honghui; Fan, Qingbo; Sun, Xiangxiu

    2016-08-01

    This study is designated to investigate the roles of cyclin Y (CCNY) and Wnt signaling pathway in regulating ovarian cancer (OC) cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot, MTT assay, cell scratch, and transwell test were used in our study, and transplanted tumor model was constructed on nude mice. C-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, OGT, and β-catenin protein expressions in tumor tissues were detected. CCNY was significantly upregulated in OC cell lines and tissues (both P < 0.05); significant association was observed between CCNY expression and clinicopathological stage, lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P < 0.05); and the CCNY expression in stages III to IV was higher than that in stages I to II, and patients with LNM had higher CCNY expression when compared with those in patients without LNM (P < 0.05); expressions of c-Myc, cyclin D, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT were upregulated in OC tissues compared with ovarian benign tissues, suggesting that these expressions were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05); CCNY significantly exacerbated proliferation, migration, and invasion of A2780 cells; c-Myc and cyclin D1 protein expressions increased as the expression of CCNY increased (P < 0.001); β-catenin expressions in A2780 cells with over-expression of CCNY were significantly increased in the nucleus, but significantly decreased in the cytoplasm (both P < 0.05); high expressions of CCNY exacerbated the proliferation of A2780 cells in nude mice and significantly increased c-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT protein expressions in tumor tissues which were transplanted into nude mice (P < 0.01). CCNY might exacerbate the proliferation, migration, and invasion of OC cells via activating the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, this study provides a theoretical foundation for the development of therapeutic drugs that are able to cure OC by targeting CCNY. PMID:26831658

  19. Single Amino Acid Substitutions in the Chemotactic Sequence of Urokinase Receptor Modulate Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Paola; Pavone, Vincenzo; Mugione, Pietro; Di Carluccio, Gioconda; Masucci, Maria Teresa; Arra, Claudio; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Stoppelli, Maria Patrizia; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2012-01-01

    The receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) plays an important role in controlling cell migration. uPAR binds urokinase and vitronectin extracellular ligands, and signals in complex with transmembrane receptors such as Formyl-peptide Receptors (FPR)s and integrins. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that synthetic peptides, corresponding to the uPAR88–92 chemotactic sequence, when carrying the S90P or S90E substitutions, up- or down-regulate cell migration, respectively. To gain mechanistic insights into these opposite cell responses, the functional consequences of S90P and S90E mutations in full-length uPAR were evaluated. First, (HEK)-293 embryonic kidney cells expressing uPARS90P exhibit enhanced FPR activation, increased random and directional cell migration, long-lasting Akt phosphorylation, and increased adhesion to vitronectin, as well as uPAR/vitronectin receptor association. In contrast, the S90E substitution prevents agonist-triggered FPR activation and internalization, decreases binding and adhesion to vitronectin, and inhibits uPAR/vitronectin receptor association. Also, 293/uPARS90P cells appear quite elongated and their cytoskeleton well organized, whereas 293/uPARS90E cells assume a large flattened morphology, with random orientation of actin filaments. Interestingly, when HT1080 cells co-express wild type uPAR with uPAR S90E, the latter behaves as a dominant-negative, impairing uPAR-mediated signaling and reducing cell wound repair as well as lung metastasis in nude mice. In contrast, signaling, wound repair and in vivo lung metastasis of HT1080 cells bearing wild type uPAR are enhanced when they co-express uPARS90P. In conclusion, our findings indicate that Ser90 is a critical residue for uPAR signaling and that the S90P and S90E exert opposite effects on uPAR activities. These findings may be accommodated in a molecular model, in which uPARS90E and uPARS90P are forced into inactive and active forms, respectively

  20. Leptin promotes breast cancer cell migration and invasion via IL-18 expression and secretion.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuangfa; Wei, Lan; Huang, Yunxiu; Wu, Yang; Su, Min; Pang, Xueli; Wang, Nian; Ji, Feihu; Zhong, Changli; Chen, Tingmei

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, crosstalk between tumor microenvironment and cancer cells have received increasing attention. Accumulating research data suggests that leptin, a key adipokine secreted from adipocytes, plays important roles in breast cancer development. In our study, the effects of leptin on polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and promotion of the invasiveness of tumor cells were investigated. THP1 cells were used to differentiate M2 polarization macrophages. After stimulated by leptin, we established a co-culture system of tumor cells and macrophages to evaluate the function of leptin-induced macrophages in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. The gene and protein expressions were analyzed and the underlying mechanisms were evaluated. Moreover, pathological human specimens, and xenografts in nude mice, were detected to strengthen the in vitro results. Leptin elevated the expression of an array of cytokines in TAMs, IL-18 was the most increased, with an activation of the NF-κB/NF-κB1 signalling pathway. Additionally, after treated with leptin, TAMs significantly promoted the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. However, these effects of leptin were abolished by the co-incubation of Bay11‑7082, a pharmacological NF-κB inhibitor. Leptin also directly stimulated IL-18 expression in breast cancer cells, which, differently, was via the PI3K/AKT-ATF-2 signaling pathway. In vivo studies showed that malignant breast carcinoma exhibited strong higher expression of Leptin, IL-8, and TAMs markers. Xenograft tumor-bearing mouse models showed that leptin significantly increased tumor volume, enhanced lung metastases, and increased expression of IL-8 and TAM markers, which were abolished by depletion of macrophages by clophosome-clodronate liposomes (CCL). Leptin could induce IL-18 expression both in TAMs and breast cancer cells. Leptin-induced IL-18 expression was regulated via NF-κB/NF-κB1 signaling in TAMs, while via PI3K

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis Initiated by Dephosphorylation and Downregulation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Jiang, Guoqiang; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Hunter, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Upregulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) expression and EGFR-induced signaling have been correlated with progression to invasion and metastasis in a wide variety of carcinomas, but the mechanism behind this is not well understood. We show here that, in various human carcinoma cells that overexpress EGFR, EGF treatment induced rapid tyrosine dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) associated with downregulation of its kinase activity. The downregulation of FAK activity was both required and sufficient for EGF-induced refractile morphological changes, detachment of cells from the extracellular matrix, and increased tumor cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. Tumor cells with downregulated FAK activity became less adherent to the extracellular matrix. However, once cells started reattaching, FAK activity was restored by activated integrin signaling. Moreover, this process of readhesion and spreading could not be abrogated by further EGF stimulation. Interruption of transforming growth factor alpha-EGFR autocrine regulation with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor led to a substantial increase in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibition of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Consistent with this, FAK tyrosine phosphorylation was reduced in cells from tumors growing in transplanted, athymic, nude mice, which have an intact autocrine regulation of the EGFR. We suggest that the dynamic regulation of FAK activity, initiated by EGF-induced downregulation of FAK leading to cell detachment and increased motility and invasion, followed by integrin-dependent reactivation during readhesion, plays a role in EGF-associated tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:11359909

  2. Rap2b promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi-Gen; Zhang, Zheng-Qun; Chen, Yan-Bin; Huang, Jian-An

    2016-10-01

    Rap2b, a member of the guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins, is widely up-regulated in many types of tumors. However, the functional role of Rap2b in tumorigenesis of lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of Rap2b on the lung cancer malignant phenotype, such as cell proliferation and metastasis. We found that Rap2b could promote the abilities of lung cancer cell wound healing, migration, and invasion via increasing matrix metalloproteinase-2 enzyme activity. Furthermore, Rap2b overexpression could increase the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2. In conclusion, our results suggested that Rap2b may be a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:26671640

  3. ALK is a MYCN target gene and regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Nafady, Asmaa; Takatori, Atsushi; Kishida, Satoshi; Ohira, Miki; Suenaga, Yusuke; Hossain, Shamim; Akter, Jesmin; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified as an oncogene that is mutated or amplified in NBLs. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular events associated with ALK in the pathogenesis of NBL, it is necessary to clarify how ALK gene contributes to NBL progression. In the present study, we found that ALK expression was significantly high in NBL clinical samples with amplified MYCN (n = 126, P < 0.01) and in developing tumors of MYCN-transgenic mice. Indeed, promoter analysis revealed that ALK is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN. Overexpression and knockdown of ALK demonstrated its function in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, treatment with an ALK inhibitor, TAE-684, efficiently suppressed such biological effects in MYCN amplified cells and tumor growth of the xenograft in mice. Our present findings explore the fundamental understanding of ALK in order to develop novel therapeutic tools by targeting ALK for aggressive NBL treatment. PMID:24356251

  4. Neuromedin B receptor antagonism inhibits migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Jeong, Joo-Won; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Joon; Bae, Moon-Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Neuromedin B (NMB) acts as an autocrine growth factor and a pro-angiogenic factor. Its receptor, NMB receptor (NMB-R), is overexpressed in solid tumors. In the present study, we showed that an NMB-R antagonist, PD168368, suppresses migration and invasion of the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. In addition, PD168368 reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of breast cancer cells by E-cadherin upregulation and vimentin downregulation. Moreover, we found that PD168368 potently inhibits in vivo metastasis of breast cancer. Taken together, these findings suggest that NMB-R antagonism may be an alternative approach to prevent breast cancer metastasis, and targeting NMB-R may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for breast cancer treatment. PMID:27571778

  5. ALX1 promotes migration and invasion of lung cancer cells through increasing snail expression

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Guoquan; Xu, Xiaoying; Zou, Kun; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the main causes in cancer-related death. Here we reported a novel functional role of Aristaless-like homeobox1 (ALX1) in lung carcinogenesis. Analysis of ALX1 in lung cancer specimens confirms upregulation of ALX1 in lung cancer, especially these with distant metastasis. Moreover, higher level of ALX1 expression is associated with poorer prognosis of lung cancer patients. Ectopic expression of ALX1 significantly promotes lung cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion, while ALX1 silencing by siRNA significantly inhibits these abilities of lung cancer cells. The functional role of ALX1 is dependent on increasing Snail expression and knockdown of Snail could restrain the role of ALX1. Collectively, we identify critical roles of ALX1 in lung cancer development and progression. These findings may serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensive determination of ALX1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26722397

  6. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  7. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia aremore » motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.« less

  8. MicroRNA-200b Impacts Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Regulating Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hong; Yu, Haizhong; Yuan, Jianfen; Guo, Chunyan; Cao, Hongyan; Li, Weibing; Xiao, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) plays an important role in multiple links of tumors. It also involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis, and might be a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Another study suggested that ERM expression was regulated directly by miR-200c, and had a critical role in miR-200c suppressing cell migration. This study aimed to investigate the effect of miR-200b on ERM expression in a breast cancer cell line and its influence on invasion and metastasis ability in vitro. Material/Methods Breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different metastatic potentials were selected as a model. MiR-200b overexpression or inhibition was achieved by Lipofectamine™ 2000-mediated miRNA transfection. RT-PCR was used to test miR-200b level, while Western blot was selected to detect ERM protein expression. Wound healing assay and Transwell assay were performed to determine cell migration and invasion ability. Results RT-PCR revealed that miR-200b level in MDA-MB-231 was obviously lower than that in MCF-7, while Western blot analysis showed that ERM expression was significantly higher. MiR-200b inhibition by transfection in MCF-7 markedly decreased miR-200b level, elevated ERM expression, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. MiR-200b overexpression in MDA-MB-231 obviously increased miR-200b level, reduced ERM expression, and weakened cell migration and invasion. Conclusions MiR-200b participates in breast cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating ERM in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. PMID:27276064

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells from osteoporotic patients reveal reduced migration and invasion upon stimulation with BMP-2 or BMP-7.

    PubMed

    Haasters, Florian; Docheva, Denitsa; Gassner, Christoph; Popov, Cvetan; Böcker, Wolfgang; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias; Prall, Wolf Christian

    2014-09-12

    Fractures to the osteoporotic bone feature a delay in callus formation and reduced enchondral ossification. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), the cellular source of fracture healing, are recruited to the fracture site by cytokines, such as BMP-2 and BMP-7. Aim of the study was to scrutinize hMSC for osteoporosis associated alterations in BMP mediated migration and invasion as well as in extracellular matrix (ECM) binding integrin expression. HMSC were isolated from 18 healthy or osteoporotic donors. Migration was assessed using a collagen IV coated micro-slide linear gradient chamber and time-lapse microscopy. Invasion was analyzed utilizing an ECM coated transmembrane invasion assay. Quantitative real-time RT PCR was performed for the ECM binding integrins α1, α2, α3, α4, α5, α11, αv and β1. HMSC from osteoporotic patients showed a significant increase of migration upon BMP-2 or FCS stimulation, as well as a significant increase of invasion upon BMP-2, BMP-7 or FCS stimulation. Nevertheless, the migration and invasion capacity was significantly decreased compared to healthy controls. Out of all integrins analyzed, collagen binding integrin α2 was significantly downregulated in hMSC from osteoporotic patients. In conclusion, we here demonstrate for the first time osteoporosis associated alterations in BMP mediated hMSC recruitment. These findings may underlie the reduced healing of osteoporotic fractures. Nevertheless, the maintained migration and invasion response upon BMP stimulation illustrates the therapeutic potential of these clinically approved substances in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures. Another therapeutic target may be the downregulation of the collagen binding integrin α2 in hMSC from osteoporotic patients. PMID:25152406

  10. SIAH ubiquitin ligases regulate breast cancer cell migration and invasion independent of the oxygen status

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M Gordian; Matt, Sonja; Christian, Sven; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Haegebarth, Andrea; Hofmann, Thomas G; Algire, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Seven-in-absentia homolog (SIAH) proteins are evolutionary conserved RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for the degradation of key molecules regulating DNA damage response, hypoxic adaptation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Many studies suggest a tumorigenic role for SIAH2. In breast cancer patients SIAH2 expression levels correlate with cancer aggressiveness and overall patient survival. In addition, SIAH inhibition reduced metastasis in melanoma. The role of SIAH1 in breast cancer is still ambiguous; both tumorigenic and tumor suppressive functions have been reported. Other studies categorized SIAH ligases as either pro- or antimigratory, while the significance for metastasis is largely unknown. Here, we re-evaluated the effects of SIAH1 and SIAH2 depletion in breast cancer cell lines, focusing on migration and invasion. We successfully knocked down SIAH1 and SIAH2 in several breast cancer cell lines. In luminal type MCF7 cells, this led to stabilization of the SIAH substrate Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain protein 3 (PHD3) and reduced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) protein levels. Both the knockdown of SIAH1 or SIAH2 led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation, with comparable effects. These results point to a tumor promoting role for SIAH1 in breast cancer similar to SIAH2. In addition, depletion of SIAH1 or SIAH2 also led to decreased cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. SIAH knockdown also controlled microtubule dynamics by markedly decreasing the protein levels of stathmin, most likely via p27Kip1. Collectively, these results suggest that both SIAH ligases promote a migratory cancer cell phenotype and could contribute to metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:26654769

  11. CMTM3 inhibits cell migration and invasion and correlates with favorable prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Lianhai; Liu, Baocai; Yuan, Wanqiong; Mo, Xiaoning; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Henan; Xing, Xiaofang; Cheng, Xiaojing; Dong, Bin; Hu, Ying; Du, Hong; Zhu, Yubing; Ding, Ning; Li, Jiyou; Liu, Weili; Ma, Yongzhen; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Jiafu; Han, Wenling

    2014-01-01

    The CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 3 (CMTM3) gene is a novel tumor suppressor with frequent epigenetic inactivation. In this study, we showed the role played by CMTM3 in gastric cancer cells as a tumor suppressor gene, and examined the correlation between CMTM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters using immunohistochemistry in gastric cancer patients with different pathological stages (n = 350). We found that CMTM3 expression was reduced or silenced by epigenetic regulation in gastric cell lines, and dramatically downregulated in primary gastric cancer tissues. Restoration of CMTM3 significantly affected migration and invasion of AGS and SGC-7901 cells (P < 0.001). In vivo experiments showed that peritoneal disseminated metastases were significantly suppressed by CMTM3 (P < 0.001). We further showed that the expression of MMP2 and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 were decreased when CMTM3 was restored. In addition, by immunohistochemical staining, we found that the expression of CMTM3 was remarkably weaker in gastric cancer tissues than in normal mucosae (P = 0.008), and was significantly correlated with gender (P = 0.033), tumor depth (P = 0.049), stage (P = 0.021), and histological grade (P = 0.022). More importantly, CMTM3 expression was associated with prognosis in gastric cancer patients (P = 0.041), and was a significant independent prognostic indicator (hazard ratio = 0.704, 95% confidence interval, 0.498–0.994; P = 0.046). Our findings indicate that CMTM3 regulates migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Moreover, CMTM3 is a candidate marker for prognosis of gastric cancer in the clinic. PMID:24131472

  12. Mathematical Modelling of Molecular Pathways Enabling Tumour Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David P. A.; Martignetti, Loredana; Robine, Sylvie; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei; Calzone, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of metastasis is very important in clinical perspective, since it is estimated that metastasis accounts for 90% of cancer patient mortality. Metastasis results from a sequence of multiple steps including invasion and migration. The early stages of metastasis are tightly controlled in normal cells and can be drastically affected by malignant mutations; therefore, they might constitute the principal determinants of the overall metastatic rate even if the later stages take long to occur. To elucidate the role of individual mutations or their combinations affecting the metastatic development, a logical model has been constructed that recapitulates published experimental results of known gene perturbations on local invasion and migration processes, and predict the effect of not yet experimentally assessed mutations. The model has been validated using experimental data on transcriptome dynamics following TGF-β-dependent induction of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in lung cancer cell lines. A method to associate gene expression profiles with different stable state solutions of the logical model has been developed for that purpose. In addition, we have systematically predicted alleviating (masking) and synergistic pairwise genetic interactions between the genes composing the model with respect to the probability of acquiring the metastatic phenotype. We focused on several unexpected synergistic genetic interactions leading to theoretically very high metastasis probability. Among them, the synergistic combination of Notch overexpression and p53 deletion shows one of the strongest effects, which is in agreement with a recent published experiment in a mouse model of gut cancer. The mathematical model can recapitulate experimental mutations in both cell line and mouse models. Furthermore, the model predicts new gene perturbations that affect the early steps of metastasis underlying potential intervention points for innovative therapeutic

  13. HGF/c-Met signaling promotes liver progenitor cell migration and invasion by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-independent, phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase-dependent pathway in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Causado, A; Caballero-Díaz, D; Bertrán, E; Roncero, C; Addante, A; García-Álvaro, M; Fernández, M; Herrera, B; Porras, A; Fabregat, I; Sánchez, A

    2015-10-01

    Oval cells constitute an interesting hepatic cell population. They contribute to sustain liver regeneration during chronic liver damage, but in doing this they can be target of malignant conversion and become tumor-initiating cells and drive hepatocarcinogenesis. The molecular mechanisms beneath either their pro-regenerative or pro-tumorigenic potential are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of the HGF/c-Met pathway in regulation of oval cell migratory and invasive properties. Our results show that HGF induces c-Met-dependent oval cell migration both in normal culture conditions and after in vitro wounding. HGF-triggered migration involves F-actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which is also evidenced by activation of Rac1. Furthermore, HGF causes ZO-1 translocation from cell-cell contact sites to cytoplasm and its concomitant activation by phosphorylation. However, no loss of expression of cell-cell adhesion proteins, including E-cadherin, ZO-1 and Occludin-1, is observed. Additionally, migration does not lead to cell dispersal but to a characteristic organized pattern in rows, in turn associated with Golgi compaction, providing strong evidence of a morphogenic collective migration. Besides migration, HGF increases oval cell invasion through extracellular matrix, a process that requires PI3K activation and is at least partly mediated by expression and activation of metalloproteases. Altogether, our findings provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the essential role of HGF/c-Met signaling during oval cell-mediated mouse liver regeneration. PMID:26001768

  14. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  15. From junk to master regulators of invasion: lncRNA functions in migration, EMT and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dhamija, Sonam; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-07-15

    Metastasis is a multistep process that involves the dissemination of cells from the primary tumor and colonization of distant secondary organs. Epithelial cells at the invasive front of a carcinoma acquire an enhanced migratory phenotype in a process called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This cellular plasticity seems to drive the initiation of metastasis. Identifying important molecules and understanding their molecular mechanisms is a key to cancer prognosis and the development of therapeutics for late stage malignancies. Recent advances in sequencing technology uncovered that the mammalian genome is pervasively transcribed into many nonprotein-coding RNAs including the class of long noncoding RNA, a.k.a. lncRNA. Several lncRNAs are differentially expressed in carcinomas and they are emerging as potent regulators of tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we review the diverse molecular mechanisms, cellular roles and regulatory patterns that are becoming apparent for the noncoding transcriptome. Chromatin modification, epigenetic regulation, alternative splicing and translational control by MALAT1, HOTAIR and TRE lncRNAs represent important examples of lncRNA-mediated control of cell migration and invasion, EMT and metastasis. Beyond these better characterized examples, numerous additional transcripts have been associated with cancer metastasis, but their functional roles await their discovery. PMID:26875870

  16. Pepper seed extract suppresses invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Kim, Min-Sook; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the antimetastatic activities of chili pepper seed on human breast cancer cells. The water extract of chili pepper seeds was prepared and it contained a substantial amount of phenols (131.12 mg%) and no capsaicinoids. Pepper seed extract (PSE) suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 10, 25, and 50 μg/ml (MDA-MB-231: IC50 = 20.1 μg/ml, MCF-7: IC50 = 14.7 μg/ml). PSE increased the expression level of E-cadherin up to 1.2-fold of the control in MCF-7 cells. PSE also decreased the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 25 and 50 μg/ml. PSE treatment significantly suppressed the invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The motility of cancer cells was apparently retarded in the wound healing assay by the PSE treatment. Although our data collectively demonstrate that PSE inhibits invasion and migration of breast cancer cells, further study is needed to identify specific mechanisms and bioactive components contributing to antimetastatic effects of chili pepper seed. PMID:24341783

  17. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  18. Pristimerin inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Bashir A; Hassan, Hozeifa M; Guerram, Mounia; Hamdi, Aida M; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the world's most common cancers with a high mortality rate mainly due to metastasis. Our previous study showed that pristimerin had potent antitumor activities against human CRC cells. In the present study, we further evaluated pristimerin anti-tumor and anti-metastatic properties. MTT assay, Hoechst staining, Annexin V/PI double staining, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements were used to assess pristimerin cytotoxicity and apoptotic-inducing effects on HCT-116 cells. Wound healing assay and Transwell assay were used to estimate pristimerin anti-migration and anti-invasion activities on CRC cells. Meanwhile, HCT-116 xenograft model applied for investigating in vivo antitumor activities. Our results showed that pristimerin mediated in vitro HCT-116 cell death, through generation of intracellular ROS and apoptosis induction. Tumor volumes and weights measurements, pathological analysis and Tunnel assay proved that pristimerin inhibited in vivo HCT-116 xenografts growth. Pristimerin was also able to limit CRC invasion and metastasis. It caused downregulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and its subsequent downstream p70S6K and E4-BP1 proteins. Collectively, pristimerin exerted both in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and anti-metastatic effects on HCT-116 cells, suggesting that pristimerin has potential as a new anticancer drug for treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27044819

  19. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J.; Fitzhugh, David J.; Parker, Joel S.; Brozowski, Jaime M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Lininger, Ruth; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Sahagian, Gary; Truong, Young K.; Sassano, Maria F.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis. PMID:27049755

  20. Early Passage Dependence of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Mechanics Influences Cellular Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Lin, Wei-Chun; Booth, Elizabeth A; Ladoux, Benoit; Lazarus, Hillard M; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-07-01

    The cellular structures and mechanical properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) vary significantly during culture and with differentiation. Previously, studies to measure mechanics have provided divergent results using different quantitative parameters and mechanical models of deformation. Here, we examine hMSCs prepared for clinical use and subject them to mechanical testing conducive to the relevant deformability associated with clinical injection procedures. Micropipette aspiration of hMSCs shows deformation as a viscoelastic fluid, with little variation from cell to cell within a population. After two passages, hMSCs deform as viscoelastic solids. Further, for clinical applicability during stem cell migration in vivo, we investigated the ability of hMSCs to invade into micropillar arrays of increasing confinement from 12 to 8 μm spacing between adjacent micropillars. We find that hMSC samples with reduced deformability and cells that are more solid-like with passage are more easily able to enter the micropillar arrays. Increased cell fluidity is an advantage for injection procedures and optimization of cell selection based on mechanical properties may enhance efficacy of injected hMSC populations. However, the ability to invade and migrate within tight interstitial spaces appears to be increased with a more solidified cytoskeleton, likely from increased force generation and contractility. Thus, there may be a balance between optimal injection survival and in situ tissue invasion. PMID:26581348

  1. Primary migration of hydrocarbon fluids through invasion-percolation cracking in a source rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, M.; Panahi, H.; Renard, F.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.; Scheibert, J.; Dysthe, D.; Meakin, P.

    2010-12-01

    A petroleum source rock is a tightly bound mixture of highly viscous, high molecular weight, organics (kerogen) and inorganic sedimentary material. During burial, as the temperature and pressure increase, kerogen decomposes, and low viscosity, low molecular weight, hydrocarbons are generated. Primary migration has been studied for decades, but it still remains an enigma how the generated gas and oil escape from very low permeable shales into secondary migration pathways. There is strong evidence that microfractures play an important role in this process. In order to observe crack nucleation and development we performed high resolution x-ray microtomography experiments on samples of Mahogany Zone Green River Shale (Peance Basin, Colorado, USA). One sample was exposed to a gradual rising temperature under atmospheric pressure and time-lapse 3D images of void formation and cracking were acquired. We show that crack formation occurs via nucleation of small cracks/voids located on kerogen patches initially present in the samples. Then these cracks propagate through an invasion percolation-like process in which the fracture front incrementally moves by local stress relaxation. Finally, the small cracks merge progressively until they span the whole sample.

  2. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO2 and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO2 particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. PMID:24746987

  3. Dynamics of Cell Ensembles on Adhesive Micropatterns: Bridging the Gap between Single Cell Spreading and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-01-01

    The collective dynamics of multicellular systems arise from the interplay of a few fundamental elements: growth, division and apoptosis of single cells; their mechanical and adhesive interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix; and the tendency of polarized cells to move. Micropatterned substrates are increasingly used to dissect the relative roles of these fundamental processes and to control the resulting dynamics. Here we show that a unifying computational framework based on the cellular Potts model can describe the experimentally observed cell dynamics over all relevant length scales. For single cells, the model correctly predicts the statistical distribution of the orientation of the cell division axis as well as the final organisation of the two daughters on a large range of micropatterns, including those situations in which a stable configuration is not achieved and rotation ensues. Large ensembles migrating in heterogeneous environments form non-adhesive regions of inward-curved arcs like in epithelial bridge formation. Collective migration leads to swirl formation with variations in cell area as observed experimentally. In each case, we also use our model to predict cell dynamics on patterns that have not been studied before. PMID:27054883

  4. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Mueller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker . E-mail: Herzog@uni-bonn.de

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPP{alpha}) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPP{alpha}, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPP{alpha} has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  5. Esculin and its oligomer fractions inhibit adhesion and migration of U87 glioblastoma cells and in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mokdad-Bzeouich, Imen; Kovacic, Hervé; Ghedira, Kamel; Chebil, Latifa; Ghoul, Mohamed; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Luis, José

    2016-03-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related death. Chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural or synthetic substances to prevent cancer formation or cancer progress. In the present study, we investigate the antitumor activity of esculin and its oligomer fractions in U87 glioblastoma cells. We showed that esculin and its oligomers reduced U87 cell growth in a dose dependent manner. They also inhibited cell adhesion to collagen IV and vitronectin by interfering with the function of their respective receptors α2β1 and αvβ5 integrins. Furthermore, the tested samples were able to reduce migration of U87 cells towards another extracellular matrix fibronectin. Moreover, esculin and its oligomer fractions inhibited in vitro angiogenesis of endothelial cells (HMEC-1). In summary, our data provide the first evidence that esculin and its oligomer fractions are able to reduce adhesion, migration of glioblastoma cells and in vitro angiogenesis. Esculin and its oligomers may thus exert multi-target functions against cancer cells. PMID:26459313

  6. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  7. COX-2 Promotes Migration and Invasion by the Side Population of Cancer Stem Cell-Like Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhe; Jiang, Jing-Hang; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Hao-Jie; Yang, Fu-Quan; Qi, Ya-Peng; Zhong, Yan-Ping; Su, Jie; Yang, Ri-Rong; Li, Le-Qun; Xiang, Bang-De

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor relapse and metastasis due to their abilities to self-renew, differentiate, and give rise to new tumors. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is highly expressed in several kinds of CSCs, and it helps promote stem cell renewal, proliferation, and radioresistance. Whether and how COX-2 contributes to CSC migration and invasion is unclear. In this study, COX-2 was overexpressed in the CSC-like side population (SP) of the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line HCCLM3. COX-2 overexpression significantly enhanced migration and invasion of SP cells, while reducing expression of metastasis-related proteins PDCD4 and PTEN. Treating SP cells with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib down-regulated COX-2 and caused a dose-dependent reduction in cell migration and invasion, which was associated with up-regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN. These results suggest that COX-2 exerts pro-metastatic effects on SP cells, and that these effects are mediated at least partly through regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN expression. These results further suggest that celecoxib may be a promising anti-metastatic agent to reduce migration and invasion by hepatic CSCs. PMID:26554780

  8. Co-Expression of Ezrin-CLIC5-Podocalyxin Is Associated with Migration and Invasiveness in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Téllez, Teresita N. J.; Lopez, Tania V.; Vásquez Garzón, Verónica Rocío; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Prognostic markers are important for predicting the progression and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ezrin (EZR) and Podocalyxin (PODXL) are proteins associated with invasion, migration and poor prognosis in various types of cancer. Recently, it has been observed that chloride intracellular channel 5 (CLIC5) forms a complex with EZR and PODXL and that it is required for podocyte structure and function. In this study, we evaluated the overexpression of EZR, PODXL and CLIC5 in HCC. Methods The modified resistant hepatocyte model (MRHR), human biopsies and HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7 and SNU387) were used in this study. Gene and protein expression levels were evaluated in the MRHR by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses, and protein expression in the human biopsies was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression in the HCC cell lines was evaluated by immunofluorescence and Western blot, also the migration and invasive abilities of Huh7 cells were evaluated using shRNA-mediated inhibition. Results Our results indicated that these genes and proteins were overexpressed in HCC. Moreover, when the expression of CLIC5 and PODXL was inhibited in Huh7 cells, we observed decreased migration and invasion. Conclusion This study suggested that EZR, CLIC5 and PODXL could be biological markers to predict the prognosis of HCC and that these proteins participate in migration and invasion processes. PMID:26135398

  9. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SWAP-70 Modulates the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Ho Jun; Smith, Christian A; Salhia, Bodour; Rutka, James T

    2009-01-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor. Its tendency to invade away from the primary tumor mass is considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Accordingly, the molecular pathogenesis of glioma invasion is currently under investigation. Previously, we examined a gene expression array database comparing human gliomas to nonneoplastic controls and identified several Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors with differential expression. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 has increased expression in malignant gliomas and strongly correlates with lowered patient survival. SWAP-70 is a multifunctional signaling protein involved in membrane ruffling that works cooperatively with activated Rac. Using a glioma tissue microarray, we validated that SWAP-70 demonstrates higher expression in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas or nonneoplastic brain tissue. Through immunofluorescence, SWAP-70 localizes to membrane ruffles in response to the growth factor, epidermal growth factor. To assess the role of SWAP-70 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited its expression withsmall interfering RNAs and observed decreased glioma cell migration and invasion. SWAP-70 overexpression led to increased levels of active Rac even in low-serum conditions. In addition, when SWAP-70 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhanced membrane ruffle formation followed by increased cellmigration and invasiveness. Taken together, our findings suggest that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 plays an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas into the surrounding tissue. PMID:19956392

  10. Pulsed ultrasound promotes melanoblast migration through upregulation of macrophage colony-stimulating factor/focal adhesion kinase autocrine signaling and paracrine mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yu-Ting; Deng, Jhu-Yun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Repigmentation of vitiliginous lesions relies on the proliferation and migration of melanoblasts from hair follicles to the epidermis. Pulsed ultrasound has been demonstrated to have stimulatory effects on cell proliferation and migration and has been applied clinically to enhance tissue repair. To clarify the biologic effects and signaling mechanisms of pulsed ultrasound on melanoblast proliferation and migration, two melanoblast cell lines, the undifferentiated NCCmelb4 cells and the differentiated NCCmelan5 cells, were examined. We demonstrated that pulsed ultrasound increased cell migration in a dose-dependent manner without altering cell proliferation. Pulsed ultrasound enhanced autocrine secretion of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), which subsequently activated the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway to promote melanoblast migration. Furthermore, conditioned medium from mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH 3T3 and primary human keratinocytes treated with pulsed ultrasound could stimulate melanoblast migration through a paracrine effect. Our results provide a novel mechanism to promote migration of melanoblasts by pulsed ultrasound stimulation. PMID:23725022

  11. Qigesan inhibits migration and invasion of esophageal cancer cells via inducing connexin expression and enhancing gap junction function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huijuan; Shi, Dongxuan; Wu, Yansong; Shen, Qiang; Li, Jing

    2016-09-28

    Qigesan (QGS), a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal formula, has long been used to treat patients with esophageal cancer. However, the anticancer mechanisms of action of QGS remain unknown. This study aims to determine whether QGS regulates gap junction (GJ) function and affects the invasiveness of esophageal cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that QGS markedly inhibits the migration and invasion of esophageal cancer cells in vitro. We further show that QGS enhances the function of GJ in esophageal cancer cells. We therefore hypothesized that enhanced connexin expression leads to enhanced GJ function and inhibition of metastasis. We found that QGS enhances expression of connexin 26 and connexin 43 in esophageal cancer cells. This study suggests that QGS increases GJ function via enhancing the expression of connexins, resulting in reduced esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:27345741

  12. Analysis of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons migrating from a polyolefin-based hot-melt adhesive into food.

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Martin; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Simat, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    Hot-melt adhesives are widely utilised to glue cardboard boxes used as food packaging material. They have to comply with the requirements of Article 3 of the European Framework Regulation for food contact materials (1935/2004). The hot melt raw materials analysed mainly consisted of paraffinic waxes, hydrocarbon resins and polyolefins. The hydrocarbon resins, functioning as tackifiers, were the predominant source of hydrocarbons of sufficient volatility to migrate into dry foods: the 18 hydrocarbon resins analysed contained 8.2-118 g kg(-1) saturated and up to 59 g kg(-1) aromatic hydrocarbons eluted from GC between n-C16 and n-C24, substantially more than the paraffinic waxes and the polyolefins. These tackfier resins, especially the oligomers ≤ C24, have been characterised structurally by GC×GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Migration into food was estimated using a simulating system with polenta as food simulant, which was verified by the analysis of a commercial risotto rice sample packed in a virgin fibre folding box sealed with a hot melt. About 0.5-1.5% of the potentially migrating substances (between n-C16 and n-C24) of a hot melt were found to be transferred into food under storage conditions, which can result in a food contamination in the order of 1 mg kg(-1) food (depending on the amount of potentially migrating substances from the hot melt, the hot melt surface, amount of food, contact time etc.). Migrates from hot melts are easily mistaken for mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled cardboard. PMID:26744923

  13. miR-99a regulates ROS-mediated invasion and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting NOX4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Hong, Shunming; Li, Wenhan; Wang, Pengfei; You, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xuebin; Tang, Fan; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Chunzhi

    2016-05-01

    miR-99a is frequently downregulated in various types of human malignancies including lung adenocarcinoma. Recent studies have reported that miR-99a regulates cell growth and cell cycle progression by targeting mTOR, AKT1 and FGFR3. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in the modulation of invasion and migration by miR-99a remain elusive. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between the expression of miR-99a and clinical stage or metastasis in 90 matched lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non-tumor lung tissues. Downregulation of miR-99a was significantly associated with advanced stage and tumor metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and it was found to be a poor prognostic factor in lung adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, functional experiments found that overexpression of miR-99a inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma A549 and Calu3 cells in vitro. We then identified NOX4 as a target gene of miR-99a and NOX4 mediated the inhibition of invasion and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells by miR-99a. By targeting NOX4-mediated ROS production, miR-99a regulated the invasion and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, overexpression of miR-99a significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical staining analysis of the mouse tumor tissues revealed that NOX4 levels were downregulated in the miR-99a treatment group, confirming the in vitro data of NOX4 as a direct target gene of miR-99a. Taken together, these data indicate for the first time that miR-99a directly regulates the invasion and migration in lung adenocarcinoma by targeting NOX4 and that overexpression of miR-99a may become a therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26986073

  14. MicroRNA-126 inhibits the migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells by targeting insulin receptor substrate 1

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XIUMIN; ZHU, DANYANG; LU, CAILING; YAN, DEWEN; LI, LIFENG; CHEN, ZHOUFANG

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been demonstrated to serve important roles in the development and progression of human cancer, primarily through the direct targeting of oncogenes or tumor suppressors. It has been previously suggested that miR-126 may be associated with endometrial cancer (EC). However, the exact role of miR-126 in the migration and invasion of EC cells has not yet been studied. The present study demonstrated that the expression of miR-126 was significantly decreased in EC tissues when compared with matched normal adjacent tissues. The current study reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to examine the expression level of miR-126. Wound healing and transwell assays were used to examine cell migration and invasion. A luciferase reporter assay was used to determine the targeting relationship and western blotting assay was performed to detect the protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-126 significantly inhibited EC SKOV3 cell migration and invasion. Molecular mechanism investigation established that insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) functioned as a direct miR-126 target, and its expression was negatively regulated by miR-126 at a post-transcriptional level in the SKOV3 cells. Additionally, the overexpression of IRS1 reversed the inhibitory effect of miR-126 overexpression on SKOV3 cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that miR-126 inhibited EC cell migration and invasion, at least partially through the direct targeting of IRS1, suggesting that miR-126 may aid the treatment of EC metastasis. PMID:26893720

  15. Platycodin D inhibits migration, invasion, and growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells via suppression of EGFR-mediated Akt and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jaemoo; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    Platycodin D (PD), an active triterpenoid saponin from Platycodon grandiflorum, has been known to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells, but the effect of PD on the invasiveness of cancer cells is largely unknown. In this study, we first determined the molecular mechanism by which PD inhibits the migratory and invasive abilities of the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We demonstrated that a non-cytotoxic concentration of PD markedly suppressed wound healing migration, invasion through the matrigel, and adhesion to an ECM-coated substrate in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, PD inhibited cell invasion by reducing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme activity and mRNA expression. Western blot analysis indicated that PD potently suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as blocked the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Furthermore, PD treatment inhibited the DNA binding activity of NF-κB, which is known to mediate the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as observed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Specific mechanisms of action exerted by PD involved the downregulation of EGFR and the inhibition of EGF-induced activation of the EGFR, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways. The in vivo studies showed that PD significantly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors in BALB/c nude mice. These results suggest that PD might be a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:23867902

  16. Salmonella adhesion, invasion and cellular immune responses are differentially affected by iron concentrations in a combined in vitro gut fermentation-cell model.

    PubMed

    Dostal, Alexandra; Gagnon, Mélanie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; O'Mahony, Liam; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In regions with a high infectious disease burden, concerns have been raised about the safety of iron supplementation because higher iron concentrations in the gut lumen may increase risk of enteropathogen infection. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions of the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica Typhimurium with intestinal cells under different iron concentrations encountered in the gut lumen during iron deficiency and supplementation using an in vitro colonic fermentation system inoculated with immobilized child gut microbiota combined with Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture monolayers. Colonic fermentation effluents obtained during normal, low (chelation by 2,2'-dipyridyl) and high iron (26.5 mg iron/L) fermentation conditions containing Salmonella or pure Salmonella cultures with similar iron conditions were applied to cellular monolayers. Salmonella adhesion and invasion capacity, cellular integrity and immune response were assessed. Under high iron conditions in pure culture, Salmonella adhesion was 8-fold increased compared to normal iron conditions while invasion was not affected leading to decreased invasion efficiency (-86%). Moreover, cellular cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α secretion as well as NF-κB activation in THP-1 cells were attenuated under high iron conditions. Low iron conditions in pure culture increased Salmonella invasion correlating with an increase in IL-8 release. In fermentation effluents, Salmonella adhesion was 12-fold and invasion was 428-fold reduced compared to pure culture. Salmonella in high iron fermentation effluents had decreased invasion efficiency (-77.1%) and cellular TNF-α release compared to normal iron effluent. The presence of commensal microbiota and bacterial metabolites in fermentation effluents reduced adhesion and invasion of Salmonella compared to pure culture highlighting the importance of the gut microbiota as a barrier during pathogen invasion. High iron concentrations as

  17. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase SHIP1 and PTEN coordinate to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Subhanjan; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Sakai, Jiro; Bajrami, Besnik; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3 (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) is formed by stimulation of various receptors, including G protein–coupled receptors and integrins. The lipid phosphatases PTEN and SHIP1 are critical in regulating the level of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 during chemotaxis. Observations that loss of PTEN had minor and loss of SHIP1 resulted in a severe chemotaxis defect in neutrophils led to the belief that SHIP1 rather than PTEN acts as a predominant phospholipid phosphatase in establishing a PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 compass. In this study, we show that SHIP1 regulates PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 production in response to cell adhesion and plays a limited role when cells are in suspension. SHIP1−/− neutrophils lose their polarity upon cell adhesion and are extremely adherent, which impairs chemotaxis. However, chemo­taxis can be restored by reducing adhesion. Loss of SHIP1 elevates Akt activation following cell adhesion due to increased PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 production. From our observations, we conclude that SHIP1 prevents formation of top-down PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 polarity to facilitate proper cell attachment and detachment during chemotaxis. PMID:22323291

  18. Cell adhesion and invasion inhibitory effect of an ovarian cancer targeting peptide selected via phage display in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pu, Ximing; Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; You, Fei; Wei, Yan

    2014-01-17

    Organ-specific metastasis is of great importance since most of the cancer deaths are caused by spread of the primary cancer to distant sites. Therefore, targeted anti-metastases therapies are needed to prevent cancer cells from metastasizing to different organs. The phage clone pc3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK selected by phage display had been identified which have high binding efficiency and remarkable cell specificity to SK-OV-3 cells. In the present work, the effects of selected cell-binding phage and cognate peptide on the cell adhesion and invasion of targeted cells were investigated. Results showed that the adhesive ability of SK-OV-3 to extracellular matrix was inhibited by pc3-1 and peptide WSGPGVWGASVK, and pc3-1 blocked SK-OV-3 cells attachment more effective than the cognate peptide. The peptide WSGPGVWGASVK suppressed the cell number of SK-OV-3 that attached to HUVECs monolayer up to 24% and could block the spreading of the attaching cells. Forthermore, the cognate peptide could inhibit the invasion of SK-OV-3 significantly. The number of invaded SK-OV-3 cells and invaded SK-OV-3-activated HUVECs pretreated with peptide WSGPGVWGASVK was decreased by 24.3% and 36.6%, respectively. All these results suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK might possess anti-metastasis against SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:24342617

  19. Diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells promotes cell proliferation, migration and the dependence of cell adhesion on substrate stiffness.

    PubMed

    Moazzem Hossain, M; Wang, Xin; Bergan, Raymond C; Jin, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated protein and its h2 isoform inhibits cell motility. Here we report significant expression of h2-calponin in prostate epithelial cells, which is diminished in cancerous cells. Comparison between a prostate cancer cell line PC3 and its metastatic derivative PC3-M showed lower levels of h2-calponin in PC3-M, corresponding to faster rates of cell proliferation and migration. Substrate adhesion of PC3 and PC3-M cells was positively correlated to the level of h2-calponin and the adhesion of PC3-M exhibited a higher dependence on substrate stiffness. Such effects of h2-calponin on cell proliferation, migration and substrate adhesion were also seen in normal versus cancerous primary prostate cells. Further supporting the role of h2-calponin in inhibiting cell motility, fibroblasts isolated from h2-calponin knockout mice proliferated and migrated faster than that of wild type fibroblasts. Transfective over-expression of h2-calponin in PC3-M cells effectively inhibited cell proliferation and migration. The results suggest that the diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells increases cell motility, decreases substrate adhesion, and promotes adhesion on high stiffness substrates. PMID:25161871

  20. Diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells promotes cell proliferation, migration and the dependence of cell adhesion on substrate stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Moazzem Hossain, M.; Wang, Xin; Bergan, Raymond C.; Jin, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated protein and its h2 isoform inhibits cell motility. Here we report significant expression of h2-calponin in prostate epithelial cells, which is diminished in cancerous cells. Comparison between a prostate cancer cell line PC3 and its metastatic derivative PC3-M showed lower levels of h2-calponin in PC3-M, corresponding to faster rates of cell proliferation and migration. Substrate adhesion of PC3 and PC3-M cells was positively correlated to the level of h2-calponin and the adhesion of PC3-M exhibited a higher dependence on substrate stiffness. Such effects of h2-calponin on cell proliferation, migration and substrate adhesion were also seen in normal versus cancerous primary prostate cells. Further supporting the role of h2-calponin in inhibiting cell motility, fibroblasts isolated from h2-calponin knockout mice proliferated and migrated faster than that of wild type fibroblasts. Transfective over-expression of h2-calponin in PC3-M cells effectively inhibited cell proliferation and migration. The results suggest that the diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells increases cell motility, decreases substrate adhesion, and promotes adhesion on high stiffness substrates. PMID:25161871

  1. Inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of human bladder cancer cells by antrocin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea, and its molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kun-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Chi; Chia, Chi-Hao; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2016-04-10

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer around the world, and is a severe urological cancer irrespective of sex. Approximately 65% of the bladder cancers will recur following surgery; with more than 20% of those patients showing an advanced and metastatic stage, with reducing prognosis. Metastasis causes the most death of bladder cancer yet current therapeutic options remain limited. Antrocin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea, has been identified as a strong cytotoxic agent against lung and metastatic breast cancer cells; however, the effects and mechanisms of antrocin on cancer growth and metastasis remain largely unclear. This study showed that treatment with cytotoxic concentration of antrocin induced both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in human bladder cancer 5637 cells, evidenced by increase of Fas, DR5, Bax expression and caspase-3, -8 and -9 activation. Exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of antrocin significantly inhibited cell growth, migration, and invasion, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Antrocin also reduced subcellular distribution of FAK and paxillin at the focal adhesion contacts of the cell periphery site, and disrupted the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Moreover, antrocin increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related gene E-cadherin and decreased vimentin expression. Real-time PCR analysis showed that antrocin downregulated the expression of mRNA of several MMPs, including MMP-2. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK and c-Fos were also attenuated by antrocin. Data from chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that antrocin decreased the DNA binding activity of c-Fos to the upstream/enhancer region of MMP-2 promoter, an action likely to result in the reducing MMP-2 expression. Overall, this is the first study which demonstrates that antrocin-inhibited migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells is partly

  2. Plakoglobin Reduces the in vitro Growth, Migration and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing N-Cadherin and Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Alaee, Mahsa; Danesh, Ghazal; Pasdar, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cadherins and catenins plays pivotal roles in ovarian cancer development and progression. Plakoglobin (PG, γ-catenin) is a paralog of β-catenin with dual adhesive and signaling functions. While β-catenin has known oncogenic function, PG generally acts as a tumor/metastasis suppressor. We recently showed that PG interacted with p53 and that its growth/metastasis inhibitory function may be mediated by this interaction. Very little is known about the role of PG in ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the in vitro tumor/metastasis suppressor effects of PG in ovarian cancer cell lines with mutant p53 expression and different cadherin profiles. We showed that the N-cadherin expressing and E-cadherin and PG deficient ES-2 cells were highly migratory and invasive, whereas OV-90 cells that express E-cadherin, PG and very little/no N-cadherin were not. Exogenous expression of PG or E-cadherin or N-cadherin knockdown in ES-2 cells (ES-2-E-cad, ES-2-PG and ES-2-shN-cad) significantly reduced their migration and invasion. Also, PG expression or N-cadherin knockdown significantly decreased ES-2 cells growth. Furthermore, PG interacted with both cadherins and with wild type and mutant p53 in normal ovarian and ES-2-PG cell lines, respectively. PMID:27144941

  3. FAK activation is required for IGF1R-mediated regulation of EMT, migration, and invasion in mesenchymal triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taliaferro-Smith, LaTonia; Oberlick, Elaine; Liu, Tongrui; McGlothen, Tanisha; Alcaide, Tiffanie; Tobin, Rachel; Donnelly, Siobhan; Commander, Rachel; Kline, Erik; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Havel, Lauren; Marcus, Adam; Nahta, Rita; O'Regan, Ruth

    2015-03-10

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly metastatic disease that currently lacks effective prevention and treatment strategies. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways function in numerous developmental processes, and alterations in both are linked with a number of common pathological diseases. Overexpression of IGF1R and FAK are closely associated with metastatic breast tumors. The present study investigated the interrelationship between IGF1R and FAK signaling in regulating the malignant properties of TNBC cells. Using small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated IGF1R silencing methods, we showed that IGF1R is essential for sustaining mesenchymal morphologies of TNBC cells and modulates the expression of EMT-related markers. We further showed that IGF1R overexpression promotes migratory and invasive behaviors of TNBC cell lines. Most importantly, IGF1R-driven migration and invasion is predominantly mediated by FAK activation and can be suppressed using pharmacological inhibitors of FAK. Our findings in TNBC cells demonstrate a novel role of the IGF1R/FAK signaling pathway in regulating critical processes involved in the metastatic cascade. These results may improve the current understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of TNBC metastasis and provide a strong rationale for co-targeting of IGF1R and FAK as therapy for mesenchymal TNBCs. PMID:25749031

  4. Migration of odorous compounds from adhesives used in market samples of food packaging materials by chromatography olfactometry and mass spectrometry (GC-O-MS).

    PubMed

    Vera, Paula; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2014-02-15

    Adhesives are commonly used in the manufacture of multilayer food packaging materials. Although they are not in direct contact with the packed food, their compounds may migrate from the adhesive through the substrates to the food. The aim of this work is to determine the migrant concentration in order to evaluate the possible human risk and also to determine if this migration could affect the organoleptic properties of packed food. For this purpose, a total of 12 market samples of multilayer materials (laminates) for packaging dry food (tomatoes, cakes, cookies, breadcrumbs, flour or salt) or fresh food (pizza and pastry) produced with 5 different adhesives were analysed by GC-O-MS. A total of 25 different compounds from adhesives were detected in these laminates. Seventy-six percentage of these compounds migrated into a dry food simulant (Tenax®). Furthermore, compounds with concentrations below the MS detection limit were detected by sniffers with a high modified frequency (MF%). Acetic acid, butyric acid and cyclohexanol with vinegar, cheese and camphor odours were the most abundant compounds. All migration data were below the specific migration limits (SML) and threshold toxicological concern (TTC) recommended values according to the Cramer classification. PMID:24128473

  5. Full-mouth minimally invasive adhesive rehabilitation to treat severe dental erosion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vailati, Francesca; Vaglio, Giovanna; Belser, Urs Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Dental erosion is increasing, and only recently are clinicians starting to acknowledge the problem. A prospective clinical trial investigating which therapeutic approach must be undertaken to treat erosion and when is under way at the University of Geneva (Geneva Erosion Study). All patients affected by dental erosion who present with signs of dentin exposure are immediately treated using only adhesive techniques. In this article, the full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation of one of these patients affected by severe dental erosion (ACE class IV) is illustrated. By the end of the therapy, a very pleasing esthetic outcome had been achieved (esthetic success), all of the patient's teeth maintained their vitality, and the amount of tooth structure sacrificed to complete the adhesive full-mouth rehabilitation was negligible (biological success). PMID:21734973

  6. EGCG Inhibits Proliferation, Invasiveness and Tumor Growth by Up-Regulation of Adhesion Molecules, Suppression of Gelatinases Activity, and Induction of Apoptosis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Wu, Chung-Chun; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Yao; Tsao, George Sai-Wah; Chen, Chi-Long; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2015-01-01

    (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major green tea polyphenol, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells. Epidemiological studies have shown that drinking green tea can reduce the incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), yet the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, the inhibitory effect of EGCG was tested on a set of Epstein Barr virus-negative and -positive NPC cell lines. Treatment with EGCG inhibited the proliferation of NPC cells but did not affect the growth of a non-malignant nasopharyngeal cell line, NP460hTert. Moreover, EGCG treated cells had reduced migration and invasive properties. The expression of the cell adhesion molecules E-cadherin and β-catenin was found to be up-regulated by EGCG treatment, while the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were found to be mediated by suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and AP-1 and Sp1 transactivation. Spheroid formation by NPC cells in suspension was significantly inhibited by EGCG. Oral administration of EGCG was capable of suppressing tumor growth in xenografted mice bearing NPC tumors. Treatment with EGCG was found to elevate the expression of p53 and p21, and eventually led to apoptosis of NPC cells via caspase 3 activation. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and β-catenin was also suppressed by EGCG treatment. These results indicate that EGCG can inhibit the proliferation and invasiveness, and induce apoptosis, of NPC cells, making it a promising agent for chemoprevention or adjuvant therapy of NPC. PMID:25625511

  7. Heterophyllin B inhibits the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells by targeting PI3K/AKT/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    TANTAI, JI-CHENG; ZHANG, YAO; ZHAO, HENG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to measure the effect of heterophyllin B (HB) on the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells, and examine the possible mechanism involved. A Cell Counting kit 8 assay was performed to determine the cell viability. Cell adhesion and invasion were determined following treatment of the ECA-109 cells with HB (0, 10, 25 and 50 µM) for 24 h. The levels of phosphorylated (p-)ATK and p-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and the protein levels of β-catenin were measured using western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of E-cadherin, vimentin, snail, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 were detected using reverse trancsription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. HB (10, 25 and 50 µM) significantly suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells in a dose-dependant manner. The expression levels of p-ATK, p-PI3K and β-catenin were markedly decreased. The expression of E-cadherin was promoted, whereas the expression levels of snail, vimentin, MMP 2 and MMP 9 were decreased significantly in the ECA-109 cells treated with HB. In addition, HB inhibited the adhesion and invasion induced by PI3K activating peptide in the ECA-109 cells, and the protein expression levels were also adjusted. These results suggested that HB effectively suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the human esophageal carcinoma cells by mediating the PI3K/AKT/β-catenin pathways and regulating the expression levels of adhesion- and invasion-associated genes. PMID:26647768

  8. Heterophyllin B inhibits the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells by targeting PI3K/AKT/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Tantai, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Heng

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to measure the effect of heterophyllin B (HB) on the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells, and examine the possible mechanism involved. A Cell Counting kit 8 assay was performed to determine the cell viability. Cell adhesion and invasion were determined following treatment of the ECA-109 cells with HB (0, 10, 25 and 50 µM) for 24 h. The levels of phosphorylated (p-)ATK and p-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and the protein levels of β-catenin were measured using western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of E-cadherin, vimentin, snail, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. HB (10, 25 and 50 µM) significantly suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells in a dose-dependant manner. The expression levels of p-ATK, p-PI3K and β-catenin were markedly decreased. The expression of E-cadherin was promoted, whereas the expression levels of snail, vimentin, MMP 2 and MMP 9 were decreased significantly in the ECA-109 cells treated with HB. In addition, HB inhibited the adhesion and invasion induced by PI3K activating peptide in the ECA-109 cells, and the protein expression levels were also adjusted. These results suggested that HB effectively suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the human esophageal carcinoma cells by mediating the PI3K/AKT/β-catenin pathways and regulating the expression levels of adhesion- and invasion-associated genes. PMID:26647768

  9. Decorin-Mediated Inhibition of Human Trophoblast Cells Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion and Promotion of Apoptosis In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yanfen; Yu, Xiang; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Ziyan; Zuo, Qing; Fan, Mingsong; Huang, Shiyun; Sun, Lizhou

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a unique complication of pregnancy, the pathogenesis of which has been generally accepted to be associated with the dysfunctions of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration and invasion. Decorin (DCN) has been proved to be a decidua-derived TGF-binding proteoglycan, which negatively regulates proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of human extravillous trophoblast cells. In this study, we identified a higher expression level of decorin in severe PE placentas by both real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). And an inhibitory effect of decorin on proliferation, migration, and invasion and an enhanced effect on apoptosis in trophoblast cells HTR-8/SVneo and JEG-3 were validated in vitro. Also the modulations of decorin on trophoblast cells' metastasis and invasion functions were detected through regulating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2 and MMP9). Thus, we suggested that the contribution of decorin to the modulation of trophoblast cells might have implications for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:26357650

  10. Elastin peptides regulate HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cell migration and invasion through an Hsp90-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Donet, M; Brassart-Pasco, S; Salesse, S; Maquart, F-X; Brassart, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: The elastin-derived peptides (EDPs) exert protumoural activities by potentiating the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and the plasminogen–plasmin activating system. In the present paper, we studied heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) involvement in this mechanism. Methods: HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cell migration and invasion were studied in artificial wound assay and modified Boyden chamber assay, respectively. Heat-shock protein 90 was studied by western blot and immunofluorescence. Matrix metalloproteinase–2 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) were studied by gelatin±plasminogen zymography and immunofluorescence. Heat-shock protein 90 partners were studied by immunoprecipitation. Messenger RNA expression was studied using real-time PCR. Small interfering RNAs were used to confirm the essential role of Hsp90. Results: We showed that kappa-elastin and VGVAPG elastin hexapeptide stimulated Hsp90, pro-MMP-2 and uPA secretion within 6 h, whereas AGVPGLGVG and GRKRK peptides had no effect. No increase of mRNA level was observed. Heat-shock protein 90-specific inhibitors inhibit EDP-stimulated HT-1080 cell-invasive capacity and restrained EDP-stimulated pro-MMP-2 and uPA secretions. The inhibitory effect was reproduced by using Hsp90-blocking antibody or Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA. Heat-shock protein 90 interacted with and stabilised uPA and pro-MMP-2 in conditioned culture media of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our results demonstrate that EDPs exert protumoural activities through an Hsp90-dependent mechanism involving pro-MMP-2 and uPA. PMID:24874477

  11. Pelargonidin attenuates PDGF-BB-induced aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by direct inhibition of focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Son, Joe Eun; Jeong, Hyein; Kim, Heejoo; Kim, Yeong A; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won

    2014-05-15

    Pelargonidin is a natural red pigment found in fruits and vegetables, and has been reported to exhibit various effects potentially beneficial for human health. However, the possible preventive effects of pelargonidin toward atherosclerosis and mechanisms involved have not been investigated to date. Here, we compared the effects of pelargonidin and its glucoside-conjugated form, pelargonidin-3-glucoside (P3G), on proliferation and migration induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Pelargonidin, but not P3G, exhibited strong inhibitory effects against PDGF-BB-induced HASMC proliferation and migration, while suppressing PDGF-BB-induced ex vivo rat aortic ring sprouting. Immunoblot analysis revealed that pelargonidin inhibited PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as F-actin reduction, whereas Src, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt phosphorylation status were not altered. We also observed that the anti-proliferative and migratory effects of both pelargonidin and P3G corresponded with the extent of FAK inhibition. Both in vitro and ex vivo pull-down assays revealed that pelargonidin binds directly with FAK in an adenosine triphosphate-competitive manner, suggesting that FAK could be a molecular target of pelargonidin. Interestingly, pelargonidin did not exhibit inhibitory effects on the proliferation, migration or FAK phosphorylation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Taken together, our results suggest that pelargonidin exhibits potential preventive effects toward atherosclerosis through the attenuation of HASMC proliferation and migration, as well as aortic sprouting via the direct inhibition of FAK activity. PMID:24582770

  12. Cigarette smoke modulates PC3 prostate cancer cell migration by altering adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUPING; LONG, MINICA; TACHADO, SOUVENIR D.; SENG, SEYHA

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among American males. Studies suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with the progression of PCa; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process have not been extensively investigated. PCa progression is characterized by increased cell migration and alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM)- and cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-related gene expression. In the present study, the influence of cigarette smoke medium (SM) on cell migration and on the expression of ECM- and CAM-related genes in PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. According to a wound-healing assay, SM treatment promoted PC3 cell migration. RNA expression levels from SM-treated and control cells were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Of 84 genes analyzed, 27.38% (23/84) exhibited a ≥2-fold change in threshold cycle in PC3 cells following 0.5% SM treatment. Functional gene grouping analysis demonstrated that SM treatment modulated the RNA transcription of approximately 18.4% of CAMs and 33.93% of ECM-related genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that SM treatment led to a significant decrease in transcription levels of the following genes: Collagen 5 α-1(V), connective tissue growth factor, integrin β-2, kallmann syndrome 1, laminin α 3, matrix metallopeptidase 7 (MMP7), MMP13, secreted protein acidic cysteine-rich, thrombospondin-2 and versican; and that SM significantly increased the transcription levels of MMP2 and MMP12. Furthermore, MMP2 knockdown significantly reduced the migration of SM-treated PC3 cells. The present study provides novel insights into the association of cigarette smoking with PCa progression, via the alteration of ECM/CAM interactions. PMID:26351771

  13. Ampelopsin reduces the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianfeng; Liu, Peishu; Ding, Feng; Yu, Nina; Li, Shihong; Wang, Surong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Sun, Xiangxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yunhe; Li, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Ampelopsin has displayed anticancer activity in several types of cancers. However, no evidence has been reported for the direct effect of ampelopsin on ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, and the underling mechanisms have not yet been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of ampelopsin on the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer. Proliferation and viability of the ovarian cancer cells were detected by MTT assay. Migration and invasion of the cells were detected, respectively, by scratch wound healing assay and Transwell assay. The expression levels of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were detected at the protein level after stimulation with ampelopsin. Then, the expression levels of NF-κB and p-IκBα were detected with western blot analysis. Meanwhile, an inhibitor of NF-κB was used to investigate the effect of ampelopsin. Finally, the expression of Snail was also detected. Proliferation, migration and invasion of the A2780 cells were all inhibited following the application of ampelopsin. Ampelopsin upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated N-cadherin and vimentin in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Ampelopsin also exerted its ability to suppress the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB pathway. Administration of the inhibitor BAY11-7082 confirmed the roles of NF-κB in the expression of EMT markers and its transcription factor. These results demonstrated that ampelopsin inhibited EMT and reduced the invasion of ovarian cancer cells via the NF-κB/Snail pathway. PMID:25502786

  14. 17β-Estradiol treatment inhibits breast cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MALAT-1 RNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ziyi; Chen, Changjin; Liu, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2 affects not only estrogen-receptor α positive breast cells but also negative ones. • 100 nM E2 treatment affects breast cells proliferation, migration. • 100 nM E2 treatment functions in an estrogen-receptor α-independent way. • E2 treatment decreases MALAT-1 RNA level by post-transcriptional regulation. - Abstract: Breast cancer cells, which express estrogen receptor α (ERα), respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. But breast cancer cells without ERα show no effect on low concentration of estrogen treatment. Proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF10a, MCF7 and MB231 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified the effects of E2 on these breast cell lines, and looked for the difference in the presence and absence of ERα. Specifically, we looked for the changes of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), which is found extensively and highly expressed in several kinds of tumor cells, including breast carcinoma. It was observed that proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells were greatly affected by high concentration E2 treatment and were not affected by low concentration E2 treatment in an ERα independent way. We found that the high concentration E2 treatment largely decreased MALAT-1 RNA level. Interestingly, MALAT-1 decreasing by knocking down showed similar effects on proliferation, migration and invasion. E2 treatment affects breast tumor or non-tumor cells proliferation, migration and invasion in an ERα -independent, but a dose-dependent way by decreasing the MALAT-1 RNA level.

  15. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  16. VAMP3 regulates podosome organisation in macrophages and together with Stx4/SNAP23 mediates adhesion, cell spreading and persistent migration.

    PubMed

    Veale, Kelly J; Offenhäuser, Carolin; Lei, Nazi; Stanley, Amanda C; Stow, Jennifer L; Murray, Rachael Z

    2011-08-01

    The ability of cells to adhere, spread and migrate is essential to many physiological processes, particularly in the immune system where cells must traffic to sites of inflammation and injury. By altering the levels of individual components of the VAMP3/Stx4/SNAP23 complex we show here that this SNARE complex regulates efficient macrophage adhesion, spreading and migration on fibronectin. During cell spreading this complex mediates the polarised exocytosis of VAMP3-positive recycling endosome membrane into areas of membrane expansion, where VAMP3's surface partner Q-SNARE complex Stx4/SNAP23 was found to accumulate. Lowering the levels of VAMP3 in spreading cells resulted in a more rounded cell morphology and most cells were found to be devoid of the typical ring-like podosome superstructures seen normally in spreading cells. In migrating cells lowering VAMP3 levels disrupted the polarised localisation of podosome clusters. The reduced trafficking of recycling endosome membrane to sites of cell spreading and the disorganised podosome localisation in migrating macrophages greatly reduced their ability to persistently migrate on fibronectin. Thus, this important SNARE complex facilitates macrophage adhesion, spreading, and persistent macrophage migration on fibronectin through the delivery of VAMP3-positive membrane with its cargo to expand the plasma membrane and to participate in organising adhesive podosome structures. PMID:21586284

  17. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, OSAMU; ABE, MASAFUMI; HASHIMOTO, YUKO

    2015-01-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and Cell

  18. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre‑treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and

  19. RNA interference-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cells causes increased tumor cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    YI, NUO; LIAO, QIN-PING; LI, ZHEN-HUA; XIE, BAO-JIANG; HU, YU-HONG; YI, WEI; LIU, MIN

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an essential role in tumor invasion and migration. DKK1 functions as an important inhibitor of the pathway and represents a promising target for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of DKK1 in endometrial carcinoma (EC) cell invasion and migration using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Ishikawa EC cells were transfected at high efficiency with specific DKK1 siRNA. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1, β-catenin and metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) in siRNA-treated and -untreated cells. In addition, the invasion and migration of the EC cells were detected by invasion and migration assays. Transient transfection of DKK1 siRNA significantly inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1. Markedly increased cell invasion and migration was observed following treatment with DKK1 siRNA when compared with the negative control siRNA-treated and siRNA-untreated cells. The knockdown of DKK1 also elevated the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin and MMP14 involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, indicating that targeting this gene may promote intracellular Wnt signal transduction and thus, accelerate EC cell invasion and migration in vitro. The RNAi-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa EC cells resulted in increased tumor cell invasion and migration. DKK1 was identified as an inhibitor of EC cell invasion and migration via its novel role in the Wnt signaling pathway. Targeting DKK1 may therefore represent an effective anti-invasion and -migration strategy for the treatment of EC. PMID:24137406

  20. Disrupting the PIKE-A/Akt interaction inhibits glioblastoma cell survival, migration, invasion and colony formation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; He, K; Liu, X; Pham, C; Meyerkord, C; Fu, H; Ye, K

    2013-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) amplicon is frequently amplified in numerous human cancers including gliomas. PIKE-A, a proto-oncogene that is one of the important components of the CDK4 amplicon, binds to and enhances the kinase activity of Akt, thereby promoting cancer progression. To define the roles of the PIKE-A/Akt interaction in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) progression, we used biochemical protein/protein interaction (PPI) assays and live cell fluorescence-based protein complementation assays to search for small peptide antagonist from these proteins that were able to block their interaction. Here, we show that disruption of the interaction between PIKE-A and Akt by the small peptides significantly reduces glioblastoma cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. Disruption of PIKE-A/Akt association potently suppressed GBM cell proliferation and sensitized the cells to two clinical drugs that are currently used to treat GBM. Interestingly, GBM cells containing the CDK4 amplicon were more responsive to the inhibition of the PIKE-A/Akt interaction than GBM cells lacking this amplicon. Taken together, our findings provide proof-of-principle that blocking a PPI that is essential for cancer progression provides a valuable strategy for therapeutic discovery. PMID:22450747

  1. The anthelmintic drug mebendazole inhibits growth, migration and invasion in gastric cancer cell model.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Laine Celestino; Soares, Bruno Moreira; Pinheiro, João de Jesus Viana; Riggins, Gregory J; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of MBZ on a human malignant ascites cell line derived from a primary gastric cancer tumor. Our data reveal that MBZ showed high cytotoxicity in vitro, displaying an IC50 of 0.39 μM and 1.25 μM in ACP-02 and ACP-03, respectively. The association between MBZ and 5-FU increased slightly the cytotoxicity when compared to MBZ and 5-FU alone. Furthermore, MBZ disrupted the microtubule structure of AGP-01 cells and inhibited significantly the invasion and migration of these cells. Activity of active MMP-2 significantly decreased at all tested concentration of MBZ compared to negative control. These results support the indication of MBZ in combination with chemotherapeutic agents as a possible adjuvant therapy for the management/treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer since MBZ is a drug of low cost with acceptable safety profile and reduced toxicity to normal cells. However, clinical trials must be performed in o to evaluate its efficacy in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26315676

  2. Triazole-dithiocarbamate based, selective LSD1 inactivators inhibit gastric cancer cell growth, invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jin-Lian; Xu, Rui-Min; Zi, Xiaolin; Lv, Wen-Lei; Wang, Meng-Meng; Ye, Xian-Wei; Zhu, Shun; Mobley, David; Zhu, Yan-Yan; Wang, Jun-Wei; Li, Jin-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ru; Zhao, Wen; Liu, Hong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, plays an important role in epigenetic regulation of gene activation and repression. The up-regulated LSD1's expression has been reported in several malignant tumors. In the current study, we designed and synthesized five series of 1, 2, 3-triazole-dithiocarbamate hybrids and screened their inhibitory activity toward LSD1. We found that some of these compounds, especially compound 26, exhibited the most specific and robust inhibition of LSD1. Interestingly, compound 26 also showed potent and selective cytotoxicity against LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803 and HGC-27, as well as marked inhibition of cell migration and invasion, compared to 2-PCPA. Furthermore, compound 26 effectively reduced the tumor growth bared by human gastric cancer cells in vivo with no signs of adverse side effects. These findings suggested that compound 26 deserves further investigation as a lead compound in the treatment of LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer. PMID:24131029

  3. Mycoplasma hyorhinis Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Promotes Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaomin; Xing, Yue; Wang, Xun; Zhong, Jin; Meng, Guangxun

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M.hyorhinis, M.hy) is associated with development of gastric and prostate cancers. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a protein complex controlling maturation of important pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18, is also involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis of various cancers. Methodology/Principal Findings To clarify whether M.hy promoted tumor development via inflammasome activation, we analyzed monocytes for IL-1β and IL-18 production upon M.hy challenge. When exposed to M.hy, human monocytes exhibited rapid and robust IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. We further identified that lipid-associated membrane protein (LAMP) from M.hy was responsible for IL-1β induction. Applying competitive inhibitors, gene specific shRNA and gene targeted mice, we verified that M.hy induced IL-1β secretion was NLRP3-dependent in vitro and in vivo. Cathepsin B activity, K+ efflux, Ca2+ influx and ROS production were all required for the NLRP3 inflammasome activation by M.hy. Importantly, it is IL-1β but not IL-18 produced from macrophages challenged with M.hy promoted gastric cancer cell migration and invasion. Conclusions Our data suggest that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by M.hy may be associated with its promotion of gastric cancer metastasis, and anti-M.hy therapy or limiting NLRP3 signaling could be effective approach for control of gastric cancer progress. PMID:24223129

  4. RNA interference against TRIM29 inhibits migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Cao, Hua; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Sheng, Huiming

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Tripartite motif-containing 29 (TRIM29) is a member of TRIM proteins family, which plays diverse physiological and pathological roles in humans. Recent studies found that TRIM29 expressed highly in CRC and promoted cell growth in vitro. However, its function in the metastasis of CRC has not been studied. In the present study, we confirmed the previous report that TRIM29 was upregulated in CRC tissues and high levels of TRIM29 expression were associated with poor overall survival of patients. Moreover, TRIM29 knockdown significantly reduced cancer cell proliferation via notably inducing cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Silencing of TRIM29 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion ability of CRC cells. The protein levels of apoptosis‑, migration‑ and invasion‑related proteins were also changed after TRIM29 knockdown. Furthermore, phosphorylation levels of JAK2 and STAT3 were clearly reduced in TRIM29 knockdown cells, indicating a possible mechanism underlying its effects on colorectal carcinogenesis. Collectively, TRIM29 may exert oncogenic effects in CRC cells via regulating JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:27430345

  5. Downregulation of uPAR inhibits migration, invasion, proliferation, FAK/PI3K/Akt signaling and induces senescence in papillary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Theodore S; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Moscatello, Augustine; Shin, Edward; Schantz, Stimson; Tiwari, Raj K; Geliebter, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common endocrine and thyroid malignancy.  The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays an important role in cancer pathogenesis, including breakdown of the extracellular matrix, invasion, and metastasis.  Additionally, there is increasing evidence that uPAR also promotes tumorigenesis via the modulation of multiple signaling pathways.  BRAFV600E, the most common initial genetic mutation in PTC, leads to ERK1/2 hyperphosphorylation, which has been shown in numerous cancers to induce uPAR.  Treatment of the BRAFV600E-positive PTC cell line, BCPAP, with the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 reduced uPAR RNA levels by 90%.  siRNA-mediated down-regulation of uPAR in BCPAP cells resulted in greatly decreased activity in the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway.  This phenomenon was concurrent with drastically reduced proliferation rates and decreased clonigenic survival, as well as demonstrated senescence-associated nuclear morphology and induction of b-galactosidase activity. uPAR-knockdown BCPAP cells also displayed greatly reduced migration and invasion rates, as well as a complete loss of the cells' ability to augment their invasiveness following plasminogen supplementation. Taken together, these data provide new evidence of a novel role for uPAR induction (as a consequence of constitutive ERK1/2 activation) as a central component in PTC pathogenesis, and highlight the potential of uPAR as a therapeutic target. PMID:21191179

  6. Self-assembled HCV core virus-like particles targeted and inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Xuehe; Jin, Aihui; Jia, Qunying; Zhou, Huaibin; Kang, Shuai; Lou, Yongliang; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    We used a baculovirus expression system to express fusion proteins of HCV core, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide, and IFN-α2a fragments in Sf9 cells. Western blotting and electron microscopy demonstrate that HCV core, peptides RGD, and IFN-α2a fusion proteins assemble into 30 to 40 nm nano-particles (virus-like particles, VLPs). Xenograft assays show that VLPs greatly reduced tumor volume and weight with regard to a nontreated xenograft. Migration and invasion results show that VLPs can inhibit the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. This study will provide theoretical and experimental basis for the establishment of safe and effective tumor-targeted drug delivery systems and clinical application of VLPs carrying cell interacting cargo.

  7. WIP1 stimulates migration and invasion of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma by inducing MMP-9 and VEGF-C

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ya-ling; Liu, Xin; Gao, Shi-yu; Feng, Hao; Jiang, Ya-ping; Wang, Sha-sha; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Ma, Xiang-rui; Tang, Ya-jie; Chen, Yu; Liang, Xin-hua

    2015-01-01

    The wild-type p53 induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1) is an oncogene overexpressed in a variety of human cancers. Here, we demonstrated that WIP1 silencing reduced MMP-9 and VEGF-C expression as well as migration and invasion of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) cells. Overexpression of MMP-9 or VEGF-C restored migration and invasion in WIP1 knockdown cells, indicating that MMP-9 and VEGF-C are downstream targets of WIP1 signaling. Levels of cyclin D1 and c-Myc, targets of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, were significantly decreased by WIP1 silencing. In addition, WIP1 expression was positively associated with metastasis and prognosis of ACC patients as well as with MMP-9 or VEGF-C in ACC tissues. PMID:25797250

  8. In-vitro rescue and recovery studies of human melanoma (BLM) cell growth, adhesion and migration functions after treatment with progesterone.

    PubMed

    Leder, Douglas C; Brown, Jason R; Ramaraj, Pandurangan

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of human melanoma (BLM) cells for 48 hrs with progesterone resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth. The mechanism of growth inhibition was due to autophagy and this action of progesterone was not mediated through progesterone receptor. As cells were floating during treatment, adhesion assay was performed, which showed complete loss of adhesion. When cells were allowed to recover after treatment by culturing in growth medium without progesterone, there was recovery in cell growth. Preliminary experiments on adhesion and recovery cell growth prompted us to suppress autophagic lysosomal degradation with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which resulted in partial rescue of cell growth, adhesion and migration functions. The above experimental design gave rise to two experimental groups viz., progesterone treated and 3-MA rescued. Since, recovery studies also showed improvement in cell growth, progesterone treated and 3-MA rescued groups were allowed to recover on their own for first 48 hrs and then a second 48 hrs. Comparison of in-vitro cell growth, adhesion and migration functions of progesterone treated, 3-MA rescued and recovered human melanoma cells revealed that the recovery of 3-MA rescued cells was better than the recovery of progesterone treated cells in terms of cell growth and adhesion functions. These in-vitro experiments not only provided the scientific basis for epidemiological findings that menstruating females were better protected in melanoma, but also showed the potential of progesterone to act as an anti-cancer agent for melanoma treatment. PMID:26550137

  9. Silencing of HMGA2 suppresses cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Li, Xiang; Wu, Ding; Tang, Run; Chen, Renfu; Xue, Song; Sun, Xiaoqing

    2016-06-01

    The high-mobility group protein A2 (HMGA2) is an architectural transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the development and progression of various malignant cancers. However, the function of HMGA2 in bladder cancer remains largely unknown. Therefore, we aim to investigate the effect of HMGA2 on the proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of bladder cancer cells. The expression of HMGA2 in human bladder cancer cells was downregulated by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The protein levels of HMGA2 and other related proteins were detected by Western blotting. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined by Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry, respectively. Transwell migration and invasion assays were performed to assess the effect of HMGA2 on the migration and invasion ability of cells. In conclusion, we found that HMGA2 knockdown markedly inhibited cell proliferation; this reduced cell growth was due to the high apoptosis rate of cells, as Bcl-xl was diminished, whereas Bax was upregulated. Moreover, our results showed that silencing of HMGA2 in cancer cells greatly inhibited the cell migration and invasion, decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and affected the occurrence of EMT. We further found that decreased HMGA2 expression suppressed the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells. These results revealed that HMGA2 played an important role in the progression of bladder cancer and might be a novel target for therapy in human bladder cancer. PMID:26684800

  10. LIF upregulates poFUT1 expression and promotes trophoblast cell migration and invasion at the fetal–maternal interface

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S; Wang, J; Qin, H-M; Yan, X-M; Yang, X-S; Liu, C; Yan, Q

    2014-01-01

    Trophoblast cell migration and invasion are crucial for the establishment of a successful pregnancy. Protein O-fucosyltransferases, such as poFUT1 and poFUT2, catalyze the O-fucosylation of proteins and have important roles in embryonic development. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a critical cytokine in the regulation of embryonic development and implantation. However, the exact roles of poFUTs in embryo migration and invasion and the effects of LIF on the expression of poFUTs have not been studied in detail. In the current study, we showed that poFUT1 and LIF were highly expressed in human trophoblast cells and in the serum of women during the first trimester of a normal pregnancy. However, in patients with threatened abortion, poFUT1 and LIF levels were found to be reduced. There were no significant differences in the expression levels of poFUT2 between the two groups. The migration and invasion potential of trophoblasts in an explant culture and in an in vitro implantation model was decreased or increased upon altering poFUT1 expression levels by siRNA or cDNA transfection. Our results also revealed that LIF upregulated the expression of poFUT1. The upregulation of poFUT1 by LIF promoted trophoblast cell migration and invasion at the fetal–maternal interface by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Taken together, these study findings suggest that poFUT1 may be used as a marker of embryo implantation. PMID:25165882

  11. HOTAIR Promotes Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer SKOV3 Cells Through Regulating PIK3R3

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijun; Hu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion after silencing HOTAIR in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells, and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Material/Methods We analyzed the mRNA expression level of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian cancer SKOV3, OVCAR3, and A2780 cell lines. We analyzed the mRNA expression level of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian SKOV3 after transection with miR-214 or miR-217. We analyzed the mRNA and protein expression level of PIK3R3 when silencing HOTAIR. We analyzed the expression of HOTAIR when silencing PIK3R3. We analyzed the proliferation, migration and invasion in ovarian cancer SKOV3 after silencing HOTAIR or PIK3R3. Results The expression of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian SKOV3 and OVCAR3 was increased compared with A2780 cells (P<0.05). The mRNA level of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells was decreased when transected with miR-214 or miR-217 compared to negative control (p<0.05). The mRNA and protein level of PIK3R3 was decreased when HOTAIR was silenced and the mRNA level of HOTAIR was decreased when PIK3R3 was silenced (p<0.05). The proliferation, migration and invasion was decreased in ovarian SKOV3 when HOTAIR or PIK3R3 was silenced (p<0.05). Conclusions HOTAIR can promote proliferation, migration, and invasion in ovarian SKOV3 cells as a competing endogenous RNA. PMID:26826873

  12. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Nianxi; Shen, Liangfang; Wang, Jun; He, Dan; Duan, Chaojun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC.

  13. Downregulation of VEGFA inhibits proliferation, promotes apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of renal clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Chang; Zeng, Ming-Qiang; Huang, Liang; Li, Yong-Lin; Gao, Ben-Min; Chen, Jun-Jie; Xue, Rui-Zhi; Tang, Zheng-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) on cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC). Methods Between June 2012 and June 2015, RCCC tissues were obtained for the experimental group, and RCCC adjacent tumor-free kidney parenchyma tissues were obtained for the control group. VEGFA mRNA and protein expressions and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (AKT), and phosphorylated-AKT protein expressions were detected. The chemically synthesized specific siRNA using RNA interference technology was used to inhibit VEGFA gene expression in human RCCC 786-O cells. The negative control (NC) group was transfected with NC sequence, and the blank group was transfected with no sequence. Flow cytometry, scratch test, and cell-penetrating experiment were used to detect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion of 786-O cells. Results Positive expression of VEGFA protein was 60.62% in RCCC tissue and 18.34% in adjacent tissue with statistically significant difference (P<0.001). VEGFA protein and mRNA expressions were higher in RCCC tissue than those in adjacent tissue (both P<0.01). VEGF expression in RCCC tissue was associated with Fuhrman grading and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (both P<0.05). After RCCC 786-O cells transfecting the VEGFA siRNA, the VEGFA mRNA and protein expressions and phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphorylated-AKT protein expressions were significantly decreased, cell proliferation was remarkably inhibited, cell apoptotic ratio was obviously increased, and migration distance and invasive cell number were markedly decreased compared to those in the NC group and the blank group (all P<0.05). Conclusion Inhibition of VEGFA inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and suppressed migration and invasion of RCCC 786-O cells. VEGF has a potential role in diagnosis and therapy of RCCC

  14. Benzo(a)pyrene inhibits migration and invasion of extravillous trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells via activation of the ERK and JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Yingxiong; Shen, Cha; He, Junlin; Liu, Xueqing; Ding, Yubin; Gao, Rufei; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) that is a serious threat to human health. Numerous studies have shown that BaP causes adverse effects in pregnancy, but the mechanism remains unclear. The moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into the endometrium is an important factor during successful embryo implantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of BaP on the invasion and migration of trophoblast cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells were treated with different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 μM) of BaP. The invasion and migration of HTR-8/SVneo cells were observed after BaP treatment. The protein levels related to migration and invasion was detected by Western blot. The results confirmed that BaP inhibits the migration and invasion of extravillous trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells. Further investigations indicated that the protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and E-cadherin in HTR-8/SVneo cells were changed by BaP treatment. Moreover, the data demonstrated that BaP activated the MAPK signaling pathway. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MAPK rescued BaP-induced change in the migration and invasion of HTR-8/SVneo cells. Taken together, our results indicated that BaP inhibits invasion and the migration of HTR-8/SVneo cells, which might cause a failure in early pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26359795

  15. Regulation of sarcoma cell migration, invasion and invadopodia formation by AFAP1L1 through a phosphotyrosine-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Tie, S R; McCarthy, D J; Kendrick, T S; Louw, A; Le, C; Satiaputra, J; Kucera, N; Phillips, M; Ingley, E

    2016-04-21

    Invasion and metastasis are controlled by the invadopodia, which delivers matrix-degrading enzymes to the invasion interface permitting cancer cell penetration and spread into healthy tissue. We have identified a novel pathway that directs Lyn/Src family tyrosine kinase signals to the invadopodia to regulate sarcoma cell invasion via the molecule AFAP-1-like-1 (AFAP1L1), a new member of the AFAP (actin filament-associated protein) family. We show that AFAP1L1 can transform cells, promote migration and co-expression with active Lyn profoundly influences cell morphology and movement. AFAP1L1 intersects several invadopodia pathway components through its multiple domains and motifs, including the following (i) pleckstrin homology domains that bind phospholipids generated at the plasma membrane by phosphoinositide 3-kinase, (ii) a direct filamentous-actin binding domain and (iii) phospho-tyrosine motifs (pY136 and pY566) that specifically bind Vav2 and Nck2 SH2 domains, respectively. These phosphotyrosine motifs are essential for AFAP1L1-mediated cytoskeleton regulation. Through its interaction with Vav2, AFAP1L1 regulates Rac activity and downstream control of PAK1/2/3 (p21-activated kinases) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and MLC2. AFAP1L1 interaction with Nck2 recruits actin-nucleating complexes. Significantly, in osteosarcoma cell lines, knockdown of AFAP1L1 inhibits phosphorylated MLC2 recruitment to filamentous-actin structures, disrupts invadopodia formation, cell attachment, migration and invasion. These data define a novel pathway that directs Lyn/Src family tyrosine kinase signals to sarcoma cell invadopodia through specific recruitment of Vav2 and Nck2 to phosphorylated AFAP1L1, to control cell migration and invasion. PMID:26212012

  16. Role of ADAM17 in invasion and migration of CD133-expressing liver cancer stem cells after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Woo; Hur, Wonhee; Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Jung-Hee; Hwang, Daehee; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2016-04-26

    We investigated the biological role of CD133-expressing liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) enriched after irradiation of Huh7 cells in cell invasion and migration. We also explored whether a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17) influences the metastatic potential of CSC-enriched hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells after irradiation. A CD133-expressing Huh7 cell subpopulation showed greater resistance to sublethal irradiation and specifically enhanced cell invasion and migration capabilities. We also demonstrated that the radiation-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzyme activities as well as the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were increased more predominantly in Huh7CD133+ cell subpopulations than Huh7CD133- cell subpopulations. Furthermore, we showed that silencing ADAM17 significantly inhibited the migration and invasiveness of enriched Huh7CD133+ cells after irradiation; moreover, Notch signaling was significantly reduced in irradiated CD133-expressing liver CSCs following stable knockdown of the ADAM17 gene. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CD133-expressing liver CSCs have considerable metastatic capabilities after irradiation of HCC cells, and their metastatic capabilities might be maintained by ADAM17. Therefore, suppression of ADAM17 shows promise for improving the efficiency of current radiotherapies and reducing the metastatic potential of liver CSCs during HCC treatment. PMID:26993601

  17. The microRNA-218~Survivin axis regulates migration, invasion, and lymph node metastasis in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Ryunosuke; How, Christine; Chaudary, Naz; Bruce, Jeff; Shi, Wei; Hill, Richard P; Zahedi, Payam; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-20

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. In the present study, global microRNA profiling for 79 cervical cancer patient samples led to the identification of miR-218 down-regulation in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal cervical tissues. Lower miR-218 expression was associated significantly with worse overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and pelvic/aortic lymph node recurrence. In vitro, miR-218 over-expression decreased clonogenicity, migration, and invasion. Survivin (BIRC5) was subsequently identified as an important cervical cancer target of miR-218 using in silico prediction, mRNA profiling, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Concordant with miR-218 over-expression, survivin knockdown by siRNA decreased clonogenicity, migration, and invasion. YM155, a small molecule survivin inhibitor, significantly suppressed tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that the miR-218~survivin axis inhibits cervical cancer progression by regulating clonogenicity, migration, and invasion, and suggest that the inhibition of survivin could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve outcome in this disease. PMID:25473903

  18. Both actin and polyproline interactions of Profilin-1 are required for migration, invasion and capillary morphogenesis of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhijie; Gau, David; Deasy, Bridget; Wells, Alan; Roy, Partha

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate how different ligand interactions of profilin-1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein that is upregulated during capillary morphogenesis of vascular endothelial cells (VEC), contribute to migration and capillary forming ability of VEC. We adopted a knockdown-knockin experimental system to stably express either fully-functional or mutants of Pfn1 that are impaired in binding to two of its major ligands, actin (H119E mutant) and proteins containing polyproline domains (H133S mutant), in a human dermal microvascular cell line (HmVEC) against near-null endogenous Pfn1 background. We found that silencing endogenous Pfn1 expression in HmVEC leads to slower random migration, reduced velocity of membrane protrusion and a significant impairment in matrigel-induced cord formation. Only re-expression of fully-functional but not any of the two ligand-binding deficient mutants of Pfn1 rescues the above defects. We further show that loss of Pfn1 expression in VEC inhibits three-dimensional capillary morphogenesis, MMP2 secretion and ECM invasion. VEC invasion through ECM is also inhibited when actin and polyproline interactions of Pfn1 are disrupted. Together, these experimental data demonstrate that Pfn1 regulates VEC migration, invasion and capillary morphogenesis through its interaction with both actin and proline-rich ligands. PMID:19607826

  19. Connective tissue growth factor is activated by gastrin and involved in gastrin-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sabin; Bakke, Ingunn; Kumar, J; Beisvag, Vidar; Sandvik, Arne K; Thommesen, Liv; Varro, Andrea; Nørsett, Kristin G

    2016-06-17

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been reported in gastric adenocarcinoma and in carcinoid tumors. The aim of this study was to explore a possible link between CTGF and gastrin in gastric epithelial cells and to study the role of CTGF in gastrin induced migration and invasion of AGS-GR cells. The effects of gastrin were studied using RT-qPCR, Western blot and assays for migration and invasion. We report an association between serum gastrin concentrations and CTGF abundancy in the gastric corpus mucosa of hypergastrinemic subjects and mice. We found a higher expression of CTGF in gastric mucosa tissue adjacent to tumor compared to normal control tissue. We showed that gastrin induced expression of CTGF in gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells via MEK, PKC and PKB/AKT pathways. CTGF inhibited gastrin induced migration and invasion of AGS-GR cells. We conclude that CTGF expression is stimulated by gastrin and involved in remodeling of the gastric epithelium. PMID:27179776

  20. Modulatory role of garlicin in migration and invasion of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma via PI3K/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kun; Nian, Jianze; Zhu, Xingyang; Geng, Xiaoping; Liu, Fubao

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences have indicated the role of garlicin in inhibiting the progression of various tumors including glioma, pulmonary carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma, via mediating cell apoptosis or cell cycle. The regulatory effect and related molecular mechanism of garlicin in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, however, remained unknown. This study thus aimed to investigate this scientific issue. HCCC-9810 cell line was treated with serially diluted garlicin, followed by cell proliferation assay using MTT approach. Transwell migration and invasion assays were further employed the regulatory effect of garlicin. The expression level of p-AKT and AKT proteins in tumor cells was quantified by Western blot. The growth of tumor cells was significantly inhibited by high concentration of garlicin (> 1.5 μM). Lower concentration of garlicin showed dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell invasion and migration. After using specific agonist IGF-1 (50 ng/mL) of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, such facilitating effects of garlicin were depressed (P < 0.05). Western blotting showed significantly decreased phosphorylation level of AKT after treated with gradient concentrations of garlicin, while leaving the total AKT protein level unchanged. Garlicin may inhibit the invasion and migration of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells via inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:26823715

  1. Stanniocalicin 2 Suppresses Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion via the PKC/Claudin-1-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yu, Xiaoli; Yang, Zhaozhi; Deng, Yun; Meng, Jiao; Feng, Yan; Guo, Xiaomao; Yang, Gong

    2015-01-01

    Stanniocalcin (STC), a glycoprotein hormone, is expressed in a wide variety of tissues to regulate Ca2+ and PO4- homeostasis. STC2, a member of STC family, has been reported to be associated with tumor development. In this study, we investigated whether the expression of STC2 is associated with migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that breast cancer cell line 231 HM transfected with STC2 shRNA displayed high motility, fibroblast morphology, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. Introduction of STC2 in 231 cells reduced cell migration and invasion. In response to irradiation, silencing of STC2 in 231 HM cells reduced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of STC2 in 231 cells promoted apoptosis, compared with in control cells. Mechanistic study showed that STC2 negatively regulated PKC to control the expression of Claudin-1, which subsequently induced the expressions of EMT-related factors including ZEB1, ZO-1, Slug, Twist, and MMP9. Suppression of PKC activity by using a PKC inhibitor (Go 6983) restored the normal motility of STC2-silenced cells. Furthermore, in vivo animal assay showed that STC2 inhibited tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Collectively, these results indicate that STC2 may inhibit EMT at least partially through the PKC/Claudin-1-mediated signaling in human breast cancer cells. Thus, STC2 may be exploited as a biomarker for metastasis and targeted therapy in human breast cancer. PMID:25830567

  2. M2 polarized macrophages induced by CSE promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Shi, Hengfei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Weiyun; Dong, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking plays an important role in the genesis of lung cancer, and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are believed to accelerate the process. We therefore sought to clarify the relationship between cigarette smoking, TAMs and tumorigenesis. We treated macrophages (THP-1) with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α decreased, while TGF-β mRNA levels increased. CSE significantly inhibited the phagocytic ability of macrophages, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of FITC-dextran internalization. JAK2/STAT3 was significantly activated by CSE, as determined by Western blot analysis. When the scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of M2 macrophages, was analyzed by flow cytometry, its expression was significantly increased. After inducing M2 polarization of THP-1 cells, we co-cultured macrophages and alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549). The proliferation of A549 cells was detected by the MTT assay and cell cycle analysis, while their migration and invasion were detected by scratch wound assay and transwell assay. The results showed that the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 cells were significantly promoted by M2 macrophages but were slightly inhibited by CSE. In conclusion, we demonstrated that macrophage M2 polarization induced by CSE promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells. PMID:26253658

  3. NLRC5 regulates cell proliferation, migration and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun-Yun; He, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chen; Xu, Tao; Li, Lin; Ni, Ming-Ming; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun

    2016-06-28

    NLRC5, the largest member of nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family, has been reported to regulate immune responses and is associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the biological function of NLRC5 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been well demonstrated. In this study, the role of NLRC5 in hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion capacities was evaluated by using MTT, flow cytometry, wound healing, transwell assay, and tumor formation assay in nude mice. Western blot analysis and qPCR assay were performed to assess NLRC5 interacting with the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that NLRC5 was highly expressed in HCC. Knockdown of NLRC5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and the tumor formation in nude mice, and arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, overexpression of NLRC5 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro. Interestingly, we found that up-regulation of NLRC5 not only positively correlates with the increase of β-catenin but also coordinates the activation of downstream Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that NLRC5 may play an important role in progression of HCC and provide a potential therapeutic value in this tumor. PMID:26975630

  4. HOXB5 induces invasion and migration through direct transcriptional up-regulation of β-catenin in human gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Soo; Jeong, Oh; Piao, Zhengri; Guo, Chen; Jung, Mi-Ran; Choi, Chan; Park, Young-Kyu

    2015-12-15

    HOX (homeobox) genes encode a family of transcriptional regulators, which have an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation during embryonic development. Their deregulated expression is involved in the carcinogenesis of many human solid tumours. In the present study, we show that HOXB5 mRNA was significantly overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. HOXB5-up-regulated cancer cells showed increased invasion and migration activity, but no change in proliferation activity, whereas HOXB5-down-regulated cells showed decreased invasion and migration activity. Up-regulation of HOXB5 resulted in up-regulation of β-catenin, whereas inhibition of HOXB5 expression by siRNA led to the down-regulation of β-catenin. Moreover, a significant correlation between HOXB5 and CTNNB1 (β-catenin) mRNA expression was detected in gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, we found that HOXB5 binds directly to the CTNNB1 promoter region and activates the transcriptional expression of β-catenin, as well as its downstream target genes, encoding cyclin D1 and c-Myc, leading to an increase in the invasion and migration activity of human gastric cancer cells. Thus HOXB5 may be an important regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway, thereby contributing to gastric cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26467157

  5. Potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulation of trophoblast differentiation, migration, and invasion in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Kadam, Leena; Jain, Chandni; Armant, D Randall; Drewlo, Sascha

    2016-03-01

    The proper establishment and organogenesis of the placenta is crucial for intrauterine fetal growth and development. Endometrial invasion by the extravillous trophoblast cells, as well as formation of the syncytiotrophoblast (STB), are of vital importance for placental function. Trophoblast migration and invasion is often compared to tumor metastasis, which uses many of the same molecular mechanisms. However, unlike cancer cells, both initiation and the extent of trophoblast invasion are tightly regulated by feto-maternal cross-talk, which when perturbed, results in a wide range of abnormalities. Multiple factors control the trophoblast, including cytokines and hormones, which are subject to transcriptional regulatory networks. The relevance of epigenetics in transcriptional regulation of trophoblast differentiation and invasion, as well as in the onset of placenta-related pregnancy disorders, became recognized decades ago. Although, there has been tremendous progress in uncovering the molecular foundation of placental development, there is still much to be learned about the epigenetic machinery, and its role in trophoblast differentiation and invasion. This review will provide an overview of the epigenetic control of trophoblast differentiation and invasion. It will also highlight the major epigenetic mechanisms involved in pregnancy complications related to placental deficiencies. PMID:26745760

  6. Potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulation of trophoblast differentiation, migration, and invasion in the human placenta

    PubMed Central

    Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Kadam, Leena; Jain, Chandni; Armant, D. Randall; Drewlo, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proper establishment and organogenesis of the placenta is crucial for intrauterine fetal growth and development. Endometrial invasion by the extravillous trophoblast cells, as well as formation of the syncytiotrophoblast (STB), are of vital importance for placental function. Trophoblast migration and invasion is often compared to tumor metastasis, which uses many of the same molecular mechanisms. However, unlike cancer cells, both initiation and the extent of trophoblast invasion are tightly regulated by feto-maternal cross-talk, which when perturbed, results in a wide range of abnormalities. Multiple factors control the trophoblast, including cytokines and hormones, which are subject to transcriptional regulatory networks. The relevance of epigenetics in transcriptional regulation of trophoblast differentiation and invasion, as well as in the onset of placenta-related pregnancy disorders, became recognized decades ago. Although, there has been tremendous progress in uncovering the molecular foundation of placental development, there is still much to be learned about the epigenetic machinery, and its role in trophoblast differentiation and invasion. This review will provide an overview of the epigenetic control of trophoblast differentiation and invasion. It will also highlight the major epigenetic mechanisms involved in pregnancy complications related to placental deficiencies. PMID:26745760

  7. Tumor cell migration and invasion are enhanced by depletion of Rap1 GTPase-activating protein (Rap1GAP).

    PubMed

    Tsygankova, Oxana M; Wang, Hongbin; Meinkoth, Judy L

    2013-08-23

    The functional significance of the widespread down-regulation of Rap1 GTPase-activating protein (Rap1GAP), a negative regulator of Rap activity, in human tumors is unknown. Here we show that human colon cancer cells depleted of Rap1GAP are endowed with more aggressive migratory and invasive properties. Silencing Rap1GAP enhanced the migration of confluent and single cells. In the latter, migration distance, velocity, and directionality were increased. Enhanced migration was a consequence of increased endogenous Rap activity as silencing Rap expression selectively abolished the migration of Rap1GAP-depleted cells. ROCK-mediated cell contractility was suppressed in Rap1GAP-depleted cells, which exhibited a spindle-shaped morphology and abundant membrane protrusions. Tumor cells can switch between Rho/ROCK-mediated contractility-based migration and Rac1-mediated mesenchymal motility. Strikingly, the migration of Rap1GAP-depleted, but not control cells required Rac1 activity, suggesting that loss of Rap1GAP alters migratory mechanisms. Inhibition of Rac1 activity restored membrane blebbing and increased ROCK activity in Rap1GAP-depleted cells, suggesting that Rac1 contributes to the suppression of contractility. Collectively, these findings identify Rap1GAP as a critical regulator of aggressive tumor cell behavior and suggest that the level of Rap1GAP expression influences the migratory mechanisms that are operative in tumor cells. PMID:23864657

  8. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Leaf Extract on Staphylococcal Adhesion and Invasion in Bovine Udder Epidermal Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Mordmuang, Auemphon; Shankar, Shiv; Chethanond, Usa; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is one of the most important infectious diseases in dairy herds, and staphylococci are the most important etiologic agents of this disease. Antibiotics and chemical agents used in livestock for prevention and cure of the disease can accumulate in milk and give rise to food safety concerns. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract was studied as an alternative approach to reduce the bacterial infections. The ethanolic extract of this plant demonstrated antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 16–64 μg/mL against staphylococcal isolates. In addition, the extract had an effect on the bacterial cell surface properties by increasing its hydrophobicity in a concentration dependent manner. To further extend the antibacterial efficacy, silver nanoparticles synthesized with the extract, a pure rhodomyrtone, and liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone were applied and their inhibitory effects on bacterial adhesion and invasion were determined by ex vivo study in a bovine udder epidermal tissue model. These agents exerted remarkable antibacterial activity against staphylococci and decreased the adhesion of the bacterial cells to the tissues. These results supported that R. tomentosa ethanolic extract could be applied as an alternative agent for bovine udder care in dairy farms. PMID:26501314

  9. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Leaf Extract on Staphylococcal Adhesion and Invasion in Bovine Udder Epidermal Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Mordmuang, Auemphon; Shankar, Shiv; Chethanond, Usa; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-10-01

    Bovine mastitis is one of the most important infectious diseases in dairy herds, and staphylococci are the most important etiologic agents of this disease. Antibiotics and chemical agents used in livestock for prevention and cure of the disease can accumulate in milk and give rise to food safety concerns. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract was studied as an alternative approach to reduce the bacterial infections. The ethanolic extract of this plant demonstrated antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 16-64 μg/mL against staphylococcal isolates. In addition, the extract had an effect on the bacterial cell surface properties by increasing its hydrophobicity in a concentration dependent manner. To further extend the antibacterial efficacy, silver nanoparticles synthesized with the extract, a pure rhodomyrtone, and liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone were applied and their inhibitory effects on bacterial adhesion and invasion were determined by ex vivo study in a bovine udder epidermal tissue model. These agents exerted remarkable antibacterial activity against staphylococci and decreased the adhesion of the bacterial cells to the tissues. These results supported that R. tomentosa ethanolic extract could be applied as an alternative agent for bovine udder care in dairy farms. PMID:26501314

  10. Sub-micron lateral topography affects endothelial migration by modulation of focal adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Antonini, S; Meucci, S; Jacchetti, E; Klingauf, M; Beltram, F; Poulikakos, D; Cecchini, M; Ferrari, A

    2015-06-01

    Through the interaction with topographical features, endothelial cells tune their ability to populate target substrates, both in vivo and in vitro. Basal textures interfere with the establishment and maturation of focal adhesions (FAs) thus inducing specific cell-polarization patterns and regulating a plethora of cell activities that govern the overall endothelial function. In this study, we analyze the effect of topographical features on FAs in primary human endothelial cells. Reported data demonstrate a functional link between FA dynamics and cell polarization and spreading on structured substrates presenting variable lateral feature size. Our results reveal that gratings with 2 µm lateral periodicity maximize contact guidance. The effect is linked to the dynamical state of FAs. We argue that these results are readily applicable to the rational design of active surfaces at the interface with the blood stream. PMID:26106866

  11. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuan; Hao, Shaobo; Ye, Minhua; Zhang, Anling; Nan, Yang; Wang, Guangxiu; Jia, Zhifan; Yu, Kai; Guo, Lianmei; Pu, Peiyu; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE.

  12. The anti-CD74 humanized monoclonal antibody, milatuzumab, which targets the invariant chain of MHC II complexes, alters B-cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion molecule expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Targeting CD74 as the invariant chain of major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) became possible by the availability of a specific humanized monoclonal antibody, milatuzumab, which is under investigation in patients with hematological neoplasms. CD74 has been reported to regulate chemo-attractant migration of macrophages and dendritic cells, while the role of CD74 on peripheral naïve and memory B cells also expressing CD74 remains unknown. Therefore, the current study addressed the influence of milatuzumab on B-cell proliferation, chemo-attractant migration, and adhesion molecule expression. Methods Surface expression of CD74 on CD27- naïve and CD27+ memory B cells as well as other peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from normals, including the co-expression of CD44, CXCR4, and the adhesion molecules CD62L, β7-integrin, β1-integrin and CD9 were studied after binding of milatuzumab using multicolor flow cytometry. The influence of the antibody on B-cell proliferation and migration was analyzed in vitro in detail. Results In addition to monocytes, milatuzumab also specifically bound to human peripheral B cells, with a higher intensity on CD27+ memory versus CD27- naïve B cells. The antibody reduced B-cell proliferation significantly but moderately, induced enhanced spontaneous and CXCL12-dependent migration together with changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, CD44, β7-integrin and CD62L, mainly of CD27- naïve B cells. This was independent of macrophage migration-inhibitory factor as a ligand of CD74/CD44 complexes. Conclusions Milatuzumab leads to modestly reduced proliferation, alterations in migration, and adhesion molecule expression preferentially of CD27- naïve B cells. It thus may be a candidate antibody for the autoimmune disease therapy by modifying B cell functions. PMID:22404985

  13. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hun; Koh, Minsoo; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras promotes proliferation and malignant phenotypic conversion of cells in cancer. Ras protein must be associated with cellular membranes for its oncogenic activities through post-translational modifications, including farnesylation. Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is essential for H-Ras membrane targeting, and H-Ras, but not N-Ras, has been demonstrated to cause an invasive phenotype in MCF10A breast epithelial cells. In the present study, it was observed that an FTase inhibitor (FTI), FTI-277, blocked epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced H-Ras activation, but not N-Ras activation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which express wild-type H-Ras and N-Ras. FTI-277 exerted a more potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of H-Ras-MCF10A cells and Hs578T breast cancer cells expressing an active mutant of H-Ras than that of MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasive/migratory phenotypes of the H-Ras-MCF10A and Hs578T cells were effectively inhibited by FTI-277 treatment. By contrast, FTI-277 did not affect the invasive/migratory phenotypes of MDA-MB-231 cells. However, the EGF-induced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by FTI-277, implicating that FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FTase inhibition by FTI-277 may be an effective strategy for targeting H-Ras-mediated proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells. PMID:27602167

  14. Fibroblast invasive migration into fibronectin/fibrin gels requires a previously uncharacterized dermatan sulfate-CD44 proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard A F; Lin, Fubao; Greiling, Doris; An, Jianqang; Couchman, John R

    2004-02-01

    After tissue injury, fibroblast migration from the peri-wound collagenous stroma into the fibrin-laden wound is critical for granulation tissue formation and subsequent healing. Recently we found that fibroblast transmigration from a collagen matrix into a fibrin matrix required the presence of fibronectin. Several integrins-alpha 4 beta 1, alpha 5 beta 1, and alpha v beta 3-with known fibronectin binding affinity were necessary for this invasive migration. Here we examined another family of cell surface receptors: the proteoglycans. We found that dermatan sulfate was required for fibroblast migration into a fibronectin/fibrin gel. This conclusion was based on beta-xyloside inhibition of glycanation and specific glycosaminoglycan degradation. CD44, a cell surface receptor known to bind hyaluronan, not infrequently exists as a proteoglycan, decorated with various glycosaminoglycan chains including heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, and as such can bind fibronectin. We found that CD44H, the non-spliced isoform of CD44, was necessary for fibroblast invasion into fibronectin/fibrin gels. Resting fibroblasts expressed mostly nonglycanated CD44H core protein, which became glycanated with chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate, but not heparan sulfate, after a 24 h incubation with platelet-derived growth factor, the stimulus used in the migration assay. These results demonstrate that dermatan sulfate-CD44H proteoglycan is essential for fibroblast migration into fibrin clots and that platelet-derived growth factor, the stimulus for migration, induces the production of chondroitin-sulfate- and dermatan-sulfate-glycanated CD44H. PMID:15009704

  15. Nuclear Kaiso Indicates Aggressive Prostate Cancers and Promotes Migration and Invasiveness of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jacqueline; Wang, Honghe; Zhou, Jianjun; Hardy, Shana; Turner, Timothy; Austin, David; He, Qinghua; Wells, Alan; Grizzle, William E.; Yates, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    Kaiso, a p120 catenin-binding protein, is expressed in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of cells; however, the biological consequences and clinical implications of a shift between these compartments have yet to be established. Herein, we report an enrichment of nuclear Kaiso expression in cells of primary and metastatic prostate tumors relative to the normal prostate epithelium. Nuclear expression of Kaiso correlates with Gleason score (P < 0.001) and tumor grade (P < 0.001). There is higher nuclear expression of Kaiso in primary tumor/normal matched samples and in primary tumors from African American men (P < 0.0001). We further found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor up-regulates Kaiso at the RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cell lines, but more interestingly causes a shift of cytoplasmic Kaiso to the nucleus that is reversed by the EGF receptor–specific kinase inhibitor, PD153035. In both DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, Kaiso inhibition (short hairpin RNA-Kaiso) decreased cell migration and invasion even in the presence of EGF. Further, Kaiso directly binds to the E-cadherin promoter, and inhibition of Kaiso in PC-3 cells results in increased E-cadherin expression, as well as re-establishment of cell–cell contacts. In addition, Kaiso-depleted cells show more epithelial morphology and a reversal of the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and fibronectin. Our findings establish a defined oncogenic role of Kaiso in promoting the progression of prostate cancer. PMID:22974583

  16. Ophiopogonin-D suppresses MDA-MB-435 cell adhesion and invasion by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Han, Yuwei; Zhai, Kefeng; Sun, Minhui; Liu, Jihua; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2015-07-01

    Ophiopogonin-D is one of steroidal saponins isolated from the root of the Chinese medicinal plant Ophiopogon japonicas. It has been claimed to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. The present study was the first to examine the anti-tumor metastasis properties of ophiopogonin-D. An MTT assay showed that ophiopogonin-D inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-435 melanoma cells, and decreased invasion was demonstrated using a Transwell invasion assay. Furthermore, adhesion of MDA-MB-435 cells to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells and to fibronectin was inhibited by ophiopogonin-D. Gelatin zymography and western blot analysis showed that ophiopogonin-D inhibited the expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), but not that of MMP-2. Inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 by ophiopogonin-D indicated its inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Overall, the results suggested that ophiopogonin-D may be considered as a candidate drug for treating or preventing tumor metastasis. PMID:25816153

  17. Systems microscopy approaches to understand cancer cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Yan, Kuan; de Bont, Hans; Ghotra, Veerander; Truong, Hoa; Danen, Erik H.; Verbeek, Fons

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in a number of processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. Especially, invasion of cancer cells in the surrounding tissue is a crucial step that requires increased cell motility. Cell migration is a well-orchestrated process that involves the continuous formation and disassembly of matrix adhesions. Those structural anchor points interact with the extra-cellular matrix and also participate in adhesion-dependent signalling. Although these processes are essential for cancer metastasis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate adhesion dynamics during tumour cell migration. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advanced imaging strategies together with quantitative image analysis that can be implemented to understand the dynamics of matrix adhesions and its molecular components in relation to tumour cell migration. This dynamic cell imaging together with multiparametric image analysis will help in understanding the molecular mechanisms that define cancer cell migration. PMID:20556632

  18. Adhesion and migration of avian neural crest cells on fibronectin require the cooperating activities of multiple integrins of the (beta)1 and (beta)3 families.

    PubMed

    Testaz, S; Delannet, M; Duband, J

    1999-12-01

    Based on genetic, functional and histological studies, the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin has been proposed to play a key role in the migration of neural crest cells in the vertebrate embryo. In the present study, we have analyzed in vitro the repertoire and function of integrin receptors involved in the adhesive and locomotory responses of avian truncal neural crest cells to fibronectin. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that neural crest cells express multiple integrins, namely (alpha)3(beta)1, (alpha)4(beta)1, (alpha)5(beta)1, (alpha)8(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)3 and a (beta)8 integrin, as potential fibronectin receptors, and flow cytometry analyses revealed no major heterogeneity among the cell population for expression of integrin subunits. In addition, the integrin repertoire expressed by neural crest cells was found not to change dramatically during migration. At the cellular level, only (alpha)v(beta)1 and (alpha)v(beta)3 were concentrated in focal adhesion sites in connection with the actin microfilaments, whereas the other integrins were predominantly diffuse over the cell surface. In inhibition assays with function-perturbing antibodies, it appeared that complete abolition of cell spreading and migration could be achieved only by blocking multiple integrins of the (beta)1 and (beta)3 families, suggesting possible functional compensations between different integrins. In addition, these studies provided evidence for functional partitioning of integrins in cell adhesion and migration. While spreading was essentially mediated by (alpha)v(beta)1 and (alpha)8(beta)1, migration involved primarily (alpha)4(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)3 and (alpha)8(beta)1 and, more indirectly, (alpha)3(beta)1. (alpha)5(beta)1 and the (beta)8 integrin were not found to play any major role in either adhesion or migration. Finally, consistent with the results of inhibition experiments, recruitment of (alpha)4(beta)1 and (alpha)v(beta)3, individually or in

  19. Ectopic expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule in adult macaque Schwann cells promotes their migration and remyelination potential in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bachelin, C.; Zujovic, V.; Buchet, D.; Mallet, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings suggested that inducing neural cell adhesion molecule polysialylation in rodents is a promising strategy for promoting tissue repair in the injured central nervous system. Since autologous grafting of Schwann cells is one potential strategy to promote central nervous system remyelination, it is essential to show that such a strategy can be translated to adult primate Schwann cells and is of interest for myelin diseases. Adult macaque Schwann cells were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding sialyltransferase, an enzyme responsible for neural cell adhesion molecule polysialylation. In vitro, we found that ectopic expression of polysialylate promoted adult macaque Schwann cell migration and improved their integration among astrocytes in vitro without modifying their antigenic properties as either non-myelinating or pro-myelinating. In addition, forced expression of polysialylate in adult macaque Schwann cells decreased their adhesion with sister cells. To investigate the ability of adult macaque Schwann cells to integrate and migrate in vivo, focally induced demyelination was targeted to the spinal cord dorsal funiculus of nude mice, and both control and sialyltransferase expressing Schwann cells overexpressing green fluorescein protein were grafted remotely from the lesion site. Analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of the grafted Schwann cells performed in toto and in situ, showed that in both groups, Schwann cells migrated towards the lesion site. However, migration of sialyltransferase expressing Schwann cells was more efficient than that of control Schwann cells, leading to their accelerated recruitment by the lesion. Moreover, ectopic expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule promoted adult macaque Schwann cell interaction with reactive astrocytes when exiting the graft, and their ‘chain-like’ migration along the dorsal midline. The accelerated migration of sialyltransferase expressing Schwann cells to the

  20. Divergent behaviors and underlying mechanisms of cell migration and invasion in non-metastatic T24 and its metastatic derivative T24T bladder cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Young; Lu, Chris; Li, Jingxia; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Wu, Xue-Ru; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on cancer cell invasion were primarily focused on its migration because these two events were often considered biologically equivalent. Here we found that T24T cells exhibited higher invasion but lower migration abilities than T24 cells. Expression of Rho-GDPases was much lower and expression of SOD2 was much higher in T24T cells than those in T24 cells. Indeed, knockdown of SOD2 in T24T cells can reverse the cell migration but without affecting cell invasion. We also found that SOD2 inhibited the JNK/c-Jun cascade, and the inhibition of c-Jun activation by ectopic expression of TAM67 impaired Rho-GDPases expression and cell migration in T24T shSOD2 cells. Further, we found that Sp1 can upregulate SOD2 transcription in T24T cells. Importantly, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was overexpressed in T24T and participated in increasing its invasion, and MMP-2 overexpression was mediated by increasing nuclear transport of nucleolin, which enhanced mmp-2 mRNA stability. Taken together, our study unravels an inverse relationship between cell migration and invasion in human bladder cancer T24T cells and suggests a novel mechanism underlying the divergent roles of SOD2 and MMP-2 in regulating metastatic behaviors of human bladder T24T in cell migration and invasion. PMID:25402510

  1. Salvianolic acid A reverses the paclitaxel resistance and inhibits the migration and invasion abilities of human breast cancer cells by inactivating transgelin 2

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Chen, Siying; Yang, Qianting; Cai, Jiangxia; Zhang, Weipeng; You, Haisheng; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance and tumor migration and invasion are the major obstacles to effective breast cancer chemotherapy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the potential of transgelin 2 and salvianolic acid A to modulate the resistance and the migration and invasion abilities of paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/PTX). MCF-7/PTX cells were found to exhibit not only a high degree of resistance to paclitaxel, but also strong migration and invasion abilities. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TAGLN2 sensitized the MCF-7/PTX cells to paclitaxel, and inhibited their migration and invasion abilities. In addition, we also observed that combined salvianolic acid A and paclitaxel treatment could reverse paclitaxel resistance, markedly inhibit tumor migration and invasion, and suppress the expression of transgelin 2 in MCF-7/PTX cells. These findings indicate that salvianolic acid A can reverse the paclitaxel resistance and inhibit the migration and invasion abilities of human breast cancer cells by down-regulating the expression of transgelin 2, and hence could be useful in breast cancer treatments PMID:26176734

  2. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  3. Diosgenin, a Steroidal Saponin, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells by Reducing Matrix Metalloproteinases Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-Shern; Shih, Yuan-Wei; Huang, Hsiang-Ching; Cheng, Hsing-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Background Diosgenin, a steroidal saponin obtained from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum), was found to exert anti-carcinogenic properties, such as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells. However, the effect of diosgenin on cancer metastasis remains unclear. The aim of the study is to examine the effect of diosgenin on migration and invasion in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Principal Findings Diosgenin inhibited proliferation of PC-3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. When treated with non-toxic doses of diosgenin, cell migration and invasion were markedly suppressed by in vitro wound healing assay and Boyden chamber invasion assay, respectively. Furthermore, diosgenin reduced the activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 by gelatin zymography assay. The mRNA level of MMP-2, -9, -7 and extracellular inducer of matrix metalloproteinase (EMMPRIN) were also suppressed while tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) was increased by diosgenin. In addition, diosgenin abolished the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in PC-3 cells and tube formation of endothelial cells. Our immunoblotting assays indicated that diosgenin potently suppressed the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In addition, diosgenin significantly decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), suggesting that diosgenin inhibited NF-κB activity. Conclusion/Significance The results suggested that diosgenin inhibited migration and invasion of PC-3 cells by reducing MMPs expression. It also inhibited ERK, JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways as well as NF-κB activity. These findings reveal new therapeutic potential for diosgenin in anti-metastatic therapy. PMID:21629786

  4. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3. PMID:27073718

  5. Overexpression of urokinase receptor increases matrix invasion without altering cell migration in a human osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Karikó, K; Kuo, A; Boyd, D; Okada, S S; Cines, D B; Barnathan, E S

    1993-07-01

    Proteolysis triggered by receptor-bound urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) involves a cascade of species-specific molecular interactions. To study the role of the uPA receptor (uPAR) in such interactions, a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS), which normally expresses low levels of uPAR, was transfected with human uPAR complementary DNA. One of several stably transformed clonal cells lines, designated 2A2, was characterized and compared to the parental HOS, revealing the following: (a) stable incorporation of uPAR complementary DNA into the genome demonstrated by Southern blot analysis; (b) a 10-fold increase in steady state mRNA levels of uPAR assessed by Northern blot analysis; (c) a 2-fold increase in the surface expression of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored uPAR protein determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by the specific binding of radiolabeled single chain uPA; (d) a 2-fold increase in internalization and degradation of radiolabeled uPA/PAI-1 complexes; and (e) a 2-fold increase in receptor-bound uPA-mediated plasmin generation measured by the cleavage of a chromogenic substrate and degradation of 125I-labeled laminin. The involvement of uPAR in cellular processes was determined by comparing 2A2 and HOS cells in in vitro migration and invasion assays. The migration of 2A2 cells were slower on fibronectin-coated surfaces in a linear under-agarose assay, but both cell lines migrated at the same rate on uncoated polycarbonate filters in Boyden chamber assays. In the invasion experiments, 4 times more 2A2 than HOS cells penetrated through the barrier of reconstituted basement membrane Matrigel. These data suggest that uPAR does not potentiate random cell migration but facilitates matrix degradation and subsequent cell invasion. PMID:8391387

  6. Daidzein suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α induced migration and invasion by inhibiting hedgehog/Gli1 signaling in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Cheng; Namgung, Hyeju; Lee, Jaehoo; Park, Hyun-Chang; Ko, Jiwon; Moon, Heejung; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Lee, Hong Jin

    2014-04-30

    In breast cancer, the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induces cell invasion, although the molecular basis of it has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of daidzein in regulating TNF-α induced cell invasion and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Daidzein inhibited TNF-α induced cellular migration and invasion in estrogen receptor (ER) negative MCF10DCIS.com human breast cancer cells. TNF-α activated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by enhancing Gli1 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, which resulted in increased invasiveness; these effects were blocked by daidzein and the Hh signaling inhibitors, cyclopamine and vismodegib. Moreover, these compounds suppressed TNF-α induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 mRNA expression and activity. Taken together, mammary tumor cell invasiveness was stimulated by TNF-α induced activation of Hh signaling; these effects were abrogated by daidzein, which suppressed Gli1 activation, thereby inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:24724627

  7. MiR-625-3p promotes cell migration and invasion via inhibition of SCAI in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hailun; Ma, Renqiang; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Pei; Li, Dapeng; Wang, Qiangwu; Wang, Jianchao; Li, Huabin; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-09-29

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in controlling tumor invasion and metastasis via regulating the expression of a variety of targets, which act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Abnormally expressed miR-625-3p has been observed in several types of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of miR-625-3p-mediated tumorigenesis are largely elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the biological function and molecular insight on miR-625-3p-induced oncogenesis in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The effects of miR-625-3p in cell migration and invasion were analyzed by wound healing assay and transwell assay, respectively. In addition, the expression of miR-625-3p and its targets was detected in five human CRC cell lines. In the present study, we found that overexpression of miR-625-3p promoted migration and invasion in SW480 cells, whereas downregulation of miR-625-3p inhibited cell motility in SW620 cells. More importantly, we observed potential binding sites for miR-625-3p in the 3'-untranslated region of suppressor of cancer cell invasion (SCAI). Notably, we identified that overexpression of miR-625-3p inhibited the expression of SCAI, while depletion of miR-625-3p increased SCAI level, suggesting that SCAI could be a target of miR-625-3p. Additionally, we revealed that miR-625-3p exerts its oncogenic functions through regulation of SCAI/E-cadherin/MMP-9 pathways. Our findings indicate the pivotal role of miR-625-3p in invasion that warrants further exploration whether targeting miR-625-3p could be a promising approach for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26314959

  8. MiR-625-3p promotes cell migration and invasion via inhibition of SCAI in colorectal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Pei; Li, Dapeng; Wang, Qiangwu; Wang, Jianchao; Li, Huabin; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in controlling tumor invasion and metastasis via regulating the expression of a variety of targets, which act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Abnormally expressed miR-625-3p has been observed in several types of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of miR-625-3p-mediated tumorigenesis are largely elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the biological function and molecular insight on miR-625-3p-induced oncogenesis in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The effects of miR-625-3p in cell migration and invasion were analyzed by wound healing assay and transwell assay, respectively. In addition, the expression of miR-625-3p and its targets was detected in five human CRC cell lines. In the present study, we found that overexpression of miR-625-3p promoted migration and invasion in SW480 cells, whereas downregulation of miR-625-3p inhibited cell motility in SW620 cells. More importantly, we observed potential binding sites for miR-625-3p in the 3′-untranslated region of suppressor of cancer cell invasion (SCAI). Notably, we identified that overexpression of miR-625-3p inhibited the expression of SCAI, while depletion of miR-625-3p increased SCAI level, suggesting that SCAI could be a target of miR-625-3p. Additionally, we revealed that miR-625-3p exerts its oncogenic functions through regulation of SCAI/E-cadherin/MMP-9 pathways. Our findings indicate the pivotal role of miR-625-3p in invasion that warrants further exploration whether targeting miR-625-3p could be a promising approach for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26314959

  9. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  10. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  11. Necrotic cells influence migration and invasion of glioblastoma via NF-κB/AP-1-mediated IL-8 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, So-Hee; Park, Hyunju; Ahn, Young-Ho; Kim, Sewha; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial tumor in adults and has poor prognosis. Diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma, rapid growth, and the presence of necrosis are remarkable hallmarks of GBM. However, the effect of necrotic cells on GBM growth and metastasis is poorly understood at present. In this study, we examined the biological significance of necrotic tissues by exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling network between necrotic tissues and GBM cells. The migration and invasion of the GBM cell line CRT-MG was significantly enhanced by treatment with necrotic cells, as shown by assays for scratch wound healing and spheroid invasion. Incubation with necrotic cells induced IL-8 secretion in CRT-MG cells in a dose-dependent manner. In human GBM tissues, IL-8 positive cells were mainly distributed in the perinecrotic region, as seen in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. Necrotic cells induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and their binding to the IL-8 promoter, leading to enhanced IL-8 production and secretion in GBM cells. Our data demonstrate that when GBM cells are exposed to and stimulated by necrotic cells, the migration and invasion of GBM cells are enhanced and facilitated via NF-κB/AP-1 mediated IL-8 upregulation. PMID:27076368

  12. Apigenin suppresses colorectal cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion via inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    XU, MIN; WANG, SHUSHENG; SONG, YU; YAO, JIANHUA; HUANG, KUN; ZHU, XIAOJUE

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has a significant role in human tumorigenesis. The search for potential anticancer drugs has included widespread screening of inhibitors of the Wnt signaling pathway. Recently, one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, demonstrated potential anti-tumor effects on multiple human cancer cell lines, with low cytotoxicity and no mutagenic activity. However, the association between apigenin and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway remains to be elucidated. The results of wound healing and Transwell invasion assays revealed that apigenin was able to significantly suppress colorectal cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. An organoid culture assay revealed that apigenin was also able to suppress the growth of intestinal organoids. Furthermore, apigenin inhibited β-catenin/T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor signaling activation, which was induced by LiCl in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibited β-catenin nuclear entry, and therefore the expression of Wnt downstream target genes. In conclusion, apigenin significantly suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and organoid growth by inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27123066

  13. Necrotic cells influence migration and invasion of glioblastoma via NF-κB/AP-1-mediated IL-8 regulation.