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Sample records for adhesion migration invasion

  1. Silencing of WWP2 inhibits adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Pan, De-Biao; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Wang, Chao-Jun; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The role and clinical implication of the WWP2 E3 ubiquitin ligase in liver cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the expression level of WWP2 and its functions in cell adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer. We used real-time PCR to detect the expression of WWP2 in liver cancer and adjacent samples from the People's Hospital of Lishui and also analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-seq data by bioinformatics. Migration and invasion were detected by transwell analysis. We detected a strong WWP2 expression in tumor tissues of the People's Hospital of Lishui, and the survival rate was significantly higher in patients with lower WWP2-expressing tumors. WWP2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus stably infected cells (shWWP2), Huh7, showed slower growth speed compared with scramble control-infected cells in a xenograft mouse model. Knockdown of WWP2 Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells demonstrated a reduction in adhesion, invasion, and migration. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that WWP2 is positively correlated to cancer-related pathways including the chemokine signaling pathway. WWP2 also regulated MMP-9, caspase-9, CXCR3, and CCR5 expression in liver cancer cells. In addition, knockdown of CXCR3 and CCR5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and migration in Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells. Our data suggest that targeting of WWP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for liver cancer treatment.

  2. Filopodia in cell adhesion, 3D migration and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the role filopodia and filopodia-like structures in cell adhesion and three dimensional (3D) cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on recent advances demonstrating that filopodia are involved in substrate tethering and environment sensing in vivo. We further discuss the emerging role of filopodia and filopodial proteins in tumor dissemination as mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest that filopodia drive cancer cell invasion and highlight filopodia proteins as attractive therapeutic targets. Finally, we outline outstanding questions that remain to be addressed to elucidate the role of filopodia during 3D cell migration.

  3. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi apparatus regulates cell-cell adhesion and invasive cell migration in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Emi; Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Irino, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Miki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of cell-cell adhesion and upregulation of cell migration play critical roles in the conversion of benign tumors to aggressive invasive cancers. In this study, we show that changes in cell-cell adhesion and cancer cell migration/invasion capacity depend on the level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] in the Golgi apparatus in breast cancer cells. Attenuating SAC1, a PI(4)P phosphatase localized in the Golgi apparatus, resulted in decreased cell-cell adhesion and increased cell migration in weakly invasive cells. In contrast, silencing phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, which generates PI(4)P in the Golgi apparatus, increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased invasion in highly invasive cells. Furthermore, a PI(4)P effector, Golgi phosphoprotein 3, was found to be involved in the generation of these phenotypes in a manner that depends on its PI(4)P-binding ability. Our results provide a new model for breast cancer cell progression in which progression is controlled by PI(4)P levels in the Golgi apparatus.

  5. TRPV2 Mediates Adrenomedullin Stimulation of Prostate and Urothelial Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Lehen’kyi, V’yacheslav; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level. PMID:23741410

  6. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) modulates adhesion, migration and invasion in bone tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mak, Isabella W Y; Turcotte, Robert E; Ghert, Michelle

    2013-07-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be an important factor in osteolysis in the setting of metastatic carcinoma to the bone. However, PTHrP may also be central in the setting of primary bone tumors. Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is an aggressive osteolytic bone tumor characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that are recruited by osteoblast-like stromal cells. The stromal cells of GCT are well established as the only neoplastic element of the tumor, and we have previously shown that PTHrP is highly expressed by these cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the stromal cells exposed to a monoclonal antibody to PTHrP exhibited rapid plate detachment and quickly died in vitro. Therefore, PTHrP may serve in an autocrine manner to increase cell proliferation and promote invasive properties in GCT. The purpose of this study was to use transcriptomic microarrays and functional assays to examine the effects of PTHrP neutralization on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Microarray and proteomics data identified genes that were differentially expressed in GCT stromal cells under various PTHrP treatment conditions. Treatment of GCT stromal cells with anti-PTHrP antibodies showed a change in the expression of 13 genes from the integrin family relative to the IgG control. Neutralization of PTHrP reduced cell migration and invasion as evidenced by functional assays. Adhesion and anoikis assays demonstrated that although PTHrP neutralization inhibits cell adhesion properties, cell detachment related to PTHrP neutralization did not result in associated cell death, as expected in mesenchymal stromal cells. Based on the data presented herein, we conclude that PTHrP excreted by GCT stromal cells increases bone tumor cell local invasiveness and migration.

  7. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells.

  8. Hedgehog signaling pathway regulates ovarian cancer invasion and migration via adhesion molecule CD24

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chunyan; Chen, Tingtao; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays an important role in cancer; however, its mechanism in ovarian cancer migration and invasion remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the effect of the Hh signalling pathway on ovarian cancer migration and invasion through the regulation of CD24 expression, both in vitro and in vivo. Patients with ovarian cancer (n = 97) were recruited for this study. Evaluation of the explored the role parameters of patients indicated that CD24 expression was negatively associated with age, histological type and lymph node metastasis (p>0.05), but was positively associated with the clinical stage and pathological grading (p<0.05).The in vitro results indicated that the activator (sonic hedgehog, Shh) and inhibitor (GANT61) of Hh signalling significantly enhanced and reduced CD24 expression, respectively, at both the gene and protein levels (p<0.05).The addition of Shh significantly enhanced cellular migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells in vitro (p<0.05) Down regulation of CD24 using siRNA inhibited the tumour-promoting effects of Shh, and the in vivo results confirmed that GANT61 significantly inhibited CD24 expression and reduced tumour growth (p<0.01). In conclusion, the expression of CD24 can be regulated by Hh signalling, and downregulation of CD24 could play an important role in inhibiting ovarian cancer progression. PMID:28382140

  9. Periostin promotes migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma through the integrin/focal adhesion kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chuanyu, Sun; Yuqing, Zhu; Chong, Xu; Guowei, Xia; Xiaojun, Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Periostin (POSTN) is an extracellular matrix protein which is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and has been related to tumorigenesis of renal cell carcinoma. However, the involvement of POSTN in renal cell carcinoma migration, invasion, and their underlying mechanisms has not been established. In this study, renal cell carcinoma cell lines stably overexpressing POSTN were established using a lentiviral vector, and the effects of POSTN on renal cell carcinoma cell migration and invasion were investigated. POSTN overexpression increased the migration and invasion capabilities of renal cell carcinoma cell lines as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5 antibodies inhibited POSTN overexpression or recombinant POSTN-induced focal adhesion kinase activation, cell migration, and invasion. Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated focal adhesion kinase knockdown and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor reduced POSTN-enhanced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expressions, cell migration, and invasion. Our research thus indicates that POSTN promotes renal cell carcinoma cell migration and invasion through interaction with integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 and subsequent activation of the focal adhesion kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. These results suggest that POSTN plays a critical role in renal cell carcinoma metastasis and may represent a potential target for novel therapeutic approaches against renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  11. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  12. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC.

  13. Focal adhesion kinases crucially regulate TGFβ-induced migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells via Src kinase and E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kong, De-Bo; Chen, Feng; Sima, Ni

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that is triggered off by special extracellular signals such as some growth factors and integrins. FAK is found in cell–matrix attachment sites and implicated in cell migration, invasion, movement, gene expression, survival and apoptosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether FAK plays a role in invasion and migration of bladder cancer cells. Using an FAK-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and an FAK inhibitor PF-228, we found that inhibition of FAK tyrosine phosphorylation or knockdown of FAK suppressed invasion and migration of bladder cancer cells. Src is an important mediator of FAK-regulated migratory and invasive activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Src and FAK is mutually dependent and plays a key role in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced invasion and migration. E-cadherin acts downstream of FAK and is a critical negative regulator in FAK-regulated invasion and migration of bladder cancer cells. These findings imply that FAK is involved in oncogenic signaling of invasion and migration, which can be a novel therapeutic target to treat patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28367061

  14. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  15. Portulacerebroside A inhibits adhesion, migration, and invasion of human leukemia HL60 cells and U937 cells through the regulation of p38/JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qidong; Liao, Xuelian; Fu, Pan; Dou, Jiaying; Chen, Kai; Jiang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly malignant hematopoietic tumor. This study aimed to explore the effect of portulacerebroside A (PCA) on the adhesion, migration, and invasion in human leukemia HL60 cells and U937 cells and clarify the possible mechanisms involved, which could provide potential strategies for the treatment of AML. By methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium analysis, it was found that PCA (1–10 μM) suppressed the cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A total of 1, 2, and 5 μM of PCA dramatically inhibited the adhesion, migration, and invasion of HL60 cells and U937 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylation level of JNK and P38 protein level was measured by Western blot. After the real-time quantification polymerase chain reaction and Western blot detection of the total RNA and protein, messenger RNA, and protein expression levels of Ras homologous C (RhoC), metastasis-associated gene 1 (MTA1) and matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 (MMP-2/9) were decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. The phosphorylation level of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38) was decreased dramatically in HL60 cells and U937 cells after PCA treatment. In conclusion, PCA significantly inhibits the adhesion, migration, and invasion of HL60 cells and U937 cells by suppressing the p38/JNK pathway and regulating the expressions of related genes. PMID:27956839

  16. Laminin-511: a multi-functional adhesion protein regulating cell migration, tumor invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Normand; Kusuma, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Laminins are major constituents of basement membranes. At least 16 isoforms have now been described, each with distinct spatio-temporal expression patterns and functions. The laminin-511 heterotrimer (α5β1γ1) is one of the more recent isoforms to be identified and a potent adhesive and pro-migratory substrate for a variety of normal and tumor cell lines in vitro. As our understanding of its precise function in normal tissues and in pathologies is rapidly unraveling, current evidence suggests an important regulatory role in cancer. This review describes published data on laminin-511 expression in several malignancies and experimental evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies supporting its functional role during tumor progression. A particular emphasis is put on more recent studies from our laboratory and that of others indicating that laminin-511 contributes to tumor dissemination and metastasis in advanced breast carcinomas and other tumor types. Collectively, the experimental evidence suggests that high expression of laminin-511 has prognostic significance and that targeting tumor-laminin-511 interactions may have therapeutic potential in advanced cancer patients.

  17. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin β3 via SMAD2/3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-10-13

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin βB subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin B (βB dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin β3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin β3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin β3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers.

  18. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  19. Using real-time impedance-based assays to monitor the effects of fibroblast-derived media on the adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Catríona M; Herranz Ors, Carmen; Kiely, Patrick A

    2014-07-29

    Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating cell proliferation, migration and invasion are central to understanding tumour progression and metastasis. The local tumour microenvironment contributes to the transformed phenotype in cancer by providing specific environmental cues that alter the cells behaviour and promotes metastasis. Fibroblasts have a strong association with cancer and in recent times there has been some emphasis in designing novel therapeutic strategies that alter fibroblast behaviour in the tumour microenvironment. Fibroblasts produce growth factors, chemokines and many of the proteins laid down in the ECM (extracellular matrix) that promote angiogenesis, inflammation and tumour progression. In this study, we use a label-free RTCA (real-time cell analysis) platform (xCELLigence) to investigate how media derived from human fibroblasts alters cancer cell behaviour. We used a series of complimentary and novel experimental approaches to show HCT116 cells adhere, proliferate and migrate significantly faster in the presence of media from human fibroblasts. As well as this, we used the xCELLigence CIM-plates system to show that HCT116 cells invade matrigel layers aggressively when migrating towards media derived from human fibroblasts. These data strongly suggest that fibroblasts have the ability to increase the migratory and invasive properties of HCT116 cells. This is the first study that provides real-time data on fibroblast-mediated migration and invasion kinetics of colon cancer cells.

  20. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  1. Fibroblast surface-associated FGF-2 promotes contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion through FGFR-SRC signaling and integrin αvβ5-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Knuchel, Sarah; Anderle, Pascale; Werfelli, Patricia; Diamantis, Eva; Rüegg, Curzio

    2015-06-10

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts were reported to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion by secreting motility factors and extracellular matrix processing enzymes. Less is known whether fibroblasts may induce CRC cancer cell motility by contact-dependent mechanisms. To address this question we characterized the interaction between fibroblasts and SW620 and HT29 colorectal cancer cells in 2D and 3D co-culture models in vitro. Here we show that fibroblasts induce contact-dependent cancer cell elongation, motility and invasiveness independently of deposited matrix or secreted factors. These effects depend on fibroblast cell surface-associated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) -2. Inhibition of FGF-2 or FGF receptors (FGFRs) signaling abolishes these effects. FGFRs activate SRC in cancer cells and inhibition or silencing of SRC in cancer cells, but not in fibroblasts, prevents fibroblasts-mediated effects. Using an RGD-based integrin antagonist and function-blocking antibodies we demonstrate that cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts requires integrin αvβ5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fibroblasts induce cell-contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D and 3D conditions in vitro through fibroblast cell surface-associated FGF-2, FGF receptor-mediated SRC activation and αvβ5 integrin-dependent cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts. The FGF-2-FGFRs-SRC-αvβ5 integrin loop might be explored as candidate therapeutic target to block colorectal cancer invasion.

  2. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  3. A novel co-drug of aspirin and ursolic acid interrupts adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via regulating EMT and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways: multiple targets for cancer metastasis prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao; Liu, Yajun; Li, Tao; Yang, Xiang; Zheng, Guirong; Chen, Hongning; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis currently remains the predominant cause of breast carcinoma treatment failure. The effective targeting of metastasis-related-pathways in cancer holds promise for a new generation of therapeutics. In this study, we developed an novel Asp-UA conjugate, which was composed of classical “old drug” aspirin and low toxicity natural product ursolic acid for targeting breast cancer metastasis. Our results showed that Asp-UA could attenuate the adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a more safe and effective manner in vitro. Molecular and cellular study demonstrated that Asp-UA significantly down-regulated the expression of cell adhesion and invasion molecules including integrin α6β1, CD44, MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, EGFR and ERK proteins, and up-regulated the epithelial markers “E-cadherin” and “β-catenin”, and PTEN proteins. Furthermore, Asp-UA (80 mg/kg) reduced lung metastasis in a 4T1 murine breast cancer metastasis model more efficiently, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of CD44. More importantly, we did not detect side effects with Asp-UA in mice such as weight loss and main viscera tissues toxicity. Overall, our research suggested that co-drug Asp-UA possessed potential metastasis chemoprevention abilities via influencing EMT and EGFR-mediated pathways and could be a more promising drug candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27683033

  4. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  5. Mean-field descriptions of collective migration with strong adhesion.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stuart T; Simpson, Matthew J; Baker, Ruth E

    2012-05-01

    Random walk models based on an exclusion process with contact effects are often used to represent collective migration where individual agents are affected by agent-to-agent adhesion. Traditional mean-field representations of these processes take the form of a nonlinear diffusion equation which, for strong adhesion, does not predict the averaged discrete behavior. We propose an alternative suite of mean-field representations, showing that collective migration with strong adhesion can be accurately represented using a moment closure approach.

  6. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  7. α-Tubulin acetylation elevated in metastatic and basal-like breast cancer cells promotes microtentacle formation, adhesion, and invasive migration.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Amanda E; Vitolo, Michele I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Charpentier, Monica S; Goloubeva, Olga G; Ioffe, Olga B; Tuttle, Kimberly C; Slovic, Jana; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Martin, Stuart S

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cases of breast cancer pose the primary challenge in clinical management of this disease, demanding the identification of effective therapeutic strategies that remain wanting. In this study, we report that elevated levels of α-tubulin acetylation are a sufficient cause of metastatic potential in breast cancer. In suspended cell culture conditions, metastatic breast cancer cells exhibited high α-tubulin acetylation levels that extended along microtentacle (McTN) protrusions. Mutation of the acetylation site on α-tubulin and enzymatic modulation of this posttranslational modification exerted a significant impact on McTN frequency and the reattachment of suspended tumor cells. Reducing α-tubulin acetylation significantly inhibited migration but did not affect proliferation. In an analysis of more than 140 matched primary and metastatic tumors from patients, we found that acetylation was maintained and in many cases increased in lymph node metastases compared with primary tumors. Proteomic analysis of an independent cohort of more than 390 patient specimens further documented the relationship between increased α-tubulin acetylation and the aggressive behaviors of basal-like breast cancers, with a trend toward increased risk of disease progression and death in patients with high-intensity α-tubulin acetylation in primary tumors. Taken together, our results identify a tight correlation between acetylated α-tubulin levels and aggressive metastatic behavior in breast cancer, with potential implications for the definition of a simple prognostic biomarker in patients with breast cancer.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  9. MIEN1 drives breast tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal-focal adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Van Treuren, Timothy; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2016-01-01

    Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1) is an important regulator of cell migration and invasion. MIEN1 overexpression represents an oncogenic event that promotes tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. The underlying mechanism by which MIEN1 regulates migration and invasion has yet to be deciphered. Here, we demonstrate that MIEN1 acts as a cytoskeletal-signaling adapter protein to drive breast cancer cell migration. MIEN1 localization is concentrated underneath the actin-enriched protrusive structures of the migrating breast cancer cells. Depletion of MIEN1 led to the loss of actin-protrusive structures whereas the over-expression of MIEN1 resulted in rich and thick membrane extensions. Knockdown of MIEN1 also decreased the cell-substratum adhesion, suggesting a role for MIEN1 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Our results show that MIEN1 supports the transition of G-actin to F-actin polymerization and stabilizes F-actin polymers. Additionally, MIEN1 promotes cellular adhesion and actin dynamics by inducing phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 and reducing phosphorylation of cofilin at Ser-3, which results in breast cancer cell migration. Collectively, our data show that MIEN1 plays an essential role in maintaining the plasticity of the dynamic membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton, which leads to an increase in cell motility. Hence, targeting MIEN1 might represent a promising means to prevent breast tumor metastasis. PMID:27462783

  10. Effect of Surface Adhesion on Individual and Collective Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; McCann, Colin; Rericha, Erin; Parent, Carole

    2011-03-01

    Cell-surface adhesion plays a critical role in amoeboid cell motion by supplying the traction allowing a cell to move itself forward.~ The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for individual and collective cell migration, naturally exhibits both cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesion during the aggregation process.~ We used both high- and low-magnification time-lapse microscopy to investigate the individual and collective migration of D. discoideum on substrates of varying adhesiveness, as well as on interfaces between surfaces.~ We find that surface adhesion can affect both individual cell migration as well as the behavior of cell groups.~ At the population scale, non-ideal surfaces slow down the initiation of aggregation and change the aggregation dynamics. At the scale of single cells, we measure both adhesion ability as well as the area of contact between cells and surface for individual cells and cells that are part of groups.~ We find that comparable forces are needed to pull cells off all surfaces, indicating that surface adhesion is actively regulated by migrating cells. Supported by NCI and NSF-PoLS.

  11. Anisotropic forces from spatially constrained focal adhesions mediate contact guidance directed cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arja; Lee, Oscar; Win, Zaw; Edwards, Rachel M; Alford, Patrick W; Kim, Deok-Ho; Provenzano, Paolo P

    2017-04-12

    Directed migration by contact guidance is a poorly understood yet vital phenomenon, particularly for carcinoma cell invasion on aligned collagen fibres. We demonstrate that for single cells, aligned architectures providing contact guidance cues induce constrained focal adhesion maturation and associated F-actin alignment, consequently orchestrating anisotropic traction stresses that drive cell orientation and directional migration. Consistent with this understanding, relaxing spatial constraints to adhesion maturation either through reduction in substrate alignment density or reduction in adhesion size diminishes the contact guidance response. While such interactions allow single mesenchymal-like cells to spontaneously 'sense' and follow topographic alignment, intercellular interactions within epithelial clusters temper anisotropic cell-substratum forces, resulting in substantially lower directional response. Overall, these results point to the control of contact guidance by a balance of cell-substratum and cell-cell interactions, modulated by cell phenotype-specific cytoskeletal arrangements. Thus, our findings elucidate how phenotypically diverse cells perceive ECM alignment at the molecular level.

  12. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  13. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type. PMID:25333694

  14. Relationship between neuronal migration and cell-substratum adhesion: laminin and merosin promote olfactory neuronal migration but are anti- adhesive

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Regulation by the extracellular matrix (ECM) of migration, motility, and adhesion of olfactory neurons and their precursors was studied in vitro. Neuronal cells of the embryonic olfactory epithelium (OE), which undergo extensive migration in the central nervous system during normal development, were shown to be highly migratory in culture as well. Migration of OE neuronal cells was strongly dependent on substratum- bound ECM molecules, being specifically stimulated and guided by laminin (or the laminin-related molecule merosin) in preference to fibronectin, type I collagen, or type IV collagen. Motility of OE neuronal cells, examined by time-lapse video microscopy, was high on laminin-containing substrata, but negligible on fibronectin substrata. Quantitative assays of adhesion of OE neuronal cells to substrata treated with different ECM molecules demonstrated no correlation, either positive or negative, between the migratory preferences of cells and the strength of cell-substratum adhesion. Moreover, measurements of cell adhesion to substrata containing combinations of ECM proteins revealed that laminin and merosin are anti-adhesive for OE neuronal cells, i.e., cause these cells to adhere poorly to substrata that would otherwise be strongly adhesive. The evidence suggests that the anti- adhesive effect of laminin is not the result of interactions between laminin and other ECM molecules, but rather an effect of laminin on cells, which alters the way in which cells adhere. Consistent with this view, laminin was found to interfere strongly with the formation of focal contacts by OE neuronal cells. PMID:1918163

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the SH3 domain regulates CAS subcellular localization, cell migration, and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Janoštiak, Radoslav; Tolde, Ondřej; Brůhová, Zuzana; Novotný, Marian; Hanks, Steven K; Rösel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2011-11-01

    Crk-associated substrate (CAS) is a major tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in cells transformed by v-crk and v-src oncogenes and plays an important role in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells. A novel phosphorylation site on CAS, Tyr-12 (Y12) within the ligand-binding hydrophobic pocket of the CAS SH3 domain, was identified and found to be enriched in Src-transformed cells and invasive human carcinoma cells. To study the biological significance of CAS Y12 phosphorylation, phosphomimicking Y12E and nonphosphorylatable Y12F mutants of CAS were studied. The phosphomimicking mutation decreased interaction of the CAS SH3 domain with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and PTP-PEST and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Live-cell imaging showed that green fluorescent protein-tagged CAS Y12E mutant is, in contrast to wild-type or Y12F CAS, excluded from focal adhesions but retains its localization to podosome-type adhesions. Expression of CAS-Y12F in cas-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in hyperphosphorylation of the CAS substrate domain, and this was associated with slower turnover of focal adhesions and decreased cell migration. Moreover, expression of CAS Y12F in Src-transformed cells greatly decreased invasiveness when compared to wild-type CAS expression. These findings reveal an important role of CAS Y12 phosphorylation in the regulation of focal adhesion assembly, cell migration, and invasiveness of Src-transformed cells.

  16. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  17. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  18. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Torres, Vicente A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  19. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  20. Collective cell migration: leadership, invasion and segregation.

    PubMed

    Kabla, Alexandre J

    2012-12-07

    A number of biological processes, such as embryo development, cancer metastasis or wound healing, rely on cells moving in concert. The mechanisms leading to the emergence of coordinated motion remain however largely unexplored. Although biomolecular signalling is known to be involved in most occurrences of collective migration, the role of physical and mechanical interactions has only been recently investigated. In this study, a versatile framework for cell motility is implemented in silico in order to study the minimal requirements for the coordination of a group of epithelial cells. We find that cell motility and cell-cell mechanical interactions are sufficient to generate a broad array of behaviours commonly observed in vitro and in vivo. Cell streaming, sheet migration and susceptibility to leader cells are examples of behaviours spontaneously emerging from these simple assumptions, which might explain why collective effects are so ubiquitous in nature. The size of the population and its confinement appear, in particular, to play an important role in the coordination process. In all cases, the complex response of the population can be predicted from the knowledge of the correlation length of the velocity field measured in the bulk of the epithelial layer. This analysis provides also new insights into cancer metastasis and cell sorting, suggesting, in particular, that collective invasion might result from an emerging coordination in a system where single cells are mechanically unable to invade.

  1. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in mechanosensing during fibroblast migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Hanks, S. K.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase localized at focal adhesions and is believed to mediate adhesion-stimulated effects. Although ablation of FAK impairs cell movement, it is not clear whether FAK might be involved in the guidance of cell migration, a role consistent with its putative regulatory function. We have transfected FAK-null fibroblasts with FAK gene under the control of the tetracycline repression system. Cells were cultured on flexible polyacrylamide substrates for the detection of traction forces and the application of mechanical stimulation. Compared with control cells expressing wild-type FAK, FAK-null cells showed a decrease in migration speed and directional persistence. In addition, whereas FAK-expressing cells responded to exerted forces by reorienting their movements and forming prominent focal adhesions, FAK-null cells failed to show such responses. Furthermore, FAK-null cells showed impaired responses to decreases in substrate flexibility, which causes control cells to generate weaker traction forces and migrate away from soft substrates. Cells expressing Y397F FAK, which cannot be phosphorylated at a key tyrosine site, showed similar defects in migration pattern and force-induced reorientation as did FAK-null cells. However, other aspects of F397-FAK cells, including the responses to substrate flexibility and the amplification of focal adhesions upon mechanical stimulation, were similar to that of control cells. Our results suggest that FAK plays an important role in the response of migrating cells to mechanical input. In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr-397 is required for some, but not all, of the functions of FAK in cell migration.

  2. Cellular Migration and Invasion Uncoupled: Increased Migration Is Not an Inexorable Consequence of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Daneen; Somarelli, Jason A.; Hanna, Gabi; Palmer, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination requires carcinoma cells to detach from the primary tumor and invade through the basement membrane. To acquire these characteristics, epithelial tumor cells undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), whereby cells lose polarity and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Post-EMT cells have also been shown, or assumed, to be more migratory; however, there have been contradictory reports on an immortalized human mammary epithelial cell line (HMLE) that underwent EMT. In the context of carcinoma-associated EMT, it is not yet clear whether the change in migration and invasion must be positively correlated during EMT or whether enhanced migration is a necessary consequence of having undergone EMT. Here, we report that pre-EMT rat prostate cancer (PC) and HMLE cells are more migratory than their post-EMT counterparts. To determine a mechanism for increased epithelial cell migration, gene expression analysis was performed and revealed an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pre-EMT cells. Indeed, inhibition of EGFR in PC epithelial cells slowed migration. Importantly, while post-EMT PC and HMLE cell lines are less migratory, both remain invasive in vitro and, for PC cells, in vivo. Our study demonstrates that enhanced migration is not a phenotypic requirement of EMT, and migration and invasion can be uncoupled during carcinoma-associated EMT. PMID:25002532

  3. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Owen L.; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  4. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon.

  5. Baicalein inhibits the migration and invasive properties of human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Teng, Chun-Yuh; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Huang, Hai-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Huang, Chih-Yang; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hwang, Jin-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Flavonoids have been demonstrated to exert health benefits in humans. We investigated whether the flavonoid baicalein would inhibit the adhesion, migration, invasion, and growth of human hepatoma cell lines, and we also investigated its mechanism of action. The separate effects of baicalein and baicalin on the viability of HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep1 cells were investigated for 24 h. To evaluate their invasive properties, cells were incubated on matrigel-coated transwell membranes in the presence or absence of baicalein. We examined the effect of baicalein on the adhesion of cells, on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), protein kinase C (PKC), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and on tumor growth in vivo. We observed that baicalein suppresses hepatoma cell growth by 55%, baicalein-treated cells showed lower levels of migration than untreated cells, and cell invasion was significantly reduced to 28%. Incubation of hepatoma cells with baicalein also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to matrigel, collagen I, and gelatin-coated substrate. Baicalein also decreased the gelatinolytic activities of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased phosphorylated I-kappa-B (IKB)-{beta}. In addition, baicalein reduced the phosphorylation levels of PKC{alpha} and p38 proteins, which regulate invasion in poorly differentiated hepatoma cells. Finally, when SK-Hep1 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of baicalein induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results demonstrate the anticancer properties of baicalein, which include the inhibition of adhesion, invasion, migration, and proliferation of human hepatoma cells in vivo. - Highlight: > Baicalein inhibits several essential steps in the onset of metastasis.

  6. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  7. Cell Migration in the Immune System: the Evolving Inter-Related Roles of Adhesion Molecules and Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Graesser, Donnasue

    2000-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation into perivascular tissue during inflammation and lymphocyte homing to lymphoid organs involve transient adhesion to the vessel endothelium, followed by transmigration through the endothelial cell (EC) layer and establishment of residency at the tissue site for a period of time. In these processes, leukocytes undergo multiple attachments to, and detachments from, the vessel-lining endothelial cells, prior to transendothelial cell migration. Transmigrating leukocytes must traverse a subendothelial basement membrane en route to perivascular tissues and utilize enzymes known as matrix metalloproteinases to make selective clips in the extracellular matrix components of the basement membrane. This review will focus on the evidence for a link between adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, the induction of matrix metalloproteinases mediated by engagement of adhesion receptors on leukocytes, and the ability to utilize these matrix metalloproteinases to facilitate leukocyte invasion of tissues. Leukocytes with invasive phenotypes express high levels of MMPs, and expression of MMPs enhances the migratory and invasive properties of these cells. Furthermore, MMPs may be used by lymphocytes to proteolytically cleave molecules such as adhesion receptors and membrane bound cytokines, increasing their efficiency in the immune response. Engagement of leukocyte adhesion receptors may modulate adhesive (modulation of integrin affinities and expression), synthetic (proteinase induction and activation), and surface organization (clustering of proteolyric complexes) behaviors of invasive leukocytes. Elucidation of these pathways will lead to better understanding of controlling mechanisms in order to develop rational therapeutic approaches in the areas of inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:11097205

  8. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  9. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  10. Live-cell migration and adhesion turnover assays.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, J; Young, K; Brown, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized the way live-cell imaging is achieved. At the same time, it is also potentially harmful to a living specimen. Therefore, the specimen must be monitored for viability and health before, during, and after imaging sessions. Methods for monitoring cell viability and health will be discussed in this chapter. Another key to successful live-cell imaging is to minimize light exposure as much as possible. A summary of strategies for minimizing light exposure including maximizing the light throughput of the microscope and the sensitivity of light detection is presented. Various fluorescence microscopy techniques are presented with a focus on how the light is delivered to the sample (i.e., light density) and pros and cons for use with living specimens. The reader is also directed to other publications that go into these topics in more detail. Methods are described on how to prepare samples for single cell migration assays, how to measure cell migration rates (e.g., bright-field, semi-automated, and automated), and how to measure focal adhesion turnover rates. Details of how to correct images for background intensity and field-illumination uniformity artifacts for quantitative imaging are also described. Overall, this chapter will be helpful to scientists who are interested in imaging live specimens using fluorescence microscopy techniques. It will be of particular interest to anyone wanting to perform quantitative fluorescence imaging, and wanting to measure cell migration rates, and focal adhesion dynamics.

  11. Rocking adhesion assay system to study adhesion and transendothelial migration of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bapu, Deepashree; Khadim, Munira; Brooks, Susan A

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of metastatic cancer cells to the vascular endothelium of the target organs and their subsequent transendothelial migration is one of the critical, yet poorly understood, steps of the metastatic cascade. Conventionally, the mechanisms of this complex process have been studied using static adhesion systems or flow assay systems. Static assay systems are easy to set up and perform but do not mimic the physiological conditions of blood flow. Flow assays closely mimic physiological conditions of flow but are time consuming and require specialist equipment. In this chapter we describe the rocking adhesion system which incorporates the key advantages of both the static and flow assay systems and not only is easy to set up and perform but also mimics conditions of blood flow.

  12. The conveyor belt hypothesis for thymocyte migration: participation of adhesion and de-adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Villa-Verde, D M; Calado, T C; Ocampo, J S; Silva-Monteiro, E; Savino, W

    1999-05-01

    Thymocyte differentiation is the process by which bone marrow-derived precursors enter the thymus, proliferate, rearrange the genes and express the corresponding T cell receptors, and undergo positive and/or negative selection, ultimately yielding mature T cells that will represent the so-called T cell repertoire. This process occurs in the context of cell migration, whose cellular and molecular basis is still poorly understood. Kinetic studies favor the idea that these cells leave the organ in an ordered pattern, as if they were moving on a conveyor belt. We have recently proposed that extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, among others, produced by non-lymphoid cells both in the cortex and in the medulla, would constitute a macromolecular arrangement allowing differentiating thymocytes to migrate. Here we discuss the participation of both molecules with adhesive and de-adhesive properties in the intrathymic T cell migration. Functional experiments demonstrated that galectin-3, a soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin secreted by thymic microenvironmental cells, is a likely candidate for de-adhesion proteins by decreasing thymocyte interaction with the thymic microenvironment.

  13. Inhibition of Src family kinases with dasatinib blocks migration and invasion of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Mesa, Tania; Vultur, Adina; Lee, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Src family kinases (SFK) are involved in regulating a multitude of biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival, depending on the cellular context. Therefore, although SFKs are currently being investigated as potential targets for treatment strategies in various cancers, the biological responses to inhibition of SFK signaling in any given tumor type are not predictable. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor with potent antiproliferative activity against hematologic malignancies harboring activated BCR-ABL. In this study, we show that dasatinib blocks migration and invasion of human melanoma cells without affecting proliferation and survival. Moreover, dasatinib completely inhibits SFK kinase activity at low nanomolar concentrations in all eight human melanoma cell lines investigated. In addition, two known downstream targets of SFKs, focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)), are inhibited with similar concentrations and kinetics. Consistent with inhibition of these signaling pathways and invasion, dasatinib down-regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9. We also provide evidence that dasatinib directly inhibits kinase activity of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, which is overexpressed and/or overactive in many solid tumors, including melanoma. Thus, SFKs and downstream signaling are implicated as having key roles in migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  14. Adhesion systems in normal breast and in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Glukhova, M.; Koteliansky, V.; Sastre, X.; Thiery, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    To analyze the role of various elements of the adhesion system in the organization of the normal mammary gland and in breast carcinoma, we have studied simultaneously the expression of integrins, E- and P-cadherins, and cytoplasmic constituents of adherens junctions. In the normal gland, E-cadherin and alpha-catenin are present in luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells, whereas integrins are more abundant in acinar epithelial and in myoepithelial cells. We demonstrate here that, in addition, myoepithelial cells express much more vinculin and alpha-actinin than luminal epithelial cells, whereas talin and focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) are restricted to the basal cell layer. In invasive carcinoma, E-cadherin is usually present although often in reduced amount; different integrin subunits are expressed either by a fraction or by all of the cells or are absent. However, the cytoplasmic components of adherens junctions, such as alpha-catenin, vinculin, alpha-actinin, talin, and pp125FAK, are expressed at low levels or cannot be detected in the carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that 1), in the normal mammary gland, the myoepithelial cells, being particularly rich in integrins and cytoplasmic components of the adherens junctions, play an important role in the maintenance of tissue integrity; 2), in invasive carcinoma, cell aggregates may be maintained due to varying levels of expression of E-cadherin and/or integrins; and 3), interaction of the transmembrane adhesion molecules with the cytoskeleton in carcinoma may be impaired as revealed by reduced levels of expression of alpha-catenin, vinculin, alpha-actinin, talin, and pp125FAK. Importantly, carcinoma cells, when exposed to stroma during invasion, do not acquire the adhesion apparatus characteristic of normal cells in contact with the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7887451

  15. Metformin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed

    Trinh, Son Xuan; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Bich; Saimuang, Kween; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Chan On, Waraporn

    2017-02-01

    Background: Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic agent that has been widely prescribed for treatment of type II diabetes. Anti-cancer properties of metformin have been revealed for numerous human malignancies including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) with anti-proliferative effects in vitro. However, effects on CCA cell migration and invasion have not been fully investigated. The present study aimed to explore the inhibitory effects of metformin on motility, migration and invasion of the CCA cell line HuCCT1, and examine molecular mechanisms underlying metformin effects. Methods: HuCCT1 cells were exposed to increasing doses of metformin. Viability and growth of HuCCT1 cells were assessed by MTS and colony formation assays, respectively. Motility, migration and invasion of metformin-treated HuCCT1 cells were determined in vitro using wound healing, transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays. Expression of signaling molecules and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers was assessed by Western blotting. Results: It was observed that metformin significantly decreased HuCCT1 cell viability and colony formation. The agent also markedly reduced wound closure, migration and invasion of HuCCT1 cells. Furthermore, metformin exposure resulted in decreased STAT3 activation and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. In addition, it upregulated the expression of E-cadherin, while downregulating that of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-2. Conclusion: These results demonstrated inhibitory effects of metformin on CCA cell migration and invasion, possibly involving the STAT3 pathway and reversal of EMT markers expression. They further suggest that metformin may be useful for CCA management.

  16. Bradykinin promotes migration and invasion of human immortalized trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Having demonstrated that the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) is expressed in cells that participate in trophoblast invasion in humans and guinea-pigs, we investigated the role of bradykinin (BK) on cell migration and invasion in the HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cell line using wound healing and invasion assays. First, we documented that HTR-8/SVneo cells expressed kallikrein, B2R, B1R, MMP-2 and MMP-9 using immunocytochemistry. Incubation with BK (10.0 microMol/L) for 18 hours increased the migration index 3-fold in comparison to controls or to cells preincubated with the B2R antagonist HOE-140. BK (10.0 microMol/L) incubation yielded a similar number of proliferating and viable cells as controls, therefore the enhanced closure of the wound cannot be attributed to proliferating cells. Incubation with BK (10.0 microMol/L) for 18 hours increased the invasion index 2-fold in comparison to controls or to cells preincubated with the antagonist of the B2R. Neither the B1R ligand Lys-des-Arg9 BK, nor its antagonist Lys-(des-Arg9-Leu8), modified migration and invasion. Further support for the stimulatory effect of B2R activation on migration and invasion is provided by the 3-fold increase in the number of filopodia per cell versus controls or cells preincubated with the B2R antagonist. Bradykinin had no effect on the cellular protein content of the B2R, nor the MMP-9 and MMP-2 gelatinase activity in the culture media varied after incubation with BK. This study adds bradykinin-acting on the B2R-to the stimuli of trophoblast migration and invasion, an effect that should be integrated to other modifications of the kallikrein-kinin system in normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:21729302

  17. Laser-based microfabrication for cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.

    Mammalian cell adhesion and migration impact a multitude of cellular behaviors and tissue remodeling processes. Over the past several decades, investigators have methodically improved in vitro systems as mimics of the extracellular microenvironment to study these biologic phenomena. Experiments have progressed from early studies on bifunctional inorganic surfaces to those with purified adhesive proteins against an organic, non-adhesive background. Recently, subcellular geometric patterns of adhesive proteins have proven useful to restrict and direct focal contact formation, cell survival, lamellopodia extension, and the maturation of "supermature" focal contacts. The vast majority of recent studies have involved the construction of hydrophobic patches with adsorbed fibronectin as the adhesive constraint of choice. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which cells operate is a complex and diverse environment where numerous signals interact with a cell simultaneously; signals that the cell must integrate and that directly impact these processes. Microfabrication methods to approximate the extracellular milieu have significant limitations in their potential to be extended to pattern multiple bioactive ligands with high precision. Current techniques require multi-step processes which lose feature fidelity at every pattern transfer step, while simultaneously increasing logistical complexity and the chance of technical missteps. We have developed a family of complementary techniques using the raster-scanning laser of a confocal microscope to address a number of current challenges in improving microfabrication. For our work with thin films of self-assembled organic monolayers, we systematically removed the multi-step processing requirements of conventional photolithographic microfabrication and characterized and verified the technical advantages of our new patterning techniques. For 3D work, we developed and demonstrated micron-scale biochemical and mechanical

  18. A mechanically active heterotypic E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion enables fibroblasts to drive cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Kato, Takuya; Brugués, Agustí; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Derzsi, Stefanie; Arwert, Esther; Weston, Anne; González-Tarragó, Victor; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Alcaraz, Jordi; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Sahai, Erik; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumour invasion and metastasis. We show that CAFs exert a physical force on cancer cells that enables their collective invasion. Force transmission is mediated by a heterophilic adhesion involving N-cadherin at the CAF membrane and E-cadherin at the cancer cell membrane. This adhesion is mechanically active; when subjected to force it triggers β-catenin recruitment and adhesion reinforcement dependent on α-catenin/vinculin interaction. Impairment of E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion abrogates the ability of CAFs to guide collective cell migration and blocks cancer cell invasion. N-cadherin also mediates repolarization of the CAFs away from the cancer cells. In parallel, nectins and afadin are recruited to the cancer cell/CAF interface and CAF repolarization is afadin dependent. Heterotypic junctions between CAFs and cancer cells are observed in patient-derived material. Together, our findings show that a mechanically active heterophilic adhesion between CAFs and cancer cells enables cooperative tumour invasion.

  19. Cyclic mechanical stretching promotes migration but inhibits invasion of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Jinghui; Xu, Baiyao; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also broadly known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent stem cells that have a self-renewal capacity and multilineage differentiation potential. Mechanical stretching plays a vital role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. However, little is known about the effects of cyclic stretching on BMSC migration and invasion. In this study, using a custom-made cell-stretching device, we studied the effects of cyclic mechanical stretching on rat BMSC migration and invasion using a Transwell Boyden Chamber. The protein secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was detected by gelatin zymography, and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) was measured by western blot. We found that cyclic mechanical stretching with 10% amplitude at 1Hz frequency for 8h promotes BMSC migration, but reduces BMSC invasion. FAK and ERK1/2 signals were activated in BMSCs after exposure to cyclic stretching. In the presence of the FAK phosphorylation blocker PF573228 or the ERK1/2 phosphorylation blocker PD98059, the cyclic-stretch-promoted migration of BMSCs was completely suppressed. On the other hand, cyclic mechanical stretching reduced the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in BMSCs, and PF573228 suppressed the cyclic-stretch-reduced secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The decrease of BMSC invasion induced by mechanical stretching is partially restored by PF573228 but remained unaffected by PD98059. Taken together, these data show that cyclic mechanical stretching promotes BMSC migration via the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway, but reduces BMSC invasion by decreasing secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via FAK, independent of the ERK1/2 signal.

  20. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  1. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  2. Transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) is an anti-adhesive protein regulating the invasive growth of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Pirjo; Lammi, Johanna; Soikkeli, Johanna; Saksela, Olli; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Hölttä, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    Melanoma is a malignancy characterized by high invasive/metastatic potential, with no efficient therapy after metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the invasive/metastatic tendency is therefore important. Our genome-wide gene expression analyses revealed that human melanoma cell lines WM793 and especially WM239 (vertical growth phase and metastatic cells, respectively) overexpress the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein transforming growth factor β induced (TGFBI). In adhesion assays, recombinant TGFBI was strongly anti-adhesive for both melanoma cells and skin fibroblasts. TGFBI further impaired the adhesion of melanoma cells to the adhesive ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen-I, and laminin, known to interact with it. Unexpectedly, WM239 cells migrated/invaded more effectively in three-dimensional collagen-I and Matrigel cultures after knockdown of TGFBI by shRNA expression. However, in the physiological subcutaneous microenvironment in nude mice, after TGFBI knockdown, these cells showed markedly impaired tumor growth and invasive capability; the initially formed small tumors later underwent myxoid degeneration and completely regressed. By contrast, the expanding control tumors showed intense TGFBI staining at the tumor edges, co-localizing with the fibrillar fibronectin/tenascin-C/periostin structures that characteristically surround melanoma cells at invasion fronts. Furthermore, TGFBI was found in similar fibrillar structures in clinical human melanoma metastases as well, co-localizing with fibronectin. These data imply an important role for TGFBI in the ECM deposition and invasive growth of melanoma cells, rendering TGFBI a potential target for therapeutic interventions.

  3. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhuai; Xiang, Ru; Zhang, Xiangzhong; Chen, Yunxian

    2015-09-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix‑coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia.

  4. Modulation of Cell Migration and Invasiveness by Tumor Suppressor TSC2 in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Elena A.; Goncharov, Dmitriy A.; Lim, Poay N.; Noonan, Daniel; Krymskaya, Vera P.

    2006-01-01

    The loss of TSC2 function is associated with the pathobiology of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), which is characterized by the abnormal proliferation, migration, and differentiation of smooth muscle–like cells within the lungs. Although the etiology of LAM remains unknown, clinical and genetic evidence provides support for the neoplastic nature of LAM. The goal of this study was to determine the role of tumor suppressor TSC2 in the neoplastic potential of LAM cells. We show that primary cultures of human LAM cells exhibit increased migratory activity and invasiveness, which is abolished by TSC2 re-expression. We found that TSC2 also inhibits cell migration through its N-terminus, independent of its GTPase-activating protein activity. LAM cells show increased stress fiber and focal adhesion formation, which is attenuated by TSC2 re-expression. The small GTPase RhoA is activated in LAM cells compared with normal human mesenchymal cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of Rho activity abrogates LAM cell migration; RhoA activity was also abolished by TSC2 re-expression or TSC1 knockdown with specific siRNA. These data demonstrate that TSC2 controls cell migration through its N-terminus by associating with TSC1 and regulating RhoA activity, suggesting that TSC2 may play a critical role in modulating cell migration and invasiveness, which contributes to the pathobiology of LAM. PMID:16388022

  5. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lishan; Xian, Guozhe; Lv, Yinping; Lin, Yanliang; Wang, Yibing

    2017-03-18

    25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase in various organs and is involved in many processes, including lipid metabolism, inflammation and the immune response. However, the role of 25-HC in the migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that 0.1 μM 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion without affecting cell proliferation, especially after coculture with THP1-derived macrophages. Further investigation showed that 0.1 μM 25-HC significantly stimulated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in a coculture system and increased the expression of LXR and Snail. IL-1β also mimicked the effect of 25-HC. LXR knockdown notably blocked the 25-HC-induced Snail expression, migration and invasion in both the monoculture system and the coculture system, but it did not impact the effect of IL-1β, which suggested that IL-1β functioned in an LXR-independent manner. These results suggested that 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion in an LXR-dependent manner in the monoculture system but that in the coculture system, the 25-HC-induced IL-1β secretion enhanced the effect of 25-HC in an LXR-independent manner.

  6. Distinct roles of AKT isoforms in regulating β1-integrin activity, migration, and invasion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Virtakoivu, Reetta; Pellinen, Teijo; Rantala, Juha K.; Perälä, Merja; Ivaska, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    AKT1 and AKT2 kinases have been shown to play opposite roles in breast cancer migration and invasion. In this study, an RNA interference screen for integrin activity inhibitors identified AKT1 as an inhibitor of β1-integrin activity in prostate cancer. Validation experiments investigating all three AKT isoforms demonstrated that, unlike in breast cancer, both AKT1 and AKT2 function as negative regulators of cell migration and invasion in PC3 prostate cancer cells. Down-regulation of AKT1 and AKT2, but not AKT3, induced activation of cell surface β1-integrins and enhanced adhesion, migration, and invasion. Silencing of AKT1 and AKT2 also resulted in increased focal adhesion size. Importantly, the mechanisms involved in integrin activity regulation were distinct for the two AKT isoforms. Silencing of AKT1 relieved feedback suppression of the expression and activity of several receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR and MET, with established cross-talk with β1-integrins. Silencing of AKT2, on the other hand, induced up-regulation of the microRNA-200 (miR-200) family, and overexpression of miR-200 was sufficient to induce integrin activity and cell migration in PC3 cells. Taken together, these data define an inhibitory role for both AKT1 and AKT2 in prostate cancer migration and invasion and highlight the cell type–specific actions of AKT kinases in the regulation of cell motility. PMID:22809628

  7. Inhibitory effects of simvastatin on migration and invasion of rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes by preventing geranylgeranylation of RhoA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Youjun; Liang, Liuqin; Pan, Yunfeng; Lian, Fan; Li, Long; Lin, Haobo; Fu, Di; Fan, Jinjin; Yang, Xiuyan; Sun, Lin; Xu, Hanshi

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effect of simvastatin on the migration and invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its cellular signal mechanisms, FLS from active RA patients were stimulated with 3 % FBS or GM-CSF in the presence or absence of simvastatin. Cells migration and invasion in vitro were measured by the Boyden chamber method. RhoA activity was assessed by a pull-down assay. Matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) activity was evaluated by zymography. Simvastatin inhibits FBS- or GM-CSF-induced migration in a dose-dependent manner by RA FLS, and this inhibitory effect is independent of cell apoptosis. We also found that simvastatin suppressed in vitro invasion, adhesion, MMP-2 activity, cytoskeletal reorganization and RhoA activation. Furthermore, mevalonate or GGPP treatment reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin not only on migration and invasion in vitro but also on RhoA activation, and inhibition of RhoA by specific siRNA transfection reduced migration, adhesion and invasion of RA FLS. This study shows that simvastatin reduces RA FLS migration and invasion through the prevention of protein geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation. These findings provide a novel evidence that statin may be benefit for preventing RA arthritic destruction, and also indicate that RhoA may be a new target for the modulation of RA FLS migration and invasion.

  8. Cadherin-12 contributes to tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer by promoting migration, invasion, adhersion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cadherin 12 (CDH12), which encodes a type II classical cadherin from the cadherin superfamily, may mediate calcium-dependent cell adhesion. It has been demonstrated that CDH12 could play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma. We decided to investigate the relationship between CDH12 expression level and clinicopathologic variables in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients and to explore the functions of CDH12 in tumorigenesis in CRC. Methods The expression levels of CDH12 in colorectal carcinoma tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Real-time PCR and Western Blot were used to screen CDH12 high-expression cell lines. CCK-8 assay was used to detect the proliferation ability of CRC cells being transfected by shRNAs against CDH12. The wound assay and transwell assay were performed to test migration and invasion ability. The importance of CDH12 in cell-cell junctions was detected by cell adhesion assay and cell aggregation assay. Endothelial tube formation assay was used to test the influence of CDH12 on angiogenesis. Results Statistical analysis of clinical cases revealed that the positive rate of CDH12 was higher in the CRC tumor tissues compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. The expression levels of CDH12 in CRC patients are significantly correlated with invasion depth. Consistently, the ability of proliferation, migration and invasion were suppressed when CDH12 was decreased in CRC cells transfected with shRNAs. Cell adhesion assay and cell aggregation assay presented that tumor cells tend to disperse with the lack of CDH12. Endothelial tube formation assay showed that down-regulation of CDH12 could obviously inhibit the process of angiogenesis, implying that CDH12 may play an important role in tumor metastasis Conclusion Our results showed that CDH12 promotes proliferation, migration, invasion, adhesion and angiogenesis, suggesting that CDH12 may be an oncogene in colorectal cancer. CDH12 is

  9. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Lu, Na; Guo, Qinglong

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  10. HOXA10 controls proliferation, migration and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Manoela; Bitu, Carolina C; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Cervigne, Nilva K; Graner, Edgard; Manninen, Aki; Salo, Tuula; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    Although HOX genes are best known for acting in the regulation of important events during embryogenesis, including proliferation, differentiation and migration, alterations in their expression patterns have been frequently described in cancers. In previous studies we analyzed the expression profile of the members of the HOX family of homeobox genes in oral samples of normal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and identified differently expressed genes such as HOXA10. The present study aimed to validate the increased expression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and to investigate the effects arising from its knockdown in OSCC cells. The levels of HOXA10 mRNA were determined in human OSCC samples and cell lines by quantitative PCR, and HOXA10-mediated effects on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion were studied in HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells by using retrovirus-mediated RNA interference. Higher expression of HOXA10 mRNA was observed in OSCC cell lines and in tumor tissues compared to normal controls. HOXA10 knockdown significantly reduced the proliferation of the tumor cells which was accompanied by increased levels of p21. HOXA10 silencing also significantly induced the expression of EMT markers and enhanced the adhesion, migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells. No effects on cell death were observed after HOXA10 knockdown. The results of the current study confirm the overexpression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and further demonstrate that its expression is functionally associated with several important biological processes related to oral tumorigenesis, such as proliferation, migration and invasion. PMID:26097543

  11. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-C.; Su, H.-W.; Lee, C.-C.; Tang, M.-J.; Su, F.-C. . E-mail: fcsu@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level ({approx}600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration.

  12. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazão, Tiago F; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and have critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA-mediated interference screen, we identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We found that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via the kinases OXSR1 and STK39 and the ion co-transporter SLC12A2. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway previously known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration.

  13. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazao, Tiago F.; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V.; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and play critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA interference screen we have identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We demonstrate that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via OXSR1 and STK39 kinases and the SLC12A2 ion co-transporter. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs, and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway hitherto known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration. PMID:27400149

  14. Grhl3 induces human epithelial tumor cell migration and invasion via downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pan; Guo, Sijia; Tu, Zhenzhen; Di, Lijun; Zha, Xiaojun; Zhou, Haisheng; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Grainyhead genes are involved in wound healing and developmental neural tube closure. Metastasis is a multistep process during which cancer cells disseminate from the site of primary tumors and establish secondary tumors in distant organs. The adhesion protein E-cadherin plays an essential role in metastasis. In light of the high degree of similarity between the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurring in wound-healing processes and the EMT occurring during the acquisition of invasiveness in skin or breast cancer, we investigated the role of the Grainyhead genes in cancer invasion. Here, we show that there is an inverse relationship between Grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) and E-cadherin expression in some epithelial tumor cell lines. Overexpression of Grhl3 in the E-cadherin-positive epithelial tumor cell line, characterized by less invasiveness, generated a transcriptional blockage of the E-cadherin gene and promoted cell migration and cell invasion. Conversely, Grhl3 depletion inhibited cell migration and cell invasion and was associated with a gain of E-cadherin expression. To further explore the mechanism by which Grhl3 regulated E-cadherin expression, an E-cadherin promoter report analysis was performed and results showed that Grhl3 repressed E-cadherin gene expression by directly or indirectly binding to the E-boxes present in the proximal E-cadherin promoter. Taken together, our findings define a major role for Grhl3 in the induction of migration and invasion by the downregulation of E-cadherin in cancer cells.

  15. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15.

    PubMed

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-02-16

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy.

  16. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  17. Focal adhesion kinase and paxillin promote migration and adhesion to fibronectin by swine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Chun-Qi; Chen, Rong-Qiang; Jin, Cheng-Long; Li, Hai-Chang; Yan, Hui-Chao; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2016-05-24

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway contributes to the cell migration and adhesion that is critical for wound healing and regeneration of damaged muscle, but its function in skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) is less clear. We compared the migration and adhesion of SCs derived from two species of pig (Lantang and Landrace) in vitro, and explored how FAK signaling modulates the two processes. The results showed that Lantang SCs had greater ability to migrate and adhere to fibronection (P < 0.05) than Landrace SCs. Compared to Landrace SCs, Lantang SCs expressed many more focal adhesion (FA) sites, which were indicated by the presence of p-paxillin (Tyr118), and exhibited less F-actin reorganization 24 h after seeding onto fibronectin. Levels of p-FAK (Tyr397) and p-paxillin (Tyr118) were greater (P < 0.05) in Lantang SCs than Landrace SCs after migration for 24 h. Similarly, Lantang SCs showed much higher levels of p-FAK (Tyr397), p-paxillin (Tyr118) and p-Akt (Ser473) than Landrace SCs 2 h after adhesion. Treatment with the FAK inhibitor PF-573228 (5 or 10 μmol/L) inhibited Lantang SC migration and adhesion to fibronectin (P < 0.05), decreased levels of p-paxillin (Tyr118) and p-Akt (Ser473) (P < 0.05), and suppressed the formation of FA sites on migrating SCs. Thus FAK appears to play a key role in the regulation of SC migration and adhesion necessary for muscle regeneration.

  18. TGF-β Effects on Prostate Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion Require FosB

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Cachétne S.X.; Millena, Ana C.; Khan, Shafiq A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) family (cJun, JunB, JunD, cFos, FosB, Fra1, and Fra2) plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of many genes that are associated with cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, metastasis, and survival. Many oncogenic signaling pathways converge at the AP-1 transcription complex. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is a multifunctional regulatory cytokine that regulates many aspects of cellular function, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration, apoptosis, adhesion, angiogenesis, immune surveillance, and survival. METHODS This study investigated, the role of FOS proteins in TGF-β signaling in prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Steady state expression levels of FOS mRNA and proteins were determined using RT-PCR and western blotting analyses. DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells were exposed to TGF-β1 at varying time and dosage, RT-PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses were used to determine TGF-β1 effect on FOS mRNA and protein expression levels as well as FosB subcellular localization. Transient silencing of FosB protein was used to determine its role in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. RESULTS Our data show that FOS mRNA and proteins were differentially expressed in human prostate epithelial (RWPE-1) and prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, DU145, and PC3). TGF-β1 induced the expression of FosB at both the mRNA and protein levels in DU145 and PC3 cells, whereas cFos and Fra1 were unaffected. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in the accumulation of FosB protein in the nucleus of PC3 cells after treatment with exogenous TGF-β1. Selective knockdown of endogenous FosB by specific siRNA did not have any effect on cell proliferation in PC3 and DU145 cells. However, basal and TGF-β1- and EGF-induced cell migration was significantly reduced in DU145 and PC3 cells lacking endogenous FosB. TGF-β1- and EGF-induced cell invasion

  19. Src family kinase activity regulates adhesion, spreading and migration of pancreatic endocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Alessia; Capurso, Gabriele; Milione, Massimo; Panzuto, Francesco; Geremia, Raffaele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and 'indolent' neoplasms that usually develop metastatic lesions and exhibit poor response to standard medical treatments. Few studies have investigated pathways responsible for PET cell growth and invasion and no alternative therapeutic strategies have been proposed. In a recent microarray analysis for genes up-regulated in PETs, we have described the up-regulation of soluble Src family tyrosine kinases in this neoplasia, which may represent potentially promising candidates for therapy. Herein, we have investigated the expression and function of Src family kinases in PETS and PET cell lines. Western blot analysis indicated that Src is highly abundant in the PET cell lines CM and QGP-1. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed that Src is up-regulated also in human PET lesions. Pharmacological inhibition of Src family kinases by the specific inhibitor PP2 strongly interfered with adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cell lines. Accordingly, the actin cytoskeleton was profoundly altered after inhibition of Src kinases, whereas even prolonged incubation with PP2 exerted no effect on cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis of PET cells. A transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a subset of proteins was observed in QGP-1 cells adhering to the plate, with a peak at 75 min after seeding, when approximately 80% of cells were attached. Inhibition of Src kinases caused a dramatic reduction in the phosphorylation of proteins with different molecular weight that were isolated from the cell extracts by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation or pull-down with the SH2 domain of Src. Among them, the docking protein p130Cas interacted with Src and is a major substrate of the Src kinases in QGP-1 cells undergoing adhesion. Our results suggest that Src kinases play a specific role during adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cells and may indicate therapeutical approaches directed to limiting the metastatic

  20. Novel Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohafez, Omar; Hairul-Islam, Villianur Ibrahim; Alzahrani, Abdullah; Bani Ismail, Mohammad; Thirugnanasambantham, Krishnaraj

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the remarkable progress to fight against breast cancer, metastasis remains the dominant cause of treatment failure and recurrence. Therefore, control of invasiveness potential of breast cancer cells is crucial. Accumulating evidences suggest Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), a helix-loop-helix transcription factor, as a promising target to control migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Thus, an Ahr-based exploration was performed to identify a new Ahr agonist with inhibitory potentials on cancer cell motility. Methods For prediction of potential interactions between Ahr and candidate molecules, bioinformatics analysis was carried out. The interaction of the selected ligand with Ahr and its effects on migration and invasion were examined in vitro using the MDA-MB-231 and T47D cell lines. The silencing RNAs were transfected into cells by electroporation. Expressions of microRNAs (miRNAs) and coding genes were quantified by real-time PCR, and the protein levels were detected by western blot. Results The in silico and in vitro results identified Flavipin as a novel Ahr agonist. It induces formation of Ahr/Ahr nuclear translocator (Arnt) heterodimer to promote the expression of cytochrome P450 family 1 subfamily A member 1 (Cyp1a1). Migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and T47D cells were inhibited with Flavipin treatment in an Ahr-dependent fashion. Interestingly, Flavipin suppressed the pro-metastatic factor SRY-related HMG-box4 (Sox4) by inducing miR-212/132 cluster. Moreover, Flavipin inhibited growth and adhesion of both cell lines by suppressing gene expressions of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and integrinα4 (ITGA4). Conclusion Taken together, the results introduce Flavipin as a novel Ahr agonist, and provide first evidences on its inhibitory effects on cancer cell motility, suggesting Flavipin as a candidate to control cell invasiveness in breast cancer patients. PMID:27907195

  1. Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) – p130Cas Interactions Promote Adhesion Disassembly and Invasion in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Allison M.; Wilson, Ashley L.; Guerrero, Michael S.; Thomas, Keena S.; Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, A. Rick; Bouton, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion turnover is critical for cell motility and invasion. We previously demonstrated that the adaptor molecule Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) promotes adhesion disassembly and breast tumor cell invasion. One of two established binding partners of BCAR3 is the adaptor molecule, p130Cas. In this study, we sought to determine whether signaling through the BCAR3/Cas complex was responsible for the cellular functions of BCAR3. We show that the entire pool of BCAR3 is in complex with Cas in invasive breast tumor cells and that these proteins co-localize in dynamic cellular adhesions. While accumulation of BCAR3 in adhesions did not require Cas binding, a direct interaction between BCAR3 and Cas was necessary for efficient dissociation of BCAR3 from adhesions. The dissociation rates of Cas and two other adhesion molecules, α-actinin and talin, were also significantly slower in the presence of a Cas-binding mutant of BCAR3, suggesting that turnover of the entire adhesion complex was delayed under these conditions. As was the case for adhesion turnover, BCAR3-Cas interactions were found to be important for BCAR3-mediated breast tumor cell chemotaxis toward serum and invasion in Matrigel. Previous work demonstrated that BCAR3 is a potent activator of Rac1, which in turn is an important regulator of adhesion dynamics and invasion. However, in contrast to wildtype BCAR3, ectopic expression of the Cas-binding mutant of BCAR3 failed to induce Rac1 activity in breast cancer cells. Together, these data show that the ability of BCAR3 to promote adhesion disassembly, tumor cell migration and invasion, and Rac1 activity is dependent on its ability to bind to Cas. The activity of BCAR3-Cas complexes as a functional unit in breast cancer is further supported by the co-expression of these molecules in multiple subtypes of human breast tumors. PMID:27109104

  2. Sarsaparilla (Smilax Glabra Rhizome) extract inhibits migration and invasion of cancer cells by suppressing TGF-β1 pathway.

    PubMed

    She, Tiantian; Zhao, Chuanke; Feng, Junnan; Wang, Lixin; Qu, Like; Fang, Ke; Cai, Shaoqing; Shou, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Sarsaparilla, also known as Smilax Glabra Rhizome (SGR), was shown to modulate immunity, protect against liver injury, lower blood glucose and suppress cancer. However, its effects on cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion were unclear. In the present study, we found that the supernatant of water-soluble extract from SGR (SW) could promote adhesion, inhibit migration and invasion of HepG2, MDA-MB-231 and T24 cells in vitro, as well as suppress metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo. Results of F-actin and vinculin dual staining showed the enhanced focal adhesion in SW-treated cells. Microarray analysis indicated a repression of TGF-β1 signaling by SW treatment, which was verified by real-time RT-PCR of TGF-β1-related genes and immunoblotting of TGFBR1 protein. SW was also shown to antagonize TGF-β1-promoted cell migration. Collectively, our study revealed a new antitumor function of Sarsaparilla in counteracting invasiveness of a subset of cancer cells by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling.

  3. Recombinant disintegrin domain of human ADAM9 inhibits migration and invasion of DU145 prostate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ana Carolina Baptista Moreno; Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa Sobreiro; Cominetti, Márcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important features of malignant cells is their capacity to invade adjacent tissues and metastasize to distant organs. This process involves the creation, by tumor and stroma cells, of a specific microenvironment, suitable for proliferation, migration and invasion of tumor cells. The ADAM family of proteins has been involved in these processes. This work aimed to investigate the role of the recombinant disintegrin domain of the human ADAM9 (rADAM9D) on the adhesive and mobility properties of DU145 prostate tumor cells. rADAM9D was able to support DU145 cell adhesion, inhibit the migration of DU145 cells, as well as the invasion of this cell line through matrigel in vitro. Overall this work demonstrates that rADAM9D induces specific cellular migratory properties when compared with different constructs having additional domains, specially those of metalloproteinase and cysteine-rich domains. Furthermore, we showed that rADAM9D was able to inhibit cell adhesion, migration and invasion mainly through interacting with α6β1 in DU145 tumor cell line. These results may contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer. PMID:26211476

  4. Sarsaparilla (Smilax Glabra Rhizome) Extract Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells by Suppressing TGF-β1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    She, Tiantian; Zhao, Chuanke; Feng, Junnan; Wang, Lixin; Qu, Like; Fang, Ke; Cai, Shaoqing; Shou, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Sarsaparilla, also known as Smilax Glabra Rhizome (SGR), was shown to modulate immunity, protect against liver injury, lower blood glucose and suppress cancer. However, its effects on cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion were unclear. In the present study, we found that the supernatant of water-soluble extract from SGR (SW) could promote adhesion, inhibit migration and invasion of HepG2, MDA-MB-231 and T24 cells in vitro, as well as suppress metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo. Results of F-actin and vinculin dual staining showed the enhanced focal adhesion in SW-treated cells. Microarray analysis indicated a repression of TGF-β1 signaling by SW treatment, which was verified by real-time RT-PCR of TGF-β1-related genes and immunoblotting of TGFBR1 protein. SW was also shown to antagonize TGF-β1-promoted cell migration. Collectively, our study revealed a new antitumor function of Sarsaparilla in counteracting invasiveness of a subset of cancer cells by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:25742000

  5. Genomic and phenotypic analysis reveals a key role for CCN1 (CYR61) in BAG3-modulated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Jareer N; Virador, Victoria M; Guancial, Elizabeth A; Kimm, Daniel; Ho, Allen S; Mishra, Mark; Chuang, Eric Y; Cook, John; Gius, David; Kohn, Elise C

    2009-08-01

    Chaperone protein quantity may regulate the balance of proteins involved in invasion and malignancy. BAG3 is a co-chaperone and pro-survival protein that has been implicated in adhesion, migration, and metastasis. We reported that BAG3 overexpression in MDA435 human breast cancer cells results in a significant decrease in migration and adhesion to matrix molecules that is reversed upon deletion of the BAG3 proline-rich domain (dPXXP). We now hypothesize that transcriptional analysis would identify proteins involved in matrix-related processes that are regulated by BAG3 and/or its PXXP domain mutant. Expression array analysis of MDA435 cells overexpressing either wild-type BAG3 (FL) or dPXXP identified CCN1 as a BAG3 target protein. CCN1 is a known AP-1 target. Increased AP-1 transcriptional activity and AP-1 DNA-binding was found in MDA435 dPXXP cells. Consistent with these findings, CCN1 quantity and secretion were increased in dPXXP mutants but suppressed in FL cells; both BAG3 forms resulted in up-regulated CCN1 in HeLa cells. CCN1 silencing in the BAG3 FL overexpressors reduced the already low phospho-integrin beta1 in response to attachment on collagen IV. Matrigel invasion of HeLa cells engineered with the BAG3 constructs was enhanced in FL cells and minimal in dPXXP cells. CCN1 silencing blocked a greater percentage of the serum-induced invasion in FL cells than in dPXXP cells. This implies a context-dependent function of BAG3 on CCN1 and thus mesenchymal behaviour. CCN1 may be necessary for adhesion and matrix-related signalling in FL cells, abrogating a negative signal of the PXXP domain when BAG3 is intact. We propose that BAG3 regulates CCN1 expression to regulate tumour cell adhesion and migration.

  6. Focal adhesion kinase activity is required for actomyosin contractility-based invasion of cells into dense 3D matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia T.; Fischer, Tony; Puder, Stefanie; Kunschmann, Tom; Soetje, Birga; Ziegler, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates the dynamics of integrin-based cell adhesions important for motility. FAK’s activity regulation is involved in stress-sensing and focal-adhesion turnover. The effect of FAK on 3D migration and cellular mechanics is unclear. We analyzed FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cells expressing a kinase-dead FAK mutant, R454-FAK, in comparison to FAK wild-type cells. FAK knock-out and FAKR454/R454 cells invade dense 3D matrices less efficiently. These results are supported by FAK knock-down in wild-type fibroblasts and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells showing reduced invasiveness. Pharmacological interventions indicate that in 3D matrices, cells deficient in FAK or kinase-activity behave similarly to wild-type cells treated with inhibitors of Src-activity or actomyosin-contractility. Using magnetic tweezers experiments, FAKR454/R454 cells are shown to be softer and exhibit impaired adhesion to fibronectin and collagen, which is consistent with their reduced 3D invasiveness. In line with this, FAKR454/R454 cells cannot contract the matrix in contrast to FAK wild-type cells. Finally, our findings demonstrate that active FAK facilitates 3D matrix invasion through increased cellular stiffness and transmission of actomyosin-dependent contractile force in dense 3D extracellular matrices. PMID:28202937

  7. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates focal adhesions at the leading edge of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Teckchandani, Anjali; Cooper, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration requires the cyclical assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions. Adhesion induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins, including Cas (Crk-associated substrate/p130Cas/BCAR1). However, Cas phosphorylation stimulates adhesion turnover. This raises the question of how adhesion assembly occurs against opposition from phospho-Cas. Here we show that suppressor of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS6) and Cullin 5, two components of the CRL5SOCS6 ubiquitin ligase, inhibit Cas-dependent focal adhesion turnover at the front but not rear of migrating epithelial cells. The front focal adhesions contain phospho-Cas which recruits SOCS6. If SOCS6 cannot access focal adhesions, or if cullins or the proteasome are inhibited, adhesion disassembly is stimulated. This suggests that the localized targeting of phospho-Cas within adhesions by CRL5SOCS6 and concurrent cullin and proteasome activity provide a negative feedback loop, ensuring that adhesion assembly predominates over disassembly at the leading edge. By this mechanism, ubiquitination provides a new level of spatio-temporal control over cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17440.001 PMID:27656905

  8. Confinement and low adhesion induce fast amoeboid migration of slow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Le Berre, Maël; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Heuzé, Mélina; Takaki, Tohru; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-02-12

    The mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) was proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to adapt their migration mode to their environment. While the molecular pathways involved in this transition are well documented, the role of the microenvironment in the MAT is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how confinement and adhesion affect this transition. We report that, in the absence of focal adhesions and under conditions of confinement, mesenchymal cells can spontaneously switch to a fast amoeboid migration phenotype. We identified two main types of fast migration--one involving a local protrusion and a second involving a myosin-II-dependent mechanical instability of the cell cortex that leads to a global cortical flow. Interestingly, transformed cells are more prone to adopt this fast migration mode. Finally, we propose a generic model that explains migration transitions and predicts a phase diagram of migration phenotypes based on three main control parameters: confinement, adhesion, and contractility.

  9. Microfilament-coordinated adhesion dynamics drives single cell migration and shapes whole tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocio; Llorente-Gonzalez, Clara; Vicente, Carlos; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the substratum and/or other cells is a crucial step of cell migration. While essential in the case of solitary migrating cells (for example, immune cells), it becomes particularly important in collective cell migration, in which cells maintain contact with their neighbors while moving directionally. Adhesive coordination is paramount in physiological contexts (for example, during organogenesis) but also in pathology (for example, tumor metastasis). In this review, we address the need for a coordinated regulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions during collective cell migration. We emphasize the role of the actin cytoskeleton as an intracellular integrator of cadherin- and integrin-based adhesions and the emerging role of mechanics in the maintenance, reinforcement, and turnover of adhesive contacts. Recent advances in understanding the mechanical regulation of several components of cadherin and integrin adhesions allow us to revisit the adhesive clutch hypothesis that controls the degree of adhesive engagement during protrusion. Finally, we provide a brief overview of the major impact of these discoveries when using more physiological three-dimensional models of single and collective cell migration. PMID:28299195

  10. ROCK-2 is associated with focal adhesion maturation during myoblast migration.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, K P; Snyman, C; Myburgh, K H; Niesler, C U

    2014-07-01

    Satellite cell migration is critical for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Controlled cell migration is dependent on the formation of mature focal adhesions between the cell and the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). These cell-ECM interactions trigger the activation of signalling events such as the Rho/ROCK pathway. We have previously identified a specific role for ROCK-2 during myoblast migration. In this study we report that ROCK inhibition with Y-27632 increases C2C12 myoblast velocity, but at the expense of directional migration. In response to Y-27632 an increased number of smaller focal adhesions were distributed across adhesion sites that in turn were clearly larger than sites in untreated cells, suggesting a reduction in focal adhesion maturation. We also confirm ROCK-2 localisation to the focal adhesion sites in migrating myoblasts and demonstrate a change in the distribution of these ROCK-2 containing adhesions in response to Y-27632. Taken together, our observations provide further proof that ROCK-2 regulates directional myoblast migration through focal adhesion formation and maturation.

  11. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  12. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  13. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  14. Macrophages Modulate Migration and Invasion of Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  15. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  16. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  17. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  18. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  19. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong-Xia; Wang, Honglan; Wang, Yuchun; Song, Juan; Tian, Hua; Xia, Chunhui; Shen, Yetong

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the carbohydrate structure on the surface of tumor cells is an important feature of cancer metastasis. The specific role of sialic acids in the glycoconjugate terminal has not yet been clearly elucidated in these processes. Previously, we reported that α2,3-sialic acid residues in breast cancer are associated with metastatic potential. The α2,3-sialyltransferase ST3Gal III, which adds α2,3-sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in various tumors, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor metastasis, yet its mechanistic role has not been fully evaluated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of ST3Gal III on key steps in the process of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III-overexpressing and ST3Gal III-silenced breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell lines were generated. They showed an increase or decrease in the tumor-associated antigen sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX). The E-selectin binding capacity of the transfectants was proportional to cell surface SLeX levels. Cell migration and invasion were positively correlated with ST3Gal III levels. Moreover, ST3Gal III expression modulated the protein expression of invasion-related molecules, including β1 integrin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and cyclooxygenase-2, which may account for the mechanism involved in the effects of ST3Gal III on breast cancer invasiveness. In conclusion, our findings in these novel models of ST3Gal III expression revealed a critical requirement for ST3Gal III in several steps of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying metastasis and suggests a new target for the effective drug treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  20. Cell migration and invasion assays as tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hulkower, Keren I; Herber, Renee L

    2011-03-11

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  1. The heterotrimeric laminin coiled-coil domain exerts anti-adhesive effects and induces a pro-invasive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Santos-Valle, Patricia; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Cuesta, Angel M; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Villate, Maider; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J; Sanz, Laura; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling.

  2. The Heterotrimeric Laminin Coiled-Coil Domain Exerts Anti-Adhesive Effects and Induces a Pro-Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Valle, Patricia; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Villate, Maider; Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling. PMID:22723936

  3. Disentangling Membrane Dynamics and Cell Migration; Differential Influences of F-actin and Cell-Matrix Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Jacob M.; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Endrias Ganebo, Bereket; Gong, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is heavily interconnected with plasma membrane protrusion and retraction (collectively termed “membrane dynamics”). This makes it difficult to distinguish regulatory mechanisms that differentially influence migration and membrane dynamics. Yet such distinctions may be valuable given evidence that cancer cell invasion in 3D may be better predicted by 2D membrane dynamics than by 2D cell migration, implying a degree of functional independence between these processes. Here, we applied multi-scale single cell imaging and a systematic statistical approach to disentangle regulatory associations underlying either migration or membrane dynamics. This revealed preferential correlations between membrane dynamics and F-actin features, contrasting with an enrichment of links between cell migration and adhesion complex properties. These correlative linkages were often non-linear and therefore context-dependent, strengthening or weakening with spontaneous heterogeneity in cell behavior. More broadly, we observed that slow moving cells tend to increase in area, while fast moving cells tend to shrink, and that the size of dynamic membrane domains is independent of cell area. Overall, we define macromolecular features preferentially associated with either cell migration or membrane dynamics, enabling more specific interrogation and targeting of these processes in future. PMID:26248038

  4. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  5. Dose-dependent effects of prostaglandin E2 in macrophage adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Osma-Garcia, Inés C; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage migration to the focus of infection is a hallmark of the innate immune response. Macrophage spreading, adhesion, and migration through the extracellular matrix require dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton associated to integrin clustering in podosomes and focal adhesions. Here, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), the main prostaglandin produced by macrophages during inflammation, promote the distinctive dose-dependent formation of podosomes or focal adhesions in macrophages. Low concentrations of PGE2 increased p110γ PI3K expression, phosphorylation of actin-related protein 2, and formation of podosomes, which enhanced macrophage migration in response to chemokines. However, high doses of PGE2 increased phosphorylation of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase, the expression of serine/threonine protein kinase 1, and promoted focal adhesion formation and macrophage adhesion, reducing macrophage chemotaxis. In summary, we describe the dual role of PGE2 as a promoter of macrophage chemotaxis and adhesion, proposing a new model of macrophage migration to the inflammatory focus in the presence of a gradient of PGE2 .

  6. Tumor cell migration and invasion are regulated by expression of variant integrin glycoforms

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Faheem M; Seales, Eric C; Clem, William C; Hennessy, Kristin M; Zhuo, Ya; Bellis, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    The ST6Gal-I glycosyltransferase, which adds α2-6-linked sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in colon adenocarcinoma, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor cell invasiveness. Previously we reported that forced expression of oncogenic ras in HD3 colonocytes causes upregulation of ST6Gal-I, leading to increased α2-6 sialylation of β1 integrins. To determine whether ras-induced sialylation is involved in promoting the tumor cell phenotype, we used shRNA to downregulate ST6Gal-I in ras-expressors, and then monitored integrin-dependent responses. Here we show that forced ST6Gal-I downregulation, leading to diminished α2-6 sialylation of integrins, inhibits cell adhesion to collagen-I, a β1 ligand. Correspondingly, collagen binding is reduced by enzymatic removal of cell surface sialic acids from ras-expressors with high ST6Gal-I levels (i.e., no shRNA). Cells with forced ST6Gal-I downregulation also exhibit decreased migration on collagen-I and diminished invasion through Matrigel. Importantly, GD25 cells, which lack β1 integrins (and ST6Gal-I), do not demonstrate differential invasiveness when forced to express ST6Gal-I, suggesting that the effects of variant sialylation are mediated specifically by β1 integrins. The observation that cell migration and invasion can be blocked in oncogenic ras-expressing cells by forcing ST6Gal-I downregulation implicates differential sialylation as an important ras effector, and also suggests that ST6Gal-I is a promising therapeutic target. PMID:18703050

  7. Pleiotrophin exerts its migration and invasion effect through the neuropilin-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Elahouel, Rania; Blanc, Charly; Carpentier, Gilles; Frechault, Sophie; Cascone, Ilaria; Destouches, Damien; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina

    2015-08-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a pleiotropic growth factor that exhibits angiogenic properties and is involved in tumor growth and metastasis. Although it has been shown that PTN is expressed in tumor cells, few studies have investigated its receptors and their involvement in cell migration and invasion. Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is a receptor for multiple growth factors that mediates cell motility and plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumor progression. Here we provide evidence for the first time that NRP-1 is crucial for biological activities of PTN. We found that PTN interacted directly with NRP-1 through its thrombospondin type-I repeat domains. Importantly, binding of PTN to NRP-1 stimulated the internalization and recycling of NRP-1 at the cell surface. Invalidation of NRP-1 by RNA interference in human carcinoma cells inhibited PTN-induced intracellular signaling of the serine-threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein MAP kinase, and focal adhesion kinase pathways. Accordingly, NRP-1 silencing or blocking by antibody inhibited PTN-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell migration and tumor cell invasion. These results suggest that NRP-1/PTN interaction provides a novel mechanism for controlling the response of endothelial and tumoral cells to PTN and may explain, at least in part, how PTN contributes to tumor angiogenesis and cancer progression.

  8. Pleiotrophin Exerts Its Migration and Invasion Effect through the Neuropilin-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Elahouel, Rania; Blanc, Charly; Carpentier, Gilles; Frechault, Sophie; Cascone, Ilaria; Destouches, Damien; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a pleiotropic growth factor that exhibits angiogenic properties and is involved in tumor growth and metastasis. Although it has been shown that PTN is expressed in tumor cells, few studies have investigated its receptors and their involvement in cell migration and invasion. Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is a receptor for multiple growth factors that mediates cell motility and plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumor progression. Here we provide evidence for the first time that NRP-1 is crucial for biological activities of PTN. We found that PTN interacted directly with NRP-1 through its thrombospondin type-I repeat domains. Importantly, binding of PTN to NRP-1 stimulated the internalization and recycling of NRP-1 at the cell surface. Invalidation of NRP-1 by RNA interference in human carcinoma cells inhibited PTN-induced intracellular signaling of the serine-threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein MAP kinase, and focal adhesion kinase pathways. Accordingly, NRP-1 silencing or blocking by antibody inhibited PTN-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell migration and tumor cell invasion. These results suggest that NRP-1/PTN interaction provides a novel mechanism for controlling the response of endothelial and tumoral cells to PTN and may explain, at least in part, how PTN contributes to tumor angiogenesis and cancer progression. PMID:26408254

  9. ODAM is a predictor for biomedical recurrence and inhibits the migration and invasion of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun; Wu, Jie-Ying; Hou, Guo-Liang; Lu, Min-Hua; Shi, Zhi; Di, Jin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic ameloblast associated protein (ODAM) is a protein contributed to cell adhesion and has been shown to express in normal prostate tissue, but the expression and significance of ODAM in prostate cancer remain unknown. In this study, we detected the protein expressions of ODAM in 88 prostate cancer tissues with immunohistochemical staining, and found that 53 cases (60.2%) was high expression of ODAM, which was shown in the cytoplasm and paranuclear regions. Furthermore, low expression of ODAM was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, preoperative PSA and Gleason score, but not with mean age, follow-up duration, PSM rate and distribution of pathological T stage. Additionally, our results of multivariate analysis showed that low ODAM expression was an independent predictor of biomedical recurrence, while the positive lymph node metastasis, Gleason score, and preoperative PSA were not the independent risks for biomedical recurrence. Overexpression of ODAM did not inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells PC3, but significant suppressed their invasion and migration with decrease of the protein levels of MMP-2. These results suggest that ODAM is a predictor for biomedical recurrence and inhibits the migration and invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:27158359

  10. Clathrin mediates integrin endocytosis for focal adhesion disassembly in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Ezratty, Ellen J; Bertaux, Claire; Marcantonio, Eugene E; Gundersen, Gregg G

    2009-11-30

    Focal adhesion disassembly is regulated by microtubules (MTs) through an unknown mechanism that involves dynamin. To test whether endocytosis may be involved, we interfered with the function of clathrin or its adaptors autosomal recessive hypercholesteremia (ARH) and Dab2 (Disabled-2) and found that both treatments prevented MT-induced focal adhesion disassembly. Surface labeling experiments showed that integrin was endocytosed in an extracellular matrix-, clathrin-, and ARH- and Dab2-dependent manner before entering Rab5 endosomes. Clathrin colocalized with a subset of focal adhesions in an ARH- and Dab2-dependent fashion. Direct imaging showed that clathrin rapidly accumulated on focal adhesions during MT-stimulated disassembly and departed from focal adhesions with integrin upon their disassembly. In migrating cells, depletion of clathrin or Dab2 and ARH inhibited focal adhesion disassembly and decreased the rate of migration. These results show that focal adhesion disassembly occurs through a targeted mechanism involving MTs, clathrin, and specific clathrin adaptors and that direct endocytosis of integrins from focal adhesions mediates their disassembly in migrating cells.

  11. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  12. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Dong, Delu; Chen, Yaoyu; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2) were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  13. ARID1A gene knockdown promotes neuroblastoma migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Xu, Z; Zhao, Z; An, Q; Wang, L; Yu, Y; Piao, D

    2017-03-03

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood which often acquires drug resistance and becomes aggressive phenotypes. The high-risk patients suffer from high mortality due to the limitation of the treatment strategies. ARID1A (AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A), a subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, is considered as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ARID1A on migration and invasion in neuroblastoma cells. The shRNA targeting ARID1A was designed and delivered into SK-N-SH cells to knock down ARID1A expression. Knockdown of ARID1A by shRNA significantly increased the viability and invasion ability, and caused G1 arrest inhibition and DNA synthesis increase in SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, Knockdown of ARID1A increased the activity and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 in SK-N-SH cells. Furthermore, ARID1A knockdown caused diminished expression of E-cadherin, enhanced expression of N-cadherin and β-catenin nuclear translocation in SK-N-SH cells. These results suggest that loss of ARID1A may associate with the promotion of invasion and metastasis of neuroblastoma. Our findings indicate ARID1A is a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma.

  14. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  15. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A.

    2012-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis. PMID:22222499

  16. Comparative Effects of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Migration and Invasion in Oral Squamous Cell Cancer, by Gas Type

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Un; Seo, Seong Jin; Kim, Yeon Soo; Shin, Yoo Seob; Koh, Yoon Woo; Lee, Chang Min; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo; Moon, Eunpyo; Kang, Hami; Ryeo, Jeong Beom; Lee, Yuijina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The fourth state of matter, plasma is known as an ionized gas with electrons, radicals and ions. The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) in cancer research became possible because of the progresses in plasma medicine. Previous studies on the potential NTP-mediated cancer therapy have mainly concentrated on cancer cell apoptosis. In the present study, we compared the inhibitory effect of NTP on cell migration and invasion in the oral squamous cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods We used oral squamous cancer cell lines (SCC1483, MSKQLL1) and different gases (N2, He, and Ar). To investigate the mechanism of plasma treatment, using different gases (N2, He, and Ar) which induces anti-migration and anti-invasion properties, we performed wound healing assay, invasion assay and gelatin zymography. Results The results showed that NTP inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion of oral squamous cancer cell. In addition, focal adhesion kinase expression and matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 activity were also inhibited. Conclusion The suppression of cancer cell invasion by NTP varied depending on the type of gas. Comparison of the three gases revealed that N2 NTP inhibited cell migration and invasion most potently via decreased expression of focal adhesion kinase and matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:28120556

  17. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  18. Arachidonic acid randomizes endothelial cell motion and regulates adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Ninna Struck; Hansen, Anker Jon; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are essential for the evolution, organization, and repair of living organisms. An example of a combination of these processes is the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), which is mediated by a directed migration and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs). Angiogenesis is an essential part of wound healing and a prerequisite of cancerous tumor growth. We investigated the effect of the amphiphilic compound arachidonic acid (AA) on EC adhesion and migration by combining live cell imaging with biophysical analysis methods. AA significantly influenced both EC adhesion and migration, in either a stimulating or inhibiting fashion depending on AA concentration. The temporal evolution of cell adhesion area was well described by a two-phase model. In the first phase, the spreading dynamics were independent of AA concentration. In the latter phase, the spreading dynamics increased at low AA concentrations and decreased at high AA concentrations. AA also affected EC migration; though the instantaneous speed of individual cells remained independent of AA concentration, the individual cells lost their sense of direction upon addition of AA, thus giving rise to an overall decrease in the collective motion of a confluent EC monolayer into vacant space. Addition of AA also caused ECs to become more elongated, this possibly being related to incorporation of AA in the EC membrane thus mediating a change in the viscosity of the membrane. Hence, AA is a promising non-receptor specific regulator of wound healing and angiogenesis.

  19. Targeting the ROR1 and ROR2 receptors in epithelial ovarian cancer inhibits cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Claire; Llamosas, Estelle; Knipprath-Mészáros, Alexandra; Schoetzau, Andreas; Obermann, Ellen; Fuenfschilling, Maya; Caduff, Rosemarie; Fink, Daniel; Hacker, Neville; Ward, Robyn; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Ford, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    AIM In recent years, the Wnt signalling pathway has been implicated in epithelial ovarian cancer and its members have potential as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic targets. Here we investigated the role of two Wnt receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), ROR1 and ROR2, and their putative ligand, Wnt5a, in ovarian cancer. METHODS Immunohistochemistry for ROR2 was performed in a large patient cohort, including benign controls, borderline tumours and epithelial ovarian cancer. In addition, siRNA was used to silence ROR1, ROR2 and Wnt5a individually, and together, in two ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects on cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion were measured. RESULTS ROR2 expression is significantly increased in ovarian cancer patients compared to patients with benign disease. In vitro assays showed that silencing either receptor inhibits ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, and concurrently silencing both receptors has an even stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion. CONCLUSIONS ROR2 expression is increased in epithelial ovarian cancer, and silencing ROR2 and its sister receptor ROR1 has a strong inhibitory effect on the ability of ovarian cancer cells to proliferate, migrate and invade through an extracellular matrix. PMID:26515598

  20. Casticin Inhibits A375.S2 Human Melanoma Cell Migration/Invasion through Downregulating NF-κB and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zih-Yun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Fan, Ming-Jen; Ko, Yang-Ching; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-03-19

    Casticin is one of the main components from Fructus Viticis, which is widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent. The mechanism of how casticin affects melanoma cell migration and invasion is still not well known. Here we studied the anti-metastasis effects of casticin on A375.S2 melanoma cells by using a non-lethal concentration. First; we used an adhesion assay to test the A375.S2 cells' adhesion ability after treatment with casticin. We next investigated the cell migration ability after casticin treatment by using a wound healing assay to prove that the migration of A375.S2 cells can be inhibited by casticin and double checked the results using the transwell-migration assay. The suppressive effects on matrix metalloproteinase-2; and -9 (MMP-2; and -9) activities were examined by gelatin zymography. Furthermore, western blotting was used to investigate the protein level changes in A375.S2 cells. We found that p-EGFR; Ras and p-ERK1/2 are decreased by casticin, indicating that casticin can down-regulate the migration and invasion ability of A375.S2 cells via the p-EGFR/Ras/p-ERK pathway. The NF-κB p65 and p-ERK levels in nuclear proteins are also decreased by treatment with casticin. An EMSA assay also discovered that the NF-κB p65 and DNA interaction is decreased. NF-κB p65 protein level was examined by immunofluorescence staining and also decreased. Our findings suggest that casticin has anti-metastatic potential by decreasing the invasiveness of A375.S2 cells. We also found that casticin suppressed A375.S2 cell proliferation and cell adhesion ability, but did not affect cell death, as examined using cytometry and a collagen adhesion assay. Based on these observations, casticin could be used as an inhibitor of migration and invasion of human melanoma cells in the future.

  1. Vimentin Levels and Serine 71 Phosphorylation in the Control of Cell-Matrix Adhesions, Migration Speed, and Shape of Transformed Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Terriac, Emmanuel; Coceano, Giovanna; Mavajian, Zahra; Hageman, Tijmen A. G.; Christ, Andreas F.; Testa, Ilaria; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Gad, Annica K. B.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasizing tumor cells show increased expression of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin, which has been used to diagnose invasive tumors for decades. Recent observations indicate that vimentin is not only a passive marker for carcinoma, but may also induce tumor cell invasion. To clarify how vimentin IFs control cell adhesions and migration, we analyzed the nanoscale (30–50 nm) spatial organization of vimentin IFs and cell-matrix adhesions in metastatic fibroblast cells, using three-color stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. We also studied whether wild-type and phospho-deficient or -mimicking mutants of vimentin changed the size and lifetime of focal adhesions (FAs), cell shape, and cell migration, using live-cell total internal reflection imaging and confocal microscopy. We observed that vimentin exists in fragments of different lengths. Short fragments were mostly the size of a unit-length filament and were mainly localized close to small cell-matrix adhesions. Long vimentin filaments were found in the proximity of large FAs. Vimentin expression in these cells caused a reduction in FAs size and an elongated cell shape, but did not affect FA lifetime, or the speed or directionality of cell migration. Expression of a phospho-mimicking mutant (S71D) of vimentin increased the speed of cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that in highly migratory, transformed mesenchymal cells, vimentin levels control the cell shape and FA size, but not cell migration, which instead is linked to the phosphorylation status of S71 vimentin. These observations are consistent with the possibility that not only levels, but also the assembly status of vimentin control cell migration. PMID:28117759

  2. Focal adhesion kinase modulates radial glia-dependent neuronal migration through connexin-26.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Manuel; Ciceri, Gabriele; Rico, Beatriz; Marín, Oscar

    2011-08-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase and scaffold protein that regulates migration in many different cellular contexts but whose function in neuronal migration remains controversial. Here, we have analyzed the function of FAK in two populations of neurons with very distinct migratory behaviors: cortical interneurons, which migrate tangentially and independently of radial glia; and pyramidal cells, which undergo glial-dependent migration. We found that FAK is dispensable for glial-independent migration but is cell-autonomously required for the normal interaction of pyramidal cells with radial glial fibers. Loss of FAK function disrupts the normal morphology of migrating pyramidal cells, delays migration, and increases the tangential dispersion of neurons arising from the same radial unit. FAK mediates this process by regulating the assembly of Connexin-26 contact points in the membrane of migrating pyramidal cells. These results indicate that FAK plays a fundamental role in the dynamic regulation of Gap-mediated adhesions during glial-guided neuronal migration in the mouse.

  3. Probing the mechanosensitivity in cell adhesion and migration: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bao-Hua; Huo, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are basic physiological processes in living organisms. Cells can actively probe their mechanical micro-environment and respond to the external stimuli through cell adhesion. Cells need to move to the targeting place to perform function via cell migration. For adherent cells, cell migration is mediated by cell-matrix adhesion and cell-cell adhesion. Experimental approaches, especially at early stage of investigation, are indispensable to studies of cell mechanics when even qualitative behaviors of cell as well as fundamental factors in cell behaviors are unclear. Currently, there is increasingly accumulation of experimental data of measurement, thus a quantitative formulation of cell behaviors and the relationship among these fundamental factors are highly needed. This quantitative understanding should be crucial to tissue engineering and biomedical engineering when people want to accurately regulate or control cell behaviors from single cell level to tissue level. In this review, we will elaborate recent advances in the experimental and theoretical studies on cell adhesion and migration, with particular focuses laid on recent advances in experimental techniques and theoretical modeling, through which challenging problems in the cell mechanics are suggested.

  4. Controlling cell migration and adhesion into a scaffold by external electric currents.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Leena; Vörös, Janos; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-08-01

    Fabrication of more complex tissue-engineered structures, resembling the tissues and organs in vivo requires combining more than one cell type within the same construct. This can be achieved by designing and fabricating complex scaffolds with asymmetric properties but controlled arrangement of cells within the scaffold could also be realized by using electric current. External electric currents are able to modify cell adhesion, orientation and migration and this can be used for influencing cell location within a scaffold. In this paper we studied the effect of an electric current on cell migration and adhesion into a three-dimensional scaffold through a conductive mesh.

  5. Biphasic functions of the kinase-defective Ephb6 receptor in cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Obama, Hiroya; Kelly, Meghan L; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Nakamoto, Masaru

    2005-08-12

    EphB6 is a unique member in the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases in that its kinase domain contains several alterations in conserved amino acids and is catalytically inactive. Although EphB6 is expressed both in a variety of embryonic and adult tissues, biological functions of this receptor are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the function of EphB6 in cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated that EphB6 exerted biphasic effects in response to different concentrations of the ephrin-B2 ligand; EphB6 promoted cell adhesion and migration when stimulated with low concentrations of ephrin-B2, whereas it induced repulsion and inhibited migration upon stimulation with high concentrations of ephrin-B2. A truncated EphB6 receptor lacking the cytoplasmic domain showed monophasic-positive effects on cell adhesion and migration, indicating that the cytoplasmic domain is essential for the negative effects. EphB6 is constitutively associated with the Src family kinase Fyn. High concentrations of ephrin-B2 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EphB6 through an Src family kinase activity. These results indicate that EphB6 can both positively and negatively regulate cell adhesion and migration, and suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor by an Src family kinase acts as the molecular switch for the functional transition.

  6. Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of human lung carcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liangrui; Zheng, Junxian; Sun, Qianqian; Wei, Kemin; Hu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone (RTHF) is widely used as a traditional herb and has detoxification and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of RTHF on the growth and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and evaluated its mechanisms. A549 cells were treated with RTHF at various concentrations for different periods. In vitro Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and colony formation methods showed that RTHF had dose- and time-dependent antiproliferation effects on A549 cells. A cell adhesion assay showed that RTHF decreased A549 cell adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. Cell invasion and migration were investigated using the Transwell assay and observed using an inverted microscope; the results showed that cell metastasis was significantly lower in the treatment group than that in the control group (P<0.01). Expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The results showed that the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 decreased, while that of TIMP-2 increased significantly in the RTHF group when compared with the results of the control group. These results show that RTHF exhibits antigrowth and antimetastasis activity in lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing the expression of MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1 and increasing that of TIMP-2. PMID:26893573

  7. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  8. High environmental iron concentrations stimulate adhesion and invasive growth of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Prevorovský, Martin; Stanurová, Jana; Půta, Frantisek; Folk, Petr

    2009-04-01

    We have found that a high iron concentration in solid complete cultivation medium potentiates cell-cell and cell-surface adhesion of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Spotted giant colonies grown on iron-rich media were found to be more compact and more resistant to washing than those grown on plates with a standard iron content. Furthermore, we have documented that excess environmental iron stimulates the invasive growth of S. pombe (and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Three-dimensional, branched, washing-resistant structures composed mostly of elongated, but separate fission yeast cells, were formed within the solid agar medium. The degree of both adhesion and invasion displayed a specific, iron concentration-dependent response. Our results suggest a novel link between iron availability and the intensively studied and important fungal virulence factors, adhesion and invasion.

  9. PACE4 regulates proliferation, migration and invasion in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    PACE4 is one of the proprotein convertases (PC) that participate in the post-translational activation of inactive proteins, leading to mature, biologically active proteins. The processing reactions occur in pairs of basic amino acids. PACE4 is an extracellular PC that binds to growth factors and several components of the extracellular matrix contributing to tumor progression. In the present study, the PACE4 gene was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the knockdown human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells showed significantly reduced proliferation, migration and invasion rates. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that downregulation of PACE4 increases the percentage of cells arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, the expression of genes involved in cell growth, invasion and adhesion, i.e., IGF-2, MMP9 and MPZL2 was significantly decreased following siRNA-mediated silencing of PACE4. Taken together, these results indicate that PACE4 plays an important role in human breast cancer, and that it might represent a novel target for breast cancer therapy.

  10. Oxytocin stimulates migration and invasion in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, M G; Chini, B; Vicentini, L M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has recently been reported that oxytocin is produced by some tumour cell types, and that oxytocin receptors, belonging to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, are expressed in a variety of cell types. Among these, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) respond to oxytocin with an increased proliferation, suggesting a possible role for the hormone in the regulation of angiogenesis. Experimental approach: We employed chemotaxis and chemoinvasion assays to characterize the effect of oxytocin on HUVEC motility, and immunoblot analysis to study its molecular mechanisms of action. Key results: We showed that oxytocin stimulates migration and invasion in HUVECs via oxytocin receptor activation. Searching for the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for oxytocin's pro-migratory effect, we identified the Gq coupling of oxytocin receptors and phospholipase C (PLC) as the main effectors of oxytocin's action in HUVECs. We also found that oxytocin stimulates the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-K)/AKT pathway, and that the activation of PI-3-K and formation of nitric oxide (NO) are required for the pro-migratory effect of oxytocin. Conclusions and implications: The ability of oxytocin to stimulate HUVEC motility and invasion suggests that the hormone can participate in physiopathological processes where activation of endothelial cells plays an important role, for example, in angiogenesis. Interestingly, both the AKT and eNOS phosphorylation induced by oxytocin receptor activation depended on PLC activity, thus suggesting the existence of a still undefined mechanism connecting PLC to the PI-3-K/AKT pathway, upon oxytocin stimulation. PMID:18059319

  11. Regulation of Cell Adhesion and Migration by Kindlin-3 Cleavage by Calpain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Meller, Julia; Ma, Yi; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Bledzka, Kamila; Qin, Jun; Podrez, Eugene A.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrin activation on hematopoietic cells is essential for platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion, and transmigration through endothelium and extracellular matrix into inflamed tissues. To migrate through matrix, leukocyte integrin adhesion complexes undergo dynamic changes. Here we show that Kindlin-3, a main activator and binding partner of integrins in hematopoietic cells, can be cleaved by calpain in an activation-dependent manner. This calpain-mediated cleavage occurs in platelets and leukocytes as well as in endothelial cells. We determined the calpain I cleavage site in Kindlin-3 at tyrosine 373 in the N-terminal part of Kindlin-3 pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of the calpain-resistant Y373N mutant of Kindlin-3 promotes stronger cell adhesion to extracellular matrix under flow as well as to activated endothelium. In contrast, Y373N mutation in Kindlin-3 hinders cell migration. Mechanistically, calpain-resistant Y373N mutant of Kindlin-3 exhibited an activation-independent association with β integrin cytoplasm domain. Thus, cleavage of Kindlin-3 by calpain controls the dynamics of integrin-Kindlin-3 interaction and as a result, integrin-dependent adhesion and migration of hematopoietic cells. This represents a novel mechanism regulating reversibility of integrin adhesion complexes in leukocytes, which, in turn, is critical for their successful transmigration through the extracellular matrix. PMID:23012377

  12. Aurora kinase A mediates epithelial ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Do, T-V; Xiao, F; Bickel, L E; Klein-Szanto, A J; Pathak, H B; Hua, X; Howe, C; O'Brien, S W; Maglaty, M; Ecsedy, J A; Litwin, S; Golemis, E A; Schilder, R J; Godwin, A K; Connolly, D C

    2014-01-30

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) localizes to centrosomes and mitotic spindles where it mediates mitotic progression and chromosomal stability. Overexpression of AURKA is common in cancer, resulting in acquisition of alternate non-mitotic functions. In the current study, we identified a novel role for AURKA in regulating ovarian cancer cell dissemination and evaluated the efficacy of an AURKA-selective small molecule inhibitor, alisertib (MLN8237), as a single agent and combined with paclitaxel using an orthotopic xenograft model of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Ovarian carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of AURKA inhibition and overexpression on migration and adhesion. Pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of AURKA significantly reduced ovarian carcinoma cell migration and adhesion and the activation-associated phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal regulatory protein SRC at tyrosine 416 (pSRC(Y416)). Conversely, enforced expression of AURKA resulted in increased migration, adhesion and activation of SRC in cultured cells. In vivo tumor growth and dissemination were inhibited by alisertib treatment as a single agent. Moreover, combination of alisertib with paclitaxel, an agent commonly used in treatment of EOC, resulted in more potent inhibition of tumor growth and dissemination compared with either drug alone. Taken together, these findings support a role for AURKA in EOC dissemination by regulating migration and adhesion. They also point to the potential utility of combining AURKA inhibitors with taxanes as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of EOC patients.

  13. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell–protein or cell–cell contact was also demonstrated. PMID:27994457

  14. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell-protein or cell-cell contact was also demonstrated.

  15. Overexpression of Selenoprotein SelK in BGC-823 Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Ben, S B; Peng, B; Wang, G C; Li, C; Gu, H F; Jiang, H; Meng, X L; Lee, B J; Chen, C L

    2015-10-01

    Effects of human selenoprotein SelK on the adhesion and migration ability of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells using Matrigel adhesion and transwell migration assays, respectively, were investigated in this study. The Matrigel adhesion ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01) compared with that of the cells not expressing the protein. The migration ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK also declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of the cells that overexpressed C-terminally truncated SelK did not decline significantly. The Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells that overexpressed SelK did not show significant change (p > 0.05) with the cells that overexpressed the C-terminally truncated protein. In addition to the effect on Matrigel adhesion and migration, the overexpression of SelK also caused a loss in cell viability (as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) and induced apoptosis as shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The cytosolic free Ca2+ level of these cells was significantly increased as detected by flow cytometry. But the overexpression of SelK in HEK-293 cells caused neither significant loss in cell viability nor apoptosis induction. Only the elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ level in these cells was significant. Taken together, the results suggest that the overexpression of SelK can inhibit human cancer cell Matrigel adhesion and migration and cause both the loss in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. The release of intracellular Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum might be a mechanism whereby the protein exerted its impact. Furthermore, only the full-length protein, but not C-terminally truncated form, was capable of producing such impact. The embryonic cells were not influenced by the

  16. Emerging role of paxillin-PKL in regulation of cell adhesion, polarity and migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    Cell adhesion and motility is of fundamental importance during development, normal physiology and pathologic conditions such as tumor metastasis. Focal adhesion proteins and their dynamic interactions play a critical role in the regulation of directed cell migration upon exposure to extracellular guidance cues. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout and knockdown cells and mutant protein expression, we recently reported that following adhesion and growth factor stimulation the dynamic interaction between paxillin and PKL(GIT2) is regulated by Src/FAK-dependent phosphorylation of PKL and that this interaction is necessary for the coordination of Rho family GTPase signaling controlling front-rear cell polarity and thus directional migration. Herein, we discuss the implications of these observations.

  17. R-Ras Signals through Specific Integrin α Cytoplasmic Domains to Promote Migration and Invasion of Breast Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia J.; Rusyn, Elena V.; Cox, Adrienne D.; Parise, Leslie V.

    1999-01-01

    Specificity and modulation of integrin function have important consequences for cellular responses to the extracellular matrix, including differentiation and transformation. The Ras-related GTPase, R-Ras, modulates integrin affinity, but little is known of the signaling pathways and biological functions downstream of R-Ras. Here we show that stable expression of activated R-Ras or the closely related TC21 (R-Ras 2) induced integrin-mediated migration and invasion of breast epithelial cells through collagen and disrupted differentiation into tubule structures, whereas dominant negative R-Ras had opposite effects. These results imply novel roles for R-Ras and TC21 in promoting a transformed phenotype and in the basal migration and polarization of these cells. Importantly, R-Ras induced an increase in cellular adhesion and migration on collagen but not fibronectin, suggesting that R-Ras signals to specific integrins. This was further supported by experiments in which R-Ras enhanced the migration of cells expressing integrin chimeras containing the α2, but not the α5, cytoplasmic domain. In addition, a transdominant inhibition previously noted only between integrin β cytoplasmic domains was observed for the α2 cytoplasmic domain; α2β1-mediated migration was inhibited by the expression of excess α2 but not α5 cytoplasmic domain-containing chimeras, suggesting the existence of limiting factors that bind the integrin α subunit. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that R-Ras induced migration on collagen through a combination of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C, but not MAPK, which is distinct from the other Ras family members, Rac, Cdc42, and N- and K-Ras. Thus, R-Ras communicates with specific integrin α cytoplasmic domains through a unique combination of signaling pathways to promote cell migration and invasion. PMID:10352023

  18. Thymosin β4 induces invasion and migration of human colorectal cancer cells through the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Zhengri; Hong, Chang-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ran; Choi, Chan; Park, Young-Kyu

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Tβ4 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer cells. • The overexpression of Tβ4 is correlated with stage of colorectal cancer. • Tβ4 stimulates cell adhesion, invasion, migration and EMT. • Tβ4 activates the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway. - Abstract: Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a 43-amino-acid peptide involved in many biological processes. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanism(s) of Tβ4 in cell invasion and migration remain unclear. In this study, we show that Tβ4 was significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and high levels of Tβ4 were correlated with stage of colorectal cancer, and that Tβ4 expression was associated with morphogenesis and EMT. Tβ4-upregulated cancer cells showed increased adhesion, invasion and migration activity, whereas Tβ4-downregulated cells showed decreased activities. We also demonstrated that Tβ4 interacts with ILK, which promoted the phosphorylation and activation of AKT, the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3β, the expression and nuclear localization of β-catenin, and integrin receptor activation. These results suggest that Tβ4 is an important regulator of the ILK/AKT/β-catenin/Integrin signaling cascade to induce cell invasion and migration in colorectal cancer cells, and is a potential target for cancer treatment.

  19. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; ...

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essentialmore » for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.« less

  20. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei -Jen; Chen, Shao -Yu; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essential for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.

  1. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shao-Yu; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essential for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.

  2. Glycogen storage disease type Ib neutrophils exhibit impaired cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Jun, Hyun Sik; Chou, Janice

    2017-01-22

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis, neutropenia, and neutrophil dysfunction, is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT). Neutrophils play an essential role in the defense against invading pathogens. The recruitment of neutrophils towards the inflammation sites in response to inflammatory stimuli is a tightly regulated process involving rolling, adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we investigated the role of G6PT in neutrophil adhesion and migration using in vivo and in vitro models. We showed that the GSD-Ib (G6pt(-/-)) mice manifested severe neutropenia in both blood and bone marrow, and treating G6pt(-/-) mice with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) corrected neutropenia. However, upon thioglycolate challenge, neutrophils from both untreated and G-CSF-treated G6pt(-/-)mice exhibited decreased ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity. In vitro migration and cell adhesion of G6PT-deficient neutrophils were also significantly impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to enhanced apoptosis or altered fMLP receptor expression. Remarkably, the expression of the β2 integrins CD11a and CD11b, which are critical for cell adhesion, was greatly decreased in G6PT-deficient neutrophils. This study suggests that deficiencies in G6PT cause impairment in neutrophil adhesion and migration via aberrant expression of β2 integrins, and our finding should facilitate the development of novel therapies for GSD-Ib.

  3. Regulation of tensin-promoted cell migration by its focal adhesion binding and Src homology domain 2.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaiyang; Lo, Su Hao

    2003-01-01

    Tensin1 is an actin- and phosphotyrosine-binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. Recently, we have shown that both tensin1 and a new family member, tensin2, promote cell migration [Chen, Duncan, Bozorgchami and Lo (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 733-738]. Since localization of proteins to particular intracellular compartments often regulates their functions, and Src homology domain 2 may mediate signals related to cell migration, we hypothesize that tensin-mediated cell migration is regulated by the focal adhesion localization and the Src homology domain 2 of tensin. To test this hypothesis, we have analysed the effects of a series of tensin1 mutants on cell migration. Our results have shown that (1) tensin1 contains two focal adhesion-binding sites, (2) the wild-type tensin1 significantly promotes cell migration, (3) mutants with one focal adhesion-binding site do not promote cell migration, (4) the non-focal adhesion localized mutant suppresses cell migration and (5) the mutant that is not able to bind to phosphotyrosine-containing proteins has no effect on cell migration. These results have indicated that focal adhesion localization of tensin1 and the phosphotyrosine-binding activity are two critical factors in regulating tensin-mediated cell migration. PMID:12495434

  4. Effects of the knockdown of death-associated protein 3 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ahmad M A; Ye, Lin; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-05-01

    The death-associated protein 3 (DAP3) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP3 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we intended to determine the role of DAP3 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, and performed growth, adhesion, invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of post-wound migration of the cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, death ligand signal enhancer (DELE), IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS1), cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sub-lines. The knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 had significantly increased adhesion and decreased growth when compared to the controls. Furthermore, invasion and migration were significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231DAP3kd cells vs. the controls. The expression of caspase 9 and IPS1, known components of the apoptosis pathway, were significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP3kd cells (p=0.05 and p=0.003, respectively). We conclude that DAP3 silencing contributes to breast carcinogenesis by increasing cell adhesion, migration and invasion. It is possible that this may be due to the activity of focal adhesion kinase further downstream of the anoikis pathway. Further research in this direction would be beneficial in increasing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying human breast cancer.

  5. Effects of Hypoxia, Surrounding Fibroblasts, and p16 Expression on Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Liyuan; Lu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell migration and invasion play essential roles in the metastatic cascade that transforms the local, noninvasive confined tumor cells to the motile, metastatic cancer cells moving through the extracellular matrix and basement into the circulation. Accumulated evidences suggest that intratumoral hypoxia, a characteristic of fast-growing solid tumors, promotes cancer cell motile and invasive abilities. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia, surrounding fibroblasts, and p16 expression on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that hypoxia promoted breast cancer cell migration and invasion, and cocultured fibroblasts stimulated invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Moreover, by using a Tet-on inducible system, we found that p16 is capable of inhibiting hypoxia-induced cell migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, and suppressing cocultured fibroblast-stimulated invasiveness of breast cancer cells. These results suggest that p16, in addition to its well-known anti-tumor proliferation function, has novel anti-cancer properties capable of suppressing hypoxia-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion. This study may provide important validation for p16-mediated cancer therapy either by gene therapy or pharmacological activation of internal p16 gene that is usually inactive due to hypermethylation in the tumor cells.

  6. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  7. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  8. Osteopontin improves adhesion and migration of human primary renal cortical epithelial cells during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Zuolin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of osteopontin (OPN) on adhesion and migration in human primary renal cortical epithelial cells during wound healing and Transwell assays. MTT assay was used to examine the cell viability and western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and cell adhesion molecules. The results showed that overexpression of OPN had positive effects on the viability, proliferation, adhesion and migration of the human primary renal cortical epithelial cells. In addition, the integrity of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton of the epithelial cells was negatively affected by knockdown of OPN expression. The Transwell migration and a wound healing assays performed using OPN-knockdown cells suggested that OPN had a significant impact on cell migration (P=0.0421) and wound healing (P=0.0333). Therefore, OPN may be a potential target for the therapeutic modulation of skin repair to improve the healing rate and quality of wound healing. PMID:28101213

  9. SKI-606 (bosutinib), a novel Src kinase inhibitor, suppresses migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vultur, Adina; Buettner, Ralf; Kowolik, Claudia; Liang, Wei; Smith, David; Boschelli, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in many human tumors, including breast cancer, and is often associated with aggressive disease. We examined the effects of SKI-606 (bosutinib), a selective Src family kinase inhibitor, on human cancer cells derived from breast cancer patients to assess its potential for breast cancer treatment. Our results show that SKI-606 caused a decrease in cell motility and invasion of breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 of approximately 250 nmol/L, which was also the IC50 for inhibition of cellular Src kinase activity in intact tumor cells. These changes were accompanied by an increase in cell-to-cell adhesion and membrane localization of beta-catenin. By contrast, cell proliferation and survival were unaffected by SKI-606 at concentrations sufficient to block cell migration and invasion. Analysis of downstream effectors of Src revealed that SKI-606 inhibits the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas), with an IC50 similar to inhibition of cellular Src kinase. Our findings indicate that SKI-606 inhibits signaling pathways involved in controlling tumor cell motility and invasion, suggesting that SKI-606 is a promising therapeutic for breast cancer.

  10. Effect of DAPK1 gene on proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Pan, De-Biao; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing; Xu, Sheng-Qian

    2014-01-01

    DAPK1 can induce apoptosis in several cells; to determine the effect of DAPK1 would provide a new potential therapeutic strategy for treating pancreatic cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DAPK1 gene on proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line and explore the possible mechanisms. In our study, DAPK1 over-expressed cells were established by using the lentiviral transfection method, and DAPK1 obviously increased in BxPC-3 cells after transient transfection. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to determine the BxPC-3 cells proliferation after transfection. Apoptosis of the BxPC-3 cells was determined by using flow cytometry analysis. In addition, cell adhesion assay and in vitro invasion assay were performed. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions of caspase-3, DAPK1, VEGF, PEDF, MMP2, AKT, P-AKT, P-ERK, Bcl2, and Bax. Our results demonstrated that DAPK1 gene over-expression can suppress the proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma of pancreas BxPC-3 cell line, and the possible mechanisms may be correlated to induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, down-regulations of MMP-2 and VEGF, up-regulations of PEDF, through the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathways.

  11. Freezing adhesion molecules in a state of high-avidity binding blocks eosinophil migration

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is mediated by multiple interactions of adhesive surface structures with ligands on endothelial cells and matrix components. The functional role of beta 1 (CD29) integrins (or very late antigen [VLA] proteins) in eosinophil migration across polycarbonate filters was examined under several in vitro conditions. Eosinophil migration induced by the chemoattractant C5a or platelet- activating factor was fully inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 8A2, a recently characterized "activating" CD29 mAb. However, inhibition by mAb 8A2 was observed only under filter conditions that best reflected the in vivo situation, i.e., when the eosinophils migrated over filters preincubated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (FN), or when the filters were covered with confluent monolayers of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). When bare untreated filters were used, mAb 8A2 had no effect, whereas the C5a- directed movement was prevented by CD18 mAb. Studies with alpha-subunit (CD49)-specific mAbs indicated that the integrins VLA-4 and -5 mediated migration across FN-preincubated filters, and VLA-2, -4, -5, and -6 were involved in eosinophil migration through filters covered with HUVEC. In contrast with the activating CD29 mAb 8A2, a combination of blocking CD49 mAbs or the nonactivating but blocking CD29 mAb AIIB2 failed to inhibit completely eosinophil migration over FN-preincubated or HUVEC-covered filters. mAb 8A2 stimulated binding to FN but not to HUVEC. Moreover, eosinophil migration over FN-preincubated or HUVEC- covered filters was significantly inhibited by anti-connecting segment 1 (CS-1) mAbs, as well as the soluble CS-1 peptide (unlike migration across bare untreated filters). Thus, inhibition of eosinophil migration by mAb 8A2 depended upon the presence of ECM proteins and not upon the presence of HUVEC per se. In conclusion, "freezing" adhesion receptors of the beta 1 integrin family into their high

  12. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  13. METTL13 is downregulated in bladder carcinoma and suppresses cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Guojun; Kong, Chuize; Zhan, Bo; Dong, Xiao; Man, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of bladder cancer has increased in the last few decades, thus novel markers for early diagnosis and more efficacious treatment are urgently needed. It found that METTTL13 protein is aberrant expression in variety of human cancers and METTL13 was involved in oncogenic pathways. However, the role of METTL13 has been unexplored in bladder cancer to date. Here, expression of METTL13 was lower in bladder cancer tissue samples and cancer cell lines than in normal bladder tissue and cell lines. METTL13 was downregulated in the late stages of the disease and was maintained at low level throughout the tumor progression process based on tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging. Further research suggested that METTL13 negatively regulates cell proliferation in bladder cancer and reinstates G1/S checkpoint via the coordinated downregulation of CDK6, CDK4 and CCND1, decreased phosphorylation of Rb and subsequent delayed cell cycle progression. Moreover, METTL13-dependent inhibition of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion is mediated by downregulation of FAK (Focal adhesion kinase) phosphorylation, AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene) phosphorylation, β-catenin expression and MMP-9 expression. These integrated efforts have identified METTL13 as a tumor suppressor and might provide promising approaches for bladder cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:26763933

  14. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology.

  15. Rutin inhibits proliferation, attenuates superoxide production and decreases adhesion and migration of human cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Mousslim, Mohamed; Ammari, Youssef; Kovacic, Hervé; Luis, José

    2016-12-01

    Lung and colorectal cancer are the principal causes of death in the world. Rutin, an active flavonoid compound, is known for possessing a wide range of biological activities. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on the viability, superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon (HT29 and Caco-2) cancer cell lines. In order to control the harmlessness of the tested concentrations of rutin, the viability of cancer cell lines was assessed using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. ROS generation was measured by lucigenin chemiluminescence detecting superoxide ions. To investigate the effect of rutin on the behavior of human lung and colon cancer cell lines, we performed adhesion assays, using various purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Finally, in vitro cell migration assays were explored using modified Boyden chambers. The viability of cancerous cells was inhibited by rutin. It also significantly attenuated the superoxide production in HT29 cells. In addition, rutin affected adhesion and migration of A549 and HT29 cell. These findings indicate that rutin, a natural molecule, might have potential as anticancer agent against lung and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  16. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G.; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J.

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology. PMID:26809067

  17. Sevoflurane inhibits the migration and invasion of glioma cells by upregulating microRNA-637.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenbo; Li, Dongliang; Guo, Yongmin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Bin; Li, Xingang

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cell migration and invasion are essential features of the metastatic process. Volatile anesthetic sevoflurane inhibits the migration and invasion of multiple cancer cell lines; however, its effects on glioma cells are unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that microRNA (miRNA)-637 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion through the Akt1 pathway. Sevoflurane has been shown to modulate a number of miRNAs. In the present study, we examined whether sevoflurane inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion and, if so, whether these beneficial effects are mediated by miRNA-637. U251 glioma cells were treated without (control) or with sevoflurane at low, moderate or high concentrations for 6 h. To explore the molecular mechanisms, an additional group of U251 cells was treated with a miRNA‑637 inhibitor prior to treatment with a high concentration of sevoflurane. Compared with the control group, sevoflurane inhibited the migration and invasion of U251 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular analyses revealed that sevoflurane increased the expression of miRNA‑637 and decreased the expression of Akt1 and phosphorylated Akt1 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of sevoflurane on U251 cell migration and invasion were completely abolished by pre-treatment with miRNA‑637 inhibitor, which reversed the sevoflurane-induced reduction in the expression of Akt1 and phosphorylated Akt1 in the U251 cells. These results demonstrate that sevoflurane inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion and that these beneficial effects are mediated by the upregulation of miRNA‑637, which suppresses Akt1 expression and activity. These findings may have significant clinical implications for anesthesiologists regarding the choice of volatile anesthetic agents for the surgical resection of gliomas to prevent metastases and improve patient outcomes.

  18. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  19. Androgen receptor enhances cell adhesion and decreases cell migration via modulating β1-integrin-AKT signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Lung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Liao, Pei-Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-08-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been shown to promote the initiation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the early stage of the disease process and to suppress HCC cell invasion during the later stages of the disease. The mechanisms governing these dual yet opposite roles have yet to be elucidated. Using carcinogen-induced HCC in vivo mouse models and the in vitro human HCC cell line SKhep1, we found that knockout of AR in primary HCC cells led to a decrease in HCC cell focal adhesion capacity compared to cells from wildtype mice. Similar results were obtained after adding functional AR into human HCC SKhep1 cells. Further analysis revealed that the role AR plays in adhesion of HCC cells is governed, at least in part, by its ability to up-regulate β1-integrin and activate the PI3K/AKT pathway. We also found that AR-β1-integrin-mediated cell adhesion suppresses cell migration. Those findings indicate that the AR-β1-integrin-PI3K/AKT signaling pathway might play a role in the bimodal function of AR on cell adhesion and migration at the cellular level.

  20. The junctional adhesion molecule JAM-C regulates polarized transendothelial migration of neutrophils in vivo.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-06-26

    The migration of neutrophils into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarized migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial migration (TEM)) in a luminal-to-abluminal direction. By real-time confocal imaging, we found that neutrophils had disrupted polarized TEM ('hesitant' and 'reverse') in vivo. We noted these events in inflammation after ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterized by lower expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) at EC junctions, and they were enhanced by blockade or genetic deletion of JAM-C in ECs. Our results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarized neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM of neutrophils can contribute to the dissemination of systemic inflammation.

  1. Adhesion and Invasion of Gastric Mucosa Epithelial Cells by Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Qi-long; Cheng, Dan-dan; Xu, Wen-ting; Lu, Nong-hua

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main pathogenic bacterium involved in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and a class 1 carcinogen in gastric cancer. Current research focuses on the pathogenicity of H. pylori and the mechanism by which it colonizes the gastric mucosa. An increasing number of in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that H. pylori can invade and proliferate in epithelial cells, suggesting that this process might play an important role in disease induction, immune escape and chronic infection. Therefore, to explore the process and mechanism of adhesion and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori is particularly important. This review examines the relevant studies and describes evidence regarding the adhesion to and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori. PMID:27921009

  2. Lipopolysaccharide promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Kwon, Seong-Min; Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-02-01

    Odontoblasts and/or dental pulp cells are responsible for tooth repair and dentin formation. Furthermore, adhesion and migration are critical processes for tissue regeneration. This study was performed to clarify whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates adhesion and migration of the murine odontoblast-like cell line MDPC-23, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is engaged in this process. TLR4 expression in MDPC-23 cells was examined by RT-PCR. Adhesion assay was performed using type I collagen-coated plates. Migration ability was determined by a commercial assay kit. Phosphorylation of IκB-α, FAK, AKT, and ERK was examined by Western blot analysis. TLR4 was functionally expressed in MDPC-23 cells. LPS treatment enhanced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Blockade of TLR4 using its antibody restored LPS-induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells. These findings indicate that LPS, an immune activator from Gram-negative bacteria, can promote the adhesion and migration ability of MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

  3. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  4. Clonorchis sinensis excretory-secretory products promote the migration and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma cells by activating the integrin β4-FAK/Src signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jhang Ho; Bashir, Qudsia; Kim, In Ki; Hong, Sung-Jong; Maeng, Sejung; Bahk, Young Yil; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2017-03-08

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a slow-growing but highly metastatic cancer. Its metastatic potential largely explains its high mortality rate. A recognized risk factor for CCA development is infection with the liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis. We previously reported that the excretory-secretory products (ESPs) of C. sinensis promoted the three-dimensional aggregation and invasion of CCA cells. In the present study, a quantitative real-time PCR array of extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules was used to examine the regulatory mechanism of ESP-mediated CCA cell migration and invasion. In particular, the expression levels of integrin α isoforms and β4 were upregulated in response to ESPs. Increased expression of integrin β4 was probably correlated with activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the steroid receptor coactivator (Src) family kinase and the subsequent activation of two downstream focal adhesion molecules, paxillin and vinculin. Moreover, inhibition of FAK/Src activation reduced paxillin and vinculin phosphorylation and attenuated ESP-induced CCA cell migration and invasion. These findings suggest that the integrin β4-FAK/Src signaling axis may play a crucial role in clonorchiasis-associated CCA metastasis during tumor progression.

  5. Melanoma Cell Adhesion and Migration Is Modulated by the Uronyl 2-O Sulfotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovska, Katerina; Spillmann, Dorothe; Haier, Jörg; Ladányi, Andrea; Stock, Christian; Seidler, Daniela G.

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of melanomas are characterized by a high metastatic potential, if detected early, melanoma can have a good prognostic outcome. However, once metastasised, the prognosis is bleak. We showed previously that uronyl-2-O sulfotransferase (Ust) and 2-O sulfation of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) are involved in cell migration. To demonstrate an impact of 2-O sulfation in metastasis we knocked-down Ust in mouse melanoma cells. This significantly reduced the amount of Ust protein and enzyme activity. Furthermore, in vitro cell motility and adhesion were significantly reduced correlating with the decrease of cellular Ust protein. Single cell migration of B16VshUst(16) cells showed a decreased cell movement phenotype. The adhesion of B16V cells to fibronectin depended on α5β1 but not αvβ3 integrin. Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan sulfation or blocking fibroblast growth factor receptor (FgfR) reduced α5 integrin in B16V cell lines. Interestingly, FgfR1 expression and activation was reduced in Ust knock-down cells. In vivo, pulmonary metastasis of B16VshUst cells was prevented due to a reduction of α5 integrin. As a proof of concept UST knock-down in human melanoma cells also showed a reduction in ITGa5 and adhesion. This is the first study showing that Ust, and consequently 2-O sulfation of the low affinity receptor for FgfR CS/DS, reduces Itga5 and leads to an impaired adhesion and migration of melanoma cells. PMID:28107390

  6. PRL-3/PTP4A3 phosphatase regulates integrin β1 in adhesion structures during migration of human ocular melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Foy, Malika; Anézo, Océane; Saule, Simon; Planque, Nathalie

    2017-03-08

    In a previous transcriptomic analysis of 63 ocular melanomas of the uvea, we found that expression of the PRL-3/PTP4A3 gene, encoding a phosphatase that is anchored to the plasma membrane, was associated with the risk of metastasis, and a poor prognosis. We also showed that PRL-3 overexpression in OCM-1 ocular melanoma cells significantly increased cell migration in vitro and invasiveness in vivo, suggesting a direct role for PRL-3 in the metastatic spreading of uveal melanoma. Here, we aimed to identify PRL-3 substrates at the plasma membrane involved in adhesion to the extracellular matrix. We focused on integrin β1, which is the most highly expressed integrin in our cohort of uveal melanomas. We show that preventing PRL-3 anchorage to the plasma membrane i) abolishes PRL-3-induced migration in OCM-1 cells, ii) specifically enhances the spreading of OCM-1 cells overexpressing PRL-3, and iii) favors the maturation of large focal adhesions (FAs) containing integrin β1 on collagen I. Knockdown experiments confirmed integrin β1 involvement in PRL3-induced migration. We identified interactions between PRL-3 and integrin β1, as well as with FAK P-Y397, an auto-activated form of Focal Adhesion Kinase found in FAs. We also show that integrin β1 may be dephosphorylated by PRL-3 in its intracytoplasmic S/T region, an important motif for integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Finally, we observed that PRL-3 regulated the clustering of integrin β1 in FAs on collagen I but not on fibronectin. This work identifies PRL-3 as a new regulator of cell adhesion structures to the extracellular matrix, and further supports PRL-3 as a key actor of metastasis in uveal melanoma, of which molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood.

  7. Interleukin-21 induces migration and invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xing, R; Jin, Y; Sun, L; Yang, L; Li, C; Li, Z; Liu, X; Zhao, J

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial fibroblast hyperplasia and bone erosion. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) play a pivotal role in RA pathogenesis through aggressive migration and matrix invasion, and certain proinflammatory cytokines may affect synoviocyte invasion. Whether interleukin (IL)-21 influences this process remains controversial. Here, we evaluated the potential regulatory effect of IL-21 on the migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in RA-FLS. We found that IL-21 promoted the migration, invasion and MMP (MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13) production in RA-FLS. Moreover, IL-21 induced activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathways, and blockage of these pathways [PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) inhibitor LY294002, STAT-3 inhibitor STA-21 and ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059] attenuated IL-21-induced migration and secretion of MMP-3 and MMP-9. In conclusion, our results suggest that IL-21 promotes migration and invasion of RA-FLS. Therefore, therapeutic strategies targeting IL-21 might be effective for the treatment of RA.

  8. Parecoxib inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by upregulating miRNA-29c

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Yong; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most lethal brain cancers worldwide, and there is an urgent need for development of novel therapeutic approaches. Parecoxib is a well-known cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, and had already been developed for postoperative analgesia with high efficacy and low adverse reaction. A recent study has suggested that parecoxib potently enhances immunotherapeutic efficacy of GBM, but its effects on GBM growth, migration and invasion have not previously been studied. In the present study, MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] and BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) incorporation assays were used to evaluate the cell proliferation of GBM cells. Wound-healing and transwell assays were preformed to analyze GBM cell migration and invasion, respectively. The results suggested that parecoxib inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells in a dose-dependent manner. RT-qPCR (real-time quantitative PCR) analysis demonstrated that miRNA-29c can be significantly induced by parecoxib. Furthermore, our data suggests that a miRNA-29c inhibitor can significantly attenuate parecoxib's effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM. In conclusion, the present study suggests that parecoxib inhibits GBM cell proliferation, migration and invasion by upregulating miRNA-29c. PMID:27895048

  9. Inhibition by Tyroserleutide (YSL) on the Invasion and Adhesion of the Mouse Melanoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi; Che, Xu-chun; Lu, Rong; Zheng, Min-na; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Li, Jin-ping; Jian, Xu; Shi, Lin-xi; Liu, Jun-yan; Gao, Wen-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Tyroserleutide (YSL) is an active, low-molecular-weight polypeptide, comprised of three amino acids, that has shown antitumor effects on human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the inhibition of YSL on invasion and adhesion of the mouse B16-F10 melanoma cell line by injecting B16-F10 cells into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice to establish an experimental lung metastasis model. YSL inhibited B16-F10 cell metastasis to lung, reducing the number and area of metastasis lesions. When we treated B16-F10 cells with YSL (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL) in vitro, we found that YSL inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 cells with a 28.11% rate of inhibition. YSL significantly decreased the adhesiveness of B16-F10 cells to Matrigel with a 29.15% inhibition rate; YSL also significantly inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 cells, producing an inhibition of 35.31%. By analyses with Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, we found that YSL markedly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 in B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that YSL inhibits the growth, invasion, and adhesion of B16-F10 cells. PMID:17515953

  10. Fluorescence-based assays for in vitro analysis of cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Spessotto, Paola; Lacrima, Katia; Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Pivetta, Eliana; Scapolan, Martina; Perris, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion and cell migration are two primary cellular phenomena for which in vitro approaches may be exploited to effectively dissect the individual events and underlying molecular mechanisms. The use of assays dedicated to the analysis of cell adhesion and migration in vitro also afford an efficient way of conducting larger basic and applied research screenings on the factors affecting these processes and are potentially exploitable in the context of routine diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tests in the biological and medical fields. Therefore, there is a longstanding continuum in the interest in devising more rationale such assays and major contributions in this direction have been provided by the advent of procedures based on fluorescence cell tagging, the design of instruments capable of detecting fluorescent signals with high sensitivity, and informatic tools allowing sophisticated elaboration of data generated through these instruments. In this report, we describe three representative fluorescence-based model assays for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of cell adhesion and cell locomotion in static and dynamic conditions. The assays are easily performed, accurate and reproducible, and can be automated for high-to-medium throughput screenings of cell behavior in vitro. Performance of the assays involves the use of certain dedicated disposable accessories, which are commercially available, and a few instruments that, due to their versatility, can be regarded as constituents of a more generic laboratory setup.

  11. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  12. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells.

  13. Caveolin-1 mutants P132L and Y14F are dominant negative regulators of invasion, migration and aggregation in H1299 lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shatz, Maria; Lustig, Gila; Reich, Reuven; Liscovitch, Mordechai

    2010-06-10

    Caveolin-1 is an essential protein constituent of caveolae. Accumulating evidence indicates that caveolin-1 may act as a positive regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the function of caveolin-1 in human lung cancer cells. Caveolin-1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and reduced focal adhesion kinase (Fak) phosphorylation. Matrix invasion and cell migration as well as expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases were attenuated following caveolin-1 RNAi-mediated knockdown or overexpression of Y14F and P132L mutants, demonstrating dominant-negative activity of these mutants. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy revealed that caveolin-1 and its mutants P132L and Y14F are localized to the trailing edge of migrating cells during both random and directed cell movement, implying an active role of caveolin-1 in the migration process. Suppression of caveolin-1 function greatly elevated the percentage of H1299 cells exhibiting focal adhesions. In addition, cell aggregation was increased by wild type caveolin-1 and attenuated by both P132L and Y14F mutants. Overexpression of wild type caveolin-1 increased caveolae density, however, P132L and Y14F mutants did not affect caveolae formation, suggesting that in this respect that the mutants do not act in a dominant negative manner, and that effects of caveolin-1 on caveolae and cell invasion, migration, focal adhesion and aggregation, are separable. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of caveolin-1 in cell motility, invasiveness and aggregation, therefore, expanding our understanding of the tumor-promoting activities of caveolin-1 in advanced-stage cancer.

  14. Caveolin-1 mutants P132L and Y14F are dominant negative regulators of invasion, migration and aggregation in H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Maria; Lustig, Gila; Reich, Reuven; Liscovitch, Mordechai

    2010-06-10

    Caveolin-1 is an essential protein constituent of caveolae. Accumulating evidence indicates that caveolin-1 may act as a positive regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the function of caveolin-1 in human lung cancer cells. Caveolin-1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and reduced focal adhesion kinase (Fak) phosphorylation. Matrix invasion and cell migration as well as expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases were attenuated following caveolin-1 RNAi-mediated knockdown or overexpression of Y14F and P132L mutants, demonstrating dominant-negative activity of these mutants. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy revealed that caveolin-1 and its mutants P132L and Y14F are localized to the trailing edge of migrating cells during both random and directed cell movement, implying an active role of caveolin-1 in the migration process. Suppression of caveolin-1 function greatly elevated the percentage of H1299 cells exhibiting focal adhesions. In addition, cell aggregation was increased by wild type caveolin-1 and attenuated by both P132L and Y14F mutants. Overexpression of wild type caveolin-1 increased caveolae density, however, P132L and Y14F mutants did not affect caveolae formation, suggesting that in this respect that the mutants do not act in a dominant negative manner, and that effects of caveolin-1 on caveolae and cell invasion, migration, focal adhesion and aggregation, are separable. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of caveolin-1 in cell motility, invasiveness and aggregation, therefore, expanding our understanding of the tumor-promoting activities of caveolin-1 in advanced-stage cancer.

  15. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling enhances cell migration and invasion by induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 via the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT signaling pathway in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Zhang, Ping; Li, Chen-Long; Du, Wen-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Jiang, Chuan-Lu

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant hedgehog signaling contributes to the development of various malignancies, including glioblastoma (GBM). However, the potential mechanism of hedgehog signaling in GBM migration and invasion has remained to be elucidated. The present study showed that enhanced hedgehog signaling by recombinant human sonic hedgehog N‑terminal peptide (rhSHH) promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of GBM cells, accompanied by increases in mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑2 (MMP‑2) and MMP‑9. However, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine suppressed the adhesion, invasion and migration of GBM cells, accompanied by decreases in mRNA and protein levels of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Furthermore, it was found that MMP‑2- and MMP‑9-neutralizing antibodies or GAM6001 reversed the inductive effects of rhSHH on cell migration and invasion. In addition, enhanced hedgehog signaling by rhSHH increased AKT phosphorylation, whereas blockade of hedgehog signaling decreased AKT phosphorylations. Further experiments showed that LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), decreased rhSHH‑induced upregulation of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Finally, the protein expression of glioblastoma-associated oncogene 1 was positively correlated with levels of phosphorylated AKT as well as protein expressions of MMP‑2 and ‑9 in GBM tissue samples. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the hedgehog pathway regulates GBM-cell migration and invasion by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production via the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  16. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  17. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  18. Regulation of pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion by RhoC GTPase and Caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; DiVito, Melinda M; Merajver, Sofia D; Boyanapalli, Madanamohan; van Golen, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    Background In the current study we investigated the role of caveolin-1 (cav-1) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) cell migration and invasion; initial steps in metastasis. Cav-1 is the major structural protein in caveolae; small Ω-shaped invaginations within the plasma membrane. Caveolae are involved in signal transduction, wherein cav-1 acts as a scaffolding protein to organize multiple molecular complexes regulating a variety of cellular events. Recent evidence suggests a role for cav-1 in promoting cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis; however, the molecular mechanisms have not been described. The small monomeric GTPases are among several molecules which associate with cav-1. Classically, the Rho GTPases control actin cytoskeletal reorganization during cell migration and invasion. RhoC GTPase is overexpressed in aggressive cancers that metastasize and is the predominant GTPase in PC. Like several GTPases, RhoC contains a putative cav-1 binding motif. Results Analysis of 10 PC cell lines revealed high levels of cav-1 expression in lines derived from primary tumors and low expression in those derived from metastases. Comparison of the BxPC-3 (derived from a primary tumor) and HPAF-II (derived from a metastasis) demonstrates a reciprocal relationship between cav-1 expression and p42/p44 Erk activation with PC cell migration, invasion, RhoC GTPase and p38 MAPK activation. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoC or p38 activity in HPAF-II cells leads to partial restoration of cav-1 expression. Conclusion Cav-1 expression inhibits RhoC GTPase activation and subsequent activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in primary PC cells thus restricting migration and invasion. In contrast, loss of cav-1 expression leads to RhoC-mediated migration and invasion in metastatic PC cells. PMID:15969750

  19. Biomolecular modification of carbon nanotubes for studies of cell adhesion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2011-12-01

    We report a strategy for tailoring and patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for biospecific cell studies. We synthesized a new electroactive hydroquinone terminated pyrene molecule to tailor CNTs. These modified CNTs can be oxidized and chemoselectively reacted with oxyamine tethered ligands to generate various ligand tethered CNTs. A cell adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD) is immobilized to the CNTs and a new microfluidic patterning method is employed to generate multiplex patterned surfaces for biospecific cell adhesion and migration studies. This work demonstrates the integration of a new functionalization strategy to immobilize a variety of ligands to CNTs for a range of potential drug delivery, tissue imaging and cellular behavior studies and a microfluidic patterning strategy for generating complex high-throughput surfaces for biotechnological and cell based assay applications.

  20. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  1. Modulation of integrin α4β1 by ADAM28 promotes lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Owen J; English, William R; Roberts, Stephanie; Ager, Ann; Newham, Peter; Murphy, Gillian

    2011-10-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are a family of type I transmembrane glycoproteins related to snake venom metalloproteases and disintegrins. They are regulatory proteins that modulate intercellular adhesion and the bioavailability of growth factors, and have been implicated in many disease states, including cancer, immunity and inflammation. One member of the ADAM family, ADAM28, has been reported to bind to the integrin α4β1 in humans; however, the distribution of ADAM28 and the biological consequences of ADAM28-α4β1 interactions are yet to be fully elucidated. The expression of ADAM28 in human and murine tissues was examined by multiple Affymetrix microarray analyses, real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. We found that ADAM28 has a relatively restricted expression pattern in mouse and human and is highly expressed in the B-lymphocyte lineage, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemic B-cells. The murine B-lymphoma line L1-2 and recombinant soluble murine ADAM28 were used to investigate ADAM28-α4β1 interactions. Our data reveal that ADAM28 binding to α4β1 is typical of integrin-ligand interactions, since it is attenuated by anti-functional integrin antibodies, and is enhanced by Mn2+ and the integrin mAb (monoclonal antibody) 9EG7. However, a key finding was that soluble ADAM28 unexpectedly enhanced α4β1-dependent cell adhesion to VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In so doing ADAM28 was able to influence lymphocyte adhesion to, and migration through, endothelial monolayers, suggesting a physiological role for ADAM28 in regulating the specific spatial and temporal transendothelial migration of lymphocytes.

  2. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  3. The physical interaction of p53 and plakoglobin is necessary for their synergistic inhibition of migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Vahedah; Churchill, Lucas; Pasdar, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Plakoglobin (PG) is a paralog of β-catenin with similar adhesive, but contrasting signalling functions. Although β-catenin has well-known oncogenic function, PG generally acts as a tumor/metastasis suppressor by mechanisms that are just beginning to be deciphered. Previously, we showed that PG interacted with wild type (WT) and a number of mutant p53s, and that its tumor/metastasis suppressor activity may be mediated, at least partially, by this interaction. Here, carcinoma cell lines deficient in both p53 and PG (H1299), or expressing mutant p53 in the absence of PG (SCC9), were transfected with expression constructs encoding WT and different fragments and deletions of p53 and PG, individually or in pairs. Transfectants were characterized for their in vitro growth, migratory and invasive properties and for mapping the interacting domain of p53 and PG. We showed that when coexpressed, p53-WT and PG-WT cooperated to decrease growth, and acted synergistically to significantly reduce cell migration and invasion. The DNA-binding domain of p53 and C-terminal domain of PG mediated p53/PG interaction, and furthermore, the C-terminus of PG played a central role in the inhibition of invasion in association with p53. PMID:27058623

  4. Nuclear Membrane-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moustafa R K; Wu, Yue; Ghosh, Deepraj; Do, Brian H; Chen, Kuangcai; Dawson, Michelle R; Fang, Ning; Sulchek, Todd A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2017-03-27

    Most cancer patients die from metastasis. Recent studies have shown that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can slow down the migration/invasion speed of cancer cells and suppress metastasis. Since nuclear stiffness of the cell largely decreases cell migration, our hypothesis is that targeting AuNPs to the cell nucleus region could enhance nuclear stiffness, and therefore inhibit cell migration and invasion. Our results showed that upon nuclear targeting of AuNPs, the ovarian cancer cell motilities decrease significantly, compared with nontargeted AuNPs. Furthermore, using atomic force microscopy, we observed an enhanced cell nuclear stiffness. In order to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration/invasion inhibition, the exact locations of the targeted AuNPs were clearly imaged using a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging microscope, which showed that the AuNPs were trapped at the nuclear membrane. In addition, we observed a greatly increased expression level of lamin A/C protein, which is located in the inner nuclear membrane and functions as a structural component of the nuclear lamina to enhance nuclear stiffness. We propose that the AuNPs that are trapped at the nuclear membrane both (1) add to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus and (2) stimulate the overexpression of lamin A/C located around the nuclear membrane, thus increasing nuclear stiffness and slowing cancer cell migration and invasion.

  5. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lautscham, Lena A; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-09-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness.

  6. Down-Regulation of Gli Transcription Factor Leads to the Inhibition of Migration and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer Cells via Integrin β4-Mediated FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Xu, Rong; Zeng, Chunyan; Lu, Quqin; Huang, Dengliang; Shi, Chao; Zhang, Weilong; Deng, Libin; Yan, Runwei; Rao, Hai; Gao, Guolan; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by Gli transcription factors is characteristic of a variety of aggressive human carcinomas including ovarian cancer. Therefore, chemotherapeutic agents that inhibit activation of Gli transcription factors have emerged as promising novel therapeutic drugs for ovarian cancer. Results In this study, we show that activation of Hh signaling promoted cellular migration and invasion, whereas blockade of Hh signaling with GANT61 suppressed cellular migration and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. After treatment with GANT61, cDNA microarray analyses revealed changes in many genes such as Integrin β4 subunit (ITGB4), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), etc. Furthermore, ITGB4 expression was up-regulated by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand and down-regulated by Hh signaling inhibitor. The Shh-mediated ovarian cell migration and invasion was blocked by neutralizing antibodies to ITGB4. In addition, phosphorylations of FAK were increased by Shh and decreased by Hh signaling inhibitor. Inhibition of Gli1 expression using siRNA mimicked the effects of GANT61 treatment, supporting the specificity of GANT61. Further investigations showed that activation of FAK was required for Shh-mediated cell migration and invasion. Finally, we found that down-regulation of Gli reduced the expression of ITGB4 and the phosphorylated FAK, resulting in the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions The Hh signaling pathway induces cell migration and invasion through ITGB4-mediated activation of FAK in ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that the diminishment of crosstalk between phosphorylated FAK and ITGB4 due to the down-regulation of Gli family transcription factors might play a pivotal role for inhibiting ovarian cancer progression. PMID:24533083

  7. Cyclopeptide RA-V inhibits cell adhesion and invasion in both estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer cells via PI3K/AKT and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Wang, Zhe; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Zhao, Si-Meng; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Cyclopeptide RA-V has potent anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activities, but its potential anti-metastatic activity is unknown. Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM), allowing them to migrate to adjacent tissues and ultimately metastasize. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of RA-V on cell adhesion, migration, invasion and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in two human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 (ER-positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative). Our results demonstrated that RA-V (12.5 nM) can significantly inhibit breast cancer cell adhesion and migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors involved in cell migration. RA-V reduced the expressions of vascular intracellular adhesion molecule (VCAM), intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and integrins. The activities and expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator (uPA) were also inhibited by RA-V. Furthermore, RA-V inhibits the expressions of EGFR, PI3K/AKT and NF-κB signaling molecules, and reduces the binding of β-estradiol to ER via affecting binding ability of ER in MCF-7 cells. RA-V inhibits breast cancer cell migration, adhesion and ECM degradation in vitro, implying that RA-V is a potential anti-metastatic agent in breast cancer, and likely acts via PI3K/AKT and NF-κB signaling pathways in both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells.

  8. Significant Role of Collagen XVII And Integrin β4 in Migration and Invasion of The Less Aggressive Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Jyri M; Löffek, Stefanie; Kokkonen, Nina; Salo, Sirpa; Väyrynen, Juha P; Hurskainen, Tiina; Manninen, Aki; Riihilä, Pilvi; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Salo, Tuula; Mäkinen, Markus J; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2017-03-22

    Collagen XVII and integrin α6β4 have well-established roles as epithelial adhesion molecules. Their binding partner laminin 332 as well as integrin α6β4 are largely recognized to promote invasion and metastasis in various cancers, and collagen XVII is essential for the survival of colon and lung cancer stem cells. We have studied the expression of laminin γ2, collagen XVII and integrin β4 in tissue microarray samples of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its precursors, actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease. The expression of laminin γ2 was highest in SCC samples, whereas the expression of collagen XVII and integrin β4 varied greatly in SCC and its precursors. Collagen XVII and integrin β4 were also expressed in SCC cell lines. Virus-mediated RNAi knockdown of collagen XVII and integrin β4 reduced the migration of less aggressive SCC-25 cells in horizontal scratch wound healing assay. Additionally, in a 3D organotypic myoma invasion assay the loss of collagen XVII or integrin β4 suppressed equally the migration and invasion of SCC-25 cells whereas there was no effect on the most aggressive HSC-3 cells. Variable expression patterns and results in migration and invasion assays suggest that collagen XVII and integrin β4 contribute to SCC tumorigenesis.

  9. Significant Role of Collagen XVII And Integrin β4 in Migration and Invasion of The Less Aggressive Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moilanen, Jyri M.; Löffek, Stefanie; Kokkonen, Nina; Salo, Sirpa; Väyrynen, Juha P.; Hurskainen, Tiina; Manninen, Aki; Riihilä, Pilvi; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Salo, Tuula; Mäkinen, Markus J.; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2017-01-01

    Collagen XVII and integrin α6β4 have well-established roles as epithelial adhesion molecules. Their binding partner laminin 332 as well as integrin α6β4 are largely recognized to promote invasion and metastasis in various cancers, and collagen XVII is essential for the survival of colon and lung cancer stem cells. We have studied the expression of laminin γ2, collagen XVII and integrin β4 in tissue microarray samples of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its precursors, actinic keratosis and Bowen’s disease. The expression of laminin γ2 was highest in SCC samples, whereas the expression of collagen XVII and integrin β4 varied greatly in SCC and its precursors. Collagen XVII and integrin β4 were also expressed in SCC cell lines. Virus-mediated RNAi knockdown of collagen XVII and integrin β4 reduced the migration of less aggressive SCC-25 cells in horizontal scratch wound healing assay. Additionally, in a 3D organotypic myoma invasion assay the loss of collagen XVII or integrin β4 suppressed equally the migration and invasion of SCC-25 cells whereas there was no effect on the most aggressive HSC-3 cells. Variable expression patterns and results in migration and invasion assays suggest that collagen XVII and integrin β4 contribute to SCC tumorigenesis. PMID:28327550

  10. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; DeVaney, Trevor; Zimmer, Andreas; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  11. E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion prevents invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The ability of carcinomas to invade and to metastasize largely depends on the degree of epithelial differentiation within the tumors, i.e., poorly differentiated being more invasive than well-differentiated carcinomas. Here we confirmed this correlation by examining various human cell lines derived from bladder, breast, lung, and pancreas carcinomas. We found that carcinoma cell lines with an epithelioid phenotype were noninvasive and expressed the epithelium-specific cell- cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (also known as Arc-1, uvomorulin, and cell-CAM 120/80), as visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western and Northern blotting, whereas carcinoma cell lines with a fibroblastoid phenotype were invasive and had lost E-cadherin expression. Invasiveness of these latter cells could be prevented by transfection with E-cadherin cDNA and was again induced by treatment of the transfected cells with anti-E-cadherin mAbs. These findings indicate that the selective loss of E-cadherin expression can generate dedifferentiation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells, and they suggest further that E-cadherin acts as an invasion suppressor. PMID:2007622

  12. cAMP-induced Epac-Rap activation inhibits epithelial cell migration by modulating focal adhesion and leading edge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Karen S; Raaijmakers, Judith H; Bruinsma, Wytse; Bos, Johannes L; de Rooij, Johan

    2008-06-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a complex process crucial for embryonic development, wound healing and tumor metastasis. It depends on alterations in cell-cell adhesion and integrin-extracellular matrix interactions and on actomyosin-driven, polarized leading edge protrusion. The small GTPase Rap is a known regulator of integrins and cadherins that has also been implicated in the regulation of actin and myosin, but a direct role in cell migration has not been investigated. Here, we report that activation of endogenous Rap by cAMP results in an inhibition of HGF- and TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell migration in several model systems, irrespective of the presence of E-cadherin adhesion. We show that Rap activation slows the dynamics of focal adhesions and inhibits polarized membrane protrusion. Importantly, forced integrin activation by antibodies does not mimic these effects of Rap on cell motility, even though it does mimic Rap effects in short-term cell adhesion assays. From these results, we conclude that Rap inhibits epithelial cell migration, by modulating focal adhesion dynamics and leading edge activity. This extends beyond the effect of integrin affinity modulation and argues for an additional function of Rap in controlling the migration machinery of epithelial cells.

  13. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  14. Cryptic collagen IV promotes cell migration and adhesion in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Amanda J; Vary, Calvin P H; Brooks, Peter C; Sathyanarayana, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we showed that discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a class of collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) was highly upregulated on bone marrow (BM)-derived CD33+ leukemic blasts of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Herein as DDR1 is a class of collagen-activated RTK, we attempt to understand the role of native and remodeled collagen IV in BM microenvironment and its functional significance in leukemic cells. Exposure to denatured collagen IV significantly increased the migration and adhesion of K562 cells, which also resulted in increased activation of DDR1 and AKT. Further, levels of MMP9 were increased in conditioned media (CM) of denatured collagen IV exposed cells. Mass spectrometric liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry QSTAR proteomic analysis revealed exclusive presence of Secretogranin 3 and InaD-like protein in the denatured collagen IV CM. Importantly, BM samples of AML patients exhibited increased levels of remodeled collagen IV compared to native as analyzed via anti-HUIV26 antibody. Taken together, for the first time, we demonstrate that remodeled collagen IV is a potent activator of DDR1 and AKT that also modulates both migration and adhesion of myeloid leukemia cells. Additionally, high levels of the HUIV26 cryptic collagen IV epitope are expressed in BM of AML patients. Further understanding of this phenomenon may lead to the development of therapeutic agents that directly modulate the BM microenvironment and attenuate leukemogenesis.

  15. Effects of whole cigarette smoke on human gingival fibroblast adhesion, growth, and migration.

    PubMed

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chakir, Jamila; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single exposure to whole cigarette smoke on human gingival fibroblast behavior. Normal oral mucosa fibroblasts were exposed once to whole cigarette smoke for 5, 15, or 30 min, and then were used to analyze cell adhesion, β1-integrin expression, cell growth and viability, cell capacity to contract collagen gel, and cell migration following wound infliction. Our findings showed that when gingival fibroblasts were exposed once to whole cigarette smoke, this resulted in a significant inhibition of cell adhesion, a decrease in the number of β1-integrin-positive cells, increased LDH activity in the target cells, and reduced growth. The smoke-exposed fibroblasts were also not able to contract collagen gel matrix and migrate following insult. Overall results demonstrate that a single exposure to whole cigarette smoke produced significant morphological and functional deregulation in gingival fibroblasts. This may explain the higher predisposition of tobacco users to oral infections and diseases such as cancer.

  16. Cell-alignment patterns in the collective migration of cells with polarized adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd) utilizes inhomogeneities in the distribution of cell-cell adhesion molecules on cell membranes for collective cell migration. A simple example of an inhomogeneity is a front-side (leading-edge) polarization in the distribution at the early streaming stage. Experiments have shown that the polarized cell-cell adhesion induces side-by-side contact between cells [Beug et al., Nature (London) 274, 445 (1978), 10.1038/274445a0]. This result is counterintuitive, as one would expect cells to align front to front in contact with each other on the basis of front-side polarization. In this work, we theoretically examine whether front-side polarization induces side-by-side contact in collective cell migration. We construct a model for expressing cells with this polarization based on the two-dimensional cellular Potts model. By a numerical simulation with this model, we find cell-cell alignment wherein cells form lateral arrays with side-by-side contacts as observed in the experiments.

  17. β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion but induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-ming; Ji, Shan; Li, Yan; Fu, Li-ye; Jiang, Tao; Meng, Fan-dong

    2017-01-01

    β-Catenin (CTNNB1 gene coding protein) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. Abnormal accumulation of CTNNB1 contributes to most cancers. This research studied the involvement of β-catenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were analyzed by using Cell Counting Kit-8 and by flow cytometry. Migration and invasion assays were measured by transwell analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of CTNNB1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 in RCC cell lines. It was found that CTNNB1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of A-498 cells. CTNNB1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis of 786-O cells. Moreover, knockdown of CTNNB1 decreased the levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 expression, but CTNNB1 overexpression increased the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18. Further in vivo tumor formation study in nude mice indicated that inhibition of CTNNB1 delayed the progress of tumor formation through inhibiting PCNA and Ki67 expression. These results indicate that CTNNB1 could act as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for RCC. PMID:28260916

  18. miR-532 promoted gastric cancer migration and invasion by targeting NKD1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaobo; Zheng, Qichang; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Wei

    2017-03-26

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common human malignant neoplasms, especially in China, its regulatory mechanism is important to develop new therapy approaches. miRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate gastric cancer progression. We found miR-532 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues and cells, Wound healing and transwell assay revealed that its overexpression promoted gastric cancer cell migration and invasion, its knockdown inhibited gastric cancer cell migration and invasion. Wnt/β-catenin antagonist naked cuticle homolog 1 (NKD1) was the target of miR-532, miR-532 inhibited NKD1 expression. TOP/FOP luciferase activity analysis suggested miR-532 also increased Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Overexpression miR-532 and NKD1 inhibited gastric cancer cell migration and invasion, consistent with miR-532 knockdown. These findings revealed miR-532 promoted gastric cancer cell migration and invasion through inhibiting NKD1 and activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway. We provide a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  19. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  20. Antitumor effects of the flavone chalcone: inhibition of invasion and migration through the FAK/JNK signaling pathway in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-Hsuan; Shih, Yuan-Wei

    2014-06-01

    Chalcones (benzylideneacetophenone) are cancer-preventive food components found in a human diet rich in fruits and vegetables. In this study, we first report the chemopreventive effect of chalcone in human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines: AGS. The results showed that chalcone could inhibit the abilities of the adhesion, invasion, and migration by cell-matrix adhesion assay, Boyden chamber invasion/migration assay, and wound-healing assay. Molecular data showed that the effect of chalcone in AGS cells might be mediated via sustained inactivation of the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) signal involved in the downregulation of the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Next, chalcone-treated AGS cells showed tremendous decrease in the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of kappaBα (IκBα), the nuclear level of NF-κB, and the binding ability of NF-κB to NF-κB response element. Furthermore, treating FAK small interfering RNA (FAK siRNA) and specific inhibitor for JNK (SP600125) to AGS cells could reduce the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our results revealed that chalcone significantly inhibited the metastatic ability of AGS cells by reducing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions concomitantly with a marked reduction on cell invasion and migration through suppressing and JNK signaling pathways. We suggest that chalcone may offer the application in clinical medicine.

  1. Interleukin-6 stimulates cell migration, invasion and integrin expression in HTR-8/SVneo cell line.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Vićovac, L

    2009-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is present in human endometrium throughout menstrual cycle and in pregnancy. Trophoblast also expresses IL-6. IL-6R and its associated signal transducer gp130 were found in trophoblast as well. IL-6 is generally assumed to be relevant for trophoblast invasion. This study was undertaken to determine influence of endogenous and externally added IL-6 on invasion and migration of first trimester of pregnancy trophoblast in vitro. Integrins alpha(5)beta(1) and alpha(1)beta(1) have been shown to play an important role in trophoblast invasion and the effect of IL-6 on the expression of these integrin subunits was studied. We are showing that in both isolated first trimester of pregnancy cytotrophoblast (CTB) and HTR-8/SVneo cell line IL-6 and IL-6R are present. The effect on migration was studied using cell wounding and migration test on HTR-8/SVneo cells. Effect of IL-6 and function blocking anti-IL-6 antibody in Matrigel invasion tests was studied on both cell types. The effect of IL-6 on integrin subunit expression was determined by cell-based ELISA and Western blot on HTR-8/SVneo cells. The results obtained show that exogenous IL-6 has stimulatory effect on cell migration in HTR-8/SVneo and invasion by both cell types. Function blocking anti-IL-6 inhibited unstimulated invasion by isolated first trimester cytotrophoblast and both cell migration and invasion in unstimulated HTR-8/SVneo. Integrin alpha(5) expression was stimulated by IL-6 to 134% (p<0.05), alpha(1) to 135% (p<0.005), and beta(1) to 134% (p<0.001) of control in cell-based ELISA, but also in Western blot. The data obtained show for the first time sensitivity of extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo to IL-6, in addition to isolated first trimester cytotrophoblast. We conclude that both exogenous and endogenous IL-6 stimulate trophoblast cell migration and invasion, which may be partly attributable to stimulation of expression of the studied integrin subunits.

  2. AMPK activity regulates trafficking of mitochondria to the leading edge during cell migration and matrix invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Brian; McKenzie, Andrew J.; Heintz, Nicholas H.; Howe, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a complex behavior involving many energy-expensive biochemical events that iteratively alter cell shape and location. Mitochondria, the principal producers of cellular ATP, are dynamic organelles that fuse, divide, and relocate to respond to cellular metabolic demands. Using ovarian cancer cells as a model, we show that mitochondria actively infiltrate leading edge lamellipodia, thereby increasing local mitochondrial mass and relative ATP concentration and supporting a localized reversal of the Warburg shift toward aerobic glycolysis. This correlates with increased pseudopodial activity of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a critically important cellular energy sensor and metabolic regulator. Furthermore, localized pharmacological activation of AMPK increases leading edge mitochondrial flux, ATP content, and cytoskeletal dynamics, whereas optogenetic inhibition of AMPK halts mitochondrial trafficking during both migration and the invasion of three-dimensional extracellular matrix. These observations indicate that AMPK couples local energy demands to subcellular targeting of mitochondria during cell migration and invasion. PMID:27385336

  3. Adhesive and invasive capacities of Edwarsiella tarda isolated from South American sea lion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Araceli; Villanueva, María Paz; González, Mario; Fernández, Fabiola; Latif, Fadua; Flores, Sandra Nonier; Fernández, Heriberto

    2014-01-01

    Edwarsiella tarda is a zoonotic bacterium that can be isolated from humans, animals and the environment. Although E. tarda is primarily considered a fish pathogen, it is the only species of its genus considered to be pathogenic for humans as well. A survey of zoonotic intestinal bacteria in fresh feces from South American sea lions (SASL) Otaria flavescens, reported E. tarda as the most frequently isolated species. In this study, we used HEp-2 cells to establish in vitro the adherence and invasive ability of 17 E. tarda strains isolated from SASL fecal material. All the strains were able to adhere and invade HEp-2 cells with adhesion and invasion percentages ranging from 56 to 100% and 21 to 74%, respectively. Despite the expression of these pathogenic factors, further investigation is needed to determine whether this bacterium could play a role as primary pathogen for this and other species of pinnipeds. PMID:25477948

  4. Adhesive and invasive capacities of Edwardsiella tarda isolated from South American sea lion.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Araceli; Villanueva, María Paz; González, Mario; Fernández, Fabiola; Latif, Fadua; Flores, Sandra Nonier; Fernández, Heriberto

    2014-01-01

    Edwarsiella tarda is a zoonotic bacterium that can be isolated from humans, animals and the environment. Although E. tarda is primarily considered a fish pathogen, it is the only species of its genus considered to be pathogenic for humans as well. A survey of zoonotic intestinal bacteria in fresh feces from South American sea lions (SASL) Otaria flavescens, reported E. tarda as the most frequently isolated species. In this study, we used HEp-2 cells to establish in vitro the adherence and invasive ability of 17 E. tarda strains isolated from SASL fecal material. All the strains were able to adhere and invade HEp-2 cells with adhesion and invasion percentages ranging from 56 to 100% and 21 to 74%, respectively. Despite the expression of these pathogenic factors, further investigation is needed to determine whether this bacterium could play a role as primary pathogen for this and other species of pinnipeds.

  5. Decreased expression of ADAMTS-1 in human breast tumors stimulates migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a member of the ADAMTS family of metalloproteases. Here, we investigated mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses, and we addressed the role of ADAMTS-1 in regulating migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast tumor cell lines. Results In a series of primary breast tumors, we observed variable levels of ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression but lower levels of ADAMTS-1 protein expression in human breast cancers as compared to normal tissue, with a striking decrease observed in high-malignancy cases (triple-negative for estrogen, progesterone and Her-2). This result prompted us to analyze the effect of ADAMTS-1 knockdown in breast cancer cells in vitro. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 expression demonstrated increased migration, invasion and invadopodia formation. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of ADAMTS-1 may be related to VEGF, a growth factor involved in migration and invasion. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 showed increased VEGF concentrations in conditioned medium capable of inducing human endothelial cells (HUVEC) tubulogenesis. Furthermore, expression of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR2) was increased in MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to MCF7 cells. To further determine the relationship between ADAMTS-1 and VEGF regulating breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced expression of ADAMTS-1 were pretreated with a function-blocking antibody against VEGF and then tested in migration and invasion assays; both were partially rescued to control levels. Conclusions ADAMTS-1 expression was decreased in human breast tumors, and ADAMTS-1 knockdown stimulated migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast cancer cells in vitro. Therefore, this series of experiments suggests that VEGF is involved in the effects mediated by ADAMTS-1 in breast cancer cells. PMID

  6. Metastasis-associated phosphatase PRL-2 regulates tumor cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Lazo, J S

    2012-02-16

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) family, comprising PRL-1, PRL-2 and PRL-3, is a group of prenylated phosphatases that are candidate cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Although several studies have documented that altered expression of PRL-1 or PRL-3 can influence cell proliferation, migration and invasion, there is a dearth of knowledge about the biological functions of PRL-2. Thus, in the current study we have evaluated the role of PRL-2 in cell migration and invasion in human cancer cells. We found that four human lung cancer cells, including A549 cells, overexpress PRL-2 when compared with normal lung cells. PRL-2 knockdown by RNA interference markedly inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this inhibition can be restored by overexpressing the short interference RNA (siRNA)-resistant vector HA-PRL-2m. PRL-2 suppression by siRNA decreased p130Cas and vinculin expression, and decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, while increasing the phosphorylation of ezrin on tyrosine 146. We found no significant changes in total p53, Akt and c-Src expression levels or their phosphorylation status, suggesting that PRL-2 knockdown could inhibit tumor cell migration and invasion through a Src-independent p130Cas signaling pathway. Ectopic expression of wild-type PRL-2, a catalytic inactive C101S mutant and a C-terminal CAAX deletion revealed a requirement for both the PRL-2 catalytic functionality and prenylation site. Expression of wild-type but not mutant forms of PRL-2 caused ERK phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. These results support a model in which PRL-2 promotes cell migration and invasion through an ERK-dependent signaling pathway.

  7. The process of macrophage migration promotes matrix metalloproteinase-independent invasion by tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Guiet, Romain; Van Goethem, Emeline; Cougoule, Céline; Balor, Stéphanie; Valette, Annie; Al Saati, Talal; Lowell, Clifford A; Le Cabec, Véronique; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are known to amplify the malignant potential of tumors by secreting a variety of cytokines and proteases involved in tumor cell invasion and metastasis, but how these macrophages infiltrate tumors and whether the macrophage migration process facilitates tumor cell invasion remain poorly documented. To address these questions, we used cell spheroids of breast carcinoma SUM159PT cells as an in vitro model of solid tumors. We found that macrophages used both the mesenchymal mode requiring matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the amoeboid migration mode to infiltrate tumor cell spheroids. Whereas individual SUM159PT cells invaded Matrigel using an MMP-dependent mesenchymal mode, when they were grown as spheroids, tumor cells were unable to invade the Matrigel surrounding spheroids. When spheroids were infiltrated or in contact with macrophages, tumor cell invasiveness was restored. It was dependent on the capacity of macrophages to remodel the matrix and migrate in an MMP-independent mesenchymal mode. This effect of macrophages was much reduced when spheroids were infiltrated by Matrigel migration-defective Hck(-/-) macrophages. In the presence of macrophages, SUM159PT migrated into Matrigel in the proximity of macrophages and switched from an MMP-dependent mesenchymal migration to an amoeboid mode resistant to protease inhibitors.Thus, in addition to the well-described paracrine loop between macrophages and tumor cells, macrophages can also contribute to the invasiveness of tumor cells by remodeling the extracellular matrix and by opening the way to exit the tumor and colonize the surrounding tissues in an MMP-dispensable manner.

  8. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  9. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inhibits adhesion and migration of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barenys, Marta; Gassmann, Kathrin; Baksmeier, Christine; Heinz, Sabrina; Reverte, Ingrid; Schmuck, Martin; Temme, Thomas; Bendt, Farina; Zschauer, Tim-Christian; Rockel, Thomas Dino; Unfried, Klaus; Wätjen, Wim; Sundaram, Sivaraj Mohana; Heuer, Heike; Colomina, Maria Teresa; Fritsche, Ellen

    2017-02-01

    Food supplements based on herbal products are widely used during pregnancy as part of a self-care approach. The idea that such supplements are safe and healthy is deeply seated in the general population, although they do not underlie the same strict safety regulations than medical drugs. We aimed to characterize the neurodevelopmental effects of the green tea catechin epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is now commercialized as high-dose food supplement. We used the "Neurosphere Assay" to study the effects and unravel underlying molecular mechanisms of EGCG treatment on human and rat neural progenitor cells (NPCs) development in vitro. EGCG alters human and rat NPC development in vitro. It disturbs migration distance, migration pattern, and nuclear density of NPCs growing as neurospheres. These functional impairments are initiated by EGCG binding to the extracellular matrix glycoprotein laminin, preventing its binding to β1-integrin subunits, thereby prohibiting cell adhesion and resulting in altered glia alignment and decreased number of migrating young neurons. Our data raise a concern on the intake of high-dose EGCG food supplements during pregnancy and highlight the need of an in vivo characterization of the effects of high-dose EGCG exposure during neurodevelopment.

  10. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  11. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility.

  12. Decrease of breast cancer cell invasiveness by sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) is associated with an increased expression of adhesive molecules.

    PubMed

    Vasse, M; Thibout, D; Paysant, J; Legrand, E; Soria, C; Crépin, M

    2001-03-23

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPa), a non-toxic phenylalanine metabolite, has been shown to induce in vivo and in vitro cytostatic and antiproliferative effects on various cell types. In this work, we analysed the effect of NaPa on the invasiveness of breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras). Using the highly invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, we demonstrated that an 18-hour incubation with NaPa strongly inhibits the cell invasiveness through Matrigel (86% inhibition at 20 mM of NaPa). As cell invasiveness is greatly influenced by the expression of urokinase (u-PA) and its cell surface receptor (u-PAR) as well as the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), we tested the effect of NaPa on these parameters. An 18-hour incubation with NaPa did not modify u-PA expression, either on MDA-MB-231 or on MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras cell lines, and induced a small u-PA decrease after 3 days of treatment of MDA-MB-321 with NaPa. In contrast, an 18 h incubation of MDA-MB-231 increased the expression of u-PAR and the secretion of MMP-9. As u-PAR is a ligand for vitronectin, a composant of the extracellular matrix, these data could explain the increased adhesion of MDA-MB-231 to vitronectin, while cell adhesivity of MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras was unmodified by NaPa treatment. NaPa induced also an increased expression of both Lymphocyte Function-Associated-1 (LFA-1) and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which was obvious from 18 hour incubation with NaPa for the MDA-MB-231 cells, but was delayed (3 days) for MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras. Only neutralizing antibodies against LFA-1 reversed the decreased invasiveness of NaPa-treated cells. Therefore we can conclude that the strong inhibition of MDA-MB-231 invasiveness is not due to a decrease in proteases involved in cell migration (u-PA and MMP) but could be related both to the modification of cell structure and an increased expression of adhesion molecules such as u-PAR and LFA-1.

  13. Rnd3 Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton Promotes Melanoma Migration and Invasive Outgrowth in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Klein, R. Matthew; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    Depth of cell invasion into the dermis is a clinical determinant for poor prognosis in cutaneous melanoma. The signaling events that promote the switch from a non-invasive to invasive tumor phenotype remain obscure. Activating mutations in the serine/threonine kinase B-RAF are prevalent in melanoma. Mutant B-RAF is required for melanoma cell invasion. The expression of Rnd3, a Rho family GTPase, is regulated by mutant B-RAF, although its role in melanoma progression is unknown. In this study, we determined the functional contribution of Rnd3 to invasive melanoma. Endogenous Rnd3 was targeted for knockdown using a doxycyclineinducible shRNA system in invasive human melanoma cells. Depletion of Rnd3 promoted prominent actin stress fibers and enlarged focal adhesions. Mechanistically, stress fiber formation induced by Rnd3 knockdown required the specific involvement of RhoA and ROCK1/2 activity but not RhoB or RhoC. Rnd3 expression in human melanoma cell lines was strongly associated with elevated ERK phosphorylation and invasive behavior in a 3-D dermal-like environment. A functional role for Rnd3 was demonstrated in the invasive outgrowth of melanoma tumor spheroids. Knockdown of Rnd3 reduced invasive outgrowth of spheroids embedded in collagen gels. Additionally, Rnd3 depletion inhibited collective and border cell movement out from spheroids in a ROCK1/2-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings implicate Rnd3 as a major suppressor of RhoA mediated actin cytoskeletal organization and in the acquisition of an invasive melanoma phenotype. PMID:19244113

  14. Reduced expression of the chromatin remodeling gene ARID1A enhances gastric cancer cell migration and invasion via downregulation of E-cadherin transcription.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hai-Bo; Wang, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Zhao-Qing; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Fan, Hui-Zhi; Sun, Yi-hong; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The chromatin remodeling gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) encodes the protein BAF250a, a subunit of human SWI/SNF-related complexes. Recent studies have identified ARID1A as a tumor suppressor. Here, we show that ARID1A expression is reduced in gastric cancer (GC) tissues, which are significantly associated with local lymph node metastasis, tumor infiltration and poor patient prognosis. ARID1A silencing enforces the migration and invasion of GC cells, whereas ectopic expression of ARID1A inhibits migration. The adhesive protein E-cadherin is remarkably downregulated in response to ARID1A silencing, but it is upregulated by ARID1A overexpression. E-cadherin overexpression significantly inhibits GC cell migration and invasion, whereas CDH1 (coded E-cadherin) silencing promotes migration. Restored expression of CDH1 in ARID1A-silenced cell lines restores the inhibition of cell migration. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicate that the ARID1A-associated SWI/SNF complex binds to the CDH1 promoter and modulates CDH1 transcription. ARID1A knockdown induces evident morphological changes of GC cells with increased expression of mesenchymal markers, indicating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. ARID1A silencing does not alter the level of β-catenin but induces a subcellular redistribution of β-catenin from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrate that reduced expression of E-cadherin is associated with local lymph node metastasis, tumor infiltration and poor clinical prognosis. ARID1A and E-cadherin expression show a strong correlation in 75.4% of the analyzed GC tissues. They are synergistically downregulated in 23.5% of analyzed GC tissues. In conclusion, ARID1A targets E-cadherin during the modulation of GC cell migration and invasion.

  15. Down-regulation of the cancer/testis antigen 45 (CT45) is associated with altered tumor cell morphology, adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to their restricted expression in male germ cells and certain tumors, cancer/testis (CT) antigens are regarded as promising targets for tumor therapy. CT45 is a recently identified nuclear CT antigen that was associated with a severe disease score in Hodgkin’s lymphoma and poor prognosis in multiple myeloma. As for many CT antigens, the biological function of CT45 in developing germ cells and in tumor cells is largely unknown. Methods CT45 expression was down-regulated in CT45-positive Hodgkin’s lymphoma (L428), fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and myeloma (U266B1) cells using RNA interference. An efficient CT45 knock-down was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining and/or Western blotting. These cellular systems allowed us to analyze the impact of CT45 down-regulation on proliferation, cell cycle progression, morphology, adhesion, migration and invasive capacity of tumor cells. Results Reduced levels of CT45 did not coincide with changes in cell cycle progression or proliferation. However, we observed alterations in cell adherence, morphology and migration/invasion after CT45 down-regulation. Significant changes in the distribution of cytoskeleton-associated proteins were detected by confocal imaging. Changes in cell adherence were recorded in real-time using the xCelligence system with control and siRNA-treated cells. Altered migratory and invasive capacity of CT45 siRNA-treated cells were visualized in 3D migration and invasion assays. Moreover, we found that CT45 down-regulation altered the level of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein syncrip (hnRNP-Q1) which is known to be involved in the control of focal adhesion formation and cell motility. Conclusions Providing first evidence of a cell biological function of CT45, we suggest that this cancer/testis antigen is involved in the modulation of cell morphology, cell adherence and cell motility. Enhanced motility and/or invasiveness of CT45-positive cells could contribute to the more severe

  16. CD26-mediated regulation of periostin expression contributes to migration and invasion of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komiya, Eriko; Ohnuma, Kei; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Hatano, Ryo; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD26-expressing MPM cells upregulate production of periostin. • The intracytoplasmic region of CD26 mediates the upregulation of periostin. • CD26 expression leads to nuclear translocation of Twist1 via phosphorylation of Src. • Secreted periostin enhances migration and invasion of MPM cells. - Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignancy arising from mesothelial lining of pleura. It is generally associated with a history of asbestos exposure and has a very poor prognosis, partly due to the lack of a precise understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with its malignant behavior. In the present study, we expanded on our previous studies on the enhanced motility and increased CD26 expression in MPM cells, with a particular focus on integrin adhesion molecules. We found that expression of CD26 upregulates periostin secretion by MPM cells, leading to enhanced MPM cell migratory and invasive activity. Moreover, we showed that upregulation of periostin expression results from the nuclear translocation of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1, a process that is mediated by CD26-associated activation of Src phosphorylation. While providing new and profound insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in MPM biology, these findings may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for MPM.

  17. Loss of GM130 in breast cancer cells and its effects on cell migration, invasion and polarity.

    PubMed

    Baschieri, Francesco; Uetz-von Allmen, Edith; Legler, Daniel F; Farhan, Hesso

    2015-01-01

    Spatially distinct pools of the small GTPase Cdc42 were observed, but the major focus of research so far has been to investigate its signaling at the plasma membrane. We recently showed that the Golgi pool of Cdc42 is relevant for cell polarity and that it is regulated by GM130, a Golgi matrix protein. Loss of GM130 abrogated cell polarity and consistent with the notion that polarity is frequently impaired in cancer, we found that GM130 is downregulated in colorectal cancer. Whether the loss of GM130 solely affects polarity, or whether it affects other processes relevant for tumorigenesis remains unclear. In a panel of breast cancer cells lines, we investigated the consequences of GM130 depletion on traits of relevance for tumor progression, such as survival, proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion. We show that cellular assays that depend on polarity, such as chemotaxis and wound scratch assays, are only of limited use to investigate the role of polarity modulators in cancer. Depletion of GM130 increases cellular velocity and increases the invasiveness of breast cancer cells, therefore supporting the view that alterations of polarity contribute to tumor progression.

  18. Human pathogens utilize host extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen for adhesion and invasion of the host.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Fleury, Christophe; Jalalvand, Farshid; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-11-01

    Laminin (Ln) and collagen are multifunctional glycoproteins that play an important role in cellular morphogenesis, cell signalling, tissue repair and cell migration. These proteins are ubiquitously present in tissues as a part of the basement membrane (BM), constitute a protective layer around blood capillaries and are included in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a component of BMs, both Lns and collagen(s), thus function as major mechanical containment molecules that protect tissues from pathogens. Invasive pathogens breach the basal lamina and degrade ECM proteins of interstitial spaces and connective tissues using various ECM-degrading proteases or surface-bound plasminogen and matrix metalloproteinases recruited from the host. Most pathogens associated with the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or urogenital tracts, as well as with the central nervous system or the skin, have the capacity to bind and degrade Lns and collagen(s) in order to adhere to and invade host tissues. In this review, we focus on the adaptability of various pathogens to utilize these ECM proteins as enhancers for adhesion to host tissues or as a targets for degradation in order to breach the cellular barriers. The major pathogens discussed are Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Yersinia, Treponema, Mycobacterium, Clostridium, Listeria, Porphyromonas and Haemophilus; Candida, Aspergillus, Pneumocystis, Cryptococcus and Coccidioides; Acanthamoeba, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas; retrovirus and papilloma virus.

  19. MIGRESIVES: a research project on migration from adhesives in food-packaging materials in support of European legislation and standardization.

    PubMed

    Störmer, A; Franz, R

    2009-12-01

    Most food packages and food-contact materials are manufactured using adhesives. The European Union regulates all food-contact materials, as their constituents may not contaminate food and endanger consumers' health. In contrast to plastics which are regulated by positive lists of authorized ingredients, adhesives have not yet a specific regulation. The MIGRESIVES project aimed to elaborate a scientific global risk-assessment approach to meet current general European Union regulatory requirements and as a basis for future specific European Union legislation as well as to provide the industry, especially small and medium-sized enterprises, a tool to ensure that migration from adhesives is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. The idea was to demonstrate that consumers' exposure to chemicals released by adhesives is in many cases below levels of concern. Technical/scientific knowledge from industry and research institutes will be merged into a collective research endeavour gathering all stakeholders. The major milestones are (1) the classification of adhesives according to chemistry and uses, (2) the test strategies based on physico-chemical behaviour of adhesives, (3) modelling migration/exposure from adhesives, (4) providing guidelines to integrate the risk-assessment approach into the daily life of companies, (5) the feasibility of applying the toxicological approach from the European Union BIOSAFEPAPER project, and (6) extensive training/education to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and large dissemination for general adoption of the concept in Europe.

  20. Inhibition of TRPM7 by carvacrol suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Barszczyk, Andrew; Turlova, Ekaterina; Deurloo, Marielle; Liu, Baosong; Yang, Burton B; Rutka, James T; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2015-06-30

    Glioblastomas are progressive brain tumors with devastating proliferative and invasive characteristics. Ion channels are the second largest target class for drug development. In this study, we investigated the effects of the TRPM7 inhibitor carvacrol on the viability, resistance to apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness of the human U87 glioblastoma cell line.The expression levels of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in U87 cells were detected by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 currents were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. An MTT assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments were used to evaluate cell migration and invasion. Protein levels of p-Akt/t-Akt, p-ERK1/2/t-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, MMP-2 and phosphorylated cofilin were also detected.TRPM7 mRNA and protein expression in U87 cells is higher than in normal human astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed that carvacrol blocks recombinant TRPM7 current in HEK293 cells and endogenous TRPM7-like current in U87 cells. Carvacrol treatment reduced the viability, migration and invasion of U87 cells. Carvacrol also decreased MMP-2 protein expression and promoted the phosphorylation of cofilin. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited the Ras/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.Therefore, carvacrol may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of glioblastomas through its inhibition of TRPM7 channels.

  1. Emodin inhibits migration and invasion of MHCC-97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wanfu; Zhong, Maofeng; Liang, Shufang; Chen, Yongan; Liu, Dong; Yin, Zifei; Cao, Qingxin; Wang, Chen; Ling, Changquan

    2016-01-01

    Emodin, an anthraquinone derivative from the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum L., was found to have antitumor effects in different types of cancer by regulating multi-molecular targets. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of emodin on the migration and invasion of MHCC-97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Firstly, it was demonstrated that emodin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, using a MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. However, when emodin concentration was <50 µmol/l, it had little effect on the inhibition of proliferation or the induction of apoptosis. Then, it was observed that emodin can significantly suppress cell migration and invasion with a treatment dose <50 µmol/l compared with the control (P<0.05), which was not attributed to a decrease in cell number. Further study demonstrated that emodin significantly suppressed the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 compared with the control, which may be mediated by the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway and suppression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)/MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways. Therefore, the present study, for the first time, used MHCC-97H cells, which have the high potential of malignant invasion, to demonstrate that emodin may inhibit cell migration and invasion. PMID:27882165

  2. Inhibition of TRPM7 by carvacrol suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Barszczyk, Andrew; Turlova, Ekaterina; Deurloo, Marielle; Liu, Baosong; Yang, Burton B.; Rutka, James T.; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas are progressive brain tumors with devastating proliferative and invasive characteristics. Ion channels are the second largest target class for drug development. In this study, we investigated the effects of the TRPM7 inhibitor carvacrol on the viability, resistance to apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness of the human U87 glioblastoma cell line. The expression levels of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in U87 cells were detected by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 currents were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. An MTT assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments were used to evaluate cell migration and invasion. Protein levels of p-Akt/t-Akt, p-ERK1/2/t-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, MMP-2 and phosphorylated cofilin were also detected. TRPM7 mRNA and protein expression in U87 cells is higher than in normal human astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed that carvacrol blocks recombinant TRPM7 current in HEK293 cells and endogenous TRPM7-like current in U87 cells. Carvacrol treatment reduced the viability, migration and invasion of U87 cells. Carvacrol also decreased MMP-2 protein expression and promoted the phosphorylation of cofilin. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited the Ras/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Therefore, carvacrol may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of glioblastomas through its inhibition of TRPM7 channels. PMID:25965832

  3. Benzyl-isothiocyanate Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingyue; Li, Wei; Dong, Xu; Chen, Yi; Lu, Yan; Lin, Bo; Guo, Junli; Li, Mengsen

    2017-01-01

    Despite consideration of benzyl isothiocyanate(BITC) is applied to prevention and therapeutic of cancer, the role of BITC in inducing apoptosis, and inhibiting migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) cells is still unclear. In this study, we aim to explore the effects of BITC on the growth, migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro. When human HCC cell lines, Bel 7402 and HLE, were treated with an optimal concentration of BITC for 48 hours, the results indicated that BITC inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of HCC cells; BITC has a significant inhibitory effect on the migration and invasion of HCC cells. BITC stimulated expression of caspase-3/8 and PARP-1, and suppressed expression of survivin, MMP2/9 and CXCR4. BITC also inhibited the enzymatic activities of MMP2 and MMP9. Altogether, BITC was able to induce apoptosis and suppress the invasive and migratory abilities of Bel 7402 and HLE cells. The role mechanism of BITC might involve an up-regulating the expression of apoptosis-related proteins and down-regulating the expression of metastasis-related proteins. BITC may be applied as a novel chemotherapy for HCC patients. PMID:28243328

  4. Synaptopodin-2 induces assembly of peripheral actin bundles and immature focal adhesions to promote lamellipodia formation and prostate cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kai, FuiBoon; Fawcett, James P.; Duncan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Synaptopodin-2 (Synpo2), an actin-binding protein and invasive cancer biomarker, induces formation of complex stress fiber networks in the cell body and promotes PC3 prostate cancer cell migration in response to serum stimulation. The role of these actin networks in enhanced cancer cell migration is unknown. Using time-course analysis and live cell imaging of mock- and Synpo2-transduced PC3 cells, we now show that Synpo2 induces assembly of actin fibers near the cell periphery and Arp2/3-dependent lamellipodia formation. Lamellipodia formed in a non-directional manner or repeatedly changed direction, explaining the enhanced chemokinetic activity of PC3 cells in response to serum stimulation. Myosin contraction promotes retrograde flow of the Synpo2-associated actin filaments at the leading edge and their merger with actin networks in the cell body. Enhanced PC3 cell migration correlates with Synpo2-induced formation of lamellipodia and immature focal adhesions (FAs), but is not dependent on myosin contraction or FA maturation. The previously reported correlation between Synpo2-induced stress fiber assembly and enhanced PC3 cell migration therefore reflects the role of Synpo2 as a newly identified regulator of actin bundle formation and nascent FA assembly near the leading cell edge. PMID:25883213

  5. Analgesic-antitumor peptide inhibits the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells by an upregulated VGSC β1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guili; Cui, Yong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Mingyi; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jinghai; Liu, Yanfeng

    2016-03-01

    Analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), one of the scorpion toxin polypeptides, has been shown to have an antitumor activity. Recombinant AGAP (rAGAP) was shown to affect the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells via a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) β1 subunit. The VGSC β1 subunit was validated as a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. rAGAP suppresses the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells but has no significant effect of human liver HL7702 cells without β1 subunit expression. rAGAP inhibits the migration and invasion of the cells when the VGSC β1 subunit is overexpressed in HL7702 cells. To explain these findings, VGSC β1 subunit messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were measured. The β1 subunit protein level was upregulated in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with rAGAP while there was no significant change in the mRNA level, so rAGAP might be an active component of the VGSC β1 subunit.

  6. Rubus idaeus extract suppresses migration and invasion of human oral cancer by inhibiting MMP-2 through modulation of the Erk1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chuang, Chun-Yi; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chen, Pei-Ni; Yang, Shun-Fa; Shih-Hsuan-Lin; Chen, Yang-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2017-03-01

    Raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) have been extensively studies worldwide because of their beneficial effects on health. Recently reports indicate that crude extracts of Rubus idaeus (RIE) have antioxidant and anticancer ability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of its antimetastatic ability in oral cancer cells. In this study, SCC-9 and SAS oral cancer cells were subjected to a treatment with RIE and then analyzed the effect of RIE on migration and invasion. The addition of RIE inhibited the migration and invasion ability of oral cancer cells. Real time PCR, western blot and zymography analysis demonstrated that mRNA, protein expression and enzyme activity of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) were down-regulated by RIE. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), src, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were inhibited after RIE treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that RIE exerted an inhibitory effect of migration and invasion in oral cancer cells and alter metastasis by suppression of MMP-2 expression through FAK/Scr/ERK signaling pathway. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1037-1046, 2017.

  7. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  8. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  9. MAGI1 inhibits migration and invasion via blocking MAPK/ERK signaling pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuqin; Lu, Jiajia; Qu, Tingting; Feng, Yi; Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Caixia; Ji, Jiafu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the association of membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 1 (MAGI1) with gastric cancer (GC) and the related molecular mechanisms. Methods The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were utilized to measure the MAGI1 expression level in GC tissues. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to ensure the MAGI1 expression in GC cell lines. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) was applied for knockdown of endogenous MAGI1 in GC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay, scratch wounding migration assay and transwell chamber migration assay, as well as transwell chamber invasion assay were employed respectively to investigate the GC cell proliferation, migration and invasion in MAGI1-knockdown and control GC cells. The potential molecular mechanism mediated by MAGI1 was studied using Western blotting and RT- PCR. Results RT-PCR and IHC verified MAGI1 was frequently expressed in matched adjacent noncancerous mucosa compared with GC tissues and the expression of MAGI1 was related to clinical pathological parameters. Functional assays indicated that MAGI1 knockdown significantly promoted GC cell migration and invasion. Further mechanism investigation demonstrated that one pathway of MAGI1 inhibiting migration and invasion was mainly by altering the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related molecules via inhibiting MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Conclusions MAGI1 was associated with GC clinical pathological parameters and acted as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting of MAPK/ERK signaling pathway in GC. PMID:28373751

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to human laminin α4 chain globular domain inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to α4-laminins.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Taichi; Wondimu, Zenebech; Oikawa, Yuko; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Virtanen, Ismo; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    α4-Laminins, such as laminins 411 and 421, are mesenchymal laminins expressed by vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, leukocytes and other normal cell types. These laminins are recognized by α6β1 and α6β4 integrins and MCAM (CD146), and promote adhesion and migration of the cells. α4-Laminins are also expressed and secreted by some tumor cells and strongly promote tumor cell migration. Moreover, the abluminal side of blood and/or lymphatic vessels and the nerve perineurium, common tracks of tumor cell dissemination, express α4-laminins, and these laminin isoforms, when expressed in the stroma, may contribute to tumor invasion. In the present study, we examined ten mAbs to human laminin α4 chain for their reactivity with the isolated laminin α4 globular domain, their ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and their effect on the binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to both α4-laminins. Most of the mAbs reacted with the laminin α4 globular domain, but only two, mAbs FC10 and 084, significantly inhibited tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411. When used in combination, these antibodies practically abolished the cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411 and significantly reduced the cellular responses on laminin-421. Accordingly, mAbs FC10 and 084 significantly inhibited the binding of purified α6β1 integrin and MCAM to laminins 411 and 421. These results indicate that mAbs to the laminin α4 globular domain are able to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and that α6β1 integrin and MCAM bind α4-laminins at very close sites on the globular domain. These reagents contribute to a better understanding of the biology of α4-laminins and may have a therapeutic potential in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  11. Atorvastatin suppresses glioma invasion and migration by reducing microglial MT1-MMP expression.

    PubMed

    Yongjun, Yi; Shuyun, Huang; Lei, Chen; Xiangrong, Chen; Zhilin, Yang; Yiquan, Ke

    2013-07-15

    Microglia, the immune cells of the brain, often present in large numbers in gliomas, where they promote tumor growth and invasiveness. This study found that atorvastatin reduced the pro-tumorigenic effects of microglia on glioma migration and invasion by reducing the microglial expression of membrane type 1 metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The results suggest that down-regulation of MT1-MMP is controlled by a p38 MAPK pathway in microglia. Taken together, the results support further research on atorvastatin as a candidate for glioma therapy by targeting microglia.

  12. β-Catenin–regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor–dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin–mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury. PMID:24837430

  13. β-Catenin-regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A

    2014-06-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor-dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin-mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury.

  14. Rap GTPase-mediated adhesion and migration: A target for limiting the dissemination of B-cell lymphomas?

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Gold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas, which arise in lymphoid organs, can spread rapidly via the circulatory system and form solid tumors within multiple organs. Rate-limiting steps in this metastatic process may be the adhesion of lymphoma cells to vascular endothelial cells, their exit from the vasculature and their migration to tissue sites that will support tumor growth. Thus proteins that control B cell adhesion and migration are likely to be key factors in lymphoma dissemination, and hence potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The Rap GTPases are master regulators of integrin activation, cell motility and the underlying cytoskeletal, adhesion and membrane dynamics. We have recently shown that Rap activation is critical for B-lymphoma cells to undergo transendothelial migration in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, suppressing Rap activation impairs the ability of intravenously injected B-lymphoma cells to form solid tumors in the liver and other organs. We discuss this work in the context of targeting Rap, its downstream effectors, or other regulators of B cell adhesion and migration as an approach for limiting the dissemination of B-lymphoma cells and the development of secondary tumors.

  15. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  16. Sesquiterpene lactones derived from Saussurea lappa induce apoptosis and inhibit invasion and migration in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Keiichi; Nishimura, Yuki; Takeda, Taiji; Kurita, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Taketo; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is among the most fatal of solid tumors in the pediatric age group, even when treated aggressively. Therefore, a new effective therapeutic drug(s) for neuroblastoma is urgently needed. To clarify the anticancer effects of the sesquiterpene lactones dehydrocostus lactone and costunolide, derived from Saussurea lappa, we examined the cytotoxic and migration/invasion-inhibitory effects of these compounds against neuroblastoma cell lines. Both the compounds exerted significant cytotoxicity against the neuroblastoma cell lines IMR-32, NB-39, SK-N-SH, and LA-N-1. Evidence of cellular apoptosis, such as nuclear condensation and membrane inversion, were observed after treatment with these compounds. Both compounds induced caspase-7 activation and PARP cleavage as confirmed by Western blotting. Furthermore, the sesquiterpene lactones also suppressed invasion and migration of the neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that dehydrocostus lactone and costunolide are promising candidates for being developed into novel anticancer drugs effective against neuroblastoma.

  17. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  18. Inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by the proteasome antagonist carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Areeb, Zammam; Stylli, Stanley S; Ware, Thomas M B; Harris, Nicole C; Shukla, Lipi; Shayan, Ramin; Paradiso, Lucia; Li, Bo; Morokoff, Andrew P; Kaye, Andrew H; Luwor, Rodney B

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive and lethal tumor of the central nervous system with limited treatment strategies on offer, and as such the identification of effective novel therapeutic agents is paramount. To examine the efficacy of proteasome inhibitors, we tested bortezomib, carfilzomib, nafamostat mesylate, gabexate mesylate and acetylsalicylic acid on glioblastoma cell viability, migration and invasion. Both bortezomib and carfilzomib produced significant reduction of cell viability, while nafamostat mesylate, gabexate mesylate and acetylsalicylic acid did not. Subsequent testing showed that carfilzomib significantly reduced cell viability at nM concentrations. Carfilzomib also reduced cell migration, secretion and activation of MMP2 and also cell invasion of all four glioblastoma cells tested. In summary, carfilzomib represents a novel, yet FDA-approved agent for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  19. Rhodanine-based PRL-3 inhibitors blocked the migration and invasion of metastatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Garam; Lee, Su-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Nan; Han, Young-Min; Lee, Rhan-Hee; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2013-07-01

    PRL-3, phosphatase of regenerating liver-3, plays a role in cancer progression through its involvement in invasion, migration, metastasis, and angiogenesis. We synthesized rhodanine derivatives, CG-707 and BR-1, which inhibited PRL-3 enzymatic activity with IC50 values of 0.8 μM and 1.1 μM, respectively. CG-707 and BR-1 strongly inhibited the migration and invasion of PRL-3 overexpressing colon cancer cells without exhibiting cytotoxicity. The specificity of the inhibitors on PRL-3 phosphatase activity was confirmed by the phosphorylation recovery of known PRL-3 substrates such as ezrin and cytokeratin 8. The compounds selectively inhibited PRL-3 in comparison with other phosphatases, and CG-707 regulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins. The results of the present study reveal that rhodanine is a specific PRL-3 inhibitor and a good lead molecule for obtaining a selective PRL-3 inhibitor.

  20. Apigenin Attenuates Melanoma Cell Migration by Inducing Anoikis through Integrin and Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hasnat, Md Abul; Pervin, Mehnaz; Lim, Ji Hong; Lim, Beong Ou

    2015-11-27

    Apigenin, a nonmutagenic flavonoid, has been found to have antitumor properties and is therefore particularly relevant for the development of chemotherapeutic agents for cancers. In this study, time- and dose-dependent cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed to determine the effects of apigenin on A2058 and A375 melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were pretreated with different concentrations of apigenin and analyzed for morphological changes, anoikis induction, cell migration, and levels of proteins associated with apoptosis. Apigenin reduced integrin protein levels and inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), which induce anoikis in human cutaneous melanoma cells. Apigenin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of melanoma cell migration, unlike untreated controls. Furthermore, apigenin treatment increased apoptotic factors such as caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating the metastasis of melanoma cells. Our results provide a new insight into the mechanisms by which apigenin prevents melanoma metastasis by sensitizing anoikis induced by the loss of integrin proteins in the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. These findings elucidate the related mechanisms and suggest the potential of apigenin in developing clinical treatment strategies against malignant melanoma.

  1. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  2. The invasion mode of GH(3) cells is conditioned by collagen subtype, and its efficiency depends on cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Azorín, Erika; Solano-Agama, Carmen; Mendoza-Garrido, M Eugenia

    2012-12-15

    The adaptation of GH(3) cells to different microenvironments is a consequence of a partial compromise with the tumor phenotype. A collagen type IV enriched microenvironment favors an invasive phenotype and increases the substrate adhesion capacity, whereas it decreases the phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chain and the aggregation capacity. In contrast, the higher internal tension and increased aggregation capacity induced by collagen type I/III are factors that reduce the invasion rate. Our results show, for the first time, the importance of collagen subtypes in determining the migratory strategy: collagen I/III favors mesenchymal-like motility, whereas collagen type IV induces an ameboid-type displacement. The reciprocal modulation of the myosin light chain kinase and the Rho-kinase determines the invasive capacity through changes in tissue cohesion, extracellular matrix affinity, regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation and spatial distribution. The collagen subtype determines which of the mechano-transduction signaling pathways will regulate the tensional homeostasis and affect the invasion ability as well as the preferred migration strategy of the cells.

  3. Roles of SGK Isoform Signaling in Breast Cancer Migration and Invasion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Silencing of SGK and Akt isoforms had been confirmed March 15, 2010- March 14, 2011. However on further analysis of substrate NDRG1 it appears the...silencing of SGK3 but not Akt isoforms causes an increase in total NDRG1 protein level while simultaneously decreasing phosphorylation of NDRG1 at...substrate phosphorylation mutants and optimize their expression (month 22-23) NDRG1 has been shown to be a potent mediator of invasive migration through

  4. Pin1 promotes transforming growth factor-beta-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Isao; Chiang, Keng-Nan; Lai, Chen-Yu; He, Dongming; Wang, Guannan; Ramkumar, Romila; Uchida, Takafumi; Ryo, Akihide; Lu, Kunping; Liu, Fang

    2010-01-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological activities. It induces potent growth-inhibitory responses in normal cells but promotes migration and invasion of cancer cells. Smads mediate the TGF-beta responses. TGF-beta binding to the cell surface receptors leads to the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in their C terminus as well as in the proline-rich linker region. The serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in the linker region are followed by the proline residue. Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, recognizes phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motifs. Here we show that Smad2/3 interacts with Pin1 in a TGF-beta-dependent manner. We further show that the phosphorylated threonine 179-proline motif in the Smad3 linker region is the major binding site for Pin1. Although epidermal growth factor also induces phosphorylation of threonine 179 and other residues in the Smad3 linker region the same as TGF-beta, Pin1 is unable to bind to the epidermal growth factor-stimulated Smad3. Further analysis suggests that phosphorylation of Smad3 in the C terminus is necessary for the interaction with Pin1. Depletion of Pin1 by small hairpin RNA does not significantly affect TGF-beta-induced growth-inhibitory responses and a number of TGF-beta/Smad target genes analyzed. In contrast, knockdown of Pin1 in human PC3 prostate cancer cells strongly inhibited TGF-beta-mediated migration and invasion. Accordingly, TGF-beta induction of N-cadherin, which plays an important role in migration and invasion, is markedly reduced when Pin1 is depleted in PC3 cells. Because Pin1 is overexpressed in many cancers, our findings highlight the importance of Pin1 in TGF-beta-induced migration and invasion of cancer cells.

  5. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Rohan, Thomas E; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B; Condeelis, John S; Oktay, Maja H

    2014-11-25

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding Mena(INV), an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down Mena(INV) or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that Mena(INV) and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and Mena(INV) may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes.

  6. Gemifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug, inhibits migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jung-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Gemifloxacin (GMF) is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF- κ B and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF- α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased I κ B phosphorylation and NF- κ B nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  7. MACC1 mediates acetylcholine-induced invasion and migration by human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianling; Zhou, Rui; Wu, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Yang; Shi, Min

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) promotes the growth and metastasis of several cancers via its M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R). Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is an oncogene that is overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC) and plays an important role in GC progression, though it is unclear how MACC1 activity is regulated in GC. In this study, we demonstrated that ACh acts via M3Rs to promote GC cell invasion and migration as well as expression of several markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The M3R antagonist darifenacin inhibited GC cell activity in both the presence and absence of exogenous ACh, suggesting GC cells secrete endogenous ACh, which then acts in an autocrine fashion to promote GC cell migration/invasion. ACh up-regulated MACC1 in GC cells, and MACC1 knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effects of ACh on GC cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) served as an intermediate signal between ACh and MACC1. These findings suggest that ACh acts via a M3R/AMPK/MACC1 signaling pathway to promote GC cell invasion/migration, which provides insight into the mechanisms underlying GC growth and metastasis and may shed light on new targets for GC treatment. PMID:26919111

  8. Fisetin inhibits migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of LMP1-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Zhao, Yinhai; Chen, Jin; Shao, Songjun; Zhang, Xiujuan

    2014-02-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) has been reported to possess certain anticancer properties. It may inhibit tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and induce apoptosis. However, the effects of fisetin in preventing the metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells remain to be determined. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in several metastatic malignancies including NPC. It has been reported that the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) induced EMT and is associated with the metastasis of NPC. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of fisetin in preventing the migration and invasion of LMP1-expressing NPC cells (CNE1-LMP1 cells), as well as to investigate whether fisetin may inhibit the molecular changes associated with EMT induced by LMP1. The investigation demonstrated that fisetin suppressed the migration and invasion of CNE1-LMP1 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Fisetin inhibited molecular changes associated with EMT induced by LMP1, upregulated the epithelial marker, E-cadherin protein, and downregulated the mesenchymal marker, vimentin protein, levels. Fisetin also significantly reduced the levels of Twist protein, an EMT regulator. The investigation suggested that fisetin inhibits the migration and invasion of LMP1-positive NPC cells, and the molecular mechanism involves fisetin reversing the EMT induced by LMP1 and downregulates the expression of Twist. This study indicated that fisetin serves as a potential candidate for the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  9. PFTK1 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression by Regulating Proliferation, Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jia; Huang, Hua; Yang, Qichang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Zhu, Junya; Shao, Mengting; Xiao, Jinzhang; Cao, Jie; Gu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shusen; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    PFTK1, also known as PFTAIRE1, CDK14, is a novel member of Cdc2-related serine/threonine protein kinases. Recent studies show that PFTK1 is highly expressed in several malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and involved in regulation of cell cycle, tumors proliferation, migration, and invasion that further influence the prognosis of tumors. However, the expression and physiological significance of PFTK1 in gastric cancer remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of PFTK1 by Western blot in 8 paired fresh gastric cancer tissues, nontumorous gastric mucosal tissues and immunohistochemistry on 161 paraffinembedded slices. High PFTK1 expression was correlated with the tumor grade, lymph node invasion as well as Ki-67. Through Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, flow cytometry, colony formation, wound healing and transwell assays, the vitro studies demonstrated that PFTK1 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, while PFTK1 knockdown led to the opposite results. Our findings for the first time supported that PFTK1 might play an important role in the regulation of gastric cancer proliferation, migration and would provide a novel promising therapeutic strategy against human gastric cancer.

  10. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  11. Inhibition of mTOR pathway attenuates migration and invasion of gallbladder cancer via EMT inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zong, Huajie; Yin, Baobing; Zhou, Huading; Cai, Duan; Ma, Baojin; Xiang, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an aggressive disease in which epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role. Whether inhibition of mTOR effects via EMT reversal in GBC remains unclear. Using genetic and pharmacologic inhibitions of mTOR, we investigated the changes of EMT levels in GBC cells. Expressions of EMT related genes were also studied. Migration and invasion assays were carried out and in vivo tumour metastasis mouse models were established. Circulating tumour DNA was quantified. We used EMT index (ratio of Vimentin/Ecadherin expression) to profile EMT levels. We found that inhibition of mTOR using shRNAs and rapamycin inhibited EMT in GBC-SD gallbladder cancer cells. Inhibition of mTOR inhibited EMT in GBC-SD cells in TGF-β-dependent manner, which was contributed majorly by mTORC2 inhibition. Rapamycin decreased invasiveness and migration of GBC-SD cells in vitro and in vivo. We have in the current study shown that rapamycin diminishes the ability of invasion and migration of GBC via inhibition of TGF-β-dependent EMT. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the carcinogenesis of GBC.

  12. Migration and invasion of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells are dependent on mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Dong Keon; Shin, Youngmi; Kim, Hee Yeon; Song, Bomin; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Jong Kwang; You, Hye Jin; Cheong, Heesun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo Youl; Jang, Hyonchol

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of cancer cells have stem-cell-like properties, are resistant to standard therapy and are associated with a poor prognosis. The metabolism of such drug-resistant cells differs from that of nearby non-resistant cells. In this study, the metabolism of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. The expression of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial membrane was negatively correlated with the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Because the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reflects the functional status of mitochondria and metastasis is the principal cause of death due to cancer, the relationship between MMP and metastasis was evaluated. Cells with a higher MMP exhibited greater migration and invasion than those with a lower MMP. Cells that survived treatment with cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug for lung adenocarcinoma, exhibited increased MMP and enhanced migration and invasion compared with parental cells. Consistent with these findings, inhibition of mitochondrial activity significantly impeded the migration and invasion of cisplatin-resistant cells. RNA-sequencing analysis indicated that the expression of mitochondrial complex genes was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. These results suggested that drug-resistant cells have a greater MMP and that inhibition of mitochondrial activity could be used to prevent metastasis of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27932791

  13. Intracellular Expression of PAI-1 Specific Aptamers Alters Breast Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fortenberry, Yolanda M.; Brandal, Stephanie M.; Carpentier, Gilles; Hemani, Malvi; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is elevated in various cancers, where it has been shown to effect cell migration and invasion and angiogenesis. While, PAI-1 is a secreted protein, its intercellular levels are increased in cancer cells. Consequently, intracellular PAI-1 could contribute to cancer progression. While various small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 are currently being investigated, none specifically target intracellular PAI-1. A class of inhibitors, termed aptamers, has been used effectively in several clinical applications. We previously generated RNA aptamers that target PAI-1 and demonstrated their ability to inhibit extracellular PAI-1. In the current study we explored the effect of these aptamers on intracellular PAI-1. We transiently transfected the PAI-1 specific aptamers into both MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and studied their effects on cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Aptamer expressing MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a decrease in cell migration and invasion. Additionally, intracellular PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) protein levels decreased, while the PAI-1/uPA complex increased. Moreover, a significant decrease in endothelial tube formation in HUVECs transfected with the aptamers was observed. In contrast, conditioned media from aptamer transfected MDA-MB-231 cells displayed a slight pro-angiogenic effect. Collectively, our study shows that expressing functional aptamers inside breast and endothelial cells is feasible and may exhibit therapeutic potential. PMID:27755560

  14. Role of N-cadherin in proliferation, migration, and invasion of germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Hubertus; Küffer, Stefan; Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Strauβ, Arne; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Honecker, Friedemann; Behnes, Carl Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common malignancies in young men. Most patients with GCT can be cured with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, even in metastatic disease. In case of therapy resistance, prognosis is usually poor. We investigated the potential of N-cadherin inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the GCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2, TCam-2, and the cisplatin-resistant sublines NCCIT-R and NTERA-2R. Effects of a blocking antibody or siRNA against N-cadherin on proliferation, migration, and invasion were investigated. Mouse xenografts of GCT cell lines were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for N-cadherin expression. All investigated GCT cell lines were found to express N-cadherin protein in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of N-cadherin in vitro leads to a significant inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion. N-cadherin-downregulation leads to a significantly higher level of pERK. N-cadherin-inhibition resulted in significantly higher rates of apoptotic cells in caspase-3 staining. Expression of N-cadherin is preserved in cisplatin-resistant GCT cells, pointing to an important physiological role in cell survival. N-cadherin-downregulation results in a significant decrease of proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulates apoptosis in cisplatin-naive and resistant GCT cell lines. Therefore, targeting N-cadherin may be a promising therapeutic approach, particularly in cisplatin-resistant, therapy refractory and metastatic GCT. PMID:26451610

  15. The use of electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic field for directed cell migration and adhesion in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christina L

    2017-01-01

    Directed cell migration and adhesion is essential to embryonic development, tissue formation and wound healing. For decades it has been reported that electric field (EF), magnetic field (MF) and electromagnetic field (EMF) can play important roles in determining cell differentiation, migration, adhesion, and evenwound healing. Combinations of these techniques have revealed new and exciting explanations for how cells move and adhere to surfaces; how the migration of multiple cells are coordinated and regulated; how cellsinteract with neighboring cells, and also to changes in their microenvironment. In some cells, speed and direction are voltage dependent. Data suggests that the use of EF, MF and EMF could advance techniques in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and wound healing. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:5-16, 2017.

  16. Translucent titanium coating altered the composition of focal adhesions and promoted migration of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells on glass.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi; Kok, Sang-Heng; Wang, Juo-Song; Lin, Li-Deh

    2014-04-01

    "TiGlass" was designed and was known to promote initial adhesion and increase migration of rat calvarial osteoblats. In this article, migration study and a series of epifluorescence microscopic studies were conducted to find out the composition of focal adhesion on titanium surface. The translucent titanium surface was applied in random migration analysis and immunofluorescence cell staining. In the immunofluorescent double staining, phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase was tested with vinculin. Various integrin subunits were then tested with vinculin to study the composition of activated focal adhesions. Integrin subunit α5 and αV were tested against β3; integrin subunits α5, αV, β3, and αVβ3 were tested with F-actin, respectively. The MG-63 cells began migration earlier and migrated faster on "TiGlass." Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that all focal adhesion kinase in the focal adhesions were activated on both the surfaces. The osteoblast was inferred to made adhesion to titanium and glass through integrins. The focal adhesions on glass were found to be composed of integrin subunits αV and β3. However, on "TiGlass," integrin subunits α5 might have supplemented the adhesion to titanium. Results from double staining of integrin subunits α5, αV, β3, and αVβ3 with F-actin also supported integrin subunits α5 might have involved in adhesion of titanium.

  17. Pharmacological targeting of membrane rigidity: implications on cancer cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Simone; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Stoiber, Katharina; Händel, Chris; Möhn, Till; Werz, Oliver; Müller, Rolf; Zahler, Stefan; Koeberle, Andreas; Käs, Josef A.; Vollmar, Angelika M.

    2015-08-01

    The invasive potential of cancer cells strongly depends on cellular stiffness, a physical quantity that is not only regulated by the mechanical impact of the cytoskeleton but also influenced by the membrane rigidity. To analyze the specific role of membrane rigidity in cancer progression, we treated cancer cells with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A and revealed an alteration of the phospholipidome via mass spectrometry. Migration, invasion, and cell death assays were employed to relate this alteration to functional consequences, and a decrease of migration and invasion without significant impact on cell death has been recorded. Fourier fluctuation analysis of giant plasma membrane vesicles showed that Soraphen A increases membrane rigidity of carcinoma cell membranes. Mechanical measurements of the creep deformation response of whole intact cells were performed using the optical stretcher. The increase in membrane rigidity was observed in one cell line without changing the creep deformation response indicating no restructuring of the cytoskeleton. These data indicate that the increase of membrane rigidity alone is sufficient to inhibit invasiveness of cancer cells, thus disclosing the eminent role of membrane rigidity in migratory processes.

  18. Adhesion and invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae to primary and secondary respiratory epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Sara; Shagan, Marilous; Blau, Karin; Lifshitz, Sarit; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Grossman, Nili; Bodner, Lipa; Dagan, Ron; Nebenzahl, Yaffa Mizrachi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) and the mucosal epithelial cells of its host is a prerequisite for pneumococcal disease development, yet the specificity of this interaction between different respiratory cells is not fully understood. In the present study, three areas were examined: i) The capability of the encapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 strain (WU2) to adhere to and invade primary nasal-derived epithelial cells in comparison to primary oral-derived epithelial cells, A549 adenocarcinoma cells and BEAS-2B viral transformed bronchial cells; ii) the capability of the unencapsulated 3.8DW strain (a WU2 derivative) to adhere to and invade the same cells over time; and iii) the ability of various genetically-unrelated encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains to adhere to and invade A549 lung epithelial cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the encapsulated WU2 strain adhesion to and invasion of primary nasal epithelial cells was greatest, followed by BEAS-2B, A549 and primary oral epithelial cells. By contrast, the unencapsulated 3.8-DW strain invaded oral epithelial cells significantly more efficiently when compared to the nasal epithelial cells. In addition, unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains adhered to and invaded the A459 cells significantly more efficiently than the encapsulated strains; this is consistent with previously published data. In conclusion, the findings presented in the current study indicated that the adhesion and invasion of the WU2 strain to primary nasal epithelial cells was more efficient compared with the other cultured respiratory epithelial cells tested, which corresponds to the natural course of S. pneumoniae infection and disease development. The target cell preference of unencapsulated strains was different from that of the encapsulated strains, which may be due to the exposure of cell wall proteins. PMID:27922699

  19. Hint1 suppresses migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro by modulating girdin activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Song; Bao, Tian-Hao; Ke, Yang; Sun, De-Yun; Shi, Zhi-Tian; Tang, Hao-Ran; Wang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (Hint1) is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Its role in cancer cell migration has not been previously speculated. In the current study, we examined the expression of Hint1 in metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further elucidated the effect of Hint1 expression on girdin expression and phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2 and on the migration of HCC cells in vitro. Expression of Hint1 and girdin in primary HCC tissues and metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes was determined by RT-PCR assays. HepG2 cells were transfected with plasmid vectors overexpressing Hint1 or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Hint1, girdin, Hint1 plus girdin, or the scrambled RNA. Migration and invasion of HCC cells were examined by wound and Transwell assays. Protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. RT-PCR assays revealed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of Hint1 were markedly lower than those of primary HCC tissues and non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.01). By contrast, the mRNA transcript levels of girdin were significantly higher than non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of HINT1 resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA transcript levels of girdin in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). Wound assays and Transwell assays showed that Hint1 knockdown by siRNA significantly enhanced the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells compared to HepG2 cells transfected with scrambled siRNA. Hint1 knockdown also led to significantly increased phosphorylation of girdin and AKT in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05), which, however, was effectively aborted by girdin knockdown by siRNA (P < 0.05). Hint1 is downregulated in metastatic lymph nodes and is implicated in migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro by modulating girdin and AKT expression and phosphorylation. The Hint1-girdin-AKT signaling axis should be

  20. ARAP3 inhibits peritoneal dissemination of scirrhous gastric carcinoma cells by regulating cell adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Yagi, R; Tanaka, M; Sasaki, K; Kamata, R; Nakanishi, Y; Kanai, Y; Sakai, R

    2011-03-24

    During the analysis of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in scirrhous gastric carcinoma cell lines, we observed an unusual expression of Arf-GAP with Rho-GAP domain, ankyrin repeat and PH domain 3 (ARAP3), a multimodular signaling protein that is a substrate of Src family kinases. Unlike other phosphotyrosine proteins, such as CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) and Homo sapiens chromosome 9 open reading frame 10/oxidative stress-associated Src activator (C9orf10/Ossa), which are overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in scirrhous gastric carcinoma cell lines, ARAP3 was underexpressed in cancerous human gastric tissues. In this study, we found that overexpression of ARAP3 in the scirrhous gastric carcinoma cell lines significantly reduced peritoneal dissemination. In vitro studies also showed that ARAP3 regulated cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, as well as invasive activities. These effects were suppressed by mutations in the Rho-GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain or in the C-terminal two tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src. Thus, the expression and phosphorylation state of ARAP3 may affect the invasiveness of cancer by modulating cell adhesion and motility. Our results suggest that ARAP3 is a unique Src substrate that suppresses peritoneal dissemination of scirrhous gastric carcinoma cells.

  1. Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 regulates adhesion and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YE, LIN; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; SUN, PING-HUI; MASON, MALCOLM D.; JIANG, WEN G.

    2014-01-01

    Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2), also known as anthrax toxin receptor 2, has been indicated in the formation of new vasculature and in the internalisation of the anthrax toxin. Anti-angiogenesis therapy that targets this molecule has been investigated. However, our recent studies of this molecule have indicated that this gene may also play certain roles in cancer cells. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CMG2 in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines, and also its impact on cellular functions. The expression of CMG2 was detectable in normal and prostate cancer tissues. The prostate cancer cell lines appeared to have relatively high expression compared with the prostatic epithelial cells. Knockdown of CMG2 impaired the adherence of the prostate cancer cells. CMG2 overexpression resulted in decreasing invasiveness, while the knockdown of CMG2 contrastingly enhanced this ability. The altered expression of CMG2 in the prostate cancer cells did not affect the in vitro or in vivo growth of the cells. Taken together, these results show that CMG2 is expressed in prostatic epithelia and cancer cells. In addition to its role in the angiogenesis and the internalisation of anthrax toxin, CMG2 also plays an important role in regulating the adhesion and invasion of prostate cancer cells. PMID:24932305

  2. Derivate Isocorydine (d-ICD) Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell by Downregulating ITGA1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tian, Hua; Li, Hong; Ge, Chao; Zhao, Fangyu; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies, we found that isocorydine (ICD) could be a potential antitumor agent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Derivate isocorydine (d-ICD), a more effective antitumor agent, has been demonstrated to inhibit proliferation and drug resistance in HCC. In order to investigate the potential role of d-ICD on HCC cell migration and its possible mechanism, wound healing assay, trans-well invasion assay, western blot analysis, and qRT-PCR were performed to study the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells as well as relevant molecular alteration following d-ICD treatment. Results indicated that the migration and invasion ability of HCC cells were suppressed when cultured with d-ICD. Meanwhile, the expression level of ITGA1 was markedly reduced. Furthermore, we found that ITGA1 promotes HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro, and that ITGA1 can partly reverse the effect of d-ICD-induced migration and invasion suppression in HCC cells. In addition, dual luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were used to study the expression regulation of ITGA1, and found that E2F1 directly upregulates ITGA1 expression and d-ICD inhibits E2F1 expression. Taken together, these results reveal that d-ICD inhibits HCC cell migration and invasion may partly by downregulating E2F1/ITGA1 expression. PMID:28264467

  3. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future.

  4. Invadopodia and matrix degradation, a new property of prostate cancer cells during migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Desai, Bhavik; Ma, Tao; Chellaiah, Meenakshi A

    2008-05-16

    The present study demonstrated that invadopodia are associated with invasion by degradation of matrix in prostate cancer cells PC3. To find out the presence of invadopodia in PC3 cells, we performed a few comparative analyses with osteoclasts, which utilize podosomes for migration. Our investigations indeed demonstrated that invadopodia are comparable to podosomes in the localization of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)/matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the degradation of matrix. Invadopodia are different from podosomes in the localization of actin/vinculin, distribution during migration, and the mode of degradation of extracellular matrix. Invadopodia enable polarized invasion of PC3 cells into the gelatin matrix in a time-dependent manner. Gelatin degradation was confined within the periphery of the cell. Osteoclasts demonstrated directional migration with extensive degradation of matrix underneath and around the osteoclasts. A pathway of degradation of matrix representing a migratory track was observed due to the rearrangement of podosomes as rosettes or clusters at the leading edge. Reducing the matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels by RNA interference inhibited the degradation of matrix but not the formation of podosomes or invadopodia. Competition experiments with TAT-fused WASP peptides suggest that actin polymerization and formation of invadopodia involve the WASP-Arp2/3 complex pathway. Moreover, PC3 cells overexpressing osteopontin (OPN) displayed an increase in the number of invadopodia and gelatinolytic activity as compared with PC3 cells and PC3 cells expressing mutant OPN in integrin-binding domain and null for OPN. Thus, we conclude that OPN/integrin alphavbeta3 signaling participates in the process of migration and invasion of PC3 cells through regulating processes essential for the formation and function of invadopodia.

  5. Rab25 upregulation correlates with the proliferation, migration, and invasion of renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jia, Qingzhu; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Ying

    2015-03-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common urological cancer with a poor prognosis. A recent cohort study revealed that the median survival of RCC patients was only 1.5 years and that <10% of the patients in the study survived up to 5 years. In tumor development, Rab GTPase are known to play potential roles such as regulation of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, communication, and drug resistance in multiple tumors. However, the correlation between Rabs expression and the occurrence, development, and metastasis of RCC remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases in RCC patients. Our results showed that high levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with RCC invasion classification (P < 0.01), lymph-node metastasis (P < 0.001), and pathological stage (P < 0.01). Conversely, in 786-O and A-498 cells, knocking down Rab25 protein expression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Our results also demonstrated that Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d, and further suggested that Rab25 upregulation in RCC is due to diminished expression of let-7d. These findings indicate that Rab25 might be a novel candidate molecule involved in RCC development, thus identifying a potential biological therapeutic target for RCC. - Highlights: • The transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases were analyzed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). • High levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with clinicopathological factors of RCC. • Knockdown of Rab25 protein expression reduced RCC cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d in RCC.

  6. USP2 promotes cell migration and invasion in triple negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qing; Mao, Yan; Xiao, Gang; Fei, Xiaochun; Wang, Jinglong; Zhang, Yuzi; Liu, Junjun; Cheng, Guangcun; Chen, Xiaosong; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Kunwei

    2015-07-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is often associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predictive of TNBC progression. Primary TNBC breast tissue samples including four with metastasis and six without metastasis were subjected to Affymetrix GeneChip® analysis (human genome U133). Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) was identified as an upregulated gene in the metastatic group, and its expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 121 primary breast cancers, 13 paired normal tissues, and 13 paired metastatic lesions. Survival analysis was performed using the log-rank test and Cox regression hazard model. Matrigel migration and invasion assays in USP2-silenced and USP2-overexpressed breast cancer cell lines were used to investigate the mechanisms of USP2 in vitro. Positive immunostaining for USP2 was detected in breast tumors and was correlated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) statuses and TNBC subtype. USP2 was overexpressed in distant metastatic lesions compared with primary breast cancers. Survival analyses demonstrated that positive USP2 is a poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Silencing of USP2 expression decreased migration and invasion in LM2-4175 and SCP46 cells in association with the downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression, whereas overexpression of USP2 in MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced migration and invasion and upregulated the expression of MMP2. The present study showed that USP2 expression is associated with TNBC cell line's invasiveness and poor survival of breast cancer patients and may serve as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for TNBC.

  7. TGF-β1 promotes Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to and invasion into bovine mammary fibroblasts via the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Gao, Yuanyuan; Xia, Xiaojing; Che, Yanyi; Wang, Yuping; Liu, Hongtao; Sun, Yingying; Ren, Wenbo; Han, Wenyu; Yang, Junling; Lei, Liancheng

    2017-01-25

    Fibroblasts are the structural base of mammary breast tissues. TGF-β1 can regulate the fibrotic process; however, it remains unclear whether TGF-β1 influences the susceptibility of fibroblasts to bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major bacterium in both chronic and subclinical mastitis in lactating cows that acts by invading host cells. To better understand the function of TGF-β1 in bovine mammary fibroblasts' (BMFBs) susceptibility to bacteria as well as the mechanisms involved, a primary BMFB model was established by treating cells with TGF-β1 followed by infection with S. aureus. The results revealed that the adhesion and invasion of S. aureus into BMFBs was significantly increased after cells were treated with 5 ng/ml TGF-β1 for 12 h. Moreover, TGF-β1 can increase Collagen I and α-SMA expression via activation of ERK signaling. However, the increased adhesion and invasion of S. aureus can be blocked by specific antibodies against either Collagen I or α-SMA, indicating that the increased adhesion and invasion are dependent on TGF-β1-induced upregulation of both Collagen I and α-SMA. Using PD98059, an ERK inhibitor, could also decrease the adhesion and invasion of S. aureus. These results indicate that TGF-β1 could promote S. aureus adhesion to and invasion into BMFBs by increasing Collagen I and α-SMA expression and may provide a novel target for controlling bovine mastitis.

  8. Leptin stimulates migration and invasion and maintains cancer stem-like properties in ovarian cancer cells: an explanation for poor outcomes in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Sumie; Abarzua-Catalan, Lorena; Trigo, César; Delpiano, Ana; Sanhueza, Cristobal; García, Karen; Ibañez, Carolina; Hormazábal, Katherine; Diaz, Daniela; Brañes, Jorge; Castellón, Enrique; Bravo, Erasmo; Owen, Gareth; Cuello, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    The evidence linking obesity with ovarian cancer remains controversial. Leptin is expressed at higher levels in obese women and stimulates cell migration in other epithelial cancers. Here, we explored the clinical impact of overweight/obesity on patient prognosis and leptin's effects on the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells. We assessed clinical outcomes in 70 ovarian cancer patients (33 healthy weight and 37 overweight) that were validated with an external cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Progression-free and overall survival rates were significantly decreased in overweight patients. Similarly, a worse overall survival rate was found in TCGA patients expressing higher leptin/OB-Rb levels. We explored serum and ascites leptin levels and OB-Rb expression in our cohort. Serum and ascites leptin levels were higher in overweight patients experiencing worse survival. OB-Rb was more highly expressed in ascites and metastases than in primary tumors. Leptin exposure increased cancer cell migration/invasion through leptin-mediated activation of JAK/STAT3, PI3/AKT and RhoA/ROCK and promoted new lamellipodial, stress-fiber and focal adhesion formation. Leptin also contributed to the maintenance of stemness and the mesenchymal phenotype in ovarian cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate that leptin stimulated ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, offering a potential explanation for the poor prognosis among obese women. PMID:26053184

  9. Diacylglycerol kinase α controls RCP-dependent integrin trafficking to promote invasive migration.

    PubMed

    Rainero, Elena; Caswell, Patrick T; Muller, Patricia A J; Grindlay, Joan; McCaffrey, Mary W; Zhang, Qifeng; Wakelam, Michael J O; Vousden, Karen H; Graziani, Andrea; Norman, Jim C

    2012-01-23

    Inhibition of αvβ3 integrin or expression of oncogenic mutants of p53 promote invasive cell migration by enhancing endosomal recycling of α5β1 integrin under control of the Rab11 effector Rab-coupling protein (RCP). In this paper, we show that diacylglycerol kinase α (DGK-α), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid (PA), was required for RCP to be mobilized to and tethered at the tips of invasive pseudopods and to allow RCP-dependent α5β1 recycling and the resulting invasiveness of tumor cells. Expression of a constitutive-active mutant of DGK-α drove RCP-dependent invasion in the absence of mutant p53 expression or αvβ3 inhibition, and conversely, an RCP mutant lacking the PA-binding C2 domain was not capable of being tethered at pseudopod tips. These data demonstrate that generation of PA downstream of DGK-α is essential to connect expression of mutant p53s or inhibition of αvβ3 to RCP and for this Rab11 effector to drive the trafficking of α5β1 that is required for tumor cell invasion through three-dimensional matrices.

  10. Focal Adhesion Kinase Regulates Fibroblast Migration via Integrin beta-1 and Plays a Central Role in Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Ke; Cheng, Yiju; Liang Cheng, Ming; Yu, Lei; Mu, Mao; Li, Hong; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Baofang; Yao, Yumei; Guo, Hui; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Quan

    2016-01-14

    Lung fibrosis is a major medical problem for the aging population worldwide. Fibroblast migration plays an important role in fibrosis. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) senses the extracellular stimuli and initiates signaling cascades that promote cell migration. This study first examined the dose and time responses of FAK activation in human lung fibroblasts treated with platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). The data indicate that FAK is directly recruited by integrin β1 and the subsequent FAK activation is required for fibroblast migration on fibronectin. In addition, the study has identified that α5β1 and α4β1 are the major integrins for FAK-mediated fibroblast migration on fibronect. In contrast, integrins αvβ3, αvβ6, and αvβ8 play a minor but distinct role in fibroblast migration on fibronectin. FAK inhibitor significantly reduces PDGF-BB stimulated fibroblast migration. Importantly, FAK inhibitor protects bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice. FAK inhibitor blocks FAK activation and significantly reduces signaling cascade of fibroblast migration in bleomycin-challenged mice. Furthermore, FAK inhibitor decreases lung fibrotic score, collagen accumulation, fibronectin production, and myofibroblast differentiation in in bleomycin-challenged mice. These data demonstrate that FAK mediates fibroblast migration mainly via integrin β1. Furthermore, the findings suggest that targeting FAK signaling is an effective therapeutic strategy against fibrosis.

  11. The role of SH3GL3 in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhao, Hong; Wu, Dan; Zhao, Chen; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-11-08

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable cancer characterized by clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow and their egress into peripheral blood. The mechanisms of myeloma cells migration/invasion have remained unclear. Herein, we found SH3GL3 was highly expressed in the CD138-negative (CD138-) myeloma cells. The migration/invasion capability of CD138- cells was significantly higher than that in the CD138-positive (CD138+) cells. Silencing SH3GL3 using shRNA reduced myeloma cells migration/invasion. Conversely, overexpression of SH3GL3 increased myeloma cells migration/invasion. Moreover, SH3GL3 is also associated with the stemness and chemo-resistance of CD138- myeloma cells. Elevated expression of stem cell and multi-drug resistant markers were seen in the myeloma cells with overexpressed SH3GL3; while knocking-down SH3GL3 reduced the expression of these markers. A marked increase in p-PI3K and p-FAK was observed in the cells with overexpressed SH3GL3. To test if FAK/PI3K signaling pathway was involved in the SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cells migration, the cells transfected w/wo SH3GL3 cDNA were treated with FAK inhibitor 14 and PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Inhibition of FAK and PI3K attenuated SH3GL3-mediated migration /invasion. Our findings indicate that SH3GL3 plays an important role in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance. The SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cell migration/invasion is mediated by FAK/PI3K signaling pathway.

  12. The role of SH3GL3 in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhao, Hong; Wu, Dan; Zhao, Chen; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable cancer characterized by clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow and their egress into peripheral blood. The mechanisms of myeloma cells migration/invasion have remained unclear. Herein, we found SH3GL3 was highly expressed in the CD138-negative (CD138−) myeloma cells. The migration/invasion capability of CD138− cells was significantly higher than that in the CD138-positive (CD138+) cells. Silencing SH3GL3 using shRNA reduced myeloma cells migration/invasion. Conversely, overexpression of SH3GL3 increased myeloma cells migration/invasion. Moreover, SH3GL3 is also associated with the stemness and chemo-resistance of CD138− myeloma cells. Elevated expression of stem cell and multi-drug resistant markers were seen in the myeloma cells with overexpressed SH3GL3; while knocking-down SH3GL3 reduced the expression of these markers. A marked increase in p-PI3K and p-FAK was observed in the cells with overexpressed SH3GL3. To test if FAK/PI3K signaling pathway was involved in the SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cells migration, the cells transfected w/wo SH3GL3 cDNA were treated with FAK inhibitor 14 and PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Inhibition of FAK and PI3K attenuated SH3GL3-mediated migration /invasion. Our findings indicate that SH3GL3 plays an important role in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance. The SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cell migration/invasion is mediated by FAK/PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27683032

  13. The RNA‐binding protein LARP4 regulates cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Seetharaman, Shailaja; Flemyng, Ella; Shen, Jiazhen; Conte, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    LARP4 is a La‐related RNA‐binding protein implicated in regulating mRNA translation, which interacts with poly(A)‐binding protein (PABP). We previously identified LARP4 in an RNAi screen as one of several genes that regulate the shape of PC3 prostate cancer cells. Here we show that LARP4 depletion induces cell elongation in PC3 cells and MDA‐MB‐231 breast cancer cells. LARP4 depletion increases cell migration and invasion, as well as inducing invasive cell protrusions in 3D Matrigel. Conversely, LARP4 over‐expression reduces cell elongation and increases cell circularity. LARP4 mutations are found in a variety of cancers. Introduction of some of these cancer‐associated mutations, including a truncation mutant, into LARP4 enhances its effects on cell morphology. The truncation mutant shows enhanced interaction with PABP. We propose that LARP4 inhibits migration and invasion of cancer cells, and that some cancer‐associated mutations stimulate these effects of LARP4. © 2016 The Authors. Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27615744

  14. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  15. Norstictic Acid Inhibits Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Migration, Invasion, and In Vivo Invasive Growth Through Targeting C-Met

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Hassan Y.; Elsayed, Heba E.; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M.; Akl, Mohamed R.; Bhattacharjee, Joydeep; Egbert, Susan; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem affecting the female population worldwide. The triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are characterized by malignant phenotypes, worse patient outcomes, poorest prognosis, and highest mortality rates. The proto-oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is usually dysregulated in TNBCs, contributing to their oncogenesis, tumor progression, and aggressive cellular invasiveness that is strongly linked to tumor metastasis. Therefore, c-Met is proposed as a promising candidate target for the control of TNBCs. Lichens-derived metabolites are characterized by their structural diversity, complexity, and novelty. The chemical space of lichen-derived metabolites has been extensively investigated, albeit their biological space is still not fully explored. The anticancer-guided fractionation of Usnea strigosa (Ach.) lichen extract led to the identification of the depsidone-derived norstictic acid as a novel bioactive hit against breast cancer cell lines. Norstictic acid significantly suppressed the TNBC MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, with minimal toxicity to non-tumorigenic MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Molecular modeling, Z′-LYTE biochemical kinase assay and Western blot analysis identified c-Met as a potential macromolecular target. Norstictic acid treatment significantly suppressed MDA-MB-231/GFP tumor growth of a breast cancer xenograft model in athymic nude mice. Lichen-derived natural products are promising resources to discover novel c-Met inhibitors useful to control TNBCs. PMID:26744260

  16. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene inhibits adhesion and migration of human triple-negative breast cancer cells by suppressing β1 integrin function and surface protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hua; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kung, Po-Hsiung; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibits an aggressive clinical course by high metastatic potential. It is known that integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration are important for cancer metastasis. In the present study, a synthetic compound, 3, 4-methyenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene (MNS), significantly inhibited adhesion of TNBC cell lines to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The antimetastatic capacity of MNS was also observed through reducing TNBC cells migration and invasion without affecting cell viability. Confocal microscopy revealed that MNS disrupted the formation of focal adhesion complex and actin stress fiber networks. Consistent with this finding, MNS inhibited phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin as detected by Western blot analysis. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we found that MNS inhibited phosphorylation of FAK as a result of reducing β1 integrin activation and clustering. A cell-impermeable dithiol reagent, 2, 3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid abrogated all of MNS's actions, indicating that MNS may react with thiol groups of cell surface proteins that are involved in regulation of β1 integrin function as well as cell adhesion and migration. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been reported to be essential for the affinity modulation of β integrins. We also demonstrated that MNS inhibited PDI activity both in a pure enzyme system and in intact cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that MNS inhibits in vitro metastatic properties of TNBC cells through suppression of β1 integrin activation and focal adhesion signaling. Moreover, inhibition of surface PDI may contribute, at least in part, to the actions of MNS. These results suggest that MNS has a potential to be developed as an anticancer agent for treatment of TNBC.

  17. RacGAP1-driven focal adhesion formation promotes melanoma transendothelial migration through mediating adherens junction disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Panying; Wu, Chengxiang; Ye, Qichao; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-27

    Melanoma cell migration across vascular endothelial cells is an essential step of tumor metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that RacGAP1, a cytokinesis-related Rho GTPase-activating protein, contributed to this process. Depletion of RacGAP1 with RacGAP1-targeting siRNA or overexpression of RacGAP1 mutant (T249A) attenuated melanoma cell transendothelial migration and concomitant changes of adherens junctions. In addition, RacGAP1 promoted the activations of RhoA, FAK, paxillin and triggered focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal rearrangement. By overexpressing FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) in endothelium, we showed that RacGAP1 mediated endothelial barrier function loss and melanoma transmigration in a focal adhesion-dependent manner. These results suggest that endothelial RacGAP1 may play critical roles in pathogenic processes of cancer by regulating endothelial permeability.

  18. MicroRNA-101 inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion in osteosarcoma cells by targeting ROCK1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Guangyao; Gu, Rui; Wu, Han

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant bone tumor in adolescents, with high degree of malignancy, and highly incidence of recurrence and metastasis. Our study aimed to explore the role of miR-101 in osteosarcoma cells by targeting ROCK1. In the present study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction data revealed that miR-101 was down-regulated in the tissue samples of 20 patients with osteosarcoma compared with their matched adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.01). Furthermore, miR-101 was significantly down-regulated in three common OS cell lines, MG63, U2OS, and OS732 compared with the human osteoblast cell line, hFOB1.19 (P < 0.01). MiR-101 was shown to target the ROCK1 3’-UTR in dual-luciferase reporter assays in MG63 cells. Overexpression of miR-101 significantly suppressed the protein expression levels of ROCK1, while knockdown of miR-101 significantly enhanced the formers’ expression levels in MG63 cells (P < 0.05). Overexpression of miR-101 inhibited cell viability, migration, and invasion while promoted apoptosis. Independent inhibition of ROCK1 and knockdown of miR-101 expression levels significantly promoted MG63 cell proliferation, migration and invasion while inhibited apoptosis (P < 0.01). Moreover, knockdown of ROCK1 reversed the promotion effect of miR-101 knockdown on proliferation, migration, and invasion while promoted apoptosis of MG63 cells, suggesting that miR-101 acts as a tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma cells via targeting ROCK1. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-101 inhibited tumor growth and motion by inactivating PI3K/AKT and JAK/STAT signaling pathways via downregulation of ROCK1. To conclude, miR-101/ROCK1 may be a potential therapeutic target for osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:28123850

  19. c-Cbl regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Min Woo; Park, Ji Ho; Yoo, Hee Min; Yang, Seung Wook; Oh, Kyu Hee; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Park, Dong Eun; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chung, Chin Ha

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • c-Cbl ubiquitinates αPix for proteasome-mediated degradation. • C6 and A172 glioma cells lack c-Cbl, which leads to stabilization of αPix. • The accumulated αPix promotes migration and invasion of the cancer cells. • The lack of c-Cbl in the cells appears responsible for their malignant behavior. - Abstract: c-Cbl, a RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase, down-regulates receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGF receptor, and inhibits cell proliferation. Moreover, c-Cbl mutations are frequently found in patients with myeloid neoplasm. Therefore, c-Cbl is known as a tumor suppressor. αPix is expressed only in highly proliferative and mobile cells, including immune cells, and up-regulated in certain invasive tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we showed that c-Cbl serves as an ubiquitin E3 ligase for proteasome-mediated degradation of αPix, but not βPix. Remarkably, the rat C6 and human A172 glioma cells were unable to express c-Cbl, which leads to a dramatic accumulation of αPix. Depletion of αPix by shRNA markedly reduced the ability of the glioma cells to migrate and invade, whereas complementation of shRNA-insensitive αPix promoted it. These results indicate that c-Cbl negatively regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion and the lack of c-Cbl in the C6 and A172 glioma cells is responsible for their malignant behavior.

  20. Lidocaine inhibits the invasion and migration of TRPV6-expressing cancer cells by TRPV6 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Gou, Hui; Zhu, Jiang; Tian, Si; Yu, Lehua

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of pharmacological actions, acting as nerve blocks, and treating pain and cardiac arrhythmias via blocking of the sodium channel. The use of local anesthetics could reduce the possibility of cancer metastasis and recurrence following surgical tumor excision. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of lidocaine upon the invasion and migration of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 6 (TRPV6)-expressing cancer cells. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, prostatic cancer PC-3 cells and ovarian cancer ES-2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability was quantitatively determined by MTT assay. The migration of the cells was evaluated using the wound healing assay, and the invasion of the cells was assessed using a Transwell assay. Calcium (Ca2+) measurements were performed using a Fluo-3 AM fluorescence kit. The expression of TRPV6 mRNA and protein in the cells was determined by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results suggested that lidocaine inhibits the cell invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231, PC-3 and ES-2 cells at lower than clinical concentrations. The inhibitory effect of lidocaine on TRPV6-expressing cancer cells was associated with a reduced rate of calcium influx, and could occur partly as a result of the downregulation of TRPV6 expression. The use of appropriate local anesthetics may confer potential benefits in clinical practice for the treatment of patients with TRPV6-expressing cancer. PMID:27446413

  1. MiR-200c promotes bladder cancer cell migration and invasion by directly targeting RECK

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yidong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Peng; Yang, Chengdi; Tang, Jinyuan; Deng, Xiaheng; Yang, Xiao; Tao, Jun; Lu, Qiang; Li, Pengchao

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the dysregulation of certain microRNAs plays an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. MiR-200c exhibits a disordered expression in many tumors and presents dual roles in bladder cancer (BC). Therefore, the definite role of miR-200c in BC needs to be investigated further. Materials and methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to assess miR-200c expression. Cell invasion and migration were evaluated using wound healing and transwell assays. The luciferase reporter assay was used to identify the direct target of miR-200c. The expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK) in BC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues, as well as in BC cell lines, was detected through quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot assay, and immunohistochemistry. Results The miR-200c expression was significantly upregulated in the BC tissues compared with the adjacent nontumor tissues. The downregulation of miR-200c significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in the BC cell lines. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RECK was a direct target of miR-200c. The knockdown of RECK in the BC cell lines treated with anti-miR-200c elevated the previously attenuated cell migration and invasion. Conclusion Our findings indicated that miR-200c functions as oncogenes in BC and may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of BC. PMID:27574450

  2. Pertussis Toxin Is a Robust and Selective Inhibitor of High Grade Glioma Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Natali, Letizia; Karimi-Mostowfi, Nicki; Brifault, Coralie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    In high grade glioma (HGG), extensive tumor cell infiltration of normal brain typically precludes identifying effective margins for surgical resection or irradiation. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a multimeric complex that inactivates diverse Gi/o G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Despite the broad continuum of regulatory events controlled by GPCRs, PT may be applicable as a therapeutic. We have shown that the urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a major driver of HGG cell migration. uPAR-initiated cell-signaling requires a Gi/o GPCR, N-formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2), as an essential co-receptor and is thus, PT-sensitive. Herein, we show that PT robustly inhibits migration of three separate HGG-like cell lines that express a mutated form of the EGF Receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, which is constitutively active. PT also almost completely blocked the ability of HGG cells to invade Matrigel. In the equivalent concentration range (0.01–1.0 μg/mL), PT had no effect on cell survival and only affected proliferation of one cell line. Neutralization of EGFRvIII expression in HGG cells, which is known to activate uPAR-initiated cell-signaling, promoted HGG cell migration. The increase in HGG cell migration, induced by EGFRvIII neutralization, was entirely blocked by silencing FPR2 gene expression or by treating the cells with PT. When U87MG HGG cells were cultured as suspended neurospheres in serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium, uPAR expression was increased. HGG cells isolated from neurospheres migrated through Transwell membranes without loss of cell contacts; this process was inhibited by PT by >90%. PT also inhibited expression of vimentin by HGG cells; vimentin is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and worsened prognosis. We conclude that PT may function as a selective inhibitor of HGG cell migration and invasion. PMID:27977780

  3. LKB1 kinase-dependent and -independent defects disrupt polarity and adhesion signaling to drive collagen remodeling during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Lee, Byoungkoo; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine/threonine kinase and a commonly mutated gene in lung adenocarcinoma. The majority of LKB1 mutations are truncations that disrupt its kinase activity and remove its C-terminal domain (CTD). Because LKB1 inactivation drives cancer metastasis in mice and leads to aberrant cell invasion in vitro, we sought to determine how compromised LKB1 function affects lung cancer cell polarity and invasion. Using three-dimensional models, we show that LKB1 kinase activity is essential for focal adhesion kinase–mediated cell adhesion and subsequent collagen remodeling but not cell polarity. Instead, cell polarity is overseen by the kinase-independent function of its CTD and more specifically its farnesylation. This occurs through a mesenchymal-amoeboid morphological switch that signals through the Rho-GTPase RhoA. These data suggest that a combination of kinase-dependent and -independent defects by LKB1 inactivation creates a uniquely invasive cell with aberrant polarity and adhesion signaling that drives invasion into the microenvironment. PMID:26864623

  4. FGF19 Contributes to Tumor Progression in Gastric Cancer by Promoting Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Daqi; Tian, Ruihua; Shi, Hailong; Chen, Xiangming; Liu, Wenzhi; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Since patients are often diagnosed at a late stage, very few effective therapies are left in the arsenal. FGF19, as a hormone, has been reported to promote tumor growth in various types of cancer; however, its function in gastric cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we showed that FGF19 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FGF19 is able to enhance migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells. Given its great potency in gastric cancer progression, FGF19 may be an effective target of treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients.

  5. Two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional in vitro tumor migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Miriam; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A

    2013-01-01

    Motility and invasion are key hallmarks that distinguish benign from malignant tumors, enabling cells to cross tissue boundaries, disseminate in blood and lymph and establish metastases at distant sites. Similar properties are also utilized by activated endothelial cells during tumor-induced angiogenesis. It is now appreciated that these processes might provide a rich source of novel molecular targets with the potential for inhibitors to restrain both metastasis and neoangiogenesis. Such therapeutic strategies require assays that can rapidly and quantitatively measure cell movement and the ability to traverse physiological barriers. The need for high-throughput, however, must be balanced by assay designs that accommodate, as far as possible, the complexity of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. This chapter aims to give an overview of some commonly used migration and invasion assays to aid in the selection of a balanced portfolio of techniques for the rapid and accurate evaluation of novel therapeutic agents.

  6. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr–/–). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr–/– mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. KEY RESULTS Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr–/– mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on

  7. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Guillaume; Perera, Upamali; Gillett, Cheryl; Naba, Alexandra; Law, Ah-Lai; Sharma, Ved P.; Wang, Jian; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Balsamo, Michele; Mosis, Fuad; De Piano, Mario; Monypenny, James; Woodman, Natalie; McConnell, Russell E.; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cao, Yihai; Condeelis, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Gertler, Frank B.; Krause, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlates with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation, and matrix degradation were impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identify a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, while Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of EGF gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis. PMID:26996666

  8. Identification of key regulators for the migration and invasion of rheumatoid synoviocytes through a systems approach.

    PubMed

    You, Sungyong; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Choi, Susanna; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Su-Jung; Ji, Jong Dae; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Jo; Cho, Chul-Soo; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-01-07

    Rheumatoid synoviocytes, which consist of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) and synovial macrophages (SMs), are crucial for the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly, FLSs of RA patients (RA-FLSs) exhibit invasive characteristics reminiscent of cancer cells, destroying cartilage and bone. RA-FLSs and SMs originate differently from mesenchymal and myeloid cells, respectively, but share many pathologic functions. However, the molecular signatures and biological networks representing the distinct and shared features of the two cell types are unknown. We performed global transcriptome profiling of FLSs and SMs obtained from RA and osteoarthritis patients. By comparing the transcriptomes, we identified distinct molecular signatures and cellular processes defining invasiveness of RA-FLSs and proinflammatory properties of RA-SMs, respectively. Interestingly, under the interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated condition, the RA-FLSs newly acquired proinflammatory signature dominant in RA-SMs without losing invasive properties. We next reconstructed a network model that delineates the shared, RA-FLS-dominant (invasive), and RA-SM-dominant (inflammatory) processes. From the network model, we selected 13 genes, including periostin, osteoblast-specific factor (POSTN) and twist basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor 1 (TWIST1), as key regulator candidates responsible for FLS invasiveness. Of note, POSTN and TWIST1 expressions were elevated in independent RA-FLSs and further instigated by IL-1β. Functional assays demonstrated the requirement of POSTN and TWIST1 for migration and invasion of RA-FLSs stimulated with IL-1β. Together, our systems approach to rheumatoid synovitis provides a basis for identifying key regulators responsible for pathological features of RA-FLSs and -SMs, demonstrating how a certain type of cells acquires functional redundancy under chronic inflammatory conditions.

  9. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Teng, Yong; Liu, Haitao; Purohit, Sharad; Xu, Heng; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA’s antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer) cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA) and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1) with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1). However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3) were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA’s overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment. PMID:24260584

  10. Roles of SGK Isoform Signaling in Breast Cancer Migration and Invasion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Silencing of SGK and Akt isoforms had been confirmed March 15, 2010- March 14, 2011. However on further analysis of substrate NDRG1 it appears the...silencing of SGK3 but not Akt isoforms causes an increase in total NDRG1 protein level while simultaneously decreasing phosphorylation of NDRG1 at T346...22-23) NDRG1 has been shown to be a potent mediator of invasive migration through its roll in the recycling of E-cadherin the cellular membrane(7

  11. Numerical Solutions for a Model of Tissue Invasion and Migration of Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, M.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to construct a new algorithm for the numerical simulations of the evolution of tumour invasion and metastasis. By means of mathematical model equations and their numerical solutions we investigate how cancer cells can produce and secrete matrix degradative enzymes, degrade extracellular matrix, and invade due to diffusion and haptotactic migration. For the numerical simulations of the interactions between the tumour cells and the surrounding tissue, we apply numerical approximations, which are spectrally accurate and based on small amounts of grid-points. Our numerical experiments illustrate the metastatic ability of tumour cells. PMID:21331265

  12. Semaphorin 3A Increases FAK Phosphorylation at Focal Adhesions to Modulate MDA-MB-231 Cell Migration and Spreading on Different Substratum Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Compere, Frances V.; Miller, Alex M.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between integrin-mediated adhesions and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are important regulators of cell migration and spreading. However, mechanisms by which extracellular ligands regulate cell migration and spreading in response to changes in substratum concentration are not well understood. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) has been shown to inhibit cell motility and alter integrin signaling in various cell types. We propose that Sema3A alters focal adhesions to modulate breast carcinoma cell migration and spreading on substrata coated with different concentrations of ECM. We demonstrate that Sema3A inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell migration and spreading on substrata coated with high concentrations of collagen and fibronectin but enhances migration and spreading at lower concentrations of collagen and fibronectin. Sema3A increases focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 (pFAK397) at focal adhesions on all substratum concentrations of collagen and fibronectin but decreased pFAK397 levels on laminin. Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition blocks the Sema3A-mediated effects on cell migration, spreading, and pFAK397 at focal adhesions when cultured on all concentrations of collagen. These results suggest that Sema3A shifts the optimal level of cell-matrix adhesions to a nonoptimal ECM coating concentration, in particular collagen, to yield maximal cell migration and spreading that may be mediated through a ROCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:28182100

  13. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  14. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in type III group B streptococcal invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooan; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Maneesh, Paul-Satyaseela; Lee, Jong-Seok; Romer, Lewis H; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2006-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS), the leading cause of neonatal meningitis, has been shown to invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. GBS invasion of HBMEC has been shown to require the host cell actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The present study examined the mechanisms underlying actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that are involved in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC. We showed that type III GBS invasion was inhibited by genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mean 54% invasion decrease at 100 microM), and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase inhibitor (mean 70% invasion decrease at 50 microM), but not by PP2, an inhibitor of the Src family tyrosine kinases. We subsequently showed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was the one of the host proteins tyrosine phosphorylated by type III GBS. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of the FAK C-terminal domain significantly decreased type III GBS invasion of HBMEC (mean 51% invasion decrease). In addition, we showed that FAK phosphorylation correlated with its association of paxillin, an adapter protein of actin filament, and PI3-kinase subunit p85. This is the first demonstration that FAK phosphorylation and its association with paxillin and PI3 kinase play a key role in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC.

  15. Memo-RhoA-mDia1 signaling controls microtubules, the actin network, and adhesion site formation in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Kossay; Honoré, Stéphane; Isnardon, Daniel; Braguer, Diane; Badache, Ali

    2008-11-03

    Actin assembly at the cell front drives membrane protrusion and initiates the cell migration cycle. Microtubules (MTs) extend within forward protrusions to sustain cell polarity and promote adhesion site turnover. Memo is an effector of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase involved in breast carcinoma cell migration. However, its mechanism of action remained unknown. We report in this study that Memo controls ErbB2-regulated MT dynamics by altering the transition frequency between MT growth and shortening phases. Moreover, although Memo-depleted cells can assemble the Rac1-dependent actin meshwork and form lamellipodia, they show defective localization of lamellipodial markers such as alpha-actinin-1 and a reduced number of short-lived adhesion sites underlying the advancing edge of migrating cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Memo is required for the localization of the RhoA guanosine triphosphatase and its effector mDia1 to the plasma membrane and that Memo-RhoA-mDia1 signaling coordinates the organization of the lamellipodial actin network, adhesion site formation, and MT outgrowth within the cell leading edge to sustain cell motility.

  16. β-eudesmol, a sesquiterpene from Teucrium ramosissimum, inhibits superoxide production, proliferation, adhesion and migration of human tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Mousslim, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Ammari, Youssef; Luis, José; Kovacic, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species are well-known mediators of various biological responses. Recently, new homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase have been discovered in non phagocytic cells. These new homologues (Nox1-Nox5) produce low levels of superoxides compared to the phagocytic homologue Nox2/gp91phox. In this study we examined the effect of β-eudesmol, a sesquiterpenoid alcohol isolated from Teucrium ramosissimum leaves, on proliferation, superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon (HT29 and Caco-2) cancer cell lines. Proliferation of tumor cells was inhibited by β-eudesmol. It also significantly inhibited superoxide production in A549 cells. Furthermore, β-eudesmol inhibited adhesion and migration of A549 and HT29 cell. These results demonstrate that β-eudesmol may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of lung and colon cancer by different ways: by inhibition of superoxide production or by blocking proliferation, adhesion and migration.

  17. Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Flagella Are Required for Broiler Skin Adhesion and Caco-2 Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Sanaz; Howe, Kevin; Lawrence, Mark L; Brooks, John P; Bailey, R Hartford; Karsi, Attila

    2017-01-15

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella strains are the main source of pathogenic bacterial contamination in the poultry industry. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has been recognized as the most prominent serovar on carcasses in poultry-processing plants. Previous studies showed that flagella are one of the main factors that contribute to bacterial attachment to broiler skin. However, the precise role of flagella and the mechanism of attachment are unknown. There are two different flagellar subunits (fliC and fljB) expressed alternatively in Salmonella enterica serovars using phase variation. Here, by making deletions in genes encoding flagellar structural subunits (flgK, fliC, and fljB), and flagellar motor (motA), we were able to differentiate the role of flagella and their rotary motion in the colonization of broiler skin and cellular attachment. Utilizing a broiler skin assay, we demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate tight attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild type. S Kentucky with deletions in all three structural genes, fliC, fljB, and flgK, as well as a flagellar motor mutant (motA), exhibited less adhesion and invasion of Caco-2 cells, while an fljB mutant was as adherent and invasive as the wild-type strain.

  18. Downregulation of LIMK1–ADF/cofilin by DADS inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jian; Zhou, Yujuan; Pan, Zhibing; Shi, Ling; Yang, Jing; Liao, Aijun; Liao, Qianjin; Su, Qi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether the downregulation of LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1)-actin depolymerization factor (ADF, also known as destrin)/cofilin by diallyl disulfide (DADS) inhibited the migration and invasion of colon cancer. Previous studies have shown that silencing LIMK1 could significantly enhance the inhibitory effect of DADS on colon cancer cell migration and invasion, suggesting that LIMK1 was a target molecule of DADS, which needed further confirmation. This study reported that LIMK1 and destrin were highly expressed in colon cancer and associated with poor prognosis of patients with colon cancer. Also, the expression of LIMK1 was positively correlated with the expression of destrin. The overexpression of LIMK1 significantly promoted colon cancer cell migration and invasion. DADS obviously inhibited migration and invasion by suppressing the phosphorylation of ADF/cofilin via downregulation of LIMK1 in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, DADS-induced suppression of cell proliferation was enhanced and antagonized by the knockdown and overexpression of LIMK1 in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Similar results were observed for DADS-induced changes in the expression of vimentin, CD34, Ki-67, and E-cadherin in xenografted tumors. These results indicated that LIMK1 was a potential target molecule for the inhibitory effect of DADS on colon cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:28358024

  19. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits HNSCC cell migration and invasion, and sensitizes HNSCC cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M Allison; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis and chemoresistance represent two detrimental events that greatly hinder the outcome for those suffering with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Herein, we investigated benzyl isothiocyanate's (BITC) ability to inhibit HNSCC migration and invasion and enhance chemotherapy. Our data suggests that treatment with BITC 1) induced significant reductions in the viability of multiple HNSCC cell lines tested (HN12, HN8, and HN30) after 24 and 48 h, 2) decreased migration and invasion of the HN12 cells in a dose dependent manner, and 3) inhibited expression and altered localization of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, vimentin. We also observed that a pretreatment of BITC followed by cisplatin treatment 1) induced a greater decrease in HN12, HN30, and HN8 cell viability and total cell count than either treatment alone and 2) significantly increased apoptosis when compared to either treatment alone. Taken together these data suggest that BITC has the capacity to inhibit processes involved in metastasis and enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Consequently, the results indicate that further investigation, including in vivo studies, are warranted.

  20. CCL25/CCR9 Signal Promotes Migration and Invasion in Hepatocellular and Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqi; Sun, Tong; Chen, Yuxi; Gong, Shu; Sun, Xiye; Zou, Fangdong; Peng, Rui

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is one of the most lethal diseases worldwide, and metastasis is the most common cause of patients' deaths. Identification and inhibition of markers involved in metastasis process in cancer cells are promising works to block metastasis and improve prognoses of patients. Chemokines are a superfamily of small, chemotactic cytokines, whose functions are based on interaction with corresponding receptors. It has been found that one of the functions of chemokines is to regulate migration and invasion abilities of lymphocytes, as well as cancer cells. Chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) regulates trafficking of lymphocytes and cancer cell lines when interacting with its exclusive ligand chemokine 25 (CCL25). However, the mechanisms of CCL25/CCR9 signal that regulates metastasis of cancer cells are not completely known yet. In this study, we stimulated or inhibited CCL25/CCR9 signal in breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) and hepatocellular cancer cell lines (HepG2 and HUH7), and found that CCL25/CCR9 signal resulted in different promotion of migration and invasion in different cell lines. These phenomena could be explained by selective regulation of several markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our findings suggested that CCL25/CCR9 signal may provide cancer cells with chemotactic abilities through influencing several EMT markers.

  1. Siegesbeckia orientalis Extract Inhibits TGFβ1-Induced Migration and Invasion of Endometrial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Chang; Ling, Xue-Hua; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Wu, Jing-Mei; Wang, Chao-Ping; Yang, Jyh-Ferng; Fang, Li-Wen; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2016-08-05

    Type II endometrial carcinoma typically exhibits aggressive metastasis and results in a poor prognosis. Siegesbeckia orientalis Linne is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb with several medicinal benefits, including the cytotoxicity against various cancers. This study investigates the inhibitory effects of S. orientalis ethanol extract (SOE) on the migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). The inhibitory effects were evaluated by determining wound healing and performing the Boyden chamber assay. This study reveals that SOE can inhibit TGFβ1-induced cell wound healing, cell migration, and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner in RL95-2 and HEC-1A endometrial cancer cells. SOE also reversed the TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including the loss of the cell-cell junction and the lamellipodia-like structures. Western blot analysis revealed that SOE inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and Akt, as well as the expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, and u-PA in RL95-2 cells dose-dependently. The results of this investigation suggest that SOE is a potential anti-metastatic agent against human endometrial tumors.

  2. MicroRNA-151 and its hosting gene FAK (focal adhesion kinase) regulate tumor cell migration and spreading of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom

    2010-09-01

    Recurrent chromosomal aberrations are often observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about the functional non-coding sequences, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), at the chromosomal breakpoints in HCC. Here we show that 22 miRNAs are often amplified or deleted in HCC. MicroRNA-151 (miR-151), a frequently amplified miRNA on 8q24.3, is correlated with intrahepatic metastasis of HCC. We further show that miR-151, which is often expressed together with its host gene FAK, encoding focal adhesion kinase, significantly increases HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo, mainly through miR-151-5p, but not through miR-151-3p. Moreover, miR-151 exerts this function by directly targeting RhoGDIA, a putative metastasis suppressor in HCC, thus leading to the activation of Rac1, Cdc42 and Rho GTPases. In addition, miR-151 can function synergistically with FAK to enhance HCC cell motility and spreading. Thus, our findings indicate that chromosome gain of miR-151 is a crucial stimulus for tumour invasion and metastasis of HCC.

  3. Methyl jasmonate abolishes the migration, invasion and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells through down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 14

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that methyl jasmonate (MJ), a plant stress hormone, exhibits anti-cancer activity on human cancer cells. The aim of this study is to determine whether sub-cytotoxic MJ can abolish the migration, invasion and angiogenesis gastric cancer cells. Methods Human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45 were treated with diverse concentrations of MJ. Cell viability, proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis capabilities of cancer cells were measured by MTT colorimetry, EdU incorporation, scratch assay, matrigel invasion assay, and tube formation assay. Gene expression was detected by western blot and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Binding of transcription factor on gene promoter was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results Sub-cytotoxic (0.05 to 0.2 mM) MJ attenuated the migration, invasion and angiogenesis, but not the cell viability or proliferation, of gastric cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP-14) and its downstream gene vascular endothelial growth factor. Restoration of MMP-14 expression rescued the SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells from sub-cytotoxic MJ-inhibited migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In addition, sub-cytotoxic MJ decreased the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) expression and binding on MMP-14 promoter, while restoration of Sp1 expression rescued the cancer cells from sub-cytotoxic MJ-mediated defects in MMP-14 expression, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Conclusions Sub-cytotoxic MJ attenuates the MMP-14 expression via decreasing the Sp1 expression and binding on MMP-14 promoter, thus inhibiting the migration, invasion and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells. PMID:23394613

  4. Carbon ion irradiation withstands cancer stem cells' migration/invasion process in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Wozny, Anne-Sophie; Gilormini, Marion; Battiston-Montagne, Priscilla; Ardail, Dominique; Beuve, Michael; Alphonse, Gersende; Simoëns, Xavier; Rancoule, Chloé

    2016-01-01

    Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) have extremely aggressive profile (high migratory and invasive potential). These characteristics can explain their resistance to conventional treatment. Efficacy of photon and carbon ion irradiation with addition of cetuximab (5 nM) is studied on clonogenic death, migration and invasion of two HNSCC populations: SQ20B and SQ20B/CSCs. SQ20B express E-cadherin and overexpress EGFR while SQ20B/CSCs express N-cadherin and low EGFR. Cetuximab strongly inhibits SQ20B proliferation but has no effect on SQ20B/CSCs. 2 Gy photon irradiation enhances migration and invasiveness in both populations (p < 0.05), while cetuximab only stops SQ20B migration (p < 0.005). Carbon irradiation significantly inhibits invasion in both populations (p < 0.05), and the association with cetuximab significantly inhibits invasion in both populations (p < 0.005). These results highlight CSCs characteristics: EGFRLow, cetuximab-resistant, and highly migratory. Carbon ion irradiation appears to be a very promising therapeutic modality counteracting migration/invasion process in both parental cells and CSCs in contrast to photon irradiation. PMID:27374096

  5. Gypenosides inhibits migration and invasion of human oral cancer SAS cells through the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 -9 and urokinase-plasminogen by ERK1/2 and NF-kappa B signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kung-Wen; Chen, Jung-Chou; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Lu, Pei-Jung; Weng, Jing-Ru; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Wood, W Gibson; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-05-01

    Gypenosides (Gyp), found in Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino, has been used as a folk medicine in the Chinese population for centuries and is known to have diverse pharmacologic effects, including anti-proliferative and anti-cancer actions. However, the effects of Gyp on prevention from invasion and migration of oral cancer cells are still unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of Gyp treatment on migration and invasion of SAS human oral cancer cells. SAS cells were cultured in the presence of 90 and 180 μg/mL Gyp for 24 and 48 hours. Gyp induced cytotoxic effects and inhibited SAS cells migration and invasion in dose- and time-dependent response. Wound-healing assay and boyden chamber assay were carried out to investigate Gyp-inhibited migration and invasion of SAS cells. Gyp decreased the abundance of several proteins, including nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/ 2), matrix metalloproteinase-9, -2 (MMP-9, -2), sevenless homolog (SOS), Ras, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (Akt), in a time-dependent manner. In addition, Gyp decreased mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 but did not affect FAK and Rho A mRNA levels in SAS cells. These results provide evidences for the role of Gyp as a potent anti-metastatic agent, which can markedly inhibit the metastatic and invasive capacity of oral cancer cells. The inhibition of NF-κB and MMP-2, -7 and -9 signaling may be one of the mechanisms that is present in Gyp-inhibited cancer cell invasion and migration.

  6. cAMP inhibits migration, ruffling and paxillin accumulation in focal adhesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells: effects of PKA and EPAC.

    PubMed

    Burdyga, Alex; Conant, Alan; Haynes, Lee; Zhang, Jin; Jalink, Kees; Sutton, Robert; Neoptolemos, John; Costello, Eithne; Tepikin, Alexei

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrated that increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations result in the inhibition of migration of PANC-1 and other pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell types. The rise of cAMP was accompanied by rapid and reversible cessation of ruffling, by inhibition of focal adhesion turnover and by prominent loss of paxillin from focal adhesions. All these phenomena develop rapidly suggesting that cAMP effectors have a direct influence on the cellular migratory apparatus. The role of two primary cAMP effectors, exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) and protein kinase A (PKA), in cAMP-mediated inhibition of PDAC cell migration and migration-associated processes was investigated. Experiments with selective activators of EPAC and PKA demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of cAMP on migration, ruffling, focal adhesion dynamics and paxillin localisation is mediated by PKA, whilst EPAC potentiates migration.

  7. Dasatinib inhibits migration and invasion in diverse human sarcoma cell lines and induces apoptosis in bone sarcoma cells dependent on SRC kinase for survival.

    PubMed

    Shor, Audrey C; Keschman, Elizabeth A; Lee, Francis Y; Muro-Cacho, Carlos; Letson, G Douglas; Trent, Jonathan C; Pledger, W Jack; Jove, Richard

    2007-03-15

    Sarcomas are rare malignant mesenchymal tumors for which there are limited treatment options. One potential molecular target for sarcoma treatment is the Src tyrosine kinase. Dasatinib (BMS-354825), a small-molecule inhibitor of Src kinase activity, is a promising cancer therapeutic agent with p.o. bioavailability. Dasatinib exhibits antitumor effects in cultured human cell lines derived from epithelial tumors, including prostate and lung carcinomas. However, the action of dasatinib in mesenchymally derived tumors has yet to be shown. Based on our previous findings of Src activation in human sarcomas, we evaluated the effects of dasatinib in 12 cultured human sarcoma cell lines derived from bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Dasatinib inhibited Src kinase activity at nanomolar concentrations in these sarcoma cell lines. Downstream components of Src signaling, including focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)), were also inhibited at similar concentrations. This inhibition of Src signaling was accompanied by blockade of cell migration and invasion. Moreover, apoptosis was induced in the osteosarcoma and Ewing's subset of bone sarcomas at nanomolar concentrations of dasatinib. Inhibition of Src protein expression by small interfering RNA also induced apoptosis, indicating that these bone sarcoma cell lines are dependent on Src activity for survival. These results show that dasatinib inhibits migration and invasion of diverse sarcoma cell types and selectively blocks the survival of bone sarcoma cells. Therefore, dasatinib may provide therapeutic benefit by preventing the growth and metastasis of sarcomas in patients.

  8. miR-101 Inhibiting Cell Proliferation, Migration and Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Downregulating Girdin

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ke; Li, Jingjing; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Qinghai; He, Siqi; Yu, Li; Zhou, Jianda; Cao, Peiguo

    2016-01-01

    miR-101 is considered to play an important role in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we aimed to confirm whether Girdin is a target gene of miR-101 and determine the tumor suppressor of miR-101 through Girdin pathway. In our previous studies, we firstly found Girdin protein was overexpressed in HCC tissues, and it closely correlated to tumor size, T stage, TNM stage and Edmondson-Steiner stage of HCC patients. After specific small interfering RNA of Girdin was transfected into HepG2 and Huh7.5.1 cells, the proliferation and invasion ability of tumor cells were significantly inhibited. In this study, we further explored the detailed molecular mechanism of Girdin in HCC. Interestingly, we found that miR-101 significantly low-expressed in HCC tissues compared with that in matched normal tissues while Girdin had a relative higher expression, and miR-101 was inversely correlated with Girdin expression. In addition, after miR-101 transfection, the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of HepG2 cells were weakened. Furthermore, we confirmed that Girdin is a direct target gene of miR-101. Finally we confirmed Talen-mediated Girdin knockout markedly suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC while down-regulation of miR-101 significantly restored the inhibitory effect. Our findings suggested that miR-101/Girdin axis could be a potential application of HCC treatment. PMID:26743900

  9. Effects of blueberries on migration, invasion, proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Wei; Liao, Xin; Yu, Lei; Tian, Tian; Liu, Xing; Liu, Jing; Cai, Li-Jun; Xiao, Xuan; Xie, Ru-Jia; Yang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of blueberry consumption on the migration, invasion, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, in order to provide clinical treatment and prevention strategies for liver cancer using anticancer therapeutic agents. Rabbiteye blueberry was prepared as fresh juice and fed to rats at low, moderate and high dosages (25, 50 and 100%, respectively) by daily gastric gavage. Seven days later, the rats were sacrificed and the blood serum was obtained for co-culture with HEPG2 cells. The MTT assay was used for detecting cell proliferation, Transwell assay was performed for migration and invasion evaluation, and cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. After co-culturing with the blood serum of rats that were fed different dosages of blueberry juice, the inhibition rate of HEPG2 cells in the three groups was significantly lower than that in the control group at 48 and 72 h (P<0.05). The number of migrated and transmembrane HEPG2 cells in the three groups was significantly lower than that in the control group at 48 and 72 h (P<0.05). The number of migrated HEPG2 cells in the high dosage group was significantly lower than that in the low dosage group at 48 h, and the numbers of migrated HEPG2 cells in the high and moderate dosage groups were significantly lower than that in the low dosage group at 72 h (P<0.05). The number of transmembrane HEPG2 cells in the high dosage group was significantly lower than that in the low dosage group at 48 h (P<0.05). The numbers of HEPG2 cells at the G2/M stage in the three groups were significantly lower than that in the control group, and the number of HEPG2 cells in the high dosage group was significantly lower than that in the low dosage group, at 48 and 72 h (P<0.05). The apoptosis rate in the three groups was significantly higher than that in the control group, and the apoptosis rate in the high dosage group was

  10. P300 promotes migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Lei; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xi, Mian; He, Li-Ru; Yu, Fang; Zhou, Tong-Chong; Liu, Meng-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that p300 is overexpressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and that its expression is an independent prognostic factor. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of p300 in human NPC development. A small hairpin (sh) RNA lentiviral expression vector targeting the p300 gene was constructed to suppress the expression of p300 in NPC cells. Knockdown of p300 was verified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Wound-healing, invasion, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays were performed to assess the influence of p300 on nasopharyngeal tumorigenesis and metastasis in vitro. The expression of p300 was upregulated in NPC cell lines. After knockdown of p300, the migration and invasion ability of shp300 cells were significantly inhibited (P<0.05). Furthermore, the depletion of p300 expression in NPC cell lines resulted in the upregulation of epithelial phenotype marker E-cadherin and α-catenin, and downregulation of mesenchymal phenotype markers N-cadherin and vimentin. p300 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the acetylation of Smad2 and Smad3 in the tumor growth factor-β signaling pathway. In conclusion, p300 may be involved in the invasion and metastasis of NPC through the induction of EMT. PMID:28356956

  11. The Proprotein Convertase Furin Contributes to Rhabdomyosarcoma Malignancy by Promoting Vascularization, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jaaks, Patricia; D’Alessandro, Valentina; Grob, Nicole; Büel, Sina; Hajdin, Katarina; Schäfer, Beat W.; Bernasconi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The proprotein convertase (PC) furin cleaves precursor proteins, an important step in the activation of many cancer-associated proteins. Substrates of furin and furin-like PCs play a role in proliferation, metastasis and invasion. Some of them are involved in the progression of the pediatric soft tissue sarcoma rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). In this study, we show that PCs, and in particular furin, are expressed in RMS cell lines. To investigate the functional role of furin, we generated RMS cell lines with modulated furin activity. Silencing or stable inhibition of furin delayed tumor growth in Rh30 and RD xenografts in vivo, and was correlated with lower microvessel density. Reduced furin activity also decreased migration and invasion abilities in vitro, and inhibition of furin in RMS cells diminished processing of IGF1R, VEGF-C, PDGF-B and MT1-MMP, leading to lower levels of mature proteins. Furthermore, we found that furin activity is required for proper IGF signaling in RMS cells, as furin silencing resulted in reduced phosphorylation of Akt upon IGF1 stimulation. Taken together, our results suggest that furin plays an important role in the malignant phenotype of RMS cells by activating proteins involved in tumor growth and vascularization, metastasis and invasion. PMID:27548722

  12. Inhibition of Migration and Invasion by Tet-1 Overexpression in Human Lung Carcinoma H460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Jun; Lee, Bo Ram; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Ji, Young Rae; Sung, Yong Hun; ShikChoi, Kwang; Park, Hum Dai; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Myoung Ok; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we found that lung cancer cell line (H460 cells) expressing Tet1 showed higher levels of adhesion, and Tet1 inhibited H460 cell proliferation. In addition, these cells showed a significantly reduced ability of collagen degradation and Smad2/3 phosphorylation compared to controls. Furthermore, vimentin was found to be highly expressed in larger metastatic cancer area. Tet1 overexpression was reduced in the epithelial marker E-cadherin. Moreover, Tet1 repressed cancer cell metastasis in nude mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that Tet1 expression plays a critical role in metastasis of lung cancer cells by suppression of invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  13. Inhibition of invasion and migration by newly synthesized quinazolinone MJ-29 in human oral cancer CAL 27 cells through suppression of MMP-2/9 expression and combined down-regulation of MAPK and AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Hour, Mann-Jen; Amagaya, Sakae; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lin, Jing-Pin; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-07-01

    Anti-metastasis by reducing cellular migration and invasion and by deregulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. The objective of this study focused on the effects of the novel compound 6-pyrrolidinyl-2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-quinazolinone (MJ-29) regarding anti-metastatic actions on human oral squamous cell carcinoma CAL 27 cells and on the verification of the underlying related molecular mechanisms of this event. MJ-29 concentration- and time-dependently caused a suppression of cell adhesive ability utilizing cell adhesion assay; it also inhibited the migration and invasion of CAL 27 cells using scratch wound closure and transwell invasion assays in a concentration-dependent response. Importantly, we confirmed that the applied concentration range of MJ-29 exhibited no dramatic influence of cytotoxicity on CAL 27 cells using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. MJ-29 also attenuated the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, we found that activation of their upstream protein kinases, by MJ-29, potentially exerted an inhibitory effect on the phosphorylated protein levels of extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, as well as serine/threonine kinase AKT by MJ-29 in CAL 27 cells. The expression of RAS and focal adhesion kinase was also down-regulated in MJ-29-treated CAL 27 cells. Collectively, these findings provide further evidence for the molecular signaling basis of the effects of MJ-29 on suppression of migration and invasion which might be useful as a therapeutic strategy to treat human oral cancer.

  14. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fujun; Wang, Yixong; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Ying, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a common environmental pollutant that has been associated with various diseases, including cancer. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying PFOA-induced endometrial cancer cell invasion and migration. PFOA treatment enhanced migration and invasion by human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells, which correlated with decreased E-cadherin expression, a marker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PFOA also induced activation of ERK1/2/mTOR signaling. Treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, antagonized the effects of PFOA and reversed the effects of PFOA activation in a xenograft mouse model of endometrial cancer. Consistent with these results, pre-treatment with rapamycin abolished PFOA-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. These results indicate that PFOA is a carcinogen that promotes endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling. PMID:27589685

  15. Oxidative stress inhibits adhesion and transendothelial migration, and induces apoptosis and senescence of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Zhang, Xueqing; Kang, Xueling; Li, Ning; Wang, Rong; Hu, Tiantian; Xiang, Meng; Wang, Xinhong; Yuan, Wenjun; Chen, Alex; Meng, Dan; Chen, Sifeng

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress caused by cellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major contributor to disease and cell death. However, how induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) respond to different levels of oxidative stress is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress on iPSC function in vitro. Mouse iPSC were treated with H2 O2 (25-100 μmol/L). IPSC adhesion, migration, viability, apoptosis and senescence were analysed. Expression of adhesion-related genes, stress defence genes, and osteoblast- and adipocyte-associated genes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The present study found that H2 O2 (25-100 μmol/L) decreased iPSC adhesion to matrix proteins and endothelial cells, and downregulated gene expression levels of adhesion-related molecules, such as integrin alpha 7, cadherin 1 and 5, melanoma cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. H2 O2 (100 μmol/L) decreased iPSC viability and inhibited the capacity of iPSC migration and transendothelial migration. iPSC were sensitive to H2 O2 -induced G2/M arrest, senescence and apoptosis when exposed to H2 O2 at concentrations above 25 μmol/L. H2 O2 increased the expression of stress defence genes, including catalase, cytochrome B alpha, lactoperoxidase and thioredoxin domain containing 2. H2 O2 upregulated the expression of osteoblast- and adipocyte-associated genes in iPSC during their differentiation; however, short-term H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress did not affect the protein expression of the pluripotency markers, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 and sex-determining region Y-box 2. The present results suggest that iPSC are sensitive to H2 O2 toxicity, and inhibition of oxidative stress might be a strategy for improving their functions.

  16. Tuberin, the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 tumor suppressor gene product, regulates Rho activation, cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Cash, Timothy P; Hunter, Deborah S; Walker, Cheryl L; Chernoff, Jonathan; Henske, Elizabeth P

    2002-12-05

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, autism, and tumors of the brain, kidney, heart, retina, and skin. TSC is caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2, both of which are tumor suppressor genes. Hamartin, the protein product of TSC1, was found to interact with the ezrin-radixin-moesin family of cytoskeletal proteins and to activate the small GTPase Rho. To determine whether tuberin, the TSC2 product, can also activate Rho, we stably expressed full-length human tuberin in two cell types: MDCK cells and ELT3 cells. ELT3 cells lack endogenous tuberin expression. We found that expression of human tuberin in both MDCK and ELT3 cells was associated with an increase in the amount of Rho-GTP, but not in Rac1-GTP or cdc42-GTP. Tuberin expression increased cell adhesion in both cell types, and decreased chemotactic cell migration in ELT3 cells. In MDCK cells, there was a decrease in the amount of total Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and an increase in the fraction of phosphorylated FAK. These findings demonstrate for the first time that tuberin activates Rho and regulates cell adhesion and migration. Pathways involving Rho activation may have relevance to the clinical manifestations of TSC, including pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  17. Drug migration from the adhesive matrix to the polymer film laminate facestock in a transdermal nitroglycerin system.

    PubMed

    Markovich, R J; Taylor, A K; Rosen, J

    1997-12-01

    The apparent loss of nitroglycerin in a prototype transdermal nitroglycerin system was investigated by attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) microspectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Several transdermal nitroglycerin lots placed under controlled storage conditions exhibited loss of drug potency (up to 10%) along with the appearance of a defect in the polymer film laminate facestock. A significant loss of nitroglycerin from the transdermal drug/adhesive matrix may reduce the bioavailabilty of nitroglycerin to the patient. ATR-IR analysis confirmed that nitroglycerin migrated from the drug/adhesive matrix to the facestock polyester layer under storage conditions and that nitroglycerin was retained in the facestock polyester layer. An alternate sample extraction solution successfully removed the nitroglycerin from both the adhesive matrix and facestock polyester layer with nearly 100% labeled strength recovered. The relationship between the migration of nitroglycerin into the facestock polyester layer and the appearance of the defect in the facestock aluminum layer is discussed and a nitroglycerin-aluminum metal reaction mechanism is proposed.

  18. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Kishimoto, Keishi; Kato, Ayumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Sato, Ryuichiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-03-10

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration.

  19. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R. . E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

  20. Anti-invasive and anti-adhesive activities of a recombinant disintegrin, r-viridistatin 2, derived from the Prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis).

    PubMed

    Lucena, Sara E; Jia, Ying; Soto, Julio G; Parral, Jessica; Cantu, Esteban; Brannon, Jeremy; Lardner, Kristina; Ramos, Carla J; Seoane, Agustin I; Sánchez, Elda E

    2012-07-01

    Snake venom disintegrins inhibit platelet aggregation and have anti-cancer activities. In this study, we report the cloning, expression, and functional activities of a recombinant disintegrin, r-viridistatin 2 (GenBank ID: JQ071899), from the Prairie rattlesnake. r-Viridistatin 2 was tested for anti-invasive and anti-adhesive activities against six different cancer cell lines (human urinary bladder carcinoma (T24), human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080), human skin melanoma (SK-Mel-28), human colorectal adenocarcinoma (CaCo-2), human breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) and murine skin melanoma (B16F10)). r-Viridistatin 2 shares 96% and 64% amino acid identity with two other Prairie rattlesnake medium-sized disintegrins, viridin and viridistatin, respectively. r-Viridistatin 2 was able to inhibit adhesion of T24, SK-MEL-28, HT-1080, CaCo-2 and MDA-MB-231 to various extracellular matrix proteins with different affinities. r-Viridistatin 2 decreased the ability of T24 and SK-MEL-28 cells to migrate by 62 and 96% respectively, after 24 h of incubation and the invasion of T24, SK-MEL-28, HT-1080 and MDA-MB-231 cells were inhibited by 80, 85, 65 and 64% respectively, through a reconstituted basement membrane using a modified Boyden chamber. Finally, r-viridistatin 2 effectively inhibited lung colonization of murine melanoma cells in BALB/c mice by 71%, suggesting that r-viridistatin 2 could be a potent anti-cancer agent in vivo.

  1. Diallyl trisulfide inhibits migration, invasion and angiogenesis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells, and suppresses murine xenograft tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kuang-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lein, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are beneficial for the prevention and treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases including cancer. We examined the cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS). In HT29 cells, DATS inhibited migration and invasion through the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 which was associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2, -7 and -9 and VEGF. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), DATS inhibited the migration and angiogenesis through FAK, Src and Ras. DATS also inhibited the secretion of VEGF. The capillary-like tube structure formation and migration by HUVEC was inhibited by DATS. The chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay indicated that DATS treatment inhibited ex-vivo angiogenesis. We investigated the anti-tumour effects of DATS against human colon cancer xenografts in BALB/cnu/nu mice and its anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. In this in-vivo study, DATS also inhibited the tumour growth, tumour weight and angiogenesis (decreased the levels of haemoglobin) in HT29 cells. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the inhibition of angiogenesis may be an important mechanism in colon cancer chemotherapy by DATS. PMID:25403643

  2. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  3. Magnolol suppresses metastasis via inhibition of invasion, migration, and matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 activities in PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Sun; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Magnolol, a hydroxylated biphenyl compound isolated from the root and stem bark of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to have anticancer activity, but little is known about its molecular mechanisms of action. Increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key enzyme in arachidonic acid metabolism, has been identified in many cancer types. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes involved in various steps of metastasis development. The objective of this study was to study the effects of magnolol on cancer invasion and metastasis using PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells. Cellular proliferation was determined by MTT colorimetric assay. Magnolol inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. In an invasion assay conducted in Transwell chambers, magnolol showed 33 and 98% inhibition of cancer cell at 10 microM and 20 microM concentrations, respectively, compared to the control. The expression of MMP-2/-9 and COX-1/-2 was assessed by gelatin zymography and Western blot respectively. The protein and mRNA levels of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 were down-regulated by magnolol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the antimetastatic properties of magnolol in inhibiting the adhesion, invasion, and migration of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

  4. Novel Suppressive Effects of Ketotifen on Migration and Invasion of MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ji; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Soo Youl; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rates associated with cancer reflect the metastatic spread of tumor cells from the site of their origin. Metastasis, in fact, is the cause of 90% of cancer deaths. Therefore, considerable effort is being made to inhibit metastasis. In the present study, we screened ketotifen for anti-migratory and anti-invasive activities against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cancer cells. Cancer cell migration and invasion were measured using multi-well chambers. Additionally, western blots were used to examine the effects of ketotifen on the expressions of CDC42, Rho, Rac, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). The results showed that ketotifen dose-dependently suppressed the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 cells. Ketotifen also suppressed the expressions of CDC42, Rac, and Rho, which, significantly, are involved in MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 cancer cell migration. Moreover, ketotifen suppressed the expression and activity of MMP-9, which is involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix leading to invasion. The overall data suggested that ketotifen suppresses the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and HT-1080 cancer cells via inhibition of CDC42, Rac, Rho, and MMP-9 expression. PMID:25489422

  5. miR-940 Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion and Migration via Regulation of CXCR2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dong; Zhang, Yaodong; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Xing; Ji, Guwei; Huo, Liqun; Shao, Zicheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the expression of miR-940 in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on function and biological mechanism in the HCC cells. Methods. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to quantify miR-940 expression in 46 cases of tissues and cells. Transfection of HCC cell lines was performed by miR-940 mimics; the abilities of invasion and migration were assessed through Transwell array. Western blot represents the alteration in expression of CXCR2 by miR-940 mimics. Results. miR-940 expression was decreased significantly in the HCC tissues and the relevant cell lines. miR-940 upregulation suppressed the invasion and migration of HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CXCR2 was downregulated to suppress invasion and migration after miR-940 mimics. Moreover, decreased miR-940 expression was negatively correlated with Edmondson grade (P = 0.008), tumor microsatellite or multiple tumors (P = 0.04), vascular invasion (P = 0.035), and recurrence and metastasis (P = 0.038). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-940 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Our findings present that miR-940 acts as a pivotal adaptor of CXCR2 and its transcription downregulated CXCR2 expression to decrease HCC invasion and migration in vitro. Our study suggests that miR-940 may be a novel poor prognostic biomarker for HCC. PMID:27807540

  6. Effect of targeted silencing of IL-8 on in vitro migration and invasion of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyu; Liu, Ling; Yin, Zeyuan; Xu, Hui; Li, Shuang; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Hui; Du, Lei; Zhou, Xueyuan; Zhang, Bei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether interleukin-8 (IL-8) affects human SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion by targeting silencing of IL-8 expression. Silencing small-interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IL-8 gene was constructed to infect SKOV3 cells by lentiviral vector. The expression of IL-8 and p-nuclear factor (NF)-κB protein was detected by western blot analysis. The wound scratch and Transwell tests were used to assay the cell migration and invasiveness of SKOV3 cells infected with lentiviral vector targeting IL-8 gene siRNA. The levels of IL-8 protein expressed by SKOV3 cells infected by lentiviral vector targeting IL-8 gene siRNA decreased by 72.3%. IL-8 (50 ng/ml) increased the ability of SKOV3 cells to suppress cell migration (p<0.01). Cisplatin and silencing of IL-8 achieved the ability to inhibit SKOV3 cell invasion (p<0.01), and 100 ng/ml concentration of IL-8 enhanced the ability of SKOV3 invasion (p<0.01). Silencing of IL-8 to a certain extent reduced the expression of p-NF-κB proteins, but it was not statistically significant. In conclusion, silencing of IL-8 may inhibit the migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells, which may be independent of the p-NF-κB protein. PMID:28356930

  7. Triggering cell adhesion, migration or shape change with a dynamic surface coating.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Stijn F M; Maiuri, Paolo; Marie, Emmanuelle; Tribet, Christophe; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-03-25

    There's an APP for that: cell-repellent APP (azido-[polylysine-g-PEG]) is used to create substrates for spatially controlled dynamic cell adhesion. The simple addition of a functional peptide to the culture medium rapidly triggers cell adhesion. This highly accessible yet powerful technique allows diverse applications, demonstrated through tissue motility assays, patterned coculturing and triggered cell shape change.

  8. Plexin-B1 silencing inhibits ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated Plexin-B1 expression has been found in diverse human cancers and in non-neoplastic tissues, and it mediates diverse biological and pathological activities. However, whether or not Plexin-B1 expression is involved in human ovarian tumors remains unclear. In the present study, Plexin-B1 expression was explored in benign and malignant human ovarian tumor tissues. In addition, the impact of Plexin-B1 expression on ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion were investigated in vitro. Methods Plexin-B1 expression was analyzed in normal and benign ovarian tissues and serous ovarian tumors (both borderline and malignant) by immunohistochemical staining, as well as in four human ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, C13*, SKOV3, and OV2008) by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, endogenous Plexin-B1 expression was suppressed by Plexin-B1 siRNA in SKOV3 cells, which overexpress Plexin-B1. Protein levels of Plexin-B1, AKT and AKTSer473 were examined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were measured with MTT, wound healing and boyden chamber assays, respectively, and the cytoskeleton was monitored via F-actin staining. Results Expression levels of Plexin-B1 protein were significantly higher in serous ovarian carcinomas than in normal ovaries or benign ovarian neoplasms, and in the former, Plexin-B1 expression was positively correlated with lymphatic metastasis, and the membrane and cytoplasm of cancer cells stained positively. SKOV3 cells displayed the highest Plexin-B1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels among the four tested human ovarian cancer cell lines and was selected as a cell model for further in vitro experiments. Plexin-B1 siRNA significantly suppressed phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 in SKOV3 cells, but it did not alter total AKT expression. In addition, silencing of Plexin-B1 in SKOV3 cells inhibited cell migration and invasion and reorganized the cytoskeleton, whereas cell

  9. TAT-Hsp27 promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells through beta1 integrin-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Young-Sin; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Odontoblasts are involved in tooth repair and regeneration as well as dentin formation. The aim of this study was to examine whether delivery of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) into cells using a TAT fusion protein system (TAT-Hsp27) enhances adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells. Hsp27 was delivered into cells by the TAT-fusion protein system. To examine whether TAT-Hsp27 affects the viability of MDPC-23 cells, MTT assay was performed. The effect of TAT-Hsp27 on adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells was determined using type I collagen-coated plates and a commercial kit, respectively. In addition, a precise molecular mechanism was examined by Western blot analysis and focal adhesion activity. TAT-fusion protein system delivered Hsp27 into cells successfully. Transduction of TAT-Hsp27 induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, transduction of TAT-Hsp27 increased the protein expression of beta1 integrin and focal adhesion formation, and induced phosphorylation of FAK and ERK. TAT-Hsp27-induced migration of MDPC-23 cells was restored by treatment of anti-beta1 integrin antibody. These findings suggest that TAT-Hsp27 promotes adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells via beta1 integrin-mediated signaling and is a promising candidate for therapeutic application of dental pulp regeneration.

  10. Analytical tools for identification of non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from polyurethane adhesives in multilayer packaging materials and their migration into food simulants.

    PubMed

    Félix, Juliana S; Isella, Francesca; Bosetti, Osvaldo; Nerín, Cristina

    2012-07-01

    Adhesives used in food packaging to glue different materials can provide several substances as potential migrants, and the identification of potential migrants and migration tests are required to assess safety in the use of adhesives. Solid-phase microextraction in headspace mode and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and ChemSpider and SciFinder databases were used as powerful tools to identify the potential migrants in the polyurethane (PU) adhesives and also in the individual plastic films (polyethylene terephthalate, polyamide, polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyethylene/ethyl vinyl alcohol). Migration tests were carried out by using Tenax(®) and isooctane as food simulants, and the migrants were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. More than 63 volatile and semivolatile compounds considered as potential migrants were detected either in the adhesives or in the films. Migration tests showed two non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from PU adhesives that migrated through the laminates into Tenax(®) and into isooctane. Identification of these NIAS was achieved through their mass spectra, and 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione and 1,4,7-trioxacyclotridecane-8,13-dione were confirmed. Caprolactam migrated into isooctane, and its origin was the external plastic film in the multilayer, demonstrating real diffusion through the multilayer structure. Comparison of the migration values between the simulants and conditions will be shown and discussed.

  11. An emerging role for voltage-gated Na+ channels in cellular migration: regulation of central nervous system development and potentiation of invasive cancers.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A; Isom, Lori L

    2008-12-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) exist as macromolecular complexes containing a pore-forming alpha subunit and one or more beta subunits. The VGSC alpha subunit gene family consists of 10 members, which have distinct tissue-specific and developmental expression profiles. So far, four beta subunits (beta1-beta4) and one splice variant of beta1 (beta1A, also called beta1B) have been identified. VGSC beta subunits are multifunctional, serving as modulators of channel activity, regulators of channel cell surface expression, and as members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). beta subunits are substrates of beta-amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) and gamma-secretase, yielding intracellular domains (ICDs) that may further modulate cellular activity via transcription. Recent evidence shows that beta1 regulates migration and pathfinding in the developing postnatal CNS in vivo. The alpha and beta subunits, together with other components of the VGSC signaling complex, may have dynamic interactive roles depending on cell/tissue type, developmental stage, and pathophysiology. In addition to excitable cells like nerve and muscle, VGSC alpha and beta subunits are functionally expressed in cells that are traditionally considered nonexcitable, including glia, vascular endothelial cells, and cancer cells. In particular, the alpha subunits are up-regulated in line with metastatic potential and are proposed to enhance cellular migration and invasion. In contrast to the alpha subunits, beta1 is more highly expressed in weakly metastatic cancer cells, and evidence suggests that its expression enhances cellular adhesion. Thus, novel roles are emerging for VGSC alpha and beta subunits in regulating migration during normal postnatal development of the CNS as well as during cancer metastasis.

  12. Expression of CHODL in hepatocellular carcinoma affects invasion and migration of liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zejian; Zhang, Ning; Li, Wenda; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Yajin

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-associated death. Due to rapid progression and metastasis, the long-term survival remains poor for most patients. Thus, it is important to discover and develop novel preventive strategies and therapeutic approaches for HCC. Recent data show that chondrolectin (CHODL) is commonly overexpressed in the majority of lung cancers, indicating a possible correlation between CHODL and metastasis of lung cancer cells. Our investigation shows that the expression of CHODL is significantly decreased in HCC clinical samples and in HCC cell lines. Overexpression of CHODL in SMMC7721 cells with a lentiviral vector increased SMMC7721 cell migration and invasion. Our findings establish for the first time an association between human CHODL and HCC metastasis. PMID:28356950

  13. PinX1 inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Mei, Peng-Jin; Chen, Yan-Su; Du, Ying; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-03-01

    PinX1 induces apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation in some cancer cells, and the expression of PinX1 is frequently decreased in some cancer and negatively associated with metastasis and prognosis. However, the precise roles of PinX1 in gliomas have not been studied. In this study, we found that PinX1 obviously reduced the gliomas cell proliferation through regulating the expressions of cell cycle-relative molecules to arrest cell at G1 phase and down-regulating the expression of component telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT in human), which is the hardcore of telomerase. Moreover, PinX1 could suppress the abilities of gliomas cell wound healing, migration and invasion via suppressing MMP-2 expression and increasing TIMP-2 expression. In conclusion, our results suggested that PinX1 may be a potential suppressive gene in the progression of gliomas.

  14. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  15. Borrelia burgdorferi upregulates expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and promotes transendothelial migration of neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sellati, T J; Burns, M J; Ficazzola, M A; Furie, M B

    1995-01-01

    The accumulation of leukocytic infiltrates in perivascular tissues is a key step in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. During an inflammatory response, endothelial cell adhesion molecules mediate the attachment of circulating leukocytes to the blood vessel wall and their subsequent extravasation into perivascular tissues. Using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrated that B. burgdorferi activated endothelium in a dose- and time-dependent fashion as measured by upregulation of the adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). As few as one spirochete per endothelial cell stimulated increased expression of these molecules. Expression of E-selectin peaked after spirochetes and HUVEC were coincubated for 4 h and returned to near-basal levels by 24 h. In contrast, expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 peaked at 12 h and remained elevated at 24 h. HUVEC monolayers cultured on acellular amniotic tissue were used to investigate the consequences of endothelial cell activation by spirochetes. After incubation of HUVEC-amnion cultures with B. burgdorferi, subsequently added neutrophils migrated across the endothelial monolayers. This process was mediated by E-selectin and by CD11/CD18 leukocytic integrins. The extent of migration depended on both the number of spirochetes used to stimulate the HUVEC and the length of the coincubation period. These results raise the possibility that B. burgdorferi induces a host inflammatory response and accompanying perivascular damage through activation of vascular endothelium. PMID:7591083

  16. Adhesion in Mammary Development: Novel Roles for E-Cadherin in Individual and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are essential for barrier function, secretion, and regulation of fluid transport. Their function requires cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion, mediated through intercellular junctions. Conversely, disruption of adhesion and polarity is thought to drive cancer progression. The mammary gland is an important model for cell adhesion due to its postnatal hormonally regulated development; ducts undergo branching morphogenesis in response to steroid hormones during puberty. These hormonal signals induce a transition from simple to stratified architecture, initiated by asymmetric luminal cell divisions. Ductal elongation is accomplished by this multilayered, low-polarity epithelium, and polarity is reestablished as elongation ceases. The requirement for cell adhesion has been tested in 3D culture and in vivo, using gene deletion, knockdown, and misexpression in both developmental and homeostatic contexts. Attention has focused on E-cadherin, the major classical cadherin in luminal epithelial cells. Classic studies revealed a requirement for E-cadherin during lactation, and E-cadherin loss is widely posited to promote metastasis. However, recent findings demonstrated a broader requirement for E-cadherin during branching morphogenesis and homeostasis and also, surprisingly, in epithelial dissemination. These studies suggest that longstanding models of the role of adhesion in epithelial biology need to be revisited. Advances in inducible gene expression and knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and fluorescent labeling of genetically modified cells offer the opportunity to test the roles of diverse adhesion systems and to develop a mechanistic understanding of how cell adhesion regulates development and cancer. PMID:25733146

  17. MicroRNA-613 suppresses proliferation, migration and invasion of osteosarcoma by targeting c-MET

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyu; Sun, Xufang; Wu, Jing; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-613 (miR-613) has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the biological role of miR-613 in osteosarcoma (OS) remained unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine the expression and biological roles of miR-613 in OS. We found that miR-613 was significantly downregulated in OS tissues and cell lines, and that decreased miR-613 expression was correlated negatively with advanced TNM stage and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of miR-613 in OS cells significantly suppressed the proliferation and colony formation by regulating cell arrest at G0/G1 phase, and impaired the migration and invasive abilities of OS cells, followed by suppression of the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Bioinformatic and luciferase reporter analysis identified cellular-mesenchymal to epithelial transition factor (c-MET, also named as MET) as a direct target of miR-613. Overexpression of miR-613 significantly inhibited the c-MET expression and its downstream PI3k/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in OS cells. In OS clinical samples, there was a significant inverse correlation between miR-613 and c-MET mRNA expression. Rescue experiments showed that overexpression of c-MET partially prevented miR-613-induced suppression of OS cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. In conclusion, we provide first evidence for the suppressive activity of miR-613 by repressing c-MET, suggesting that miR-613 might be a potential therapeutic strategy for OS. PMID:28042506

  18. CS-31A NOVEL YAP-DRIVEN MIGRATION AND INVASION SIGNALING PATHWAY PREDICTS POOR OUTCOME IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sagar R; Tippens, Nathaniel D; Park, Jinseok; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Vela, Guillermo; Levchenko, Andre; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of tumor malignancy is the ability of cells to not only locally invade its surrounding parenchyma but also distally metastasize. Aggressive tumors such as glioblastoma (GBM) often display a collective sheet of migrating cells which may eventually disseminate and migrate in a single cell manner. By integrating extracellular cues and intracellular signaling, cell polarization and the persistence and speed of locomotion is tightly governed. Given the diverse inputs that may modulate this intricate cell migration pathway, it is of interest to identify critical modulators of this network. Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcriptional regulator, has been suggested to potentiate migration, invasion, and metastasis; however, it is not known how or whether YAP expression and activity can regulate the molecular networks controlling cell migration and invasion, and whether this function of YAP may be consequential to the progression of aggressive cancers. We thus explored mechanisms of YAP-mediated migration and invasion in normal cells as well as cancer cells where YAP is hyperactive (p < 0.05). We found that YAP plays a pivotal role in regulation of this complex migratory and invasive behavior through a novel small Rho-GTPase-dependent signaling mechanism. As with GBM, metastatic cancers often evade detection because individual cells spread from the primary bulk tumor; thus, making complete resection and treatment virtually impossible. Congruent with our in vitro studies, our murine intracranial xenograft model argue the role of YAP in driving invasive tumor growth (p < 0.05). Moreover, we demonstrate that these YAP-driven cell dispersal mechanisms confer poor patient prognosis in the TCGA and REMBRANDT GBM databases (p < 0.05). Thus, our findings provide new insights into the biology of aggressive cancers with particular prognostic relevance of this YAP-driven pro-motility cascade in glioblastoma. In addition, our studies suggest these YAP

  19. Overexpression of miR-664 is associated with enhanced osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion ability via targeting SOX7.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yongzheng; Chen, Bin; Wu, Qiang; Hu, Konghe; Xi, Xinhua; Zhu, Wengang; Zhong, Xueren; Chen, Jianting

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is one of the most common types of primary sarcoma of bone in children and young adults, and the long-term prognosis for OS patients still remains dismal due to the lack of effective early diagnostic biomarkers. Identifying sensitive and specific biomarkers in carcinogenesis may improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this malignancy. The expression of miR-664 in osteosarcoma cell lines and osteosarcoma tissues was examined using real-time PCR. The effects of miR-664 on osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion were evaluated by cell invasion assays, migration assays, and three-dimension spheroid invasion assay. The effect of miR-664 on SOX7 was determined by luciferase assays and Western blot assay. The clinical association between miR-664 and SOX7 was analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot assay. Expression of miR-664 was found to be upregulated in OS cell lines and tissues. Overexpression of miR-664 was associated with increased migration and invasive abilities of OS cells in vitro, whereas downregulation of miR-664 appeared to inhibit their migration and invasive potential. Furthermore, using biological approaches, we showed that miR-664 directly targeted and suppressed expression of the tumor suppressor SOX7. Additionally, the expression of miR-664 was negatively correlated with SOX7 expression in OS clinical tissues. Our findings suggest that miR-664 functions as an oncogene miRNA and has an important role in promoting human OS cell invasion and migration by suppressing SOX7 expression. Consequently, miR-664 may have potential as a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of osteosarcoma.

  20. Human astrocytes secrete IL-6 to promote glioma migration and invasion through upregulation of cytomembrane MMP14

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Jian; Qu, Xun; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    The brain microenvironment has emerged as an important component in malignant progression of human glioma. However, astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the glioma microenvironment, have as yet a poorly defined role in the development of this disease, particularly with regard to invasion. Here, we co-cultured human astrocytes with human glioma cell lines, U251 and A172, in an in vitro transwell system in order to ascertain their influence on migration and invasion of gliomas. mRNA and protein expression assays were subsequently used to identify candidate proteins mediating this activity. Astrocytes significantly increased migration and invasion of both U251 and A172 cells in migration and invasion (plus matrigel) assays. Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14) originating from glioma cells was identified in qRT-PCR as the most highly up-regulated member of the MMP family of genes (~ 3 fold, p < 0.05) in this system. A cytokine array and ELISA were used to identify interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a highly increased factor in media collected from astrocytes, especially under co-culture conditions. IL-6 was also the key cytokine inducing cytomembrane MMP14 expression, the active form of MMP14, in glioma cells. Knockdown of MMP14 with siRNA led to decreased migration and invasion. Taken together, our results indicated that cytomembrane MMP14 was induced by IL-6 secreted from astrocytes, thereby enhancing the migration and invasion of glioma cells through activation of MMP2. Therefore, this IL-6 and MMP14 axis between astrocytes and glioma cells may become a potential target for treatment of glioma patients. PMID:27613828

  1. Paclitaxel combined with harmine inhibits the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells through downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    SUN, KUN; TANG, XIAO-HE; XIE, YI-KUI

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has a critical role in the invasiveness and metastasis of gastric cancer. In addition, paclitaxel (PTX) and harmine (HM) were reported to be potential therapeutic drug candidates for cancer therapy; however, the synergistic antitumor effect of PTX and HM combined treatment on the human gastric cancer cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of PTX and/or HM on the cell migration and invasion in two human gastric cancer cell lines, SGC-7901 and MKN-45. MTT assay was used to detect the growth inhibition induced by PTX and HM. The Transwell assay was employed to assess the effects of PTX and HM on the cell migration and invasion. The expression levels of COX-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PTX and HM inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Individually PTX and HM were able to inhibit the migration and invasion of two human gastric cancer cells; however, the combination of PTX and HM exerted synergistic effects on migration and invasion inhibition, with downregulation of COX-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that combination chemotherapy using PTX with HM exerted an antitumor effect, which may be implicated for the treatment of gastric cancer. Of note, the combination of the two drugs inhibited migration and invasion more effectively compared with each drug alone, the mechanism of which proceeded via the downregulation of COX-2 expression. PMID:26622726

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency in macrophages leads to defective p110γ PI3K signaling and impairs cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Osma-García, Inés C; Iñiguez, Miguel A; Fresno, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 dependent PGs modulate several functions in many pathophysiological processes, including migration of immune cells. In this study, we addressed the role of Cox-2 in macrophage migration by using in vivo and in vitro models. Upon thioglycolate challenge, CD11b(+) F4/80(+) macrophages showed a diminished ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity in cox-2(-/-) mice. In vivo migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages from the peritoneal cavity to lymph nodes, as well as cell adhesion to the mesothelium, was reduced in response to LPS. In vitro migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages toward MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-1β, as well as cell adhesion to ICAM-1 or fibronectin, was impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to changes in chemokine receptor expression. Remarkably, cox-2(-/-) macrophages showed a deficiency in focal adhesion formation, with reduced phosphorylation of paxillin (Tyr(188)). Interestingly, expression of the p110γ catalytic subunit of PI3K was severely reduced in the absence of Cox-2, leading to defective Akt phosphorylation, as well as cdc42 and Rac-1 activation. Our results indicate that the paxillin/p110γ-PI3K/Cdc42/Rac1 axis is defective in cox-2(-/-) macrophages, which results in impaired cell adhesion and migration.

  3. Amygdalin blocks the in vitro adhesion and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells by an integrin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Afschar, Masud; Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Tsaur, Igor; Mani, Jens; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-03-01

    Information about the natural compound amygdalin, which is employed as an antitumor agent, is sparse and thus its efficacy remains controversial. In this study, to determine whether amygdalin exerts antitumor effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, its impact on RCC metastatic activity was investigated. The RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, were exposed to amygdalin from apricot kernels, and adhesion to human vascular endothelium, immobilized collagen or fibronectin was investigated. The influence of amygdalin on chemotactic and invasive activity was also determined, as was the influence of amygdalin on surface and total cellular α and β integrin expression, which are involved in metastasis. We noted that amygdalin caused significant reductions in chemotactic activity, invasion and adhesion to endothelium, collagen and fibronectin. Using FACScan analysis, we noted that amygdalin also induced reductions, particularly in integrins α5 and α6, in all three cell lines. Functional blocking of α5 resulted in significantly diminished adhesion of KTC-26 and A498 to collagen and also in decreased chemotactic behavior in all three cell lines. Blocking α6 integrin significantly reduced chemotactic activity in all three cell lines. Thus, we suggest that exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibits metastatic spread and is associated with downregulation of α5 and α6 integrins. Therefore, we posit that amygdalin exerts antitumor activity in vitro, and this may be linked to integrin regulation.

  4. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Perera, U; Gillett, C; Naba, A; Law, A-L; Sharma, V P; Wang, J; Wyckoff, J; Balsamo, M; Mosis, F; De Piano, M; Monypenny, J; Woodman, N; McConnell, R E; Mouneimne, G; Van Hemelrijck, M; Cao, Y; Condeelis, J; Hynes, R O; Gertler, F B; Krause, M

    2016-09-29

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlate with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement, we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation and matrix degradation was impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not with Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identified a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, whereas Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not to Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of epidermal growth factor (EGF) gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis.

  5. DDR2-CYR61-MMP1 Signaling Pathway Promotes Bone Erosion in Rheumatoid Arthritis Through Regulating Migration and Invasion of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tong-Lie; Mu, Nan; Gu, Jin-Tao; Shu, Zhen; Zhang, Kuo; Zhao, Jin-Kang; Zhang, Cun; Hao, Qiang; Li, Wei-Na; Zhang, Wang-Qian; Liu, Nan-Nan; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Xiao-Chang; Zhang, Ying-Qi

    2017-02-01

    Regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by collagen in the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) plays a critical role in joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our previous study indicated that discoidin receptor 2 (DDR2) mediated collagen upregulation of MMPs. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains unclear. We report here that CYR61, a secreted, extracellular matrix-associated signaling protein which is capable of regulating a broad range of cellular activities, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and apoptosis, is significantly upregulated in collagen II-stimulated RA FLS. Further studies found that collagen II-activated phosphorylated-DDR2 induces CYR61 through activation of transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1). The elevated CYR61, in turn, accelerates MMP1 production via ETS1 (ETS proto-oncogene 1). In addition, CYR61 significantly promotes FLS invasion and migration. Blockade of CYR61 by an adenovirus expressing CYR61 shRNA (Ad-shCYR61) in vivo remarkably ameliorated the severity of arthritis, reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion, and attenuated bone erosion as detected by micro-computed tomography (μCT), in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Taken together, we uncovered the Collagen II-DDR2-AP-1-CYR61-ETS1-MMP1 loop in RA FLS. In which, CYR61 acts as a hinge to promote cartilage damage through regulating FLS invasion, migration, and MMP1 production and the inflammatory cascade in RA. Thus, CYR61 may be a promising diagnostic and therapeutic target for RA treatment. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Early Passage Dependence of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Mechanics Influences Cellular Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Lin, Wei-Chun; Booth, Elizabeth A; Ladoux, Benoit; Lazarus, Hillard M; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-07-01

    The cellular structures and mechanical properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) vary significantly during culture and with differentiation. Previously, studies to measure mechanics have provided divergent results using different quantitative parameters and mechanical models of deformation. Here, we examine hMSCs prepared for clinical use and subject them to mechanical testing conducive to the relevant deformability associated with clinical injection procedures. Micropipette aspiration of hMSCs shows deformation as a viscoelastic fluid, with little variation from cell to cell within a population. After two passages, hMSCs deform as viscoelastic solids. Further, for clinical applicability during stem cell migration in vivo, we investigated the ability of hMSCs to invade into micropillar arrays of increasing confinement from 12 to 8 μm spacing between adjacent micropillars. We find that hMSC samples with reduced deformability and cells that are more solid-like with passage are more easily able to enter the micropillar arrays. Increased cell fluidity is an advantage for injection procedures and optimization of cell selection based on mechanical properties may enhance efficacy of injected hMSC populations. However, the ability to invade and migrate within tight interstitial spaces appears to be increased with a more solidified cytoskeleton, likely from increased force generation and contractility. Thus, there may be a balance between optimal injection survival and in situ tissue invasion.

  7. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J.; Fitzhugh, David J.; Parker, Joel S.; Brozowski, Jaime M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Lininger, Ruth; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Sahagian, Gary; Truong, Young K.; Sassano, Maria F.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis. PMID:27049755

  8. Insulin-like growth factor I induces migration and invasion of human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Ya-Wei; Yao, Lei; Tosato, Giovanna; Rudikoff, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable form of cancer characterized by accumulation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. During the course of this disease, tumor cells cross endothelial barriers and home to the bone marrow. In latter stages, myeloma cells extravasate through blood vessels and may seed a variety of organs. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is one of several growth factors shown to promote the growth of MM cells. In the current study, we have assessed the ability of IGF-I to serve additionally as a chemotactic factor affecting the mobility and invasive properties of these cells. Results indicate that IGF-I promotes transmigration through vascular endothelial cells and bone marrow stromal cell lines. Analysis of endogenous signaling pathways revealed that protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmicro (PKD/PKCmicro) and RhoA were both activated in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)-dependent manner. Inhibition of PI-3K, PKCs, or Rho-associated kinase by pharmacologic inhibitors abrogated migration, whereas mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Akt, and p70S6 kinase inhibitors had no effect. These results suggest that IGF-I promotes myeloma cell migration by activation of PI-3K/PKCmicro and PI-3K/RhoA pathways independent of Akt. The identification of IGF-I as both a proliferative and migratory factor provides a rational basis for the development of targeted therapeutic strategies directed at IGF-I in the treatment of MM.

  9. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-06-08

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule.

  10. Antithrombin controls tumor migration, invasion and angiogenesis by inhibition of enteropeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Gil, Ginés; Calvo, María Inmaculada; Martín-Villar, Ester; Águila, Sonia; Bohdan, Nataliya; Antón, Ana I.; Espín, Salvador; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Quintanilla, Miguel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a key inhibitor of the coagulation cascade, but it may also function as an anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-viral and anti-apoptotic protein. Here, we report a novel function of antithrombin as a modulator of tumor cell migration and invasion. Antithrombin inhibited enteropeptidase on the membrane surface of HT-29, A549 and U-87 MG cells. The inhibitory process required the activation of antithrombin by heparin, and the reactive center loop and the heparin binding domain were essential. Surprisingly, antithrombin non-covalently inhibited enteropeptidase, revealing a novel mechanism of inhibition for this serpin. Moreover, as a consequence of this inhibition, antithrombin was cleaved, resulting in a molecule with anti-angiogenic properties that reduced vessel-like formation of endothelial cells. The addition of antithrombin and heparin to U-87 MG and A549 cells reduced motility in wound healing assays, inhibited the invasion in transwell assays and the degradation of a gelatin matrix mediated by invadopodia. These processes were controlled by enteropeptidase, as demonstrated by RNA interference experiments. Carcinoma cell xenografts in nude mice showed in vivo co-localization of enteropeptidase and antithrombin. Finally, treatment with heparin reduced experimental metastasis induced by HT29 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the inhibition of enteropeptidase by antithrombin may have a double anti-tumor effect through inhibiting a protease involved in metastasis and generating an anti-angiogenic molecule. PMID:27270881

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis homolog of macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces prostate cell growth, invasiveness, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Twu, Olivia; Dessí, Daniele; Vu, Anh; Mercer, Frances; Stevens, Grant C; de Miguel, Natalia; Rappelli, Paola; Cocco, Anna Rita; Clubb, Robert T; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Johnson, Patricia J

    2014-06-03

    The human-infective parasite Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Infections in men may result in colonization of the prostate and are correlated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We have found that T. vaginalis secretes a protein, T. vaginalis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TvMIF), that is 47% similar to human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (HuMIF), a proinflammatory cytokine. Because HuMIF is reported to be elevated in prostate cancer and inflammation plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancers, we have explored a role for TvMIF in prostate cancer. Here, we show that TvMIF has tautomerase activity, inhibits macrophage migration, and is proinflammatory. We also demonstrate that TvMIF binds the human CD74 MIF receptor with high affinity, comparable to that of HuMIF, which triggers activation of ERK, Akt, and Bcl-2-associated death promoter phosphorylation at a physiologically relevant concentration (1 ng/mL, 80 pM). TvMIF increases the in vitro growth and invasion through Matrigel of benign and prostate cancer cells. Sera from patients infected with T. vaginalis are reactive to TvMIF, especially in males. The presence of anti-TvMIF antibodies indicates that TvMIF is released by the parasite and elicits host immune responses during infection. Together, these data indicate that chronic T. vaginalis infections may result in TvMIF-driven inflammation and cell proliferation, thus triggering pathways that contribute to the promotion and progression of prostate cancer.

  12. Enantioselective Effects of o,p'-DDT on Cell Invasion and Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells: Chirality in Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangming; Dong, Xiaowu; Zou, Dehong; Yu, Yang; Fang, Qunying; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Meirong

    2015-08-18

    The o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) with a chiral center possesses enantioselective estrogenic activity, in which R-(-)-o,p'-DDT exerts a more potent estrogenic effect than S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. Although concern regarding DDT exposure and breast cancer has increased in recent decades, the mode of enantioselective action of o,p'-DDT in breast cancer development is still unknown. Herein, we conducted a systematic study of the effect of o,p'-DDT on stereoselective breast tumor cell progression in a widely used in vitro breast tumor cell model, MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that R-(-)-o,p'-DDT promoted more cancer cell invasion mediated by the human estrogen receptor (ER) by inducing invasion-promoted genes (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and inhibiting invasion-inhibited genes (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -4). Molecular docking verified that the binding affinity between R-(-)-o,p'-DDT and human ER was stronger than that of S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. The enantioselective-induced decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion may involve the downregulation of adhesion-promoted genes (E-cadherin and β-catenin). For the first time, these results reveal that estrogenic-like chiral compounds are of significant concern in the progression of human cancers and that human health risk assessment of chiral chemicals should consider enantioselectivity.

  13. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; ...

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia aremore » motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.« less

  14. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  15. Blocking Junctional Adhesion Molecule C Enhances Dendritic Cell Migration and Boosts the Immune Responses against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Romain; Emre, Yalin; Jemelin, Stéphane; Charmoy, Mélanie; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Imhof, Beat A.

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs) from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1) response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2) response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response. PMID:25474593

  16. HGF/c-Met signaling promotes liver progenitor cell migration and invasion by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-independent, phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase-dependent pathway in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Causado, A; Caballero-Díaz, D; Bertrán, E; Roncero, C; Addante, A; García-Álvaro, M; Fernández, M; Herrera, B; Porras, A; Fabregat, I; Sánchez, A

    2015-10-01

    Oval cells constitute an interesting hepatic cell population. They contribute to sustain liver regeneration during chronic liver damage, but in doing this they can be target of malignant conversion and become tumor-initiating cells and drive hepatocarcinogenesis. The molecular mechanisms beneath either their pro-regenerative or pro-tumorigenic potential are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of the HGF/c-Met pathway in regulation of oval cell migratory and invasive properties. Our results show that HGF induces c-Met-dependent oval cell migration both in normal culture conditions and after in vitro wounding. HGF-triggered migration involves F-actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which is also evidenced by activation of Rac1. Furthermore, HGF causes ZO-1 translocation from cell-cell contact sites to cytoplasm and its concomitant activation by phosphorylation. However, no loss of expression of cell-cell adhesion proteins, including E-cadherin, ZO-1 and Occludin-1, is observed. Additionally, migration does not lead to cell dispersal but to a characteristic organized pattern in rows, in turn associated with Golgi compaction, providing strong evidence of a morphogenic collective migration. Besides migration, HGF increases oval cell invasion through extracellular matrix, a process that requires PI3K activation and is at least partly mediated by expression and activation of metalloproteases. Altogether, our findings provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the essential role of HGF/c-Met signaling during oval cell-mediated mouse liver regeneration.

  17. N-WASP promotes invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells through regulating p38 MAPKs signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jinxuan; Yang, Hui; Huang, Xin; Leng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Yunfeng; Xu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) is an important member of the WASP family involved in the actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Recent evidence suggests that N-WASP may play important roles in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the contribution of N-WASP to cervical cancer is still unknown. The present study focused on elucidating the role of N-WASP in the malignant behavior of cervical cancer cells. We found that N-WASP overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues compared with paired paracancerous tissues and normal tissues, and similar results were observed in several cervical cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that overexpression of N-WASP facilitated migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells, while downregulation of N-WASP resulted in decreased cell migration and invasion. In addition, the data showed that N-WASP might promote invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells via regulating the activity of p38 MAPKs pathway. Altogether, the study suggested that N-WASP might serve as an oncogene in cervical cancer, and provided novel insights into the mechanism that how N-WASP promoted invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells.

  18. Co-Expression of Ezrin-CLIC5-Podocalyxin Is Associated with Migration and Invasiveness in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Téllez, Teresita N. J.; Lopez, Tania V.; Vásquez Garzón, Verónica Rocío; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Prognostic markers are important for predicting the progression and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ezrin (EZR) and Podocalyxin (PODXL) are proteins associated with invasion, migration and poor prognosis in various types of cancer. Recently, it has been observed that chloride intracellular channel 5 (CLIC5) forms a complex with EZR and PODXL and that it is required for podocyte structure and function. In this study, we evaluated the overexpression of EZR, PODXL and CLIC5 in HCC. Methods The modified resistant hepatocyte model (MRHR), human biopsies and HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7 and SNU387) were used in this study. Gene and protein expression levels were evaluated in the MRHR by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses, and protein expression in the human biopsies was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression in the HCC cell lines was evaluated by immunofluorescence and Western blot, also the migration and invasive abilities of Huh7 cells were evaluated using shRNA-mediated inhibition. Results Our results indicated that these genes and proteins were overexpressed in HCC. Moreover, when the expression of CLIC5 and PODXL was inhibited in Huh7 cells, we observed decreased migration and invasion. Conclusion This study suggested that EZR, CLIC5 and PODXL could be biological markers to predict the prognosis of HCC and that these proteins participate in migration and invasion processes. PMID:26135398

  19. S100A7 promotes the migration, invasion and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Xukun; Hua, Zhen; Ma, Jianlin; Wu, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhihua; Chen, Hongyan; Cui, Zhumei

    2017-02-15

    S100A7 is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein that has been suggested to be implicated in cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumor metastasis. However, its role in cervical cancer has not yet been fully clarified. The present study used immunohistochemistry analysis of S100A7 in clinical specimens of cervical cancer to show that S100A7 expression was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues and S100A7 expression in high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN) was significantly higher than cervical cancer. Statistical analysis showed that S100A7 expression was associated with tumor grade (P <0.01) and lymph node metastasis (P <0.05). Functional studies showed that overexpression of S100A7 in cervical cancer cells promoted migration, invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer cells without influencing cell proliferation. Furthermore, S100A7 was found to be secreted into the conditioned media and extracellular S100A7 enhanced cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, S100A7 bound to RAGE and activated ERK signaling pathway. And S100A7 enhanced cell mesenchymal properties and induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In summary, these data reveal a crucial role for S100A7 in regulating cell migration, invasion, metastasis and EMT of cervical cancer and suggest that targeting S100A7 may offer a new targeted strategy for cervical cancer.

  20. Girdin regulates the migration and invasion of glioma cells via the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    NI, WEIMIN; FANG, YAN; TONG, LEI; TONG, ZHAOXUE; YI, FUXIN; QIU, JIANWU; WANG, RUI; TONG, XIAOJIE

    2015-01-01

    Girdin, an actin-binding protein, is associated with cell migration and is expressed at high levels in glioma cells. However, the association between girdin and the development of glioma remains to be elucidated. In the present study, short-hairpin RNA technology was used to silence the gene expression of girdin. The effects of girdin silencing on glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion were then assessed using a cell viability assay, wound-healing assay, transwell invasion assay, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and gelatin zymography. The results suggested that girdin silencing inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. In addition, the expression levels and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were also affected by girdin silencing. Further mechanistic investigation indicated that girdin may regulate glioma cell migration and invasion through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K-Akt) signaling pathway. Therefore, the results of the present study provide a theoretical foundation for the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:26151295

  1. Involvement of IL-10 and TGF-β in HLA-E-mediated neuroblastoma migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Zijun; Guo, Xiaofang; Liao, Ru; Yang, Kaibin; Ye, Litong; You, Zhiyao

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is highly expressed in a variety of tumors and, in addition to immune escape, may promote tumor growth via other mechanisms. However, the role of HLA-E in neuroblastoma (NB) migration and invasion is unknown. In the present study, HLA-E expression in human NB tumors was measured by immunohistochemistry. The effect of HLA-E on NB cell migration and invasion was studied in vitro and in vivo, as well as the effect of HLA-E on natural killer (NK)-cell cytotoxicity. HLA-E was expressed in 70.2% of the NB tumor tissues examined. HLA-E expression by NB cells inhibited NK-cell cytotoxicity and induced the release of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. HLA-E and the released cytokines enhanced the ability of NB cells migration and invasion. NK cell infusion did not inhibit the growth of NB cells with high HLA-E expression but instead increased the number of metastatic cells in the bone marrow. Taken together, the results indicate that IL-10 and TGF-β are involved in HLA-E-mediated NB migration and invasion. Thus, HLA-E may be a new treatment target in NB. PMID:27322426

  2. Triptolide inhibits the migration and invasion of human prostate cancer cells via Caveolin-1/CD147/MMPs pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shiqi; Wang, Liping; Chen, Xixi; Fan, Bo; Yuan, Qingmin; Zhang, Han; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Shujing

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common type of carcinoma and the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death in males. Triptolide, is a main and effective component of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, which exerts an broad-spectrum anti-malignant tumor function. However, the effect of triptolide on migration and invasion of human prostate cancer cells is still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that triptolide significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is regarded as a major structural protein of caveolae and participated in lipid transport, signal transduction and tumor progression. Triptolide treatment inhibited the expression of tumor promoter Cav-1 and reduced CD147 and MMPs activities at both mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, triptolide treatment combined with Cav-1 knockdown in PCa cells enhanced the effects of anti-migration and anti-invasion, and those effects were restored following Cav-1-rescued. Together, our research indicates that triptolide represses the migration and invasion through Cav-1/CD147/MMPs pathway in PCa cells, which gives a better understanding of triptolide in clinical aggressive prostate cancer therapy.

  3. [Effects of miR-382 on cell migration, invasion and proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Bu, P; Li, F; Liu, X L; Xu, J

    2017-02-28

    Objective: To investigate the effects of miR-382 on cell migration, invasion and proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803. Methods: The level of miR-382 expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 50 paired gastric cancer tissues and their adjacent normal tissues. miR-382 overexpression was achieved by transfection of construct pcDNA-miR-382 into MGC-803 cells. The migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells were detected by the scratch wound assay, Transwell and CCK-8, respectively. Results: miR-382 was decreased in 41 cases (82%) of gastric cancer tissues compared to their control. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-382 effectively inhibited the migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells(P<0.05). Conclusion: Down-regulation of miR-382 has a correlation with the progression of gastric cancer. Up-regulation of miR-382 can inhibit the migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells.

  4. miR-186 affects the proliferation, invasion and migration of human gastric cancer by inhibition of Twist1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chunhong; Sun, Deguang; Zhang, Liang; Song, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that miRNAs are dysregulated in a variety of cancers including gastric cancer (GC), and emerging as key oncogenes or tumor suppressors. In this study, qRT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of miR-186 in GC tissues and adjacent non-cancerous tissues, and then more in-vitro experiments were used to investigate the role of miR-186 in GC cells. Here, we identified miR-186 was generally down-regulated in GC tissues; however, Twist1 was generally up-regulated in GC tissues. Moreover, miR-186 and Twist1 were associated with larger tumor size and advanced clinical stage of GC. In-vitro experiments demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of miR-186 inhibited GC cell proliferation, invasion and migration; however, inhibited expression of miR-186 enhanced cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, the luciferase reporter assay demonstrated Twist1 as a direct target of miR-186. Finally, over-expression of Twist1 abrogated inhibitory impact of miR-186 on cell proliferation, invasion and migration. In conclusion, miR-186 affects the proliferation, invasion and migration of human gastric cancer by inhibition of Twist1, and could be a tumor suppressor in GC development. Thus, miR-186 may be served as a candidate prognostic biomarker and target for new therapies in human gastric cancer. PMID:27835599

  5. N-WASP promotes invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells through regulating p38 MAPKs signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jinxuan; Yang, Hui; Huang, Xin; Leng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Yunfeng; Xu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) is an important member of the WASP family involved in the actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Recent evidence suggests that N-WASP may play important roles in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the contribution of N-WASP to cervical cancer is still unknown. The present study focused on elucidating the role of N-WASP in the malignant behavior of cervical cancer cells. We found that N-WASP overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues compared with paired paracancerous tissues and normal tissues, and similar results were observed in several cervical cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that overexpression of N-WASP facilitated migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells, while downregulation of N-WASP resulted in decreased cell migration and invasion. In addition, the data showed that N-WASP might promote invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells via regulating the activity of p38 MAPKs pathway. Altogether, the study suggested that N-WASP might serve as an oncogene in cervical cancer, and provided novel insights into the mechanism that how N-WASP promoted invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. PMID:28337270

  6. MSX1 inhibits cell migration and invasion through regulating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Haiquan; Guo, Li; Chen, Lifeng; Qiao, Guangyu; Meng, Xianghui; Xu, Bainan; Ye, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a type of primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. The hallmark phenotype of glioblastoma is its aggressive invasion. Understanding the molecular mechanism of the invasion behavior of glioblastoma is essential for the development of effective treatment of the disease. In our present study, we found that the expression levels of a homeobox transcription factor, MSX1, were significantly reduced in glioblastoma compared to normal brain tissues. The levels of MSX1 in glioblastoma tissues were also correlated with the survival of the patients. In cultured glioblastoma cells, MSX1 was a negative regulator of cell migration and invasion. Loss of MSX1 enhanced cell migration and induced mesenchymal transition as characterized by the downregulation of E-cadherin and the upregulation of N-cadherin. Overexpression of MSX1 on the other hand led to the inhibition of both cell migration and mesenchymal transition. We also found that MSX1 was able to inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and that the ability to regulate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is critical for MSX1 to suppress glioblastoma cell migration and invasion.

  7. Feruloyl-L-arabinose attenuates migration, invasion and production of reactive oxygen species in H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Wang, Hui-Min; Chang, Kuo-Feng; Hu, Huei-Ting; Hwang, Lian-Je; Fu, Tzu-Fun; Lin, Yin-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Fong, Yao; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2013-08-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, is an abundant dietary antioxidant and exerts the mitogenic effect on cells. Recently, we isolated an active FA derivative, namely feruloyl-L-arabinose (FAA), from coba husk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of FAA on the proliferation, migration and invasion of H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our results showed a strong antioxidant potential of FAA. Additionally, FAA inhibited the migration and invasion ability, while causing a significant accumulation of G2/M-population, of H1299 tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas no significant change on cell proliferation was observed. Results from the wound healing assay revealed that cell migration ability was markedly inhibited by FAA treatments. Similarly, results of gelatin zymography study showed that FAA treatments significantly decreased the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, suggesting that FAA-mediated inhibition on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells may be achieved by the down-regulation of the MMPs activities. Taken together, our present work provides a new insight into the novel inhibitory function of FAA on cell migration in H1299 cells, suggesting its promising role in the chemoprevention of lung cancer.

  8. Dihydromyricetin inhibits migration and invasion of hepatoma cells through regulation of MMP-9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Li, Ran; Zeng, Guo-Fang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jie; Shu, Yang; Liu, Zhong-Kao; Qiu, Zhi-Dong; Wang, Dong-Jun; Miao, Hui-Lai; Li, Ming-Yi; Zhu, Run-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of dihydromyricetin (DHM) on the migration and invasion of human hepatic cancer cells. METHODS: The hepatoma cell lines SK-Hep-1 and MHCC97L were used in this study. The cells were cultured in RPIM-1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum at 37 °C in a humidified 5% CO2 incubator. DHM was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and diluted to various concentrations in medium before applying to cells. MTT assays were performed to measure the viability of the cells after DHM treatment. Wound healing and Boyden transwell assays were used to assess cancer cell motility. The invasive capacity of cancer cells was measured using Matrigel-coated transwell chambers. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 activity was examined by fluorescence analysis. Western blot was carried out to analyze the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, p-38, JNK, ERK1/2 and PKC-δ proteins. All data were analyzed by Student’s t tests in GraphPad prism 5.0 software and are presented as mean ± SD. RESULTS: DHM was found to strongly inhibit the migration of the hepatoma cell lines SK-Hep-1 (without DHM, 24 h: 120 ± 8 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 65 ± 10 μmol/L, P < 0.001) and MHCC97L (without DHM, 24 h: 126 ± 7 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 74 ± 6 μmol/L, P < 0.001). The invasive capacity of the cells was reduced by DHM treatment (SK-Hep-1 cells without DHM, 24 h: 67 ± 4 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 9 ± 3 μmol/L, P < 0.001; MHCC97L cells without DHM, 24 h: 117 ± 8 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 45 ± 2 μmol/L, P < 0.001). MMP2/9 activity was also inhibited by DHM exposure (SK-Hep-1 cells without DHM, 24 h: 600 ± 26 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 100 ± 6 μmol/L, P < 0.001; MHCC97L cells without DHM, 24 h: 504 ± 32 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM 24 h: 156 ± 10 μmol/L, P < 0.001). Western blot analysis showed that DHM decreased the expression level of MMP-9 but had little effect on MMP-2. Further investigation indicated that DHM markedly

  9. Full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation in case of severe dental erosion, a minimally invasive approach following the 3-step technique.

    PubMed

    Grütter, Linda; Vailati, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    A full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation in case of severe dental erosion may present a challenge for both the clinician and the laboratory technician, not only for the multiple teeth to be restored, but also for their time schedule, difficult to be included in a busy agenda of a private practice. Thanks to the simplicity of the 3-step technique, full-mouth rehabilitations become easier to handle. In this article the treatment of a very compromised case of dental erosion (ACE class V) is illustrated, implementing only adhesive techniques. The very pleasing clinical outcome was the result of the esthetic, mechanic and most of all biological success achieved, confirming that minimally invasive dentistry should always be the driving motor of any rehabilitation, especially in patients who have already suffered from conspicuous tooth destruction.

  10. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  11. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Müller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPPalpha, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPPalpha has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  12. Keratinocytes from APP/APLP2-deficient mice are impaired in proliferation, adhesion and migration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Siemes, Christina; Quast, Thomas; Kummer, Christiane; Wehner, Sven; Kirfel, Gregor; Mueller, Ulrike; Herzog, Volker . E-mail: Herzog@uni-bonn.de

    2006-07-01

    Growing evidence shows that the soluble N-terminal form (sAPP{alpha}) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) represents an epidermal growth factor fostering keratinocyte proliferation, migration and adhesion. APP is a member of a protein family including the two mammalian amyloid precursor-like proteins APLP1 and APLP2. In the mammalian epidermis, only APP and APLP2 are expressed. APP and APLP2-deficient mice die shortly after birth but do not display a specific epidermal phenotype. In this report, we investigated the epidermis of APP and/or APLP2 knockout mice. Basal keratinocytes showed reduced proliferation in vivo by about 40%. Likewise, isolated keratinocytes exhibited reduced proliferation rates in vitro, which could be completely rescued by either exogenously added recombinant sAPP{alpha}, or by co-culture with dermal fibroblasts derived from APP knockout mice. Moreover, APP-knockout keratinocytes revealed reduced migration velocity resulting from severely compromised cell substrate adhesion. Keratinocytes from double knockout mice died within the first week of culture, indicating essential functions of APP-family members for survival in vitro. Our data indicate that sAPP{alpha} has to be considered as an essential epidermal growth factor which, however, in vivo can be functionally compensated to a certain extent by other growth factors, e.g., factors released from dermal fibroblasts.

  13. Dynamics of Cell Ensembles on Adhesive Micropatterns: Bridging the Gap between Single Cell Spreading and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-01-01

    The collective dynamics of multicellular systems arise from the interplay of a few fundamental elements: growth, division and apoptosis of single cells; their mechanical and adhesive interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix; and the tendency of polarized cells to move. Micropatterned substrates are increasingly used to dissect the relative roles of these fundamental processes and to control the resulting dynamics. Here we show that a unifying computational framework based on the cellular Potts model can describe the experimentally observed cell dynamics over all relevant length scales. For single cells, the model correctly predicts the statistical distribution of the orientation of the cell division axis as well as the final organisation of the two daughters on a large range of micropatterns, including those situations in which a stable configuration is not achieved and rotation ensues. Large ensembles migrating in heterogeneous environments form non-adhesive regions of inward-curved arcs like in epithelial bridge formation. Collective migration leads to swirl formation with variations in cell area as observed experimentally. In each case, we also use our model to predict cell dynamics on patterns that have not been studied before. PMID:27054883

  14. Leptin promotes human endometriotic cell migration and invasion by up-regulating MMP-2 through the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji-Hye; Choi, Youn Seok; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-10-01

    Despite evidence that leptin may play a role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis, the specific function of leptin in the migration and invasion of endometriotic cells is not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on the migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression levels of human endometriotic cells. We found that leptin stimulated the migration and invasion of endometriotic cells (11Z, 12Z and 22B) in a dose-dependent manner. Leptin receptor (ObR) siRNA significantly inhibited the migration and invasion induced by leptin in 11Z and 12Z cells. Leptin-induced migration and invasion were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with SB-3CT, a specific gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) inhibitor. In addition, leptin-induced increases in the mRNA and protein expression and enzyme activity of MMP-2 in 11Z and 12Z cells. Selectively inhibiting MMP-2 using siRNA and an inhibitor (GM6003), impaired the ability of leptin to stimulate the migration and invasion of endometriotic cells, suggesting that MMP-2 plays an essential role in leptin-induced migration and invasion. Janus Kinase 2/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (JAK2/STAT3) inhibitor (AG490) significantly inhibited the migration, invasion and MMP-2 expression induced by leptin in endometriotic cells. Furthermore, the Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase inhibitor PD98059 neutralized the migration and invasion promoting effects of leptin. Taken together, these results suggest that leptin may contribute to the migration and invasion abilities of endometriotic cells via the up-regulation of MMP-2 through an ObR-dependent JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway.

  15. Role of the actin-binding protein profilin1 in radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rust, Marco B; Kullmann, Jan A; Witke, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Profilins are small G-actin-binding proteins essential for cytoskeletal dynamics. Of the four mammalian profilin isoforms, profilin1 shows a broad expression pattern, profilin2 is abundant in the brain, and profilin3 and profilin4 are restricted to the testis. In vitro studies on cancer and epithelial cell lines suggested a role for profilins in cell migration and cell-cell adhesion. Genetic studies in mice revealed the importance of profilin1 in neuronal migration, while profilin2 has apparently acquired a specific function in synaptic physiology. We recently reported a mouse mutant line lacking profilin1 in the brain; animals display morphological defects that are typical for impaired neuronal migration. We found that during cerebellar development, profilin1 is specifically required for radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons. Profilin1 mutants showed cerebellar hypoplasia and aberrant organization of cerebellar cortex layers, with ectopically arranged granule neurons. In this commentary, we briefly introduce the profilin family and summarize the current knowledge on profilin activity in cell migration and adhesion. Employing cerebellar granule cells as a model, we shed some light on the mechanisms by which profilin1 may control radial migration and glial cell adhesion. Finally, a potential implication of profilin1 in human developmental neuropathies is discussed.

  16. RhoC Mediates Epidermal Growth Factor-Stimulated Migration and Invasion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tumur, Zohra; Katebzadeh, Shahbaz; Guerra, Carlos; Bhushan, Lokesh; Alkam, Tursun; Henson, Bradley S.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) where it has been shown to promote tumor cell invasion upon phosphorylation. One mechanism by which EGFR promotes tumor progression is by activating signal cascades that lead to loss of E-cadherin, a transmembrane glycoprotein of the cell-cell adherence junctions; however mediators of these signaling cascades are not fully understood. One such mediator, RhoC, is activated upon a number of external stimuli, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), but its role as a mediator of EGF-stimulated migration and invasion has not been elucidated in HNSCC. In the present study, we investigate the role of RhoC as a mediator of EGF-stimulated migration and invasion in HNSCC. We show that upon EGF stimulation, EGFR and RhoC were strongly activated in HNSCC. This resulted in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Akt pathway (PI3K-Akt), phosphorylation of GSK-3β at the Ser9 residue, and subsequent down regulation of E-cadherin cell surface expression resulting in increased tumor cell invasion. Knockdown of RhoC restored E-cadherin expression and inhibited EGF-stimulated migration and invasion. This is the first report in HNSCC demonstrating the role RhoC plays in mediating EGF-stimulated migration and invasion by down-regulating the PI3K-Akt pathway and E-cadherin expression. RhoC may serve as a treatment target for HNSCC. PMID:25622907

  17. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF regulates migration, invasion, and MMP secretion of immortalized cells derived from human ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Marina Rolo Pinheiro; Falcão, Aline Semblano Carreira; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; da Silva Kataoka, Maria Sueli; Ribeiro, André L R; Boccardo, Enrique; de Siqueira, Adriane Sousa; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João; de Melo Alves Júnior, Sérgio

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumor characterized by local invasiveness and frequent recurrence. The surrounding stroma, composed of different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM), may influence ameloblastoma invasive behavior. Furthermore, tumor and stromal cells secrete matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which, in turn, can modulate the matrix and promote the release of ECM-bound growth factors. Among these growth factors, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor, EGFR, have already been shown to stimulate MMP synthesis, suggesting that an interdependent mechanism, involving MMP activity and growth factors release, may contribute to tumor invasiveness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the EGF/EGFR signaling pathway on migration, invasion, and MMP activity, in a primary cell line derived from human ameloblastoma. We established and characterized a primary cell line (AME-1) from a human ameloblastoma sample. This cell line was transduced with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 oncogenes, generating the AME-HPV continuous cell line. EGF, MMP2, and MMP9 expression in ameloblastoma biopsies and in the AME-HPV cell line was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, respectively. Migratory activity of EGF-treated AME-HPV cells was investigated using monolayer wound assays and Transwell chambers. EGF-induced invasion was assessed in Boyden chambers coated with Matrigel. Conditioned medium from EGF-treated cells was subjected to zymography. EGFR expression in AME-HPV cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA), to verify the relationship between this receptor and MMP secretion. Ameloblastoma samples and AME-HPV cells expressed EGF, EGFR, MMP2, and MMP9. AME-HPV cells treated with EGF showed increased rates of migration and invasion, as well as enhanced MMP2 and MMP9 activity. EGFR knockdown decreased MMP2 and MMP9 levels in AME-HPV cells. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF probably regulates migration, invasion

  18. The focal adhesion-associated proteins DOCK5 and GIT2 comprise a rheostat in control of epithelial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Scott R.; Köllmann, Clemens P.; van Lidth de Jeude, Jooske F.; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Engelholm, Lars H.; Frödin, Morten; Hansen, Steen H.

    2016-01-01

    DOCK proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac and Cdc42 GTPases. DOCK1 is the founding member of the family and acts downstream of integrins via the canonical Crk-p130Cas complex to activate Rac GTPases in numerous contexts. In contrast, DOCK5, which possesses the greatest similarity to DOCK1, remains sparingly studied. Here we establish that DOCK5 plays a non-redundant role in regulating motile and invasive capacities of epithelial cells. DOCK1 is constitutively associated with sites of integrin attachment termed focal adhesions (FA). In contrast, we demonstrate that DOCK5 recruitment to FAs in Hela cells is restricted by GIT2, an established regulator of FA signaling. We determine that GIT2 is targeted to FAs in response to Rho-ROCK signaling and actomyosin contractility. Accordingly, inhibition of ROCK activity or MLC function promotes enrichment of DOCK5 in membrane protrusions and nascent cell-substratum adhesions. We further demonstrate that GIT2 inhibits the interaction of DOCK5 with Crk. Moreover, we show that depletion of GIT2 promotes DOCK5-dependent activation of the Crk-p130Cas signaling cascade to promote Rac1-mediated lamellipodial protrusion and FA turnover. The antagonism between GIT2 and DOCK5 extends to non-transformed MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, with DOCK5 “dialing-up” and GIT2 “dialing-down” invasiveness. Finally, we determine that DOCK5 inhibition attenuates invasion and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells and prolongs life span of mice injected with these cells. Collectively, our work identifies DOCK5 as a key regulator of epithelial invasion and metastasis, and demonstrates that suppression of DOCK5 by GIT2 represents a previously unappreciated mechanism for coordination of Rho and Rac GTPases. PMID:27669437

  19. Analysis of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons migrating from a polyolefin-based hot-melt adhesive into food.

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Martin; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Simat, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Hot-melt adhesives are widely utilised to glue cardboard boxes used as food packaging material. They have to comply with the requirements of Article 3 of the European Framework Regulation for food contact materials (1935/2004). The hot melt raw materials analysed mainly consisted of paraffinic waxes, hydrocarbon resins and polyolefins. The hydrocarbon resins, functioning as tackifiers, were the predominant source of hydrocarbons of sufficient volatility to migrate into dry foods: the 18 hydrocarbon resins analysed contained 8.2-118 g kg(-1) saturated and up to 59 g kg(-1) aromatic hydrocarbons eluted from GC between n-C16 and n-C24, substantially more than the paraffinic waxes and the polyolefins. These tackfier resins, especially the oligomers ≤ C24, have been characterised structurally by GC×GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Migration into food was estimated using a simulating system with polenta as food simulant, which was verified by the analysis of a commercial risotto rice sample packed in a virgin fibre folding box sealed with a hot melt. About 0.5-1.5% of the potentially migrating substances (between n-C16 and n-C24) of a hot melt were found to be transferred into food under storage conditions, which can result in a food contamination in the order of 1 mg kg(-1) food (depending on the amount of potentially migrating substances from the hot melt, the hot melt surface, amount of food, contact time etc.). Migrates from hot melts are easily mistaken for mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled cardboard.

  20. A continuum approximation to an off-lattice individual-cell based model of cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Alistair M; Fleck, Christian; Grima, Ramon

    2014-10-21

    Cell-cell adhesion plays a key role in the collective migration of cells and in determining correlations in the relative cell positions and velocities. Recently, it was demonstrated that off-lattice individual cell based models (IBMs) can accurately capture the correlations observed experimentally in a migrating cell population. However, IBMs are often computationally expensive and difficult to analyse mathematically. Traditional continuum-based models, in contrast, are amenable to mathematical analysis and are computationally less demanding, but typically correspond to a mean-field approximation of cell migration and so ignore cell-cell correlations. In this work, we address this problem by using an off-lattice IBM to derive a continuum approximation which does take into account correlations. We furthermore show that a mean-field approximation of the off-lattice IBM leads to a single partial integro-differential equation of the same form as proposed by Sherratt and co-workers to model cell adhesion. The latter is found to be only effective at approximating the ensemble averaged cell number density when mechanical interactions between cells are weak. In contrast, the predictions of our novel continuum model for the time-evolution of the ensemble cell number density distribution and of the density-density correlation function are in close agreement with those obtained from the IBM for a wide range of mechanical interaction strengths. In particular, we observe 'front-like' propagation of cells in simulations using both our IBM and our continuum model, but not in the continuum model simulations obtained using the mean-field approximation.

  1. AJUBA promotes the migration and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through upregulation of MMP10 and MMP13 expression.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuejiao; Chen, Zhaoli; Hu, Xueda; Luo, Mei; Sun, Zengmiao; Li, Jiagen; Shi, Susheng; Feng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Chengcheng; Li, Zitong; Yang, Wenhui; Li, Yuan; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Fang; Gao, Yibo; He, Jie

    2016-06-14

    The LIM-domain protein AJUBA has been reported to be involved in cell-cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and cell fate decision by acting as a scaffold or adaptor protein. We previously identified AJUBA as a putative cancer gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, the function and underlying mechanisms of AJUBA in ESCC remain largely unknown. In the present study, we detected AJUBA levels in ESCC tumor tissues and in corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and investigated the function and mechanism of AJUBA in ESCC cells. The IHC results showed that AJUBA levels were significantly higher in ESCC tissues compared with corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.001). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that AJUBA promoted cell growth and colony formation, inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis of ESCC cells, and promoted ESCC cell migration and invasion. RNA sequencing was used to reveal the oncogenic pathways of AJUBA that were involved, and MMP10 and MMP13 were identified as two of the downstream targets of AJUBA. Thus, AJUBA upregulates the levels of MMP10 and MMP13 by activating ERK1/2. Taken together, these findings revealed that AJUBA serves as oncogenic gene in ESCC and may serve as a new target for ESCC therapy.

  2. Plakoglobin Reduces the in vitro Growth, Migration and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing N-Cadherin and Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Alaee, Mahsa; Danesh, Ghazal; Pasdar, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cadherins and catenins plays pivotal roles in ovarian cancer development and progression. Plakoglobin (PG, γ-catenin) is a paralog of β-catenin with dual adhesive and signaling functions. While β-catenin has known oncogenic function, PG generally acts as a tumor/metastasis suppressor. We recently showed that PG interacted with p53 and that its growth/metastasis inhibitory function may be mediated by this interaction. Very little is known about the role of PG in ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the in vitro tumor/metastasis suppressor effects of PG in ovarian cancer cell lines with mutant p53 expression and different cadherin profiles. We showed that the N-cadherin expressing and E-cadherin and PG deficient ES-2 cells were highly migratory and invasive, whereas OV-90 cells that express E-cadherin, PG and very little/no N-cadherin were not. Exogenous expression of PG or E-cadherin or N-cadherin knockdown in ES-2 cells (ES-2-E-cad, ES-2-PG and ES-2-shN-cad) significantly reduced their migration and invasion. Also, PG expression or N-cadherin knockdown significantly decreased ES-2 cells growth. Furthermore, PG interacted with both cadherins and with wild type and mutant p53 in normal ovarian and ES-2-PG cell lines, respectively. PMID:27144941

  3. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase SHIP1 and PTEN coordinate to regulate cell migration and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Subhanjan; Subramanian, Kulandayan K; Sakai, Jiro; Bajrami, Besnik; Luo, Hongbo R

    2012-04-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P(3) (PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)) is formed by stimulation of various receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors and integrins. The lipid phosphatases PTEN and SHIP1 are critical in regulating the level of PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) during chemotaxis. Observations that loss of PTEN had minor and loss of SHIP1 resulted in a severe chemotaxis defect in neutrophils led to the belief that SHIP1 rather than PTEN acts as a predominant phospholipid phosphatase in establishing a PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) compass. In this study, we show that SHIP1 regulates PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) production in response to cell adhesion and plays a limited role when cells are in suspension. SHIP1((-)/(-)) neutrophils lose their polarity upon cell adhesion and are extremely adherent, which impairs chemotaxis. However, chemo-taxis can be restored by reducing adhesion. Loss of SHIP1 elevates Akt activation following cell adhesion due to increased PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) production. From our observations, we conclude that SHIP1 prevents formation of top-down PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) polarity to facilitate proper cell attachment and detachment during chemotaxis.

  4. DDR2 plays a role in fibroblast migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activated DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Mireya Liliana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto

    2012-12-07

    Discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) is a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that can be activated by soluble collagen and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions including organism growth and wound repair. In the current studies, we used fibronectin and collagen-coated 2D surfaces and collagen matrices in combination with siRNA technology to investigate the role of DDR2 in a range of fibroblast motile activities. Silencing DDR2 with siRNA inhibited cell spreading and migration, and similar inhibition occurred regardless whether cells were interacting with fibronectin or collagen surfaces. Under the assay conditions used, DDR2 tyrosine kinase activation was not observed unless soluble collagen was added to the incubation medium. Finally silencing DDR2 also inhibited human fibroblast migration in 3D collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D collagen matrix remodeling and contraction. Taken together, our findings suggest that DDR2 is required for normal fibroblast spreading and migration independent of adhesion ligand and collagen activation of DDR2 tyrosine kinase.

  5. MIP-1α enhances Jurkat cell transendothelial migration by up-regulating endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Ma, Ying-Huan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) in Jurkat cells and its effect on transendothelial migration. In the present study, human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells (Jurkat cells) were used as a model of T cells in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), which demonstrated significantly higher MIP-1α expression compared with that in normal T-cell controls. The ability of Jurkat cells to cross a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) monolayer was almost completely abrogated by MIP-1α siRNA. In addition, the overexpression of MIP-1α resulted in the up-regulated expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, which enhanced the migration of Jurkat cells through a monolayer of HBMEC. MIP-1α levels in Jurkat cells appeared to be an important factor for its transendothelial migration, which may provide the theoretical basis to understand the mechanisms of brain metastases of T-ALL at cellular and molecular levels.

  6. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration.

  7. PKD Controls αvβ3 Integrin Recycling and Tumor Cell Invasive Migration Through its Substrate Rabaptin-5

    PubMed Central

    Christoforides, Claudine; Rainero, Elena; Brown, Kristin K.; Norman, Jim C.; Toker, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Summary Integrin recycling is critical for cell migration. Protein Kinase D (PKD) mediates signals from the platelet-derived growth factor-receptor (PDGF-R) to control αvβ3 integrin recycling. We now show that Rabaptin-5, a Rab5 effector in endosomal membrane fusion, is a PKD substrate. PKD phosphorylates Rabaptin-5 at Ser407 and this is both necessary and sufficient for PDGF-dependent short-loop recycling of αvβ3, which in turn inhibits α5β1 integrin recycling. Rab4, but not Rab5, interacts with phosphorylated Rabaptin-5 toward the front of migrating cells to promote delivery of αvβ3 to the leading edge, thereby driving persistent cell motility and invasion that is dependent on this integrin. Consistently, disruption of Rabaptin-5 Ser407 phosphorylation reduces persistent cell migration in 2D and αvβ3-dependent invasion. Conversely, invasive migration that is dependent on α5β1 integrin is promoted by disrupting Rabaptin phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate that the PKD pathway couples receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to an integrin switch, via Rabaptin-5 phosphorylation. PMID:22975325

  8. Evaluation of the behavior of murine and human embryonic stem cells in in vitro migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    T'Joen, V; Somers, P; Declercq, H; Cornelissen, M

    2013-04-01

    Cell migration and invasion are essential processes in a variety of physiological events in the body, but also in several patho-physiological events. In this paper, the behavior of murine and human embryonic stem cells is examined in in vitro migration and invasion models. mESC and hESC were applied as spheroids, also known as patches, and as single cells, to mimic possible cell therapy application strategies. Two known in vitro migration assays, the ECM (extracellular matrix) assay and the Boyden chamber migration assay were selected. These assays revealed that mESC are statistically significantly more infiltrative than hESC. Application as spheroid results in a slightly higher infiltrative capacity compared single cells. The PHF (precultured chick heart fragment) assay was selected as an invasion assay. In the PHF assay a more 3D examination of the infiltrative nature of the ESC can be observed. The mESC showed infiltrative behavior, as spheroids and as single cells. The hESC were infiltrative as single cells but not as spheroids. The results of these assays are mostly complementary and prove the applicability of these assays, which were originally applied in tumor biology, in migratory behavior studies regarding stem cells and their progeny in basic and other conditions.

  9. Overexpression of ADAMTS5 can regulate the migration and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Chen, Jie; Feng, Jian; Liu, Yifei; Xue, Qun; Mao, Guoxin; Gai, Ling; Lu, Xiaoning; Zhang, Rui; Cheng, Jialin; Hu, Yanxia; Shao, Mengting; Shen, Hong; Huang, Jianan

    2016-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major cause of cancer-related lethality among human cancer patients globally, and the poor prognosis of this cancer is mainly explained by metastasis, so it is essential to find out the molecule mechanisms and a novel therapeutic for NSCLC. A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motif 5 (ADAMTS5) belongs to the protease family. It has been reported to participate in tumor migration and invasion. In this study, we showed that the expression of ADAMTS5 was higher in lung cancer tissues by Western blot. The immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 140 NSCLC cases, and the result indicated that ADAMTS5 was significantly associated with clinical pathologic variables. The Kaplan-Meier curve showed that the high expression of ADAMTS5 was related to poor prognosis of lung cancer patients. Wound healing assays and transwell migration assays revealed that the high expression of ADAMTS5 promoted the migration and invasion of NSCLC. In a word, our findings suggest that ADAMTS5 can regulate the migration and invasion of NSCLC and it may be a useful target of therapy in NSCLC.

  10. n-Butylidenephthalide Regulated Tumor Stem Cell Genes EZH2/AXL and Reduced Its Migration and Invasion in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ssu-Yin; Chuang, Hong-Meng; Huang, Mao-Hsuan; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most common and aggressive types of brain tumor. Due to its highly recurrent rate and poor prognosis, the overall survival time with this type of tumor is only 20–21 months. Recent knowledge suggests that its recurrence is in part due to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which display radioresistant, chemoresistant, self-renewal and tumorigenic potential. Enhancers of Zeste 2 (EZH2) and AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) are both highly expressed in GBM. Additionally, they are an essential regulator involved in CSCs maintenance, migration, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), stemness, metastasis and patient survival. In this study, we used a small molecule, n-butylidenephthalide (BP), to assess the anti-GBM stem-like cells potential, and then tried to find out the associated genes involved with regulation in migration and invasion. We demonstrated that BP reduced the expression of AXL and stemness related genes in a dose-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capabilities of GBM stem-like cells could be reduced by AXL/EZH2. Finally, in the overexpression of AXL, EZH2 and Sox2 by transfection in GBM stem-like cells, we found that AXL/EZH2/TGF-β1, but not Sox2, might be a key regulator in tumor invasion, migration and EMT. These results might help in the development of a new anticancer compound and can be a target for treating GBM. PMID:28208648

  11. Dopamine D2 receptor suppresses gastric cancer cell invasion and migration via inhibition of EGFR/AKT/MMP-13 pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongli; Wu, Kaiming; Ma, Jun; Du, Yanlei; Cao, Chuangyu; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA), an important neurotransmitter, has been reported to play a negative role in tumor progression. DA acts its role via dopamine receptors (DRs), which can be divided into five receptor subtypes (D1R-D5R). Among these receptor subtypes, D2R has been found to inhibit IGF-I-induced gastric cancer cell growth. However, the functions of D2R in gastric cancer cell invasion remain elusive. Here, we found that D2R expression was decreased in gastric cancer cells. DA treatment dose-dependently inhibited EGF-mediated gastric cancer cell invasion and migration via D2R. Furthermore, D2R decreased EGF-mediated MMP-13 production, and attenuated EGFR and AKT activation. Together with the results that EGF promoted gastric cancer cell invasion and migration via EGFR/AKT pathway, these data indicate that DA treatment, acting via D2R, suppresses gastric cancer cell invasion and migration via inhibition of EGFR/AKT/MMP-13 pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that use of D2R agonist may have a potential therapeutic effect on gastric cancer.

  12. n-Butylidenephthalide Regulated Tumor Stem Cell Genes EZH2/AXL and Reduced Its Migration and Invasion in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ssu-Yin; Chuang, Hong-Meng; Huang, Mao-Hsuan; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2017-02-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most common and aggressive types of brain tumor. Due to its highly recurrent rate and poor prognosis, the overall survival time with this type of tumor is only 20-21 months. Recent knowledge suggests that its recurrence is in part due to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which display radioresistant, chemoresistant, self-renewal and tumorigenic potential. Enhancers of Zeste 2 (EZH2) and AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) are both highly expressed in GBM. Additionally, they are an essential regulator involved in CSCs maintenance, migration, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), stemness, metastasis and patient survival. In this study, we used a small molecule, n-butylidenephthalide (BP), to assess the anti-GBM stem-like cells potential, and then tried to find out the associated genes involved with regulation in migration and invasion. We demonstrated that BP reduced the expression of AXL and stemness related genes in a dose-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capabilities of GBM stem-like cells could be reduced by AXL/EZH2. Finally, in the overexpression of AXL, EZH2 and Sox2 by transfection in GBM stem-like cells, we found that AXL/EZH2/TGF-ꞵ1, but not Sox2, might be a key regulator in tumor invasion, migration and EMT. These results might help in the development of a new anticancer compound and can be a target for treating GBM.

  13. A Conserved Oct4/POUV-Dependent Network Links Adhesion and Migration to Progenitor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Livigni, Alessandra; Peradziryi, Hanna; Sharov, Alexei A.; Chia, Gloryn; Hammachi, Fella; Migueles, Rosa Portero; Sukparangsi, Woranop; Pernagallo, Salvatore; Bradley, Mark; Nichols, Jennifer; Ko, Minoru S.H.; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The class V POU domain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) is a pivotal regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Oct4 is also an important evolutionarily conserved regulator of progenitor cell differentiation during embryonic development. Results Here we examine the function of Oct4 homologs in Xenopus embryos and compare this to the role of Oct4 in maintaining mammalian embryo-derived stem cells. Based on a combination of expression profiling of Oct4/POUV-depleted Xenopus embryos and in silico analysis of existing mammalian Oct4 target data sets, we defined a set of evolutionary-conserved Oct4/POUV targets. Most of these targets were regulators of cell adhesion. This is consistent with Oct4/POUV phenotypes observed in the adherens junctions in Xenopus ectoderm, mouse embryonic, and epiblast stem cells. A number of these targets could rescue both Oct4/POUV phenotypes in cellular adhesion and multipotent progenitor cell maintenance, whereas expression of cadherins on their own could only transiently support adhesion and block differentiation in both ESC and Xenopus embryos. Conclusions Currently, the list of Oct4 transcriptional targets contains thousands of genes. Using evolutionary conservation, we identified a core set of functionally relevant factors that linked the maintenance of adhesion to Oct4/POUV. We found that the regulation of adhesion by the Oct4/POUV network occurred at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and was required for pluripotency. PMID:24210613

  14. 17β-Estradiol treatment inhibits breast cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MALAT-1 RNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ziyi; Chen, Changjin; Liu, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2 affects not only estrogen-receptor α positive breast cells but also negative ones. • 100 nM E2 treatment affects breast cells proliferation, migration. • 100 nM E2 treatment functions in an estrogen-receptor α-independent way. • E2 treatment decreases MALAT-1 RNA level by post-transcriptional regulation. - Abstract: Breast cancer cells, which express estrogen receptor α (ERα), respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. But breast cancer cells without ERα show no effect on low concentration of estrogen treatment. Proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF10a, MCF7 and MB231 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified the effects of E2 on these breast cell lines, and looked for the difference in the presence and absence of ERα. Specifically, we looked for the changes of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), which is found extensively and highly expressed in several kinds of tumor cells, including breast carcinoma. It was observed that proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells were greatly affected by high concentration E2 treatment and were not affected by low concentration E2 treatment in an ERα independent way. We found that the high concentration E2 treatment largely decreased MALAT-1 RNA level. Interestingly, MALAT-1 decreasing by knocking down showed similar effects on proliferation, migration and invasion. E2 treatment affects breast tumor or non-tumor cells proliferation, migration and invasion in an ERα -independent, but a dose-dependent way by decreasing the MALAT-1 RNA level.

  15. CCL25 mediates migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase expression by breast cancer cells in a CCR9-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON-HOLIDAY, CRYSTAL; SINGH, RAJESH; JOHNSON, ERICA; SINGH, SHAILESH; STOCKARD, CECIL R.; GRIZZLE, WILLIAM E.; LILLARD, JAMES W.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer (BrCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in North American women. Most deaths are caused by metastasis, and BrCa is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung, liver and brain. Migration of metastatic cells share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which are regulated by chemokines and their receptors. The current study evaluates the expression and functional role of CCR9, and its only known ligand, CCL25, in BrCa cell migration and invasion. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis showed that both moderately and poorly differentiated BrCa tissue expressed significantly more (P<0.0001) CCR9 compared to non-neoplastic breast tissue. Interestingly, poorly differentiated BrCa tissue expressed significantly more (P<0.0001) CCR9 compared to moderately differentiated BrCa tissue. Similarly, CCR9 was highly expressed by the aggressive breast cancer cell line (MDA-MD-231) compared to the less aggressive MCF-7. Migration as well as invasion assays were used to evaluate the functional interaction between CCR9 and CCL25 in BrCa cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7). Neutralizing CCR9-CCL25 interactions significantly impaired the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. Furthermore, CCL25 enhanced the expression of MMP-1, -9, -11 and -13 active proteins by BrCa cells in a CCR9-dependent fashion. These studies show CCR9 is functionally and significantly expressed by BrCa (poorly > moderately differentiated) tissue and cells as well as that CCL25 activation of this receptor promotes breast tumor cell migration, invasion and MMP expression, which are key components of BrCa metastasis. PMID:21344163

  16. miR-30b inhibits cancer cell growth, migration, and invasion by targeting homeobox A1 in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Ning; Liu, Qin; Chen, Dongfeng

    2017-02-09

    Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in tumor development and progression. In particular, miR-30b is thought to be closely related to the migration, invasion, proliferation, communication, and drug resistance of tumor cells. However, the potential value of miR-30b in human esophageal cancer (EC) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the biological functions of miR-30b and its potential role in EC. The results indicated that the expression levels of miR-30b were decreased in EC tissues and were correlated with invasion classification (P < 0.01), lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01), and pathological stage (P < 0.05). Log-rank tests demonstrated that low expression of miR-30bwas strongly correlated with poor overall survival in patients with EC (P < 0.05). Moreover, overexpression of miR-30b markedly inhibited the growth, migration, and invasion of ECA109 and TE-1 cells by directly downregulating homeobox A1 (HOXA1). When HOXA1 was reintroduced into miR-30b-transfected ECA109 or TE-1 cells, the inhibitory effects of miR-30b on EC cell growth, migration, and invasion were markedly reversed. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that miR-30b could inhibit tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion by directly targeting HOXA1 in EC cells.

  17. p38 MAPK down-regulates fibulin 3 expression through methylation of gene regulatory sequences: role in migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Arechederra, María; Priego, Neibla; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Sequera, Celia; Gutiérrez-Uzquiza, Álvaro; Cerezo-Guisado, María Isabel; Ortiz-Rivero, Sara; Roncero, Cesáreo; Cuenda, Ana; Guerrero, Carmen; Porras, Almudena

    2015-02-13

    p38 MAPKs regulate migration and invasion. However, the mechanisms involved are only partially known. We had previously identified fibulin 3, which plays a role in migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis, as a gene regulated by p38α. We have characterized in detail how p38 MAPK regulates fibulin 3 expression and its role. We describe here for the first time that p38α, p38γ, and p38δ down-regulate fibulin 3 expression. p38α has a stronger effect, and it does so through hypermethylation of CpG sites in the regulatory sequences of the gene. This would be mediated by the DNA methylase, DNMT3A, which is down-regulated in cells lacking p38α, but once re-introduced represses Fibulin 3 expression. p38α through HuR stabilizes dnmt3a mRNA leading to an increase in DNMT3A protein levels. Moreover, by knocking-down fibulin 3, we have found that Fibulin 3 inhibits migration and invasion in MEFs by mechanisms involving p38α/β inhibition. Hence, p38α pro-migratory/invasive effect might be, at least in part, mediated by fibulin 3 down-regulation in MEFs. In contrast, in HCT116 cells, Fibulin 3 promotes migration and invasion through a mechanism dependent on p38α and/or p38β activation. Furthermore, Fibulin 3 promotes in vitro and in vivo tumor growth of HCT116 cells through a mechanism dependent on p38α, which surprisingly acts as a potent inducer of tumor growth. At the same time, p38α limits fibulin 3 expression, which might represent a negative feed-back loop.

  18. PTTG1 regulated by miR-146a-3p promotes bladder cancer migration, invasion, metastasis and growth

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wei; Wu, Xinchao; Huang, Chao; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Xian; Luo, Gang; Li, Yawei; Jiang, Guosong; Xiao, Xingyuan; Zeng, Fuqing

    2017-01-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene 1 (PTTG1) is identified as an oncogene, and overexpresses in many tumors. However, the role of PTTG1 in bladder cancer (BC) hasn't yet been characterized well. In this study, we showed the expression of PTTG1 mRNA and protein were both significantly increased in BC tissues and cells. The PTTG1 protein levels were positive correlated with increased tumor size, tumor–node–metastasis (TNM) stage, lymphatic invasion and distant metastasis of BC. PTTG1 knockdown dramatically suppressed the migration, invasion, metastasis and growth, and induced senescence and cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of BC cells. We further identified PTTG1 was the direct target of miR-146a-3p through using target prediction algorithms and luciferase reporter assay. miR-146a-3p was low expressed and negatively correlated with PTTG1 levels in BC tissues and cells. miR-146a-3p overexpression inhibited migration, invasion, metastasis and growth, and induced senescence of BC cells. Rescue experiment suggested ectopic expression of miR-146a-3p and PTTG1 suppressed migration, invasion and induced cell cycle arrest and senescence of BC cells compared to PTTG1 overexpression, confirming miR-146a-3p inhibited BC progression by targeting PTTG1. In summary, our study found miR-146a-3p/PTTG1 axis regulated BC migration, invasion, metastasis and growth, and might be a targets for BC therapy. PMID:27893422

  19. Migration of odorous compounds from adhesives used in market samples of food packaging materials by chromatography olfactometry and mass spectrometry (GC-O-MS).

    PubMed

    Vera, Paula; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2014-02-15

    Adhesives are commonly used in the manufacture of multilayer food packaging materials. Although they are not in direct contact with the packed food, their compounds may migrate from the adhesive through the substrates to the food. The aim of this work is to determine the migrant concentration in order to evaluate the possible human risk and also to determine if this migration could affect the organoleptic properties of packed food. For this purpose, a total of 12 market samples of multilayer materials (laminates) for packaging dry food (tomatoes, cakes, cookies, breadcrumbs, flour or salt) or fresh food (pizza and pastry) produced with 5 different adhesives were analysed by GC-O-MS. A total of 25 different compounds from adhesives were detected in these laminates. Seventy-six percentage of these compounds migrated into a dry food simulant (Tenax®). Furthermore, compounds with concentrations below the MS detection limit were detected by sniffers with a high modified frequency (MF%). Acetic acid, butyric acid and cyclohexanol with vinegar, cheese and camphor odours were the most abundant compounds. All migration data were below the specific migration limits (SML) and threshold toxicological concern (TTC) recommended values according to the Cramer classification.

  20. Nrdp1-mediated ErbB3 degradation inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion by reducing cytoplasmic localization of p27(Kip1).

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengliang; Gong, Hui; Cao, Kuan; Zou, Shenshan; Zhu, Bingxin; Bao, Hanmo; Wu, Yuxuan; Gao, Yong; Tang, Yuan; Yu, Rutong

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that loss of Nrdp1 contributes to human glioma progression by reducing apoptosis. However, the role of Nrdp1 in glioma migration and invasion has not been investigated. Here, we report that ErbB3, a substrate of Nrdp1, is undetectable in normal brain tissues and grade II/III glioma tissues, but is abundant in a certain percentage of grade IV glioma tissues and is associated with the loss of Nrdp1. This suggests that Nrdp1 may be involved in glioma migration and invasion by regulating ErbB3. Thus, the role of Nrdp1/ErbB3 signaling in glioma cell migration and invasion was investigated using Nrdp1 loss- and gain-of-function. The results show that down-regulation of Nrdp1 by use of short hairpin RNA promoted glioma cell migration and invasion. In contrast, overexpression of Nrdp1 significantly inhibited glioma cell migration and invasion. Further investigation on molecular targets revealed that Nrdp1 decreased the level of ErbB3, which resulted in decreasing p-AKT thereby reducing cytoplasmic p27(Kip1). Taken together, these findings suggest that Nrdp1-mediated ErbB3 degradation suppresses glioma migration and invasion and that loss of Nrdp1 may amplify ErbB3 signaling to contribute to glioma migration and invasion. These findings suggest that Nrdp1 may be a target for glioma therapy.

  1. Loss of tricellular tight junction protein LSR promotes cell invasion and migration via upregulation of TEAD1/AREG in human endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Abe, Shyuetsu; Kohno, Takayuki; Satohisa, Seiro; Konno, Takumi; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Arimoto, Chihiro; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Takano, Ken-ichi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is a unique molecule of tricellular contacts of normal and cancer cells. We investigated how the loss of LSR induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation in endometrial cancer cell line Sawano. mRNAs of amphiregulin (AREG) and TEA domain family member 1 (TEAD1) were markedly upregulated by siRNA-LSR. In endometrial cancer tissues, downregulation of LSR and upregulation of AREG were observed together with malignancy, and Yes-associated protein (YAP) was present in the nuclei. siRNA-AREG prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR, whereas treatment with AREG induced cell migration and invasion. LSR was colocalized with TRIC, angiomotin (AMOT), Merlin and phosphorylated YAP (pYAP). siRNA-LSR increased expression of pYAP and decreased that of AMOT and Merlin. siRNA-YAP prevented expression of the mRNAs of AREG and TEAD1, and the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. Treatment with dobutamine and 2-deoxy-D-glucose and glucose starvation induced the pYAP expression and prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. siRNA-AMOT decreased the Merlin expression and prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. The loss of LSR promoted cell invasion and migration via upregulation of TEAD1/AREG dependent on YAP/pYAP and AMOT/Merlin in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:28071680

  2. Toll like receptor 4 facilitates invasion and migration as a cancer stem cell marker in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Ting; Jing, Ying-Ying; Yu, Guo-feng; Han, Zhi-peng; Yu, Dan-dan; Fan, Qing-Min; Ye, Fei; Li, Rong; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-03-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a small subset of tumor cells, are involved in tumor initiation, progression, recurrence and metastasis. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), TICs are enriched with cell surface markers and play a key role in chemotherapy resistance, tumor invasion and migration. Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4), acting as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has been reported to be responsible for carcinogenesis, invasion, metastasis and cancer progression. In our study, two HCC cell lines and a splenic vein metastasis of the nude mouse model were used to study the invasive ability of TLR4 positive HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Stem-like features were also detected in TLR4 positive HCC cells. A total of 88 clinical samples from HCC patients were used to evaluate the association of TLR4 and stem-cell marker expression, and the relationship between TLR4 expression and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. The in vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that TLR4 positive HCC cells displayed significantly enhanced invasion and migration, and stem-like properties were also detected in TLR4 positive HCC cells. Clinically, TLR4 expression levels were found to be significantly higher in HCC tissues with microvascular invasion. Additionally, high expression of TLR4 in HCC tissues was strongly associated with both early recurrence and poor survivals in patients. Our results indicated that there was a relationship between TLR4 expression and CSC's features, TLR4 may act as a CSC marker, prompting tumor invasion and migration, which contributes to the poor prognosis of HCC.

  3. Bradykinin enhances invasion of malignant glioma into the brain parenchyma by inducing cells to undergo amoeboid migration

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The molecular and cellular mechanisms governing cell motility and directed migration in response to the neuropeptide bradykinin are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human glioma cells whose migration is guided by bradykinin generate bleb-like protrusions. We found that activation of the B2 receptor leads to a rise in free Ca2+ from internal stores that activates actomyosin contraction and subsequent cytoplasmic flow into protrusions forming membrane blebs. Furthermore Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent K+ and Cl− channels, which participate in bleb regulation. Treatment of gliomas with bradykinin in situ increased glioma growth by increasing the speed of cell migration at the periphery of the tumour mass. To test if bleb formation is related to bradykinin-promoted glioma invasion we blocked glioma migration with blebbistatin, a blocker of myosin kinase II, which is necessary for proper bleb retraction. Our findings suggest a pivotal role of bradykinin during glioma invasion by stimulating amoeboid migration of glioma cells. PMID:25194042

  4. AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Capodanno, Alessandra; Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Ejby Jensen, Lasse Dahl; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model. Results Migration and invasion were decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we observed that radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown abolished this effect. The results from the zebrafish embryo model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells. Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and, radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective stable AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected those cells into zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail. Conclusion AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced invasion both in vitro and in vivo. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression by AEG-1 in the cancer cells. This study also shows, for the first time, that the zebrafish is a great model to study the early events in radiation-enhanced invasion. PMID:27835571

  5. Cantharidin Impairs Cell Migration and Invasion of Human Lung Cancer NCI-H460 Cells via UPA and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yu, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Bau, DA-Tian; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-11-01

    Cantharidin (CTD), a component of natural mylabris (Mylabris phalerata Pallas), has been shown to have biological activities and induce cell death in many human cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CTD on cell migration and invasion of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells. Cell viability was examined and results indicated that CTD decreased the percentage of viable cells in dose-dependent manners. CTD inhibited cell migration and invasion in dose-dependent manners. Gelatin zymography analysis was used to measure the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/-9) and the results indicated that CTD inhibited the enzymatic activities of MMP-2/-9 of NCI-H460 cells. Western blotting was used to examine the protein expression of NCI-H460 cells after incubation with CTD and the results showed that CTD decreased the expression of MMP-2/-9, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Ras homolog gene family, member A (Rho A), phospho-protein kinase B (AKT) (Thr308)(p-AKT(308)), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (p-ERK1/2), phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (p-p38), phospho c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (p-JNK1/2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA). Furthermore, confocal laser microscopy was used to confirm that CTD suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65, but did not significantly affect protein kinase C (PKC) translocation in NCI-H460 cells. Based on those observations, we suggest that CTD may be used as a novel anticancer metastasis agent for lung cancer in the future.

  6. Tetraspanin 8 is a novel regulator of ILK-driven β1 integrin adhesion and signaling in invasive melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    El Kharbili, Manale; Robert, Clément; Witkowski, Tiffany; Danty-Berger, Emmanuelle; Barbollat-Boutrand, Laetitia; Masse, Ingrid; Gadot, Nicolas; de la Fouchardière, Arnaud; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Le Naour, François; Degoul, Françoise; Berthier-Vergnes, Odile

    2017-02-04

    Melanoma is well known for its propensity for lethal metastasis and resistance to most current therapies. Tumor progression and drug resistance depend to a large extent on the interplay between tumor cells and the surrounding matrix. We previously identified Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) as a critical mediator of melanoma invasion, whose expression is absent in healthy skin. The present study investigated whether Tspan8 may influence cell-matrix anchorage and regulate downstream molecular pathways leading to an aggressive behavior. Using silencing and ectopic expression strategies, we showed that Tspan8-mediated invasion of melanoma cells resulted from defects in cell-matrix anchorage by interacting with β1 integrins and by interfering with their clustering, without affecting their surface or global expression levels. These effects were associated with impaired phosphorylation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and its downstream target Akt-S473, but not FAK. Specific blockade of Akt or ILK activity strongly affected cell-matrix adhesion. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative form of ILK reduced β1 integrin clustering and cell-matrix adhesion. Finally, we observed a tumor-promoting effect of Tspan8 in vivo and a mutually exclusive expression pattern between Tspan8 and phosphorylated ILK in melanoma xenografts and human melanocytic lesions. Altogether, the in vitro, in vivo and in situ data highlight a novel regulatory role for Tspan8 in melanoma progression by modulating cell-matrix interactions through β1 integrin-ILK axis and establish Tspan8 as a negative regulator of ILK activity. These findings emphasize the importance of targeting Tspan8 as a means of switching from low- to firm-adhesive states, mandatory to prevent tumor dissemination.

  7. The novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 promotes the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Kauttu, Tuuli; Seppänen, Hanna; Vainionpää, Sanna; Wang, Shan; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2013-02-01

    Kindlin-2 is a novel focal adhesion gene mediating the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in linking chronic inflammation to cancer progression. Both kindlin-2 and TAMs have been found to promote the invasion of gastric cancer cells in our previous studies. However, the correlation between kindlin-2 and TAMs remains unclear. Real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate kindlin-2 expression in the AGS, NCI and Hs-746T gastric cancer cell lines co-cultured with TAMs under normal or hypoxic conditions. IL8, IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL18, IL22 and IL24 expressions were measured by real-time RT-PCR in the gastric cancer lines with varying levels of kindlin-2 expression, as well as after downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA expression by the siRNA method. We found that kindlin-2 was upregulated in all three gastric cancer cell lines when co-cultured with TAMs under normal conditions. Under hypoxic conditions, the induction of kindlin-2 expression induced by macrophages was significantly downregulated in the Hs-746T cell line. IL8, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression was significantly higher in gastric cell lines with high kindlin-2 expression. Downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA decreased IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression but IL8 and IL18 expression was upregulated. Therefore, the novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 may play an important role in promoting the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by TAMs through regulating interleukin expression.

  8. NHE1 is upregulated in gastric cancer and regulates gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Wang, Haibo; Jin, Hai; Wen, Guorong; Tuo, Biguang; Xu, Jingyu

    2017-03-01

    Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is known to play a key role in regulating intracellular pH and osmotic homeostasis and is involved in the development and progression of several types of cancer. However, the function and specific mechanism of NHE1 in gastric cancer (GC) are not clearly understood. In the present study, we report that NHE1 is overexpressed in tissues and cell lines from GC patients, and knockdown or inhibition of NHE1 suppressed GC cell proliferation via regulation of G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phase transitions, concomitant with a marked decrease in positive cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Likewise, NHE1 was required for GC cell migration and invasion through the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins, and NHE1 inhibition resulted in an acidic intracellular environment, providing possible mechanisms underlying NHE1-mediated GC progression both in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight the important role of NHE1 in GC progression and suggest that NHE1 may be a useful target for GC therapy.

  9. Triazole-dithiocarbamate based, selective LSD1 inactivators inhibit gastric cancer cell growth, invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jin-Lian; Xu, Rui-Min; Zi, Xiaolin; Lv, Wen-Lei; Wang, Meng-Meng; Ye, Xian-Wei; Zhu, Shun; Mobley, David; Zhu, Yan-Yan; Wang, Jun-Wei; Li, Jin-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ru; Zhao, Wen; Liu, Hong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, plays an important role in epigenetic regulation of gene activation and repression. The up-regulated LSD1's expression has been reported in several malignant tumors. In the current study, we designed and synthesized five series of 1, 2, 3-triazole-dithiocarbamate hybrids and screened their inhibitory activity toward LSD1. We found that some of these compounds, especially compound 26, exhibited the most specific and robust inhibition of LSD1. Interestingly, compound 26 also showed potent and selective cytotoxicity against LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803 and HGC-27, as well as marked inhibition of cell migration and invasion, compared to 2-PCPA. Furthermore, compound 26 effectively reduced the tumor growth bared by human gastric cancer cells in vivo with no signs of adverse side effects. These findings suggested that compound 26 deserves further investigation as a lead compound in the treatment of LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer. PMID:24131029

  10. Alphaxalone inhibits growth, migration and invasion of rat C6 malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huawei; Zheng, Xiaoke; Zhou, Yuehan; Zhu, Wenbo; Ou, Yanqiu; Shu, Minfeng; Gao, Xiuren; Leng, Tiandong; Qiu, Pengxin; Yan, Guangmei

    2013-10-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most devastating and aggressive brain tumors affecting the central nervous system. The insidious growth and infiltration are the most prominent characteristics of malignant gliomas, which render the current therapies for malignant gliomas including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy unsuccessful. Inhibition of infiltration as well as proliferation in combination with surgery might be more effective in the treatment of malignant gliomas. In the current study, we demonstrate the alphaxalone (3-hydroxypregnane-11,20-dione) could effectively inhibit the proliferation of C6 glioma cells in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, this compound could also suppress the migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells at a concentration without causing significant cytotoxicity. Except the in vitro anti-glioma activity, alphaxalone effectively delayed the growth of rat C6 malignant glioma xenografts in vivo. Together, these findings suggest alphaxalone might be a promising candidate for the treatment of malignant gliomas and may also provide helpful clues for anti-glioma drugs development in future.

  11. PFTK1 regulates cell proliferation, migration and invasion in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Rong; Tang, Chunhui; Xi, Qinghua; Lu, Shumin; Chen, Wenjuan; Zhu, Lianxin; Cheng, Jialin; Chen, Yannan; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Jianxin; Deng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    PFTK1, also named Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 14 (CDK14), is a member of the cell division cycle 2 (CDC2)-related protein kinase family. It is a serine/threonine-protein kinase involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. In this study, we investigated the role of PFTK1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) development. The expression of PFTK1 was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemistry staining, both of which demonstrated that PFTK1 was overexpressed in EOC tissues and cells. Statistical analysis showed the expression of PFTK1 was associated with multiple clinicopathological factors, including tumor grade, FIGO stage, lymph node metastatis, Ki-67 expression and predicted a poor prognosis of EOC patients. With in vitro studies we found that PFTK1 expression was decreased in serum-starved ovarian cancer cells, and progressively increased after serum-re-feeding. Knocking PFTK1 down by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly inhibited ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Taken together, our study suggested that PFTK1 played an important role in ovarian cancer development.

  12. RNA interference-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cells causes increased tumor cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nuo; Liao, Qin-Ping; Li, Zhen-Hua; Xie, Bao-Jiang; Hu, Yu-Hong; Yi, Wei; Liu, Min

    2013-09-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an essential role in tumor invasion and migration. DKK1 functions as an important inhibitor of the pathway and represents a promising target for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of DKK1 in endometrial carcinoma (EC) cell invasion and migration using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Ishikawa EC cells were transfected at high efficiency with specific DKK1 siRNA. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1, β-catenin and metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) in siRNA-treated and -untreated cells. In addition, the invasion and migration of the EC cells were detected by invasion and migration assays. Transient transfection of DKK1 siRNA significantly inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1. Markedly increased cell invasion and migration was observed following treatment with DKK1 siRNA when compared with the negative control siRNA-treated and siRNA-untreated cells. The knockdown of DKK1 also elevated the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin and MMP14 involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, indicating that targeting this gene may promote intracellular Wnt signal transduction and thus, accelerate EC cell invasion and migration in vitro. The RNAi-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa EC cells resulted in increased tumor cell invasion and migration. DKK1 was identified as an inhibitor of EC cell invasion and migration via its novel role in the Wnt signaling pathway. Targeting DKK1 may therefore represent an effective anti-invasion and -migration strategy for the treatment of EC.

  13. EGCG Inhibits Proliferation, Invasiveness and Tumor Growth by Up-Regulation of Adhesion Molecules, Suppression of Gelatinases Activity, and Induction of Apoptosis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Wu, Chung-Chun; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Yao; Tsao, George Sai-Wah; Chen, Chi-Long; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2015-01-01

    (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major green tea polyphenol, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells. Epidemiological studies have shown that drinking green tea can reduce the incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), yet the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, the inhibitory effect of EGCG was tested on a set of Epstein Barr virus-negative and -positive NPC cell lines. Treatment with EGCG inhibited the proliferation of NPC cells but did not affect the growth of a non-malignant nasopharyngeal cell line, NP460hTert. Moreover, EGCG treated cells had reduced migration and invasive properties. The expression of the cell adhesion molecules E-cadherin and β-catenin was found to be up-regulated by EGCG treatment, while the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were found to be mediated by suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and AP-1 and Sp1 transactivation. Spheroid formation by NPC cells in suspension was significantly inhibited by EGCG. Oral administration of EGCG was capable of suppressing tumor growth in xenografted mice bearing NPC tumors. Treatment with EGCG was found to elevate the expression of p53 and p21, and eventually led to apoptosis of NPC cells via caspase 3 activation. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and β-catenin was also suppressed by EGCG treatment. These results indicate that EGCG can inhibit the proliferation and invasiveness, and induce apoptosis, of NPC cells, making it a promising agent for chemoprevention or adjuvant therapy of NPC. PMID:25625511

  14. Anti-oestrogens but not oestrogen deprivation promote cellular invasion in intercellular adhesion-deficient breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Borley, Annabel C; Hiscox, Stephen; Gee, Julia; Smith, Chris; Shaw, Victoria; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Nicholson, Robert I

    2008-01-01

    fulvestrant, it is absent during oestrogen withdrawal. Conclusions These data highlight a previously unreported effect of tamoxifen (and potentially further anti-oestrogens), that such agents appear able to induce breast cancer cell invasion in a specific context (absence of good cell-cell contacts), where these findings may have major clinical implications for those patients with tumours that have inherently poor intercellular adhesion. In such patients oestrogen deprivation with aromatase inhibitors may be more appropriate. PMID:19055788

  15. Cigarette smoke modulates PC3 prostate cancer cell migration by altering adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUPING; LONG, MINICA; TACHADO, SOUVENIR D.; SENG, SEYHA

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among American males. Studies suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with the progression of PCa; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process have not been extensively investigated. PCa progression is characterized by increased cell migration and alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM)- and cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-related gene expression. In the present study, the influence of cigarette smoke medium (SM) on cell migration and on the expression of ECM- and CAM-related genes in PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. According to a wound-healing assay, SM treatment promoted PC3 cell migration. RNA expression levels from SM-treated and control cells were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Of 84 genes analyzed, 27.38% (23/84) exhibited a ≥2-fold change in threshold cycle in PC3 cells following 0.5% SM treatment. Functional gene grouping analysis demonstrated that SM treatment modulated the RNA transcription of approximately 18.4% of CAMs and 33.93% of ECM-related genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that SM treatment led to a significant decrease in transcription levels of the following genes: Collagen 5 α-1(V), connective tissue growth factor, integrin β-2, kallmann syndrome 1, laminin α 3, matrix metallopeptidase 7 (MMP7), MMP13, secreted protein acidic cysteine-rich, thrombospondin-2 and versican; and that SM significantly increased the transcription levels of MMP2 and MMP12. Furthermore, MMP2 knockdown significantly reduced the migration of SM-treated PC3 cells. The present study provides novel insights into the association of cigarette smoking with PCa progression, via the alteration of ECM/CAM interactions. PMID:26351771

  16. miR-24 triggers epidermal differentiation by controlling actin adhesion and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Lena, Anna Maria; Viticchiè, Giuditta; Shalom-Feuerstein, Ruby; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Dinsdale, David; Russo, Giandomenico; Fortunato, Claudia; Bonanno, Elena; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Aberdam, Daniel; Knight, Richard Austen

    2012-01-01

    During keratinocyte differentiation and stratification, cells undergo extensive remodeling of their actin cytoskeleton, which is important to control cell mobility and to coordinate and stabilize adhesive structures necessary for functional epithelia. Limited knowledge exists on how the actin cytoskeleton is remodeled in epithelial stratification and whether cell shape is a key determinant to trigger terminal differentiation. In this paper, using human keratinocytes and mouse epidermis as models, we implicate miR-24 in actin adhesion dynamics and demonstrate that miR-24 directly controls actin cable formation and cell mobility. miR-24 overexpression in proliferating cells was sufficient to trigger keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo and directly repressed cytoskeletal modulators (PAK4, Tks5, and ArhGAP19). Silencing of these targets recapitulated the effects of miR-24 overexpression. Our results uncover a new regulatory pathway involving a differentiation-promoting microribonucleic acid that regulates actin adhesion dynamics in human and mouse epidermis. PMID:23071155

  17. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  18. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad H; Trapani, Linda M; Sieminski, Alisha L; Siemeski, Alisha; Mackellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-18

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and beta1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments.

  19. Self-assembled HCV core virus-like particles targeted and inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Xuehe; Jin, Aihui; Jia, Qunying; Zhou, Huaibin; Kang, Shuai; Lou, Yongliang; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    We used a baculovirus expression system to express fusion proteins of HCV core, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide, and IFN-α2a fragments in Sf9 cells. Western blotting and electron microscopy demonstrate that HCV core, peptides RGD, and IFN-α2a fusion proteins assemble into 30 to 40 nm nano-particles (virus-like particles, VLPs). Xenograft assays show that VLPs greatly reduced tumor volume and weight with regard to a nontreated xenograft. Migration and invasion results show that VLPs can inhibit the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. This study will provide theoretical and experimental basis for the establishment of safe and effective tumor-targeted drug delivery systems and clinical application of VLPs carrying cell interacting cargo.

  20. LMO4 is a prognostic marker involved in cell migration and invasion in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Wu, Sipei; Guo, Minzhang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to analyze the association of LMO4 with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survival rate, and to determine its functional role and signaling pathway in lung cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect the expression of LMO4 in NSCLC cell lines and tumor tissues. Migration and invasion ability was detected respectively by wound healing test and transwell test. Immunofluorescence and western blot were detected of AKT/PI3K pathway related genes MAPK, PI3K, AKT. Results LMO4 has high expression level of NSCLC cell lines and tumor tissues, and correlated with a lower survival rate. LMO4 can regulate the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells through the AKT/PI3K pathway. Conclusions LMO4 could serve as a promising biomarker and therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:28149564

  1. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre‑treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and

  2. LncRNA-ANCR down-regulation suppresses invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells by regulating EZH2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao-Yang; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Ying-Li; Liu, Bao; Wang, Meng; Hong, Xuan; Yu, Yan; Zhou, Yao-Hui; Zeng, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore the effects of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA)-ANCR on the invasion and migration of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells by regulating enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) expression. CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were collected and CRC SW620 cells line and normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIECs) were incubated. CRC SW620 cells line was transfected with ANCR-siRNA. The expressions of ANCR and EZH2 mRNA were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). EZH2 and trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3) protein expressions were detected using Western blotting. The relationship between ANCR and EZH2 was determined through RNA pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays. Cell invasion and migration were determined by Trans-well and cell scratch assays. ANCR, EZH2 and H3K27me3 expressions were up-regulated in CRC tissues and SW620 cells (all P < 0.05). After transfected with ANCR-siRNA, SW620 cells showed decreased ANCR expression and EZH2 mRNA and protein expressions (all P < 0.05). According to the results of RNA pull-down and co-IP assays, ANCR could specifically bind to EZH2. The results of Trans-well and cell scratch tests showed that when ANCR expression was decreased, the invasion and migration abilities of SW620 cells significantly declined (both P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that lncRNA-ANCR could influence the invasion and migration of CRC cells by specifically binding to EZH2.

  3. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Nianxi; Shen, Liangfang; Wang, Jun; He, Dan; Duan, Chaojun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC.

  4. Alcohol promotes migration and invasion of triple-negative breast cancer cells through activation of p38 MAPK and JNK.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Howard, Erin W; Parris, Amanda B; Guo, Zhiying; Zhao, Qingxia; Yang, Xiaohe

    2017-03-01

    Although alcohol is an established breast cancer risk factor, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies examined the general association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk; however, the risk for different breast cancer subtypes has been rarely reported. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a subtype of breast cancer lacking hormone receptors and HER2 expression, and having poor prognosis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of TNBC etiology remains a significant challenge. In this study, we investigated cellular responses to alcohol in two TNBC cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468. Our results showed that alcohol at low concentrations (0.025-0.1% v/v) induced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in 1% FBS-containing medium. Molecular analysis indicated that these phenotypic changes were associated with alcohol-induced reactive oxygen species production and increased p38 and JNK phosphorylation. Likewise, p38 or JNK inhibition attenuated alcohol-induced cell migration and invasion. We revealed that alcohol treatment activated/phosphorylated NF-κB regulators and increased transcription of NF-κB-targeted genes. While examining the role of acetaldehyde, the major alcohol metabolite, in alcohol-associated responses in TNBC cells, we saw that acetaldehyde induced cell migration, invasion, and increased phospho-p38, phospho-JNK, and phospho-IκBα in a pattern similar to alcohol treatment. Taken together, we established that alcohol promotes TNBC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. The underlying mechanisms involve the induction of oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB signaling. In particular, the activation of p38 and JNK plays a pivotal role in alcohol-induced cellular responses. These results will advance our understanding of alcohol-mediated development and promotion of TNBC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. CCR7 regulates cell migration and invasion through MAPKs in metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa-Yu; Safdar, Jawad; Li, Zhen-Ning; Fang, Qi-Gen; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Zhong-Fei; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Migration and invasion of tumor cells are essential prerequisites for the formation of metastasis in malignant diseases. Previously, we have reported that CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) regulates the mobility of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) cells through several pathways, such as integrin and cdc42. In this study, we investigated the connection between CCR7 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members, and their influence on cell invasion and migration in metastatic SCCHN cells. Western blotting, immunostaining and fluorescence microcopy were used to detect the protein expression and distribution of MAPKs, and the Migration assay, Matrigel invasion assay and wound-healing assay to detec