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Sample records for adhesion protein e-cadherin

  1. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  2. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth's biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  3. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth’s biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  4. E-cadherin and Src associate with extradesmosomal Dsg3 and modulate desmosome assembly and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rötzer, Vera; Hartlieb, Eva; Vielmuth, Franziska; Gliem, Martin; Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Desmosomes provide strong intercellular cohesion essential for the integrity of cells and tissues exposed to continuous mechanical stress. For desmosome assembly, constitutively synthesized desmosomal cadherins translocate to the cell-cell border, cluster and mature in the presence of Ca(2+) to stable cell contacts. As adherens junctions precede the formation of desmosomes, we investigated in this study the relationship between the classical cadherin E-cadherin and the desmosomal cadherin Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), the latter of which is indispensable for cell-cell adhesion in keratinocytes. By using autoantibodies from patients with the blistering skin disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), we showed in loss of function studies that E-cadherin compensates for effects of desmosomal disassembly. Overexpression of E-cadherin reduced the loss of cell cohesion induced by PV autoantibodies and attenuated activation of p38 MAPK. Silencing of E-cadherin abolished the localization of Dsg3 at the membrane and resulted in a shift of Dsg3 from the cytoskeletal to the non-cytoskeletal protein pool which conforms to the notion that E-cadherin regulates desmosome assembly. Mechanistically, we identified a complex consisting of extradesmosomal Dsg3, E-cadherin, β-catenin and Src and that the stability of this complex is regulated by Src. Moreover, Dsg3 and E-cadherin are phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in a Src-dependent manner and Src activity is required for recruiting Dsg3 to the cytoskeletal pool as well as for desmosome maturation towards a Ca(2+)-insensitive state. Our data provide new insights into the role of E-cadherin and the contribution of Src signaling for formation and maintenance of desmosomal junctions. PMID:26115704

  5. Molecular basis for disruption of E-cadherin adhesion by botulinum neurotoxin A complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangkook; Zhong, Xiaofen; Gu, Shenyan; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Dorner, Martin B; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-06-20

    How botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cross the host intestinal epithelial barrier in foodborne botulism is poorly understood. Here, we present the crystal structure of a clostridial hemagglutinin (HA) complex of serotype BoNT/A bound to the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin at 2.4 angstroms. The HA complex recognizes E-cadherin with high specificity involving extensive intermolecular interactions and also binds to carbohydrates on the cell surface. Binding of the HA complex sequesters E-cadherin in the monomeric state, compromising the E-cadherin-mediated intercellular barrier and facilitating paracellular absorption of BoNT/A. We reconstituted the complete 14-subunit BoNT/A complex using recombinantly produced components and demonstrated that abolishing either E-cadherin- or carbohydrate-binding of the HA complex drastically reduces oral toxicity of BoNT/A complex in vivo. Together, these studies establish the molecular mechanism of how HAs contribute to the oral toxicity of BoNT/A. PMID:24948737

  6. E-Cadherin Facilitates Protein Kinase D1 Activation and Subcellular Localization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chen, Li; Li, Guosheng; Qu, Ling; Balaji, K C; Du, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Protein kinase D 1 (PKD1) is a serine/threonine kinase implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular functions including cell growth, differentiation, adhesion and motility. The current model for PKD1 activation involves diacylglycerol (DAG) binding to the C1 domain of PKD1 which results in the translocation of PKD1 to subcellular membranes where PKD1 is phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, we have identified a novel regulation of PKD1 activation. The epithelial cell membrane protein E-cadherin physically binds to PKD1 which leads to a subcellular redistribution of PKD1. Furthermore, artificial targeting of PKD1 to the membrane leads to PKD1 activation in a PKC-independent manner, indicating that membrane attachment is sufficient enough to activate PKD1. The presence of E-cadherin dynamically regulates PKD1 activation by Bryostatin 1, a potent activator of PKD1, and its substrate phosphorylation specificity, implying a loss of E-cadherin during cancer metastasis could cause the re-distribution PKD1 and re-wiring of PKD1 signaling for distinct functions. The knocking down of PKD1 in lung epithelial cell line A549 results in an epithelial to mesenchymal transition with changes in biomarker expression, cell migration and drug resistance. These results extend our previous understanding of PKD1 regulation and E-cadherin signaling functions and may help to explain the diversified functions of PKD1 in various cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2741-2748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991955

  7. Loss of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion due to mutation of the beta-catenin gene in a human cancer cell line, HSC-39.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, J; Kato, J; Sasaki, K; Fujii, S; Watanabe, N; Niitsu, Y

    1995-01-01

    Detachment of cell-cell adhesion is indispensable for the first step of invasion and metastasis of cancer. This mechanism is frequently associated with the impairment of either E-cadherin expression or function. However, mechanisms of such abnormalities have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that the function of E-cadherin was completely abolished in the human gastric cancer cell line HSC-39, despite the high expression of E-cadherin, because of mutations in one of the E-cadherin-associated cytoplasmic proteins, beta-catenin. Although immunofluorescence staining of HSC-39 cells by using an anti-E-cadherin antibody (HECD-1) revealed the strong and uniform expression of E-cadherin on the cell surface, cell compaction and cell aggregation were not observed in this cell. Western blotting (immunoblotting) using HECD-1 exhibited a 120-kDa band which is equivalent to normal E-cadherin. Northern (RNA) blotting demonstrated a 4.7-kb band, the same as mature E-cadherin mRNA. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled proteins with HECD-1 revealed three bands corresponding to E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and gamma-catenin and a 79-kDa band which was apparently smaller than that of normal beta-catenin, indicating truncated beta-catenin. The 79-kDa band was immunologically identified as beta-catenin by using immunoblotting with anti-beta-catenin antibodies. Examination of beta-catenin mRNA by the reverse transcriptase-PCR method revealed a transcript which was shorter than that of normal beta-catenin. The sequencing of PCR product for beta-catenin confirmed deletion in 321 bases from nucleotides +82 to +402. Southern blotting of beta-catenin DNA disclosed mutation at the genomic level. Expression vectors of Beta-catenin were introduced into HSC-39 cells by transfection. In the obtained transfectants, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesiveness was recovered, as revealed by cell compaction, cell aggregation, and immunoflourescence staining. From these

  8. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Diego A; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-07-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  9. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Diego A.; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  10. E-cadherin Surface Levels in Epithelial Growth Factor-stimulated Cells Depend on Adherens Junction Protein Shrew-1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Julia Christina; Schreiner, Alexander; Engels, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicate that the adherens junction protein shrew-1 acts as a novel modulator of E-cadherin internalization induced by epithelial growth factor (EGF) or E-cadherin function-blocking antibody during epithelial cell dynamics. Knocking down shrew-1 in MCF-7 carcinoma cells preserves E-cadherin surface levels upon EGF stimulation. Overexpression of shrew-1 leads to preformation of an E-cadherin/EGF receptor (EGFR) HER2/src-kinase/shrew-1 signaling complex and accelerated E-cadherin internalization. Shrew-1 is not sufficient to stimulate E-cadherin internalization, but facilitates the actions of EGFR and thus may promote malignant progression in breast cancer cells with constitutive EGFR stimulation by reducing surface E-cadherin expression. PMID:19515834

  11. Modulation of integrin and E-cadherin-mediated adhesions to spatially control heterogeneity in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Toh, Yi-Chin; Xing, Jiangwa; Yu, Hanry

    2015-05-01

    Heterogeneity in human pluripotent stem cell (PSC) fates is partially caused by mechanical asymmetry arising from spatial polarization of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Independent studies have shown that integrin and E-cadherin adhesions promote opposing differentiation and pluripotent fates respectively although their crosstalk mechanism in modulating cell fate heterogeneity remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that spatial polarization of integrin and E-cadherin adhesions in a human PSC colony compete to recruit Rho-ROCK activated myosin II to different localities to pattern pluripotent-differentiation decisions, resulting in spatially heterogeneous colonies. Cell micropatterning was used to modulate the spatial polarization of cell adhesions, which enabled us to prospectively determine localization patterns of activated myosin II and mesoendoderm differentiation. Direct inhibition of Rho-ROCK-myosin II activation phenocopied E-cadherin rather than integrin inhibition to form uniformly differentiated colonies. This indicated that E-cadherin was the primary gatekeeper to differentiation progression. This insight allows for biomaterials to be tailored for human PSC maintenance or differentiation with minimal heterogeneity. PMID:25736499

  12. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Érika C; Quevedo, Francisco C; Neto, Francisco A Moraes; Rainho, Cláudia A; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2006-01-01

    Background The E-cadherin gene (CDH1) maps, at chromosome 16q22.1, a region often associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human breast cancer. LOH at this site is thought to lead to loss of function of this tumor suppressor gene and was correlated with decreased disease-free survival, poor prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. Methods The aim of our study was to assess, by Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP), the methylation pattern of the CDH1 gene and its possible correlation with the expression of E-cadherin and other standard immunohistochemical parameters (Her-2, ER, PgR, p53, and K-67) in a series of 79 primary breast cancers (71 infiltrating ductal, 5 infiltrating lobular, 1 metaplastic, 1 apocrine, and 1 papillary carcinoma). Results CDH1 hypermethylation was observed in 72% of the cases including 52/71 ductal, 4/5 lobular carcinomas and 1 apocrine carcinoma. Reduced levels of E-cadherin protein were observed in 85% of our samples. Although not statistically significant, the levels of E-cadherin expression tended to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 71 ductal cancinomas, most of the cases of showing CDH1 hypermethylation also presented reduced levels of expression of ER and PgR proteins, and a possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. Conclusion Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast cancers associated with a decrease in E-cadherin expression in a subgroup of cases characterized by loss of expression of other important genes to the mammary

  13. E-cadherin interactome complexity and robustness resolved by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhuan; Neilson, Lisa J; Zhong, Hang; Murray, Paul S; Zanivan, Sara; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2014-12-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and signaling plays an essential role in development and maintenance of healthy epithelial tissues. Adhesiveness mediated by E-cadherin is conferred by its extracellular cadherin domains and is regulated by an assembly of intracellular adaptors and enzymes associated with its cytoplasmic tail. We used proximity biotinylation and quantitative proteomics to identify 561 proteins in the vicinity of the cytoplasmic tail of E-cadherin. In addition, we used proteomics to identify proteins associated with E-cadherin-containing adhesion plaques from a cell-glass interface, which enabled the assignment of cellular localization to putative E-cadherin-interacting proteins. Moreover, by tagging identified proteins with GFP (green fluorescent protein), we determined the subcellular localization of 83 putative E-cadherin-proximal proteins and identified 24 proteins that were previously uncharacterized as part of adherens junctions. We constructed and characterized a comprehensive E-cadherin interaction network of 79 published and 394 previously uncharacterized proteins using a structure-informed database of protein-protein interactions. Finally, we found that calcium chelation, which disrupts the interaction of the extracellular E-cadherin domains, did not disrupt most intracellular protein interactions with E-cadherin, suggesting that the E-cadherin intracellular interactome is predominantly independent of cell-cell adhesion. PMID:25468996

  14. Single molecule imaging of green fluorescent proteins in living cells: E-cadherin forms oligomers on the free cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Iino, R; Koyama, I; Kusumi, A

    2001-01-01

    Single green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules were successfully imaged for the first time in living cells. GFP linked to the cytoplasmic carboxyl terminus of E-cadherin (E-cad-GFP) was expressed in mouse fibroblast L cells, and observed using an objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. Based on the fluorescence intensity of individual fluorescent spots, the majority of E-cad-GFP molecules on the free cell surface were found to be oligomers of various sizes, many of them greater than dimers, suggesting that oligomerization of E-cadherin takes place before its assembly at cell-cell adhesion sites. The translational diffusion coefficient of E-cad-GFP is reduced by a factor of 10 to 40 upon oligomerization. Because such large decreases in translational mobility cannot be explained solely by increases in radius upon oligomerization, an oligomerization-induced trapping model is proposed in which, when oligomers are formed, they are trapped in place due to greatly enhanced tethering and corralling effects of the membrane skeleton on oligomers (compared with monomers). The presence of many oligomers greater than dimers on the free surface suggests that these greater oligomers are the basic building blocks for the two-dimensional cell adhesion structures (adherens junctions). PMID:11371443

  15. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  16. E-cadherin Is Critical for Collective Sheet Migration and Is Regulated by the Chemokine CXCL12 Protein During Restitution*

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonyean; Zimmerman, Noah P.; Agle, Kimberle A.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Kumar, Suresh N.; Dwinell, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines and other immune mediators enhance epithelial barrier repair. The intestinal barrier is established by highly regulated cell-cell contacts between epithelial cells. The goal of these studies was to define the role for the chemokine CXCL12 in regulating E-cadherin during collective sheet migration during epithelial restitution. Mechanisms regulating E-cadherin were investigated using Caco2BBE and IEC-6 model epithelia. Genetic knockdown confirmed a critical role for E-cadherin in in vitro restitution and in vivo wound repair. During restitution, both CXCL12 and TGF-β1 tightened the monolayer by decreasing the paracellular space between migrating epithelial cells. However, CXCL12 differed from TGF-β1 by stimulating the significant increase in E-cadherin membrane localization during restitution. Chemokine-stimulated relocalization of E-cadherin was paralleled by an increase in barrier integrity of polarized epithelium during restitution. CXCL12 activation of its cognate receptor CXCR4 stimulated E-cadherin localization and monolayer tightening through Rho-associated protein kinase activation and F-actin reorganization. These data demonstrate a key role for E-cadherin in intestinal epithelial restitution. PMID:22549778

  17. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Jennifer C; Welsh, Natalie J; Braga, Vania M M

    2015-09-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  18. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, Jennifer C.; Welsh, Natalie J.; Braga, Vania M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  19. Dynamic and Static Interactions between p120 Catenin and E-Cadherin Regulate the Stability of Cell-Cell Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Lee, Seung-Hye; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guang-Yao; Smith, Matthew J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-04-26

    The association of p120 catenin (p120) with the juxtamembrane domain (JMD) of the cadherin cytoplasmic tail is critical for the surface stability of cadherin-catenin cell-cell adhesion complexes. Here, we present the crystal structure of p120 isoform 4A in complex with the JMD core region (JMD{sub core}) of E-cadherin. The p120 armadillo repeat domain contains modular binding pockets that are complementary to electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the JMD{sub core}. Single-residue mutations within the JMD{sub core}-binding site of p120 abolished its interaction with E- and N-cadherins in vitro and in cultured cells. These mutations of p120 enabled us to clearly differentiate between N-cadherin-dependent and -independent steps of neuronal dendritic spine morphogenesis crucial for synapse development. NMR studies revealed that p120 regulates the stability of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by associating with the majority of the JMD, including residues implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Hakai-dependent ubiquitination of E-cadherin, through its discrete dynamic and static binding sites.

  20. Transcriptional Repression of E-Cadherin by Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, Zarina J.; Jolly, Carol; Androphy, Elliot J.; Mercer, Andrew; Matthews, Charles M.; Hibma, Merilyn H.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence supporting DNA virus regulation of the cell adhesion and tumour suppressor protein, E-cadherin. We previously reported that loss of E-cadherin in human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16-infected epidermis is contributed to by the major viral proto-oncogene E6 and is associated with reduced Langerhans cells density, potentially regulating the immune response. The focus of this study is determining how the HPV16 E6 protein mediates E-cadherin repression. We found that the E-cadherin promoter is repressed in cells expressing E6, resulting in fewer E-cadherin transcripts. On exploring the mechanism for this, repression by increased histone deacetylase activity or by increased binding of trans-repressors to the E-cadherin promoter Epal element was discounted. In contrast, DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity was increased in E6 expressing cells. Upon inhibiting DNMT activity using 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine, E-cadherin transcription was restored in the presence of HPV16 E6. The E-cadherin promoter was not directly methylated, however a mutational analysis showed general promoter repression and reduced binding of the transactivators Sp1 and AML1 and the repressor Slug. Expression of E7 with E6 resulted in a further reduction in surface E-cadherin levels. This is the first report of HPV16 E6-mediated transcriptional repression of this adhesion molecule and tumour suppressor protein. PMID:23189137

  1. Zeb1 Regulates E-cadherin and Epcam (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule) Expression to Control Cell Behavior in Early Zebrafish Development*

    PubMed Central

    Vannier, Corinne; Mock, Kerstin; Brabletz, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The ZEB1 transcription factor is best known as an inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) in cancer metastasis, acting through transcriptional repression of CDH1 (encoding E-cadherin) and the EMT-suppressing microRNA-200s (miR-200s). Here we analyze roles of the ZEB1 zebrafish orthologs, Zeb1a and Zeb1b, and of miR-200s in control of cell adhesion and morphogenesis during gastrulation and segmentation stages. Loss and gain of function analyses revealed that Zeb1 represses cdh1 expression to fine-tune adhesiveness of migrating deep blastodermal cells. Furthermore, Zeb1 acts as a repressor of epcam in the deep cells of the blastoderm and may contribute to control of epithelial integrity of enveloping layer cells, the outermost cells of the blastoderm. We found a similar ZEB1-dependent repression of EPCAM expression in human pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines, mediated through direct binding of ZEB1 to the EPCAM promoter. Thus, Zeb1 proteins employ several evolutionary conserved mechanisms to regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and cancer. PMID:23667256

  2. Spatial distribution of cell–cell and cell–ECM adhesions regulates force balance while main­taining E-cadherin molecular tension in cell pairs

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Joo Yong; Moeller, Jens; Hart, Kevin C.; Ramallo, Diego; Vogel, Viola; Dunn, Alex R.; Nelson, W. James; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical linkage between cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions regulates cell shape changes during embryonic development and tissue homoeostasis. We examined how the force balance between cell–cell and cell–ECM adhesions changes with cell spread area and aspect ratio in pairs of MDCK cells. We used ECM micropatterning to drive different cytoskeleton strain energy states and cell-generated traction forces and used a Förster resonance energy transfer tension biosensor to ask whether changes in forces across cell–cell junctions correlated with E-cadherin molecular tension. We found that continuous peripheral ECM adhesions resulted in increased cell–cell and cell–ECM forces with increasing spread area. In contrast, confining ECM adhesions to the distal ends of cell–cell pairs resulted in shorter junction lengths and constant cell–cell forces. Of interest, each cell within a cell pair generated higher strain energies than isolated single cells of the same spread area. Surprisingly, E-cadherin molecular tension remained constant regardless of changes in cell–cell forces and was evenly distributed along cell–cell junctions independent of cell spread area and total traction forces. Taken together, our results showed that cell pairs maintained constant E-cadherin molecular tension and regulated total forces relative to cell spread area and shape but independently of total focal adhesion area. PMID:25971797

  3. Paranuaclear E-cadherin in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Philip M; Al-Kuran, Rasha A; Theuer, Charles P

    2002-12-01

    Decreased E-cadherin expression permits dissociation and widespread dissemination of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. We studied the relationship between paranuclear E-cadherin distribution and the histopathologic characteristics of gastric adenocarcinomas. E-cadherin immunostains of 173 gastric adenocarcinoma sections revealed paranuclear; punctate to vesicular staining in 18% (16/87) of the intestinal-type adenocarcinomas, 30% (17/56) of the diffuse-type adenocarcinomas, and 30% (9/30) of the mired adenocarcinomas. These data suggest that in some gastric adenocarcinomas, there is a defect in transport of E-cadherin to the cell surface, which may prevent intercellular adhesion and encourage dissemination. Of 34 cancers with paranuclear E-cadherin staining, 20 (59%) had paranuclear staining within the nonneoplastic epithelium, but only 22.0% of 100 carcinomas with absent or membranous E-cadherin staining were accompanied by morphologically benign epithelium with paranuclear E-cadherin. In surface epithelium, paranuclear E-cadherin staining colocalized with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II in the Golgi apparatus. The presence of paranuclear E-cadherin in cancer-associated benign epithelium suggests that the alteration in the E-cadherin molecule responsible for the paranuclear distribution may be an early change in gastric adenocarcinoma progression. PMID:12472282

  4. E-cadherin is important for cell differentiation during osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Cara; Harrison, Rene E

    2016-05-01

    E-cadherin, a protein responsible for intercellular adhesion between epithelial cells, is also expressed in the monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this study we have explored the involvement of E-cadherin during receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated osteoclast differentiation. Osteoclastogenesis involves a period of precursor expansion followed by multiple fusion events to generate a multinuclear osteoclast that is capable of bone resorption. We asked whether E-cadherin participated in early precursor interactions and recognition or was a component of the osteoclast fusion machinery. Here, we show that endogenous E-cadherin expression is the highest during early stages of osteoclast differentiation, with surface expression visible on small precursor cells (fewer than four nuclei per cell) in both RAW 264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Blocking E-cadherin function with neutralizing antibodies prior to the onset of fusion delayed the expression of TRAP, Cathepsin K, DC-STAMP and NFATc1 and significantly diminished multinucleated osteoclast formation. Conversely, E-cadherin-GFP overexpressing macrophages displayed earlier NFATc1 nuclear translocation along with faster formation of multinucleated osteoclasts compared to control macrophages. Through live imaging we identified that disrupting E-cadherin function prolonged the proliferative phase of the precursor population while concomitantly decreasing the proportion of migrating precursors. The lamellipodium and polarized membrane extensions appeared to be the principal sites of fusion, indicating precursor migration was a critical factor contributing to osteoclast fusion. These findings demonstrate that E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts can modulate osteoclast-specific gene expression and prompt differentiating osteoclast precursors toward migratory and fusion activities. PMID:26959175

  5. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in a patient with cervical cancer: relation of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complex in their carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Ram, Lakshmi; Mathew, Renol Koshy; Chawdhery, Muhammad Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) of the pancreas is one of the most uncommon histotypes of all exocrine pancreatic neoplasms. Disorganization of E-cadherin and β-catenin mutations, two key components of the Wnt signal transduction pathway, has been implicated in the development of SPT, but not other pancreatic tumors. Loss of E-cadherin/β-catenin proteins and tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin/β-catenin have been postulated in cervical carcinogenesis and cancer invasion. A 38-year-old married woman, who had undergone brachytherapy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for cervical cancer in Philippines in 2011, was admitted to our hospital after follow-up CT scan of abdomen in 2012 revealed a lesion in the tail of pancreas. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathological diagnosis was SPT of pancreas. We suspect that the concurrent SPT pancreas and cervical cancer in this woman were triggered by a primary insult, a process in which E-cadherin/β-catenin/Wnt-signaling pathway played important roles. PMID:25848087

  6. Vangl2 Regulates E-Cadherin in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Begum, Khadiza; hafiz, Khandakar musabbir bin; Kishi, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin belongs to the classic cadherin subfamily of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules and is crucial for the formation and function of epithelial adherens junctions. In this study, we demonstrate that Vangl2, a vertebrate regulator of planar cell polarity (PCP), controls E-cadherin in epithelial cells. E-cadherin co-immunoprecipitates with Vangl2 from embryonic kidney extracts, and this association is also observed in transfected fibroblasts. Vangl2 enhances the internalization of E-cadherin when overexpressed. Conversely, the quantitative ratio of E-cadherin exposed to the cell surface is increased in cultured renal epithelial cells derived from Vangl2Lpt/+ mutant mice. Interestingly, Vangl2 is also internalized through protein traffic involving Rab5- and Dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Taken together with recent reports regarding the transport of Frizzled3, MMP14 and nephrin, these results suggest that one of the molecular functions of Vangl2 is to enhance the internalization of specific plasma membrane proteins with broad selectivity. This function may be involved in the control of intercellular PCP signalling or in the PCP-related rearrangement of cell adhesions. PMID:25373475

  7. TGF-β signaling links E-cadherin loss to suppression of nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Qiang, L; Shah, P; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; He, Y Y

    2016-06-23

    E-cadherin is a cell adhesion molecule best known for its function in suppressing tumor progression and metastasis. Here we show that E-cadherin promotes nucleotide excision repair through positively regulating the expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and DNA damage-binding protein 1 (DDB1). Loss of E-cadherin activates the E2F4 and p130/107 transcription repressor complexes to suppress the transcription of both XPC and DDB1 through activating the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway. Adding XPC or DDB1, or inhibiting the TGF-β pathway, increases the repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage in E-cadherin-inhibited cells. In the mouse skin and skin tumors, UVB radiation downregulates E-cadherin. In sun-associated premalignant and malignant skin neoplasia, E-cadherin is downregulated in association with reduced XPC and DDB1 levels. These findings demonstrate a crucial role of E-cadherin in efficient DNA repair of UV-induced DNA damage, identify a new link between epithelial adhesion and DNA repair and suggest a mechanistic link of early E-cadherin loss in tumor initiation. PMID:26477308

  8. Prognostic implications of epithelial to mesenchymal transition related proteins (E-cadherin, Snail) and hypoxia inducible factor 1α in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abouhashem, Nehal S; Ibrahim, Doaa Abdelaziz; Mohamed, Abdel Motaleb

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important step in the invasion and metastasis of cancer. E-cadherin downregulation, which is essentially controlled by EMT-mediated proteins such as Snail, is a main molecular feature of this process. Tumor hypoxia is one of the essential biological phenomena that are associated with the development and progression of various solid tumors. Recently, hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway were identified to have an essential role in the regulation of EMT phenotype. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of EMT-related proteins (E-cadherin, Snail) and HIF-1α in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) among Egyptian women. Immunohistochemical evaluation of E-cadherin, Snail, and HIF-1α expression was performed using 50 cases of EEC. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was investigated. The frequency of immunopositivity for E-cadherin, Snail, and HIF-1α in our cases of EEC was 82%, 28%, and 66%, respectively. Reduced E-cadherin and increased nuclear expression of Snail as well as HIF-1α were significantly associated with histopathologic grade, clinical stage myometrial invasion, and lymph node involvement. Statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between HIF-1α overexpression and Snail upregulation (τ= +0.252, P= .025); however, E-cadherin expression level was inversely correlated with enhanced Snail expression (τ= -0.450, P< .001) as well as with HIF-1α overexpression (τ= -0.439, P< .001). The overall survival and progression-free survival were inversely related to Snail immunoreactivity and positively related to E-cadherin expression. E-cadherin and Snail have a predictive value in EEC. In conclusion, the current study reveals that both Snail and HIF-1α expressions are significantly associated with poor prognosis in EEC; however, E-cadherin expression is considered a marker of good prognosis. E-cadherin and

  9. The Epstein-Barr virus oncogene product, latent membrane protein 1, induces the downregulation of E-cadherin gene expression via activation of DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Tse, Ka-Po; Chang, Hwan-You; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2002-07-23

    The latent membrane protein (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is expressed in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which is notoriously metastatic. Although it is established that LMP1 represses E-cadherin expression and enhances the invasive ability of carcinoma cells, the mechanism underlying this repression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that LMP1 induces the expression and activity of the DNA methyltransferases 1, 3a, and 3b, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme activity assay. This results in hypermethylation of the E-cadherin promoter and down-regulation of E-cadherin gene expression, as revealed by methylation-specific PCR, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting data. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5'-Aza-2'dC, restores E-cadherin promoter activity and protein expression in LMP1-expressing cells, which in turn blocks cell migration ability, as demonstrated by the Transwell cell migration assay. Our findings suggest that LMP1 down-regulates E-cadherin gene expression and induces cell migration activity by using cellular DNA methylation machinery. PMID:12110730

  10. Distinct roles of secreted HtrA proteases from gram-negative pathogens in cleaving the junctional protein and tumor suppressor E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Benjamin; Geppert, Tim; Boehm, Manja; Reisen, Felix; Plattner, Patrick; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Sewald, Norbert; Ferreira, Fatima; Briza, Peter; Schneider, Gisbert; Backert, Steffen; Wessler, Silja

    2012-03-23

    The periplasmic chaperone and serine protease HtrA is important for bacterial stress responses and protein quality control. Recently, we discovered that HtrA from Helicobacter pylori is secreted and cleaves E-cadherin to disrupt the epithelial barrier, but it remained unknown whether this maybe a general virulence mechanism. Here, we show that important other pathogens including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Campylobacter jejuni, but not Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cleaved E-cadherin on host cells. HtrA deletion in C. jejuni led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage, loss of cell adherence, paracellular transmigration, and basolateral invasion. Computational modeling of HtrAs revealed a conserved pocket in the active center exhibiting pronounced proteolytic activity. Differential E-cadherin cleavage was determined by an alanine-to-glutamine exchange in the active center of neisserial HtrA. These data suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is a prevalent pathogenic mechanism of multiple gram-negative bacteria representing an attractive novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat bacterial infections. PMID:22337879

  11. A mechanism for inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by the membrane-associated mucin episialin/MUC1.

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, J; van der Valk, S W; Hilkens, J

    1996-01-01

    Episialin (MUC1, PEM, EMA, CA15-3 antigen) is a sialylated, membrane-associated glycoprotein with an extended mucin-like ectodomain. This domain mainly consists of 30-90 homologous 20-amino acid repeats that are rich in O-glycosylation sites (serines and threonines). It is likely that this part forms a polyproline beta-turn helix. As a result, the ectodomain can protrude more than 200 nm above the cell surface, whereas most cell surface molecules do not exceed a length of 35 nm. Normally, episialin is present at the apical side of glandular epithelial cells. On carcinoma cells, however, it can be strongly overexpressed and it is often present over the entire cell surface. We have previously shown that episialin, if it is interspersed between adhesion molecules, nonspecifically reduces cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions in vitro and in vivo, presumably by steric hindrance caused by the extreme length and high density of the episialin molecules at the cell surface. To analyze the molecular mechanism for this anti-adhesion effect in more detail, we have now deleted an increasing number of repeats in the episialin cDNA and transfected the resulting mutants into murine L929 cells expressing the homophilic adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Here we show that the length of episialin is the dominant factor that determines the inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions. For the anti-adhesive effect mediated by the full length episialin, charge repulsion by negatively charged sialylated O-linked glycans is far less important. Images PMID:8730100

  12. E-cadherin interactome complexity and robustness resolved by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenhuan; Neilson, Lisa J; Zhong, Hang; Murray, Paul S; Rao, Megha Vaman; Zanivan, Sara; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and signaling plays an essential role in development and maintenance of healthy epithelial tissues. Adhesiveness is conferred by cadherin extracellular domains, and is regulated by an assembly of adaptors and enzymes associated with the cytoplasmic tail. Here, we employed proximity biotinylation and quantitative proteomics to isolate and identify 612 proteins in the vicinity of E-cadherin’s cytoplasmic tail. We used a structure-informed database of protein-protein interactions to construct the most comprehensive E-cadherin interactome to date, containing 89 known E-cadhesome components and 346 novel proteins. Moreover, through cloning and expression of GFP-tagged fusion proteins we localized 26 of the novel proteins to adherens junctions. Finally, employing calcium depletion and myosin inhibition we show the E-cadherin interactome to be remarkably robust to perturbation and essentially independent of cell-cell junctions or actomyosin contractility. PMID:25468996

  13. In situ phosphorylation of immobilized receptors on biosensor surfaces: application to E-cadherin/beta-catenin interactions.

    PubMed

    Catimel, Bruno; Layton, Meredith; Church, Nicole; Ross, Janine; Condron, Melanie; Faux, Maree; Simpson, Richard J; Burgess, Antony W; Nice, Edouard C

    2006-10-15

    Phosphorylation is a key posttranslational modification for modulating biological interactions. Biosensor technology is ideally suited for examining in real time the role of phosphorylation on protein-protein interactions in signaling pathways. We have developed processes for on-chip phosphorylation of immobilized receptors on biosensor surfaces. These processes have been used to analyze E-cadherin/beta-catenin interactions. Phosphorylation of the intracellular domain (ICD) of E-cadherin modulates its affinity to beta-catenin and consequently the strength of cell-cell adhesion. We have phosphorylated immobilized E-cadherin ICD in situ using casein kinase 1 (CK1), casein kinase 2 (CK2), and src. On-chip phosphorylation of E-cadherin was confirmed using anti-phosphoserine and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The binding of beta-catenin to E-cadherin was analyzed quantitatively. CK1 phosphorylation of E-cadherin increased the binding affinity to beta-catenin from approximately 230 to 4 nM. A similar increase in affinity, from 260 to 4 nM, was obtained with CK2 phosphorylation of E-cadherin. However, phosphorylation by src kinase decreased the affinity constant from approximately 260 nM to 4 microM. Interestingly, phosphorylation of E-cadherin by CK1 or CK2 prevented the inhibition of beta-catenin binding by src phosphorylation. PMID:16945320

  14. Mutations of the E-cadherin gene in human gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Risinger, J I; Berchuck, A; Kohler, M F; Boyd, J

    1994-05-01

    Expression of the E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule is reduced in several types of human carcinomas, and the protein serves as an invasion suppressor in vitro. To determine if mutations of the E-cadherin gene (on chromosome 16q22) contribute to epithelial tumorigenesis, 135 carcinomas of the endometrium and ovary were examined for alterations in the E-cadherin coding region. Four mutations were identified: one somatic nonsense and one somatic missense mutation, both with retention of the wild-type alleles, and two missense mutations with somatic loss of heterozygosity in the tumour tissue. These data support the classification of E-cadherin as a human tumour suppressor gene. PMID:8075649

  15. EVALUATION OF P53, E-CADHERIN, COX-2, AND EGFR PROTEIN IMUNNOEXPRESSION ON PROGNOSTIC OF RESECTED GALLBLADDER CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    PAIS-COSTA, Sergio Renato; FARAH, José Francisco de Matos; ARTIGIANI-NETO, Ricardo; MARTINS, Sandro José; GOLDENBERG, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma presents a dismal prognosis. Choice treatment is surgical resection that is associated a high levels of both morbidity and mortality. Best knowledgement of prognostic factors may result a better selection of patients either for surgical or multimodal treatment. Aim To evaluate tecidual immunoexpression of P53, E-cadherin, Cox-2, and EGFR proteins and to correlate these findings with resected gallbladder adenocarcinoma survival. Methods Clinical, laboratorial, surgical, and anatomopathological reports of a series of gallbladder adenocarcinoma patients were collected by individualized questionary. Total sample was 42 patients. Median of age was 72 years (35-87). There were seven men and 35 women. Lesion distribuition in according TNM state was the following: T1 (n=2), T2 (n=5), T3 (n=31), T4 (n=4). Twenty-three patients underwent radical resection (R0), while 19 palliative surgery (R1-R2). A block of tissue microarray with neoplasic tissue of each patient was confected. It was performed evaluation of P53, E-Caderine, COX-2, and EGFR proteins imunoexpression. These findings were correlated with overall survival. Results Five-year survival was 28%. The median of global survival was eight months. Only immunoexpression of EGFR protein was considered independent variable at multivariated analysis. Conclusion Final prognosis was influenced by over-expression of EGFR protein in tumoral tissue. PMID:25004291

  16. Intestine-specific transcription factor Cdx2 induces E-cadherin function by enhancing the trafficking of E-cadherin to the cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Funakoshi, Shinsuke; Kong, Jianping; Crissey, Mary Ann; Dang, Long; Dang, Duyen

    2010-01-01

    Cdx2 is an intestine-specific transcription factor required for normal intestinal epithelium development. Cdx2 regulates the expression of intestine-specific genes and induces cell adhesion and columnar morphogenesis. Cdx2 also has tumor-suppressor properties, including the reduction of colon cancer cell proliferation and cell invasion, the latter due to its effects on cell adhesion. E-cadherin is a cell adhesion protein required for adherens junction formation and the establishment of intestinal cell polarity. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which Cdx2 regulates E-cadherin function. Two colon cancer cell lines were identified in which Cdx2 expression was associated with increased cell-cell adhesion and diminished cell migration. In both cell lines, Cdx2 did not directly alter E-cadherin levels but increased its trafficking to the cell membrane compartment. Cdx2 enhanced this trafficking by altering receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity. Cdx2 expression diminished phosphorylated Abl and phosphorylated Rac levels, which are downstream effectors of RTKs. Specific chemical inhibition or short interfering RNA (shRNA) knockdown of c-Abl kinase phenocopied Cdx2's cell-cell adhesion effects. In Colo 205 cells, Cdx2 reduced PDGF receptor and IGF-I receptor activation. This was mediated by caveolin-1, which was induced by Cdx2. Targeted shRNA knockdown of caveolin-1 restored PDGF receptor and reversed E-cadherin membrane trafficking, despite Cdx2 expression. We conclude that Cdx2 regulates E-cadherin function indirectly by disrupting RTK activity and enhancing E-cadherin trafficking to the cell membrane compartment. This novel mechanism advances Cdx2's prodifferentiation and antitumor properties and suggests that Cdx2 may broadly regulate RTK activity in normal intestinal epithelium by modulating membrane trafficking of proteins. PMID:20671195

  17. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas P; Perna, Anna M; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions. PMID:26983597

  18. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Perna, Anna M.; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T.; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions. PMID:26983597

  19. Single Dimer E-Cadherin Interaction Forces Characterized Using Modified AFM Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, Robert; Drees, Frauke; Nelson, W. James; Kenny, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In tissue monolayers, adhesion between cells is accomplished chiefly through the action of [Ca++] dependent cadherin proteins. E-cadherin molecules coalesce into large plaques on contacting membranes of adjacent cells. Using specialized AFM cantilevers functionalized with tethered E-cadherin proteins, we studied the interaction forces of trans dimers from the single bond level through to the higher surface densities found in plaques, with pico-Newton force resolution. The measurements demonstrated the dependence of E-cadherin homoassociation on surface protein density. Previous in-vivo studies established the role of Ca++ in E-cadherin adhesion in whole cells. Advances in AFM force spectroscopy allowed us to characterize the unbinding process under force loads, and to differentiate single and multiple molecular binding events. The data correlates the dependence of E-cadherin adhesion at a molecular level to [Ca++], revealing interaction details that cannot be observed using whole-cell studies. This work is supported by NSF (XYZ on a Chip Program) CMS-9980838, NIH (GMB5227), and the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  20. Adherens Junction and E-Cadherin complex regulation by epithelial polarity.

    PubMed

    Coopman, Peter; Djiane, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    E-Cadherin-based Adherens Junctions (AJs) are a defining feature of all epithelial sheets. Through the homophilic association of E-Cadherin molecules expressed on neighboring cells, they ensure intercellular adhesion amongst epithelial cells, and regulate many key aspects of epithelial biology. While their adhesive role requires these structures to remain stable, AJs are also extremely plastic. This plasticity allows for the adaptation of the cell to its changing environment: changes in neighbors after cell division, cell death, or cell movement, and changes in cell shape during differentiation. In this review we focus on the recent advances highlighting the critical role of the apico-basal polarity machinery, and in particular of the Par3/Bazooka scaffold, in the regulation and remodeling of AJs. We propose that by regulating key phosphorylation events on the core E-Cadherin complex components, Par3 and epithelial polarity promote meta-stable protein complexes governing the correct formation, localization, and functioning of AJ. PMID:27151512

  1. Interactions between E-Cadherin and MicroRNA Deregulation in Head and Neck Cancers: The Potential Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Thian-Sze; Gao, Wei; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin expression in the head and neck epithelium is essential for the morphogenesis and homeostasis of epithelial tissues. The cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts are required for the anchorage-dependent growth of epithelial cells. Further, survival and proliferation require physical tethering created by proper cell-cell adhesion. Otherwise, the squamous epithelial cells will undergo programmed cell death. Head and neck cancers can escape from anoikis and enter into the epithelial-mesenchymal transition stages via the modulation of E-cadherin expression with epigenetic mechanisms. At epigenetic level, gene expression control is not dependent on the DNA sequence. In the context of E-cadherin regulation in head and neck cancers, 2 major mechanisms including de novo promoter hypermethylation and microRNA dysregulation are most extensively studied. Both of them control E-cadherin expression at transcription level and subsequently hinder the overall E-cadherin protein level in the head and neck cancer cells. Increasing evidence suggested that microRNA mediated E-cadherin expression in the head and neck cancers by directly/indirectly targeting the transcription suppressors of E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2. PMID:25161999

  2. There are four dynamically and functionally distinct populations of E-cadherin in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Timpson, Paul; Yao, Wu; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Anderson, Kurt I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT E-cadherin is a trans-membrane tumor suppressor responsible for epithelial cell adhesion. E-cadherin forms adhesive clusters through combined extra-cellular cis- and trans-interactions and intracellular interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. Here we identify four populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions based on the molecular interactions which determine their mobility and adhesive properties. Adhesive and non-adhesive populations of E-cadherin each consist of mobile and immobile fractions. Up to half of the E-cadherin immobilized in cell junctions is non-adhesive. Incorporation of E-cadherin into functional adhesions require all three adhesive interactions, with deletion of any one resulting in loss of effective cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, the only interaction which could independently slow the diffusion of E-cadherin was the tail-mediated intra-cellular interaction. The adhesive and non-adhesive mobile fractions of E-cadherin can be distinguished by their sensitivity to chemical cross-linking with adhesive clusters. Our data define the size, mobility, and adhesive properties of four distinct populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions, and support association with the actin cytoskeleton as the first step in adhesion formation. PMID:26471767

  3. There are four dynamically and functionally distinct populations of E-cadherin in cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Erami, Zahra; Timpson, Paul; Yao, Wu; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Anderson, Kurt I

    2015-01-01

    E-cadherin is a trans-membrane tumor suppressor responsible for epithelial cell adhesion. E-cadherin forms adhesive clusters through combined extra-cellular cis- and trans-interactions and intracellular interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. Here we identify four populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions based on the molecular interactions which determine their mobility and adhesive properties. Adhesive and non-adhesive populations of E-cadherin each consist of mobile and immobile fractions. Up to half of the E-cadherin immobilized in cell junctions is non-adhesive. Incorporation of E-cadherin into functional adhesions require all three adhesive interactions, with deletion of any one resulting in loss of effective cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, the only interaction which could independently slow the diffusion of E-cadherin was the tail-mediated intra-cellular interaction. The adhesive and non-adhesive mobile fractions of E-cadherin can be distinguished by their sensitivity to chemical cross-linking with adhesive clusters. Our data define the size, mobility, and adhesive properties of four distinct populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions, and support association with the actin cytoskeleton as the first step in adhesion formation. PMID:26471767

  4. Restraining FOXO3-dependent transcriptional BMF activation underpins tumour growth and metastasis of E-cadherin-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hornsveld, M; Tenhagen, M; van de Ven, R A; Smits, A M M; van Triest, M H; van Amersfoort, M; Kloet, D E A; Dansen, T B; Burgering, B M; Derksen, P W B

    2016-09-01

    Loss of cellular adhesion leads to the progression of breast cancer through acquisition of anchorage independence, also known as resistance to anoikis. Although inactivation of E-cadherin is essential for acquisition of anoikis resistance, it has remained unclear how metastatic breast cancer cells counterbalance the induction of apoptosis without E-cadherin-dependent cellular adhesion. We report here that E-cadherin inactivation in breast cancer cells induces PI3K/AKT-dependent FOXO3 inhibition and identify FOXO3 as a novel and direct transcriptional activator of the pro-apoptotic protein BMF. As a result, E-cadherin-negative breast fail to upregulate BMF upon transfer to anchorage independence, leading to anoikis resistance. Conversely, expression of BMF in E-cadherin-negative metastatic breast cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumour growth and dissemination in mice. In conclusion, we have identified repression of BMF as a major cue that underpins anoikis resistance and tumour dissemination in E-cadherin-deficient metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27035620

  5. RPTPα controls epithelial adherens junctions, linking E-cadherin engagement to c-Src-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin.

    PubMed

    Truffi, Marta; Dubreuil, Véronique; Liang, Xuan; Vacaresse, Nathalie; Nigon, Fabienne; Han, Siew Ping; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Sap, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial junctions are fundamental determinants of tissue organization, subject to regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation. Homophilic binding of E-cadherin activates tyrosine kinases, such as Src, that control junctional integrity. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) also contribute to cadherin-based adhesion and signaling, but little is known about their specific identity or functions at epithelial junctions. Here, we report that the receptor PTP RPTPα (human gene name PTPRA) is recruited to epithelial adherens junctions at the time of cell-cell contact, where it is in molecular proximity to E-cadherin. RPTPα is required for appropriate cadherin-dependent adhesion and for cyst architecture in three-dimensional culture. Loss of RPTPα impairs adherens junction integrity, as manifested by defective E-cadherin accumulation and peri-junctional F-actin density. These effects correlate with a role for RPTPα in cellular (c)-Src activation at sites of E-cadherin engagement. Mechanistically, RPTPα is required for appropriate tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin, a major Src substrate and a cytoskeletal actin organizer. Expression of a phosphomimetic cortactin mutant in RPTPα-depleted cells partially rescues F-actin and E-cadherin accumulation at intercellular contacts. These findings indicate that RPTPα controls cadherin-mediated signaling by linking homophilic E-cadherin engagement to cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation through c-Src. PMID:24652832

  6. Depletion of E-Cadherin Disrupts Establishment but Not Maintenance of Cell Junctions in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    E-cadherin forms calcium-dependent homophilic intercellular adhesions between epithelial cells. These contacts regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, including the organization of intercellular tight junctions (TJs). To distinguish between the roles of E-cadherin in formation versus maintenance of junctions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were depleted of E-cadherin by RNA interference. Surprisingly, reducing E-cadherin expression had little effect on the protein levels or localization of adherens junction (AJ) or TJ markers. The cells underwent morphological changes, as the normally flat apical surface swelled into a dome. However, apical–basal polarity was not compromised, transmembrane resistance was normal, and zonula occludin protein 1 dynamics at the TJs were unchanged. Additionally, an E-cadherin/Cadherin-6 double knockdown also failed to disrupt established TJs, although β-catenin was lost from the cell cortex. Nevertheless, cells depleted of E-cadherin failed to properly reestablish cell polarity after junction disassembly. Recovery of cell–cell adhesion, transepithelial resistance, and the localization of TJ and AJ markers were all delayed. In contrast, depletion of α-catenin caused long-term disruption of junctions. These results indicate that E-cadherin and Cadherin-6 function as a scaffold for the construction of polarized structures, and they become largely dispensable in mature junctions, whereas α-catenin is essential for the maintenance of functional junctions. PMID:17093058

  7. E-Cadherin and Gastric Cancer: Cause, Consequence, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin (epithelial-cadherin), encoded by the CDH1 gene, is a transmembrane glycoprotein playing a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and to be down regulated in gastric cancer. Besides genetic mutations in CDH1 gene to induce hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), epigenetic factors such as DNA hypermethylation also contribute to the reduction of E-cadherin in gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, expression of E-cadherin could be mediated by infectious agents such as H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori). As E-cadherin is vitally involved in signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and migration, dysregulation of E-cadherin leads to dysfunction of gastric epithelial cells and contributes to gastric cancer development. Moreover, changes in its expression could reflect pathological conditions of gastric mucosa, making its role in gastric cancer complicated. In this review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates. We aim to provide comprehensive perspectives in the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin and its involvement in gastric cancer initiation and progression. We also focus on its applications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy in gastric cancer in order to open new avenues in this field. PMID:25184143

  8. Soy isoflavone genistein upregulates epithelial adhesion molecule e-cadherin expression and attenuates beta-catenin signaling in mammary epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta -catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor protection by dietary intake of soy-rich foods and the soy isoflavone genistein (Gen) is widely regarded based on numerous epidemiological and animal studies; howev...

  9. Effects of non-protein-type amino acids of fine particulate matter on E-cadherin and inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Ho, Kin-Fai; Cao, Jun-Ji; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Feng, Po-Hao; Tian, Linwei; Lee, Chii-Hong; Han, Yong-Ming; Lee, Chun-Nin; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2015-09-17

    Exposure to particulate matter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) in size is an urgent issue for the protection of human health. Chemicals with PM2.5 collected during a period of intensive haze episodes in Beijing (BJ), Xian (XA) and Hong Kong (HK) were characterised for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), total carbon (TC) and free amino acids. BALB/c mice underwent aspiration exposure of 50 or 150 μg of PM2.5/mouse (BJ, XA and HK) on days 1 and 7 and were euthanised on day 14. The effects of these exposures on E-cadherin and inflammatory responses in the mouse lungs were analysed. The PM2.5 chemicals consisted of significant amounts of OC: 36.6 ± 17.2 μg/m(3) for BJ, 38.8 ± 3.8 μg/m(3) for XA and 7.2 ± 1.4 μg/m(3) for HK. A total of 23 free amino compounds for the PM2.5 samples were analysed: 4075 ± 1578 pmol/m(3) for BJ, 4718 ± 2190 pmol/m(3) for XA and 1145 ± 213 pmol/m(3) for HK. Exposure to PM2.5 resulted in the suppression of E-cadherin levels in the lung tissues and increased IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The alterations in E-cadherin, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-10 were associated with OC, TC and some amino acids, particularly non-protein-type amino acids. These data emphasised the deleterious health effects of PM2.5. PMID:26101798

  10. Recombinant fragilysin isoforms cause E-cadherin cleavage of intact cells and do not cleave isolated E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kharlampieva, Daria; Manuvera, Valentin; Podgorny, Oleg; Grafskaia, Ekaterina; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Pobeguts, Olga; Altukhov, Ilya; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2015-01-01

    The fragilysin (BFT) is a protein secreted by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis strains. BFT contains zinc-binding motif which was found in the metzincins family of metalloproteinases. In this study, we generated three known recombinant isoforms of BFT using Escherichia coli, tested their activity and examined whether E-cadherin is a substrate for BFTs. BFT treatment of HT-29 cells induced endogenous E-cadherin cleavage, and this BFT activity requires the native structure of zinc-binding motif. At the same time recombinant BFTs did not cleave recombinant E-cadherin or E-cadherin in isolated cell fractions. It indicates that E-cadherin may be not direct substrate for BFT. We also detected and identified proteins released into the cultural medium after HT-29 cells treatment with BFT. The role of these proteins in pathogenesis and cell response to BFT remains to be determined. PMID:25998017

  11. Hypotonic stress induces E-cadherin expression in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Loitsch, Stefan; Guschel, Maike; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August

    2005-01-01

    Human epidermis marks the interface between internal and external environments with the major task being to maintain body hydration. Alternating exposure of skin to a dry or humid environment is likely to cause changes in the epidermal water gradient resulting in osmotic alterations of epidermal keratinocytes. The present in vitro approach studied the effect of hypotonicity on cell-cell contact. It was demonstrated that hypotonic stress applied to human epithelial cells (HaCaT, A-431) induced upregulation of E-cadherin at both, the protein and mRNA level. 5'-deletional mutants of the E-cadherin promoter identified an element ranging from -53 to +31 that conveyed strong transactivation under hypotonic stress. In order to define relevant upstream regulators members of the MAP kinase family, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt) were investigated. Hypotonic conditions led to a fast activation of ERK1/2, SAPK/JNK, p38, EGFR and PKB/Akt with distinct activation patterns. Experiments using specific inhibitors showed that p38 contributes to the E-cadherin transactivation under hypotonic conditions. Further upstream, adhesion was found to be a prerequisite for E-cadherin transactivation in this model. In summary, the present study provides evidence that E-cadherin is an osmo-sensitive gene that responds to hypotonic stress. The function of this regulation may be found in morphological changes induced by cell swelling. It is likely that induction of E-cadherin contributes to the stabilization between adjacent cells in order to withstand the physical forces induced by hypotonicity. PMID:15620715

  12. Peptide Sequence Region That is Essential for the Interactions of the Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Metalloproteinase II with E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Shiryaev, Sergey A.; Remacle, Albert G.; Cieplak, Piotr; Strongin, Alex Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a valuable anaerobic commensal and an essential component of the gut microbiome in humans. The presence of a short pathogenicity island in the genome is predominantly associated with the enterotoxigenic strains of B. fragilis. Metallopro-teinase II (MPII) and fragilysin (FRA) are the structurally related enzymes encoded by the pathogenicity island in the enterotoxigenic strains. Accordingly, there is a significant overlap between the cleavage preferences of MPII and FRA. These proteinases, however, are counter-transcribed in the bacterial genome suggesting their distinct and specialized functions in the course of infection. It is well established that FRA directly cleaves E-cadherin, a key protein of the cell-to-cell adhesion junctions in the intestinal epithelium. Counterintuitively, MPII directly binds to, rather than cleaves, E-cadherin. Structural modeling suggested that a potential E-cadherin binding site involves the C-terminal -helical region of the MPII catalytic domain. The sequence of this region is different in MPII and FRA. Here, we employed substitution mutagenesis of this C-terminal -helical region to isolate the MPII mutants with the potentially inactivated E-cadherin binding site. Overall, as a result of our modeling, mutagenesis and binding studies, we determined that the C-terminal ten residue segment is essential for the binding of MPII, but not of FRA3, to E-cadherin, and that the resulting MPII•E-cadherin complex does not impair E-cadherin-dependent cell-to-cell contacts. It is possible to envision that the putative cleavage targets of MPII should be explored not only on the host cell surface but also in B. fragilis. PMID:25964952

  13. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone assignment of the EC-1 domain of human E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Prasasty, Vivitri D; Krause, Mary E; Tambunan, Usman S F; Anbanandam, Asokan; Laurence, Jennifer S; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2015-04-01

    The Extracellular 1 (EC1) domain of E-cadherin has been shown to be important for cadherin-cadherin homophilic interactions. Cadherins are responsible for calcium-mediated cell-cell adhesion located at the adherens junction of the biological barriers (i.e., intestinal mucosa and the blood-brain barrier (BBB)). Cadherin peptides can modulate cadherin interactions to improve drug delivery through the BBB. However, the mechanism of modulating the E-cadherin interactions by cadherin peptides has not been fully elucidated. To provide a basis for subsequent examination of the structure and peptide-binding properties of the EC1 domain of human E-cadherin using solution NMR spectroscopy, the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance of the uniformly labeled-EC1 were assigned and the secondary structure was determined based on the chemical shift values. These resonance assignments are essential for assessing protein-ligand interactions and are reported here. PMID:24510398

  14. Protein 4.1R links E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and modulates adherens junction integrity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaomin; Guo, Xinhua; Debnath, Gargi; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2009-07-01

    Protein 4.1R (4.1R) is the prototypical member of the protein 4.1 superfamily comprising of the protein 4.1 family (4.1R, 4.1B, 4.1G and 4.1N) and ERM family (ezrin, radixin and meosin). These proteins in general serve as adaptors between the membrane and the cytoskeleton. Here we show that 4.1R expressed in the gastric epithelial cells associates with adherens junction protein beta-catenin. Biochemical examination of 4.1R-deficient stomach epithelia revealed a selective reduction of beta-catenin which is accompanied by a weaker linkage of E-cadherin to the cytoskeleton. In addition, organization of actin cytoskeleton was altered in 4.1R-deficient cells. Moreover, histological examination revealed that cell-cell contacts are impaired and gastric glands are disorganized in 4.1R null stomach epithelia. These results demonstrate an important and previously unidentified role of 4.1R in linking the cadherin/catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and in regulating the integrity of adherens junction. PMID:19376086

  15. An Instructive Role for C. elegans HMR-1/E-cadherin in Translating Cell Contact Cues into Cortical Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Klompstra, Diana; Anderson, Dorian C.; Yeh, Justin Y.; Zilberman, Yuliya; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Cell contacts provide spatial cues that polarize early embryos and epithelial cells. The homophilic adhesion protein E-cadherin is required for contact-induced polarity in many cells. However, it is debated whether E-cadherin functions instructively as a spatial cue, or permissively by ensuring adequate adhesion so that cells can sense other contact signals. In C. elegans, contacts polarize early embryonic cells by recruiting the RhoGAP PAC-1 to the adjacent cortex, inducing PAR protein asymmetry. Here we show that HMR-1/E-cadherin, which is dispensable for adhesion, functions together with HMP-1/α-catenin, JAC-1/p120 catenin, and the previously uncharacterized linker PICC-1/CCDC85/DIPA to bind PAC-1 and recruit it to contacts. Mislocalizing the HMR-1 intracellular domain to contact-free surfaces draws PAC-1 to these sites and depolarizes cells, demonstrating an instructive role for HMR-1 in polarization. Our findings identify an E-cadherin-mediated pathway that translates cell contacts into cortical polarity by directly recruiting a symmetry-breaking factor to the adjacent cortex. PMID:25938815

  16. An instructive role for C. elegans E-cadherin in translating cell contact cues into cortical polarity.

    PubMed

    Klompstra, Diana; Anderson, Dorian C; Yeh, Justin Y; Zilberman, Yuliya; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Cell contacts provide spatial cues that polarize early embryos and epithelial cells. The homophilic adhesion protein E-cadherin is required for contact-induced polarity in many cells. However, it is debated whether E-cadherin functions instructively as a spatial cue, or permissively by ensuring adequate adhesion so that cells can sense other contact signals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, contacts polarize early embryonic cells by recruiting the RhoGAP PAC-1 to the adjacent cortex, inducing PAR protein asymmetry. Here we show that the E-cadherin HMR-1, which is dispensable for adhesion, functions together with the α-catenin HMP-1, the p120 catenin JAC-1, and the previously uncharacterized linker PICC-1 (human CCDC85A-C) to bind PAC-1 and recruit it to contacts. Mislocalizing the HMR-1 intracellular domain to contact-free surfaces draws PAC-1 to these sites and depolarizes cells, demonstrating an instructive role for HMR-1 in polarization. Our findings identify an E-cadherin-mediated pathway that translates cell contacts into cortical polarity by directly recruiting a symmetry-breaking factor to the adjacent cortex. PMID:25938815

  17. Significance of the hedgehog pathway-associated proteins Gli-1 and Gli-2 and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated proteins Twist and E-cadherin in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyung Wook; Hong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that abnormal activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is involved in the occurrence, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. In addition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) also performs an important function in the invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. However, the significance of the Hh signaling pathway and EMT in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In the present study, the expression of Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli-1) and Gli family zinc finger 2 (Gli-2), which are key transcriptional factors in the Hh signaling pathway, and Twist and E-cadherin, which are two factors involved in EMT, was examined in 42 patients with HCC and 20 cases of non-tumorous liver (NTL) tissue by immunohistochemistry. Clinicopathological information was collected in order to analyze the correlation of the Hh signaling pathway with EMT. The present study aimed to examine the difference in the expression of Gli-1, Gli-2, E-cadherin and Twist in HCC and NTL to assess the diagnostic value of these factors in HCC. Additionally, the present study aimed to elucidate the correlation between those proteins and other clinicopathological parameters. Whether abnormal activation of the Hh signaling pathway is closely associated with EMT was also evaluated. Gli-1 and Twist expression was found to be significantly increased and E-cadherin expression was found to be decreased in HCC in contrast to NTL (Gli-1, P=0.019; Twist, P=0.003; E-cadherin, P<0.001). Increased Twist expression was associated with the tumor size (P=0.043), and loss of or decreased E-cadherin expression was associated with the histological type of HCC (P=0.021). There was an inverse association between the expression of Twist and E-cadherin (P=0.006). These results showed that Twist overexpression by induction of EMT changes is involved in the occurrence and progression of HCC. However, the role of Hh signaling pathway-associated proteins in HCC may require elucidation by

  18. Functional loss of E-cadherin and cadherin-11 alleles on chromosome 16q22 in colonic cancer.

    PubMed

    Braungart, E; Schumacher, C; Hartmann, E; Nekarda, H; Becker, K F; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    1999-04-01

    Proteins of the cadherin family regulate cellular adhesion and motility and are believed to act as tumour suppressors. Previous studies have identified frequent mutation and allelic inactivation of the E-cadherin (cadherin-1) locus in diffuse gastric cancer. At least two other cadherin genes, P-cadherin (cadherin-3) and OB-cadherin (cadherin-11), have been mapped close to the E-cadherin gene on chromosome 16q22. As this region of the genome is frequently deleted in malignancy, multiple cadherin loci may be affected by losses of chromosome 16q22. The expression of mRNA transcripts from polymorphic alleles of the E-cadherin and cadherin-11 genes was examined in 30 cases of colonic, gastric, and renal carcinoma. In gastric cancer, loss of expression of one allele was restricted to the E-cadherin locus, whilst in renal carcinoma neither locus was affected. In colonic cancers, loss of expression of one E-cadherin allele was detected in 5 of 22 cases, whilst loss of a cadherin-11 allele was seen in 5 of 23 cases. This functional loss of cadherin gene expression may be due to gene deletion, inactivation or recombination. As no evidence of cadherin gene mutation was observed in the remaining transcripts, we can conclude that these two genes are only indirectly involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:10398117

  19. IL-8 suppresses E-cadherin expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by enhancing E-cadherin promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Peng, Li-Xia; Yang, Jun-Ping; Zheng, Li-Sheng; Xie, Ping; Wang, Meng-Yao; Huang, Bi-Jun; Zhao, Hua-Rong; Bao, Yong-Xing; Qian, Chao-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has the highest metastasis potential among head and neck cancers. Distant metastasis is the major cause of treatment failure. Recent studies from our laboratory have revealed that IL-8 promotes NPC metastasis via activation of AKT signaling and induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the cells. In the present study, we found that IL-8 treatment for NPC cells resulted in an accumulation of DNMT1 protein through activating AKT1 pathway and consequent DNMT1 protein stabilization. Then DNMT1 suppressed E-cadherin expression by increasing the methylation of its promoter region. LY-294002 blocked IL-8-induced p-AKT1 activation resulting in reduction of DNMT1 and increase of E-cadherin expression, whereas forced demethylation using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored E-cadherin expression. In conclusion, our study, for the first time, shows that the IL-8/AKT1 signaling pathway stabilizes DNMT1 protein, consequently enhancing hypermethylation of E-cadherin promoter regions and downregulating E-cadherin protein level in NPC cells. Upon blockage of the IL-8/AKT pathway and inhibition of DNMT1, E-cadherin expression can be reversed. These data suggest that targeting the IL-8/AKT1 signaling pathway and DNMT1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for blocking NPC metastasis. PMID:26530812

  20. E-cadherin mediates contact inhibition of proliferation through Hippo signaling-pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gyun; Koh, Eunjin; Chen, Xiao; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Contact inhibition of cell growth is essential for embryonic development and maintenance of tissue architecture in adult organisms, and the growth of tumors is characterized by a loss of contact inhibition of proliferation. The recently identified Hippo signaling pathway has been implicated in contact inhibition of proliferation as well as organ size control. The modulation of the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP) by the highly conserved kinase cascade of the Hippo signaling pathway has been intensively studied. However, cell-surface receptors regulating the Hippo signaling pathway in mammals are not well understood. In this study, we show that Hippo signaling pathway components are required for E-cadherin–dependent contact inhibition of proliferation. Knockdown of the Hippo signaling components or overexpression of YAP inhibits the decrease in cell proliferation caused by E-cadherin homophilic binding at the cell surface, independent of other cell–cell interactions. We also demonstrate that the E-cadherin/catenin complex functions as an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway in mammalian cells. Expression of E-cadherin in MDA-MB-231 cells restores the density-dependent regulation of YAP nuclear exclusion. Knockdown of β-catenin in densely cultured MCF10A cells, which mainly depletes E-cadherin–bound β-catenin, induces a decrease in the phosphorylation of S127 residue of YAP and its nuclear accumulation. Moreover, E-cadherin homophilic binding independent of other cell interactions is sufficient to control the subcellular localization of YAP. Therefore, Our results indicate that, in addition to its role in cell–cell adhesion, E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contact directly regulates the Hippo signaling pathway to control cell proliferation. PMID:21730131

  1. A novel role for p120 catenin in E-cadherin function

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Reneé C.; Davis, Michael A.; van Hengel, Jolanda; Mariner, Deborah J.; Barnes, Kirk; Thoreson, Molly A.; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Matrisian, Linsey; Bundy, Linda M.; Sealy, Linda; Gilbert, Barbara; van Roy, Frans; Reynolds, Albert B.

    2002-01-01

    Îndirect evidence suggests that p120-catenin (p120) can both positively and negatively affect cadherin adhesiveness. Here we show that the p120 gene is mutated in SW48 cells, and that the cadherin adhesion system is impaired as a direct consequence of p120 insufficiency. Restoring normal levels of p120 caused a striking reversion from poorly differentiated to cobblestone-like epithelial morphology, indicating a crucial role for p120 in reactivation of E-cadherin function. The rescue efficiency was enhanced by increased levels of p120, and reduced by the presence of the phosphorylation domain, a region previously postulated to confer negative regulation. Surprisingly, the rescue was associated with substantially increased levels of E-cadherin. E-cadherin mRNA levels were unaffected by p120 expression, but E-cadherin half-life was more than doubled. Direct p120–E-cadherin interaction was crucial, as p120 deletion analysis revealed a perfect correlation between E-cadherin binding and rescue of epithelial morphology. Interestingly, the epithelial morphology could also be rescued by forced expression of either WT E-cadherin or a p120-uncoupled mutant. Thus, the effects of uncoupling p120 from E-cadherin can be at least partially overcome by artificially maintaining high levels of cadherin expression. These data reveal a cooperative interaction between p120 and E-cadherin and a novel role for p120 that is likely indispensable in normal cells. PMID:12427869

  2. TCF12 protein functions as transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin, and its overexpression is correlated with metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Chung; Chen, Wei-Shone; Chen, Chia-Chi; Chen, Li-Li; Lin, Yi-Shing; Fan, Chi-Shuan; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2012-01-20

    A correlation of TCF12 mRNA overexpression with colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis was suggested by microarray data and validated by the survey of 120 patients. Thirty-three (27.5%) of the 120 patients showed tumor TCF12 mRNA overexpression and had a higher rate of metastatic occurrence (p = 0.020) and a poorer survival outcome (p = 0.014). Abundant TCF12 levels were also observed in human CRC cell lines such as SW620 and LoVo, but a relatively low level was detected in SW480 cells. Knockdown of TCF12 expression in SW620 and LoVo cells drastically reduced their activities of migration, invasion, and metastasis. Tight cell-cell contact and an increase in E-cadherin but a concomitant decrease in fibronectin were observed in TCF12-knockdown cells. Connexin 26, connexin 43, and gap-junction activity were also increased upon TCF12-knockdown. In contrast, ectopic TCF12 overexpression in SW480 cells facilitated fibronectin expression and cell migration and invasion activities but diminished cellular levels of E-cadherin, connexin 26, connexin 43, and gap junction. A physical association of TCF12 with the E-cadherin promoter was evidenced by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. TCF12 was tightly correlated with cellular expression of Bmi1 and EZH2 and was co-immunoprecipitable with Bmi1 and EZH2, suggesting that TCF12 transcriptionally suppressed E-cadherin expression via polycomb group-repressive complexes. Clinically, TCF12 mRNA overexpression was also correlated with E-cadherin mRNA down-regulation in the tumor tissues of our 120 patients (p = 0.013). These studies suggested that TCF12 functioned as a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin and its overexpression was significantly correlated with the occurrence of CRC metastasis. PMID:22130667

  3. PC7 and the related proteases Furin and Pace4 regulate E-cadherin function during blastocyst formation

    PubMed Central

    Mesnard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first cell differentiation in mammalian embryos segregates polarized trophectoderm cells from an apolar inner cell mass (ICM). This lineage decision is specified in compacted morulae by cell polarization and adhesion acting on the Yes-associated protein in the Hippo signaling pathway, but the regulatory mechanisms are unclear. We show that morula compaction and ICM formation depend on PC7 and the related proprotein convertases (PCs) Furin and Pace4 and that these proteases jointly regulate cell–cell adhesion mediated by E-cadherin processing. We also mapped the spatiotemporal activity profiles of these proteases by live imaging of a transgenic reporter substrate in wild-type and PC mutant embryos. Differential inhibition by a common inhibitor revealed that all three PCs are active in inner and outer cells, but in partially nonoverlapping compartments. E-cadherin processing by multiple PCs emerges as a novel mechanism to modulate cell–cell adhesion and fate allocation. PMID:26416966

  4. PC7 and the related proteases Furin and Pace4 regulate E-cadherin function during blastocyst formation.

    PubMed

    Bessonnard, Sylvain; Mesnard, Daniel; Constam, Daniel B

    2015-09-28

    The first cell differentiation in mammalian embryos segregates polarized trophectoderm cells from an apolar inner cell mass (ICM). This lineage decision is specified in compacted morulae by cell polarization and adhesion acting on the Yes-associated protein in the Hippo signaling pathway, but the regulatory mechanisms are unclear. We show that morula compaction and ICM formation depend on PC7 and the related proprotein convertases (PCs) Furin and Pace4 and that these proteases jointly regulate cell-cell adhesion mediated by E-cadherin processing. We also mapped the spatiotemporal activity profiles of these proteases by live imaging of a transgenic reporter substrate in wild-type and PC mutant embryos. Differential inhibition by a common inhibitor revealed that all three PCs are active in inner and outer cells, but in partially nonoverlapping compartments. E-cadherin processing by multiple PCs emerges as a novel mechanism to modulate cell-cell adhesion and fate allocation. PMID:26416966

  5. Crystal Structure of Human E-Cadherin-EC1EC2 in Complex with a Peptidomimetic Competitive Inhibitor of Cadherin Homophilic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Valentina; Lucarelli, Anna Paola; Dalle Vedove, Andrea; Fanelli, Roberto; Tomassetti, Antonella; Belvisi, Laura; Civera, Monica; Parisini, Emilio

    2016-05-26

    Cadherins are transmembrane cell adhesion proteins whose aberrant expression often correlates with cancer development and proliferation. We report the crystal structure of an E-cadherin extracellular fragment in complex with a peptidomimetic compound that was previously shown to partially inhibit cadherin homophilic adhesion. The structure reveals an unexpected binding mode and allows the identification of a druggable cadherin interface, thus paving the way to a future structure-guided design of cell adhesion inhibitors against cadherin-expressing solid tumors. PMID:27120112

  6. Enhanced G2/M Arrest, Caspase Related Apoptosis and Reduced E-Cadherin Dependent Intercellular Adhesion by Trabectedin in Prostate Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Eda; Guven, Ummu; Duzagac, Fahriye; Uslu, Ruchan; Kara, Mikail; Soner, Burak Cem; Oktem, Gulperi

    2015-01-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis, ET-743) is a marine-derived tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid. It is originally derived from the Caribbean marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata and currently produced synthetically. Trabectedin is active against a variety of tumor cell lines growing in culture. The present study focused on the effect of trabectedin in cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis and spheroid formation in prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Cluster of differentiation (CD) 133+high/CD44+high prostate CSCs were isolated from the DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line through flow cytometry. We studied the growth-inhibitory effects of trabectedin and its molecular mechanisms on human prostate CSCs and non-CSCs. DU-145 and PC-3 CSCs were treated with 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nM trabectedin for 24, 48 and 72 h and the growth inhibition rates were examined using the sphere-forming assay. Annexin-V assay and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the detection of the cell death. Concentration-dependent effects of trabectedin on the cell cycle were also evaluated. The cells were exposed to the different doses of trabectedin for 24, 48 and 72 h to evaluate the effect of trabectedin on the number and diameter of spheroids. According to the results, trabectedin induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis at the IC50 dose, resulting in a significant increase expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, p53 and decrease expression of bcl-2 in dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analyses revealed that trabectedin induces dose-dependent G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, particularly at high-dose treatments. Three-dimensional culture studies showed that trabectedin reduced the number and diameter of spheroids of DU145 and PC3 CSCs. Furthermore, we have found that trabectedin disrupted cell-cell interactions via E-cadherin in prostasphere of DU-145 and PC-3 CSCs. Our results showed that trabectedin inhibits cellular proliferation and accelerates apoptotic events in

  7. Drosophila E-cadherin is required for the maintenance of ring canals anchoring to mechanically withstand tissue growth.

    PubMed

    Loyer, Nicolas; Kolotuev, Irina; Pinot, Mathieu; Le Borgne, Roland

    2015-10-13

    Intercellular bridges called "ring canals" (RCs) resulting from incomplete cytokinesis play an essential role in intercellular communication in somatic and germinal tissues. During Drosophila oogenesis, RCs connect the maturing oocyte to nurse cells supporting its growth. Despite numerous genetic screens aimed at identifying genes involved in RC biogenesis and maturation, how RCs anchor to the plasma membrane (PM) throughout development remains unexplained. In this study, we report that the clathrin adaptor protein 1 (AP-1) complex, although dispensable for the biogenesis of RCs, is required for the maintenance of the anchorage of RCs to the PM to withstand the increased membrane tension associated with the exponential tissue growth at the onset of vitellogenesis. Here we unravel the mechanisms by which AP-1 enables the maintenance of RCs' anchoring to the PM during size expansion. We show that AP-1 regulates the localization of the intercellular adhesion molecule E-cadherin and that loss of AP-1 causes the disappearance of the E-cadherin-containing adhesive clusters surrounding the RCs. E-cadherin itself is shown to be required for the maintenance of the RCs' anchorage, a function previously unrecognized because of functional compensation by N-cadherin. Scanning block-face EM combined with transmission EM analyses reveals the presence of interdigitated, actin- and Moesin-positive, microvilli-like structures wrapping the RCs. Thus, by modulating E-cadherin trafficking, we show that the sustained E-cadherin-dependent adhesion organizes the microvilli meshwork and ensures the proper attachment of RCs to the PM, thereby counteracting the increasing membrane tension induced by exponential tissue growth. PMID:26424451

  8. Inhibition of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition by E-cadherin Up-regulation via Repression of Slug Transcription and Inhibition of E-cadherin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Arghya; Chakraborty, Samik; Mazumdar, Minakshi; Ghosh, Swatilekha; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Manna, Argha; Mohanty, Suchismita; Nakka, Kiran Kumar; Joshi, Shruti; De, Abhijit; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Sa, Gaurisankar; Das, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the cancer cell into a metastatic entity is the major cause of death in patients with cancer. It has been acknowledged that aberrant activation of a latent embryonic program, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), can endow cancer cells with the migratory and invasive capabilities associated with metastatic competence for which E-cadherin switch is a well-established hallmark. Discerning the molecular mechanisms that regulate E-cadherin expression is therefore critical for understanding tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Here we report that SMAR1 overexpression inhibits EMT and decelerates the migratory potential of breast cancer cells by up-regulating E-cadherin in a bidirectional manner. While SMAR1-dependent transcriptional repression of Slug by direct recruitment of SMAR1/HDAC1 complex to the matrix attachment region site present in the Slug promoter restores E-cadherin expression, SMAR1 also hinders E-cadherin-MDM2 interaction thereby reducing ubiquitination and degradation of E-cadherin protein. Consistently, siRNA knockdown of SMAR1 expression in these breast cancer cells results in a coordinative action of Slug-mediated repression of E-cadherin transcription, as well as degradation of E-cadherin protein through MDM2, up-regulating breast cancer cell migration. These results indicate a crucial role for SMAR1 in restraining breast cancer cell migration and suggest the candidature of this scaffold matrix-associated region-binding protein as a tumor suppressor. PMID:25086032

  9. Letter to the Editor: Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Release Oncogenic Soluble E-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Since their discovery, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Despite intensive research and remarkable progress, it is becoming increasingly acknowledged that their yet incomplete, biological characterisation represents one of the major drawbacks to their successful translation into the clinics. The expression of the transmembrane protein E-cadherin in hPSCs is well defined to be pivotal to the maintenance of the pluripotent state by mediating intercellular adhesion and intracellular signaling. Next to these canonical functions, were here report for the first time that hPSCs are subject to matrix metalloproteinase-dependent E-cadherin ectodomain shedding. This generates a ∼80-kD, soluble E-cadherin fragment which is released into the extracellular space, and which is well described to exert paracrine signaling activity and classified as being oncogenic. Collectively, this finding does not only improve our knowledge on the signaling crosstalk between hPSCs and their cellular environment and the type and nature of the paracrine signals produced by these cells, but also has clear implications for the development of efficient and safe stem cell-based therapies. Stem Cells 2016;34:2443-2446. PMID:27399873

  10. Dehydropeptidase 1 promotes metastasis through regulation of E-cadherin expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Seon-Jin; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Jae Wha; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Yeom, Young Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Younghee; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropeptidase 1 (DPEP1) is a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase that is expressed aberrantly in several cancers. The role of DPEP1 in cancer remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that DPEP1 functions as a positive regulator for colon cancer cell metastasis. The expression of DPEP1 mRNA and proteins were upregulated in colon cancer tissues compared to normal mucosa. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were used to examine the malignant phenotype of DPEP1-expressing or DPEP1-depleted cells. DPEP1 expression caused a significant increase in colon cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, DPEP1 depletion induced opposite effects. Furthermore, cilastatin, a DPEP1 inhibitor, suppressed the invasion and metastasis of DPEP1-expressing cells. DPEP1 inhibited the leukotriene D4 signaling pathway and increased the expression of E-cadherin. We also show that DPEP1 mediates TGF-β-induced EMT. TGF-β transcriptionally repressed DPEP1 expression. TGF-β treatment decreased E-cadherin expression and promoted cell invasion in DPEP1-expressing colon cancer cell lines, whereas it did not affect these parameters in DPEP1-depleted cell lines. These results suggest that DPEP1 promotes cancer metastasis by regulating E-cadherin plasticity and that it might be a potential therapeutic target for preventing the progression of colon cancer. PMID:26824987

  11. E-cadherin expression in colorectal cancer. An immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed Central

    Dorudi, S.; Sheffield, J. P.; Poulsom, R.; Northover, J. M.; Hart, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the epithelial-specific adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been assessed in paraffin-embedded tissue from a series of 72 colorectal carcinomas. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization it was found that E-cadherin expression was related inversely to tumor differentiation. Out of 44 well- and moderately differentiated tumors, 36 expressed good positivity, whereas 24 of 28 poorly differentiated tumors were E-cadherin-negative. Classification by Dukes stage revealed a highly significant difference (P << 0.001) between A and B (32 positive, four negative) and C1 and C2 (seven positive, 29 negative) stages in terms of immunoreactivity. Of the 32 lymph node metastases studied, 20 were negative for E-cadherin expression, as were seven of eight liver metastases. These results indicate that the down-regulation of E-cadherin levels in vivo is associated with the dedifferentiation, progression, and metastasis of colorectal cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7682766

  12. A Novel Role of E-Cadherin-Based Adherens Junctions in Neoplastic Cell Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Gloushankova, Natalya A.

    2015-01-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we analyzed the behavior of IAR-6-1, IAR1170, and IAR1162 transformed epithelial cells seeded onto the confluent monolayer of normal IAR-2 epithelial cells. Live-cell imaging of neoplastic cells stably expressing EGFP and of normal epithelial cells stably expressing mKate2 showed that transformed cells retaining expression of E-cadherin were able to migrate over the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer and invade the monolayer. Transformed IAR cells invaded the IAR-2 monolayer at the boundaries between normal cells. Studying interactions of IAR-6-1 transformed cells stably expressing GFP-E-cadherin with the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer, we found that IAR-6-1 cells established E-cadherin-based adhesions with normal epithelial cells: dot-like dynamic E-cadherin-based adhesions in protrusions and large adherens junctions at the cell sides and rear. A comparative study of a panel of transformed IAR cells that differ by their ability to form E-cadherin-based AJs, either through loss of E-cadherin expression or through expression of a dominant negative E-cadherin mutant, demonstrated that E-cadherin-based AJs are key mediators of the interactions between neoplastic and normal epithelial cells. IAR-6-1DNE cells expressing a dominant-negative mutant form of E-cadherin with the mutation in the first extracellular domain practically lost the ability to adhere to IAR-2 cells and invade the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer. The ability of cancer cells to form E-cadherin-based AJs with the surrounding normal epithelial cells may play an important role in driving cancer cell dissemination in the body. PMID:26207916

  13. Three mechanisms control E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens.

    PubMed

    Woichansky, Innokenty; Beretta, Carlo Antonio; Berns, Nicola; Riechmann, Veit

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens is fundamental for epithelial differentiation but the mechanisms controlling localization are unclear. Using the Drosophila follicular epithelium we genetically dissect E-cadherin transport in an in vivo model. We distinguish three mechanisms mediating E-cadherin accumulation at the zonula adherens. Two membrane trafficking pathways deliver newly synthesized E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. One is Rab11 dependent and targets E-cadherin directly to the zonula adherens, while the other transports E-cadherin to the lateral membrane. Lateral E-cadherin reaches the zonula adherens by endocytosis and targeted recycling. We show that this pathway is dependent on RabX1, which provides a functional link between early and recycling endosomes. Moreover, we show that lateral E-cadherin is transported to the zonula adherens by an apically directed flow within the plasma membrane. Differential activation of these pathways could facilitate cell shape changes during morphogenesis, while their misregulation compromises cell adhesion and tissue architecture in differentiated epithelia. PMID:26960923

  14. Three mechanisms control E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens

    PubMed Central

    Woichansky, Innokenty; Beretta, Carlo Antonio; Berns, Nicola; Riechmann, Veit

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens is fundamental for epithelial differentiation but the mechanisms controlling localization are unclear. Using the Drosophila follicular epithelium we genetically dissect E-cadherin transport in an in vivo model. We distinguish three mechanisms mediating E-cadherin accumulation at the zonula adherens. Two membrane trafficking pathways deliver newly synthesized E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. One is Rab11 dependent and targets E-cadherin directly to the zonula adherens, while the other transports E-cadherin to the lateral membrane. Lateral E-cadherin reaches the zonula adherens by endocytosis and targeted recycling. We show that this pathway is dependent on RabX1, which provides a functional link between early and recycling endosomes. Moreover, we show that lateral E-cadherin is transported to the zonula adherens by an apically directed flow within the plasma membrane. Differential activation of these pathways could facilitate cell shape changes during morphogenesis, while their misregulation compromises cell adhesion and tissue architecture in differentiated epithelia. PMID:26960923

  15. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  16. The clinicopathological significance and potential drug target of E-cadherin in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kaize; Chen, Weiwen; Xiao, Ning; Zhao, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Human epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), a member of transmembrane glycoprotein family, encoded by the E-cadherin gene, plays a key role in cell-cell adhesion, adherent junction in normal epithelial tissues, contributing to tissue differentiation and homeostasis. Although previous studies indicated that inactivation of the E-cadherin is mainly induced by hypermethylation of E-cadherin gene, evidence concerning E-cadherin hypermethylation in the carcinogenesis and development of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remains controversial. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of E-cadherin hypermethylation on the incidence and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC. A comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase databases was performed up to October 2014. Analyses of pooled data were performed. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated and summarized. Our meta-analysis combining 18 published articles demonstrated that the hypermethylation frequencies in NSCLC were significantly higher than those in normal control tissues, OR = 3.55, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.98-6.36, p < 0.0001. Further analysis showed that E-cadherin hypermethylation was not strongly associated with the sex or smoking status in NSCLC patients. In addition, E-cadherin hypermethylation was also not strongly associated with pathological types, differentiated status, clinical stages, or metastatic status in NSCLC patients. The results from the current study indicate that the hypermethylation frequency of E-cadherin in NSCLC is strongly associated with NSCLC incidence and it may be an early event in carcinogenesis of NSCLC. We also discussed the potential value of E-cadherin as a drug target that may bring new direction and hope for cancer treatment through gene-targeted therapy. PMID:25758052

  17. N-glycosylation status of E-cadherin controls cytoskeletal dynamics through the organization of distinct β-catenin- and γ-catenin-containing AJs

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Basem T; Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Gao, Zhennan; Amin, Bakr; Walker, Janice; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    N-glycosylation of E-cadherin has been shown to inhibit cell–cell adhesion. Specifically, our recent studies have provided evidence that the reduction of E-cadherin N-glycosylation promoted the recruitment of stabilizing components, vinculin and serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), to adherens junctions (AJs) and enhanced the association of AJs with the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we examined the details of how N-glycosylation of E-cadherin affected the molecular organization of AJs and their cytoskeletal interactions. Using the hypoglycosylated E-cadherin variant, V13, we show that V13/β-catenin complexes preferentially interacted with PP2A and with the microtubule motor protein dynein. This correlated with dephosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, suggesting that increased association of PP2A with V13-containing AJs promoted their tethering to microtubules. On the other hand V13/γ-catenin complexes associated more with vinculin, suggesting that they mediated the interaction of AJs with the actin cytoskeleton. N-glycosylation driven changes in the molecular organization of AJs were physiologically significant because transfection of V13 into A253 cancer cells, lacking both mature AJs and tight junctions (TJs), promoted the formation of stable AJs and enhanced the function of TJs to a greater extent than wild-type E-cadherin. These studies provide the first mechanistic insights into how N-glycosylation of E-cadherin drives changes in AJ composition through the assembly of distinct β-catenin- and γ-catenin-containing scaffolds that impact the interaction with different cytoskeletal components. PMID:20502620

  18. Sustained α-catenin Activation at E-cadherin Junctions in the Absence of Mechanical Force.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kabir H; Hartman, Kevin L; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    Mechanotransduction at E-cadherin junctions has been postulated to be mediated in part by a force-dependent conformational activation of α-catenin. Activation of α-catenin allows it to interact with vinculin in addition to F-actin, resulting in a strengthening of junctions. Here, using E-cadherin adhesions reconstituted on synthetic, nanopatterned membranes, we show that activation of α-catenin is dependent on E-cadherin clustering, and is sustained in the absence of mechanical force or association with F-actin or vinculin. Adhesions were formed by filopodia-mediated nucleation and micron-scale assembly of E-cadherin clusters, which could be distinguished as either peripheral or central assemblies depending on their relative location at the cell-bilayer adhesion. Whereas F-actin, vinculin, and phosphorylated myosin light chain associated only with the peripheral assemblies, activated α-catenin was present in both peripheral and central assemblies, and persisted in the central assemblies in the absence of actomyosin tension. Impeding filopodia-mediated nucleation and micron-scale assembly of E-cadherin adhesion complexes by confining the movement of bilayer-bound E-cadherin on nanopatterned substrates reduced the levels of activated α-catenin. Taken together, these results indicate that although the initial activation of α-catenin requires micron-scale clustering that may allow the development of mechanical forces, sustained force is not required for maintaining α-catenin in the active state. PMID:27602732

  19. Antioxidants Maintain E-Cadherin Levels to Limit Drosophila Prohemocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongjuan; Wu, Xiaorong; Simon, LaTonya; Fossett, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate a variety of biological processes by networking with signal transduction pathways to maintain homeostasis and support adaptation to stress. In this capacity, ROS have been shown to promote the differentiation of progenitor cells, including mammalian embryonic and hematopoietic stem cells and Drosophila hematopoietic progenitors (prohemocytes). However, many questions remain about how ROS alter the regulatory machinery to promote progenitor differentiation. Here, we provide evidence for the hypothesis that ROS reduce E-cadherin levels to promote Drosophila prohemocyte differentiation. Specifically, we show that knockdown of the antioxidants, Superoxide dismutatase 2 and Catalase reduce E-cadherin protein levels prior to the loss of Odd-skipped-expressing prohemocytes. Additionally, over-expression of E-cadherin limits prohemocyte differentiation resulting from paraquat-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, two established targets of ROS, Enhancer of Polycomb and FOS, control the level of E-cadherin protein expression. Finally, we show that knockdown of either Superoxide dismutatase 2 or Catalase leads to an increase in the E-cadherin repressor, Serpent. As a result, antioxidants and targets of ROS can control E-cadherin protein levels, and over-expression of E-cadherin can ameliorate the prohemocyte response to oxidative stress. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that ROS promote differentiation by reducing E-cadherin levels. In mammalian systems, ROS promote embryonic stem cell differentiation, whereas E-cadherin blocks differentiation. However, it is not known if elevated ROS reduce E-cadherin to promote embryonic stem cell differentiation. Thus, our findings may have identified an important mechanism by which ROS promote stem/progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:25226030

  20. E-cadherin gene mutations are rare in adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Wijnhoven, B P; de Both, N J; van Dekken, H; Tilanus, H W; Dinjens, W N

    1999-07-01

    Reduced expression of E-cadherin, a cell-cell adhesion molecule, is observed in oesophageal adenocarcinomas and correlates with less favourable pathological parameters and survival. To determine if genetic events lead to reduced E-cadherin expression in these patients, we screened all 16 exons of the E-cadherin gene for mutations with the polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (PCR-SSCP) technique in 49 resection specimens, including four loco-regional lymph node metastases, four established cell lines and four xenografts. Fifteen exon-spanning primer pairs were used, and in nine amplicons aberrant bands were detected. Sequencing of the amplicons revealed a one base-pair deletion (codon 120; exon 3) in cell lines JROECL 47 and JROECL 50 leading to a premature downstream stop codon. Polymorphisms were identified for amplicons 1, 4/5, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16 corresponding with data from the literature. Three new polymorphisms were detected for amplicons 2, 3 and 4/5. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the E-cadherin locus on 16q22.1 was examined with four polymorphic markers. LOH was found in 31 of the 48 informative cases (65%). These results show that, despite the frequent LOH of the E-cadherin locus, mutations in the E-cadherin gene are rare events and can not be held responsible for down-regulation of E-cadherin observed in the majority of adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. PMID:10408414

  1. Fast dissociation kinetics between individual E-cadherin fragments revealed by flow chamber analysis

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Emilie; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Nassoy, Pierre; Pierres, Anne; Delmas, Véronique; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Bongrand, Pierre; Feracci, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    E-cadherin is the predominant adhesion molecule of epithelia. The interaction between extracellular segments of E-cadherin in the membrane of opposing cells is homophilic and calcium dependent. Whereas it is widely accepted that the specificity of the adhesive interaction is localized to the N-terminal domain, the kinetics of the recognition process are unknown. We report the first quantitative data describing the dissociation kinetics of individual E-cadherin interactions. Aggregation assays indicate that the two outermost domains of E-cadherin (E/EC1–2) retain biological activity when chemically immobilized on glass beads. Cadherin fragment trans-interaction was analysed using a flow chamber technique. Transient tethers had first-order kinetics, suggesting a unimolecular interaction. The unstressed lifetime of individual E-cadherin interactions was as brief as 2 s. A fast off rate and the low tensile strength of the E-cadherin bond may be necessary to support the high selectivity and plasticity of epithelial cell interactions. PMID:12032067

  2. Modulation of E-cadherin expression promotes migration ability of esophageal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujun; Qin, Xuebo; Chai, Song; Qu, Changbao; Wang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Helin

    2016-01-01

    Losing the E-cadherin plays an important role in the metastasis of cancer. The regulation of the expression of E-cadherin is unclear. Circadian rhythm alteration is associated with the pathogenesis of a number of cancers. This study aims to investigate the role of one of the circadian proteins, period-2 (Per2) in repressing the expression of E-cadherin in esophageal cancer (esophageal cancer). We observed that the levels of circadian protein Per2 were significantly increased and E-cadherin was significantly decreased in the tissue of human esophageal cancer with metastasis as compared with non-metastatic esophageal cancer. Overexpression of Per2 in the esophageal cancer cells markedly repressed the expression of E-cadherin. The pHDAC1 was detected in human esophageal cancer with metastasis, which was much less in the esophageal cancer tissue without metastasis. Overexpression of Per2 increased the levels of pHDAC1 as well as the E-cadherin repressors at the E-cadherin promoter locus. Overexpression of Per2 markedly increased the migratory capacity of esophageal cancer cells, which was abolished by the inhibition of HDAC1. We conclude that Per-2 plays an important role in the esophageal cancer cell metastasis, which may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:26898709

  3. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  4. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  5. E-cadherin is required for intestinal morphogenesis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bondow, Benjamin J.; Faber, Mary L.; Wojta, Kevin J.; Walker, Emily; Battle, Michele A.

    2012-01-01

    E-cadherin, the primary epithelial adherens junction protein, has been implicated as playing a critical role in nucleating formation of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and desmosomes. In addition to its role in maintaining structural tissue integrity, E-cadherin has also been suggested as an important modulator of cell signaling via interactions with its cytoplasmic binding partners, catenins, as well as with growth factor receptors. Therefore, we proposed that loss of E-cadherin from the developing mouse intestinal epithelium would disrupt intestinal epithelial morphogenesis and function. To test this hypothesis, we used a conditional knockout approach to eliminate E-cadherin specifically in the intestinal epithelium during embryonic development. We found that E-cadherin conditional knockout mice failed to survive, dying within the first 24 hours of birth. Examination of intestinal architecture at E18.5 demonstrated severe disruption to intestinal morphogenesis in animals lacking E-cadherin in the epithelium of the small intestine. We observed changes in epithelial cell shape as well as in the morphology of villi. Although junctional complexes were evident, junctions were abnormal, and barrier function was compromised in E-cadherin mutant intestine. We also identified changes in the epithelial cell populations present in E-cadherin conditional knockout animals. The number of proliferating cells was increased, whereas the number of enterocytes was decreased. Although Wnt/β-catenin target mRNAs were more abundant in mutants compared with controls, the amount of nuclear activated β-catenin protein was dramatically lower in mutants compared with controls. In summary, our data demonstrate that E-cadherin is essential for intestinal epithelial morphogenesis and homeostasis during embryonic development. PMID:22766025

  6. Expression of connexin 43 and E-cadherin in choroidal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jin-Yong; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Hong; Hu, Li-Ting; Xu, Qiang; Wang 1, Qing; Sun, Wei-Rong

    2011-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression of connexin 43 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) in choroidal melanoma, to explore the clinical and pathological implications of expression of these proteins, and to determine their relations with malignant features. METHODS The expression of connexin 43 and E-cadherin in choroidal melanoma were detected by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathological features. RESULTS Positive rates of connexin 43 in choroidal melanomas and benign pigmented nevus tissues were 75% and 40% respectively with significant differences between the two groups (χ2=5.607, P=0.009). Positive rates of E-cadherin in choroidal melanomas and benign pigmented nevus tissues were 40% and 75% respectively with significant differences between the two groups (χ2=5.214, P=0.010). Significant overexpression of connexin 43 and reduction of E-cadherin expression was associated with the invasion to the sclera, and there were respectively significant differences between without and with scleral invasion groups (χ2=2.880, P=0.040; χ2=2.778, P=0.046). Overexpression of connexin 43 were correlated with tumor cell types and the expression of connexin 43 and E-cadherin may be correlated with each other. CONCLUSION The increased expression of connexin 43 and the decreased expression of E-cadherin may be involved in the process of invasion of choroidal melanoma. The overepression of connexin 43 and reduction of E-cadherin may contribute to the development of choroidal melanoma. PMID:22553632

  7. 1H, 13C and 15N Backbone Assignment of the EC-1 Domain of Human E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Prasasty, Vivitri D.; Krause, Mary E.; Tambunan, Usman S. F.; Anbanandam, Asokan; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2014-01-01

    The EC1 domain of E-cadherin has been shown to be important for cadherin-cadherin homophilic interactions. Cadherins are responsible for calcium-mediated cell-cell adhesion located at the adherens junction of the biological barriers (i.e., intestinal mucosa and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Cadherin peptides can modulate cadherin interactions to improve drug delivery through the blood-brain barriers (BBB). However, the mechanism of modulating the E-cadherin interactions by cadherin peptides has not been fully elucidated. To provide a basis for subsequent examination of the structure and peptide-binding properties of the EC1 domain of human E-cadherin using solution NMR spectroscopy, the 1H, 13C and 15N backbone resonance of the uniformly labeled-EC1 were assigned and the secondary structure was determined based on the chemical shift values. These resonance assignments are essential for assessing protein-ligand interactions and are reported here. PMID:24510398

  8. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  9. Epithelial cell-derived periostin functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14ARF/Mdm2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongjun; Liu, Rui; Fu, Jiao; Yang, Qi; Shi, Jing; Chen, Pu; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Periostin is usually considered as an oncogene in diverse human cancers, including breast, prostate, colon, esophagus, and pancreas cancers, whereas it acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. In gastric cancer, it has been demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression is decreased whereas stromal periostin expression is significantly increased as compared with normal gastric tissues. Moreover, periostin produced by stromal myofibroblasts markedly promotes gastric cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that periostin derived from different types of cells may play distinct biological roles in gastric tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the biological functions and related molecular mechanisms of epithelial cell-derived periostin in gastric cancer. Our data showed that periglandular periostin was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric mucosa. In addition, its expression in metastatic lymph nodes was significantly lower than that in their primary cancer tissues. Our data also demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression was negatively associated with tumor stage. More importantly, restoration of periostin expression in gastric cancer cells dramatically suppressed cell growth and invasiveness. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved revealed that periostin restoration enhanced Rb phosphorylation and sequentially activated the transcription of E2F1 target gene p14(ARF), leading to Mdm2 inactivation and the stabilization of p53 and E-cadherin proteins. Strikingly, these effects of periostin were abolished upon Rb deletion. Collectively, we have for the first time demonstrated that epithelial cell-derived periostin exerts tumor-suppressor activities in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14(ARF)/Mdm2 signaling pathway. PMID:25486483

  10. Epigenetic regulation of E-cadherin expression by the histone demethylase UTX in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zha, Lin; Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Li, Fenfen; Liang, Houjie; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang

    2016-03-01

    Decreased epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) gene expression, a hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is essential for triggering metastatic advantage of the colon cancer. Genetic mechanisms underlying the regulation of E-cadherin expression in EMT have been extensively investigated; however, much is unknown about the epigenetic mechanism underlying this process. Here, we identified ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on chromosome X (UTX), a histone demethylase involved in demethylating di- or tri-methylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me2/3), as a positive regulator for the expression of E-cadherin in the colon cancer cell line HCT-116. We showed that inactivation of UTX down-regulated E-cadherin gene expression, while overexpression of UTX did the opposite. Notably, overexpression of UTX inhibited migration and invasion of HCT-116 cells. Moreover, UTX demethylated H3K27me3, a histone transcriptional repressive mark, leading to decreased H3K27me3 at the E-cadherin promoter. Further, UTX interacted with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein CBP and recruited it to the E-cadherin promoter, resulting in increased H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac), a histone transcriptional active mark. UTX positively regulates E-cadherin expression through coordinated regulation of H3K27 demethylation and acetylation, switching the transcriptional repressive state to the transcriptional active state at the E-cadherin promoter. We conclude that UTX may play a role in regulation of E-cadherin gene expression in HCT-116 cells and that UTX may serve as a therapeutic target against the metastasis in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:26819089

  11. E-cadherin is required for cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaolie; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-03-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent embryonic cell population, which migrates directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo, contributing to facial structures including cartilage, bone and ganglia. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is known to play a crucial role in the directional migration of CNC cells. However, migrating CNC co-express different cadherin subtypes, and their individual roles have yet to be fully explored. In previous studies, the expression of individual cadherin subtypes has been analysed using different methods with varying sensitivities, preventing the direct comparison of expression levels. Here, we provide the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of the expression of six cadherin superfamily members during different phases of CNC cell migration in Xenopus. By applying a quantitative RT-qPCR approach, we can determine the copy number and abundance of each expressed cadherin through different phases of CNC migration. Using this approach, we show for the first time expression of E-cadherin and XB/C-cadherin in CNC cells, adding them as two new members of cadherins co-expressed during CNC migration. Cadherin co-expression during CNC migration in Xenopus, in particular the constant expression of E-cadherin, contradicts the classical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) model postulating a switch in cadherin expression. Loss-of-function experiments further show that E-cadherin is required for proper CNC cell migration in vivo and also for cell protrusion formation in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin is not rescued by co-injection of other classical cadherins, pointing to a specific function of E-cadherin in mediating CNC cell migration. Finally, through reconstitution experiments with different E-cadherin deletion mutants in E-cadherin morphant embryos, we demonstrate that the extracellular domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain, of E-cadherin is sufficient to rescue CNC cell migration in vivo

  12. Drosophila E-cadherin is required for the maintenance of ring canals anchoring to mechanically withstand tissue growth

    PubMed Central

    Loyer, Nicolas; Kolotuev, Irina; Pinot, Mathieu; Le Borgne, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular bridges called “ring canals” (RCs) resulting from incomplete cytokinesis play an essential role in intercellular communication in somatic and germinal tissues. During Drosophila oogenesis, RCs connect the maturing oocyte to nurse cells supporting its growth. Despite numerous genetic screens aimed at identifying genes involved in RC biogenesis and maturation, how RCs anchor to the plasma membrane (PM) throughout development remains unexplained. In this study, we report that the clathrin adaptor protein 1 (AP-1) complex, although dispensable for the biogenesis of RCs, is required for the maintenance of the anchorage of RCs to the PM to withstand the increased membrane tension associated with the exponential tissue growth at the onset of vitellogenesis. Here we unravel the mechanisms by which AP-1 enables the maintenance of RCs’ anchoring to the PM during size expansion. We show that AP-1 regulates the localization of the intercellular adhesion molecule E-cadherin and that loss of AP-1 causes the disappearance of the E-cadherin–containing adhesive clusters surrounding the RCs. E-cadherin itself is shown to be required for the maintenance of the RCs’ anchorage, a function previously unrecognized because of functional compensation by N-cadherin. Scanning block-face EM combined with transmission EM analyses reveals the presence of interdigitated, actin- and Moesin-positive, microvilli-like structures wrapping the RCs. Thus, by modulating E-cadherin trafficking, we show that the sustained E-cadherin–dependent adhesion organizes the microvilli meshwork and ensures the proper attachment of RCs to the PM, thereby counteracting the increasing membrane tension induced by exponential tissue growth. PMID:26424451

  13. β-elemene decreases cell invasion by upregulating E-cadherin expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yinghua

    2013-08-01

    Inactivation of E-cadherin results in cell migration and invasion, hence leading to cancer aggressiveness and metastasis. Downregulation of E-cadherin is closely correlated with a poor prognosis in invasive breast cancer. Thus, re-introducing E-cadherin is a novel strategy for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the traditional Chinese medicine, β-elemene (ELE), on E-cadherin expression, cell migration and invasion in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. MCF-7 cells were treated with 50 and 100 µg/ml ELE. E-cadherin mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. E-cadherin protein levels were determined by immunofluorescence and western blot assays. Cell motility was measured by a Transwell assay. ELE increased both the protein and mRNA levels of E-cadherin, accompanied by decreased cell migration and invasion. Further analysis demonstrated that ELE upregulated estrogen receptor‑α (ERα) and metastasis-associated protein 3 (MTA3), and decreased the nuclear transcription factor Snail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that ELE decreases cell migration and invasion by upregulating E-cadherin expression via controlling the ERα/MTA3/Snail signaling pathway. PMID:23732279

  14. Comparative Evaluation of β-Catenin and E-Cadherin Expression in Liquid Aspiration Biopsy Specimens of Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Isaeva, A V; Zima, A P; Saprina, T V; Kasoyan, K T; Popov, O S; Brynova, O V; Berezkina, I S; Vasil'eva, O A; Ryazantseva, N V; Shabalova, I P; Litvinova, L S; Pak, Yu D; Novitskii, V V

    2016-06-01

    We compared the results of gene molecular and immunocytochemical studies of β-catenin and E-cadherin in different variants of nodular thyroid disease (nodular colloid goiter, follicular thyroid adenocarcinoma, papillary thyroid cancer) and revealed changes of the function of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex leading to switching from adhesion function of β-catenin in nodular colloid goiter to predominantly transcriptional activity in papillary carcinoma. The results confirm the important role of disturbances in E-cadherin-β-catenin interactions in the mechanisms of malignant transformation of follicular epithelium. PMID:27383156

  15. Isoform 5 of PIPKIγ regulates the endosomal trafficking and degradation of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Schill, Nicholas J.; Hedman, Andrew C.; Choi, Suyong; Anderson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs) have distinct cellular targeting, allowing for site-specific synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] to activate specific signaling cascades required for cellular processes. Several C-terminal splice variants of PIPKIγ (also known as PIP5K1C) exist, and have been implicated in a multitude of cellular roles. PI(4,5)P2 serves as a fundamental regulator of E-cadherin transport, and PI(4,5)P2-generating enzymes are important signaling relays in these pathways. We present evidence that the isoform 5 splice variant of PIPKIγ (PIPKIγi5) associates with E-cadherin and promotes its lysosomal degradation. Additionally, we show that the endosomal trafficking proteins SNX5 and SNX6 associate with PIPKIγi5 and inhibit PIPKIγi5-mediated E-cadherin degradation. Following HGF stimulation, activated Src directly phosphorylates PIPKIγi5. Phosphorylation of the PIPKIγi5 C-terminus regulates its association with SNX5 and, consequently, E-cadherin degradation. Additionally, this PIPKIγi5-mediated pathway requires Rab7 to promote degradation of internalized E-cadherin. Taken together, the data indicate that PIPKIγi5 and SNX5 are crucial regulators of E-cadherin sorting and degradation. PIPKIγi5, SNX and phosphoinositide regulation of lysosomal sorting represent a novel area of PI(4,5)P2 signaling and research. PIPKIγi5 regulation of E-cadherin sorting for degradation might have broad implications in development and tissue maintenance, and enhanced PIPKIγi5 function might have pathogenic consequences due to downregulation of E-cadherin. PMID:24610942

  16. Localization of E-cadherin in peripheral glia after nerve injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Seto, A; Uchiyama, N; Kida, S; Yamashima, T; Yamashita, J

    1996-04-01

    Peripheral nerve injury results in histological and histochemical changes in neurons and glia. We have recently found that Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin plays an important role in the selective fasciculation of a particular subset of unmyelinated sensory fibers. In the present immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, the temporal profile of the subcellular expression of this molecule in spinal nerves was examined after crushing, transecting, or ligaturing the sciatic nerve in mice with special attention paid to E-cadherin expression in glial cells. After axotomy of the sciatic nerve, distal axons of the proximal stump and the fibers of the distal stump degenerated, but E-cadherin was still detectable at the outer mesaxons of the myelinated axons as long as they remained morphologically intact. Subsequently, Schwann cells proliferated and migrated to form Schwann cell columns (Büngner's bands) as initial responses to denervation, and expressed E-cadherin at their site of contact with each other and later with sprouting axons. At the initial stage of myelin formation, slender processes of a single Schwann cell interdigitated with an enveloped axons, and expressed E-cadherin at the contact site elaborated by a single Schwann cell. Immunoblot analysis on day 7 revealed that E-cadherin was detected in both the proximal nerve segments and the regenerative distal segments, but was negative in the degenerative distal segments. On the basis of present data, it is suggested that E-cadherin might be involved in the stabilization of the peripheral glial network which provides the guidance of sprouting axons and myelination. PMID:8786402

  17. RhoA-JNK Regulates the E-Cadherin Junctions of Human Gingival Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Kim, H J; Kim, H-M

    2016-03-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is unique with regard to its wide intercellular spaces and sparsely developed intercellular junctions. Thus, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation of the intercellular junctions of the junctional epithelium may be essential to understand the pathophysiology of the JE. HOK-16B cells, a normal human gingival epithelial cell line, were used to identify the molecules involved in the regulation of the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions between human gingival epithelial cells. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) disrupted the intercellular junctions through the dissociation of E-cadherin. The role of JNK in the formation of these E-cadherin junctions was further confirmed by demonstrating that JNK inhibition induced the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions. The upstream signaling of JNK was also examined. Activation of the small GTPase RhoA disrupted the formation of E-cadherin junctions between HOK-16B cells, which was accompanied by JNK activation. Disruption of these intercellular junctions upon RhoA activation was prevented when JNK activity was inhibited. In contrast, RhoA inactivation led to HOK-16B cell aggregation and the formation of intercellular junctions, even under conditions in which the cellular junctions were naturally disrupted by growth on a strongly adhesive surface. Furthermore, the JE of mouse molars had high JNK activity associated with low E-cadherin expression, which was reversed in the other gingival epithelia, including the sulcular epithelium. Interestingly, JNK activity was increased in cells grown on a solid surface, where cells showed higher RhoA activity than those grown on soft surfaces. Together, these results indicate that the decreased formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions within the JE may be coupled to high JNK activity, which is activated by the upregulation of RhoA on solid tooth surfaces. PMID:26635280

  18. Suppression of E-cadherin Mediates Gallotannin Induced Apoptosis in Hep G2 Hepatocelluar Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Ko, Hyunsuk; Kim, Bogeun; Jung, Kwon; Lew, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Though gallotannin was known to have anti-oxidant and antitumor activity, the underlying antitumor mechanism of gallotannin still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, antitumor mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Gallotannin significantly exerted cytotoxicity against Hep G2 and Chang hepatocellular carcinoma cells with the accumulation of the sub-G1 population and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferasedUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells as an apoptotic feature. Also, gallotannin attenuated the expression of pro-caspase9, pro-caspase3, Bcl2 and integrin β1 and cleaved poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) in Hep G2 and Chang cancer cells. Furthermore, gallotannin suppressed cell repair motility by wound healing assay and also inhibited cell adhesion in Hep G2 cells. Of note, gallotannin attenuated the expression of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) to form cell-cell adhesion from the early stage, and also beta-catenin at late phase in Hep G2 cells. Consistently, Immunofluorescence assay showed that E-cadherin or β-catenin expression was suppressed in a time dependent manner by gallotannin. Furthermore, silencing of E-cadherin by siRNA transfection method enhanced PAPR cleavage, caspase 3 activation and sub G1 population and attenuated the cell adhesion induced by gallotannin in Hep G2 cells. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the disruption of cell adhesion junction by suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin enhanced apoptosis in Hep G2 liver cancer cells. PMID:24795530

  19. Down-regulation of MUC1 in cancer cells inhibits cell migration by promoting E-cadherin/catenin complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhenglong; Wong, Sandy; Borrelli, Alexander; Chung, Maureen A.

    2007-10-26

    MUC1, a tumor associated glycoprotein, is over-expressed in most cancers and can promote proliferation and metastasis. The objective of this research was to study the role of MUC1 in cancer metastasis and its potential mechanism. Pancreatic (PANC1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells with stable 'knockdown' of MUC1 expression were created using RNA interference. {beta}-Catenin and E-cadherin protein expression were upregulated in PANC1 and MCF-7 cells with decreased MUC1 expression. Downregulation of MUC1 expression also induced {beta}-catenin relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, increased E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and E-cadherin membrane localization in PANC1 cells. PANC1 cells with 'knockdown' MUC1 expression had decreased in vitro cell invasion. This study suggested that MUC1 may affect cancer cell migration by increasing E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and restoring E-cadherin membrane localization.

  20. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  1. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  2. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  3. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  4. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  5. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kabir H; Hartman, Kevin L; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W; Huang, William Y C; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M; Dustin, Michael L; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T

    2015-09-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  6. Cloning and characterization of the human invasion suppressor gene E-cadherin (CDH1)

    SciTech Connect

    Berx, G.; Staes, K.; Hengel, J. van

    1995-03-20

    E-cadherin is a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent epithelial cell-cell adhesion molecule. Downregulation of E-cadherin expression often correlates with strong invasive potential and poor prognosis of human carcinomas. By using recombinant {lambda} phage, cosmid, and P1 phage clones, we isolated the full-length human E-cadherin gene (CDH1). The gene spans a region of approximately 100 kb, and its location on chromosome 16q22.1 was confirmed by FISH analysis. Detailed restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis of the gene allowed us to identify 16 exons and a 65-kb-long intron 2. The intron-exon boundaries are highly conserved in comparison with other {open_quotes}classical cadherins.{close_quotes} In intron 1 we identified a high-density CpG island that may be implicated in transcription regulation during embryogenesis and malignancy. 52 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  8. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, TA; Dias, AM; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, JM; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, CA; Pinho, SS

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell–cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  9. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  10. Activated macrophages down-regulate expression of E-cadherin in hepatocellular carcinoma cells via NF-κB/Slug pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianteng; Wang, Hao; Li, Guosheng; Song, Yonghong; Wang, Shurong; Zhu, Faliang; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Shi, Yongyu

    2014-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas are an aggressive malignancy mainly due to metastasis or postsurgical recurrence. Expression of E-cadherin is strongly reduced in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and its downregulation is connected to invasiveness and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinomas. The previous study showed that the supernatant from activated macrophages can downregulate the expression of E-cadherin in HCC cells. The partial known molecular mechanism is that tyrosine kinases c-Src- and EGFR phosphorylate β-catenin and E-cadherin leading to destabilization of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex. The aim of this study is to clarify other mechanism by which activated macrophages downregulate the expression of E-cadherin. We detect the expression of E-cadherin and macrophage infiltration in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues by double-staining immunohistochemistry and evaluate the relationship between macrophages and E-cadherin expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro experiments. We found that reduced expression of E-cadherin was associated with macrophage infiltration along the border between the tumor nest and stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Besides, protein expression of E-cadherin was significantly decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma cells co-cultured with macrophages derived from THP-1 cells. Consistently, mRNA expression of E-cadherin was also decreased in cancer cells co-cultured with THP-1-differentiated macrophages. Moreover, the downregulation of E-cadherin expression was companied by upregulation of Slug expression in cancer cells with conditional medium from THP-1-differentiated macrophage culture. The change in expression of E-cadherin and Slug was abrogated when NF-κB signaling pathway was blocked. All the findings suggested that macrophages contributed to the decreased expression of E-cadherin by NF-κB/Slug pathway in hepatocellular carcinomas. PMID:24894673

  11. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  12. CDH1/E-cadherin and solid tumors. An updated gene-disease association analysis using bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Abascal, María Florencia; Besso, María José; Rosso, Marina; Mencucci, María Victoria; Aparicio, Evangelina; Szapiro, Gala; Furlong, Laura Inés; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica Hebe

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases that causes millions of deaths worldwide. Among cancers, Solid Tumors (ST) stand-out due to their high incidence and mortality rates. Disruption of cell-cell adhesion is highly relevant during tumor progression. Epithelial-cadherin (protein: E-cadherin, gene: CDH1) is a key molecule in cell-cell adhesion and an abnormal expression or/and function(s) contributes to tumor progression and is altered in ST. A systematic study was carried out to gather and summarize current knowledge on CDH1/E-cadherin and ST using bioinformatics resources. The DisGeNET database was exploited to survey CDH1-associated diseases. Reported mutations in specific ST were obtained by interrogating COSMIC and IntOGen tools. CDH1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) were retrieved from the dbSNP database. DisGeNET analysis identified 609 genes annotated to ST, among which CDH1 was listed. Using CDH1 as query term, 26 disease concepts were found, 21 of which were neoplasms-related terms. Using DisGeNET ALL Databases, 172 disease concepts were identified. Of those, 80 ST disease-related terms were subjected to manual curation and 75/80 (93.75%) associations were validated. On selected ST, 489 CDH1 somatic mutations were listed in COSMIC and IntOGen databases. Breast neoplasms had the highest CDH1-mutation rate. CDH1 was positioned among the 20 genes with highest mutation frequency and was confirmed as driver gene in breast cancer. Over 14,000 SNP for CDH1 were found in the dbSNP database. This report used DisGeNET to gather/compile current knowledge on gene-disease association for CDH1/E-cadherin and ST; data curation expanded the number of terms that relate them. An updated list of CDH1 somatic mutations was obtained with COSMIC and IntOGen databases and of SNP from dbSNP. This information can be used to further understand the role of CDH1/E-cadherin in health and disease. PMID:26674224

  13. Snail controls proliferation of Drosophila ovarian epithelial follicle stem cells, independently of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2016-06-15

    Epithelial stem cells undergo constant self-renewal and differentiation to maintain the homeostasis of epithelial tissues that undergo rapid turnover. Recent studies have shown that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is primarily mediated by Snail via the suppression of E-cadherin, is able to generate cells with stem cell properties. However, the role of Snail in epithelial stem cells remains unclear. Here, we report that Snail directly controls proliferation of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in Drosophila females. Disruption of Snail expression in FSCs compromises their proliferation, but not their maintenance. Conversely, FSCs with excessive Snail expression display increased proliferation and lifespan, which is accompanied by a moderate decrease in the expression of E-cadherin (required for adhesion of FSCs to their niche) at the junction between their adjacent cells, indicating a conserved role of Snail in E-cadherin inhibition, which promote epithelial cell proliferation. Interestingly, a decrease in E-cadherin in snail-knock down FSCs does not restore the decreased proliferation of snail-knock down FSCs, suggesting that adhesion strength of FSCs to their niche is dispensable for Snail-mediated FSC division. Our results demonstrate that Snail controls epithelial stem cell division independently of its known role in the EMT, which contributes to induction of cancer stem cells. PMID:27141871

  14. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification

    PubMed Central

    Haenebalcke, Lieven; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Huylebroeck, Danny; Stemmler, Marc P.; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J.; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  15. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Tim; Goossens, Steven; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Andries, Vanessa; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Hochepied, Tino; Huylebroeck, Danny; Berx, Geert; Stemmler, Marc P; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-08-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  16. ADAM12-directed ectodomain shedding of E-cadherin potentiates trophoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, M; Hogg, K; Perdu, S; Robinson, W P; Beristain, A G

    2015-12-01

    Trophoblasts, placental cells of epithelial lineage, undergo extensive differentiation to form the cellular components of the placenta. Trophoblast progenitor cell differentiation into the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast is a key developmental process required for placental function, where defects in syncytiotrophoblast formation and turnover associate with placental pathologies and link to poor pregnancy outcomes. The cellular and molecular processes governing syncytiotrophoblast formation are poorly understood, but require the activation of pathways that direct cell fusion. The protease, A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12), controls cell fusion in myoblasts and is highly expressed in the placenta localizing to multiple trophoblast populations. However, the importance of ADAM12 in regulating trophoblast fusion is unknown. Here, we describe a function for ADAM12 in regulating trophoblast fusion. Using two distinct trophoblast models of cell fusion, we show that ADAM12 is dynamically upregulated and is under the transcriptional control of protein kinase A. siRNA-directed loss of ADAM12 impedes spontaneous fusion of primary cytotrophoblasts, whereas overexpression of the secreted variant, ADAM12S, potentiates cell fusion in the Bewo trophoblast cell line. Mechanistically, both ectopic and endogenous levels of ADAM12 were shown to control trophoblast fusion through E-cadherin ectodomain shedding and remodeling of intercellular boundaries. This study describes a novel role for ADAM12 in placental development, specifically highlighting its importance in controlling the differentiation of villous cytotrophoblasts into multinucleated cellular structures. Moreover, this work identifies E-cadherin as a novel ADAM12 substrate, and highlights the significance that cell adhesion molecule ectodomain shedding has in normal development. PMID:25909890

  17. XPC inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation and migration by enhancing E-Cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Tiantian; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Linlin; Zhao, Ran; Zou, Ning; Qu, Meihua; Duan, Wenrui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is an important DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair. Deletion of XPC is associated with early stages of human lung carcinogenesis, and reduced XPC mRNA levels predict poor patient outcome for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the mechanisms linking loss of XPC expression and poor prognosis in lung cancer are still unclear. Here, we report evidence that XPC silencing drives proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells by down-regulating E-Cadherin. XPC knockdown enhanced proliferation and migration while decreasing E-Cadherin expression in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype. Restoration of E-Cadherin in these cells suppressed XPC knockdown-induced cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that the loss of XPC repressed E-Cadherin expression by activating the ERK pathway and upregulating Snail expression. Our findings indicate that XPC silencing-induced reduction of E-Cadherin expression contributes, at least in part, to the poor outcome of NSCLC patients with low XPC expression. PMID:25871391

  18. Fate of E-cadherin in Early RPE Cultures: Transient Accumulation of Truncated Peptides at Nonjunctional Sites

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Janice M.; Hong, Jeehee

    2006-01-01

    Purpose E-cadherin is known to accumulate variably and slowly at junctions of cultured human RPE cells. The intent of this investigation was to determine what limits E-cadherin protein accumulation in RPE cells by analyzing cultures at early postplating intervals when junctions of the dominant cadherin (N-cadherin) are first forming. Methods RPE cell lines hTERT-RPE1 and ARPE-19 and RPE cultures established from human donors were analyzed within 48 hours after plating for E-cadherin gene and protein expression (by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively) and for protein distribution (by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy), including codistribution with markers for organelles. Cell surface localization was analyzed by biotinylation and trypsin cleavage of extracellular cadherin domains. Results The E-cadherin gene was constitutively expressed by RPE cultures, but the protein did not accumulate substantially in early RPE cultures. Instead small amounts of newly synthesized E-cadherin were detectable only transiently, peaking within a few hours after plating, at which time the protein was in the form of peptides of variable size rather the predicted 120-kDa molecular mass. Immunoreactive E-cadherin peptides did not traffic to the cell surface and localize to junctions. Rather they codistributed with several organelles including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; but not the Golgi), sites of protein degradation (proteasomes, lysosomes, and autophagosomes) and unusual compartments (centrosomes and apposed to subdomains of the mitochondrial network). Conclusions The results suggest that in RPE cells posttranscriptional mechanisms involving altered protein processing and rapid turnover exist to limit E-cadherin accumulation. The consequence may be to limit E-cadherin-specific inductive properties in the RPE, a cell type in which N-cadherin is the normal dominant cadherin. PMID:16877438

  19. Involvement of the MEK/ERK pathway in EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Etsu; Henmi, Shizuka; Odake, Hiroyuki; Ino, Seitaro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin is a major component of the epithelial adherens junction. However, the regulatory mechanism of E-cadherin expression is still poorly understood. In this study, we found that EGF decreased E-cadherin expression at both mRNA and protein levels in colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells. Since E-cadherin down-regulation is a well-known hallmark of the EMT (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition), we investigated whether EGF induced E-cadherin down-regulation during the EMT. EGF was unable to affect the expression of mesenchymal markers (such as N-cadherin, vimentin or fibronectin) or EMT-regulating transcription factors (such as SNAIL, SLUG, ZEB1, ZEB2 or TWIST), suggesting that EGF induced E-cadherin down-regulation via an EMT-independent mechanism. On the other hand, the MEK inhibitor U0126 was found to suppress EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation at the transcriptional level, suggesting that the MEK/ERK pathway is involved in EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. Moreover, we also found that EGF disrupted cell-cell contact, stimulated cells to form an elongated shape with filamentous protrusions, and induced cell migration in LoVo cells. These effects were suppressed by U0126. Therefore, EGF is suggested to induce E-cadherin down-regulation at the transcriptional level through the MEK/ERK pathway, which might result in, at least in part, the induction of cellular morphological changes and cell migration in LoVo cells. PMID:27369075

  20. Molecular basis for the regulation of islet beta cell mass in mice: the role of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Wakae-Takada, N.; Xuan, S.; Watanabe, K.; Meda, P.; Leibel, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis In rodents and humans, the rate of beta cell proliferation declines rapidly after birth; formation of the islets of Langerhans begins perinatally and continues after birth. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increasing levels of E-cadherin during islet formation mediate the decline in beta cell proliferation rate by contributing to a reduction of nuclear β-catenin and D-cyclins. Methods We examined E-cadherin, nuclear β-catenin, and D-cyclin levels, as well as cell proliferation during in vitro and in vivo formation of islet cell aggregates, using β-TC6 cells and transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled beta cells, respectively. We tested the role of E-cadherin using antisense-mediated reductions of E-cadherin in β-TC6 cells, and mice segregating for a beta cell-specific E-cadherin knockout (Ecad [also known as Cdh1] βKO). Results In vitro, pseudo-islets of β-TC6 cells displayed increased E-cadherin but decreased nuclear β-catenin and cyclin D2, and reduced rates of cell proliferation, compared with monolayers. Antisense knockdown of E-cadherin increased cell proliferation and levels of cyclins D1 and D2. After birth, beta cells showed increased levels of E-cadherin, but decreased levels of D-cyclin, whereas islets of Ecad βKO mice showed increased levels of D-cyclins and nuclear β-catenin, as well as increased beta cell proliferation. These islets were significantly larger than those of control mice and displayed reduced levels of connexin 36. These changes correlated with reduced insulin response to ambient glucose, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions/interpretation The findings support our hypothesis by indicating an important role of E-cadherin in the control of beta cell mass and function. PMID:23354125

  1. Deletion of the E-cadherin gene in hepatitis B virus-positive Chinese hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Slagle, B L; Zhou, Y Z; Birchmeier, W; Scorsone, K A

    1993-10-01

    Frequent allele loss from chromosome 16q was recently described for human tumors of the breast, prostate gland and liver, indicating the possible presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on that chromosome arm. In this study, the chromosome 16 allele status of 38 hepatocellular carcinomas in Chinese patients was determined with restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis. Tumor-specific allele loss was detected in 14 (74%) of 19 patients informative for 16p markers and in 22 (85%) of 26 patients informative for 16q markers. Quantitative densitometric analysis revealed reduction to hemizygosity of the E-cadherin cell adhesion gene (localized to 16q22.1) in 18 (64%) of the 28 patients for whom quantitative data were available. Reduced expression of E-cadherin has been associated with invasion and metastasis in several human cell lines and primary tumors, and our results suggest that one mechanism of reduced E-cadherin expression is the loss of one copy of the E-cadherin gene. PMID:8104855

  2. Epithelial DLD-1 Cells with Disrupted E-cadherin Gene Retain the Ability to Form Cell Junctions and Apico-basal Polarity.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Miwako; Fujimura, Kihito; Obata, Shuichi; Yanagibashi, Ryo; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2015-01-01

    Gene editing methods were applied to the study of E-cadherin function in epithelial cells. The E-cadherin gene in epithelial DLD-1 cells was ablated using TALEN. The resultant cells showed round fibroblast-like morphology and had almost no Ca(2+)-dependent cell aggregation activity. E-cadherin re-expression in the knockout cells restored epithelial cell morphology and strong Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion activity, indicating that the knockout cells retained the ability to support cadherin function. The knockout cells showed partial localization of desmoplakin and ZO-1 at intercellular contact sites. The transfectants expressing mutant E-cadherin lacking the cytoplasmic domain showed clear localization of desmoplakin and ZO-1 at cell-cell contact sites, although the cells had only weak Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion activity. Electron microscopy revealed the formation of intercellular junctions and apico-basal polarity in these cells. A portion of these cells occasionally formed an epithelial-like structure after prolonged culture. When the cells were treated with blebbistatin, the localization was enhanced. However, the localization was incomplete and contained defects. Double-knockout MDCK cells for the E-cadherin and cadherin-6 genes showed similar results, suggesting that the above properties were general. The present results showed that an epithelial-like structure could be formed without E-cadherin, but that the construction of mature epithelia requires E-cadherin. PMID:26289297

  3. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25619476

  4. Effects of Cd{sup 2+} on cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The effects of Cd on the dimer of cadherin in living cells was analyzed. • Cd induced cadherin dimer formation was not detected in living cell with low Ca. • Ca mediated structural cooperativity and allostery in the native cadherin. • Ca concentration-dependent competitive displacement of Cd from cadherin is proposed. - Abstract: E-cadherin, a calcium (Ca{sup 2+})-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecule, plays a key role in the maintenance of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that E-cadherin functions in vivo as a cis-dimer through chemical cross-linking reagents. Ca{sup 2+} plays an important role in the cis-dimer formation of cadherin. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Ca{sup 2+} interacts with the binding sites that regulate cis-dimer structures have not been completely elucidated. As expected for a Ca{sup 2+} antagonist, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) disrupts cadherin function by displacing Ca{sup 2+} from its binding sites on the cadherin molecules. We used Cd{sup 2+} as a probe for investigating the role of Ca{sup 2+} in the dynamics of the E-cadherin extracellular region that involve cis-dimer formation and adhesion. While cell–cell adhesion assembly was completely disrupted in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, the amount of cis-dimers of E-cadherin that formed at the cell surface was not affected. In our “Cd{sup 2+}-switch” experiments, we did not find that Cd{sup 2+}-induced E-cadherin cis-dimer formation in EL cells when they were incubated in low-Ca{sup 2+} medium. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time the effects of Cd{sup 2+} on the cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells using a chemical cross-link analysis.

  5. Loss of E-cadherin expression is not a prerequisite for c-erbB2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    NILSSON, GISELA M.A.; AKHTAR, NOREEN; KANNIUS-JANSON, MARIE; BAECKSTRÖM, DAN

    2014-01-01

    Recent research into the mechanisms of tumour cell invasiveness has highlighted the parallels between carcinogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), originally described as a developmental transdifferentiation program but also implicated in fibrosis and cancer. In a model system for mammary carcinogenesis, we previously observed that induced signalling from a homodimer of the c-erbB2 (HER2) receptor tyrosine kinase in an initially non-malignant mammary cell line caused EMT where i) cell scattering occurred before downregulation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin and ii) the progress of EMT was dramatically delayed when cells were grown at high density. Here, we have further analysed these phenomena. Ectopic expression of E-cadherin concomitant with c-erbB2 signalling was unable to impede the progression of EMT, suggesting that E-cadherin downregulation is not required for EMT. Furthermore, fibroblast-like cells isolated after EMT induced in the presence or absence of ectopic E-cadherin expression showed highly similar morphology and vimentin expression. E-cadherin expressed in these fibroblastic cells had a subcellular localisation similar to that found in epithelial cells, but it exhibited a much weaker attachment to the cytoskeleton, suggesting cytoskeletal rearrangements as an important mechanism in EMT-associated cell scattering. We also investigated whether density-dependent inhibition of EMT is mediated by E-cadherin as a sensor for cell-cell contact, by expressing dominant-negative E-cadherin. While expression of this mutant weakened cell-cell adhesion, it failed to facilitate EMT at high cell densities. These results indicate that loss of E-cadherin expression is a consequence rather than a cause of c-erbB2-induced EMT and that density-dependent inhibition of EMT is not mediated by E-cadherin signalling. PMID:24807161

  6. α3 Integrin of Cell-Cell Contact Mediates Kidney Fibrosis by Integrin-Linked Kinase in Proximal Tubular E-Cadherin Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoping; Zhang, Jianlin; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Hailong; Pang, Min; Qiao, Xi; Lee, So R; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Tan, Thian K; Lyons, J Guy; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Xinrui; Loebel, David A F; Rubera, Isabella; Tauc, Michel; Wang, Ya; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Yuan M; Cao, Qi; Wang, Changqi; Lee, Vincent W S; Alexander, Stephen I; Tam, Patrick P L; Harris, David C H

    2016-07-01

    Loss of E-cadherin marks a defect in epithelial integrity and polarity during tissue injury and fibrosis. Whether loss of E-cadherin plays a causal role in fibrosis is uncertain. α3β1 Integrin has been identified to complex with E-cadherin in cell-cell adhesion, but little is known about the details of their cross talk. Herein, E-cadherin gene (Cdh1) was selectively deleted from proximal tubules of murine kidney by Sglt2Cre. Ablation of E-cadherin up-regulated α3β1 integrin at cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin-deficient proximal tubular epithelial cell displayed enhanced transforming growth factor-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression, which was suppressed by siRNA silencing of α3 integrin, but not β1 integrin. Up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1-induced α-SMA was mediated by an α3 integrin-dependent increase in integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Src phosphorylation of β-catenin and consequent p-β-catenin-Y654/p-Smad2 transcriptional complex underlies the transcriptional up-regulation of ILK. Kidney fibrosis after unilateral ureteric obstruction or ischemia reperfusion was increased in proximal tubule E-cadherin-deficient mice in comparison to that of E-cadherin intact control mice. The exacerbation of fibrosis was explained by the α3 integrin-dependent increase of ILK, β-catenin nuclear translocation, and α-SMA/proximal tubular-specific Cre double positive staining in proximal tubular epithelial cell. These studies delineate a nonconventional integrin/ILK signaling by α3 integrin-dependent Src/p-β-catenin-Y654/p-Smad2-mediated up-regulation of ILK through which loss of E-cadherin leads to kidney fibrosis. PMID:27182643

  7. E-cadherin, N-cadherin Expression and Histologic Characterization of Canine Choroid Plexus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Reginato, A; Girolami, D; Menchetti, L; Foiani, G; Mandara, M T

    2016-07-01

    Choroid plexus tumors (CPTs) are reported with an increasing incidence in dogs, and they call for a reexamination of histologic features and criteria of classification corresponding to their biological behavior. In this study, the human World Health Organization classification was applied to 16 canine CPTs, and the expression of molecules involved in neoplastic cell adhesion (E-cadherin, N-cadherin), invasion (doublecortin), and proliferation (Ki-67) was investigated. Mitotic index was found to be the main criterion for grading CPTs. Cell density and multilayering of papillae were also statistically associated with histologic grade. Intraventricular spread and parenchymal invasion was observed for tumors showing histologic benign features. E-cadherin was expressed in all CPT grades, independent of tumor invasion. N-cadherin immunolabeling was more expressed in grade I than high-grade CPTs, whereas doublecortin expression was not detected in CPTs. An increasing proliferative activity was observed in relation with histologic grade. PMID:26792846

  8. Secreted Heat Shock Protein 90α (HSP90α) Induces Nuclear Factor-κB-mediated TCF12 Protein Expression to Down-regulate E-cadherin and to Enhance Colorectal Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Shone; Chen, Chia-Chi; Chen, Li-Li; Lee, Chun-Chung; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2013-01-01

    Secreted levels of HSP90α and overexpression of TCF12 have been associated with the enhancement of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell migration and invasion. In this study, we observed that CRC patients with tumor TCF12 overexpression exhibited both a higher rate of metastatic occurrence and a higher average serum HSP90α level compared with patients without TCF12 overexpression. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the actions of secreted HSP90α and TCF12. Like overexpressed TCF12, secreted HSP90α or recombinant HSP90α (rHSP90α) induced fibronectin expression and repressed E-cadherin, connexin-26, connexin-43, and gap junction levels in CRC cells. Consistently, rHSP90α stimulated invasive outgrowths of CRC cells from spherical structures during three-dimensional culture. rHSP90α also induced TCF12 expression in CRC cells. Its effects on CRC cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion were drastically prevented when TCF12 was knocked down. This suggests that TCF12 expression is required for secreted HSP90α to enhance CRC cell spreading. Through the cellular receptor CD91, rHSP90α facilitated the complex formation of CD91 with IκB kinases (IKKs) α and β and increased the levels of phosphorylated (active) IKKα/β and NF-κB. Use of an IKKα/β inhibitor or ectopic overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα efficiently repressed rHSP90α-induced TCF12 expression. Moreover, κB motifs were recognized in the gene sequence of the TCF12 promoter, and a physical association between NF-κB and the TCF12 promoter was detected in rHSP90α-treated CRC cells. Together, these results suggest that the CD91/IKK/NF-κB signaling cascade is involved in secreted HSP90α-induced TCF12 expression, leading to E-cadherin down-regulation and enhanced CRC cell migration/invasion. PMID:23386606

  9. Secreted heat shock protein 90α (HSP90α) induces nuclear factor-κB-mediated TCF12 protein expression to down-regulate E-cadherin and to enhance colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shone; Chen, Chia-Chi; Chen, Li-Li; Lee, Chun-Chung; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2013-03-29

    Secreted levels of HSP90α and overexpression of TCF12 have been associated with the enhancement of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell migration and invasion. In this study, we observed that CRC patients with tumor TCF12 overexpression exhibited both a higher rate of metastatic occurrence and a higher average serum HSP90α level compared with patients without TCF12 overexpression. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the actions of secreted HSP90α and TCF12. Like overexpressed TCF12, secreted HSP90α or recombinant HSP90α (rHSP90α) induced fibronectin expression and repressed E-cadherin, connexin-26, connexin-43, and gap junction levels in CRC cells. Consistently, rHSP90α stimulated invasive outgrowths of CRC cells from spherical structures during three-dimensional culture. rHSP90α also induced TCF12 expression in CRC cells. Its effects on CRC cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion were drastically prevented when TCF12 was knocked down. This suggests that TCF12 expression is required for secreted HSP90α to enhance CRC cell spreading. Through the cellular receptor CD91, rHSP90α facilitated the complex formation of CD91 with IκB kinases (IKKs) α and β and increased the levels of phosphorylated (active) IKKα/β and NF-κB. Use of an IKKα/β inhibitor or ectopic overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα efficiently repressed rHSP90α-induced TCF12 expression. Moreover, κB motifs were recognized in the gene sequence of the TCF12 promoter, and a physical association between NF-κB and the TCF12 promoter was detected in rHSP90α-treated CRC cells. Together, these results suggest that the CD91/IKK/NF-κB signaling cascade is involved in secreted HSP90α-induced TCF12 expression, leading to E-cadherin down-regulation and enhanced CRC cell migration/invasion. PMID:23386606

  10. Force via integrins but not E-cadherin decreases Oct3/4 expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Yuhei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Chowdhury, Farhan; Wu, Douglas C.; Tanaka, Tetsuya S.; Sato, Masaaki; Wang, Ning

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins or cadherins induces similar cell stiffening responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces cell spreading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests that mechanical factors play a critical role in fate decisions of stem cells. Recently we have demonstrated that a local force applied via Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides coated magnetic beads to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells increases cell spreading and cell stiffness and decreases Oct3/4 (Pou5f1) gene expression. However, it is not clear whether the effects of the applied stress on these functions of ES cells can be extended to natural extracellular matrix proteins or cell-cell adhesion molecules. Here we show that a local cyclic shear force applied via fibronectin or laminin to integrin receptors increased cell spreading and stiffness, downregulated Oct3/4 gene expression, and decreased cell proliferation rate. In contrast, the same cyclic force applied via cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (Cdh1) had no effects on cell spreading, Oct3/4 gene expression, and the self-renewal of mouse ES cells, but induced significant cell stiffening. Our findings demonstrate that biological responses of ES cells to force applied via integrins are different from those to force via E-cadherin, suggesting that mechanical forces might play different roles in different force transduction pathways to shape early embryogenesis.

  11. Lateral Mobility of E-cadherin Enhances Rac1 Response in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, J.; Kam, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    The fluidity of cellular membranes imparts lateral mobility of proteins across the cell surface. To understand the impact of lateral mobility on cell-cell communication, a protein consisting of the extracellular recognition domains of E-cadherin was associated with the surface of silica beads by either tethering to a bead-supported lipid bilayer or direct adsorption, resulting in laterally mobile and immobile presentations of this protein. These beads were then seeded onto the upper surface of MDCK cells. Functional engagement of these beads was compared by measurement of Rac1 recruitment around the bead. Lateral mobility enhanced recognition of E-cadherin, promoting cell response to the beads at lower per-area concentrations than their immobilized counterparts. A more complete understanding of how lateral mobility of membrane-associated proteins influences molecular recognition, and potentially other downstream responses, could provide new strategies for the design of materials and devices intended to capture the architecture of natural tissues. PMID:20368760

  12. Anomalous expression of P-cadherin in breast carcinoma. Correlation with E-cadherin expression and pathological features.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, J.; Benito, N.; Pizarro, A.; Suárez, A.; Espada, J.; Cano, A.; Gamallo, C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies on the cell-cell adhesion molecules P- and E-cadherin have shown that P-cadherin is not expressed in breast cancer. In contrast, the expression of E-cadherin is a normal event in these tumors, but a reduction in the levels of this molecule in neoplastic cells is associated with the histological type, high histological grade, greater tumor size, and metastasis. The expression pattern of P- and E-cadherin were immunohistochemically studied in tissue sections from normal breast tissue, benign breast lesions, and 57 infiltrating breast carcinomas. Cadherin expression was analyzed in parallel with pathological features and the immunohistochemical expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast carcinomas. P-cadherin was detected in the myoepithelial cells and E-cadherin in luminal epithelial cells from normal breast and benign breast lesions. P-cadherin expression was detected in 9 of 45 cases (20%) of infiltrating ductal carcinomas of no special type; none of the special histological types that were analyzed (7 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, 3 colloid carcinomas, and 2 infiltrating papillary carcinomas) expressed P-cadherin. In infiltrating ductal carcinomas, P-cadherin expression correlated significantly with a reduction in E-cadherin expression, histological grade (all cases were grade III tumors), and hormone receptor content (8 of 9 cases were estrogen and progesterone receptor negative). Although E-cadherin was not found in the 7 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, it was present in the remaining histological types and was preserved in 15 infiltrating ductal and 3 colloid and 2 papillary carcinomas and was reduced in 30 infiltrating ductal carcinomas. In addition, a reduction in E-cadherin expression was significantly associated with high histological grade and a lack of steroid hormone receptors in infiltrating ductal carcinomas. No apparent relationship was found between P- and E-cadherin expression and tumor size and axillary lymph

  13. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  14. Expression of E-cadherin, beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen and their reciprocal relationships in mammary adenocarcinomas in bitches.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Marcin; Madej, Janusz A; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In progression of tumours, resulting from, i.e., release of cells from the parental tumour and development of metastases, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) plays a significant role. CAM, including E-cadherin and the linked to it beta-catenin, determine the extent of adhesion between normal and neoplastically altered cells. Moreover, the unbound form of beta-catenin in a cell nucleus may affect the rate of cell proliferation This study aimed at demonstrating intensity and localisation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression as related to expression of the proliferation-associated antigen, Ki-67 in mammary adenocarcinomas of bitches. The study was performed on 35 cases of the above mentioned tumours. On paraffin sections immunohistochemical reactions were performed using monoclonal antibodies directed against E-cadherin, beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen. In the studies a membranous expression of E-cadherin, a cytoplasmic-nuclear expression of beta-catenin and nuclear expression of Ki-67 antigen were demonstrated. Statistical calculations using Spearman's test demonstrated a pronounced positive correlation between expression of beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen and absence of correlation between expression of E-cadherin and Ki-67 antigen. No correlation could be detected between expression intensities of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. PMID:17951173

  15. Interaction of E-cadherin and PTEN regulates morphogenesis and growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Fata, Jimmie E.; Martin, Katherine J.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    PTEN is a dual function phosphatase with tumor suppressor function compromised in a wide spectrum of cancers. Because tissue polarity and architecture are crucial modulators of normal and malignant behavior, we postulated that PTEN may play a role in maintenance of tissue integrity. We used two non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMECs) that form polarized, growth-arrested structures (acini) when cultured in 3-dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (3D lrECM). As acini begin to form, PTEN accumulates in both the cytoplasm, and at cell-cell contacts where it colocalizes with E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex. Reduction of PTEN levels by shRNA in lrECM prevents formation of organized breast acini and disrupts growth arrest. Importantly, disruption of acinar polarity and cell-cell contact by E-cadherin function-blocking antibodies reduces endogenous PTEN protein levels and inhibits its accumulation at cell-cell contacts. Conversely, in SKBR3 breast cancer cells lacking endogenous E-cadherin expression, exogenous introduction of E-cadherin gene causes induction of PTEN expression and its accumulation at sites of cell interactions. These studies provide evidence that E-cadherin regulates both the PTEN protein levels and its recruitment to cell-cell junctions in 3D lrECM indicating a dynamic reciprocity between architectural integrity and the levels and localization of PTEN. This interaction thus appears to be a critical integrator of proliferative and morphogenetic signaling in breast epithelial cells.

  16. Cleavage of E-cadherin by ADAM10 mediates epithelial cell sorting downstream of EphB signalling.

    PubMed

    Solanas, Guiomar; Cortina, Carme; Sevillano, Marta; Batlle, Eduard

    2011-09-01

    The formation and maintenance of complex organs requires segregation of distinct cell populations into defined territories (that is, cell sorting) and the establishment of boundaries between them. Here we have investigated the mechanism by which Eph/ephrin signalling controls the compartmentalization of cells in epithelial tissues. We show that EphB/ephrin-B signalling in epithelial cells regulates the formation of E-cadherin-based adhesions. EphB receptors interact with E-cadherin and with the metalloproteinase ADAM10 at sites of adhesion and their activation induces shedding of E-cadherin by ADAM10 at interfaces with ephrin-B1-expressing cells. This process results in asymmetric localization of E-cadherin and, as a consequence, in differences in cell affinity between EphB-positive and ephrin-B-positive cells. Furthermore, genetic inhibition of ADAM10 activity in the intestine of mice results in a lack of compartmentalization of Paneth cells within the crypt stem cell niche, a defect that phenocopies that of EphB3-null mice. These results provide important insights into the regulation of cell migration in the intestinal epithelium and may help in the understanding of the nature of the cell sorting process in other epithelial tissues where Eph-ephrin interactions play a central role. PMID:21804545

  17. PDLIM1 Stabilizes the E-Cadherin/β-Catenin Complex to Prevent Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Metastatic Potential of Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Ning; Yuan, Kefei; Xie, Na; Wang, Kui; Huang, Zhao; Chen, Yan; Dou, Qianhui; Wu, Min; Nice, Edouard C; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Huang, Canhua

    2016-03-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of death in patients with colorectal cancer, and increasing evidence supports the contribution of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to cancer progression. The dissociation of the E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complex represents a key step in EMT and promotes cancer invasion and metastasis, but the upstream signaling pathways regulating this interaction are poorly understood. Here, we show that PDLIM1, a member of the PDZ and LIM protein family, was downregulated in highly metastatic colorectal cancer cells and liver metastases from colorectal cancer patients. We found that loss of PDLIM1 promoted the expression of EMT markers and increased the invasive and migratory properties of multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, PDLIM1 knockdown increased colon-derived liver metastasis in an orthotopic colorectal cancer model and promoted distant metastatic colonization in an experimental lung metastasis model. Mechanistic investigations revealed that PDLIM1 interacted with and stabilized the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex, thereby inhibiting the transcriptional activity of β-catenin and preventing EMT. Accordingly, PDLIM1 overexpression attenuated EMT of colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, the downregulation of PDLIM1 in colorectal cancer samples correlated with reduced E-cadherin and membrane β-catenin levels, and was associated with shorter overall survival. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PDLIM1 suppresses EMT and metastatic potential of colorectal cancer cells by stabilizing β-catenin at cell-cell junctions, and its loss in metastatic tissues may represent a potential prognostic marker of aggressive disease. PMID:26701804

  18. Loss of functional E-cadherin renders cells more resistant to the apoptotic agent taxol in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Beraldi, Eliana; Mateus, Ana Rita; Nakajima, Takashi; Gleave, Martin; Yokota, Jun; Carneiro, Fatima; Huntsman, David; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo . E-mail: gsuriano@ipatimup.pt

    2005-10-15

    Experimental evidence supports a role for E-cadherin in suppressing invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Germline mutations of the E-cadherin represent the genetic cause of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this type of tumor, isolated cancer cells permeate the basal membrane and paradoxically survive in the gastric wall in the absence of contact with neighbor epithelial cells or with the extracellular matrix. This suggests that upon E-cadherin deregulation, cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, CHO cells stably expressing either wild-type E-cadherin or the HDGC-related germline mutations T340A and V832M were seeded either on a thin layer of collagen type I or on plastic and then subjected to the apoptotic agent taxol. We found that in vitro functional E-cadherin renders cells more sensitive to the effect of taxol. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated to decreased level of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein.

  19. Salt-inducible kinase 1 regulates E-cadherin expression and intercellular junction stability.

    PubMed

    Eneling, Kristina; Brion, Laura; Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria J; Sznajder, Jacob I; Mochizuki, Naoki; Emoto, Kazuo; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Bertorello, Alejandro M

    2012-08-01

    The protein kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) regulates cell polarity and intercellular junction stability. Also, LKB1 controls the activity of salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1). The role and relevance of SIK1 and its downstream effectors in linking the LKB1 signals within these processes are partially understood. We hypothesize that SIK1 may link LKB1 signals to the maintenance of epithelial junction stability by regulating E-cadherin expression. Results from our studies using a mouse lung alveolar epithelial (MLE-12) cell line or human renal proximal tubule (HK2) cell line transiently or stably lacking the expression of SIK1 (using SIK1 siRNAs or shRNAs), or with its expression abrogated (sik1(+/+) vs. sik1(-/-) mice), indicate that suppression of SIK1 (∼40%) increases the expression of the transcriptional repressors Snail2 (∼12-fold), Zeb1 (∼100%), Zeb2 (∼50%), and TWIST (∼20-fold) by activating cAMP-response element binding protein. The lack of SIK1 and activation of transcriptional repressors decreases the availability of E-cadherin (mRNA and protein expression by ∼100 and 80%, respectively) and the stability of intercellular junctions in epithelia (decreases in transepithelial resistance). Furthermore, LKB1-mediated increases in E-cadherin expression are impaired in cells where SIK1 has been disabled. We conclude that SIK1 is a key regulator of E-cadherin expression, and thereby contributes to the stability of intercellular junctions. PMID:22522110

  20. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry. PMID:27298373

  1. E-cadherin plays an essential role in collective directional migration of large epithelial sheets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hartley, Robert; Reiss, Bjoern; Sun, Yaohui; Pu, Jin; Wu, Dan; Lin, Francis; Hoang, Trung; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    In wound healing and development, large epithelial sheets migrate collectively, in defined directions, and maintain tight cell–cell adhesion. This type of movement ensures an essential function of epithelia, a barrier, which is lost when cells lose connection and move in isolation. Unless wounded, epithelial sheets in cultures normally do not have overall directional migration. Cell migration is mostly studied when cells are in isolation and in the absence of mature cell–cell adhesion; the mechanisms of the migration of epithelial sheets are less well understood. We used small electric fields (EFs) as a directional cue to instigate and guide migration of epithelial sheets. Significantly, cells in monolayer migrated far more efficiently and directionally than cells in isolation or smaller cell clusters. We demonstrated for the first time the group size-dependent directional migratory response in several types of epithelial cells. Gap junctions made a minimal contribution to the directional collective migration. Breaking down calcium-dependent cell–cell adhesion significantly reduced directional sheet migration. Furthermore, E-cadherin blocking antibodies abolished migration of cell sheets. Traction force analysis revealed an important role of forces that cells in the leading rows exert on the substratum. With EF, the traction forces of the leading edge cells coordinated in directional re-orientation. Our study thus identifies a novel mechanism—E-cadherin dependence and coordinated traction forces of leading cells in collective directional migration of large epithelial sheets. PMID:22410739

  2. Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane vesicle-associated proteolytic activity promotes bacterial invasion by mediating cleavage of intestinal epithelial cell E-cadherin and occludin.

    PubMed

    Elmi, Abdi; Nasher, Fauzy; Jagatia, Heena; Gundogdu, Ozan; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wren, Brendan; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) play an important role in the pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni produces OMVs that trigger IL-8, IL-6, hBD-3 and TNF-α responses from T84 intestinal epithelial cells and are cytotoxic to Caco-2 IECs and Galleria mellonella larvae. Proteomic analysis of 11168H OMVs identified the presence of three proteases, HtrA, Cj0511 and Cj1365c. In this study, 11168H OMVs were shown to possess proteolytic activity that was reduced by pretreatment with specific serine protease inhibitors. OMVs isolated from 11168H htrA, Cj0511 or Cj1365c mutants possess significantly reduced proteolytic activity. 11168H OMVs are able to cleave both E-cadherin and occludin, but this cleavage is reduced with OMVs pretreated with serine protease inhibitors and also with OMVs isolated from htrA or Cj1365c mutants. Co-incubation of T84 monolayers with 11168H OMVs results in a visible reduction in both E-cadherin and occludin. The addition of 11168H OMVs to the co-culture of live 11168H bacteria with T84 cells results in enhanced levels of bacterial adhesion and invasion in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation of the cleavage of host cell structural proteins by C. jejuni OMVs should enhance our understanding of the interactions of this important pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26451973

  3. Expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric carcinoma and its correlation with the clinicopathological features and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Xu, Cai-Pu; Han, Biao; Li, Min; Qiao, Liang; Fang, Dian-Chun; Yang, Jian-Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The E-cadherin-catenin complex is important for cell-cell adhesion of epithelial cells. Impairment of one or more components of this complex is associated with poor differentiation and increased invasiveness of carcinomas. We evaluated the expression pattern of E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric carcinoma and dysplasia and analyzed their relationship with tumor clinicopathological features and patient survival. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and β-catenin was performed from paraffin specimens of 163 gastric carcinomas, 44 gastric mucosal dysplasia, and 25 intestinal metaplasia, 28 atrophic gastritis and 12 healthy controls. RESULTS: Normal membrane staining was observed in intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and control biopsy specimens for E-cadherin and β-catenin. 36% and 16% of gastric dysplasia were stained abnormally for E-cadherin and β-catenin respectively. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin was demonstrated in 46% and 44% of gastric carcinoma respectively. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin and β- catenin occurred more significantly in Borrmann III/IV than in Borrmann I/II type (P < 0.005, respectively). A significantly higher proportion of signet-ring, mucinous and tubular adenocarcinomas were abnormally expressed for E-cadherin and β-catenin as compared with papillary adenocarcinomas (χ2 = 8.47, P < 0.005, and χ2 = 7.05, P < 0.01, respectively). Morever, abnormal E-cadherin and β-catenin staining occurred more frequently in diffuse than in intestinal type of tumor (χ2 = 18.18 and 17.79, P < 0.005, respectively). There was a significant correlation between abnormal β-catenin expression and positive lymph node metastasis. A survival advantage was noted in tumors retaining normal membranous expression of β-catenin, independent of type, grade, or stage of the disease (P < 0.0005). CONCLUSION: Abnormal expression of the E-cadherin-catenin complex occurs frequently in gatric carcinoma, closely related to

  4. Phospholipase Cδ1 induces E-cadherin expression and suppresses malignancy in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Reiko; Hirano, Tamaki; Batori, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Tomomi; Murayama, Yumi; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in CRC predict the ineffectiveness of EGF receptor-targeted therapy. Previous transcriptional microarray analysis suggests the association between phospholipase Cδ1 (PLCδ1) expression and KRAS mutation status in CRC. However, both the roles and the regulatory mechanisms of PLCδ1 in CRC are not known. Here, we found that the expression of PLCδ1, one of the most basal PLCs, is down-regulated in CRC specimens compared with normal colon epithelium by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we examined the roles of PLCδ1 in CRC cell lines that harbor an activating KRAS mutation. Ectopic expression of PLCδ1 in CRC cells induced the expression of E-cadherin, whereas knockdown of PLCδ1 repressed the expression of E-cadherin. Moreover, the overexpression of PLCδ1 suppressed the expression of several mesenchymal genes and reduced cell motility, invasiveness, and in vivo tumorigenicity of SW620 CRC cells. We also showed that PLCδ1 expression is repressed by the KRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) pathway. Furthermore, PLCδ1 suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 through E-cadherin induction in CRC cells, suggesting the presence of a negative regulatory loop between KRAS/MEK/ERK signaling and PLCδ1. These data indicate that PLCδ1 has tumor-suppressive functions in CRC through E-cadherin induction and KRAS/MEK/ERK signal attenuation. PMID:25197077

  5. Alterations of MEN1 and E-cadherin/β-catenin complex in sporadic pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    VESCHI, SERENA; LATTANZIO, ROSSANO; ACETO, GITANA MARIA; CURIA, MARIA CRISTINA; MAGNASCO, SALVATORE; ANGELUCCI, DOMENICO; CAMA, ALESSANDRO; PIANTELLI, MAURO; BATTISTA, PASQUALE

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids, distinct in typical and atypical, represent 2–5% of all primary lung tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular alterations correlated with the development of this form of neoplasms. A collection of 38 paraffin-embedded apparently sporadic carcinoids was investigated, through a combined study, for protein expression/localization of menin, p53, β-catenin and E-cadherin and for mutational analysis of the MEN1, TP53 and CTNNB1 genes. Menin was expressed in 71% of cases, with a prevalent cytoplasmic (c) localization, β-catenin was expressed in 68.4% of cases, of which 36.8% with a membranous (m) and 31.6% with a cytoplasmic localization. Membranous E-cadherin immunoreactivity was detected in 84.2% cases, nuclear p53 expression in 5.3% of cases. Positive correlation was found between c-menin and c-β-catenin expression (rho=0.439, P=0.008). In addition, m-β-catenin showed a positive correlation with both c-β-catenin and E-cadherin expression (rho=0.380, P=0.022 and rho=0.360, P=0.040, respectively). With regard to the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex, we found also a significant positive correlation between c-menin and ‘disarrayed’ β-catenin expression (rho=0.481, P= 0.007). MEN1 gene variants were characterized in 34% of cases. c-menin was more highly expressed in tumors with MEN1 variants, compared to tumors without MEN1 variants (P=0.023). Three nucleotide variants of TP53 were also detected. This study confirms the involvement of the MEN1 gene in the development of sporadic pulmonary carcinoids, demonstrates the accumulation of menin in the cytoplasm, and indicates that the disarrayed pattern of the complex significantly correlates with c-menin accumulation. PMID:22825745

  6. Cleavage of E-cadherin and β-catenin by calpain affects Wnt signaling and spheroid formation in suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Konze, Sarah A; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F R

    2014-04-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell-cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that pharmacological

  7. Cleavage of E-Cadherin and β-Catenin by Calpain Affects Wnt Signaling and Spheroid Formation in Suspension Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Konze, Sarah A.; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell–cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that

  8. Immunohistochemical Analysis of E-Cadherin, p53 and Inhibin-α Expression in Hydatidiform Mole and Hydropic Abortion.

    PubMed

    Erol, Onur; Süren, Dinç; Tutuş, Birsel; Toptaş, Tayfun; Gökay, Ahmet Arda; Derbent, Aysel Uysal; Özel, Mustafa Kemal; Sezer, Cem

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α immunostaining in the differential diagnosis of hydropic abortion (HA), partial hydatidiform mole (PHM), and complete hydatidiform mole (CHM). E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α protein expression patterns were investigated immunohistochemically using paraffin -embedded tissue sections from histologically diagnosed cases of HA (n = 23), PHM (n = 24), and CHM (n = 23). Expression patterns of these markers were scored semi-quantitatively according to the staining intensity, percentage of positive cells, and immunoreactivity score. Classification of cases was established on histologic criteria and supported by the molecular genotyping. Immunostaining allowed the identification of specific cell types with E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α expression in all cases. E-cadherin expression was detected on the cell surface of villous cytotrophoblasts. We observed a marked decline in the expression of E-cadherin from HAs to PHMs to CHMs. The p53-positive reaction was restricted to the nucleus of villous cytotrophoblasts. Significantly increased p53 expression was observed in CHMs, compared with HAs and PHMs. The expression of inhibin-α was localised in the cytoplasm of villous syncytiotrophoblasts, and the expression of this marker was significantly higher in PHMs and CHMs than HAs. In conclusion, immunohistochemical analysis of E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α expression could serve as a useful adjunct to conventional methods in the differential diagnosis of HA, PHM, and CHM. PMID:26683836

  9. Functional dissection of the Clostridium botulinum type B hemagglutinin complex: identification of the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yo; Yutani, Masahiro; Amatsu, Sho; Matsumura, Takuhiro; Fujinaga, Yukako

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) inhibits neurotransmitter release in motor nerve endings, causing botulism, a condition often resulting from ingestion of the toxin or toxin-producing bacteria. BoNTs are always produced as large protein complexes by associating with a non-toxic protein, non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH), and some toxin complexes contain another non-toxic protein, hemagglutinin (HA), in addition to NTNH. These accessory proteins are known to increase the oral toxicity of the toxin dramatically. NTNH has a protective role against the harsh conditions in the digestive tract, while HA is considered to facilitate intestinal absorption of the toxin by intestinal binding and disruption of the epithelial barrier. Two specific activities of HA, carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding, appear to be involved in these processes; however, the exact roles of these activities in the pathogenesis of botulism remain unclear. The toxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A through G. In this study, we identified the amino acid residues critical for carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding in serotype B HA. We constructed mutants defective in each of these two activities and examined the relationship of these activities using an in vitro intestinal cell culture model. Our results show that the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding activities are functionally and structurally independent. Carbohydrate binding potentiates the epithelial barrier-disrupting activity by enhancing cell surface binding, while E-cadherin binding is essential for the barrier disruption. PMID:25340348

  10. Vinculin potentiates E-cadherin mechanosensing and is recruited to actin-anchored sites within adherens junctions in a myosin II–dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    le Duc, Quint; Shi, Quanming; Blonk, Iris; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors integrate chemical and mechanical cues to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Integrin complexes are the mechanotransducers between the extracellular matrix and the actomyosin cytoskeleton. By analogy, cadherin complexes may function as mechanosensors at cell–cell junctions, but this capacity of cadherins has not been directly demonstrated. Furthermore, the molecular composition of the link between E-cadherin and actin, which is needed to sustain such a function, is unresolved. In this study, we describe nanomechanical measurements demonstrating that E-cadherin complexes are functional mechanosensors that transmit force between F-actin and E-cadherin. Imaging experiments reveal that intercellular forces coincide with vinculin accumulation at actin-anchored cadherin adhesions, and nanomechanical measurements show that vinculin potentiates the E-cadherin mechanosensory response. These investigations directly demonstrate the mechanosensory capacity of the E-cadherin complex and identify a novel function for vinculin at cell–cell junctions. These findings have implications for barrier function, morphogenesis, cell migration, and invasion and may extend to all soft tissues in which classical cadherins regulate cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20584916

  11. E-Cadherin Suppression Directs Cytoskeletal Rearrangement and Intraepithelial Tumor Cell Migration in 3D Human Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Alt-Holland, Addy; Shamis, Yulia; Riley, Kathleen N.; DesRochers, Teresa M.; Fusenig, Norbert E.; Herman, Ira M.; Garlick, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    The link between loss of cell–cell adhesion, the activation of cell migration, and the behavior of intraepithelial (IE) tumor cells during the early stages of skin cancer progression is not well understood. The current study characterized the migratory behavior of a squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HaCaT-II-4) upon E-cadherin suppression in both 2D, monolayer cultures and within human skin equivalents that mimic premalignant disease. The migratory behavior of tumor cells was first analyzed in 3D tissue context by developing a model that mimics transepithelial tumor cell migration. We show that loss of cell adhesion enabled migration of single, IE tumor cells between normal keratinocytes as a prerequisite for stromal invasion. To further understand this migratory behavior, E-cadherin-deficient cells were analyzed in 2D, monolayer cultures and displayed altered cytoarchitecture and enhanced membrane protrusive activity that was associated with circumferential actin organization and induction of the nonmuscle, β actin isoform. These features were associated with increased motility and random, individual cell migration in response to scrape-wounding. Thus, loss of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion led to the acquisition of phenotypic properties that augmented cell motility and directed the transition from the precancer to cancer in skin-like tissues. PMID:18528437

  12. Pharmacoproteomic analysis reveals that metapristone (RU486 metabolite) intervenes E-cadherin and vimentin to realize cancer metastasis chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Yang, Xingtian; He, Sudang; Liu, Jian; Qin, Chongtao; Huang, Chuanzhong; Lu, Yusheng; Tian, Zhongping; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Metapristone is the most predominant biological active metabolite of mifepristone, and being developed as a novel cancer metastasis chemopreventive agent by us. Despite its prominent metastasis chemopreventive effect, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that metapristone had the ability to prevent breast cancer cells from migration, invasion, and interfere with their adhesion to endothelial cells. To explore the underlying mechanism of metapristone, we employed the iTRAQ technique to assess the effect of metapristone on MDA-MB-231 cells. In total, 5,145 proteins were identified, of which, 311 proteins showed significant differences in metapristone-treated cells compared to the control group (P-value < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis showed many differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) functionally associated with post-translational modification, chaperones, translation, transcription, replication, signal transduction, etc. Importantly, many of the DEPs, such as E-cadherin, vimentin, TGF-β receptor I/II, smad2/3, β-catenin, caveolin, and dystroglycan were associated with TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways, which were also linked to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further validation of the epithelial marker “E-caderin” and mesenchymal marker “vimetin” were carried out using immunoblot and immunofluorescence. These results have revealed a novel mechanism that metapristone-mediated metastasis chemoprevention is through intervening the EMT-related signaling pathways. PMID:26932781

  13. Pharmacoproteomic analysis reveals that metapristone (RU486 metabolite) intervenes E-cadherin and vimentin to realize cancer metastasis chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Yang, Xingtian; He, Sudang; Liu, Jian; Qin, Chongtao; Huang, Chuanzhong; Lu, Yusheng; Tian, Zhongping; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Metapristone is the most predominant biological active metabolite of mifepristone, and being developed as a novel cancer metastasis chemopreventive agent by us. Despite its prominent metastasis chemopreventive effect, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that metapristone had the ability to prevent breast cancer cells from migration, invasion, and interfere with their adhesion to endothelial cells. To explore the underlying mechanism of metapristone, we employed the iTRAQ technique to assess the effect of metapristone on MDA-MB-231 cells. In total, 5,145 proteins were identified, of which, 311 proteins showed significant differences in metapristone-treated cells compared to the control group (P-value < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis showed many differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) functionally associated with post-translational modification, chaperones, translation, transcription, replication, signal transduction, etc. Importantly, many of the DEPs, such as E-cadherin, vimentin, TGF-β receptor I/II, smad2/3, β-catenin, caveolin, and dystroglycan were associated with TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways, which were also linked to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further validation of the epithelial marker "E-caderin" and mesenchymal marker "vimetin" were carried out using immunoblot and immunofluorescence. These results have revealed a novel mechanism that metapristone-mediated metastasis chemoprevention is through intervening the EMT-related signaling pathways. PMID:26932781

  14. α-Catulin downregulates E-cadherin and promotes melanoma progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kreiseder, Birgit; Orel, Lukas; Bujnow, Constantin; Buschek, Stefan; Pflueger, Maren; Schuett, Wolfgang; Hundsberger, Harald; de Martin, Rainer; Wiesner, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis for melanoma responsible for about 90% of skin cancer-related mortality. To metastasize, melanoma cells must escape keratinocyte control, invade across the basement membrane and survive in the dermis by resisting apoptosis before they can intravasate into the circulation. α-Catulin (CTNNAL1) is a cytoplasmic molecule that integrates the crosstalk between nuclear factor-kappa B and Rho signaling pathways, binds to β-catenin and increases the level of both α-catenin and β-catenin and therefore has potential effects on inflammation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, we show that α-catulin is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Expression of α-catulin promoted melanoma progression and occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of E-cadherin and the upregulation of expression of mesenchymal genes such as N-cadherin, Snail/Slug and the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Knockdown of α-catulin promoted adhesion to and inhibited migration away from keratinocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner and decreased the transmigration through a keratinocyte monolayer, as well as in Transwell assays using collagens, laminin and fibronectin coating. Moreover, knockdown promoted homotypic spheroid formation and concomitantly increased E-cadherin expression along with downregulation of transcription factors implicated in its repression (Snail/Slug, Twist and ZEB). Consistent with the molecular changes, α-catulin provoked invasion of melanoma cells in a three-dimensional culture assay by the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and the activation of ROCK/Rho. As such, α-catulin may represent a key driver of the metastatic process, implicating potential for therapeutic interference. PMID:22733455

  15. Drosophila MAGI interacts with RASSF8 to regulate E-Cadherin-based adherens junctions in the developing eye.

    PubMed

    Zaessinger, Sophie; Zhou, Yanxiang; Bray, Sarah J; Tapon, Nicolas; Djiane, Alexandre

    2015-03-15

    Morphogenesis is crucial during development to generate organs and tissues of the correct size and shape. During Drosophila late eye development, interommatidial cells (IOCs) rearrange to generate the highly organized pupal lattice, in which hexagonal ommatidial units pack tightly. This process involves the fine regulation of adherens junctions (AJs) and of adhesive E-Cadherin (E-Cad) complexes. Localized accumulation of Bazooka (Baz), the Drosophila PAR3 homolog, has emerged as a critical step to specify where new E-Cad complexes should be deposited during junction remodeling. However, the mechanisms controlling the correct localization of Baz are still only partly understood. We show here that Drosophila Magi, the sole fly homolog of the mammalian MAGI scaffolds, is an upstream regulator of E-Cad-based AJs during cell rearrangements, and that Magi mutant IOCs fail to reach their correct position. We uncover a direct physical interaction between Magi and the Ras association domain protein RASSF8 through a WW domain-PPxY motif binding, and show that apical Magi recruits the RASSF8-ASPP complex during AJ remodeling in IOCs. We further show that this Magi complex is required for the cortical recruitment of Baz and of the E-Cad-associated proteins α- and β-catenin. We propose that, by controlling the proper localization of Baz to remodeling junctions, Magi and the RASSF8-ASPP complex promote the recruitment or stabilization of E-Cad complexes at junction sites. PMID:25725070

  16. PTK6 Inhibition Suppresses Metastases of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer via SNAIL-Dependent E-Cadherin Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Park, Sun Hee; Nayak, Anupma; Byerly, Jessica H; Irie, Hanna Y

    2016-08-01

    Patients with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are at high risk for recurrent or metastatic disease despite standard treatment, underscoring the need for novel therapeutic targets and strategies. Here we report that protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) is expressed in approximately 70% of TNBCs where it acts to promote survival and metastatic lung colonization. PTK6 downregulation in mesenchymal TNBC cells suppressed migration and three-dimensional culture growth, and enhanced anoikis, resistance to which is considered a prerequisite for metastasis. PTK6 downregulation restored E-cadherin levels via proteasome-dependent degradation of the E-cadherin repressor SNAIL. Beyond being functionally required in TNBC cells, kinase-active PTK6 also suppressed E-cadherin expression, promoted cell migration, and increased levels of mesenchymal markers in nontransformed MCF10A breast epithelial cells, consistent with a role in promoting an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). SNAIL downregulation and E-cadherin upregulation mediated by PTK6 inhibition induced anoikis, leading to impaired metastatic lung colonization in vivo Finally, effects of PTK6 downregulation were phenocopied by treatment with a recently developed PTK6 kinase inhibitor, further implicating kinase activity in regulation of EMT and metastases. Our findings illustrate the clinical potential for PTK6 inhibition to improve treatment of patients with high-risk TNBC. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4406-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302163

  17. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue. PMID:26880767

  18. Curcumin Suppresses Metastasis via Sp-1, FAK Inhibition, and E-Cadherin Upregulation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Sureshbabul, Munisamy; Chen, Huei-Wen; Lin, Yu-Shuang; Lee, Jen-Yi; Hong, Qi-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious public health problem that results due to changes of diet and various environmental stress factors in the world. Curcumin is a traditional medicine used for treatment of a wide variety of tumors. However, antimetastasis mechanism of curcumin on CRC has not yet been completely investigated. Here, we explored the underlying molecular mechanisms of curcumin on metastasis of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin significantly inhibits cell migration, invasion, and colony formation in vitro and reduces tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. We found that curcumin suppresses Sp-1 transcriptional activity and Sp-1 regulated genes including ADEM10, calmodulin, EPHB2, HDAC4, and SEPP1 in CRC cells. Curcumin inhibits focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and enhances the expressions of several extracellular matrix components which play a critical role in invasion and metastasis. Curcumin reduces CD24 expression in a dose-dependent manner in CRC cells. Moreover, E-cadherin expression is upregulated by curcumin and serves as an inhibitor of EMT. These results suggest that curcumin executes its antimetastasis function through downregulation of Sp-1, FAK, and CD24 and by promoting E-cadherin expression in CRC cells. PMID:23970932

  19. Curcumin Suppresses Metastasis via Sp-1, FAK Inhibition, and E-Cadherin Upregulation in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Sureshbabul, Munisamy; Chen, Huei-Wen; Lin, Yu-Shuang; Lee, Jen-Yi; Hong, Qi-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Chien; Yu, Sung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious public health problem that results due to changes of diet and various environmental stress factors in the world. Curcumin is a traditional medicine used for treatment of a wide variety of tumors. However, antimetastasis mechanism of curcumin on CRC has not yet been completely investigated. Here, we explored the underlying molecular mechanisms of curcumin on metastasis of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin significantly inhibits cell migration, invasion, and colony formation in vitro and reduces tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. We found that curcumin suppresses Sp-1 transcriptional activity and Sp-1 regulated genes including ADEM10, calmodulin, EPHB2, HDAC4, and SEPP1 in CRC cells. Curcumin inhibits focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and enhances the expressions of several extracellular matrix components which play a critical role in invasion and metastasis. Curcumin reduces CD24 expression in a dose-dependent manner in CRC cells. Moreover, E-cadherin expression is upregulated by curcumin and serves as an inhibitor of EMT. These results suggest that curcumin executes its antimetastasis function through downregulation of Sp-1, FAK, and CD24 and by promoting E-cadherin expression in CRC cells. PMID:23970932

  20. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  1. Quantification of mutant E-cadherin using bioimaging analysis of in situ fluorescence microscopy. A new approach to CDH1 missense variants

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, João Miguel; Figueiredo, Joana; Fonseca, Martina; Durães, Cecília; Melo, Soraia; Esménio, Sofia; Seruca, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations result in full-length proteins containing an amino acid substitution that can be neutral or deleterious, interfering with the normal conformation, localization, and function of a protein. A striking example is the presence of CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) germline missense variants in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), which represent a clinical burden for genetic counseling and surveillance of mutation carriers and their families. CDH1 missense variants can compromise not only the function of E-cadherin but also its expression pattern. Here, we propose a novel method to characterize E-cadherin signature in order to identify cases with E-cadherin deregulation and functional impairment. The strategy includes a bioimaging pipeline to quantify the expression level and characterize the distribution of the protein from in situ immunofluorescence images. The algorithm computes 1D (dimension intensity) radial and internuclear fluorescence profiles to generate expression outlines and 2D virtual cells representing a typical cell within the populations analyzed. Using this new approach, we verify that cells expressing mutant forms of E-cadherin display fluorescence profiles distinct from those of the wild-type cells. Mutant proteins showed a significantly decrease of fluorescence intensity at the membrane and often abnormal expression peaks in the cytoplasm, reflecting the underlying molecular mechanism of trafficking deregulation. Our results suggest employing this methodology as a complementary approach to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense variants. Moreover, it can be applied to a wide range of proteins and, more importantly, to diseases characterized by aberrant protein expression or trafficking deregulation. PMID:25388006

  2. Quantification of mutant E-cadherin using bioimaging analysis of in situ fluorescence microscopy. A new approach to CDH1 missense variants.

    PubMed

    Sanches, João Miguel; Figueiredo, Joana; Fonseca, Martina; Durães, Cecília; Melo, Soraia; Esménio, Sofia; Seruca, Raquel

    2015-08-01

    Missense mutations result in full-length proteins containing an amino acid substitution that can be neutral or deleterious, interfering with the normal conformation, localization, and function of a protein. A striking example is the presence of CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) germline missense variants in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), which represent a clinical burden for genetic counseling and surveillance of mutation carriers and their families. CDH1 missense variants can compromise not only the function of E-cadherin but also its expression pattern. Here, we propose a novel method to characterize E-cadherin signature in order to identify cases with E-cadherin deregulation and functional impairment. The strategy includes a bioimaging pipeline to quantify the expression level and characterize the distribution of the protein from in situ immunofluorescence images. The algorithm computes 1D (dimension intensity) radial and internuclear fluorescence profiles to generate expression outlines and 2D virtual cells representing a typical cell within the populations analyzed. Using this new approach, we verify that cells expressing mutant forms of E-cadherin display fluorescence profiles distinct from those of the wild-type cells. Mutant proteins showed a significantly decrease of fluorescence intensity at the membrane and often abnormal expression peaks in the cytoplasm, reflecting the underlying molecular mechanism of trafficking deregulation. Our results suggest employing this methodology as a complementary approach to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense variants. Moreover, it can be applied to a wide range of proteins and, more importantly, to diseases characterized by aberrant protein expression or trafficking deregulation. PMID:25388006

  3. ID2 predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer, especially in triple-negative breast cancer, and inhibits E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Yao, Ling; Chen, Li; Cao, Zhi-Gang; Yu, San-Jian; Kuang, Xia-Ying; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of DNA-binding (ID) proteins are known as important modulators in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. This study sought to investigate the prognostic value of ID proteins in breast cancer. Methods The prognostic role of ID proteins in human breast cancer was investigated in 250 breast cancers, via tissue microarrays. The messenger (m)RNA and protein levels of E-cadherin were examined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting, in cells overexpressing IDs. Dual-luciferase report assay was used to investigate the potential mechanism, and a migration assay was performed to investigate the influence of IDs on cell migratory activity. Results The survival analysis with Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression showed that ID2 expression level, which correlated with estrogen receptor status and E-cadherin abundance, served as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.013). The prognostic value of ID2 for DFS was most significant in triple-negative breast cancer patients (P=0.009). We also found that ID2 was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression by correlation analysis (P=0.020, Pearson’s R=−0.155). Subsequently, we explored the biological rationale and uncovered that the enforced expression of ID proteins could suppress E-cadherin expression significantly, thus increasing the migration ability of mammary epithelial cells. Then using a combination of ID2 and E-cadherin expression, the patients were classified into four subgroups with different DFS (P=0.023). Conclusion The overexpression of ID2 can be used as a prognostic marker in breast cancer patients, especially in triple-negative breast cancer patients. ID proteins were still, unexpectedly, revealed to inhibit E-cadherin abundance. PMID:24971018

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, Bcl-2, COX-2, C-erb-B2, EPO-R, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane.

    PubMed

    Sereno, M; García-Cabezas, M A; De Castro, J; Cejas, P; Saenz, E Casado; Belda-Iniesta, C; Feijoo, J Barriuso; Larrauri, J; Nistal, M; Baron, M Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Different authors have investigated the immunohistochemical expression of some proteins in the adenocarcinoma of the stomach, including cell cycle regulators proteins like p53 and Bcl-2; growth factors (c-erb-B2 and EPO-R); angiogenesis-related markers such as COX-2 and cellular adhesion molecules (beta-catenin and E-cadherin). While these proteins have been studied in gastric adenocarcinoma, their immunophenotyping in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the expression, function and behavior of these proteins in normal gastric mucous membrane to contribute to gain further knowledge on the significance of their loss or overexpression in malignant gastric tumors. PMID:17213037

  5. Altered E-Cadherin Levels and Distribution in Melanocytes Precede Clinical Manifestations of Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Roselyne Y; Luciani, Flavie; Cario-André, Muriel; Rubod, Alain; Petit, Valérie; Benzekri, Laila; Ezzedine, Khaled; Lepreux, Sébastien; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Taieb, A; Gauthier, Yvon; Larue, Lionel; Delmas, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder resulting from the loss of melanocytes from the basal epidermal layer. The pathogenesis of the disease is likely multifactorial and involves autoimmune causes, as well as oxidative and mechanical stress. It is important to identify early events in vitiligo to clarify pathogenesis, improve diagnosis, and inform therapy. Here, we show that E-cadherin (Ecad), which mediates the adhesion between melanocytes and keratinocytes in the epidermis, is absent from or discontinuously distributed across melanocyte membranes of vitiligo patients long before clinical lesions appear. This abnormality is associated with the detachment of the melanocytes from the basal to the suprabasal layers in the epidermis. Using human epidermal reconstructed skin and mouse models with normal or defective Ecad expression in melanocytes, we demonstrated that Ecad is required for melanocyte adhesiveness to the basal layer under oxidative and mechanical stress, establishing a link between silent/preclinical, cell-autonomous defects in vitiligo melanocytes and known environmental stressors accelerating disease expression. Our results implicate a primary predisposing skin defect affecting melanocyte adhesiveness that, under stress conditions, leads to disappearance of melanocytes and clinical vitiligo. Melanocyte adhesiveness is thus a potential target for therapy aiming at disease stabilization. PMID:25634357

  6. Downregulated MicroRNA-200a in Meningiomas Promotes Tumor Growth by Reducing E-Cadherin and Activating the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Saydam, Okay; Shen, Yiping; Würdinger, Thomas; Senol, Ozlem; Boke, Elvan; James, Marianne F.; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Fraefel, Cornel; Gusella, James F.; Krichevsky, Anna M.; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2009-01-01

    Meningiomas, one of the most common human brain tumors, are derived from arachnoidal cells associated with brain meninges, are usually benign, and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. Here, we define a typical human meningioma microRNA (miRNA) profile and characterize the effects of one downregulated miRNA, miR-200a, on tumor growth. Elevated levels of miR-200a inhibited meningioma cell growth in culture and in a tumor model in vivo. Upregulation of miR-200a decreased the expression of transcription factors ZEB1 and SIP1, with consequent increased expression of E-cadherin, an adhesion protein associated with cell differentiation. Downregulation of miR-200a in meningiomas and arachnoidal cells resulted in increased expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 involved in cell proliferation. miR-200a was found to directly target β-catenin mRNA, thereby inhibiting its translation and blocking Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which is frequently involved in cancer. A direct correlation was found between the downregulation of miR-200a and the upregulation of β-catenin in human meningioma samples. Thus, miR-200a appears to act as a multifunctional tumor suppressor miRNA in meningiomas through effects on the E-cadherin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. This reveals a previously unrecognized signaling cascade involved in meningioma tumor development and highlights a novel molecular interaction between miR-200a and Wnt signaling, thereby providing insights into novel therapies for meningiomas. PMID:19703993

  7. Expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlations.

    PubMed

    Ping, Fu-Min; Liu, Gui-Jing; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhai, Jian-Wen; Li, Shu-Xia; Liu, Yue-Mei; Li, Bao-Wei; Wei, Hong

    2015-01-01

    To detect the expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and study their correlations. Steptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method was employed to detect the expressions of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues from 77 cases and paracancerous tissues from 77 cases. The correlations between their expressions and clinicopathological indices and between the expressions of these proteins themselves were analyzed. The expressions of RKIP and E-cadherin in ESCC tissues were obviously lower than those in the paracancerous tissues (P<0.01); the expressions in ESCC tissues from cases with lymph node metastasis were lower than those from cases without lymph node metastasis (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was positively correlated with the expression of E-cadherin in ESCC tissues (P<0.01). The expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues was correlated with clinical staging, lymph node metastasis and tumor differentiation (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was negatively correlated with the expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues (P<0.05). Downregulation or depletion of RKIP was related to the onset and progression of ESCC, and facilitated the invasion and metastasis of ESCC by downregulating E-cadherin and upregulating NF-kB p65. PMID:26617724

  8. Expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlations

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Fu-Min; Liu, Gui-Jing; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhai, Jian-Wen; Li, Shu-Xia; Liu, Yue-Mei; Li, Bao-Wei; Wei, Hong

    2015-01-01

    To detect the expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and study their correlations. Steptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method was employed to detect the expressions of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues from 77 cases and paracancerous tissues from 77 cases. The correlations between their expressions and clinicopathological indices and between the expressions of these proteins themselves were analyzed. The expressions of RKIP and E-cadherin in ESCC tissues were obviously lower than those in the paracancerous tissues (P<0.01); the expressions in ESCC tissues from cases with lymph node metastasis were lower than those from cases without lymph node metastasis (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was positively correlated with the expression of E-cadherin in ESCC tissues (P<0.01). The expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues was correlated with clinical staging, lymph node metastasis and tumor differentiation (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was negatively correlated with the expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues (P<0.05). Downregulation or depletion of RKIP was related to the onset and progression of ESCC, and facilitated the invasion and metastasis of ESCC by downregulating E-cadherin and upregulating NF-kB p65. PMID:26617724

  9. Small molecule/ML327 mediated transcriptional de-repression of E-cadherin and inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    An, Hanbing; Stoops, Sydney L.; Deane, Natasha G.; Zhu, Jing; Zi, Jinghuan; Weaver, Connie; Waterson, Alex G.; Zijlstra, Andries; Lindsley, Craig W.; Beauchamp, Robert Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional repression of E-cadherin is a hallmark of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying E-cadherin repression during EMT may provide insights into the development of novel targeted therapeutics for cancer. Here, we report on the chemical probe, ML327, which de-represses E-cadherin transcription, partially reverses EMT, and inhibits cancer cell invasiveness and tumor cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Induction of E-cadherin mRNA expression by ML327 treatment does not require de novo protein synthesis. RNA sequencing analysis revealed that ML327 treatment significantly alters expression of over 2,500 genes within three hours in the presence of the translational inhibitor, cycloheximide. Network analysis reveals Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) as the most significant upstream transcriptional regulator of multiple genes whose expressions were altered by ML327 treatment. Further, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of HNF4α markedly attenuates the E-cadherin expression response to ML327. In summary, ML327 represents a valuable tool to understand mechanisms of EMT and may provide the basis for a novel targeted therapeutic strategy for carcinomas. PMID:26082441

  10. Impact of p120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A on epithelial mesenchymal transition of lung cancer cells expressing E-cadherin in different subcellular locations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Zhao, Huanyu; Wu, Junhua; Xu, Ke; Wang, Enhua

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process in tumor development. Despite previous investigations, it remains unclear how p120-catenin (p120ctn) isoforms 1A and 3A affect the EMT of tumor cells. Here we investigated expression of p120ctn, E-cadherin and vimentin in 78 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples by immunohistochemistry and found that p120ctn membrane expression positively correlated with E-cadherin expression (P<0.001) and negatively correlated with vimentin expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Meanwhile, p120ctn cytoplasmic expression negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (P<0.001) and positively correlated with vimentin expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Cells expressing high (H460 and SPC) and low (H1299 and LK2) levels of p120ctn were screen to investigate its impact on EMT. E-cadherin was restricted to the cell membrane in H460 and H1299 cells, whereas it was expressed in the cytoplasm of SPC and LK2 cells. Ablation of endogenous p120ctn isoform 1A in cells expressing high levels of the protein resulted in decreased E-cadherin expression, increased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and enhanced invasiveness in H460 cells. Meanwhile, completely opposite results were observed in SPC cells. Furthermore, transfection of in H1299 cells expressing low p120ctn levels with the p120ctn isoform 1A plasmid resulted in increased E-cadherin expression, decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and weakened invasiveness, while LK2 cells showed completely opposite results. Both cell lines expressing low p120ctn levels and transfected with the p120ctn isoform 3A plasmid appeared to have increased E-cadherin expression, decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and weakened invasiveness. In conclusion, in cells with membrane E-cadherin, both p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A inhibited EMT and decreased cell invasiveness. In cells with cytoplasmic E-cadherin, p120ctn isoform 1A

  11. A Pathway for the Control of Anoikis Sensitivity by E-Cadherin and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Park, Sun Hee; Cieply, Benjamin; Schupp, Jane; Killiam, Elizabeth; Zhang, Fan; Rimm, David L.; Frisch, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Detachment of epithelial cells from matrix or attachment to an inappropriate matrix engages an apoptotic response known as anoikis, which prevents metastasis. Cellular sensitivity to anoikis is compromised during the oncogenic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), through unknown mechanisms. We report here a pathway through which EMT confers anoikis resistance. NRAGE (neurotrophin receptor-interacting melanoma antigen) interacted with a component of the E-cadherin complex, ankyrin-G, maintaining NRAGE in the cytoplasm. Oncogenic EMT downregulated ankyrin-G, enhancing the nuclear localization of NRAGE. The oncogenic transcriptional repressor protein TBX2 interacted with NRAGE, repressing the tumor suppressor gene p14ARF. P14ARF sensitized cells to anoikis; conversely, the TBX2/NRAGE complex protected cells against anoikis by downregulating this gene. This represents a novel pathway for the regulation of anoikis by EMT and E-cadherin. PMID:21746881

  12. Streptococcus oralis and Candida albicans Synergistically Activate μ-Calpain to Degrade E-cadherin From Oral Epithelial Junctions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbin; Sobue, Takanori; Bertolini, Martinna; Thompson, Angela; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2016-09-15

    Streptococcus oralis forms robust mucosal biofilms with Candida albicans that have increased pathogenic potential. In this study, using oral epithelial cultures, organotypic oral mucosal constructs, and a mouse model of oral infection, we demonstrated that S. oralis augmented C. albicans invasion through epithelial junctions. C. albicans and S. oralis decreased epithelial E-cadherin levels by synergistically increasing µ-calpain, a proteolytic enzyme that targets E-cadherin. In the mouse coinfection model this was accompanied by increased fungal kidney dissemination. Coinfection with a secreted aspartyl protease (sap) mutant sap2456 and S. oralis increased μ-calpain and triggered mucosal invasion and systemic dissemination, suggesting that fungal protease activity is not required for invasion during coinfection. We conclude that C. albicans and S. oralis synergize to activate host enzymes that cleave epithelial junction proteins and increase fungal invasion. PMID:27190184

  13. Regulatory Variants and Disease: The E-Cadherin −160C/A SNP as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gongcheng; Pan, Tiejun; Guo, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in noncoding sequences have largely been ignored in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Yet, amounting evidence suggests that many noncoding SNPs especially those that are in the vicinity of protein coding genes play important roles in shaping chromatin structure and regulate gene expression and, as such, are implicated in a wide variety of diseases. One of such regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) is the E-cadherin (CDH1) promoter −160C/A SNP (rs16260) which is known to affect E-cadherin promoter transcription by displacing transcription factor binding and has been extensively scrutinized for its association with several diseases especially malignancies. Findings from studying this SNP highlight important clinical relevance of rSNPs and justify their inclusion in future GWAS to identify novel disease causing SNPs. PMID:25276428

  14. A common clathrin-mediated machinery coordinates cell-cell adhesion and bacterial internalization

    PubMed Central

    Bonazzi, Matteo; Kühbacher, Andreas; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Mallet, Adeline; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Brodsky, Frances M.; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Invasive bacterial pathogens often target cellular proteins involved in adhesion as a first event during infection. For example, Listeria monocytogenes uses the bacterial protein InlA to interact with E-cadherin, hijack the host adherens junction machinery, and invade non-phagocytic cells by a clathrin-dependent mechanism. Here we investigate a potential role for clathrin in cell-cell adhesion. We observed that the initial steps of adherens junction formation trigger the phosphorylation of clathrin, and its transient localization at forming cell-cell contacts. Furthermore, we show that clathrin serves as a hub for the recruitment of proteins that are necessary for the actin rearrangements that accompany the maturation of adherens junctions. Using an InlA/E-cadherin chimera, we show that adherent cells expressing the chimera form adherens junctions with cells expressing E-cadherin. To model bacterial invasion, we demonstrate that non-adherent cells expressing the InlA chimera can be internalized by E-cadherin-expressing adherent cells. Together these results reveal that a common clathrin-mediated machinery may regulate internalization and cell adhesion and that the relative mobility of one of the interacting partners plays an important role in the commitment to either one of these processes. PMID:22984946

  15. A Novel Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein, gpUS9, Which Promotes Cell-to-Cell Spread in Polarized Epithelial Cells, Colocalizes with the Cytoskeletal Proteins E-Cadherin and F-Actin

    PubMed Central

    Maidji, Ekaterina; Tugizov, Sharof; Abenes, Gerardo; Jones, Thomas; Pereira, Lenore

    1998-01-01

    Processes by which human herpesviruses penetrate and are released from polarized epithelial cells, which have distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains differing in protein and lipid content, are poorly understood. We recently reported that human cytomegalovirus (CMV) mutants with deletions of the gene US9 formed wild-type plaques in cultures of human fibroblasts but were impaired in the capacity for cell-to-cell spread in polarized human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Unlike the glycoproteins that are required for infection, the protein encoded by CMV US9 plays an accessory role by promoting dissemination of virus across cell-cell junctions of polarized epithelial cells. To identify the product and investigate its specialized functions, we selected Madine-Darby canine kidney II (MDCK) epithelial cells that constitutively express CMV US9 or, as a control, US8. The gene products, designated gpUS9 and gpUS8, were glycosylated proteins of comparable molecular masses but differed considerably in intracellular distribution and solubility. Immunofluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy indicated that, like gpUS8, gpUS9 was present in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments of nonpolarized cells. In polarized epithelial cells, gpUS9 also accumulated along lateral membranes, colocalizing with cadherin and actin, and was insoluble in Triton X-100, a property shared with proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton. We hypothesize that gpUS9 may enhance the dissemination of CMV in infected epithelial tissues by associating with the cytoskeletal matrix. PMID:9621030

  16. N- and E-cadherins in Xenopus are specifically required in the neural and non-neural ectoderm, respectively, for F-actin assembly and morphogenetic movements

    PubMed Central

    Nandadasa, Sumeda; Tao, Qinghua; Menon, Nikhil R.; Heasman, Janet; Wylie, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Summary Transmembrane cadherins are calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion molecules. Recently, they have also been shown to be sites of actin assembly during adhesive contact formation. However, the roles of actin assembly on transmembrane cadherins during development are not fully understood. We show here, using the developing ectoderm of the Xenopus embryo as a model, that F-actin assembly is a primary function of both N-cadherin in the neural ectoderm and E-cadherin in the non-neural (epidermal) ectoderm, and that each cadherin is essential for the characteristic morphogenetic movements of these two tissues. However, depletion of N-cadherin and E-cadherin did not cause dissociation in these tissues at the neurula stage, probably owing to the expression of C-cadherin in each tissue. Depletion of each of these cadherins is not rescued by the other, nor by the expression of C-cadherin, which is expressed in both tissues. One possible reason for this is that each cadherin is expressed in a different domain of the cell membrane. These data indicate the combinatorial nature of cadherin function, the fact that N- and E-cadherin play primary roles in F-actin assembly in addition to roles in cell adhesion, and that this function is specific to individual cadherins. They also show how cell adhesion and motility can be combined in morphogenetic tissue movements that generate the form and shape of the embryonic organs. PMID:19279134

  17. Enhanced Biological Functions of Human Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Aggregates Incorporating E-Cadherin-Modified PLGA Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mao, Hongli; Gao, Chao; Li, Suhua; Shuai, Qizhi; Xu, Jianbin; Xu, Ke; Cao, Lei; Lang, Ren; Gu, Zhongwei; Akaike, Toshihiro; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a promising source of multipotent cells for various cell-based therapies due to their unique properties, and formation of 3D MSC aggregates has been explored as a potential strategy to enhance therapeutic efficacy. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles modified with human E-cadherin fusion protein (hE-cad-PLGA microparticles) have been fabricated and integrated with human MSCs to form 3D cell aggregates. The results show that, compared with the plain PLGA, the hE-cad-PLGA microparticles distribute within the aggregates more evenly and further result in a more significant improvement of cellular proliferation and secretion of a series of bioactive factors due to the synergistic effects from the bioactive E-cadherin fragments and the PLGA microparticles. Meanwhile, the hE-cad-PLGA microparticles incorporated in the aggregates upregulate the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activate the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in the MSCs. Additionally, the E-cadherin/β-catenin cellular membrane complex in the MSCs is markedly stimulated by the hE-cad-PLGA microparticles. Therefore, engineering 3D cell aggregates with hE-cad-PLGA microparticles can be a promising method for ex vivo multipotent stem-cell expansion with enhanced biological functions and may offer a novel route to expand multipotent stem-cell-based clinical applications. PMID:27245478

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  19. OLA1 contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer by modulating the GSK3β/snail/E-cadherin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiawei; Yuan, Shuai; Liao, Chen; Jeyabal, Prince V.S; Rubio, Valentina; Chen, Huarong; Li, Yafei; Shi, Zheng-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Obg-like ATPase 1 (OLA1) belongs to the Obg family of P-loop NTPases, and may serve as a “molecular switch” regulating multiple cellular processes. Aberrant expression of OLA1 has been observed in several human malignancies. However, the role of OLA1 in cancer progression remains poorly understood. In this study, we used the Kaplan-Meier plotter search tool to show that increased expression of OLA1 mRNA was significantly associated with shorter overall survival in lung cancer patients. By immunohistochemical analysis we discovered that levels of OLA1 protein in lung cancer tissues were positively correlated with TNM stage and lymph node metastasis, but negatively correlated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker E-cadherin. Knockdown of OLA1 in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line rendered the cells more resistant to TGF- β-induced EMT and the accompanied repression of E-cadherin. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that OLA1 is a GSK3 β-interacting protein and inhibits GSK3 β activity by mediating its Ser9 phosphorylation. During EMT, OLA1 plays an important role in suppressing the GSK3 β-mediated degradation of Snail protein, which in turn promotes downregulation of E-cadherin. These data suggest that OLA1 contributes to EMT by modulating the GSK3 β/Snail/E-cadherin signaling, and its overexpression is associated with clinical progression and poor survival in lung cancer patients. PMID:26863455

  20. E-cadherin inhibits cell surface localization of the pro-migratory 5T4 oncofetal antigen in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Helen L; Eastham, Angela M; Merry, Catherine L R; Southgate, Thomas D; Perez-Campo, Flor; Soncin, Francesca; Ritson, Sarah; Kemler, Rolf; Stern, Peter L; Ward, Christopher M

    2007-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) events occur during embryonic development and are important for the metastatic spread of epithelial tumors. We show here that spontaneous differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is associated with an E- to N-cadherin switch, up-regulation of E-cadherin repressor molecules (Snail and Slug proteins), gelatinase activity (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2 and -9), and increased cellular motility, all characteristic EMT events. The 5T4 oncofetal antigen, previously shown to be associated with very early ES cell differentiation and altered motility, is also a part of this coordinated process. E- and N-cadherin and 5T4 proteins are independently regulated during ES cell differentiation and are not required for induction of EMT-associated transcripts and proteins, as judged from the study of the respective knockout ES cells. Further, abrogation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact in undifferentiated ES cells using neutralizing antibody results in a reversible mesenchymal phenotype and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement that is concomitant with translocation of the 5T4 antigen from the cytoplasm to the cell surface in an energy-dependent manner. E-cadherin null ES cells are constitutively cell surface 5T4 positive, and although forced expression of E-cadherin cDNA in these cells is sufficient to restore cell-cell contact, cell surface expression of 5T4 antigen is unchanged. 5T4 and N-cadherin knockout ES cells exhibit significantly decreased motility during EMT, demonstrating a functional role for these proteins in this process. We conclude that E-cadherin protein stabilizes cortical actin cytoskeletal arrangement in ES cells, and this can prevent cell surface localization of the promigratory 5T4 antigen. PMID:17507657

  1. Correlation between methylation of the E-Cadherin gene and malignancy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Q; Zhang, G Q; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignant tumor in males with an unclear pathogenic mechanism. As one epigenetic regulation mechanism, DNA methylation of the whole genome and specific gene(s) plays critical roles in pathogenesis, progression, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. The E-Cadherin gene is involved in cell metabolism and has been suggested to be related with malignancy of multiple tumors. This study investigated the correlation between E-Cadherin methylation and malignancy of prostate cancer. Gradient concentrations of 5-Aza-CdR (5, 10, and 20 mM) were used to treat the prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP), and mRNA level of E-Cadherin was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A total of 82 prostate cancer patients were recruited to detect the methylation status of the promoter region of the E-Cadherin gene by pyrophosphate sequencing. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was employed to determine mRNA levels of E-Cadherin. Methylation and mRNA levels of E-Cadherin were analyzed by the SPSS software. With elevated concentrations of 5-Aza-CdR, mRNA levels of E-Cadherin gradually increased. DNA methylation levels of tumor tissues were significantly elevated with increased Gleason score (P < 0.05) and tumor-node-metastasis stage (P < 0.05) but were not related to age, smoking habits, or alcohol consumption (P > 0.05). DNA methylation level was negatively correlated with mRNA expression of the E-Cadherin gene. Methylation in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in tumor adjacent tissues (P < 0.05). DNA methylation level of the E-Cadherin gene could be an important predictive index for malignancy of prostate cancer. PMID:27420993

  2. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA. PMID:26262813

  3. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that CNTN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies. PMID:26795349

  4. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and e-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E.; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode ‘budding’ is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of adherens junction component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another adherens junction component, has been more difficult to study due to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent adherens junction dissolution. PMID:25010141

  5. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Drasdo, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell-cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell-cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell-cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin-catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces.

  6. An E-cadherin-mediated hitchhiking mechanism for C. elegans germ cell internalization during gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Daisuke; Nance, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Gastrulation movements place endodermal precursors, mesodermal precursors and primordial germ cells (PGCs) into the interior of the embryo. Somatic cell gastrulation movements are regulated by transcription factors that also control cell fate, coupling cell identity and position. By contrast, PGCs in many species are transcriptionally quiescent, suggesting that they might use alternative gastrulation strategies. Here, we show that C. elegans PGCs internalize by attaching to internal endodermal cells, which undergo morphogenetic movements that pull the PGCs into the embryo. We show that PGCs enrich HMR-1/E-cadherin at their surfaces to stick to endoderm. HMR-1 expression in PGCs is necessary and sufficient to ensure internalization, suggesting that HMR-1 can promote PGC-endoderm adhesion through a mechanism other than homotypic trans interactions between the two cell groups. Finally, we demonstrate that the hmr-1 3′ untranslated region promotes increased HMR-1 translation in PGCs. Our findings reveal that quiescent PGCs employ a post-transcriptionally regulated hitchhiking mechanism to internalize during gastrulation, and demonstrate a morphogenetic role for the conserved association of PGCs with the endoderm. PMID:22675206

  7. A new rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin antibody [EP700Y] shows higher sensitivity than mouse monoclonal E-cadherin [HECD-1] antibody in breast ductal carcinomas and does not stain breast lobular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Laura L; Tang, Ping; Hicks, David G; Chen, Huijiao; Yang, Qi; Haas, Thomas S; Bremer, Ryan E; Tacha, David

    2014-09-01

    Immunohistochemical studies have shown E-cadherin to be expressed in breast carcinomas showing a ductal histology, with a corresponding loss of expression in tumors with a lobular histology. As a result, mouse monoclonal anti-E-cadherin [HECD-1] has been used by pathologists to differentiate between ductal and lobular carcinomas, with currently published sensitivity and specificity rates of approximately 90%. Rabbit monoclonal antibodies may combine the best properties of both mouse monoclonal antibodies and rabbit antisera. Therefore, this study compares the staining sensitivity and specificity of a new rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin and the standard mouse monoclonal E-cadherin [HECD-1] in breast ductal carcinomas, and evaluates a cocktail of rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin and p120 catenin in the discrimination of ductal from lobular carcinomas. The rabbit E-cadherin showed sharper staining and increased sensitivity (80/81, 99%) than the mouse E-cadherin (75/81, 93%). The rabbit E-cadherin achieved a score of 3+ in 85.2% (69/81) of cases as compared with a 3+ in only 21.0% (17/81) of cases stained with mouse E-cadherin. All lobular carcinomas (n=37) were confirmed by the absence of E-cadherin and the diffuse cytoplasmic expression of p120 catenin. Although both the single mouse E-cadherin and dual stain can differentiate ductal from lobular lesions, the dual stain is helpful in challenging cases because of its bright pink p120 catenin and dark brown rabbit E-cadherin staining. The highly sensitive rabbit E-cadherin antibody is the preferred antibody for evaluating ductal carcinomas and for distinguishing ductal versus lobular lesions, and the dual stain was superior to the single E-cadherin stain. PMID:24569788

  8. Allelic imbalance within the E-cadherin gene is an infrequent event in prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murant, S J; Rolley, N; Phillips, S M; Stower, M; Maitland, N J

    2000-01-01

    By exploiting two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within the E-cadherin gene, at 16q22, we have determined the frequency of allelic imbalance at this proposed tumor suppressor locus in a series of human prostatic carcinoma DNA samples. Whereas results with seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers flanking the E-cadherin locus confirmed the existence of three separate loci on chromosome 16, at which allelic imbalance increased with increasing loss of tumor cell differentiation, no allelic imbalance within the E-cadherin gene was detected either by single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis or by direct sequencing. We conclude that the loss of E-cadherin function observed in prostate cancer is not a result of allelic deletion. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 27:104-109, 2000. PMID:10564592

  9. E-cadherin immunohistochemical expression in mammary gland neoplasms in bitches.

    PubMed

    Rodo, A; Malicka, E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate E-cadherin expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade and proliferative activity. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours, collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures and archival samples. All together 21 adenomas, 32 complex carcinomas, 35 simple carcinomas and 13 solid carcinomas were qualified for further investigation. E-cadherin expression was higher in adenomas as compared with carcinomas but lower in solid carcinomas as compared with simple and complex carcinomas. More over, the expression of E-cadherin decreased with the increase in the neoplasm malignancy and proliferative activity (value of the mitotic index and number of cells showing Ki67). The study has shown that the expression of E-cadherin can be used as a prognostic factor. PMID:18540208

  10. Immunolocalization of E-cadherin and β-catenin in the cyclic and early pregnant canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Payan-Carreira, R; Pires, M A; Santos, C; Holst, B Ström; Colaço, J; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2016-09-01

    Putative changes in E-cadherin and β-catenin during implantation in dogs are of interest to study, as they are relevant proteins for epithelial integrity. E-cadherin and β-catenin were immunolocalized in the canine endometrium during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy, using monoclonal antibodies. Both proteins were detected in all types of endometrial epithelia (surface epithelium [SE], superficial glandular, and deep glandular epithelia) at all stages of the estrous cycle and in early placental structures. E-cadherin depicted a gradient of intensity apparently being lowest in the SE to progressively increase toward the deepness of the endometrial glands, regardless of the stage of estrous cycle. The overall immunostaining was, however, weaker at diestrus. In pregnant samples, the trophoblast was conspicuously immunolabeled compared with the endometrial surface lining epithelium. In the latter, the cytoplasmic pattern predominated over the membrane-bound, as was also seen in the decidual cells of the placental labyrinth. In the early placenta, only trophoblast cells and lacunae retained membrane signals. β-Catenin membrane labeling appeared relatively constant throughout the cycle, although a tendency toward a decrease in intensity was detected at the secretory stages. In addition, a dislocation of the immunoreaction from membrane to the cytoplasm was observed in both the SE and the glandular epithelia at particular stages of the cycle. In early pregnancy, a loss of the membranous pattern was observed in the SE and labyrinth, but neither on trophoblast nor in lacunae. The results show the existence of a softening of the adherens junctional complex in progestagen-dominated stages favoring embryo-maternal interactions and endometrial invasion during canine implantation. PMID:27155731

  11. Posttranslational modification of E-cadherin by core fucosylation regulates Src activation and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Kang; Chen, Zhong Yi; Gautam, Suraj; Deng, Nian Hui; Zhou, You; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2016-02-01

    E-cadherin is often dysregulated in aggressive lung cancer, the mechanism of which cannot always be explained at the level of transcription. In 66 patients with lung cancer, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that co-localization of E-cadherin and core fucose by Lens culinaris agglutinin was significantly less extensive in tumor than in nontumor tissue. Through gain and loss of fucosylation experiments in the giant lung carcinoma cell lines 95C and 95D, our results revealed that E-cadherin core fucosylation in 95C cells overexpressing α-1, 6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) inhibited Fut8-95C cell migration, whereas knockdown of Fut8 in 95D cells enhanced migration of short-interfering RNA-targeting Fut8 (siFut8)-95D cells. The level of active Src (phosphorylated Src [Y416]) was significantly reduced in Fut8-95C cells, but elevated in siFut8-95D cells. In protein complexes immunoprecipitated from Fut8-95C cell lysates with anti-E-cadherin, less phosphorylated Src (Y416) and more β-catenin were observed, but immunoprecipitates from siFut8-95D cells, containing less core fucosylated E-cadherin, contained an elevated level of phospho-Src Y416. In Fut8-95C cells, phosphorylation of Akt (Y315, Y326) and GSK-3β (S9) was significantly reduced, but β-catenin (S37) phosphorylation was enhanced. Expression of N-cadherin and Snail1 was also reduced in Fut8-95C cells, but significantly increased in siFut8-95D cells. Intriguingly, when Src kinase activity was inhibited by treatment of cells with PP2 and SU6656, regulation of N-cadherin, Snail1 and cell migration by E-cadherin core fucosylation was abrogated in both Fut8-95C and siFut8-95D cells. Therefore, posttranslational modification of E-cadherin by less core fucosylation recruited and activated Src, and induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in lung cancer cells. PMID:26443198

  12. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  13. Matrilysin (Matrix Metalloproteinase-7) Mediates E-Cadherin Ectodomain Shedding in Injured Lung Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, John K.; Li, Qinglang; Parks, William C.

    2003-01-01

    Matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase-7) is highly expressed in lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis and other conditions associated with airway and alveolar injury. Although matrilysin is required for closure of epithelial wounds ex vivo, the mechanism of its action in repair is unknown. We demonstrate that matrilysin mediates shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain from injured lung epithelium both in vitro and in vivo. In alveolar-like epithelial cells, transfection of activated matrilysin resulted in shedding of E-cadherin and accelerated cell migration. In vivo, matrilysin co-localized with E-cadherin at the basolateral surfaces of migrating tracheal epithelium, and the reorganization of cell-cell junctions seen in wild-type injured tissue was absent in matrilysin-null samples. E-cadherin ectodomain was shed into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of bleomycin-injured wild-type mice, but was not shed in matrilysin-null mice. These findings identify E-cadherin as a novel substrate for matrilysin and indicate that shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain is required for epithelial repair. PMID:12759241

  14. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin involving regulators of Hippo pathway due to HIF-1α stabilization/nuclear translocation in bone metastasis from breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Drago, Lorenzo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2015-01-15

    The present study deals with the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of E-cadherin expression under hypoxia, because the adjustment of the amount of E-cadherin due to physical stimuli of the microenvironment might influence the colonization of metastasis to skeleton. We analyzed the effect of 1% oxygen tension, that is similar to that encountered in the bone marrow by metastatic cells spreading from breast carcinoma. The purpose was to evaluate the hypoxia-orchestrated control of E-cadherin transactivation via hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), and the involvement of Hippo pathway members, as regulators of transcription factors. To give a translational significance to the study, we took into consideration human pair-matched ductal breast carcinoma and bone metastasis: E-cadherin and Wwox were expressed in bone metastasis but not in breast carcinoma, while HIF-1α and TAZ seemed localized principally in nuclei of metastasis and were found in all cell compartments of breast carcinoma. A close examination of the regulatory mechanisms underlying E-cadherin expression in bone metastasis was done in 1833 clone derived from MDA-MB231 cells. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin only in 1833 clone, but not in parental cells, through HIF-1 and PPARγ activities, while Wwox decreased. Since Wwox was highly expressed in bone metastasis, the effect of ectopic Wwox was evaluated, and we showed E-cadherin transactivation and enhanced invasiveness in WWOX transfected 1833 cells. Also, hypoxia was additive with ectopic Wwox remarkably enhancing HIF-1α nuclear shuttle and accumulation due to the lengthening of the half-life of HIF-1α protein; under this experimental condition HIF-1α appeared as a slower migrated band compared with control, in agreement with the phosphorylation state. The in vitro data strongly supported the almost exclusive presence of HIF-1α in nuclei of human-bone metastasis. Thus, we identified

  15. Beyond a tumor suppressor: Soluble E-cadherin promotes the progression of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Ping; Kuang, Jing-Ya; Yang, Qing-Kai; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Yu, Shi-Cang

    2016-06-15

    E-cadherin (E-cad) plays important roles in tumorigenesis as well as in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. This protein exists in two forms: a membrane-tethered form and a soluble form. Full-length E-cad is membrane tethered. As a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, E-cad mainly mediates adherens junctions between cells and is involved in maintaining the normal structure of epithelial tissues. Soluble E-cad (sE-cad) is the extracellular fragment of the protein that is cleaved from the membrane after proteolysis of full-length E-cad. The production of sE-cad undermines adherens junctions, causing a reduction in cell aggregation capacity; furthermore, sE-cad can diffuse into the extracellular environment and the blood. As a paracrine/autocrine signaling molecule, sE-cad activates or inhibits multiple signaling pathways and participates in the progression of various types of cancer, such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and lung cancer, by promoting invasion and metastasis. This article briefly reviews the role of sE-cad in tumorigenesis and tumor progression and its significance in clinical therapeutics. PMID:26704932

  16. Insulin-like growth factor I activates the invasion suppressor function of E-cadherin in MCF-7 human mammary carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, M. E.; Vyncke, B. M.; Bruyneel, E. A.; Vermeulen, S. J.; De Bruyne, G. K.; Van Larebeke, N. A.; Vleminckx, K.; Van Roy, F. M.; Mareel, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been shown to counteract invasion of epithelial neoplastic cells. Using three monoclonal antibodies, we have demonstrated the presence of E-cadherin at the surface of human MCF-7/6 mammary carcinoma cells by indirect immunofluorescence coupled to flow cytometry and by immunocytochemistry. Nevertheless, MCF-7/6 cells failed to aggregate in a medium containing 1.25 mM CaCl2, and they were invasive after confrontation with embryonic chick heart fragments in organ culture. Treatment of MCF-7/6 cells with 0.5 microgram ml-1 insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) led to homotypic aggregation within 5 to 10 min and inhibited invasion in vitro during at least 8 days. The effect of IGF-I on cellular aggregation was insensitive to cycloheximide. However, monoclonal antibodies that interfered with the function of either the IGF-I receptor (alpha IR3) or E-cadherin (HECD-1, MB2) blocked the effect of IGF-I on aggregation. The effects of IGF-I on aggregation and on invasion could be mimicked by 1 microgram ml-1 insulin, but not by 0.5 microgram ml-1 IGF-II. The insulin effects were presumably not mediated by the IGF-I receptor, since they could not be blocked by an antibody against this receptor (alpha IR3). Our results indicate that IGF-I activates the invasion suppressor role of E-cadherin in MCF-7/6 cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:8347483

  17. Application of APTES-Anti-E-cadherin film for early cancer monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ben Ismail, Manel; Carreiras, Franck; Agniel, Rémy; Mili, Donia; Sboui, Dejla; Zanina, Nahla; Othmane, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Cancer staging is a way to classify cancer according to the extent of the disease in the body. The stage is usually determined by several factors such as the location of the primary tumor, the tumor size, the degree of spread in the surrounding tissues, etc. The study of E-cadherin (EC) expression on cancerous cells of patients has revealed variations in the molecular expression patterns of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. The detection of these cells requires a long procedure involving conventional techniques, thus, the requirement for development of new rapid devices that permit direct and highly sensitive detection stimulates the sensing field progress. Here, we explore if E-cadherin could be used as a biomarker to bind and detect epithelial cancer cells. Hence, the sensitive and specific detection of E-cadherin expressed on epithelial cells is approached by immobilizing anti-E-cadherin antibody (AEC) onto aminosilanized indium-tin oxide (ITO) surface. The immunosensing surfaces have been characterized by electrochemical measurements, wettability and confocal microscopy and their performance has been assessed in the presence of cancer cell lines. Under optimal conditions, the resulting immunosensor displayed a selective detection of E-cadherin expressing cells, which could be detected either by fluorescence or electrochemical techniques. The developed immunosensing surface could provide a simple tool that can be applied to cancer staging. PMID:27423102

  18. p63 and E-cadherin Expression in Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, L A; Pissarra, H; Faísca, P B; Bragança, M; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2015-07-01

    The expression of p63 and E-cadherin was studied in 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas in the dog according to immunohistochemical techniques. The association between these markers and clinicopathologic parameters was assessed. All tumor cells studied showed enhanced p63 expression. Regarding E-cadherin expression, 17 of 22 cases (77.3%) showed decreased immunoreactivity, and in 13 of 22 cases (59.1%), its expression was cytoplasmic. Neither p63 nor E-cadherin expression patterns were associated with tumor size, bone invasion, or lymph node metastasis. p63 score was related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferative index (P = .020). A statistically significant correlation between the expression patterns of these 2 markers was noted (P = .026). Furthermore, they were related with tumor grade. An atypical p63 labeling and a cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining were statistically related with a higher tumor grade (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). These findings suggest that changes in p63 and E-cadherin expression are frequent events in oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs. PMID:25248518

  19. Prognostic Significance of β-Catenin, E-Cadherin, and SOX9 in Colorectal Cancer: Results from a Large Population-Representative Series

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Jarle; Kolberg, Matthias; Nesland, Jahn M.; Svindland, Aud; Nesbakken, Arild; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2014-01-01

    Robust biomarkers that can precisely stratify patients according to treatment needs are in great demand. The literature is inconclusive for most reported prognostic markers for colorectal cancer (CRC). Hence, adequately reported studies in large representative series are necessary to determine their clinical potential. We investigated the prognostic value of three Wnt signaling-associated proteins, β-catenin, E-cadherin, and SOX9, in a population-representative single-hospital series of 1290 Norwegian CRC patients by performing immunohistochemical analyses of each marker using the tissue microarray technology. Loss of membranous or cytosolic β-catenin and loss of cytosolic E-cadherin protein expression were significantly associated with reduced 5-year survival in 903 patients who underwent major resection (722 evaluable tissue cores) independently of standard clinicopathological high-risk parameters. Pre-specified subgroup analyses demonstrated particular effect for stage IV patients for β-catenin membrane staining (P = 0.018; formal interaction test P = 0.025). Among those who underwent complete resection (714 patients, 568 evaluable), 5-year time-to-recurrence analyses were performed, and stage II patients with loss of cytosolic E-cadherin were identified as an independent high-risk subgroup (P = 0.020, formal interaction test was not significant). Nuclear β-catenin and SOX9 protein, regardless of intracellular location, were not associated with prognosis. In conclusion, the protein expression level of membranous or cytosolic β-catenin and E-cadherin predicts CRC patient subgroups with inferior prognosis. PMID:24904831

  20. Carcinoma cells induce lumen filling and EMT in epithelial cells through soluble E-cadherin-mediated activation of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pratima U; D'Ambrosio, Julia; Inge, Landon J; Mason, Robert W; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2015-12-01

    In epithelial cancers, carcinoma cells coexist with normal cells. Although it is known that the tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, it is not completely understood how the tumor influences adjacent normal epithelial cells. In this study, a three-dimensional co-culture system comprising non-transformed epithelial cells (MDCK) and transformed carcinoma cells (MSV-MDCK) was used to demonstrate that carcinoma cells sequentially induce preneoplastic lumen filling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cysts. MMP-9 secreted by carcinoma cells cleaves cellular E-cadherin (encoded by CDH1) from epithelial cells to generate soluble E-cadherin (sE-cad), a pro-oncogenic protein. We show that sE-cad induces EGFR activation, resulting in lumen filling in MDCK cysts. Long-term sE-cad treatment induced EMT. sE-cad caused lumen filling by induction of the ERK signaling pathway and triggered EMT through the sustained activation of the AKT pathway. Although it is known that sE-cad induces MMP-9 release and consequent EGFR activation in tumor cells, our results, for the first time, demonstrate that carcinoma cells can induce sE-cad shedding in adjacent epithelial cells, which leads to EGFR activation and the eventual transdifferentiation of the normal epithelial cells. PMID:26483386

  1. Soy and cottonseed protein blends as wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As an environmentally friendlier alternative to adhesives from petroleum feedstock, soy proteins are currently being formulated as wood adhesives. Cottonseed proteins have also been found to provide good adhesive properties. In at least some cases, cottonseed proteins appear to form greater shear ...

  2. From cell membrane to the nucleus: an emerging role of E-cadherin in gene transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Liu, Xi; Fan, Guiling; Zhao, Xingsheng; Sun, Yanying; Wang, Tianzhen; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Guangyu; Zhao, Ci; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Ye, Fei; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin is a well-known mediator of cell–cell adherens junctions. However, many other functions of E-cadherin have been reported. Collectively, the available data suggest that E-cadherin may also act as a gene transcriptional regulator. Here, evidence supporting this claim is reviewed, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. E-cadherin has been shown to modulate the activity of several notable cell signalling pathways, and given that most of these pathways in turn regulate gene expression, we proposed that E-cadherin may regulate gene transcription by affecting these pathways. Additionally, E-cadherin has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus where documentation of an E-cadherin fragment bound to DNA suggests that E-cadherin may directly regulate gene transcription. In summary, from the cell membrane to the nucleus, a role for E-cadherin in gene transcription may be emerging. Studies specifically focused on this potential role would allow for a more thorough understanding of this transmembrane glycoprotein in mediating intra- and intercellular activities. PMID:25164084

  3. Suppression of SIPA-1 expression may reduce bladder cancer invasion and metastasis via the downregulation of E-cadherin and ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, PING; WANG, XINGHUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the capacity of signal-induced proliferation-associated protein 1 (SIPA-1) to regulate bladder cancer cell invasion and metastasis. BIU-87 and T24 cells were transfected with the SIPA gene and SIPA short hairpin (sh)RNA, respectively. Western blot analysis was conducted to analyze the expression levels of SIPA-1, Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1), Rap1 guanosine triphosphate (Rap1GTP), E-cadherin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1). Cell motility and invasion were evaluated in vitro using wound and Transwell assays. Transfected cells were inoculated into the pelvic region of BALB/c nude mice, and the number of resulting tumors was recorded after 6 weeks. Western blot analysis revealed that expression levels of E-cadherin and ZO-1 were reduced in the cells with enhanced levels of SIPA-1. By contrast, the levels of E-cadherin and ZO-1 were elevated in the cells in which SIPA-1 was knocked down. In comparison with untransfected cells, the cells with reduced levels of SIPA-1 exhibited reduced wound closure and fewer cells crossed the chamber in the Transwell experiment, whereas the cells with enhanced levels of SIPA-1 exhibited increased migration and invasion In vivo, an increased tumor count was obtained in the mice with elevated levels of SIPA-1. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that SIPA-1 is able to regulate bladder cancer cell metastasis and invasion by reducing the expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1. PMID:26889242

  4. Comparative analysis of the expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and β1 integrin in congenital and acquired cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Chung, Jae Ho; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chul Won; Kang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Young Ha; Pyo, Ju Yeon

    2016-04-01

    E-cadherin, β-catenin, and β1 integrin are important cell adhesion molecules to maintain epithelial structure and function. We investigated the expression of these cell adhesion molecules in cholesteatomas to understand the role of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interaction in cholesteatomas. An immunohistochemical investigation was carried out on 35 cholesteatoma tissue samples (14 congenital, 21 acquired cholesteatomas) and 10 normal retroauricular skin (RAS) tissues which are obtained during middle ear surgery. The expression rate was measured to find out differences between retroauricular skin and cholesteatoma, as well as between congenital and acquired cholesteatoma. E-cadherin expression rate was significantly lower in the cholesteatoma (spinous layer 88.7 ± 17.9 %, granular layer 54.6 ± 22.6 %) than in the RAS (100 %, 74.4 ± 7.4 %) and in the acquired (83.3 ± 19.4 %, 48.1 ± 22.9 %) than in the congenital (96.7 ± 12.0 %, 64.4 ± 18.8 %). β-catenin expression rate was significantly lower in the cholesteatoma (spinous layer 84.1 ± 17.2 %, granular layer 28.7 ± 30.8 %) than in the RAS (100 %, 75.9 ± 6.1 %) and in the acquired (78.1 ± 17.0 %, 17.1 ± 22.3 %) than in the congenital (93.2 ± 13.5 %, 46.1 ± 34.2 %). The expression pattern of β-catenin is similar to that of E-cadherin. In β1 integrin, there was no significant difference of the expression rate between RAS and cholesteatoma, as well as between congenital and acquired cholesteatoma. In conclusion, the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin is reduced in cholesteatoma, and the reduction is more pronounced in acquired cholesteatoma than in congenital cholesteatoma. Acquired cholesteatomas showed more aggressive characteristics than congenital cholesteatomas in terms of cell-cell adhesion. PMID:25864182

  5. E-Cadherin loss associated with EMT promotes radioresistance in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Theys, Jan; Jutten, Barry; Habets, Roger; Paesmans, Kim; Groot, Arjan J.; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Brad G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid cancers and associated with metastases and treatment failure. During tumor progression epithelial cells often acquire mesenchymal features, a phenomenon known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Intratumoral hypoxia has been linked to EMT induction. We hypothesized that signals from the tumor microenvironment such as growth factors and tumor oxygenation collaborate to promote EMT and thereby contribute to radioresistance. Materials and methods Gene expression changes under hypoxia were analyzed using microarray and validated by qRT-PCR. Conversion of epithelial phenotype upon hypoxic exposure, TGFβ addition or oncogene activation was investigated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Cell survival following ionizing radiation was assayed using clonogenic survival. Results Upon hypoxia, TGFβ addition or EGFRvIII expression, MCF7, A549 and NMuMG epithelial cells acquired a spindle shape and lost cell–cell contacts. Expression of epithelial markers such as E-cadherin decreased, whereas mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and N-cadherin increased. Combining hypoxia with TGFβ or EGFRvIII expression, lead to more rapid and pronounced EMT-like phenotype. Interestingly, E-cadherin expression and the mesenchymal appearance were reversible upon reoxygenation. Mesenchymal conversion and E-cadherin loss were associated with radioresistance. Conclusions Our findings describe a mechanism by which the tumor microenvironment may contribute to tumor radioresistance via E-cadherin loss and EMT. PMID:21680037

  6. Soy Components Genistein and Lunasin Regulate E-Cadherin and Wnt Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of tumorigenesis. We previously showed by microarray gene profiling that dietary intake of soy-based AIN-93G diets altered components of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in rat mammary epithelial cells. To furth...

  7. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Miranda V.; Lee, Donghoon M.; Harris, Tony J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair. PMID:26304727

  8. Estrogen-mediated down-regulation of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E-cadherin is an important mediator of cell-cell interactions, and has been shown to play a crucial role in breast tumor suppression. Its inactivation occurs through instability at its chromosomal locus and mutations, but also through epigenetic mechanisms such as promoter hypermethylation and trans...

  9. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Miranda V; Lee, Donghoon M; Harris, Tony J C; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2015-08-31

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair. PMID:26304727

  10. How to develop globular proteins into adhesives.

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, M C; Rutten, A A; Frens, G

    2000-05-26

    To make globular proteins suitable for application in adhesives, the specific bonds and interactions which shape their structure have to broken. Only then, a layer of relatively large, flexible and interwoven polymer chains, which are firmly attached to the solid surface by adsorption, can be created. Such a network layer is essential to save the adhesive bond under an applied force, because it can distribute the concentration of stresses generated at the interface into the bulk. Unfolding and swelling of a protein can be achieved by changing the solvent quality. For the globular whey protein beta-lactoglobulin, the optimal conditions for unfolding and swelling is found with 98% formic acid as a solvent. In formic acid, beta-lactoglobulin looses its amphoteric character (it is protonated, probably for approximately 20%). In addition, formic acid is less polar than water and thus a better solvent for the apolar parts of the protein. The swelling and unfolding behaviour of beta-lactoglobulin is studied by viscosity and CD-spectroscopy measurements. For the interpretation of the results we apply the Kuhn formalism that the conformation of a protein can be described in terms of a statistical chain which consists of segments of an average persistence length P. The statistical segment length P, which varies with the experimental conditions, is directly related to the adsorption energy required for a strong adhesion between coil and surface. It determines the depletion energy kT P(-2) m(-2) which must be overcome by specific attraction between side groups of the protein chain and the surface. For beta-lactoglobulin in 98% formic acid, we find a P value of approximately 2.2 nm, pointing at a relatively flexible chain. The minimum net adsorption energy kT P(-2) is then approximately 1 mJ m(-2), a relatively small value to be exceeded. Preliminary results of destructive adhesion tests on beech wood lap-shear joints reveal promising tensile strengths of approximately 2

  11. E-Cadherin repression increases amount of cancer stem cells in human A549 lung adenocarcinoma and stimulates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Farmakovskaya, M; Khromova, N; Rybko, V; Dugina, V; Kopnin, B; Kopnin, P

    2016-04-17

    Here we show that cancer stem cells amount in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 depends on E-cadherin expression. In fact, downregulation of E-cadherin expression enhanced expression of pluripotent genes (c-MYC, NESTIN, OCT3/4 and SOX2) and enriched cell population with the cells possessing the properties of so-called 'cancer stem cells' via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Repression of E-cadherin also stimulated cell proliferation and migration in vitro, decreased cell amount essential for xenografts formation in nude mice, increased tumors vascularization and growth. On the other hand, E-cadherin upregulation caused opposite effects i.e. diminished the number of cancer stem cells, decreased xenograft vascularization and decelerated tumor growth. Therefore, agents restoring E-cadherin expression may be useful in anticancer therapy. PMID:26940223

  12. HER-2/neu and E-cadherin Expression and Microsatellite Instability in Gastric Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, L; Kamkari, S; Mokarram, P; Lankarani, K Bagheri; Tabibi, N; Ashktorab, H; Vasei, M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastric dysplasia (GD) is a precursor lesion of gastric adenocarcinoma. Intestinal type gastric carcinoma commonly shows microsatellite instability (MSI) and the diffuse type is associated with down regulation of E-cadherin. HER-2/neu is over-expressed in some cases of gastric cancer. In this study, MSI and expression rates of HER-2/neu and E-cadherin in GD were evaluated. METHODS Paraffin blocks of 21 cases of low grade dysplasia (LD), 11 cases of high grade dysplasia (HD) and 25 cases of indefinite for dysplasia (ID) were collected. After deparaffinization and antigen retrieval, the sections were incubated with antibodies against E-cadherin, hMLH1, hMSH2 and HER-2/neu. The streptavidin-biotin complex method was used followed by peroxidase enzyme development with diaminobenzidine. RESULTS HER-2/neu was positive in six cases of HD (50%), four LD (21%) and two ID (9%). E-cadherin was absent in two cases of LD and showed normal expression in all HD and ID cases. hMLH1 expression was absent or markedly decreased only in the zones of dysplasia in HD (3/11), LD (3/21) and ID (4/25). Absence or diminished expression of hMSH2 was seen in HD (3/11), LD (2/21) and ID (3/25) cases. HER-2/neu expression showed close association with diminished expression of hMLH1 or hMSH2 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Stepwise increase in the expression rate of HER-2/neu was seen in ID, LD and HD cases implying its role in cancer evolution. The absence of hMLH1 and hMSH2 in GD may predispose individuals to over-expression of other oncogenes such as HER-2/neu. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin is not a frequent finding in GD. PMID:25197528

  13. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  14. Knockdown of Sec6 improves cell-cell adhesion by increasing α-E-catenin in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Iino, Mituyoshi; Goto, Kaoru

    2012-03-23

    The Sec6/8 complex is essential for specific exocytic sites on the plasma membrane and contributes to membrane growth in mammalian cells. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, E-cadherin and nectin-based adhesion complexes recruit the Sec6/8 complex to intercellular contacts. However, in cancer cells, the relationship between the Sec6/8 complex and the cell-cell adhesion proteins remains obscure. We demonstrate that the expression of α-E-catenin is increased by Sec6 siRNAs, and E-cadherin and β-catenin localize mainly at the cell-cell contact region in HSC3 cells, which were transfected with Sec6 siRNA. PMID:22381337

  15. Heme-oxygenase-1 implications in cell morphology and the adhesive behavior of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Geraldine; Giudice, Jimena; Valacco, Pia; Paez, Alejandra; Elguero, Belen; Toscani, Martin; Jaworski, Felipe; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Cotignola, Javier; Marti, Marcelo; Binaghi, Maria; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Although previous studies in PCa have focused on cell adherens junctions (AJs), key players in metastasis, they have left the molecular mechanisms unexplored. Inflammation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical in the regulation of cell adhesion and the integrity of the epithelium. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative and inflammatory damage. Here, we investigated whether HO-1 is implicated in the adhesive and morphological properties of tumor cells. Genes differentially regulated by HO-1 were enriched for cell motility and adhesion biological processes. HO-1 induction, increased E-cadherin and β-catenin levels. Immunofluorescence analyses showed a striking remodeling of E-cadherin/β-catenin based AJs under HO-1 modulation. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin coincided with a markedly change in cell morphology. To further our analysis we sought to identify HO-1 binding proteins that might participate in the regulation of cell morphology. A proteomics approach identified Muskelin, as a novel HO-1 partner, strongly implicated in cell morphology regulation. These results define a novel role for HO-1 in modulating the architecture of cell-cell interactions, favoring a less aggressive phenotype and further supporting its anti-tumoral function in PCa. PMID:24961479

  16. The Characteristics and Prognostic Effect of E-Cadherin Expression in Colorectal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjie; Ma, Xiaoji; Li, Yaqi; He, Yiping; Huang, Dan; Cai, Sanjun; Peng, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is rare. The aim of this study is to understand the clinicopathological features and identify the possible prognostic factors in colorectal SRCC. Methods Patients with SRCC who underwent primary lesion resection at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from September 2008 to July 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient’s gender, age, tumor location, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression were studied with prognosis, and the correlation between E-cadherin expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed. All clinicopathological and molecular factors were put into multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model for detecting independent prognostic factors. Results 59 patients accounting for 0.89% of total colorectal cancer patients met the criteria and were enrolled in the study. The median survival time is 28.9 months, and the 3-year survival rate is 62.7%. SRCC were seen more common in young male patients. Advanced stage was more common in SRCC, 58 (98.3%) patients had T3/T4 lesions, 52 (88.1%) patients had lymph node metastasis, and 14 (23.7%) patients had distant metastasis. Distant metastases were seen more common in peritoneal cavity. Distant metastasis (HR = 4.194, 95% CI: 1.297–13.567), lymphovascular invasion (HR = 2.888, 95% CI: 1.115–7.483), and E-cadherin expression (HR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.096–0.768) were independent predictors for survival. Conclusions SRCC is a rare subtype of colorectal cancer with poor prognosis. Distant metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression can predict prognosis of colorectal SRCCs independently. More precise therapy and more close surveillance are needed for these patients. PMID:27509205

  17. Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Qi; Zhang, Wu; Lui, Eric L H; Zhu, Yongqiang; Lu, Ping; Yu, Xiaoming; Sun, Jisan; Yang, Sitian; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2012-08-01

    Notch signaling, a critical pathway for tissue development, also contributes to tumorigenesis in many cancers, but its pathological function in liver cancer is not well defined. In our study, Notch1 expression and its clinicopathological parameters were evaluated in 82 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Plasmid-based siNotch1 shRNA was transiently or stably transfected into metastatic HCC cells and subsequently evaluated for the effects on orthotopic liver tumor metastasis in a mouse model as well as the effects on downstream pathways. Aberrant high expression of Notch1 was significantly associated with metastatic disease parameters in HCC patients, such as tumor-node-metastasis Stages III-IV and tumor venous invasion. Knocking-down Notch1 reduced cell motility in vitro and orthotopic tumor metastasis from the liver to the lung in vivo in a mouse model. In metastatic HCC cells, abnormal expression of Notch1 was associated with increased expression of Snail1 and repressed expression of E-cadherin; the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin association can also be found in HCC patient tumors. Inhibition of Notch1 by shRNA abolished Snail1 expression, which further resulted in the re-establishment of repressed E-cadherin in metastatic HCC cells. Thus, abnormal Notch1 expression was strongly associated with HCC metastatic disease, which might be mediated through the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway. Knock-down of Notch1 reversed HCC tumor metastasis in a mouse model. Therefore, these data suggest that effective targeting of Notch signaling might also inhibit tumor metastasis. PMID:22052196

  18. Cutaneous histiocytic sarcoma with E-cadherin expression in a Pembroke Welsh Corgi dog.

    PubMed

    Hirako, Ayano; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Sakurai, Masashi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Takashi; Morita, Takehito; Moore, Peter F

    2015-09-01

    An 11-year-old male neutered Pembroke Welsh Corgi dog displayed a mass measuring 7.5 cm × 6.6 cm × 1.6 cm in the skin. Neoplastic tissue was nonencapsulated, and the neoplastic cells showed infiltrative growth into the surrounding tissue on microscopic examination. The neoplastic tissue was mainly located from the dermis to the subcutis. Epidermotropism of neoplastic cells was not observed. The tissue was composed of irregular, solid nests of round to polygonal cells. Nests were separated by fine fibrovascular stroma. Mitotic index was high (7.90 ± 0.38 per high power field) and extensive necrosis was observed in the neoplastic tissue. Vascular invasion was often observed in the neoplastic tissue. Neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, HLA-DR antigen, Iba1, CD18, and E-cadherin, but cells did not express cytokeratin, S100, CD20, CD79α, CD3, MUM-1, lambda light chain, kappa light chain, lysozyme, CD204, or CD11d by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dendrites on these cells. From the above-mentioned findings, the tumor was diagnosed as a cutaneous histiocytic sarcoma with E-cadherin expression. It is possible that neoplastic cells in the present case were derived from cutaneous Langerhans cell. To our knowledge, cutaneous histiocytic sarcoma with E-cadherin expression in domestic animals has not been previously diagnosed in domestic animals. PMID:26330395

  19. Quantification of topological features in cell meshes to explore E-cadherin dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Tânia; Figueiredo, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Sanches, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, defective E-cadherin leads to cell detachment, migration and metastization. Further, alterations mediated by E-cadherin dysfunction affect cell topology and tissue organization. Herein, we propose a novel quantitative approach, based on microscopy images, to analyse abnormal cellular distribution patterns. We generated undirected graphs composed by sets of triangles which accurately reproduce cell positioning and structural organization within each image. Network analysis was developed by exploring triangle geometric features, namely area, edges length and formed angles, as well as their variance, when compared with the respective equilateral triangles. We generated synthetic networks, mimicking the diversity of cell-cell interaction patterns, and evaluated the applicability of the selected metrics to study topological features. Cells expressing wild-type E-cadherin and cancer-related mutants were used to validate our strategy. Specifically, A634V, R749W and P799R cancer-causing mutants present more disorganized spatial distribution when compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, P799R exhibited higher length and angle distortions and abnormal cytoskeletal organization, suggesting the formation of very dynamic and plastic cellular interactions. Hence, topological analysis of cell network diagrams is an effective tool to quantify changes in cell-cell interactions and, importantly, it can be applied to a myriad of processes, namely tissue morphogenesis and cancer. PMID:27151223

  20. Quantification of topological features in cell meshes to explore E-cadherin dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Tânia; Figueiredo, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Sanches, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, defective E-cadherin leads to cell detachment, migration and metastization. Further, alterations mediated by E-cadherin dysfunction affect cell topology and tissue organization. Herein, we propose a novel quantitative approach, based on microscopy images, to analyse abnormal cellular distribution patterns. We generated undirected graphs composed by sets of triangles which accurately reproduce cell positioning and structural organization within each image. Network analysis was developed by exploring triangle geometric features, namely area, edges length and formed angles, as well as their variance, when compared with the respective equilateral triangles. We generated synthetic networks, mimicking the diversity of cell-cell interaction patterns, and evaluated the applicability of the selected metrics to study topological features. Cells expressing wild-type E-cadherin and cancer-related mutants were used to validate our strategy. Specifically, A634V, R749W and P799R cancer-causing mutants present more disorganized spatial distribution when compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, P799R exhibited higher length and angle distortions and abnormal cytoskeletal organization, suggesting the formation of very dynamic and plastic cellular interactions. Hence, topological analysis of cell network diagrams is an effective tool to quantify changes in cell-cell interactions and, importantly, it can be applied to a myriad of processes, namely tissue morphogenesis and cancer. PMID:27151223

  1. Persisting and Increasing Neutrophil Infiltration Associates with Gastric Carcinogenesis and E-cadherin Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hualin; Ma, Yue; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Chunlei; Huang, Hai; Xia, Ying; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation is considered the most important cause of gastric cancer. The actual process how chronic inflammation triggers gastric carcinogenesis is still not clear. In this study, neutrophils and relative markers in gastric cancer development were examined with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence RNA in situ hybridization methods. On average, 24 times more neutrophils were found in gastric cancer tissues and about 9 times more neutrophils were found in gastric intestinal metaplasia tissues comparing to normal gastric tissue controls. CagA(+) H. pylori infection in cancer adjacent tissues or EBV infection in cancer tissues did not increase neutrophil infiltration into gastric cancer tissues significantly. Neutrophil density was positively correlated with cell proliferation while negatively correlated with E-cadherin intensity. E-cadherin is also transcriptionally downregulated in gastric cancer tissues comparing to adjacent tissue controls. The increased neutrophils in the gastric cancer tissues appear to be related to increased chemoattractant IL-8 levels. In gastric cancers, neutrophil numbers were higher comparing to cancer adjacent tissues and not associated with patient ages, tumor invasion depth, tumor staging, metastasis or cancer types. The conclusion is that persisting and increasing neutrophil infiltration is associated with E-cadherin downregulation, cell proliferation and gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27412620

  2. Persisting and Increasing Neutrophil Infiltration Associates with Gastric Carcinogenesis and E-cadherin Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hualin; Ma, Yue; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Chunlei; Huang, Hai; Xia, Ying; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation is considered the most important cause of gastric cancer. The actual process how chronic inflammation triggers gastric carcinogenesis is still not clear. In this study, neutrophils and relative markers in gastric cancer development were examined with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence RNA in situ hybridization methods. On average, 24 times more neutrophils were found in gastric cancer tissues and about 9 times more neutrophils were found in gastric intestinal metaplasia tissues comparing to normal gastric tissue controls. CagA+ H. pylori infection in cancer adjacent tissues or EBV infection in cancer tissues did not increase neutrophil infiltration into gastric cancer tissues significantly. Neutrophil density was positively correlated with cell proliferation while negatively correlated with E-cadherin intensity. E-cadherin is also transcriptionally downregulated in gastric cancer tissues comparing to adjacent tissue controls. The increased neutrophils in the gastric cancer tissues appear to be related to increased chemoattractant IL-8 levels. In gastric cancers, neutrophil numbers were higher comparing to cancer adjacent tissues and not associated with patient ages, tumor invasion depth, tumor staging, metastasis or cancer types. The conclusion is that persisting and increasing neutrophil infiltration is associated with E-cadherin downregulation, cell proliferation and gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27412620

  3. A role for E-cadherin in ensuring cohesive migration of a heterogeneous population of non-epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kyra; Casanova, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration is a key process underlying the morphogenesis of many organs as well as tumour invasion, which very often involves heterogeneous cell populations. Here we investigated how such populations can migrate cohesively in the Drosophila posterior midgut, comprised of epithelial and mesenchymal cells and show a novel role for the epithelial adhesion molecule E-cadherin (E-Cad) in mesenchymal cells. Despite a lack of junctions at the ultrastructure level, reducing E-Cad levels causes mesenchymal cells to detach from one another and from neighbouring epithelial cells; as a result, coordination between the two populations is lost. Moreover, Bazooka and recycling mechanisms are also required for E-Cad accumulation in mesenchymal cells. These results indicate an active role for E-Cad in mediating cohesive and ordered migration of non-epithelial cells, and discount the notion of E-Cad as just an epithelial feature that has to be switched off to enable migration of mesenchymal cells. PMID:26272476

  4. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  5. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  6. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  7. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  8. Characteristics of bladder transitional cell carcinoma with E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression

    PubMed Central

    LUO, YANG; ZHU, YONG-TONG; MA, LI-LI; PANG, SHI-YU; WEI, LI-JIE; LEI, CHENG-YONG; HE, CHENG-WU; TAN, WAN-LONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the characteristics of bladder transitional cell carcinoma with E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression. An immunofluorescence assay was used to detect E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression in infiltrative bladder cancer tissues, and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis were used to detect E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression in human urinary bladder grade II carcinoma 5637, transitional cell carcinoma UMUC-3 and invasive bladder carcinoma EJ cells. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion and plate colony formation assays were used to detect the proliferative, migratory and invasive abilities and the efficiency of plate colony formation of 5637, UMUC3 and EJ cells. A tumor xenograft formation assay was used to evaluate the tumorigenic abilities of 5637, UMUC-3 and EJ cells in vivo. E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression was identified in various pathological grades of infiltrative bladder cancers. E-cadherin positive and N-cadherin negative expression was exhibited by 5637 cells. By contrast, E-cadherin negative and N-cadherin positive expression was exhibited by EJ cells, and E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression was exhibited by UMUC-3 cells. The ability of cells to proliferate, migrate, invade, and the efficiency of plate colony formation and tumorigenic abilities of the cells were significantly different among 5637, UMUC-3 and EJ cells. These cell characteristics were significantly increased in UMUC-3 cells compared with 5637 cells; however, the characteristics were significantly decreased compared with EJ cells. The biological characteristics of bladder cancer cells with E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression was between bladder cancer cells that exhibited a E-cadherin positive and N-cadherin negative expression, and bladder cancer cells that exhibited E-cadherin negative and N-cadherin positive expression. The present study deduces that the status of E-cadherin

  9. Transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin and oncoprotein E7 by valproic acid in HPV positive cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Akbari, Abolfazl; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Valproic acid (VPA) has proven to be as one of the most promising useful drug with anticancer properties. In this study, we investigate the VPA effects on E-cadherin expression in HeLa, TC1, MKN45, and HCT116 cell lines. This study assesses the effects of VPA on human papillomavirus E7 expression in HPV positive cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cell lines were treated by 2 mmol/l VPA and expression of E-cadherin and E7 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Student’s t test and ANOVA were used to determine changes in expression levels. Results: The results revealed that mean of E-cadherin expression is increased by VPA 1.8 times in HCT116 and MKN45 cell lines, also the mean of E-cadherin mRNA levels is up-regulated 2.9 times in HeLa and TC1 cell lines. So, E-cadherin augmentation induced by VPA in HeLa and TC-1, HPV positive cell lines, is higher than HPV negative cell lines MKN45 and HCT116. The mean of HPV E7 expression is decreased by VPA, 4.6 times in in HeLa and TC-1 cell lines. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that re-expression of E-cadherin by VPA in HPV positive cell lines is more than HPV negative cell lines. Whereas, HPV E7 reduces the expression of E-cadherin, reduction of HPV E7 expression by VPA is related to more augmentation of E-cadherin in HPV positive cell lines. So, this study demonstrates that VPA has more anticancer properties in HPV positive cell lines, and could potentially be a promising candidate for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:27482340

  10. Differential Targeting of the E-Cadherin/β-Catenin Complex by Gram-Positive Probiotic Lactobacilli Improves Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Stephanie; Veltman, Katharina; Cichon, Christoph; Sonnenborn, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is balanced by dynamic interactions between resident and incoming microbes, the gastrointestinal barrier, and the mucosal immune system. However, in the context of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), where the integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier is compromised, resident microbes contribute to the development and perpetuation of inflammation and disease. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to exert beneficial effects, e.g., enhancing epithelial barrier integrity. However, the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are only poorly understood. Here, we comparatively investigated the effects of four probiotic lactobacilli, namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. gasseri, and L. rhamnosus, in a T84 cell epithelial barrier model. Results of DNA microarray experiments indicating that lactobacilli modulate the regulation of genes encoding in particular adherence junction proteins such as E-cadherin and β-catenin were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, we show that epithelial barrier function is modulated by Gram-positive probiotic lactobacilli via their effect on adherence junction protein expression and complex formation. In addition, incubation with lactobacilli differentially influences the phosphorylation of adherence junction proteins and the abundance of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms such as PKCδ that thereby positively modulates epithelial barrier function. Further insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms triggered by these probiotics might also foster the development of novel strategies for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases (e.g., IBD). PMID:22179242

  11. Prognostic significance of reduced immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin in endometrial cancer-results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xing; Du, Xue-Lian; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies which investigated the relationship between reduced E-cadherin and prognosis of endometrial cancer were ambiguous and conflicting. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between reduced expression of E-cadherin and endometrial cancer by meta-analysis approach. Method: AfterPubmed and Embasewere deliberately searched via the internet, 8 pieces of literaturewere totally included in final meta-analysis. After the data had been abstracted, the pulled odds ratio (OR) and hazard ratio (HR) were calculated by STATA with random or fixed effect model depending on their heterogeneity. The publication bias of included literature were tested by Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s test. Results: The pulled data showed that the reduced expression of E-cadherin was significantly associated with overall survival (OS), HR=2.42, 95% CI: 1.50-3.89. The clinical parameters such as lymph node metastasis (LNM), myometrial invasion (MI), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, histological type and pathological type were also significantly associated with reduced expression of E-cadherin. The results of publication biasshowed there were no significant publication bias. Conclusion: Endometrial cancer patients with reduced expression of E-cadherin may have a poorer prognosis than those with normal or higher expression of E-cadherin. PMID:26770483

  12. Adhesion of mussel foot proteins to different substrate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qingye; Danner, Eric; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Mussel foot proteins (mfps) have been investigated as a source of inspiration for the design of underwater coatings and adhesives. Recent analysis of various mfps by a surface forces apparatus (SFA) revealed that mfp-1 functions as a coating, whereas mfp-3 and mfp-5 resemble adhesive primers on mica surfaces. To further refine and elaborate the surface properties of mfps, the force–distance profiles of the interactions between thin mfp (i.e. mfp-1, mfp-3 or mfp-5) films and four different surface chemistries, namely mica, silicon dioxide, polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene, were measured by an SFA. The results indicate that the adhesion was exquisitely dependent on the mfp tested, the substrate surface chemistry and the contact time. Such studies are essential for understanding the adhesive versatility of mfps and related/similar adhesion proteins, and for translating this versatility into a new generation of coatings and (including in vivo) adhesive materials. PMID:23173195

  13. Characterization of Ascites-Derived Ovarian Tumor Cells from Spontaneously Occurring Ovarian Tumors of the Chicken: Evidence for E-Cadherin Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Anupama; Hadley, Jill A.; Hendricks, Gilbert L.; Elkin, Robert G.; Cooper, Timothy; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, a highly metastatic disease, is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Chickens are widely used as a model for human ovarian cancer as they spontaneously develop epithelial ovarian tumors similar to humans. The cellular and molecular biology of chicken ovarian cancer (COVCAR) cells, however, have not been studied. Our objectives were to culture COVCAR cells and to characterize their invasiveness and expression of genes and proteins associated with ovarian cancer. COVCAR cell lines (n = 13) were successfully maintained in culture for up to19 passages, cryopreserved and found to be viable upon thawing and replating. E-cadherin, cytokeratin and α-smooth muscle actin were localized in COVCAR cells by immunostaining. COVCAR cells were found to be invasive in extracellular matrix and exhibited anchorage-independent growth forming colonies, acini and tube-like structures in soft agar. Using RT-PCR, COVCAR cells were found to express E-cadherin, N-cadherin, cytokeratin, vimentin, mesothelin, EpCAM, steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, inhibin subunits-α, βA, βB, anti-müllerian hormone, estrogen receptor [ER]-α, ER-β, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and activin receptors. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed greater N-cadherin, vimentin, and VEGF mRNA levels and lesser cytokeratin mRNA levels in COVCAR cells as compared with normal ovarian surface epithelial (NOSE) cells, which was suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Western blotting analyses revealed significantly greater E-cadherin levels in COVCAR cell lines compared with NOSE cells. Furthermore, cancerous ovaries and COVCAR cell lines expressed higher levels of an E-cadherin cleavage product when compared to normal ovaries and NOSE cells, respectively. Cancerous ovaries were found to express significantly higher ovalbumin levels whereas COVCAR cell lines did not express ovalbumin thus suggesting that the latter did not originate from oviduct. Taken

  14. Characterization of ascites-derived ovarian tumor cells from spontaneously occurring ovarian tumors of the chicken: evidence for E-cadherin upregulation.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anupama; Hadley, Jill A; Hendricks, Gilbert L; Elkin, Robert G; Cooper, Timothy; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, a highly metastatic disease, is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Chickens are widely used as a model for human ovarian cancer as they spontaneously develop epithelial ovarian tumors similar to humans. The cellular and molecular biology of chicken ovarian cancer (COVCAR) cells, however, have not been studied. Our objectives were to culture COVCAR cells and to characterize their invasiveness and expression of genes and proteins associated with ovarian cancer. COVCAR cell lines (n = 13) were successfully maintained in culture for up to19 passages, cryopreserved and found to be viable upon thawing and replating. E-cadherin, cytokeratin and α-smooth muscle actin were localized in COVCAR cells by immunostaining. COVCAR cells were found to be invasive in extracellular matrix and exhibited anchorage-independent growth forming colonies, acini and tube-like structures in soft agar. Using RT-PCR, COVCAR cells were found to express E-cadherin, N-cadherin, cytokeratin, vimentin, mesothelin, EpCAM, steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, inhibin subunits-α, βA, βB, anti-müllerian hormone, estrogen receptor [ER]-α, ER-β, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and activin receptors. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed greater N-cadherin, vimentin, and VEGF mRNA levels and lesser cytokeratin mRNA levels in COVCAR cells as compared with normal ovarian surface epithelial (NOSE) cells, which was suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Western blotting analyses revealed significantly greater E-cadherin levels in COVCAR cell lines compared with NOSE cells. Furthermore, cancerous ovaries and COVCAR cell lines expressed higher levels of an E-cadherin cleavage product when compared to normal ovaries and NOSE cells, respectively. Cancerous ovaries were found to express significantly higher ovalbumin levels whereas COVCAR cell lines did not express ovalbumin thus suggesting that the latter did not originate from oviduct. Taken

  15. The calcium-sensing receptor-dependent regulation of cell-cell adhesion and keratinocyte differentiation requires Rho and filamin A.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chia-Ling; Chang, Wenhan; Bikle, Daniel D

    2011-05-01

    Extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(o)) functioning through the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) induces E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and cellular signals mediating cell differentiation in epidermal keratinocytes. Previous studies indicate that CaR regulates cell-cell adhesion through Fyn/Src tyrosine kinases. In this study, we investigate whether Rho GTPase is a part of the CaR-mediated signaling cascade regulating cell adhesion and differentiation. Suppressing endogenous Rho A expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing blocked the Ca(2+)(o)-induced association of Fyn with E-cadherin and suppressed the Ca(2+)(o)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of β-, γ-, and p120-catenin and formation of intercellular adherens junctions. Rho A silencing also decreased the Ca(2+)(o)-stimulated expression of terminal differentiation markers. Elevating the Ca(2+)(o) level induced interactions among CaR, Rho A, E-cadherin, and the scaffolding protein filamin A at the cell membrane. Inactivation of CaR expression by adenoviral expression of a CaR antisense complementary DNA inhibited Ca(2+)(o)-induced activation of endogenous Rho. Ca(2+)(o) activation of Rho required a direct interaction between CaR and filamin A. Interference of CaR-filamin interaction inhibited Ca(2+)(o)-induced Rho activation and the formation of cell-cell junctions. These results indicate that Rho is a downstream mediator of CaR in the regulation of Ca(2+)(o)-induced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:21209619

  16. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  17. Quantitative immunohistochemical analyses of the expression of E-cadherin, thrombomodulin, CD44H and CD44v6 in primary tumours of pharynx/larynx squamous cell carcinoma and their lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Hernández Gaspar, R; de los Toyos, J R; Alvarez Marcos, C; Riera, J R; Sampedro, A

    1999-01-01

    The quantitative expression of E-cadherin, thrombomodulin, CD44H and CD44v6 in 32 specimens of primary tumours of pharynx/larynx squamous cell carcinoma and their lymph node metastases was studied by immunohistochemistry. With the aim of obtaining comparative and objective data, image acquisition conditions were kept unaltered for all the measurements and the immunostaining intensity was quantified by applying an image processing system. On the one hand, correlations were only observed between CD44H and CD44v6, both in primary tumours and metastases, and between E-cadherin and TM in metastases. On the other hand, statistical analyses of paired data did not show significant differences in the expression of these markers between the two tumour sites. In agreement with previous reports, E-cadherin expression was rather low or negative in primary tumours and metastases of the three poorly differentiated specimens we studied, as well as that of TM, but otherwise some of these samples showed intermediate immunostaining levels of CD44H/CD44v6. It may be concluded from the present study that the quantitative expression of these adhesion molecules in well established lymph node metastases of pharynx/larynx squamous cell carcinoma is essentially unaltered in relation to their primary sites. PMID:10609562

  18. Syndecan-2 enhances E-cadherin shedding and fibroblast-like morphological changes by inducing MMP-7 expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bohee; Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Moon, Byung-In; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-08-12

    E-cadherin plays a mechanical role in mediating cell-cell interactions and maintaining epithelial tissue integrity, and the loss of E-cadherin function has been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Syndecan-2, a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is upregulated during the development of colon cancer. Here, we assessed the functional relationship between E-cadherin and syndecan-2. We found that stable overexpression of syndecan-2 in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) enhanced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin to conditioned-media. Either knockdown of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) or inhibition of MMP-7 activity using GM6001 significantly reduced the extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, suggesting that syndecan-2 mediates E-cadherin shedding via MMP-7. Consistent with this notion, enhancement of MMP-7 expression by interleukin-1α treatment increased the shedding of E-cadherin. Conversely, the specific reduction of either syndecan-2 or MMP-7 reduced the shedding of E-cadherin. HT29 cells overexpressing syndecan-2 showed significantly lower cell-surface expression of E-cadherin, decreased cell-cell contact, a more fibroblastic cell morphology, and increased expression levels of ZEB-1. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 induces extracellular shedding of E-cadherin and supports the acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology by regulating MMP-7 expression in a colon cancer cell line. PMID:27270030

  19. RhoGAP68F controls transport of adhesion proteins in Rab4 endosomes to modulate epithelial morphogenesis of Drosophila leg discs

    PubMed Central

    de Madrid, Beatriz Hernandez; Greenberg, Lina; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elongation and invagination of epithelial tissues are fundamental developmental processes that contribute to the morphogenesis of embryonic and adult structures and are dependent on coordinated remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The morphogenesis of Drosophila leg imaginal discs depends on extensive remodeling of cell contacts and thus provides a useful system with which to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The small Rho GTPase regulator RhoGAP68F has been previously implicated in leg morphogenesis. It consists of an N-terminal Sec14 domain and a C-terminal GAP domain. Here we examined the molecular function and role of RhoGAP68F in epithelial remodeling. We find that depletion of RhoGAP68F impairs epithelial remodeling from a pseudostratified to simple, while overexpression of RhoGAP68F causes tears of lateral cell-cell contacts and thus impairs epithelial integrity. We show that the RhoGAP68F protein localizes to Rab4 recycling endosomes and forms a complex with the Rab4 protein. The Sec14 domain is sufficient for localizing to Rab4 endosomes, while the activity of the GAP domain is dispensable. RhoGAP68F, in turn, inhibits the scission and movement of Rab4 endosomes involved in transport the adhesion proteins Fasciclin3 and E-cadherin back to cell-cell contacts. Expression of RhoGAP68F is upregulated during prepupal development suggesting that RhoGAP68F decreases the transport of key adhesion proteins to the cell surface during this developmental stage to decrease the strength of adhesive cell-cell contacts and thereby facilitate epithelial remodeling and leg morphogenesis. PMID:25617722

  20. Nuclear factor I-C (NFIC) regulates dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and E-cadherin via control of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) during dentinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Seol; Park, Su-Jin; Cho, Kwang-Hee; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2014-10-10

    Odontoblasts are a type of terminally differentiated matrix-secreting cells. A number of molecular mechanisms are involved in the differentiation of odontoblasts. Several studies demonstrated that Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) promotes odontoblast differentiation via control of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Because nuclear factor I-C (NFIC) is also known to control DSPP, we investigated the relationship between NFIC and KLF4 during odontoblast differentiation. Klf4 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in Nfic(-/-) pulp cells compared with wild type cells. In immunohistochemistry assays, dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1), and DSP protein expression was barely observed in Nfic(-/-) odontoblasts and dentin matrix. Nfic bound directly to the Klf4 promoter and stimulated Klf4 transcriptional activity, thereby regulating Dmp1 and DSPP expression during odontoblast differentiation. Nfic or Klf4 overexpression promoted mineralized nodule formation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, Nfic overexpression also decreased Slug luciferase activity but augmented E-cadherin promoter activity via up-regulation of Klf4 in odontoblasts. Our study reveals important signaling pathways during dentinogenesis: the Nfic-Klf4-Dmp1-Dspp and the Nfic-Klf4-E-cadherin pathways in odontoblasts. Our results indicate the important role of NFIC in regulating KLF4 during dentinogenesis. PMID:25138274

  1. Thrombomodulin reduces tumorigenic and metastatic potential of lung cancer cells by up-regulation of E-cadherin and down-regulation of N-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nana; Huo, Zihe; Zhang, Bin; Meng, Mei; Cao, Zhifei; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Quansheng

    2016-08-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial cell membrane protein and plays critical roles in anti-thrombosis, anti-inflammation, vascular endothelial protection, and is traditionally regarded as a "vascular protection god". In recent years, although TM has been reported to be down-regulated in a variety of malignant tumors including lung cancer, the role and mechanism of TM in lung cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we found that induction of TM overexpression by cholesterol-reducing drug atorvastatin significantly diminished the tumorigenic capability of the lung cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that TM overexpression caused G0/G1 phase arrest and markedly reduced the colony forming capability of the cells. Furthermore, overexpression of TM inhibited cell migration and invasion. Consistently, depletion of TM promoted cell growth, reduced the cell population at the G0/G1 phase, and enhanced cell migratory ability. Mechanistic study revealed that TM up-regulated E-cadherin but down-regulated N-cadherin expression, resulting in reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the lung cancer cells. Moreover, silencing TM expression led to decreased E-cadherin and increased N-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that TM functions as a tumor suppressive protein, providing a conceptual framework for inducing TM overexpression as a sensible strategy and approach for novel anti-lung cancer drug discovery. PMID:27223053

  2. Spatial distribution of proteins in the quagga mussel adhesive apparatus.

    PubMed

    Rees, David J; Hanifi, Arash; Manion, Joseph; Gantayet, Arpita; Sone, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The invasive freshwater mollusc Dreissena bugensis (quagga mussel) sticks to underwater surfaces via a proteinacious 'anchor' (byssus), consisting of a series of threads linked to adhesive plaques. This adhesion results in the biofouling of crucial underwater industry infrastructure, yet little is known about the proteins responsible for the adhesion. Here the identification of byssal proteins extracted from freshly secreted byssal material is described. Several new byssal proteins were observed by gel electrophoresis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to characterize proteins in different regions of the byssus, particularly those localized to the adhesive interface. Byssal plaques and threads contain in common a range of low molecular weight proteins, while several proteins with higher mass were observed only in the plaque. At the adhesive interface, a plaque-specific ~8.1 kDa protein had a relative increase in signal intensity compared to the bulk of the plaque, suggesting it may play a direct role in adhesion. PMID:26825294

  3. Intrinsic Surface-Drying Properties of Bio-adhesive Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W.; Miller, Dusty R.; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Herbert Waite, J.

    2014-01-01

    Sessile marine mussels must “dry” underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bio-inspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces but these are poor predictors of an adhesive’s ability to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction via the surface water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were found to have differential abilities to evict hydration layers from the surfaces—a necessary step for adsorption and adhesion. It was anticipated that Dopa would mediate dehydration given its efficacy forbio-inspired wet adhesion. Instead, hydrophobic side-chains are found to be a critical component in bringing about protein-surface intimacy. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial water dynamics during force-free adsorptive interactions at solid surfaces, and offers guidance for engineering wet adhesives and coatings. PMID:25168789

  4. Homeoprotein Six2 promotes breast cancer metastasis via transcriptional and epigenetic control of E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu-An; Drasin, David; Pham, Catherine; Jedlicka, Paul; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Guney, Michelle; Li, Howard; Nemenoff, Raphael; Costello, James C.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Ford, Heide L.

    2014-01-01

    Misexpression of developmental transcription factors occurs often in human cancers, where embryonic programs may be reinstated in a context that promotes or sustains malignant development. In this study, we report the involvement of the kidney development transcription factor Six2 in the metastatic progression of human breast cancer. We found that Six2 promoted breast cancer metastasis by a novel mechanism involving both transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of E-cadherin. Downregulation of E-cadherin by Six2 was necessary for its ability to increase soft agar growth and in vivo metastasis in an immune competent mouse model of breast cancer. Mechanistic investigations showed that Six2 represses E-cadherin expression by upregulating Zeb2, in part through a microRNA-mediated mechanism, and by stimulating promoter methylation of the E-cadherin gene (Cdh1). Clinically, SIX2 expression correlated inversely with CDH1 expression in human breast cancer specimens, corroborating the disease relevance of their interaction. Our findings establish Six2 as a regulator of metastasis in human breast cancers and demonstrate an epigenetic function for SIX family transcription factors in metastatic progression through the regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:25348955

  5. E-cadherin-negative acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: report of a case showing a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Waki, Michihiko; Azuma, Masaki; Koda, Kenji; Ohata, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin expression patterns in acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) of the pancreas have not been well documented. Herein, we present a hitherto undescribed case of E-cadherin-negative ACC with a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern in a 65-year-old man. We used an antibody against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin. As a further unusual status in ACC, faint β-catenin expression was observed in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells. Morphological distinction from a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas might be problematic in such a case, because of their similarities concerned with the growth pattern and E-cadherin negativity. Without nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a diagnosis of SPN was almost excluded. Immunoreactivity for trypsin and BCL10 made an accurate diagnosis of ACC to this case. The tumor recurred 10 months post-surgery as rapidly enlarging masses in the liver, presumably indicating the aggressiveness of the E-cadherin-negative phenotype among ACCs. PMID:25600280

  6. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component: relation of MMP-13, EGFR, and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal; Aziz, Azza Abdel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, ordinary adenocarcinoma (OA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) regarding clinicopathological parameters, survival, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 28 patients with adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, 47 with OA, and 56 with MA, who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. High density manual tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry for EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin was done. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component (AWMC) was significantly associated with more perineural invasion, lower EGFR, and MMP-13 expressions than OA, with no difference in E-cadherin expression. Conversely, only microscopic abscess formation was significantly more with colorectal AWMC than MC with no difference in EGFR, MMP-13 and E-cadherin expression between both groups. Colorectal AWMC showed a better survival than MA with no difference with OA. In a univariate analysis, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin expressions did not show a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival in patients with colorectal AWMC. Colorectal AWMC remains a vague entity that resembles OA in some clinicopathological and molecular respects as well as MA. PMID:25907382

  7. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J; Cullinane, Carleen; Humbert, Patrick O; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:21347396

  8. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  9. Mussel-mimetic protein-based adhesive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Jin; Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Dong Soo; Masic, Admir; Han, Dong Keun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-05-12

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials which could provide both adhesion and cohesion in wet environment have been considered as a promising formulation of tissue adhesives. Inspired by marine mussel adhesion, many researchers have tried to exploit the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) molecule as a cross-linking mediator of synthetic polymer-based hydrogels which is known to be able to achieve cohesive hardening as well as adhesive bonding with diverse surfaces. Beside DOPA residue, composition of other amino acid residues and structure of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) have also been considered important elements for mussel adhesion. Herein, we represent a novel protein-based hydrogel system using DOPA-containing recombinant MAP. Gelation can be achieved using both oxdiation-induced DOPA quinone-mediated covalent and Fe(3+)-mediated coordinative noncovalent cross-linking. Fe(3+)-mediated hydrogels show deformable and self-healing viscoelastic behavior in rheological analysis, which is also well-reflected in bulk adhesion strength measurement. Quinone-mediated hydrogel has higher cohesive strength and can provide sufficient gelation time for easier handling. Collectively, our newly developed MAP hydrogel can potentially be used as tissue adhesive and sealant for future applications. PMID:24650082

  10. Polymer adhesion at surfaces: biological adhesive proteins and their synthetic mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messersmith, Phillip

    2008-03-01

    Mussels are famous for their ability to permanently adhere to a wide variety of wet surfaces, such as rocks, metal and polymer ship hulls, and wood structures. They accomplish this through specialized proteins collectively referred to as mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). The biophysical aspects of MAP adhesion is being revealed through the use of single molecule force measurements. The results provide insight into the adhesive roles of key amino acids found in these proteins, including the magnitude of adhesive forces, cooperative effects, and their self-healing properties. This molecular-level information is being incorporated into designs of biomimetic polymer coatings for a variety of applications. Our biomimetic approach to polymer design will be illustrated by a few examples where adhesive constituents found in MAPs are exploited to make wet-adhesive polymer coatings. In addition, small molecule analogs of MAPs can be used to apply thin functional films onto virtually any material surface using a facile approach. These coatings have a variety of potential uses in microelectronics, water treatment, prevention of environmental biofouling, and for control of biointerfacial phenomena at the surfaces of medical/diagnostic devices.

  11. Involvement of the Tyrosine Kinase Fer in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Roberto; Veltmaat, Jacqueline M.; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    1998-01-01

    The Fer protein belongs to the fes/fps family of nontransmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases. Lack of success in attempts to establish a permanent cell line overexpressing it at significant levels suggested a strong negative selection against too much Fer protein and pointed to a critical cellular function for Fer. Using a tetracycline-regulatable expression system, overexpression of Fer in embryonic fibroblasts was shown to evoke a massive rounding up, and the subsequent detachment of the cells from the substratum, which eventually led to cell death. Induction of Fer expression coincided with increased complex formation between Fer and the cadherin/src-associated substrate p120cas and elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of p120cas. β-Catenin also exhibited clearly increased phosphotyrosine levels, and Fer and β-catenin were found to be in complex. Significantly, although the levels of α-catenin, β-catenin, and E-cadherin were unaffected by Fer overexpression, decreased amounts of α-catenin and β-catenin were coimmunoprecipitated with E-cadherin, demonstrating a dissolution of adherens junction complexes. A concomitant decrease in levels of phosphotyrosine in the focal adhesion-associated protein p130 was also observed. Together, these results provide a mechanism for explaining the phenotype of cells overexpressing Fer and indicate that the Fer tyrosine kinase has a function in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. PMID:9742093

  12. Novel protein-repellent dental adhesive containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biofilms at tooth-restoration margins can produce acids and cause secondary caries. A protein-repellent adhesive resin can potentially inhibition bacteria attachment and biofilm growth. However, there has been no report on protein-repellent dental resins. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent bonding agent incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), and to investigate its resistance to protein adsorption and biofilm growth for the first time. Methods MPC was incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) at 0%, 3.75%, 7.5%, 11.25%, and 15% by mass. Extracted human teeth were used to measure dentin shear bond strengths. Protein adsorption onto resins was determined by a micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to measure biofilm metabolic activity and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts. Results Adding 7.5% MPC into primer and adhesive did not decrease the dentin bond strength, compared to control (p > 0.1). Incorporation of 7.5% of MPC achieved the lowest protein adsorption, which was 20-fold less than that of control. Incorporation of 7.5% of MPC greatly reduced bacterial adhesion, yielding biofilm total microorganism, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci CFU that were an order of magnitude less than control. Conclusions A protein-repellent dental adhesive resin was developed for the first time. Incorporation of MPC into primer and adhesive at 7.5% by mass greatly reduced the protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, without compromising the dentin bond strength. The novel protein-repellent primer and adhesive are promising to inhibit biofilm formation and acid production, to protect the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. PMID:25234652

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid regulates adhesion molecules and enhances migration of human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thorlakson, Hong H; Schreurs, Olav; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2016-04-01

    Oral keratinocytes are connected via cell-to-cell adhesions to protect underlying tissues from physical and bacterial damage. Lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are a family of phospholipid mediators that have the ability to regulate gene expression, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cytokine/chemokine secretion, which mediate proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Several forms of LPA are found in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, but it is unknown how they affect human oral keratinocytes (HOK). The aim of the present study was therefore to examine how different LPA forms affect the expression of adhesion molecules and the migration and proliferation of HOK. Keratinocytes were isolated from gingival biopsies obtained from healthy donors and challenged with different forms of LPA. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression of adhesion molecules. Migration and proliferation assays were performed. Lysophosphatidic acids strongly promoted expression of E-cadherin and occludin mRNAs and translocation of E-cadherin protein from the cytoplasm to the membrane. Occludin and claudin-1 proteins were up-regulated by LPA. Migration of HOK in culture was increased, but proliferation was reduced, by the addition of LPA. This indicates that LPA can have a role in the regulation of the oral epithelial barrier by increasing the expression of adhesion molecules of HOK, by promotion of migration and by inhibition of proliferation. PMID:26913569

  14. The focal adhesion protein PINCH-1 associates with EPLIN at integrin adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Karaköse, Esra; Geiger, Tamar; Flynn, Kevin; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Zent, Roy; Mann, Matthias; Fässler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PINCH-1 is a LIM-only domain protein that forms a ternary complex with integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and parvin (to form the IPP complex) downstream of integrins. Here, we demonstrate that PINCH-1 (also known as Lims1) gene ablation in the epidermis of mice caused epidermal detachment from the basement membrane, epidermal hyperthickening and progressive hair loss. PINCH-1-deficient keratinocytes also displayed profound adhesion, spreading and migration defects in vitro that were substantially more severe than those of ILK-deficient keratinocytes indicating that PINCH-1 also exerts functions in an ILK-independent manner. By isolating the PINCH-1 interactome, the LIM-domain-containing and actin-binding protein epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN, also known as LIMA1) was identified as a new PINCH-1-associated protein. EPLIN localized, in a PINCH-1-dependent manner, to integrin adhesion sites of keratinocytes in vivo and in vitro and its depletion severely attenuated keratinocyte spreading and migration on collagen and fibronectin without affecting PINCH-1 levels in focal adhesions. Given that the low PINCH-1 levels in ILK-deficient keratinocytes were sufficient to recruit EPLIN to integrin adhesions, our findings suggest that PINCH-1 regulates integrin-mediated adhesion of keratinocytes through the interactions with ILK as well as EPLIN. PMID:25609703

  15. Drosophila p120-catenin is crucial for endocytosis of the dynamic E-cadherin-Bazooka complex.

    PubMed

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Brown, Nicholas H

    2016-02-01

    The intracellular functions of classical cadherins are mediated through the direct binding of two catenins: β-catenin and p120-catenin (also known as CTNND1 in vertebrates, and p120ctn in Drosophila). Whereas β-catenin is crucial for cadherin function, the role of p120-catenin is less clear and appears to vary between organisms. We show here that p120-catenin has a conserved role in regulating the endocytosis of cadherins, but that its ancestral role might have been to promote endocytosis, followed by the acquisition of a new inhibitory role in vertebrates. In Drosophila, p120-catenin facilitates endocytosis of the dynamic E-cadherin-Bazooka subcomplex, which is followed by its recycling. The absence of p120-catenin stabilises this subcomplex at the membrane, reducing the ability of cells to exchange neighbours in embryos and expanding cell-cell contacts in imaginal discs. PMID:26698216

  16. E-cadherin expression and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: evidence from 19 published investigations

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xusheng; Wang, Jianning; Lin, Xuefen; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to review the published literature and investigate whether E-cadherin gene is a prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by conducting a meta-analysis. Methods Studies were identified from the databases Embase, Medline, and Cochrane Library by using the keywords “E-cadherin gene” and “head and neck cancer”. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were the primary outcome measurements. Results Our literature review identified 1,458 articles; 19 studies with a total number of 2,012 cases were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The hazard ratio (HR) for OS of patients with decreased expression of E-cadherin gene was 0.57 (95% CI =0.37, 0.89; P=0.000). However, statistical heterogeneity was unacceptably high (I2=74.5%, P=0.000). After sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity became acceptable, and the effect measure was still significant (I2=7.0%; HR =0.52; 95% CI =0.40, 0.66; P=0.000). The HR for DFS was 0.53 (95% CI =0.42, 0.67; P=0.000). Conclusion This meta-analysis showed clear evidence that high E-cadherin gene expression is a positive prognostic factor of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, resulting in better OS and DFS. However, this conclusion must be interpreted with caution due to a few limitations. PMID:27217768

  17. Reduced E-cadherin expression as a cause of distinctive signet-ring cell variant in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Ho Jeong; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare type of adenocarcinoma and presents with distinctive clinicopathological features. This study was performed to assess the biological characteristics of colorectal SRCC regarding the E-cadherin expression. Seventeen patients with primary colorectal SRCC were identified and their clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. The mean age of the 17 patients was 45.3 yr (14-68). Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and beta-catenin were performed in ten colorectal SRCCs and in 30 ordinary colorectal adenocarcinomas as control. Primary colorectal SRCC occurred in 0.7% of 2,388 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Most patients had advanced stage tumor at surgery (stage III and IV, AJCC: 82%). Five-year survival rate was 16%. Peritoneal seeding was the most common recurrence pattern (41%) and liver metastasis was not identified. All SRCCs showed a markedly reduced or absent expression of E-cadherin on immunohistochemical staining, whereas seven (23.3%) of ordinary carcinomas showed reduced expression, thereby indicating a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.005). In immunohistochemical staining for beta-catenin, eight of ten SRCCs showed reduced membrane expression that did not attain statistical significance compared to ordinary adenocarcinomas. It is suggested that aberrant E-cadherin expression may explain the distinct clinicopathological features in primary colorectal SRCC. PMID:11850584

  18. BCL6 induces EMT by promoting the ZEB1-mediated transcription repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Mei; Sun, Wei; Hua, Fang; Xie, Jing; Lin, Heng; Zhou, Dan-Dan; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a transcriptional repressor, is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers with uncertain mechanism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effect and mechanism of BCL6 in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a critical cellular process for controlling the development and progression of breast cancers. We found that BCL6 promoted invasion, migration and growth by stimulating EMT in breast cancer cells. BCL6 induced EMT by enhancing the expression of transcriptional repressor ZEB1 which bound to the E-cadherin promoter and repressing the E-cadherin transcription. Deletion of ZEB1 protected against the pro-EMT roles of BCL6 by restoring the expression of E-cadherin in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of BCL6 with BCL6 inhibitor 79-6 suppressed these functions of BCL6 in breast cancer cells. These findings indicate that BCL6 promotes EMT via enhancing the ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells. Targeting BCL6 has therapeutic potential against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:26049022

  19. E-cadherin expression in macrophages dampens their inflammatory responsiveness in vitro, but does not modulate M2-regulated pathologies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, Jan; Laoui, Damya; Naessens, Thomas; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Stijlemans, Benoît; Grooten, Johan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2015-01-01

    IL-4/IL-13-induced alternatively activated macrophages (M(IL-4/IL-13), AAMs or M2) are known to express E-cadherin, enabling them to engage in heterotypic cellular interactions and IL-4-driven macrophage fusion in vitro. Here we show that E-cadherin overexpression in Raw 264.7 macrophages inhibits their inflammatory response to LPS stimulation, as demonstrated by a reduced secretion of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). To study the function of E-cadherin in M(IL-4/IL-13) macrophages in vivo, we generated macrophage-specific E-cadherin-deficient C57BL/6 mice. Using this new tool, we analyzed immunological parameters during two typical AAM-associated Th2-driven diseases and assessed Th2-associated granuloma formation. Although E-cadherin is strongly induced in AAMs during Taenia crassiceps helminth infections and allergic airway inflammation, its deletion in macrophages does not affect the course of both Th2 cytokine-driven diseases. Moreover, macrophage E-cadherin expression is largely redundant for granuloma formation around Schistosoma mansoni ova. Overall, we conclude that E-cadherin is a valuable AAM marker which suppresses the inflammatory response when overexpressed. Yet E-cadherin deletion in macrophages does not affect M(LPS+IFNγ) and M(IL-4) polarization in vitro, nor in vivo macrophage function, at least in the conditions tested. PMID:26226941

  20. Leda-1/Pianp is targeted to the basolateral plasma membrane by a distinct intracellular juxtamembrane region and modulates barrier properties and E-Cadherin processing.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Konstantin; Biswas, Siladitta; Schledzewski, Kai; Winkler, Manuel; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W; Goerdt, Sergij; Géraud, Cyrill

    2016-07-01

    Leda-1/Pianp is a type-I transmembrane protein which is sorted to the basolateral membrane domain of polarized epithelial cells. Here, we investigated trafficking mechanisms and functions of Leda-1/Pianp in MDCK and MCF-7 cells. Basolateral sorting and posttranslational modifications depended on the intracellular juxtamembrane region. Functionally, Leda-1/Pianp increased the transepithelial electrical resistance generated by a polarized cell sheet. Furthermore, resistance to junctional destabilization by tumor cells was enhanced by Leda-1/Pianp indicating increased stability and tightness of intercellular junctions. While Claudin 1 and 4 expression and activities of small GTPases were not affected, γ-Secretase-mediated cleavage of E-Cadherin was attenuated by Leda-1/Pianp. Regulation of proteolytic processing is thus a molecular mechanism by which Leda-1/Pianp can affect junctional integrity and function. PMID:27216462

  1. A correlation between altered O-GlcNAcylation, migration and with changes in E-cadherin levels in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng-zhen; Yu, Chao; Zhao, De-zhang; Wu, Ming-jun; Yang, Zhu

    2013-06-10

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. In recent years, the roles of O-GlcNAcylation in several human malignant tumors have been investigated, and O-GlcNAcylation was found to be linked to cellular features relevant to metastasis. In this study, we modeled four diverse ovarian cancer cells and investigated the effects of O-GlcNAcylation on ovarian cancer cell migration. We found that total O-GlcNAcylation level was elevated in HO-8910PM cells compared to OVCAR3 cells. Additionally, through altering the total O-GlcNAcylation level by OGT silencing or OGA inhibition, we found that the migration of OVCAR3 cells was dramatically enhanced by PUGNAc and Thiamet G treatment, and the migration ability of HO-8910PM cells was significantly inhibited by OGT silencing. Furthermore, we also found that the expression of E-cadherin, an O-GlcNAcylated protein in ovarian cancer cells, was reduced by OGA inhibition in OVCAR3 cells and elevated by OGT silencing in HO-8910PM cells. These results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation could enhance ovarian cancer cell migration and decrease the expression of E-cadherin. Our studies also suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might become another potential target for the therapy of ovarian cancer. -- Highlights: • We examine the migration potential of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • We examine the total O-GlcNAcylation level of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • Increasing O-GlcNAcylation level will enhance the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • Reducing O-GlcNAcylation level will inhibit the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • The mechanism explains O-GlcNAcylation enhance ovarian cancer cell migration.

  2. Dancing to Another Tune—Adhesive Moonlighting Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Veera; Korhonen, Timo K.

    2014-01-01

    Biological moonlighting refers to proteins which express more than one function. Moonlighting proteins occur in pathogenic and commensal as well as in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The canonical functions of moonlighting proteins are in essential cellular processes, i.e., glycolysis, protein synthesis, chaperone activity, and nucleic acid stability, and their moonlighting functions include binding to host epithelial and phagocytic cells, subepithelia, cytoskeleton as well as to mucins and circulating proteins of the immune and hemostatic systems. Sequences of the moonlighting proteins do not contain known motifs for surface export or anchoring, and it has remained open whether bacterial moonlighting proteins are actively secreted to the cell wall or whether they are released from traumatized cells and then rebind onto the bacteria. In lactobacilli, ionic interactions with lipoteichoic acids and with cell division sites are important for surface localization of the proteins. Moonlighting proteins represent an abundant class of bacterial adhesins that are part of bacterial interactions with the environment and in responses to environmental changes. Multifunctionality in bacterial surface proteins appears common: the canonical adhesion proteins fimbriae express also nonadhesive functions, whereas the mobility organelles flagella as well as surface proteases express adhesive functions. PMID:24833341

  3. Fibroblast adhesion to recombinant tropoelastin expressed as a protein A-fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, L E; Parks, W C; Wu, L J; Mecham, R P

    1991-01-01

    A bovine tropoelastin cDNA encoding exons 15-36 that includes the elastin-receptor binding site was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus. After isolation of the fusion protein by affinity chromatography on Ig-Sepharose, the tropoelastin domain was separated from plasmid-pR1T2T-encoded Protein A (Protein A') by CNBr cleavage. Cell-adhesion assays demonstrated specific adhesion to the recombinant tropoelastin. Furthermore, the data indicate that interactions involving the bovine elastin receptor mediate nuchalligament fibroblast adhesion to the recombinant protein. In agreement with earlier studies of fibroblast chemotaxis to bovine tropoelastin, nuchal-ligament fibroblast adhesion demonstrated developmental regulation of the elastin receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1996952

  4. Connexins, E-cadherin, Claudin-7 and β-catenin transiently form junctional nexuses during the post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Dianati, Elham; Poiraud, Jérémy; Weber-Ouellette, Anne; Plante, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexins (Cxs) that allow direct communication between adjacent cells. Modulation of Cxs has been associated with abnormal development and function of the mammary gland and breast cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying their expression during normal mammary gland are not yet known. Cxs interact with components of tight and adherens junctions. Thus, we hypothesized that the expression levels of Cxs vary during mammary gland development and are regulated through stage-dependent interactions with members of the tight and adherens junctions. Our specific objectives were to: 1) determine the expression of Cxs and tight and adherens junction proteins throughout development and 2) characterize Cxs interactions with components of tight and adherens junctions. Murine mammary glands were sampled at various developmental stages (pre-pubescent to post-weaning). RT-qPCR and western-blot analyses demonstrated differential expression patterns for all gap (Cx43, Cx32, Cx26, Cx30), tight (Claudin-1, -3, -4, -7) and adherens (β-catenin, E- and P-cadherins) junctions throughout development. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated interactions between these different types of junctions. Cx30 interacted with Cx26 just at the late pregnancy stage. While Cx43 showed a persistent interaction with β-catenin from virginity to post-weaning, its interactions with E-cadherin and Claudin-7 were transient. Cx32 interacted with Cx26, E-cadherin and β-catenin during lactation. Immunofluorescence results confirmed the existence of a junctional nexus that remodeled during mammary gland development. Together, our results confirm that the expression levels of Cxs vary concomitantly and that Cxs form junctional nexuses with tight and adherens junctions, suggesting the existence of common regulatory pathways. PMID:27291930

  5. Glycosylated Hydroxytryptophan in a Mussel Adhesive Protein from Perna viridis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Sagert, Jason; Hwang, Dong Soo; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of mussel byssus play a critical role in wet adhesion and have inspired versatile new synthetic strategies for adhesives and coatings. Apparently, however, not all mussel adhesive proteins are beholden to Dopa chemistry. The cDNA-deduced sequence of Pvfp-1, a highly aromatic and redox active byssal coating protein in the green mussel Perna viridis, suggests that Dopa may be replaced by a post-translational modification of tryptophan. The N-terminal tryptophan-rich domain of Pvfp-1 contains 42 decapeptide repeats with the consensus sequences ATPKPW1TAW2K and APPPAW1TAW2K. A small collagen domain (18 Gly-X-Y repeats) is also present. Tandem mass spectrometry of isolated tryptic decapeptides has detected both C2-hexosylated tryptophan (W1) and C2-hexosylated hydroxytryptophan (W2), the latter of which is redox active. The UV absorbance spectrum of W2 is consistent with 7-hydroxytryptophan, which represents an intriguing new theme for bioinspired opportunistic wet adhesion. PMID:19584055

  6. Modulation of Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability in Mice Using Synthetic E-Cadherin Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present work characterizes the effects of synthetic E-cadherin peptide (HAV) on blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity using various techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescent imaging (NIRF). The permeability of small molecular weight permeability marker gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent, the large molecular weight permeability marker, IRDye 800CW PEG, and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter contrast agent, rhodamine 800 (R800), were examined in the presence and absence of HAV peptide. The results consistently demonstrated that systemic iv administration of HAV peptide resulted in a reversible disruption of BBB integrity and enhanced the accumulation of all the dyes examined. The magnitude of increase ranged from 2-fold to 5-fold depending on the size and the properties of the permeability markers. The time frame for BBB disruption with HAV peptide was rapid, occurring within 3–6 min following injection of the peptide. Furthermore, modulation of BBB permeability was reversible with the barrier integrity being restored within 60 min of the injection. The increased BBB permeability observed following HAV peptide administration was not attributable to changes in cerebral blood flow. These studies support the potential use of cadherin peptides to rapidly and reversibly modulate BBB permeability of a variety of therapeutic agents. PMID:24495091

  7. Correlation of E-cadherin expression with differentiation grade and histological type in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gamallo, C.; Palacios, J.; Suarez, A.; Pizarro, A.; Navarro, P.; Quintanilla, M.; Cano, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a correlation has been suggested between a loss of E-cadherin (E-CD) and increased invasiveness of neoplastic cells. In this study, E-CD expression in breast cancer was investigated using an affinity-purified antibody (ECCD-2) in an immunoenzymatic (avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase) test. Intensity and extension of E-CD immunoreactivity were evaluated in 61 breast carcinomas and correlated with their histological type and grade, nodal involvement, and hormonal receptor status. Histological types were infiltrating ductal carcinoma of no special type (n = 54) and infiltrating lobular carcinoma (n = 7). All infiltrating ductal carcinomas of no special type except two grade 3 carcinomas showed positive immunoreactivity that was variable among different cases. Grade 1 breast carcinomas (n = 10) showed greater immunoreactivity than grade 2 (n = 25) and grade 3 (n = 19) carcinomas. E-CD immunoreactivity correlated positively with the degree of tubular formation and inversely with the mitoses number. None of the infiltrating lobular carcinomas expressed E-CD in their infiltrating cells, whereas they showed only weak immunostains in areas of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ. These results indicate that E-CD expression correlates with histological type and grade in breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7682767

  8. Prognostic and Clinicopathological Significance of Downregulated E-Cadherin Expression in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated the prognostic role of E-cadherin in patients with NSCLC; however, the result still remains inconclusive. An up-to data system review and meta-analysis was necessary to give a comprehensive evaluation of prognostic role of E-cadherin in NSCLC. Methods Eligible studies were searched in Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science databases. The inclusion criteria were studies that assessed the relationship between E-cadherin expression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the prognosis or clinicopathological features in patients with NSCLC. Subgroup analysis according to race, percentage of reduced/negative E-cadherin expression, histological type, and sample size were also conducted. Odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to examine the risk or hazard association. Results A total of 29 studies including 4010 patients were qualified for analysis. The analysis suggested that downregulated E-cadherin expression was significant associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival/progression-free survival (DFS/PFS) in patients with NSCLC. Subgroup analysis by race, percentage of reduced/negative E-cadherin expression, sample size also found the significant association in OS. When only the stage I NSCLC were considered, downregulated E-cadherin expression still had an unfavorable impact on OS. Additionally, downregulated E-cadherin expression was significantly associated with differentiation grade, lymphnode metastasis, vascular invasion, and TNM stage. Conclusion Downregulated E-cadherin expression detected by IHC seems to correlate with tumour progression and could serve as an important prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC. PMID:24978478

  9. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  10. Osteopontin, E-cadherin, and β-catenin expression as prognostic biomarkers in patients with radically resected gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Pellegrinelli, Alessandro; Martinetti, Antonia; Mariani, Luigi; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Bajetta, Emilio; Pelosi, Giuseppe; de Braud, Filippo; Floriani, Irene; Miceli, Rosalba

    2016-04-01

    A correlation between osteopontin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and cyclooxygenase 2 overexpression and poor clinicopathological features and prognosis has been previously suggested in gastric cancer. This translational study was aimed at assessing the correlation of these immunohistochemical biomarkers with outcome in patients with radically resected gastric cancer. We analyzed osteopontin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and cyclooxygenase 2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 346 primary gastric tumor tissue samples from patients enrolled in the ITACA-S trial. This phase III study randomized patients with radically resected gastric cancer to receive adjuvant chemotherapy with either 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin or a sequential regimen of infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin plus irinotecan followed by cisplatin and docetaxel. High expression of osteopontin was correlated with high histological grade, diffuse histotype, and peritoneal relapse, but not with TNM stage. Moreover, osteopontin overexpression was associated with higher risk of tumor recurrence and metastases, and was an independent prognostic factor for both relapse-free and overall survival of gastric cancer patients following adjuvant chemotherapy. Abnormal E-cadherin expression and abnormal β-catenin expression were correlated with more advanced disease stage, and as a consequence, with poor outcome. Our results suggest that osteopontin overexpression is a valuable independent predictor of tumor recurrence and survival in patients with radically resected gastric cancer. PMID:25862567

  11. e-Cadherin in 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-Induced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Hunot, Stéphane; Légeron, François-Pierre; Ferri, Ivana; Siccu, Paola; Sidoni, Angelo; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Curcio, Francesco; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Today a large number of studies are focused on clarifying the complexity and diversity of the pathogenetic mechanisms inducing Parkinson disease. We used 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a neurotoxin that induces Parkinson disease, to evaluate the change of midbrain structure and the behavior of the anti-inflammatory factor e-cadherin, interleukin-6, tyrosine hydroxylase, phosphatase and tensin homolog, and caveolin-1. The results showed a strong expression of e-cadherin, variation of length and thickness of the heavy neurofilaments, increase of interleukin-6, and reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase known to be expression of dopamine cell loss, reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog described to impair responses to dopamine, and reduction of caveolin-1 known to be expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis. The possibility that the overexpression of the e-cadherin might be implicated in the anti-inflammatory reaction to MPTP treatment by influencing the behavior of the other analyzed molecules is discussed. PMID:27194825

  12. Silk Fibroin Aqueous-Based Adhesives Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kelly A; Roberts, Dane C; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-11

    Silk fibroin from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori is a naturally occurring biopolymer with charged hydrophilic terminal regions that end-cap a hydrophobic core consisting of repeating sequences of glycine, alanine, and serine residues. Taking inspiration from mussels that produce proteins rich in L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) to adhere to a variety of organic and inorganic surfaces, the silk fibroin was functionalized with catechol groups. Silk fibroin was selected for its high molecular weight, tunable mechanical and degradation properties, aqueous processability, and wide availability. The synthesis of catechol-functionalized silk fibroin polymers containing varying amounts of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG, 5000 g/mol) side chains was carried out to balance silk hydrophobicity with PEG hydrophilicity. The efficiency of the catechol functionalization reaction did not vary with PEG conjugation over the range studied, although tuning the amount of PEG conjugated was essential for aqueous solubility. Adhesive bonding and cell compatibility of the resulting materials were investigated, where it was found that incorporating as little as 6 wt % PEG prior to catechol functionalization resulted in complete aqueous solubility of the catechol conjugates and increased adhesive strength compared with silk lacking catechol functionalization. Furthermore, PEG-silk fibroin conjugates maintained their ability to form β-sheet secondary structures, which can be exploited to reduce swelling. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) proliferated on the silks, regardless of PEG and catechol conjugation. These materials represent a protein-based approach to catechol-based adhesives, which we envision may find applicability as biodegradable adhesives and sealants. PMID:26674175

  13. Alternate RASSF1 Transcripts Control SRC Activity, E-Cadherin Contacts, and YAP-Mediated Invasion.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, Nikola; Scrace, Simon; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Grawenda, Anna M; Bradley, Leanne; Pankova, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Yee, Karen S; Buffa, Francesca; Goding, Colin R; Timpson, Paul; Sibson, Nicola; O'Neill, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Tumor progression to invasive carcinoma is associated with activation of SRC family kinase (SRC, YES, FYN) activity and loss of cellular cohesion. The hippo pathway-regulated cofactor YAP1 supports the tumorigenicity of RAS mutations but requires both inactivation of hippo signaling and YES-mediated phosphorylation of YAP1 for oncogenic activity. Exactly how SRC kinases are activated and hippo signaling is lost in sporadic human malignancies remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that hippo-mediated inhibition of YAP1 is lost upon promoter methylation of the RAS effector and hippo kinase scaffold RASSF1A. We find that RASSF1A promoter methylation reduces YAP phospho-S127, which derepresses YAP1, and actively supports YAP1 activation by switching RASSF1 transcription to the independently transcribed RASSF1C isoform that promotes Tyr kinase activity. Using affinity proteomics, proximity ligation, and real-time molecular visualization, we find that RASSF1C targets SRC/YES to epithelial cell-cell junctions and promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and YAP1. RASSF1A restricts SRC activity, preventing motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo, with epigenetic inactivation correlating with increased inhibitory pY527-SRC in breast tumors. These data imply that distinct RASSF1 isoforms have opposing functions, which provide a biomarker for YAP1 activation and explain correlations of RASSF1 methylation with advanced invasive disease in humans. The ablation of epithelial integrity together with subsequent YAP1 nuclear localization allows transcriptional activation of β-catenin/TBX-YAP/TEAD target genes, including Myc, and an invasive phenotype. These findings define gene transcript switching as a tumor suppressor mechanism under epigenetic control. PMID:26549256

  14. Alternate RASSF1 Transcripts Control SRC Activity, E-Cadherin Contacts, and YAP-Mediated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vlahov, Nikola; Scrace, Simon; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Grawenda, Anna M.; Bradley, Leanne; Pankova, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Yee, Karen S.; Buffa, Francesca; Goding, Colin R.; Timpson, Paul; Sibson, Nicola; O’Neill, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor progression to invasive carcinoma is associated with activation of SRC family kinase (SRC, YES, FYN) activity and loss of cellular cohesion. The hippo pathway-regulated cofactor YAP1 supports the tumorigenicity of RAS mutations but requires both inactivation of hippo signaling and YES-mediated phosphorylation of YAP1 for oncogenic activity. Exactly how SRC kinases are activated and hippo signaling is lost in sporadic human malignancies remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that hippo-mediated inhibition of YAP1 is lost upon promoter methylation of the RAS effector and hippo kinase scaffold RASSF1A. We find that RASSF1A promoter methylation reduces YAP phospho-S127, which derepresses YAP1, and actively supports YAP1 activation by switching RASSF1 transcription to the independently transcribed RASSF1C isoform that promotes Tyr kinase activity. Using affinity proteomics, proximity ligation, and real-time molecular visualization, we find that RASSF1C targets SRC/YES to epithelial cell-cell junctions and promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and YAP1. RASSF1A restricts SRC activity, preventing motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo, with epigenetic inactivation correlating with increased inhibitory pY527-SRC in breast tumors. These data imply that distinct RASSF1 isoforms have opposing functions, which provide a biomarker for YAP1 activation and explain correlations of RASSF1 methylation with advanced invasive disease in humans. The ablation of epithelial integrity together with subsequent YAP1 nuclear localization allows transcriptional activation of β-catenin/TBX-YAP/TEAD target genes, including Myc, and an invasive phenotype. These findings define gene transcript switching as a tumor suppressor mechanism under epigenetic control. PMID:26549256

  15. M protein mediates streptococcal adhesion to HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J R; Stinson, M W

    1994-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes adheres to human epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. To identify adhesins, cell wall components were extracted from S. pyogenes M6 with alkali or by treatment with mutanolysin and lysozyme. HEp-2 cells were incubated with extracts of S. pyogenes M6 and then analyzed by Western blot (immunoblot) assays, using antibodies to S. pyogenes. Only one streptococcal component (62 kDa) was bound to HEp-2 cells and was identified serologically as M6 protein. Experiments with pepsin-cleaved fragments of M protein indicated that the binding site was located at the N-terminal half of the molecule. M protein was bound selectively to two trypsin-sensitive surface components, 97 and 205 kDa, of HEp-2 cells on nitrocellulose blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Tritium-labeled lipoteichoic acid bound to different HEp-2 cell components, 34 and 35 kDa, in a parallel experiment, indicating that lipoteichoic acid was not complexed with M protein and does not mediate M-protein binding. The four HEp-2 components were unrelated to fibronectin since they did not react with specific antibodies. An M-protein-deficient (M-) strain of streptococcus (JRS75), grown in chemically defined medium, showed 73% less adhesion activity to HEp-2 monolayers than an M+ strain (JRS4). Streptococcal adhesion was insensitive to competitive inhibition by selected monosaccharides. These results indicate that M protein binds directly to certain HEp-2 cell membrane components and mediates streptococcal adhesion. PMID:8300205

  16. Distinct E-cadherin-based complexes regulate cell behaviour through miRNA processing or Src and p120 catenin activity.

    PubMed

    Kourtidis, Antonis; Ngok, Siu P; Pulimeno, Pamela; Feathers, Ryan W; Carpio, Lomeli R; Baker, Tiffany R; Carr, Jennifer M; Yan, Irene K; Borges, Sahra; Perez, Edith A; Storz, Peter; Copland, John A; Patel, Tushar; Thompson, E Aubrey; Citi, Sandra; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-09-01

    E-cadherin and p120 catenin (p120) are essential for epithelial homeostasis, but can also exert pro-tumorigenic activities. Here, we resolve this apparent paradox by identifying two spatially and functionally distinct junctional complexes in non-transformed polarized epithelial cells: one growth suppressing at the apical zonula adherens (ZA), defined by the p120 partner PLEKHA7 and a non-nuclear subset of the core microprocessor components DROSHA and DGCR8, and one growth promoting at basolateral areas of cell-cell contact containing tyrosine-phosphorylated p120 and active Src. Recruitment of DROSHA and DGCR8 to the ZA is PLEKHA7 dependent. The PLEKHA7-microprocessor complex co-precipitates with primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) and possesses pri-miRNA processing activity. PLEKHA7 regulates the levels of select miRNAs, in particular processing of miR-30b, to suppress expression of cell transforming markers promoted by the basolateral complex, including SNAI1, MYC and CCND1. Our work identifies a mechanism through which adhesion complexes regulate cellular behaviour and reveals their surprising association with the microprocessor. PMID:26302406

  17. Control of E-cadherin apical localisation and morphogenesis by a SOAP-1/AP-1/clathrin pathway in C. elegans epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Ghislain; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Nicolle, Ophélie; Damaj, Raghida; Pécréaux, Jacques; Michaux, Grégoire

    2015-05-01

    E-cadherin (E-cad) is the main component of epithelial junctions in multicellular organisms, where it is essential for cell-cell adhesion. The localisation of E-cad is often strongly polarised in the apico-basal axis. However, the mechanisms required for its polarised distribution are still largely unknown. We performed a systematic RNAi screen in vivo to identify genes required for the strict E-cad apical localisation in C. elegans epithelial epidermal cells. We found that the loss of clathrin, its adaptor AP-1 and the AP-1 interactor SOAP-1 induced a basolateral localisation of E-cad without affecting the apico-basal diffusion barrier. We further found that SOAP-1 controls AP-1 localisation, and that AP-1 is required for clathrin recruitment. Finally, we also show that AP-1 controls E-cad apical delivery and actin organisation during embryonic elongation, the final morphogenetic step of embryogenesis. We therefore propose that a molecular pathway, containing SOAP-1, AP-1 and clathrin, controls the apical delivery of E-cad and morphogenesis. PMID:25858456

  18. Distinct E-cadherin-based complexes regulate cell behaviour through miRNA processing or Src and p120 catenin activity

    PubMed Central

    Kourtidis, Antonis; Ngok, Siu P.; Pulimeno, Pamela; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carpio, Lomeli R.; Baker, Tiffany R.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Yan, Irene K.; Borges, Sahra; Perez, Edith A.; Storz, Peter; Copland, John A.; Patel, Tushar; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Citi, Sandra; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin and p120 catenin (p120) are essential for epithelial homeostasis, but can also exert pro-tumorigenic activities. Here, we resolve this apparent paradox by identifying two spatially and functionally distinct junctional complexes in non-transformed polarized epithelial cells: one growth suppressing at the apical zonula adherens (ZA), defined by the p120 partner PLEKHA7 and a non-nuclear subset of the core microprocessor components DROSHA and DGCR8, and one growth promoting at basolateral areas of cell–cell contact containing tyrosine-phosphorylated p120 and active Src. Recruitment of DROSHA and DGCR8 to the ZA is PLEKHA7 dependent. The PLEKHA7–microprocessor complex co-precipitates with primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) and possesses pri-miRNA processing activity. PLEKHA7 regulates the levels of select miRNAs, in particular processing of miR-30b, to suppress expression of cell transforming markers promoted by the basolateral complex, including SNAI1, MYC and CCND1. Our work identifies a mechanism through which adhesion complexes regulate cellular behaviour and reveals their surprising association with the microprocessor. PMID:26302406

  19. LINKIN, a new transmembrane protein necessary for cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mihoko; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Yu, Collin Z; DeModena, John; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial collective migration, leader and follower cells migrate while maintaining cell–cell adhesion and tissue polarity. We have identified a conserved protein and interactors required for maintaining cell adhesion during a simple collective migration in the developing C. elegans male gonad. LINKIN is a previously uncharacterized, transmembrane protein conserved throughout Metazoa. We identified seven atypical FG–GAP domains in the extracellular domain, which potentially folds into a β-propeller structure resembling the α-integrin ligand-binding domain. C. elegans LNKN-1 localizes to the plasma membrane of all gonadal cells, with apical and lateral bias. We identified the LINKIN interactors RUVBL1, RUVBL2, and α-tubulin by using SILAC mass spectrometry on human HEK 293T cells and testing candidates for lnkn-1-like function in C. elegans male gonad. We propose that LINKIN promotes adhesion between neighboring cells through its extracellular domain and regulates microtubule dynamics through RUVBL proteins at its intracellular domain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04449.001 PMID:25437307

  20. Transition of Immunohistochemical Expression of E-Cadherin and Vimentin from Premalignant to Malignant Lesions of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Kafil; Ara, Anjum; Siddiqui, Shahid A; Sherwani, Rana K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to study the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and vimentin in precancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx and to use the specific pattern of expression to predict invasiveness. Methods This cross-sectional study looked at 87 cases of oral and oropharyngeal lesions obtained between December 2012 and November 2014 in the Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, India. Fifty-three biopsies from the buccal mucosa, tongue, and pharynx and 34 resected oral specimens were evaluated for premalignant and malignant lesions using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker vimentin was evaluated wherever possible. Slides were examined for staining pattern (cytoplasmic or membrane), proportion, and intensity of staining of tumor cells. Patients follow-up and therapy related changes were also studied. Results There were 64 premalignant and 23 malignant cases in our study with 65 (74.7%) cases seen in males and 22 (25.3%) cases seen in females. The majority of malignant cases, (n = 15; 64.2%) were seen in the fifth and sixth decades of life while most of the premalignant lesions (n = 36; 56.4%) were seen in the fourth and fifth decade. Amongst the 64 premalignant oral lesions, leukoplakia comprised of 14 cases (21.9%), of which three cases had associated mild to moderate dysplasia. The majority of premalignant lesions showed strong E-cadherin expression and decreased expression of vimentin with negative and weak expression in both dysplasias and carcinoma in situ (p = 0.013). E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas compared to dysplasias and carcinoma in situ and the difference in immunoreactivity was statistically significant (p < 0.050). Vimentin expression increased as the tumor progressed from dysplasias to carcinoma in situ to invasive

  1. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy in adhesion protein expression

    PubMed Central

    PACHECO-SOARES, CRISTINA; MAFTOU-COSTA, MAIRA; DA CUNHA MENEZES COSTA, CAROLINA GENÚNCIO; DE SIQUEIRA SILVA, ANDREZA CRISTINA; MORAES, KAREN C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that has clinical applications in both non-neoplastic and neoplastic diseases. PDT involves a light-sensitive compound (photosensitizer), light and molecular oxygen. This procedure may lead to several different cellular responses, including cell death. Alterations in the attachment of cancer cells to the substratum and to each other are important consequences of photodynamic treatment. PDT may lead to changes in the expression of cellular adhesion structure and cytoskeleton integrity, which are key factors in decreasing tumor metastatic potential. HEp-2 cells were photosensitized with aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate and zinc phthalocyanine, and the proteins β1-integrin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assayed using fluorescence microscopy. The verification of expression changes in the genes for FAK and β1 integrin were performed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results revealed that HEp-2 cells do not express β-integrin or FAK 12 h following PDT. It was concluded that the PDT reduces the adhesive ability of HEp-2 cells, inhibiting their metastatic potential. The present study aimed to analyze the changes in the expression and organization of cellular adhesion elements and the subsequent metastatic potential of HEp-2 cells following PDT treatment. PMID:25013490

  2. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  3. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  4. Disruption of E-Cadherin by Matrix Metalloproteinase Directly Mediates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Downstream of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Lyons, James Guy; Tan, Thian Kui; Wang, Yiping; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Min, Danqing; Succar, Lena; Rangan, Gopala K.; Hu, Min; Henderson, Beric R.; Alexander, Stephen I.; Harris, David C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in organ fibrosis, including that of the kidney. Loss of E-cadherin expression is a hallmark of EMT; however, whether the loss of E-cadherin is a consequence or a cause of EMT remains unknown, especially in the renal system. In this study, we show that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells is dependent on proteolysis. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediated E-cadherin disruption led directly to tubular epithelial cell EMT via Slug. TGF-β1 induced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin, which caused the nuclear translocation of β-catenin, the transcriptional induction of Slug, and the repression of E-cadherin transcription in tubular epithelial cells. These findings reveal a direct role for E-cadherin and for matrix metalloproteinases in causing EMT downstream of TGF-β1 in fibrotic disease. Specific inhibition rather than activation of matrix metalloproteinases may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic disease. PMID:19590041

  5. ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells through upregulation of E-cadherin in a Id1-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Ming, Jia; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin in breast cancer cell. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. - Abstract: ERβ1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. It plays an important role in regulating the progression of breast cancer. However, the mechanisms of ERβ1 in tumorigenesis, metastasis and prognosis are still not fully clear. In this study, we showed that the expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we also found that ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and upregulated E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. Taken together, our study provides further understanding of the molecular mechanism of ERβ1 in tumor metastasis and suggests the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches to target Id1 to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

  6. A colorectal cell line with alterations in E-cadherin and epithelial biology may be an in vitro model of colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, I; Hardy, R; Jones, T; Jankowski, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been shown previously in ulcerative colitis tissue that E-cadherin can occasionally be mutated in the extracellular domain early in neoplastic progression. E-cadherin is known to maintain differentiation and inhibits invasion in vivo. AIMS: To assess the mechanisms by which such dysfunction occurs. METHODS: Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCA-7 colonies 1, 3, 6, and 30, derived from a single heterogeneous colorectal cancer were studied. The HCA-7 cell line has p53 mutations and a random errors of replication "positive" phenotype, as is seen in early colitis associated cancers or hereditary nonpolyposis coli cancer (HNPCC). RESULTS: Cell lines 6 and 30 expressed E-cadherin abundantly and this correlated positively with their degree of differentiation and organisation; however, both cell lines had loss of heterozygosity of E-cadherin. Interestingly, E-cadherin production was downregulated in the poorly differentiated cell line 1, and this was associated with major chromosomal rearrangements of 16q. This cell line also had a mutation in the homophilic binding domain of exon 4, which was associated with disaggregation by low titres of a function blocking antibody, and an invasive phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: These multiple biological alterations further characterise the complex association that E-cadherin has with tumour heterogeneity and suggest that this series of cell lines may be a useful model of colitis associated or HNPCC associated tumorigenesis. PMID:10694944

  7. Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition by inhibiting Snail and regulating E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyereen; Lee, Minjae; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •We investigated the effects of celastrol on TGF-β1-induced EMT in epithelial cells. •Celastrol regulates TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and E-cadherin expression. •Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced Snail expression. •Celastrol strongly suppresses TGF-β1-induced invasion in MDCK and A549 cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Celastrol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells including leukemia, glioma, prostate, and breast cancer; however, the possible role of celastrol in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of celastrol on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT-like morphologic changes and upregulation of Snail expression. The downregulation of E-cadherin expression and upregulation of Snail in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and A549 cell lines show that TGF-β1-mediated the EMT in epithelial cells; however, celastrol markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced morphologic changes, Snail upregulation, and E-cadherin expression. Migration and invasion assays revealed that celastrol completely inhibited TGF-β1-mediated cellular migration in both cell lines. These findings indicate that celastrol downregulates Snail expression, thereby inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT in MDCK and A549 cells. Thus, our findings provide new evidence that celastrol suppresses lung cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT.

  8. Dimethoxy Curcumin Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing Survivin and Inhibits Invasion by Enhancing E-Cadherin in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Dai, Fang; Chen, Zhehang; Wang, Saisai; Cheng, Xiaobin; Sheng, Qinsong; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a kind of lipophilic analog of curcumin with great improvement in chemical and metabolic stability. DMC has been studied in breast and renal cancer, but no research in colon cancer has been found yet. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two colon cancer cells (HT-29 and SW480) and one normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM460) were used in this study. We studied the effect of DMC on the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Transwell migration assay was used to estimate the inhibition of DMC on invasion. Moreover, the expressions of PARP, caspase-3, survivin and E-cadherin were detected to uncover the related signaling pathways by western blotting assay both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS DMC significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in dose-dependent manner; IC50 for DMC was calculated to be 43.4, 28.2 and 454.8µM on HT-29, SW480 and NCM460. DMC significantly increased the apoptosis in both HT-29 (p=0.0051) and SW480 (p=0.0013) cells in vitro, and significantly suppressed the growth of both cell lines in vivo. Moreover, DMC reduced the number of migrated cells in both HT-29 (p=0.007) and SW480 (p=0.004) cells. By western blotting analysis, the cleavage of pro-caspases-3 and PARP were clearly induced by DMC to their active form, while the expression of survivin was reduced and E-cadherin was enhanced in both cells in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS DMC may exert an effective anti-tumor effect in colon cancer cells by down-regulating survivin and upregulating E-cadherin. PMID:27614381

  9. CRH suppressed TGFβ1-induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via induction of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lai; Chen, Jiandong; Li, Li; Li, Chuanhua; Chen, Cheng; Li, Shengnan

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in biopsies from breast cancer patients, the effect of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on carcinoma progression is still unclear. Transforming growth factorβ1 (TGFβ1) promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and induces Snail1 and Twist1 expressions. Loss of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mainly repressed by Snail1 and Twist1, has been considered as hallmark of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were used to investigate the effect of CRH on TGFβ1-induced EMT by transwell chamber. And HEK293 cells were transiently transfected with CRHR1 or CRHR2 to explore the definite effects of CRH receptor. We reported that CRH inhibited migration of human breast cancer cells through downregulation of Snail1 and Twist1, and subsequent upregulation of E-cadherin. CRH inhibited TGFβ1-mediated migration of MCF-7 via both CRHR1 and CRHR2 while this inhibition in MDA-MB-231 was mainly via CRHR2. Ectopic re-expression of CRHR1 or CRHR2 respectively in HEK293 cells increased E-cadherin expression after CRH stimulation. Furthermore, CRH repressed expression of mesenchymal marker, N-cadherin and induced expression of Occludin, inhibiting EMT in MCF-7 & MDA-MB-231. Our results suggest that CRH may function as a tumor suppressor, at least partly by regulating TGFβ1-mediated EMT. These results may contribute to uncovering the effect of CRH in breast tumorigenesis and progression. PMID:24412750

  10. Iron Overload Causes Alterations of E-Cadherin in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Y; Krijt, J; Povýšil, C; Mělková, Z; Přikryl, P; Vokurka, M; Nečas, E

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload causes tissue damage in the liver, but its initial effects at the molecular and cellular level are not well understood. Epithelial cadherin (E-cad) is a major adhesion protein in adherens junctions and is associated with several signal transduction pathways. Dysfunction of E-cad causes instability of adherens junctions, which leads to cell invasion, cell migration, and carcinogenesis. We found in liver samples from iron-overloaded mice that the apparent molecular mass of E-cad was reduced from 125 to 115 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions and immunoblotting, and that the cellular expression of E-cad was decreased in immunohistochemistry. The mRNA level of E-cad, however, did not change significantly, suggesting that the alterations are posttranslational. Interestingly, incubation of control liver extracts with Fe2+ alone also produced the same mobility shift. Neither an oxidant nor an antioxidant influenced this shift in vitro, suggesting that reactive oxygen species, which are generated by iron and known to cause damage to macromolecules, are not involved. Treatment of the 115 kDa E-cad with deferoxamine, an iron chelator, thus removing Fe2+, shifted the molecular mass back to 125 kDa, demonstrating that the shift is reversible. The observation also implies that the alteration that causes the mobility shift is not due to transcriptional control, deglycosylation, and proteolysis. This reversible mobility shift of E-cad has not been previously known. The alteration of E-cad that causes the mobility shift might be an initial step to liver diseases by iron overload. PMID:27516188

  11. Epidermal growth factor down-regulates the expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) through E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhimin; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sung, Bokyung; Koolwal, Pooja; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Mani, Sendurai A.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Batra, Surinder K.; Guha, Sushovan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our group previously reported that neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) overexpression significantly blocked invasion and angiogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and also demonstrated a loss of NGAL expression in the advanced stages of PDAC. However, little is known regarding mechanisms of NGAL regulation in PDAC. As EGF-EGFR axis is significantly upregulated in PDAC, we examined EGF-mediated NGAL regulation in these cells. METHODS NGAL-positive AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells were used as model system. Quantitative RT-PCR, western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence studies were used to investigate EGF-mediated effects on NGAL expression. E-cadherin expression was manipulated using lentiviral overexpression or shRNA constructs. NGAL promoter activity was assessed by luciferase-reporter assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). RESULTS NGAL expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation and was significantly downregulated after EGF treatment along with a concomitant reduction of E-cadherin expression in PDAC cells. E-cadherin downregulation was partly through the EGF receptor (EGFR)-dependent MEK-ERK signaling pathway. In addition, E-cadherin downregulation reduced NGAL expression in PDAC cells, whereas overexpression of E-cadherin led to increased NGAL expression and partly rescued inhibition of NGAL expression by EGF. Furthermore, EGF in part through E-cadherin reduced NGAL promoter activity by blocking NF-κB activation. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrated for the first time that EGF potently blocked NGAL expression in PDAC cells. This effect is partly mediated through activation of the EGFR-MEK-ERK signaling pathway, which in turn downregulated E-cadherin with a subsequent reduction in NF-κB activation. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which EGF regulates NGAL expression in PDAC. PMID:24048788

  12. E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in well-differentiated and moderately-differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma: relations with clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo; Lequerica-Fernández, Paloma; Fernández, Soledad; Allonca, Eva; Villallaín, Lucas; de Vicente, Juan C

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the expression and localisation of E-cadherin and β-catenin in oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) so that we could correlate the findings with prognostically-relevant clinicopathological variables. E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in normal oral mucosa and in oral squamous cell carcinomas were examined immunohistochemically, and their association with clinicopathological factors and prognosis were then analysed in 69 patients who had been operated on for oral SCC. E-cadherin expression was found in all 69 cases: in 11 cases (16%) it was weak; in 21 (30%) moderate, and in 37 (54%) high. β-Catenin expression was found in 64 cases (93%): in 18 cases (26%) cell-membrane expression was weak; in 26 (38%) it was moderate; in 19 (28%) it was high, and in one case (1%) there was cytoplasmic staining. No nuclear staining was detected. E-cadherin was significantly associated with histological grade (p=0.002) and alcohol consumption (p=0.05), and β-catenin was significantly associated with nodal stage (p=0.02), TNM stage (p=0.009), and E-cadherin expression (p=0.01). However, none of them were independent prognostic factors in the disease-specific survival analysis. E-cadherin is closely linked to β-catenin expression in oral SCC and to tumour differentiation. Alcohol consumption could increase the aggressiveness of SCC, leading to reduced expression of E-cadherin. β-catenin could be an early marker for the identification of occult metastases in patients with oral SCC. PMID:22525043

  13. Adhesion and structure properties of protein nanomaterials containing hydrophobic and charged amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Mo, Xiaoqun; Moore, Robyn; Frazier, Shawnalea J; Iwamoto, Takeo; Tomich, John M; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2006-03-01

    Protein polymers are being used or considered for biobased adhesives and coating materials. Most adhesives derived from macro protein molecules work through receptors or cross-links to bring about adhesion. The adhesion mechanism of protein polymers would lead to better understanding of adhesives and the discovery of new practical properties of protein polymers at both nano- and macro-scales. The objective of this research work was to study adhesion properties of protein polymers at nanoscale (a peptide adhesive with nanometer-scale units that range in size of several nanometers, defined as protein nanomaterial). Seven protein nanomaterial samples with different degrees of adhesive strength were designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All protein nanomaterials contain a common hydrophobic core flanked by charged amino acid sequences. The adhesion properties of the protein nanomaterials were investigated at different pH values and curing temperatures. The protein nanomaterials self aggregate and interact with the wood surface. The protein nanomaterial KKK-FLIVIGSII-KKK identified in this study had high adhesive strength toward wood. It had the highest shear strength at pH 12, with an amino acid sequence that was very hydrophobic and uncharged. This protein nanomaterial underwent structural analyses using circular dichroism, laser-Fourier transform infrared, and laser desorption mass spectrometry. At pH 12 this peptide adopted a pH-induced beta-like conformation. Adhesive strength reflects contributions of both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Ionic and covalent bonds do not appear to be significant factors for adhesion in this study. PMID:16573147

  14. Use of additives to enhance the properties of cottonseed protein as wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein is currently being used commercially as a “green” wood adhesive. Previous work in this laboratory has shown that cottonseed protein isolate, tested on maple wood veneer, produced higher adhesive strength and hot water resistance relative to soy protein. In the present study, cottonseed...

  15. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Eloae, Florin Zugun; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Carasevici, Eugen; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  16. Measuring localization and diffusion coefficients of basolateral proteins in lateral versus basal membranes using functionalized substrates and kICS analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlar, Saw; Arnspang, Eva C; Pedersen, Gitte A; Koffman, Jennifer S; Nejsum, Lene N

    2014-10-01

    Micropatterning enabled semiquantitation of basolateral proteins in lateral and basal membranes of the same cell. Lateral diffusion coefficients of basolateral aquaporin-3 (AQP3-EGFP) and EGFP-AQP4 were extracted from "lateral" and "basal" membranes using identical live-cell imaging and k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). To simultaneously image proteins in "lateral" and "basal" membranes, micropatterning with the extracellular domain of E-cadherin and collagen, to mimic cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion, respectively, was used. In kidney collecting duct principal cells AQP3 localizes lateral and basal whereas AQP4 localizes mainly basal. On alternating stripes of E-cadherin and collagen, AQP3-EGFP was predominantly localized to "lateral" compared to "basal" membranes, whereas Orange-AQP4 was evenly distributed. Average diffusion coefficients were extracted via kICS analysis of rapid time-lapse sequences of AQP3-EGFP and EGFP-AQP4 on uniform substrates of either E-cadherin or collagen. AQP3-EGFP was measured to 0.022±0.010μm(2)/s on E-cadherin and 0.019±0.004μm(2)/s on collagen, whereas EGFP-AQP4 was measured to 0.044±0.009μm(2)/s on E-cadherin and 0.037±0.009μm(2)/s on collagen, thus, diffusion did not differ between substrates. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) reduced the AQP3-EGFP diffusion coefficient by 43% from 0.024±0.007μm(2)/s (water) to 0.014±0.003μm(2)/s (MBCD) (p<0.05) on collagen surfaces, and by 41% from 0.023±0.011μm(2)/s (water) to 0.014±0.005μm(2)/s (MBCD) (p<0.05) on E-cadherin surfaces. Thus, protein patterning enables the semiquantitation of protein distribution between the "lateral" and "basal" membranes as well as measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:24950246

  17. Elevated Src family kinase activity stabilizes E-cadherin-based junctions and collective movement of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Veracini, Laurence; Grall, Dominique; Schaub, Sébastien; Divonne, Stéphanie Beghelli-de la Forest; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Milano, Gérard; Bozec, Alexandre; Babin, Emmanuel; Sudaka, Anne; Thariat, Juliette; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    EGF receptor (EGFR) overexpression is thought to drive head and neck carcinogenesis however clinical responses to EGFR-targeting agents have been modest and alternate targets are actively sought to improve results. Src family kinases (SFKs), reported to act downstream of EGFR are among the alternative targets for which increased expression or activity in epithelial tumors is commonly associated to the dissolution of E-cadherin-based junctions and acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype. Robust expression of total and activated Src was observed in advanced stage head and neck tumors (N=60) and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines. In cultured cancer cells Src co-localized with E-cadherin in cell-cell junctions and its phosphorylation on Y419 was both constitutive and independent of EGFR activation. Selective inhibition of SFKs with SU6656 delocalized E-cadherin and disrupted cellular junctions without affecting E-cadherin expression and this effect was phenocopied by knockdown of Src or Yes. These findings reveal an EGFR-independent role for SFKs in the maintenance of intercellular junctions, which likely contributes to the cohesive invasion E-cadherin-positive cells in advanced tumors. Further, they highlight the need for a deeper comprehension of molecular pathways that drive collective cell invasion, in absence of mesenchymal transition, in order to combat tumor spread. PMID:25779657

  18. EZH2 promotes cell migration and invasion but not alters cell proliferation by suppressing E-cadherin, partly through association with MALAT-1 in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ting; Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Zi-Liang; Song, Wei-feng; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is an essential component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which is required for epigenetic silencing of target genes, including those affecting cancer progression. Its role in pancreatic cancer remains to be clarified; therefore, we investigated the effects of aberrantly expressed EZH2 on pancreatic cancer. We found that EZH2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage in pancreatic cancer patients. EZH2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines inhibited cell migration and invasion, but did not alter cell proliferation. Silencing of EZH2 also increased E-cadherin expression in vitro, and E-cadherin expression was inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissue samples. Patients with high EZH2 and low E-cadherin expression had the worst prognosis. RIP and ChIP assays suggest that EZH2 is recruited to the E-cadherin promoter by the long non-coding RNA, MALAT-1 (metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), where it represses E-cadherin expression. Our results show that EZH2-based therapies may be an option for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26848980

  19. Elevated Src family kinase activity stabilizes E-cadherin-based junctions and collective movement of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Veracini, Laurence; Grall, Dominique; Schaub, Sébastien; Beghelli-de la Forest Divonne, Stéphanie; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Milano, Gérard; Bozec, Alexandre; Babin, Emmanuel; Sudaka, Anne; Thariat, Juliette; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2015-04-10

    EGF receptor (EGFR) overexpression is thought to drive head and neck carcinogenesis however clinical responses to EGFR-targeting agents have been modest and alternate targets are actively sought to improve results. Src family kinases (SFKs), reported to act downstream of EGFR are among the alternative targets for which increased expression or activity in epithelial tumors is commonly associated to the dissolution of E-cadherin-based junctions and acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype. Robust expression of total and activated Src was observed in advanced stage head and neck tumors (N=60) and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines. In cultured cancer cells Src co-localized with E-cadherin in cell-cell junctions and its phosphorylation on Y419 was both constitutive and independent of EGFR activation. Selective inhibition of SFKs with SU6656 delocalized E-cadherin and disrupted cellular junctions without affecting E-cadherin expression and this effect was phenocopied by knockdown of Src or Yes. These findings reveal an EGFR-independent role for SFKs in the maintenance of intercellular junctions, which likely contributes to the cohesive invasion E-cadherin-positive cells in advanced tumors. Further, they highlight the need for a deeper comprehension of molecular pathways that drive collective cell invasion, in absence of mesenchymal transition, in order to combat tumor spread. PMID:25779657

  20. RAB2A controls MT1-MMP endocytic and E-cadherin polarized Golgi trafficking to promote invasive breast cancer programs.

    PubMed

    Kajiho, Hiroaki; Kajiho, Yuko; Frittoli, Emanuela; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Oldani, Amanda; Garre, Massimiliano; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Palamidessi, Andrea; Vecchi, Manuela; Chavrier, Philippe; Perez, Frank; Scita, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of tumor cell dissemination and the contribution of membrane trafficking in this process are poorly understood. Through a functional siRNA screening of human RAB GTPases, we found that RAB2A, a protein essential for ER-to-Golgi transport, is critical in promoting proteolytic activity and 3D invasiveness of breast cancer (BC) cell lines. Remarkably, RAB2A is amplified and elevated in human BC and is a powerful and independent predictor of disease recurrence in BC patients. Mechanistically, RAB2A acts at two independent trafficking steps. Firstly, by interacting with VPS39, a key component of the late endosomal HOPS complex, it controls post-endocytic trafficking of membrane-bound MT1-MMP, an essential metalloprotease for matrix remodeling and invasion. Secondly, it further regulates Golgi transport of E-cadherin, ultimately controlling junctional stability, cell compaction, and tumor invasiveness. Thus, RAB2A is a novel trafficking determinant essential for regulation of a mesenchymal invasive program of BC dissemination. PMID:27255086

  1. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, Cancers 2015, 7 1886 these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26393651

  2. Expression of epithelial adhesion proteins and integrins in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalmi, K.; Mäkelä, M.; Oksala, O.; Heino, J.; Yamada, K. M.; Uitto, V. J.; Larjava, H.

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cell behavior in chronic inflammation is poorly characterized. During inflammation of tooth-supporting structures (periodontal disease), increased proliferation of epithelial cells into the inflamed connective tissue stroma is commonly seen. In some areas ulceration and degeneration take place. We studied alterations in the expression of adhesion molecules and integrins during chronic periodontal inflammation. In inflamed tissue, laminin-1 and type IV collagen were still present in the basement membrane and surrounding blood vessels, but they were also found extravascularly in inflamed connective tissue stroma. Type VII collagen and laminin-5 (also known as kalinin, epiligrin, or nicein) were poorly preserved in the basement membrane zone, but both were found in unusual streak-like distributions in the subepithelial connective tissue stroma in inflamed tissue. Both fibronectin and tenascin were substantially decreased in chronically inflamed connective tissue, showing only punctate staining at the basement membrane zone. Integrins of the beta 1 family showed two distinct staining patterns in epithelial cells during chronic inflammation; focal losses of beta 1 integrins (alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1) were found in most areas, while in other areas the entire pocket epithelium was found to be strongly positive for beta 1 integrins. No members of the alpha v integrin family were found in any epithelia studied. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was high in basal cells of healthy tissue, but weak in epithelium associated with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation therefore involves alterations in both adhesion proteins and integrins expressed by epithelial cells. Basement membrane components found at abnormal sites in stroma in chronic inflammation might serve as new adhesive ligands for various cell types in inflamed stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7541610

  3. Heterophyllin B inhibits the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells by targeting PI3K/AKT/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    TANTAI, JI-CHENG; ZHANG, YAO; ZHAO, HENG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to measure the effect of heterophyllin B (HB) on the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells, and examine the possible mechanism involved. A Cell Counting kit 8 assay was performed to determine the cell viability. Cell adhesion and invasion were determined following treatment of the ECA-109 cells with HB (0, 10, 25 and 50 µM) for 24 h. The levels of phosphorylated (p-)ATK and p-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and the protein levels of β-catenin were measured using western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of E-cadherin, vimentin, snail, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 were detected using reverse trancsription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. HB (10, 25 and 50 µM) significantly suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells in a dose-dependant manner. The expression levels of p-ATK, p-PI3K and β-catenin were markedly decreased. The expression of E-cadherin was promoted, whereas the expression levels of snail, vimentin, MMP 2 and MMP 9 were decreased significantly in the ECA-109 cells treated with HB. In addition, HB inhibited the adhesion and invasion induced by PI3K activating peptide in the ECA-109 cells, and the protein expression levels were also adjusted. These results suggested that HB effectively suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the human esophageal carcinoma cells by mediating the PI3K/AKT/β-catenin pathways and regulating the expression levels of adhesion- and invasion-associated genes. PMID:26647768

  4. Heterophyllin B inhibits the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells by targeting PI3K/AKT/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Tantai, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Heng

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to measure the effect of heterophyllin B (HB) on the adhesion and invasion of ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells, and examine the possible mechanism involved. A Cell Counting kit 8 assay was performed to determine the cell viability. Cell adhesion and invasion were determined following treatment of the ECA-109 cells with HB (0, 10, 25 and 50 µM) for 24 h. The levels of phosphorylated (p-)ATK and p-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and the protein levels of β-catenin were measured using western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of E-cadherin, vimentin, snail, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. HB (10, 25 and 50 µM) significantly suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the ECA-109 human esophageal carcinoma cells in a dose-dependant manner. The expression levels of p-ATK, p-PI3K and β-catenin were markedly decreased. The expression of E-cadherin was promoted, whereas the expression levels of snail, vimentin, MMP 2 and MMP 9 were decreased significantly in the ECA-109 cells treated with HB. In addition, HB inhibited the adhesion and invasion induced by PI3K activating peptide in the ECA-109 cells, and the protein expression levels were also adjusted. These results suggested that HB effectively suppressed the adhesion and invasion of the human esophageal carcinoma cells by mediating the PI3K/AKT/β-catenin pathways and regulating the expression levels of adhesion- and invasion-associated genes. PMID:26647768

  5. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  6. Interaction of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), with focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Zurawski, D V; Chowrashi, P; Ayoob, J C; Huang, L; Mittal, B; Sanger, J M; Sanger, J W

    2000-12-01

    When enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) attach and infect host cells, they induce a cytoskeletal rearrangement and the formation of cytoplasmic columns of actin filaments called pedestals. The attached EPEC and pedestals move over the surface of the host cell in an actin-dependent reaction [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 34:279-287]. The discovery that EPEC inserts the protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), into the membrane of host cells, where it binds the EPEC outer membrane protein, intimin [Kenny et al., 1997: Cell 91:511-520], suggests Tir serves two functions: tethering the bacteria to the host cell and providing a direct connection to the host's cytoskeleton. The sequence of Tir predicts a protein of 56.8 kD with three domains separated by two predicted trans-membrane spanning regions. A GST-fusion protein of the N-terminal 233 amino acids of Tir (Tir1) binds to alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin from cell extracts. GST-Tir1 also coprecipitates purified forms of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin while GST alone does not bind these three focal adhesion proteins. Biotinylated probes of these three proteins also bound Tir1 cleaved from GST. Similar associations of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin were also detected with the C-terminus of Tir, i.e., Tir3, the last 217 amino acids. Antibody staining of EPEC-infected cultured cells reveals the presence of focal adhesion proteins beneath the attached bacteria. Our experiments support a model in which the cytoplasmic domains of Tir recruit a number of focal adhesion proteins that can bind actin filaments to form pedestals. Since pedestals also contain villin, tropomyosin and myosin II [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 34:279-287], the pedestals appear to be a novel structure sharing properties of both focal adhesions and microvilli. PMID:11093251

  7. Allosteric Coupling in the Bacterial Adhesive Protein FimH*

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Victoria B.; Kidd, Brian A.; Interlandi, Gianluca; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2013-01-01

    The protein FimH is expressed by the majority of commensal and uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli on the tips of type 1 fimbriae and mediates adhesion via a catch bond to its ligand mannose. Crystal structures of FimH show an allosteric conformational change, but it remains unclear whether all of the observed structural differences are part of the allosteric mechanism. Here we use the protein structural analysis tool RosettaDesign combined with human insight to identify and synthesize 10 mutations in four regions that we predicted would stabilize one of the conformations of that region. The function of each variant was characterized by measuring binding to the ligand mannose, whereas the allosteric state was determined using a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody. These studies demonstrated that each region investigated was indeed part of the FimH allosteric mechanism. However, the studies strongly suggested that some regions were more tightly coupled to mannose binding and others to antibody binding. In addition, we identified many FimH variants that appear locked in the low affinity state. Knowledge of regulatory sites outside the active and effector sites as well as the ability to make FimH variants locked in the low affinity state may be crucial to the future development of novel antiadhesive and antimicrobial therapies using allosteric regulation to inhibit FimH. PMID:23821547

  8. MicroRNA-10b Triggers the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) of Laryngeal Carcinoma Hep-2 Cells by Directly Targeting the E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Ren, Ji-Chen; Su, Wei; Zhang, Tian

    2015-05-01

    Laryngeal carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the molecular mechanism of its metastasis. The present study was designed to investigate effects of miR-10b on the invasion and migration of laryngeal Hep-2 cells. We found that miR-10b had limited effects on cell proliferation; however, it can significantly promote the migration and invasion of Hep-2 cells. Further studies revealed that overexpression of miR-10b can induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of Hep-2 cells by acquiring mesenchymal spindle-like morphology and increasing the expression of N-cadherin (N-Cad) with a concomitant decrease of E-cadherin (E-Cad). However, the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level of transcription factors such as Snail, Slug, Twist and ZEB was not changed during this process. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that miR-10b can directly target CDH1 (E-Cad gene) at nucleotides 461 and 481 within the 3'-UTR. This was confirmed by the results that miR-10 downregulated the protein and mRNA levels of E-Cad via a time-dependent manner and luciferase analysis by use of four-nucleotide substitution in the core binding sites. The present study provided a better understanding of laryngeal carcinoma metastasis and the roles of miR-10b during this process. PMID:25875782

  9. Surface functionalization of inorganic nano-crystals with fibronectin and E-cadherin chimera synergistically accelerates trans-gene delivery into embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuzawa, K.; Chowdhury, E.H.; Nagaoka, M.; Maruyama, K.; Akiyama, Y.; Akaike, T. . E-mail: takaike@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    Stem cells holding great promises in regenerative medicine have the potential to be differentiated to a specific cell type through genetic manipulation. However, conventional ways of gene transfer to such progenitor cells suffer from a number of disadvantages particularly involving safety and efficacy issues. Here, we report on the development of a bio-functionalized inorganic nano-carrier of DNA by embedding fibronectin and E-cadherin chimera on the carrier, leading to its high affinity interactions with embryonic stem cell surface and accelerated trans-gene delivery for subsequent expression. While only apatite nano-particles were very inefficient in transfecting embryonic stem cells, fibronectin-anchored particles and to a more significant extent, fibronectin and E-cadherin-Fc-associated particles dramatically enhanced trans-gene delivery with a value notably higher than that of commercially available lipofection system. The involvement of both cell surface integrin and E-cadherin in mediating intracellular localization of the hybrid carrier was verified by blocking integrin binding site with excess free fibronectin and up-regulating both integrin and E-cadherin through PKC activation. Thus, the new establishment of a bio-functional hybrid gene-carrier would promote and facilitate development of stem cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine.

  10. PTEN Loss in E-Cadherin-Deficient Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Rescues Apoptosis and Results in Development of Classical Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Mirjam C; Nethe, Micha; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; de Ruiter, Julian R; Schut, Eva; Bonzanni, Nicola; Zeeman, Amber L; Wientjens, Ellen; van der Burg, Eline; Wessels, Lodewyk; van Amerongen, Renée; Jonkers, Jos

    2016-08-23

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype with poor response to chemotherapy. Besides loss of E-cadherin, a hallmark of ILC, genetic inactivation of PTEN is frequently observed in patients. Through concomitant Cre-mediated inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN in mammary epithelium, we generated a mouse model of classical ILC (CLC), the main histological ILC subtype. While loss of E-cadherin induced cell dissemination and apoptosis, additional PTEN inactivation promoted cell survival and rapid formation of invasive mammary tumors that recapitulate the histological and molecular features, estrogen receptor (ER) status, growth kinetics, metastatic behavior, and tumor microenvironment of human CLC. Combined inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN is sufficient to cause CLC development. These CLCs showed significant tumor regression upon BEZ235-mediated inhibition of PI3K signaling. In summary, this mouse model provides important insights into CLC development and suggests inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting CLC. PMID:27524621

  11. An hTERT/ZEB1 complex directly regulates E-cadherin to promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Tang, Bo; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Rui; Yong, Xin; Wu, Yu Yun; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In human cancer, high telomerase expression is correlated with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. Telomerase activation occurs through telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) induction, which contributes to malignant transformation by stabilizing telomeres. Previous studies have shown that hTERT can promote tumor invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer, liver cancer and esophageal cancer. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a requirement for tumor invasion and metastasis, plays a key role in cancer progression. Although hTERT promotes EMT through Wnt signaling in several cancers, it is unknown if other signaling pathways are involved. In the present study, we found that hTERT and ZEB1 form a complex, which directly binds to the E-cadherin promoter, and then inhibits E-cadherin expression and promots EMT in colorectal cancer cells. hTERT overexpression in HCT116 and SW480 cells could induce E-cadherin down-regulation. However, E-cadherin expression was recovered when ZEB1 function was impaired even during hTERT overexpression. Taken together, our findings suggest that hTERT can promote cancer metastasis by stimulating EMT through the ZEB1 pathway and therefore inhibiting them may prevent cancer progression. PMID:26540342

  12. E-cadherin in non-tumor epithelium adjacent to oral cancer as risk marker for the development of multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    González-Moles, M A; Bravo, M; Ruiz-Avila, I; Gil-Montoya, J A; Acebal, F; Esteban, F

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the loss of E-cadherin is a risk factor for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and whether it could serve as a diagnostic marker for oral premalignant fields. We studied 77 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) with associated non-tumour epithelia from 61 patients. Immunohistochemical studies (antibody NHC-38) were used to investigate E-cadherin expression, which was completely lost in basal (48% of cases) and parabasal (43%) layers of non-tumour epithelia close to the tumour and in basal (47%) and parabasal (38%) layers of non-tumour epithelia distant from the tumour. In multiple tumours E-cadherin expression was significantly lower than in single tumours in the basal, parabasal layers, and the middle third of close (p=0.002, <0.001, <0.001) and distant (p=0.041, p<0.001, p=0.005) non-tumour epithelia, respectively. Downregulation of E-cadherin may be valuable as a risk marker for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and for the diagnosis of premalignant fields. PMID:22658605

  13. Biomimetic soy protein nanocomposites with calcium carbonate crystalline arrays for use as wood adhesive.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Chen, Huihuang; Chang, Peter R; Wu, Qinglin; Li, Kaifu; Guan, Litao

    2010-08-01

    Despite the biodegradability, non-toxicity, and renewability, commercially available soy protein-based adhesives still have not been widely adopted by industry, partially due to their disappointing performances, i.e., low glue strength in the dry state and no glue strength in the wet state. In this study, biomimetic soy protein/CaCO(3) hybrid wood glue was devised and an attempt made to improve the adhesion strength. The structure and morphology of the adhesive and its fracture bonding interface and adhesion strength were investigated. Results showed that the compact rivets or interlocking links, and ion crosslinking of calcium, carbonate, hydroxyl ions in the adhesive greatly improving the water-resistance and bonding strength of soy protein adhesives. Glue strength of soy protein hybrid adhesive was higher than 6 MPa even after three water-immersion cycles. This green and sustainable proteinous hybrid adhesive, with high glue strength and good water-resistance, is a good substitute for formaldehyde wood glues. PMID:20307978

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase interacts with vinculin at focal adhesions during fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    George, Margaret D.; Wine, Robert N.; Lackford, Brad; Kissling, Grace E.; Akiyama, Steven K.; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid stimulates cell adhesion by activating α2β1 integrins in a process that depends on protein kinases, including p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. Here, we describe the interaction of cytoskeletal components with key signaling molecules that contribute to spreading of, and morphological changes in, arachidonic acid-treated MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells. Arachidonic acid-treated cells showed increased attachment and spreading on collagen type IV as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Fatty acid-treated cells displayed short cortical actin filaments associated with an increased number of β1 integrin-containing pseudopodia whereas untreated cells displayed elongated stress fibers and fewer clusters of β1 integrins. Confocal microscopy of arachidonic acid-treated cells showed that vinculin and phospho-p38 both appeared enriched in pseudopodia and at the tips of actin filaments, and fluorescence ratio imaging indicated the increase was specific for the phospho-(active) form of p38. Immunoprecipitates of phospho-p38 from extracts of arachidonic acid-treated cells contained vinculin, and GST-vinculin fusion proteins carrying the central region of vinculin bound phospho-p38, whereas fusion proteins expressing the terminal portions of vinculin did not. These data suggest that phospho-p38 associates with particular domains on critical focal adhesion proteins that are involved in tumor cell adhesion and spreading and that this association can be regulated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24219282

  15. Focal adhesion linker proteins expression of fibroblast related to adhesion in response to different transmucosal abutment surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yeon-Hee; Yoon, Mi-Kyeong; Moon, Jung-Sun; Kang, Jee-Hae; Kim, Sun-Hun; Yang, Hong-Seo

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate adherence of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to transmucosal abutment of dental implant with different surface conditions with time and to investigate the roles of focal adhesion linker proteins (FALPs) involved in HGFs adhesion to abutment surfaces. MATERIALS AND METHODS Morphologies of cultured HGFs on titanium and ceramic discs with different surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility and focal adhesion were evaluated by ultrasonic wave application and cell viability assay. FALPs expression levels were assessed by RT-PCR and western blot. RESULTS There seemed to be little difference in biocompatibility and adhesion strength of HGFs depending on the surface conditions and materials. In all experimental groups, the number of cells remaining on the disc surface after ultrasonic wave application increased more than 2 times at 3 days after seeding compared to 1-day cultured cells and this continued until 7 days of culture. FALPs expression levels, especially of vinculin and paxillin, also increased in 5-day cultured cells compared to 1-day cultured fibroblasts on the disc surface. CONCLUSION These results might suggest that the strength of adhesion of fibroblasts to transmucosal abutment surfaces increases with time and it seemed to be related to expressions of FALPs. PMID:24049577

  16. Protein Recovery from Secondary Paper Sludge and Its Potential Use as Wood Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervaiz, Muhammad

    Secondary sludge is an essential part of biosolids produced through the waste treatment plant of paper mills. Globally paper mills generate around 3.0 million ton of biosolids and in the absence of beneficial applications, the handling and disposal of this residual biomass poses a serious environmental and economic proposition. Secondary paper sludges were investigated in this work for recovery of proteins and their use as wood adhesive. After identifying extracellular polymeric substances as adhesion pre-cursors through analytical techniques, studies were carried out to optimize protein recovery from SS and its comprehensive characterization. A modified physicochemical protocol was developed to recover protein from secondary sludge in substantial quantities. The combined effect of French press and sonication techniques followed by alkali treatment resulted in significant improvement of 44% in the yield of solubilized protein compared to chemical methods. The characterization studies confirmed the presence of common amino acids in recovered sludge protein in significant quantities and heavy metal concentration was reduced after recovery process. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed the presence of both low and high molecular weight protein fractions in recovered sludge protein. After establishing the proof-of-concept in the use of recovered sludge protein as wood adhesive, the bonding mechanism of protein adhesives with cellulose substrate was further elucidated in a complementary protein-modification study involving soy protein isolate and its glycinin fractions. The results of this study validated the prevailing bonding theories by proving that surface wetting, protein structure, and type of wood play important role in determining final adhesive strength. Recovered sludge protein was also investigated for its compatibility to formulate hybrid adhesive blends with formaldehyde and bio-based polymers. Apart from chemical

  17. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig; Andrews, Katrina A; Szestak, Tadge; Zhao, Yuguang; Larsen, Sine; Craig, Alister G; Higgins, Matthew K

    2013-02-22

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria. The PfEMP1 family of adhesive proteins is responsible for this sequestration by mediating interactions with diverse human ligands. In addition, as the primary targets of acquired, protective immunity, the PfEMP1s are potential vaccine candidates. PfEMP1s contain large extracellular ectodomains made from CIDR (cysteine-rich interdomain regions) and DBL (Duffy-binding-like) domains and show extensive variation in sequence, size, and domain organization. Here we use biophysical methods to characterize the entire ∼300-kDa ectodomain from IT4VAR13, a protein that interacts with the host receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). We show through small angle x-ray scattering that IT4VAR13 is rigid, elongated, and monomeric. We also show that it interacts with ICAM-1 through the DBLβ domain alone, forming a 1:1 complex. These studies provide a first low resolution structural view of a PfEMP1 ectodomain in complex with its ligand. They show that it combines a modular domain arrangement consisting of individual ligand binding domains, with a defined higher order architecture that exposes the ICAM-1 binding surface to allow adhesion. PMID:23297413

  18. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-02-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  19. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  20. Embedded proteins and sacrificial bonds provide the strong adhesive properties of gastroliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thormann, Esben; MizunoPresent Address: Nihon L'Oreal, Research; Innovation Center, 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan., Hiroyasu; Jansson, Kjell; Hedin, Niklas; Fernández, M. Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Rutland, Mark W.; PaiPresent Address: CenterFunctional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 735 Brookhaven Avenue, Upton, New York 11973., Ranjith Krishna; Bergström, Lennart

    2012-06-01

    The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO3. The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude.The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO3. The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30536d

  1. An Elmo–Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell–cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell–cell adhesion identified an Elmo–Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo–Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell–cell contacts in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. At cell–cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell–cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell–cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell–cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell–cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo–Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell–cell adhesion. PMID:25452388

  2. Specific Adhesion of Lipid Membranes Can Simultaneously Produce Two Types of Lipid and Protein Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Orrin; Micah, Natalie; Ritzer, Max; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Living cells adhere to one another and their environment. Adhesion is associated with re-organization of the lipid and protein components of the cell membrane. The resulting heterogeneities are functional structures involved in biological processes. We use artificial lipid membranes that contain a single type of binding protein. Before adhesion, the lipid, protein, and dye components in the membrane are well-mixed and constitute a single disordered-liquid phase (Ld) . After adhesion, two distinct types of heterogeneities coexist in the adhesion zone: a central domain of ordered lipid phase that excludes both binding proteins and membrane dye, and a peripheral domain of disordered lipid phase that is densely packed with adhesion proteins and enriched in membrane dye relative to the non-adhered portion of the vesicle. Thus, we show that adhesion that is mediated by only one type of protein can organize the lipid and protein components of the membranes into heterogeneities that resemble those found in biology, for example the immune synapse.

  3. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Adelina; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin) in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:22973534

  4. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein MEFP-2 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-02-07

    The present invention includes a Mytilus edulis cDNA having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-2 (Mefp-2), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-2 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-2 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-2 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-2 gene sequences will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  5. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein Mefp-1 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-01-17

    The present invention comprises a Mytilus edulis cDNA sequenc having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (Mefp-1), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-1 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-1 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-1 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-1 gene sequence will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  6. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Karina; Gomes, Fernando; Loureiro Bracarense, Ana Paula

    2013-01-01

    Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1) and deoxynivalenol (DON) cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM), DON (10 µM) and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON). Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%), DON (93%) and FB1 plus DON (100%). The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON. PMID:24287571

  7. Detecting cell-in-cell structures in human tumor samples by E-cadherin/CD68/CD45 triple staining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongyan; Chen, Ang; Wang, Ting; Wang, Manna; Ning, Xiangkai; He, Meifang; Hu, Yazhuo; Yuan, Long; Li, Shichong; Wang, Qiwei; Liu, Hong; Chen, Zhaolie; Ren, Jun; Sun, Qiang

    2015-08-21

    Although Cell-in-cell structures (CICs) had been documented in human tumors for decades, it is unclear what types of CICs were formed largely due to low resolution of traditional way such as H&E staining. In this work, we employed immunofluorescent method to stain a panel of human tumor samples simultaneously with antibodies against E-cadherin for Epithelium, CD68 for Macrophage and CD45 for Leukocytes, which we termed as "EML method" based on the cells detected. Detail analysis revealed four types of CICs, with tumor cells or macrophage engulfing tumor cells or leukocytes respectively. Interestingly, tumor cells seem to be dominant over macrophage (93% vs 7%) as the engulfer cells in all CICs detected, whereas the overall amount of internalized tumor cells is comparable to that of internalized CD45+ leukocytes (57% vs 43%). The CICs profiles vary from tumor to tumor, which may indicate different malignant stages and/or inflammatory conditions. Given the potential impacts different types of CICs might have on tumor growth, we therefore recommend EML analysis of tumor samples to clarify the correlation of CICs subtypes with clinical prognosis in future researches. PMID:26109430

  8. Slit-Robo signaling induces malignant transformation through Hakai-mediated E-cadherin degradation during colorectal epithelial cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei-Jie; Geng, Zhen H; Chi, Shan; Zhang, Wenli; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Lan, Shu-Jue; Ma, Li; Yang, Xuesong; Wang, Li-Jing; Ding, Yan-Qing; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    The Slit family of guidance cues binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors and modulates cell migration. We report here that ectopic expression of Slit2 and Robo1 or recombinant Slit2 treatment of Robo1-expressing colorectal epithelial carcinoma cells recruited an ubiquitin ligase Hakai for E-cadherin (E-cad) ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and tumor growth and liver metastasis, which were rescued by knockdown of Hakai. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous Robo1 or specific blockade of Slit2 binding to Robo1 prevented E-cad degradation and reversed EMT, resulting in diminished tumor growth and liver metastasis. Ectopic expression of Robo1 also triggered a malignant transformation in Slit2-positive human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Importantly, the expression of Slit2 and Robo1 was significantly associated with an increased metastatic risk and poorer overall survival in colorectal carcinoma patients. We conclude that engagement of Robo1 by Slit2 induces malignant transformation through Hakai-mediated E-cad ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation during colorectal epithelial cell carcinogenesis. PMID:21283129

  9. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  10. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored. PMID:23890721

  11. Adhesion of Mussel Foot Protein Mefp-5 to Mica: An Underwater Superglue†

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Eric W.; Kan, Yajing; Hammer, Malte U.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Mussels have a remarkable ability to attach their holdfast, or byssus, opportunistically to a variety of substrata that are wet, saline, corroded, and/or fouled by biofilms. Mytilus edulis foot protein-5 (Mefp-5) is one of several proteins in the byssal adhesive plaque of the mussel M. edulis. The high content of 3,4 dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) (~30 mol%) and its localization near the plaque-substrate interface have often prompted speculation that Mefp-5 plays a key role in adhesion. Using the surface forces apparatus, we show that on mica surfaces Mefp-5 achieves an adhesion energy approaching Ead = ~− 14 mJ/m2. This exceeds the adhesion energy of another interfacial protein, Mefp-3, by a factor of 4–5 and is greater than the adhesion between highly oriented monolayers of biotin and streptavidin. The adhesion to mica is notable for its dependence on Dopa, which is most stable under reducing conditions and acidic pH. Mefp-5 also exhibits strong protein-protein interactions with itself as well as with Mefp-3 from M. edulis. PMID:22873939

  12. Effect of adhesion proteins and surface chemistry on the procoagulant state of adherent platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunkemeier, John Mark

    Poor hemocompatibility of a blood contacting device can lead to blood clotting, reduced blood flow, and depletion of platelets from the blood. Improved understanding of the processes by which blood-material contact leads to these responses could result in more hemocompatible materials. Platelets accelerate blood clotting by adhesion, aggregation, secretion of proteins and agonists and acceleration of thrombin generation. Platelets are said to be "procoagulant" after phosphatidylserine residues flip from the cytosolic to the extracellular face of the lipid bilayer. This then allows for the assembly of the prothrombinase complex (Xa, Va and calcium) on the platelet membrane, which can rapidly convert prothrombin to thrombin. In this study, three different methods confirmed that adhesion causes platelets to become procoagulant: shortening of clotting times of recalcified plasma, binding of FITC-annexin V, and generation of thrombin in the presence of Va, Xa and prothrombin by adherent platelets. Adherent platelets were 10--23 times more activated than bulk phase unactivated platelets and 10--24 times less activated than bulk phase platelets activated by calcium ionophore. The role of adsorbed fibrinogen, vWF, mixtures of fibrinogen and vWF, fibronectin, whole and dilute plasma, and plasma deficient in adhesion proteins in stimulating platelet procoagulant activity was investigated. The results of these experiments suggested that adhesion proteins affect procoagulant activation to varying degrees and that surfaces preadsorbed with mixtures of adhesion proteins are more activating that surfaces preadsorbed with single adhesion proteins. The hypothesis that materials that affect tightness of binding of adsorbed adhesion proteins affect platelet procoagulant activity was investigated. These studies showed that increasing fluorine content of RFGD polymerized films caused reduced platelet adhesion, but increased procoagulant activity, possibly due to their ability to adsorb

  13. Strong underwater adhesives made by self-assembling multi-protein nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chao; Gurry, Thomas; Cheng, Allen A.; Downey, Jordan; Deng, Zhengtao; Stultz, Collin M.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-10-01

    Many natural underwater adhesives harness hierarchically assembled amyloid nanostructures to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular design, self-assembly and structure-function relationships of these natural amyloid fibres remains limited. Thus, designing biomimetic amyloid-based adhesives remains challenging. Here, we report strong and multi-functional underwater adhesives obtained from fusing mussel foot proteins (Mfps) of Mytilus galloprovincialis with CsgA proteins, the major subunit of Escherichia coli amyloid curli fibres. These hybrid molecular materials hierarchically self-assemble into higher-order structures, in which, according to molecular dynamics simulations, disordered adhesive Mfp domains are exposed on the exterior of amyloid cores formed by CsgA. Our fibres have an underwater adhesion energy approaching 20.9 mJ m-2, which is 1.5 times greater than the maximum of bio-inspired and bio-derived protein-based underwater adhesives reported thus far. Moreover, they outperform Mfps or curli fibres taken on their own and exhibit better tolerance to auto-oxidation than Mfps at pH ≥ 7.0.

  14. Adhesive Proteins of Stalked and Acorn Barnacles Display Homology with Low Sequence Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Abram, Florence; Pires, Elisabete; Varela Coelho, Ana; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins ‘sticky’ has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia) by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes). It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa). Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7–16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k) showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes). Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18–26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa) are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa). PMID:25295513

  15. Embedded proteins and sacrificial bonds provide the strong adhesive properties of gastroliths.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Esben; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Jansson, Kjell; Hedin, Niklas; Fernández, M Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Rutland, Mark W; Pai, Ranjith Krishna; Bergström, Lennart

    2012-07-01

    The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO(3). The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. PMID:22653376

  16. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  17. Adhesion mechanism in a DOPA-deficient foot protein from green mussels†

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong Soo; Zeng, Hongbo; Lu, Qingye; Israelachvili, Jacob; Waite, J. Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The holdfast or byssus of Asian green mussels, Perna viridis, contains a foot protein, pvfp-1, that differs in two respects from all other known adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfp): (1) instead of the hallmark L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) residues in mfp-1, for example, pvfp-1 contains C2-mannosyl-7-hydroxytryptophan (Man7OHTrp). (2) In addition, pvfp-1 chains are not monomeric like mfp-1 but trimerized by collagen and coiled-coil domains near the carboxy terminus after a typical domain of tandemly repeated decapeptides. Here, the contribution of these peculiarities to adhesion was examined using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Unlike previously studied mfp-1s, pvfp-1 showed significant adhesion to mica and, in symmetric pvfp-1 films, substantial cohesive interactions were present at pH 5.5. The role of Man7OHTrp in adhesion is not clear, and a DOPA-like role for Man7OHTrp in metal complexation (e.g., Cu2+, Fe3+) was not observed. Instead, cation–π interactions with low desolvation penalty between Man7OHTrp and lysyl side chains and conformational changes (raveling and unraveling of collagen helix and coiled-coil domains) are the best explanations for the strong adhesion between pvfp-1 monomolecular films. The strong adhesion mechanism induced by cation–π interactions and conformational changes in pvfp-1 provides new insights for the development of biomimetic underwater adhesives. PMID:23105946

  18. Anionic deep cavitands enable the adhesion of unmodified proteins at a membrane bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Perez, Lizeth; Morgan, Melissa A; Si, Fang; Hamdy, Omar M; Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K; Julian, Ryan R; Zhong, Wenwan; Cheng, Quan; Hooley, Richard J

    2014-12-28

    An anionic self-folding deep cavitand is capable of immobilizing unmodified proteins and enzymes at a supported lipid bilayer interface, providing a simple, soft bioreactive surface that allows enzymatic function under mild conditions. The adhesion is based on complementary charge interactions, and the hosts are capable of binding enzymes such as trypsin at the bilayer interface: the catalytic activity is retained upon adhesion, allowing selective reactions to be performed at the membrane surface. PMID:25366572

  19. Desmoplastic melanoma: expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Maria Concepción; Requena, Luis; Kutzner, Heinz; Ortiz, Pablo; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Peralto, José-Luis

    2014-03-01

    Desmoplastic melanoma (DM) is a rare variant of melanoma. Most frequently, it seems as clinically ambiguous and histologically characterized by a poorly demarcated neoplasm composed of a proliferation of spindle melanocytes dispersed in a prominent collagenous stroma. It often represents a diagnostic challenge, delaying its detection. We analyzed the expression profile of 29 (28 "pure" and 1 "combined") DM. These data were compared with a series of 62 primary vertical growth phase nondesmoplastic melanomas (NDMs) using a set of proteins including melanocytic markers (S-100 protein and melan-A) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins (E-cadherin, N-cadherin, SPARC, WT1, and PKCα). The S-100 protein confirmed the melanocytic origin of the DM (positive in 96%). The significant positive expression of N-cadherin, SPARC, and WT1 in DM (61%, 82%, and 71%) compared with NDM (28%, 43%, and 47%; P < 0.05) and a lower expression of E-cadherin in DM (14%) compared with NDM (61%) support specific adhesive and migratory properties of DM tumor cells. The study was carried out with tissue microarrays that partly limited the study of the tumor sections. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a prominent expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related proteins in DMs and tries to be one more step in refining its knowledge and leading to a better understanding of its biological and clinical behaviors. PMID:23974224

  20. Use of adhesion-defective mutants of Staphylococcus aureus to define the role of specific plasma proteins in promoting bacterial adhesion to canine arteriovenous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Vaudaux, P E; François, P; Proctor, R A; McDevitt, D; Foster, T J; Albrecht, R M; Lew, D P; Wabers, H; Cooper, S L

    1995-01-01

    We used an ex vivo canine arteriovenous shunt model, previously developed to study plasma protein adsorption and thrombogenesis on polymeric biomaterials, to define the role of host proteins in promoting adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus. Either polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride tubings were exposed to canine blood for 5, 15, or 60 min at a flow rate of 300 ml/min and then were flushed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), cut into 1.5-cm segments, and stored at -70 degrees C. After thawing, each segment was preincubated in 0.5% albumin in PBS to prevent nonspecific staphylococcal attachment to surfaces that were not exposed to blood. Each segment was then incubated with 4 x 10(6) CFU of [3H]thymidine-labelled S. aureus per ml for 60 min at 37 degrees C in an in vitro adhesion assay. Two site-specific mutants of S. aureus were tested: one specifically defective in adhesion to surface-bound fibronectin (FnAd-def) and the other defective in adhesion to fibrinogen (FgAD-def) [corrected]. Compared with their respective parental strains, the FgAd-def, but not the FnAd-def, mutant of S. aureus showed a strong (> 80%) decrease in attachment to ex vivo tubings. The adhesion of each strain of S. aureus onto polyethylene was consistently more than twofold higher than the adhesion onto polyvinyl chloride segments exposed to flowing blood for 5 or 15 min, but adhesion became similar to that on polyvinyl chloride after 60 min of exposure. In conclusion, the specific adhesion-defective mutants of S. aureus suggested that fibrinogen was the most active adhesion-promoting protein in a short-term blood-material interaction. The experimental approach described in this study should prove useful for screening materials thought to be resistant to protein-mediated staphylococcal adhesion and colonization. PMID:7822026

  1. Cell adhesion-dependent inactivation of a soluble protein kinase during fertilization in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Luo, Y; Emmett, K; Snell, W J

    1996-01-01

    Within seconds after the flagella of mt+ and mt- Chlamydomonas gametes adhere during fertilization, their flagellar adenylyl cyclase is activated several fold and preparation for cell fusion is initiated. Our previous studies indicated that early events in this pathway, including control of adenylyl cyclase, are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we describe a soluble, flagellar protein kinase activity that is regulated by flagellar adhesion. A 48-kDa, soluble flagellar protein was consistently phosphorylated in an in vitro assay in flagella isolated from nonadhering mt+ and mt- gametes, but not in flagella isolated from mt+ and mt- gametes that had been adhering for 1 min. Although the 48-kDa protein was present in the flagella isolated from adhering gametes, we demonstrate that its protein kinase was inactivated by flagellar adhesion. Immunoblot analysis and inhibitor studies indicate that the 48-kDa protein in nonadhering gametes is phosphorylated by a protein tyrosine kinase. In vivo experiments showing that the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate inhibits fertilization suggest that protein dephosphorylation may be required for signal transduction. The 48-kDa protein and its protein kinase may be among the first elements of a novel signalling pathway that couples interaction of flagellar adhesion molecules to gamete activation. Images PMID:8730096

  2. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding. PMID:25351253

  3. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Development of spermatozoa in adult mammalian testis during spermatogenesis involves extensive cell migration and differentiation. Spermatogonia that reside at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium differentiate into more advanced germ cell types that migrate toward the apical compartment until elongated spermatids are released into the tubule lumen during spermiation. Apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES; a testis-specific anchoring junction) is the only cell junction that anchors and maintains the polarity of elongating/elongated spermatids (step 8–19 spermatids) in the epithelium. Little is known regarding the signaling pathways that trigger the disassembly of the apical ES at spermiation. Here, we show that secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, is a crucial regulatory protein for spermiation. The expression of sFRP1 is tightly regulated in adult rat testis to control spermatid adhesion and sperm release at spermiation. Down-regulation of sFRP1 during testicular development was found to coincide with the onset of the first wave of spermiation at approximately age 45 d postpartum, implying that sFRP1 might be correlated with elongated spermatid adhesion conferred by the apical ES before spermiation. Indeed, administration of sFRP1 recombinant protein to the testis in vivo delayed spermiation, which was accompanied by down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tyr397 and retention of nectin-3 adhesion protein at the apical ES. To further investigate the functional relationship between p-FAK-Tyr397 and localization of nectin-3, we overexpressed sFRP1 using lentiviral vectors in the Sertoli-germ cell coculture system. Consistent with the in vivo findings, overexpression of sFRP1 induced down-regulation of p-FAK-Tyr397, leading to a decline in phosphorylation of nectin-3. In summary, this report highlights the critical role of s

  4. Single Adhesive Nanofibers from a Live Diatom Have the Signature Fingerprint of Modular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dugdale, T. M.; Dagastine, R.; Chiovitti, A.; Mulvaney, P.; Wetherbee, R.

    2005-01-01

    The adhesive and mechanical properties of a cell-substratum adhesive secreted by live diatom cells were examined in situ using atomic force microscopy. The resulting force curves have a regular saw-tooth pattern, the characteristic fingerprint of modular proteins, and when bridged between tip and surface can repeatedly be stretched and relaxed resulting in precisely overlaying saw-tooth curves (up to ∼600 successive cycles). The average rupture force of the peaks is 0.794 ± 0.007 (mean ± SE) nN at a loading rate of 0.8 μm/s and the average persistence length is 0.026 ± <0.001 (mean ± SE) nm (fit using the worm-like chain model). We propose that we are pulling on single adhesive nanofibers, each a cohesive unit composed of a set number of modular proteins aligned in register. Furthermore, we can observe and differentiate when up to three adhesive nanofibers are pulled based upon multimodal distributions of force and persistence length. The high force required for bond rupture, high extensibility (∼1.2 μm), and the accurate and rapid refolding upon relaxation, together provide strong and flexible properties ideally suited for the cell-substratum adhesion of this fouling diatom and allow us to understand the mechanism responsible for the strength of adhesion. PMID:16169972

  5. Modification of human platelet adhesion on biomaterial surfaces by protein preadsorption under static and flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Otto, Mike; Franzen, Arno; Hansen, Torsten; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2004-01-01

    Biomaterial-induced thrombosis remains one of the main complications of vascular implant devices. Preadsorbed proteins on the biomaterial/blood interface will modify the adhesion and activation of platelets (PTLs) during the initial contact-phase. Our results clearly show that PTL-adherence on biomaterials is influenced not only by protein preadsorption, but also by flow conditions. The covalent coating of TCPS and glass by phosphorylcholine (PC) induces a significant decrease of PTL adhesion but leads to a slight, but nevertheless significant activation of PTL, which was detected by the induction of P-selectin expression using FACS analysis. Methodologically, the visualization of PTL adhesion gave more reliable results for measurement of PTL adhesion than the cell-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for P-selectin. Human citrated plasma caused an inhibition of PTL. It is probable, that the contained sodium citrate may inhibit PTL adhesion by its calcium ion-binding capacity. The flow experiment as dynamic system is in our view absolutely essential for the evaluation of biomaterials for vascular prosthesis, and is in accordance with the international standards. The results of the experiments also suggest that investigations under static and flow conditions are needed to determine the influence of protein adsorption on mixed blood cell populations, for example, on PTL and PMN mixtures/co-cultures in order to achieve a better simulation of the in vivo situation. PMID:15338589

  6. A focal adhesion protein-based mechanochemical checkpoint regulates cleft progression during branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daley, William P.; Kohn, Joshua M.; Larsen, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Cleft formation is the initial step of branching morphogenesis in many organs. We previously demonstrated that ROCK 1 regulates a non-muscle myosin II-dependent mechanochemical checkpoint to transition initiated clefts to progressing clefts in developing submandibular salivary glands. Here, we report that ROCK-mediated integrin activation and subsequent formation of focal adhesion complexes comprise this mechanochemical checkpoint. Inhibition of ROCK1 and non-muscle myosin II activity decreased integrin β1 activation in the cleft region and interfered with localization and activation of focal adhesion complex proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK activity also prevented cleft progression, by disrupting recruitment of the focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and subsequent fibronectin assembly in the cleft region while decreasing ERK1/2 activation. These results demonstrate that inside-out integrin signaling leading to a localized recruitment of active FAK-containing focal adhesion protein complexes generates a mechanochemical checkpoint that facilitates progression of branching morphogenesis. PMID:22016182

  7. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  8. Corneal Cell Adhesion to Contact Lens Hydrogel Materials Enhanced via Tear Film Protein Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Claire M.; Qi, Qin M.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2014-01-01

    Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS), borate buffered saline (BBS), or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes), either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes) exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo. PMID:25144576

  9. The role of serum proteins in Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to ethylene glycol coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Swen; Yu, Wenqi; Nega, Mulugeta; Chu, Ya-Yun; Zorn, Stefan; Zhang, Fajun; Götz, Friedrich; Schreiber, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion on implants is a first step in the development of chronic foreign body associated infections. Finding strategies to minimize bacterial adhesion may contribute to minimize such infections. It is known that surfaces with oligo-ethylene-glycol (EG3OMe) or poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG2k) terminations decrease unspecific protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. However, little is known about the influence of serum and its components on bacterial adhesion. We therefore prepared two coatings on gold surface with HS-(CH2)11EG3OMe (EG3OMe) and PEG2k-thiol and studied the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA), γ-globulins, and serum on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion. While BSA and lysozyme showed no adherence even when applied at very high concentrations (100 mg/ml), γ-globulins adsorbed already from 10 mg/ml on. The adsorption of γ-globulins was, however, significantly decreased when it was mixed with BSA in a ratio of 3:1, as it is in the serum. Pretreatment of EG3OMe and PEG2k coatings with γ-globulins or serum strongly promoted adherence of S. aureus when resuspended in buffer, suggesting that γ-globulins play a pivotal role in promoting S. aureus adhesion by its IgG binding proteins; the finding that a spa-deletion mutant, lacking the IgG binding protein A, showed decreased adherence corroborated this. Similarly, when S. aureus was pretreated with serum or γ-globulins its adherence was also significantly decreased. Our findings show that particularly γ-globulins bind to the coated surfaces thus mediating adherence of S. aureus via its protein A. As pretreatment of S. aureus with serum or γ-globulins significantly decreased adherence, treatment of patients with γ-globulins before implant surgery might lower the risk of implant-associated infections. PMID:24980510

  10. Designed Stem Cell Aggregates: Enhanced Biological Functions of Human Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Aggregates Incorporating E-Cadherin-Modified PLGA Microparticles (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mao, Hongli; Gao, Chao; Li, Suhua; Shuai, Qizhi; Xu, Jianbin; Xu, Ke; Cao, Lei; Lang, Ren; Gu, Zhongwei; Akaike, Toshihiro; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    E-cadherin-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (hE-cad-PLGA) microparticles were fabricated and then mediated the 3D cell aggregates of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on page 1949 by Jun Yang and co-workers. The hE-cad-Fc matrix and the PLGA microparticles synergistically regulate the proliferation and bioactive factors secretions of MSCs by activating EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. The hE-cad-PLGA microparticles offer a novel route to expand multipotent stem cell-based clinical applications. PMID:27511954

  11. Reduced bacterial adhesion to hydrocephalus shunt catheters mediated by cerebrospinal fluid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, H L; Bayston, R; Hayward, R; Harkness, W

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Prosthetic infections are a major problem, requiring complex and lengthy management. The role of blood proteins in the pathogenesis of implant infection has been investigated, but research into the role of CSF protein in shunt infections has not been undertaken, even though a high CSF protein has been assumed to increase the risk of such infections. METHODS--New shunt catheters were exposed to either CSF or individual protein solutions, and the numbers of radiolabelled staphylococci that adhered to them were compared with controls that had been exposed to saline only. RESULTS--A significant reduction in bacteria adhering to the test catheter was found in each instance. Furthermore, the CSF with the highest protein content, from a patient with intraventricular haemorrhage, had the greatest inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion. The effect of the solutions on the hydrophobicity of the silicone rubber was also investigated. The silicone rubber was more hydrophilic, and bacterial adhesion was less, with solutions containing a higher protein content, and these findings were in keeping with the current theories on the mechanism of bacterial adhesion to polymers. CONCLUSIONS--A high CSF protein content does not predispose to the development of shunt infections. PMID:8648336

  12. Low-cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in glu...

  13. Effect of Milk Proteins on Adhesion of Bacteria to Stainless Steel Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, L.-M.; Lo, M. F.; Adams, M. R.; Chamberlain, A. H. L.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel coupons were treated with skim milk and subsequently challenged with individual bacterial suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fragi, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Serratia marcescens. The numbers of attached bacteria were determined by direct epifluorescence microscopy and compared with the attachment levels on clean stainless steel with two different surface finishes. Skim milk was found to reduce adhesion of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, and S. marcescens. P. fragi and E. coli attached in very small numbers to the clear surfaces, making the effect of any adsorbed protein layer difficult to assess. Individual milk proteins α-casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and α-lactalbumin were also found to reduce the adhesion of S. aureus and L. monocytogenes. The adhesion of bacteria to samples treated with milk dilutions up to 0.001% was investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the proportion of nitrogen in the adsorbed films. Attached bacterial numbers were inversely related to the relative atomic percentage of nitrogen on the surface. A comparison of two types of stainless steel surface, a 2B and a no. 8 mirror finish, indicated that the difference in these levels of surface roughness did not greatly affect bacterial attachment, and reduction in adhesion to a milk-treated surface was still observed. Cross-linking of adsorbed proteins partially reversed the inhibition of bacterial attachment, indicating that protein chain mobility and steric exclusion may be important in this phenomenon. PMID:10508087

  14. Low-Cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in gl...

  15. Protein Kinase C beta Mediates CD40 Ligand-Induced Adhesion of Monocytes to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeyu; Zhao, Gang; Peng, Lin; Du, Jialin; Wang, Sanming; Huang, Yijie; Ou, Jinrui; Jian, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the early involvement of monocyte/macrophage recruitment to activated endothelial cells by leukocyte adhesion molecules during atherogenesis. CD40 and its ligand CD40L are highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but its impact on monocyte adhesion and the related molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the direct effect of CD40L on monocytic cell adhesion and gain mechanistic insight into the signaling coupling CD40L function to the proinflammatory response. Exposure of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to clinically relevant concentrations of CD40L (20 to 80 ng/mL) dose-dependently increased human monocytic THP-1 cells to adhere to them under static condition. CD40L treatment induced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA and protein expression in HAECs. Furthermore, exposure of HAECs to CD40L robustly increased the activation of protein kinase C beta (PKCβ) in ECs. A selective inhibitor of PKCβ prevented the rise in VCAM-1 and THP-1 cell adhesion to ECs. Moreover, stimulation of ECs to CD40L induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. PKCβ inhibition abolished CD40L-induced NF-κB activation, and NF-κB inhibition reduced expression of VCAM-1, each resulting in reduced THP-1 cell adhesion. Our findings provide the evidence that CD40L increases VCAM-1 expression in ECs by activating PKCβ and NF-κB, suggesting a novel mechanism for EC activation. Finally, administration of CD40L resulted in PKCβ activation, increased VCAM-1 expression and activated monocytes adhesiveness to HAECs, processes attenuated by PKCβ inhibitor. Therefore, CD40L may contribute directly to atherogenesis by activating ECs and recruiting monocytes to them. PMID:24039784

  16. Retrograde Fluxes of Focal Adhesion Proteins in Response to Cell Migration and Mechanical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei-hui

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mechanical signals mediated by the extracellular matrix play an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes; yet, how cells respond to mechanical stimuli remains elusive. Using live cell fluorescence imaging, we found that actin filaments, in association with a number of focal adhesion proteins, including zyxin and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, undergo retrograde fluxes at focal adhesions in the lamella region. This flux is inversely related to cell migration, such that it is amplified in fibroblasts immobilized on micropatterned islands. In addition, the flux is regulated by mechanical signals, including stretching forces applied to flexible substrates and substrate stiffness. Conditions favoring the flux share the common feature of causing large retrograde displacements of the interior actin cytoskeleton relative to the substrate anchorage site, which may function as a switch translating mechanical input into chemical signals, such as tyrosine phosphorylation. In turn, the stimulation of actin flux at focal adhesions may function as part of a feedback mechanism, regulating structural assembly and force production in relation to cell migration and mechanical load. The retrograde transport of associated focal adhesion proteins may play additional roles in delivering signals from focal adhesions to the interior of the cell. PMID:17804814

  17. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). PMID:26311334

  18. Thrombolytic protein from cobra venom with anti-adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Chandrasekhar; Sarkar, Angshuman; Chakrabarty, Dibakar

    2016-01-15

    A metalloproteinase anticoagulant toxin of molecular weight 66 kDa has been purified from the venom of Indian monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia). This toxin named as NKV 66 cleaved fibrinogen in a dose and time dependent manner. The digestion process was specific to Aα chain and cleaved fibrinogen to peptide fragments. NKV 66 completely liquefied the fibrin clots developed in vitro in 18 h. Plasma recalcification time and thrombin time were significantly prolonged following treatment of plasma with NKV 66. NKV 66 significantly inhibited ADP and collagen induced platelet aggregation in a dose dependent manner. It showed disintegrin like activity on A549 cells cultured in vitro. About 40% inhibition of adherence of A549 cells to matrix was observed following NKV 66 treatment also NKV 66 treated A549 cells were drastically inhibited from passing through the matrix in cell invasion assays in vitro, suggesting anti-adhesive properties of NKV 66. PMID:26558696

  19. Identification of proteins associated with adhesive prints from Holothuria dofleinii Cuvierian tubules.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong Y; Glattauer, Veronica; Skewes, Timothy D; McDevitt, Andrew; Elvin, Christopher M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Graham, Lloyd D; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-12-01

    Cuvierian tubules are expelled as a defence mechanism against predators by various species within the family Holothuridae. When the tubules are expelled, they become sticky almost immediately and ensnare the predator. The mechanism of this rapid adhesion is not clear, but proteins on the surface of the expelled tubules are widely believed to be involved. This study has examined such proteins from Holothuria dofleinii, sourced from adhesive prints left on glass after the removal of adhered tubules. Gel electrophoresis showed that seven strongly staining protein bands were consistently present in all samples, with molecular masses ranging from 89 to 17 kDa. N-terminal sequence data was obtained from two bands, while others seemed blocked. Tandem mass spectrometry-based sequencing of tryptic peptides derived from individual protein bands indicated that the proteins were unlikely to be homopolymers. PCR primers designed using the peptide sequences enabled us to amplify, clone and sequence cDNA segments relating to four gel bands; for each, the predicted translation product contained other peptide sequences observed for that band that had not been used in primer design. Database searches using the peptide and cDNA-encoded sequences suggest that two of the seven proteins are novel and one is a C-type lectin, while-surprisingly-at least three of the other four are closely related to enzymes associated with the pentose phosphate cycle and glycolysis. We discuss precedents in which lectins and metabolic enzymes are involved in attachment and adhesion phenomena. PMID:25086572

  20. Heat shock protein 60 acts as a receptor for the Listeria adhesion protein in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wampler, Jennifer L; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Jaradat, Ziad; Bhunia, Arun K

    2004-02-01

    The 104-kDa Listeria adhesion protein (LAP) in Listeria monocytogenes is involved in binding to various mammalian cell lines. However, the receptor that interacts with LAP in eukaryotic cells is unknown. In this study, scanning immunoelectron microscopy qualitatively demonstrated greater binding capacity of wild-type (WT) L. monocytogenes strain (F4244) than a LAP-deficient mutant strain (KB208) to Caco-2 cells. The goal of this study was identification of the host cell receptor for LAP. Using a Western blot ligand overlay assay, we identified a protein of 58 kDa to be the putative receptor for LAP from Caco-2 cells. N-terminal sequencing and subsequent database search identified this protein as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Modified immunoseparation with protein A-Sepharose beads bound to the LAP-specific monoclonal antibody H7 (MAb-H7) and a sequential incubation with LAP preparation and Caco-2 lysate confirmed the receptor to be the same 58-kDa protein. Western blot analysis with anti-Hsp60 MAb of whole-cell adhesion between Caco-2 and WT also revealed the receptor protein to be a 58-kDa protein, thus corroborating the identification of Hsp60 as a host cell receptor for LAP. Furthermore, the anti-Hsp60 antibody also caused approximately 74% reduction in binding of L. monocytogenes WT to Caco-2 cells, whereas a control antibody, C11E9, had no effect on binding. The adhesion mechanism of L. monocytogenes to eukaryotic cells is a complex process, and identification of Hsp60 as a receptor for LAP adds to the list of previously discovered ligand-receptor modules that are essential to achieve successful adhesion. PMID:14742538

  1. Intracellular uptake and intraspheroidal distribution of hypericin and hydrophilic analogues using E-cadherin transfected T-24 human bladder cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnolatac, Ivo; Huygens, Ann; de Witte, Peter A. M.

    2008-02-01

    Hypericin (HYP) is used after instillation as a diagnostic tool for the fluorescence detection of CIS in the human bladder. In this study the in vitro cellular accumulation and intraspheroidal distribution of HYP and three analogues (OH1, OH2, OH3) with gradually increasing hydrophilicity were studied. E-cadherin negative (T24-C1 -) and E-cadherin positive (T24-H3 ++) human bladder cancer cells were used. We report that in the presence of FBS all compounds were taken up by the monolayer cells to the same limited extent, whereas the overall intracellular accumulation was substantially higher when the incubation of the different dyes took place using cell medium not supplemented with FBS. The results of this study therefore confirm the competition between cellular uptake of HYP and analogues and binding to FBS constituents. Investigating the permeation of the compounds in spheroids, it was found that all HYP analogues diffused dramatically better through the three-dimensional cell layers than HYP itself. This enhanced ability of hydrophilic HYP analogues to permeate through the cell layers in the presence of FBS can be explained in terms of a preferred binding to HDL as compared to LDL. The results further show that all compounds, including LDL-binding HYP, substantially permeated better in T24-C1 - spheroids than in T24-H3 ++ spheroids. The data therefore support the hypothesis that a lowered cellular cohesion is the key to understand the selective uptake of hypericin and its analogues in malignant urothelial cells.

  2. miR-199a-5p induces cell invasion by suppressing E-cadherin expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAOHUA; CAO, KE; HE, QUANYONG; YIN, ZHAOQI; ZHOU, JIANDA

    2016-01-01

    A growing quantity of evidence exists to suggest that microRNAs are significant regulators of multiple cellular processes. When expressed aberrantly in different types of cancer, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), they play key roles in tumorigenesis and progression. The aberrant expression of miR-199a-5p has been observed to contribute to carcinogenesis in various types of cancer. However, the role of miR-199a-5p in the progression of cSCC metastasis remains largely unknown. In this study, we determined that miR-199a-5p was the upstream regulator of CDH1 (E-cadherin) and that it could suppress the expression of E-cadherin in cSCC cells. In addition, miR-199a-5p mimics significantly induced cell invasion and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 in cSCC cells. In conclusion, these results are likely to aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cSCC progression. In addition, the findings provide a new theoretical basis to further investigate miR-199a-5p as a potential biomarker and a promising approach in cSCC treatment. PMID:27347107

  3. Deciphering Seed Sequence Based Off-Target Effects in a Large-Scale RNAi Reporter Screen for E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert; Nicke, Barbara; Pohlenz, Hans-Dieter; Sohler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Functional RNAi based screening is affected by large numbers of false positive and negative hits due to prevalent sequence based off-target effects. We performed a druggable genome targeting siRNA screen intended to identify novel regulators of E-cadherin (CDH1) expression, a known key player in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Analysis of primary screening results indicated a large number of false-positive hits. To address these crucial difficulties we developed an analysis method, SENSORS, which, similar to published methods, is a seed enrichment strategy for analyzing siRNA off-targets in RNAi screens. Using our approach, we were able to demonstrate that accounting for seed based off-target effects stratifies primary screening results and enables the discovery of additional screening hits. While traditional hit detection methods are prone to false positive results which are undetected, we were able to identify false positive hits robustly. Transcription factor MYBL1 was identified as a putative novel target required for CDH1 expression and verified experimentally. No siRNA pool targeting MYBL1 was present in the used siRNA library. Instead, MYBL1 was identified as a putative CDH1 regulating target solely based on the SENSORS off-target score, i.e. as a gene that is a cause for off-target effects down regulating E-cadherin expression. PMID:26361354

  4. Neuropilin-2 promotes tumourigenicity and metastasis in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma through ERK-MAPK-ETV4-MMP-E-cadherin deregulation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tsun Ming; Ng, Kai Yu; Tong, Man; Chen, Jin-Na; Chai, Stella; Chan, Kin-Tak; Law, Simon; Lee, Nikki P; Choi, Mei Yuk; Li, Bin; Cheung, Annie L; Tsao, Sai Wah; Qin, Yan-Ru; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Chan, Kwok Wah; Ma, Stephanie

    2016-07-01

    Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the most common histological subtype of oesophageal cancer. The disease is particularly prevalent in southern China. The incidence of the disease is on the rise and its overall survival rate remains dismal. Identification and characterization of better molecular markers for early detection and therapeutic targeting are urgently needed. Here, we report levels of transmembrane and soluble neuropilin-2 (NRP2) to be significantly up-regulated in ESCC, and to correlate positively with advanced tumour stage, lymph node metastasis, less favourable R category and worse overall patient survival. NRP2 up-regulation in ESCC was in part a result of gene amplification at chromosome 2q. NRP2 overexpression promoted clonogenicity, angiogenesis and metastasis in ESCC in vitro, while NRP2 silencing by lentiviral knockdown or neutralizing antibody resulted in a contrary effect. This observation was extended in vivo in animal models of subcutaneous tumourigenicity and tail vein metastasis. Mechanistically, overexpression of NRP2 induced expression of ERK MAP kinase and the transcription factor ETV4, leading to enhanced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity and, as a consequence, suppression of E-cadherin. In summary, NRP2 promotes tumourigenesis and metastasis in ESCC through deregulation of ERK-MAPK-ETV4-MMP-E-cadherin signalling. NRP2 represents a potential diagnostic or prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for ESCC. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27063000

  5. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and E47 EMT factor: novel partners in E-cadherin repression and early metastasis colonization.

    PubMed

    Canesin, G; Cuevas, E P; Santos, V; López-Menéndez, C; Moreno-Bueno, G; Huang, Y; Csiszar, K; Portillo, F; Peinado, H; Lyden, D; Cano, A

    2015-02-19

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with increased aggressiveness and acquisition of migratory properties providing tumor cells with the ability to invade into adjacent tissues. Downregulation of E-cadherin, a hallmark of EMT, is mediated by several transcription factors (EMT-TFs) that act also as EMT inducers, among them, Snail1 and the bHLH transcription factor E47. We previously described lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a member of the lysyl oxidase family, as a Snail1 regulator and EMT inducer. Here we show that LOXL2 is also an E47-interacting partner and functionally collaborates in the repression of E-cadherin promoter. Loss and gain of function analyses combined with in vivo studies in syngeneic breast cancer models demonstrate the participation of LOXL2 and E47 in tumor growth and their requirement for lung metastasis. Furthermore, LOXL2 and E47 contribute to early steps of metastatic colonization by cell and noncell autonomous functions regulating the recruitment of bone marrow progenitor cells to the lungs and by direct transcriptional regulation of fibronectin and cytokines TNFα, ANG-1 and GM-CSF. Moreover, fibronectin and GM-CSF proved to be necessary for LOXL2/E47-mediated modulation of tumor growth and lung metastasis. PMID:24632622

  6. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs. PMID:26197411

  7. Influence of Aae Autotransporter Protein on Adhesion and Biofilm Formation by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Ana Carla Robatto; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans colonizes oral cavity by binding to and invading epithelial cells as well as by participating in biofilms formed on hard surfaces. Aae, an autotransporter protein, is implicated in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Due to the multiple functions of bacterial autotransporter proteins, this study aimed to evaluate the role of aae in A. actinomycetemcomitans ability to adhere to both saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and biofilm. An aae null mutant was constructed. Its hydrophobic properties as well as its ability to adhere to epithelial cells, SHA and to form biofilm were evaluated and compared with the parental strain, A. actinomycetemcomitans VT1169. The aae null mutant showed reduced hydrophobicity, as well as decreased binding to SHA and biofilm formation compared to the parental strain. These data suggest that aae mediates A. actinomycetemcomitans adhesion to epithelial cells and may be involved in biofilm formation and interaction with adsorbed salivary proteins. PMID:27224556

  8. Mechanical and water soaking properties of medium density fiberboard with wood fiber and soybean protein adhesive.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Yonghui; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Ratto, Jo A; Sheng, Kuichuan; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2009-07-01

    Soybean protein is a renewable and abundant material that offers an alternative to formaldehyde-based resins. In this study, soybean protein was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as an adhesive for wood fiber medium density fiberboard (MDF) preparation. Second-order response surface regression models were used to study the effects and interactions of initial moisture content (IMC) of coated wood fiber, press time (PT) and temperature on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Results showed that IMC of coated fiber was the dominant influencing factor. Mechanical and soaking properties improved as IMC increased and reached their highest point at an IMC of 35%. Press time and temperature also had a significant effect on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Second-order regression results showed that there were strong relationships between mechanical and soaking properties of MDF and processing parameters. Properties of MDF made using soybean protein adhesive are similar to those of commercial board. PMID:19329303

  9. Adhesive strength and curing rate of marine mussel protein extracts on porcine small intestinal submucosa*

    PubMed Central

    Ninan, Lal; Stroshine, R L; Wilker, J.J.; Shi, Riyi

    2008-01-01

    An adhesive protein extracted from marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) was used to bond strips of connective tissue for the purpose of evaluating the use of curing agents to improve adhesive curing. Specifically, mussel adhesive protein solution (MAPS, 0.5 mM dihydroxyphenylalanine) was applied, with or without the curing agents, to the ends of two overlapping strips of porcine small intestinal submucosa. The bond strength of this lap joint was determined after curing for 1 h at room temperature (25°C). The strength of joints formed using only MAPS or with only the ethyl, butyl or octyl cyanoacrylate adhesives were determined. Although joints bonded using ethyl cyanoacrylate were strongest, those using MAPS were stronger than those using butyl and octyl cyanoacrylates. The addition of 25 mM solutions of the transition metal ions V5+, Fe3+ and Cr6+, which are all oxidants, increased the bond strength of the MAPS joints. The V5+ gave the strongest bonds and the Fe3+ the second strongest. In subsequent tests with V5+ and Fe3+ solutions, the bond strength increased with V5+ concentration, but it did not increase with Fe3+ concentration. Addition of 250 mM V5+ gave a very strong bond. PMID:17434815

  10. Ubiquitous distribution of salts and proteins in spider glue enhances spider silk adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chaurasia, Vishal; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Modern orb-weaving spiders use micron-sized glue droplets on their viscid silk to retain prey in webs. A combination of low molecular weight salts and proteins makes the glue viscoelastic and humidity responsive in a way not easily achieved by synthetic adhesives. Optically, the glue droplet shows a heterogeneous structure, but the spatial arrangement of its chemical components is poorly understood. Here, we use optical and confocal Raman microscopy to show that salts and proteins are present ubiquitously throughout the droplet. The distribution of adhesive proteins in the peripheral region explains the superior prey capture performance of orb webs as it enables the entire surface area of the glue droplet to act as a site for prey capture. The presence of salts throughout the droplet explains the recent Solid-State NMR results that show salts directly facilitate protein mobility. Understanding the function of individual glue components and the role of the droplet's macro-structure can help in designing better synthetic adhesives for humid environments.

  11. Ubiquitous distribution of salts and proteins in spider glue enhances spider silk adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chaurasia, Vishal; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Modern orb-weaving spiders use micron-sized glue droplets on their viscid silk to retain prey in webs. A combination of low molecular weight salts and proteins makes the glue viscoelastic and humidity responsive in a way not easily achieved by synthetic adhesives. Optically, the glue droplet shows a heterogeneous structure, but the spatial arrangement of its chemical components is poorly understood. Here, we use optical and confocal Raman microscopy to show that salts and proteins are present ubiquitously throughout the droplet. The distribution of adhesive proteins in the peripheral region explains the superior prey capture performance of orb webs as it enables the entire surface area of the glue droplet to act as a site for prey capture. The presence of salts throughout the droplet explains the recent Solid-State NMR results that show salts directly facilitate protein mobility. Understanding the function of individual glue components and the role of the droplet's macro-structure can help in designing better synthetic adhesives for humid environments. PMID:25761668

  12. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant loadbearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m2) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  13. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  14. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Kenta; NISHIYAMA, Keita; MIYAJIMA, Hiroki; OSAWA, Ro; YAMAMOTO, Yuji; MUKAI, Takao

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10−8 M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  15. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenta; Nishiyama, Keita; Miyajima, Hiroki; Osawa, Ro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10(-8) M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  16. Application of tung oil to improve adhesion strength and water resistance of cottonseed meal and protein adhesives on maple veneer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed meal-based products show promise in serving as environment-friendly wood adhesives. However, their practical utilization is currently limited due to low durability and water resistant properties. In this research, we tested the improvement of adhesion strength and water resistance of cott...

  17. Protein Adhesion and Ion Substitution (on/in)to Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, L.; Fernandez Martinez, A.; Chapron, Y.; Sahai, N.; Cuello, G.; Brendle, J.; Marichal, C.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic and pathogenic prion protein-scrapie (PrPsc) are important contaminants which may soil and water for decades, unless they are removed by sorption. Two sorption mechanisms will be discussed, namely the organics (Prp and single aminoacid) adsorption on clay and the arsenic substitution in gypsum. The elucidation of these contrasted mechanisms will be shown to request complementary molecular-mechanical simulations with experimental spectroscopic investigations. As first example, structural studies performed at ILL/ESRF on As-doped gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) using neutron and X-ray diffraction data and EXAFS were performed to determine how As fits into the bulk of gypsum structure. The combined Rietveld analysis of neutron and X-ray diffraction data shows an expansion of the unit cell volume proportional to the As concentration within the samples. to-sulfate substitution mechanisms were used as simulation starting hypotheses. DFT-based simulations (Mulliken analysis) were used to interpret charge distribution and to show that among the possible mechanisms, a sulphate substitution by either protonated, or fully deprotonated, arsenate ion, only the protonated arsenate substitution could best fit the EXAFS data. In the second example, we used Molecular Dynamics to understand the mechanism of strong binding of the pathogenic PrP peptide with clay mineral surfaces. We modeled only the infectious moiety, PrP92-138, of the whole PrPsc structure, with explicitly solvating water molecules in contact with the cleavage plane of pyrophillite, as a model for montmorillonite without any cationic substitution. Partial residual negative charges on the cleavage plane were balanced with K+ ions. The peptide anchored to the clay surface via up to 10 hydrogen bonds from lysine and histidine residues to oxygen atoms of the siloxane cavities, and a total adsorption energy of 3465 KJ.mol-1 was obtained. Our results were compared to the one obtained by chemical and thermal analysis, 23Na, 1H

  18. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  19. Signaling through the G-protein-coupled receptor Rickets is important for polarity, detachment, and migration of the border cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Anllo, Lauren; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2016-06-15

    Cell migration plays crucial roles during development. An excellent model to study coordinated cell movements is provided by the migration of border cell clusters within a developing Drosophila egg chamber. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated two alleles of the gene rickets (rk) encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor. The rk alleles result in border cell migration defects in a significant fraction of egg chambers. In rk mutants, border cells are properly specified and express the marker Slbo. Yet, analysis of both fixed as well as live samples revealed that some single border cells lag behind the main border cell cluster during migration, or, in other cases, the entire border cell cluster can remain tethered to the anterior epithelium as it migrates. These defects are observed significantly more often in mosaic border cell clusters, than in full mutant clusters. Reduction of the Rk ligand, Bursicon, in the border cell cluster also resulted in migration defects, strongly suggesting that Rk signaling is utilized for communication within the border cell cluster itself. The mutant border cell clusters show defects in localization of the adhesion protein E-cadherin, and apical polarity proteins during migration. E-cadherin mislocalization occurs in mosaic clusters, but not in full mutant clusters, correlating well with the rk border cell migration phenotype. Our work has identified a receptor with a previously unknown role in border cell migration that appears to regulate detachment and polarity of the border cell cluster coordinating processes within the cells of the cluster themselves. PMID:27130192

  20. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. PMID:27071484

  1. Ling Zhi-8 reduces lung cancer mobility and metastasis through disruption of focal adhesion and induction of MDM2-mediated Slug degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that recombinant Ling Zhi-8 (rLZ-8), a medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum recombinant protein, effectively prevents lung cancer cells proliferation in vivo mice model. In our current study, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 suppressed tumor metastasis and increased the survival rate in Lewis lung carcinoma cell-bearing mice. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is regarded as the critical event in tumor metastasis. Herein, we showed that rLZ-8 effectively induced changes in EMT by interfering with cell adhesion and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions in lung cancer cells. Slug, a transcription factor, represses E-cadherin transcription and is regarded as a critical event in EMT and tumor metastasis. Functional studies revealed that downregulation of Slug as a result of rLZ-8-induced FAK inactivation enhanced E-cadherin expression and repressed cancer cell mobility. Moreover, we found that rLZ-8 enhanced the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of Slug in CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 promoted the interaction between MDM2 and Slug, resulting in Slug degradation; however, MDM2-shRNA abolished rLZ-8-enhanced Slug degradation. This study is the first to determine anti-metastatic activity of rLZ-8 and its potential mechanism, with how the regulation of EMT and cell mobility is via the negative modulation of FAK, and thereby leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of Slug. Our findings suggest that the targets of FAK play a key role in metastasis. Moreover, rLZ-8 may be useful as a chemotherapeutic agent for treating lung cancer. PMID:26992741

  2. Phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins by protein kinase C correlates with leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Valmu, L; Autero, M; Siljander, P; Patarroyo, M; Gahmberg, C G

    1991-11-01

    Adhesion of activated leukocytes to cells is of critical functional importance. The adhesion is known to be mediated mainly by the CD11/CD18 integrins, also known as leukocytic cell adhesion molecules, or Leu-CAM. We have now studied the phosphorylation of Leu-CAM by protein kinase C and the correlation of phosphorylation with the generation of the adhesive phenotype among human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes during cell activation. We here show that a good correlation exists between the phosphorylation of the beta subunit of Leu-CAM (CD18), and the extent of cell-to-cell adhesion. The phosphorylated CD18 subunit was associated with both CD11a and CD11b. Purified protein kinase C was able to phosphorylate the beta subunit of isolated Leu-CAM in vitro. The phosphorylation occurred mainly on serine residues. PMID:1682156

  3. MicroRNA-9 up-regulates E-cadherin through inhibition of NF-κB1–Snail1 pathway in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujing; Kumar, Suresh M; Lu, Hezhe; Liu, Aihua; Yang, Ruifeng; Pushparajan, Anitha; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Hsa-miR-9 has been shown to have opposite functions in different tumour types; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that hsa-miR-9 is down-regulated in metastatic melanomas compared to primary melanomas. Overexpression of miR-9 in melanoma cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation and migratory capacity with decreased F-actin polymerization and down-regulation of multiple GTPases involved in cytoskeleton remodelling. miR-9 overexpression induced significant down-regulation of Snail1 with a concomitant increase in E-cadherin expression. In contrast, knockdown of miR-9 increased Snail1 expression as well as melanoma cell proliferation and migration capacity. Mechanistically, miR-9 expression down-regulated NF-κB1 in melanoma and the effect was abolished by mutations in the putative miR-9 binding sites within the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of NF-κB1. Anti-miR-9 miRNA inhibitor also increased the expression of NF-κB1. The effects of miR-9 on Snail1 expression and melanoma cell proliferation and migration were rescued by overexpression of NF-κB1 in these cells. Furthermore, miR-9 overexpression resulted in significantly decreased melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. In summary, miR-9 inhibits melanoma proliferation and metastasis through down-regulation of the NF-κB1-Snail1 pathway. This study finds a new mechanism that miR-9 utilizes to decrease E-cadherin expression and inhibit melanoma progression. The results suggest that function of microRNAs is context and tumour type-specific. PMID:22131135

  4. In vitro investigation of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on inorganic biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lü, Xiaoying; Jingwu, Ma; Huang, Nan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the surface properties, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion behaviors of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium (Ti) films. The surface energy and microstructures of these films were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A modified Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) protein assay was used to study the amount of adsorbed proteins. Platelet adhesion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AFM results show that the DLC film is smoother than Ti. Protein adsorption results from CBB protein assay show that the ratio of adsorbed albumin (Alb) to IgG ( RA/I) on DLC is larger than Ti, which coincide with the sequence of the ratio of interfacial tension between solid surface and Alb ( γS,Alb) to interfacial tension between surface and IgG ( γS,IgG) ( γS,Alb/ γS,IgG). The DLC film has a preferential adsorption for Alb. The results suggest that the ratio of γS,Alb/ γS,IgG may indicate an Alb/IgG affinity ratio of materials. More platelets adhere on Ti film than on DLC, which may correspond to the surface roughness of materials. The conclusion is the blood compatibility of DLC seems to be better than Ti.

  5. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  7. Vinculin phosphorylation differentially regulates mechanotransduction at cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Jennifer L.; Peng, Xiao; Tolbert, Catlin E.; Guilluy, Christophe; Angell, Ashley E.; Pan, Yuan; Superfine, Richard; Burridge, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Cells experience mechanical forces throughout their lifetimes. Vinculin is critical for transmitting these forces, yet how it achieves its distinct functions at cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions remains unanswered. Here, we show vinculin is phosphorylated at Y822 in cell–cell, but not cell–matrix, adhesions. Phosphorylation at Y822 was elevated when forces were applied to E-cadherin and was required for vinculin to integrate into the cadherin complex. The mutation Y822F ablated these activities and prevented cells from stiffening in response to forces on E-cadherin. In contrast, Y822 phosphorylation was not required for vinculin functions in cell–matrix adhesions, including integrin-induced cell stiffening. Finally, forces applied to E-cadherin activated Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase to phosphorylate vinculin; Abl inhibition mimicked the loss of vinculin phosphorylation. These data reveal an unexpected regulatory mechanism in which vinculin Y822 phosphorylation determines whether cadherins transmit force and provides a paradigm for how a shared component of adhesions can produce biologically distinct functions. PMID:24751539

  8. In Vivo Detection of Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 in Experimental Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Kimmo; Nikula, Tuomo; Holopainen, Riikka; Vähäsilta, Tommi; Matikainen, Marja-Terttu; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Huupponen, Risto; Halkola, Lauri; Nieminen, Lauri; Hiltunen, Jukka; Parviainen, Sakari; Clark, Michael R.; Knuuti, Juhani; Savunen, Timo; Kääpä, Pekka; Voipio-Pulkki, Liisa Maria; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein which mediates leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. To study the pathogenetic significance of VAP-1 in inflammatory disorders, an in vivo immunodetection method was used to detect the regulation of luminally expressed VAP-1 in experimental skin and joint inflammation in the pig and dog. Moreover, VAP-1 was studied as a potential target to localize inflammation by radioimmunoscintigraphy. Up-regulation of VAP-1 in experimental dermatitis and arthritis could be visualized by specifically targeted immunoscintigraphy. Moreover, the translocation of VAP-1 to the functional position on the endothelial surface was only seen in inflamed tissues. These results suggest that VAP-1 is both an optimal candidate for anti-adhesive therapy and a potential target molecule for imaging inflammation. PMID:10934150

  9. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investigate the role of VFL on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells. Methods Human bladder epithelial tumour cell lines HT1376, 5637, SW780, T24 and UMUC3 were used to analyse cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions under VFL treatment. VFL effect on growth inhibition was measured by using a MTT colorimetric cell viability assay. Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed to assess the roles of VFL effect on cell-cell adhesions, epithelial-to-mesenchymal markers and apoptosis. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-cell adhesion was studied using the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Results We show that VFL induces cell death in bladder cancer cells and activates epithelial differentiation of the remaining living cells, leading to an increase of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion and a reduction of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin or vimentin. Moreover, while E-cadherin is increased, the levels of Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin-ligase for E-cadherin, were significantly reduced in presence of VFL. In 5637, this reduction on Hakai expression was blocked by MG132 proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the proteasome pathway could be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in its degradation. Conclusions Our findings underscore a critical function for VFL in cell-cell adhesions of epithelial bladder tumour cells, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism by which VFL may impact upon EMT and metastasis. PMID:25012153

  10. Redox Capacity of an Extracellular Matrix Protein Associated with Adhesion in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Spahn, Jamie E; Zhou, Hongjun; Gruian, Cristina M; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Adhesive mussel foot proteins (Mfps) rely in part on DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine) side chains to mediate attachment to mineral surfaces underwater. Oxidation of DOPA to Dopaquinone (Q) effectively abolishes the adsorption of Mfps to these surfaces. The thiol-rich mussel foot protein-6 (Mfp-6) rescues adhesion compromised by adventitious DOPA oxidation by reducing Q back to DOPA. The redox chemistry and kinetics of foot-extracted Mfp-6 were investigated by using a nonspecific chromogenic probe to equilibrate with the redox pool. Foot-extracted Mfp-6 has a reducing capacity of ~17 e(-) per protein; half of this comes from the cysteine residues, whereas the other half comes from other constituents, probably a cohort of four or five nonadhesive, redox-active DOPA residues in Mfp-6 with an anodic peak potential ~500 mV lower than that for oxidation of cysteine to cystine. At higher pH, DOPA redox reversibility is lost possibly due to Q scavenging by Cys thiolates. Analysis by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance identified a pronounced β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core in foot-extracted Mfp-6 protein. The structure endows redox-active side chains in Mfp-6, i.e., cysteine and DOPA, with significant reducing power over a broad pH range, and this power is measurably diminished in recombinant Mfp-6. PMID:26998552

  11. Partial characterization of a human submandibular/sublingual salivary adhesion-promoting protein.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, S O; Dasso, M; Hay, D I; Ganeshkumar, N; Spielman, A I

    2002-05-01

    Human submandibular/sublingual saliva contains a protein that promotes adhesion of Streptococcus mutans JBP serotype-c to spheroidal hydroxyapatite in vitro. A high molecular-weight (250,000-300,000 Da) adhesion-promoting protein (APP) was purified by Trisacryl 2000 M gel-filtration chromatography and gel electroelution before it was partially characterized. Lectin blotting identified that the terminal carbohydrates include N-acetyl glucosamine-beta 1-4-N-acetylglucosamine, galactose and galactose-beta 1-3-N-acetyl galactosamine. Antibodies to APP demonstrated no difference in the immunoreactive pattern of APP from saliva of caries-active or caries-resistant individuals belonging to four different ethnic groups: Asian, African-American, Hispanic or Caucasian. No immunological similarities to salivary mucins or parotid agglutinins were detected by Western blotting using immuno-cross-reactivity as a criterion. APP appears to be a unique protein found in submandibular/sublingual saliva. Understanding such a protein could help prevent S. mutans attachment to the enamel surface. PMID:12015214

  12. E-cadherin expression on human carcinoma cell affects trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity through killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 on natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Chisako; Fujii, Satoshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Wada, Noriaki; Mukai, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Fukayama, Masashi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2011-05-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant antibody drug that is widely used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma. Despite encouraging clinical results, many HER2-overexpressing carcinomas are primarily resistant to trastuzumab. We attempted to explain trastuzumab resistance and search for solutions. Since the killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on subsets of natural killer (NK) cells recognizes E-cadherin as ligands and may inhibit immune responses by regulating the effector function of NK cells, we used HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells which were expressing E-cadherin to investigate the role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) through KLRG1 on NK cells in vitro and vivo. The results indicated that HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells were killed by trastuzumab-mediated ADCC and the ADCC activity was reflected the degree of E-cadherin expression on carcinoma cells. We found that expression of E-cadherin was shown to be a predictor of response to trastuzumab-based treatment for HER2-overexpressing carcinomas, furthermore, trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was markedly enhanced by KLRG1-negative peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs(KLRG1(-))). PMID:21387286

  13. Antiadhesive properties of arabinogalactan protein from ribes nigrum seeds against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Messing, Jutta; Niehues, Michael; Shevtsova, Anna; Borén, Thomas; Hensel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fruit extracts from black currants (Ribes nigrum L.) are traditionally used for treatment of gastritis based on seed polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach cells. For detailed investigations an arabinogalactan protein (F2) was isolated from seeds and characterized concerning molecular weight, carbohydrate, amino acid composition, linkage, configuration and reaction with β-glucosyl Yariv. Functional testing of F2 was performed by semiquantitative in situ adhesion assay on sections of human gastric mucosa and by quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori strain J99 and human stomach AGS cells. Bacterial adhesins affected were identified by overlay assay with immobilized ligands. ¹²⁵I-radiolabeled F2 served for binding studies to H. pylori and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. F2 had no cytotoxic effects against H. pylori and AGS cells; but inhibited bacterial binding to human gastric cells. F2 inhibited the binding of BabA and fibronectin-binding adhesin to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled F2 bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori; and to BabA deficient mutant. F2 did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. From these data the non-specific interactions between F2 and the H. pylori lead to moderate antiadhesive effects. PMID:24662083

  14. Serum protein layers on parylene-C and silicon oxide: Effect on cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Coffey, Paul D.; Swann, Marcus J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Welland, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Among the range of materials used in bioengineering, parylene-C has been used in combination with silicon oxide and in presence of the serum proteins, in cell patterning. However, the structural properties of adsorbed serum proteins on these substrates still remain elusive. In this study, we use an optical biosensing technique to decipher the properties of fibronectin (Fn) and serum albumin adsorbed on parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates. Our results show the formation of layers with distinct structural and adhesive properties. Thin, dense layers are formed on parylene-C, whereas thicker, more diffuse layers are formed on silicon oxide. These results suggest that Fn acquires a compact structure on parylene-C and a more extended structure on silicon oxide. Nonetheless, parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates coated with Fn host cell populations that exhibit focal adhesion complexes and good cell attachment. Albumin adopts a deformed structure on parylene-C and a globular structure on silicon oxide, and does not support significant cell attachment on either surface. Interestingly, the co-incubation of Fn and albumin at the ratio found in serum, results in the preferential adsorption of albumin on parylene-C and Fn on silicon oxide. This finding is supported by the exclusive formation of focal adhesion complexes in differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (CGR8), cultured on Fn/albumin coated silicon oxide, but not on parylene-C. The detailed information provided in this study on the distinct properties of layers of serum proteins on substrates such as parylene-C and silicon oxide is highly significant in developing methods for cell patterning. PMID:25555155

  15. Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein is involved in αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shigeru; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D

    2006-01-01

    The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disorder. The most common symptom seen in WAS patients is bleeding. One of the main causes of bleeding is defective platelet aggregation. The causative gene of WAS encodes WAS protein (WASP). Here, we show that WASP binds to the calcium- and integrin-binding protein (CIB) in platelets. CIB was originally identified as a protein binding to the αIIb cytoplasmic tail of platelet integrin αIIbβ3, which has a primary role in platelet aggregation. We also show that the WASP–CIB complex is important in αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion, and that in patients mutant forms of WASP are expressed at reduced levels or show lower affinities for CIB than wild-type WASP. Our results indicate that impaired complex formation between mutant WASPs and CIB reduces αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion and causes defective platelet aggregation, resulting in bleeding. PMID:16582881

  16. Amigo Adhesion Protein Regulates Development of Neural Circuits in Zebrafish Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Aho, Vilma; Peltola, Marjaana A.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti; Rauvala, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    The Amigo protein family consists of three transmembrane proteins characterized by six leucine-rich repeat domains and one immunoglobulin-like domain in their extracellular moieties. Previous in vitro studies have suggested a role as homophilic adhesion molecules in brain neurons, but the in vivo functions remain unknown. Here we have cloned all three zebrafish amigos and show that amigo1 is the predominant family member expressed during nervous system development in zebrafish. Knockdown of amigo1 expression using morpholino oligonucleotides impairs the formation of fasciculated tracts in early fiber scaffolds of brain. A similar defect in fiber tract development is caused by mRNA-mediated expression of the Amigo1 ectodomain that inhibits adhesion mediated by the full-length protein. Analysis of differentiated neural circuits reveals defects in the catecholaminergic system. At the behavioral level, the disturbed formation of neural circuitry is reflected in enhanced locomotor activity and in the inability of the larvae to perform normal escape responses. We suggest that Amigo1 is essential for the development of neural circuits of zebrafish, where its mechanism involves homophilic interactions within the developing fiber tracts and regulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel to form functional neural circuitry that controls locomotion. PMID:24904058

  17. Characterizing the modification of surface proteins with poly(ethylene glycol) to interrupt platelet adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Kaar, Joel L.; Russell, Alan J.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Surface protein modification with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can inhibit acute thrombosis on damaged vascular and biomaterial surfaces by blocking surface protein–platelet interactions. However, the feasibility of employing protein reactive PEGs to limit intravascular and biomaterial thrombosis in vivo is contingent upon rapid and extensive surface protein modification. To characterize the factors controlling this potential therapeutic approach, the model protein bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto polyurethane surfaces and modified with PEG-carboxymethyl succinimidyl ester (PEG-NHS), PEG-isocyanate (PEG-ISO), or PEG-diisocyanate (PEG-DISO) in aqueous buffer at varying concentrations and contact times. It was found that up to 5 PEGs could be attached per albumin molecule within one min and that adsorbed albumin PEGylation approached maximal levels by 6 min. The lability of reactive PEGs in aqueous buffer reduced total protein modification by 50% when the PEG solution was incubated for 7 min prior to application. For fibrinogen PEGylation (performed in the solution phase), PEG-NHS was more reactive than PEG-ISO or PEG-DISO. The γ peptide of fibrinogen, which contains several key platelet-binding motifs, was highly modified. A marked reduction in platelet adhesion was observed on fibrinogen-adsorbed polyurethane treated with PEG-NHS or PEG-DISO. Relative differences in platelet adhesion on PEG-NHS and PEG-DISO modified surfaces could be attributed to differences in reactivity towards fibrinogen and the size of the polymer backbone. Taken together, these findings provide insight and guidance for applying protein reactive PEGs for the interruption of acute thrombotic deposition. PMID:16457880

  18. Paradigms lost-an emerging role for over-expression of tight junction adhesion proteins in cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leech, Astrid O; Cruz, Rodrigo G B; Hill, Arnold D K; Hopkins, Ann M

    2015-08-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are multi-protein complexes located at the apicalmost tip of the lateral membrane in polarised epithelial and endothelial cells. Their principal function is in mediating intercellular adhesion and polarity. Accordingly, it has long been a paradigm that loss of TJ proteins and consequent deficits in cell-cell adhesion are required for tumour cell dissemination in the early stages of the invasive/metastatic cascade. However it is becoming increasingly apparent that TJ proteins play important roles in not just adhesion but also intracellular signalling events, activation of which can contribute to, or even drive, tumour progression and metastasis. In this review, we shall therefore highlight cases wherein the gain of TJ proteins has been associated with signals promoting tumour progression. We will also discuss the potential of overexpressed TJ proteins to act as therapeutic targets in cancer treatment. The overall purpose of this review is not to disprove the fact that loss of TJ-based adhesion contributes to the progression of several cancers, but rather to introduce the growing body of evidence that gain of TJ proteins may have adhesion-independent consequences for promoting progression in other cancers. PMID:26366401

  19. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells. PMID:23387972

  20. Rac1 inactivation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii modifies focal adhesions upstream of actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Geny, Blandine; Grassart, Alexandre; Manich, Maria; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel R

    2010-02-01

    Inactivation of different small GTPases upon their glucosylation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain IP82 (LT-82) is already known to lead to cell rounding, adherens junction (AJ) disorganization and actin depolymerization. In the present work, we observed that LT-82 induces a rapid dephosphorylation of paxillin, a protein regulating focal adhesion (FA), independently of inactivation of paxillin kinases such as Src, Fak and Pyk2. Among the small GTPases inactivated by this toxin, including Rac, Ras, Rap and Ral, we identified Rac1, as responsible for paxillin dephosphorylation using cells overexpressing Rac1(V12). Rac1 inactivation by LT-82 modifies interactions between proteins from AJ and FA complexes as shown by pull-down assays. We showed that in Triton X-100-insoluble membrane proteins from these complexes, namely E-cadherin, beta-catenin, p120-catenin and talin, are decreased upon LT-82 intoxication, a treatment that also induces a rapid decrease in cell phosphoinositide content. Therefore, we proposed that Rac inactivation by LT-82 alters phosphoinositide metabolism leading to FA and AJ complex disorganization and actin depolymerization. PMID:19840028

  1. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives. PMID:27217558

  2. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  3. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  4. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  5. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  6. Inhibition of fibroblast adhesion by covalently immobilized protein repellent polymer coatings studied by single cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aliuos, Pooyan; Sen, Aromita; Reich, Uta; Dempwolf, Wibke; Warnecke, Athanasia; Hadler, Christoph; Lenarz, Thomas; Menzel, Henning; Reuter, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Cochlea implants (CI) restore the hearing in patients with sensorineural hearing loss by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve via an electrode array. The increase of the impedance at the electrode-tissue interface due to a postoperative connective tissue encapsulation leads to higher power consumption of the implants. Therefore, reduced adhesion and proliferation of connective tissue cells around the CI electrode array is of great clinical interest. The adhesion of cells to substrate surfaces is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Protein repellent polymers (PRP) are able to inhibit unspecific protein adsorption. Thus, a reduction of cell adhesion might be achieved by coating the electrode carriers with PRPs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different PRPs, poly(dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAA) and poly(2-ethyloxazoline) (PEtOx), on the strength and the temporal dynamics of the initial adhesion of fibroblasts. Polymers were immobilized onto glass plates by a photochemical grafting onto method. Water contact angle measurements proved hydrophilic surface properties of both PDMAA and PEtOx (45 ± 1° and 44 ± 1°, respectively). The adhesion strength of NIH3T3 fibroblasts after 5, 30, and 180 s of interaction with surfaces was investigated by using single cell force spectroscopy. In comparison to glass surfaces, both polymers reduced the adhesion of fibroblasts significantly at all different interaction times and lower dynamic rates of adhesion were observed. Thus, both PDMAA and PEtOx represented antiadhesive properties and can be used as implant coatings to reduce the unspecific ECM-mediated adhesion of fibroblasts to surfaces. PMID:23596088

  7. A standardized bamboo leaf extract inhibits monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by modulating vascular cell adhesion protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunga; Park, Myoung Soo; Lee, Yu Ran; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Tae Woo; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Dong Seon

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo leaves (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel ex J. Houz (Poacea)) have a long history of food and medical applications in Asia, including Japan and Korea. They have been used as a traditional medicine for centuries. We investigated the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of a bamboo leaf extract (BLE) on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced monocyte adhesion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to BLE did not inhibit cell viability or cause morphological changes at concentrations ranging from 1 µg/ml to 1 mg/ml. Treatment with 0.1 mg/ml BLE caused 63% inhibition of monocyte adhesion in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, which was associated with 38.4% suppression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species generation was decreased to 47.9% in BLE treated TNF-α-activated HUVECs. BLE (0.05 mg/ml) also caused about 50% inhibition of interleukin-6 secretion from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocyte. The results indicate that BLE may be clinically useful as an anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant for human cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. PMID:23422838

  8. Protein-mediated adhesion of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Caccavo, F. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The rate and extent of bacterial Fe(III) mineral reduction are governed by molecular-scale interactions between the bacterial cell surface and the mineral surface. These interactions are poorly understood. This study examined the role of surface proteins in the adhesion of Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Enzymatic degradation of cell surface polysaccharides had no effect on cell adhesion to HFO. The proteolytic enzymes Streptomyces griseus protease and chymotrypsin inhibited the adhesion of S. alga BrY cells to HFO through catalytic degradation of surface proteins. Trypsin inhibited S. alga BrY adhesion solely through surface-coating effects. Protease and chymotrypsin also mediated desorption of adhered S. alga BrY cells from HFO while trypsin did not mediate cell desorption. Protease removed a single peptide band that represented a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. Chymotrypsin removed two peptide bands that represented proteins with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 31 kDa. These proteins represent putative HGO adhesion molecules. A. alga BrY adhesion was inhibited by up to 46% when cells were cultured at sub-MICs of chloramphenicol, suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for adhesion. Proteins extracted from the surface of S. alga BrY cells inhibited adhesion to HFO by up to 41%. A number of these proteins bound specifically to HFO, suggesting that a complex system of surface proteins mediates S. alga BrY adhesion to HFO.

  9. The proline-rich focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP is a ligand for profilins.

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, M; Giehl, K; Abel, K; Haffner, C; Jarchau, T; Hoppe, V; Jockusch, B M; Walter, U

    1995-01-01

    Profilins are small proteins that form complexes with G-actin and phosphoinositides and are therefore considered to link the microfilament system to signal transduction pathways. In addition, they bind to poly-L-proline, but the biological significance of this interaction is not yet known. The recent molecular cloning of the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an established in vivo substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, revealed the presence of a proline-rich domain which prompted us to investigate a possible interaction with profilins. VASP is a microfilament and focal adhesion associated protein which is also concentrated in highly dynamic regions of the cell cortex. Here, we demonstrate that VASP is a natural proline-rich profilin ligand. Human platelet VASP bound directly to purified profilins from human platelets, calf thymus and birch pollen. Moreover, VASP and a novel protein were specifically extracted from total cell lysates by profilin affinity chromatography and subsequently eluted either with poly-L-proline or a peptide corresponding to a proline-rich VASP motif. Finally, the subcellular distributions of VASP and profilin suggest that both proteins also interact within living cells. Our data support the hypothesis that profilin and VASP act in concert to convey signal transduction to actin filament formation. Images PMID:7737110

  10. MicroRNA-10b regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition by modulating KLF4/Notch1/E-cadherin in cisplatin-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Hong, Haiyu; Sun, Xiaojin; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Shiyin; Zhao, Surong; Zhang, Mengxiao; Wang, Zhiwei; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an initiating event in tumor cell invasion and metastasis that contributes to therapeutic resistance to compounds including cisplatin. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been associated with EMT as well as resistance to standard therapies. However, the underlying mechanisms by which miRNAs control the development of resistance to cisplatin (DDP), and the accompanying EMT-like properties are required to elucidate. Here we show that microRNA-10b (miR-10b) is up-regulated in HNE1/DDP cells, and inhibition of miR-10b expression reversed the EMT phenotype. However, over-expression of miR-10b was able to promote the acquisition of an EMT phenotype in HNE1 cells. Additionally, we identified that miR-10b expression inversely correlates with KLF4, which then controls expression of Notch1. Knock-down of Notch1 inhibited cell migration, invasion, and reversed EMT in HNE1/DDP cells, which was dependent on miR-10b. In summary, our results reveal that miR-10b regulates EMT by modulating KLF4/Notch1/E-cadherin expression, which promotes invasion and migration of nasal pharyngeal carcinoma cells. PMID:27186392

  11. Recombinant mussel adhesive protein fp-5 (MAP fp-5) as a bulk bioadhesive and surface coating material.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Lim, Seonghye; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Chang Sup; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2011-08-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) attach to all types of inorganic and organic surfaces, even in wet environments. MAP of type 5 (fp-5), in particular, has been considered as a key adhesive material. However, the low availability of fp-5 has hampered its biochemical characterization and practical applications. Here, soluble recombinant fp-5 is mass-produced in Escherichia coli. Tyrosinase-modified recombinant fp-5 showed ∼1.11 MPa adhesive shear strength, which is the first report of a bulk-scale adhesive force measurement for purified recombinant of natural MAP type. Surface coatings were also performed through simple dip-coating of various objects. In addition, complex coacervate using recombinant fp-5 and hyaluronic acid was prepared as an efficient adhesive formulation, which greatly improved the bulk adhesive strength. Collectively, it is expected that this work will enhance basic understanding of mussel adhesion and that recombinant fp-5 can be successfully used as a realistic bulk-scale bioadhesive and an efficient surface coating material. PMID:21770718

  12. Peptide-presenting two-dimensional protein matrix on supported lipid bilayers: an efficient platform for cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Bérat, Rémi; Rémy-Zolghadry, Murielle; Gounou, Céline; Manigand, Claude; Tan, Sisareuth; Saltó, Carmen; Arenas, Ernest; Bordenave, Laurence; Brisson, Alain R

    2007-12-01

    Understanding and controlling cell adhesion to biomaterials and synthetic materials are important issues in basic research and applied sciences. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) functionalized with cell adhesion peptides linked to lipid molecules are popular platforms of cell adhesion. In this paper, an alternative approach of peptide presentation is presented in which peptides are stereo-selectively linked to proteins self-assembling in a rigid two-dimensional (2D) matrix on SLBs. Annexin-A5 (Anx5) was used as prototype protein for its known properties of forming stable and rigid 2D matrices on lipid surfaces. Two types of Anx5-peptide complexes, containing either a RGD or an IKVAV sequence, were synthesized. The authors show that both Anx5-peptide complexes present the same properties of binding and 2D organization on lipid surfaces as Anx5, when investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Anx5-RGD and Anx5-IKVAV 2D matrices were found to promote specific adhesion of human saphenous vein endothelial cells and mouse embryonic stem cells, respectively. The influence of the surface density of exposed peptides on cell adhesion was investigated, showing that cells attach to Anx5-peptide matrices when the average distance between peptides is smaller than about 60 nm. This cell adhesion platform provides control of the orientation and density of cell ligands, opening interesting possibilities for future applications. PMID:20408654

  13. Vasoconstrictor-induced endocytic recycling regulates focal adhesion protein localization and function in vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Poythress, Ransom H.; Gallant, Cynthia; Vetterkind, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Turnover of focal adhesions (FAs) is known to be critical for cell migration and adhesion of proliferative vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. However, it is often assumed that FAs in nonmigratory, differentiated VSM (dVSM) cells embedded in the wall of healthy blood vessels are stable structures. Recent work has demonstrated agonist-induced actin polymerization and Src-dependent FA phosphorylation in dVSM cells, suggesting that agonist-induced FA remodeling occurs. However, the mechanisms and extent of FA remodeling are largely unknown in dVSM. Here we show, for the first time, that a distinct subpopulation of dVSM FA proteins, but not the entire FA, remodels in response to the α-agonist phenylephrine. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and zyxin displayed the largest redistributions, while β-integrin and FA kinase showed undetectable redistribution. Vinculin, metavinculin, Src, Crk-associated substrate, and paxillin displayed intermediate degrees of redistribution. Redistributions into membrane fractions were especially prominent, suggesting endosomal mechanisms. Deconvolution microscopy, quantitative colocalization analysis, and Duolink proximity ligation assays revealed that phenylephrine increases the association of FA proteins with early endosomal markers Rab5 and early endosomal antigen 1. Endosomal disruption with the small-molecule inhibitor primaquine inhibits agonist-induced redistribution of FA proteins, confirming endosomal recycling. FA recycling was also inhibited by cytochalasin D, latrunculin B, and colchicine, indicating that the redistribution is actin- and microtubule-dependent. Furthermore, inhibition of endosomal recycling causes a significant inhibition of the rate of development of agonist-induced dVSM contractions. Thus these studies are consistent with the concept that FAs in dVSM cells, embedded in the wall of the aorta, remodel during the action of a vasoconstrictor. PMID:23703522

  14. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  15. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  16. Syntenin-1 and Ezrin Proteins Link Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule to the Actin Cytoskeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Cicerone; te Riet, Joost; Eich, Christina; Harkes, Rolf; Smisdom, Nick; Bouhuijzen Wenger, Jessica; Ameloot, Marcel; Holt, Matthew; Kanger, Johannes S.; Figdor, Carl G.; Cambi, Alessandra; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is a type I transmembrane protein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. Involved in important pathophysiological processes such as the immune response, cancer metastasis, and neuronal development, ALCAM undergoes both homotypic interactions with other ALCAM molecules and heterotypic interactions with the surface receptor CD6 expressed at the T cell surface. Despite biochemical and biophysical evidence of a dynamic association between ALCAM and the actin cytoskeleton, no detailed information is available about how this association occurs at the molecular level. Here, we exploit a combination of complementary microscopy techniques, including FRET detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, and we demonstrate the existence of a preformed ligand-independent supramolecular complex where ALCAM stably interacts with actin by binding to syntenin-1 and ezrin. Interaction with the ligand CD6 further enhances these multiple interactions. Altogether, our results propose a novel biophysical framework to understand the stabilizing role of the ALCAM supramolecular complex engaged to CD6 during dendritic cell-T cell interactions and provide novel information on the molecular players involved in the formation and signaling of the immunological synapse at the dendritic cell side. PMID:24662291

  17. Evaluation of Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 as a Potential Biomarker in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengxin; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a glycoprotein that mediates tissue-selective lymphocyte adhesion. The prognostic value of VAP-1 has been determined in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes and the predictive value of serum VAP-1 in patients with thyroid cancer. A total of 126 patients with thyroid nodules and 53 healthy controls participated in this study. The patients were further divided into subgroup 1 (69 cases with benign thyroid nodules) and subgroup 2 (57 cases with thyroid cancer). Serum VAP-1 was measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Diagnostic value of presurgical VAP-1 for thyroid cancer was conducted by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Serum levels of VAP-1 were significantly lower in thyroid cancer group than in healthy control and benign thyroid nodule groups. VAP-1 concentrations negatively correlated with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels in thyroid cancer patients (r = −0.81; p < 0.001). The optimum cut-off value of VAP-1 was 456.6 ng/mL with a 77.4% specificity and 66.7% sensitivity for thyroid cancer diagnosis. Serum VAP-1 decreased in thyroid cancer patients and VAP-1 could be a potential useful adjunct biomarker in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. PMID:27446209

  18. Anterior Gradient Protein-2 Is a Regulator of Cellular Adhesion in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Diptiman; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Sawant, Anandi; Hensel, Jonathan A.; Isayeva, Tatyana; Reilly, Stephanie D.; Siegal, Gene P.; Smith, Claire; Grizzle, William; Singh, Raj; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2014-01-01

    Anterior Gradient Protein (AGR-2) is reported to be over-expressed in many epithelial cancers and promotes metastasis. A clear-cut mechanism for its observed function(s) has not been previously identified. We found significant upregulation of AGR-2 expression in a bone metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC3, following culturing in bone marrow-conditioned medium. Substantial AGR-2 expression was also confirmed in prostate cancer tissue specimens in patients with bone lesions. By developing stable clones of PC3 cells with varying levels of AGR-2 expression, we identified that abrogation of AGR-2 significantly reduced cellular attachment to fibronectin, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin I and fibrinogen. Loss of cellular adhesion was associated with sharp decrease in the expression of α4, α5, αV, β3 and β4 integrins. Failure to undergo apoptosis following detachment is a hallmark of epithelial cancer metastasis. The AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells showed higher resistance to Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis- inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced apoptosis in vitro. This observation was also supported by significantly reduced Caspase-3 expression in AGR-2-silenced PC3 cells, which is a key effector of both extrinsic and intrinsic death signaling pathways. These data suggest that AGR-2 influence prostate cancer metastasis by regulation of cellular adhesion and apoptosis. PMID:24587138

  19. RNA interference-mediated silencing of speckle-type POZ protein promotes apoptosis of renal cell cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Guiling; Sun, Xiuju

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of silencing the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) gene on renal cell cancer (RCC) cells and to explore its possible mechanism. The A498 and ACHN RCC cells were transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA)-SPOP by lipofection methods. The silencing efficiency was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of SPOP silencing on cell apoptosis, cell viability, colony formation ability, cell migration ability, and chemosensitivity to Sorafenib were assessed by flow cytometry, an MTT assay, a colony formation assay, a trans-well migration assay, and a CCK-8 assay, respectively. Its effects on the expression of several cytokines were determined by a protein microarray. Relevant signaling pathways were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis rate was significantly higher; the cell viability, the colony formation, and migration ability were significantly decreased in the siRNA-SPOP group. The protein microarray screening showed that the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the siRNA group was significantly decreased and that the expression of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and E-cadherin was significantly increased (P<0.05). The relevant signaling pathways were the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions pathway and extracellular matrix organization signal pathway. SPOP gene silencing induced cell apoptosis, decreased cell viability, colony formation, and migration ability, and elevated the drug sensitivity in the RCC cells. A possible mechanism is that silencing SPOP induces the differential expression of E-cadherin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, which are related to the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions and extracellular

  20. Inhibition of E-cadherin/catenin complex formation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase is partially independent of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Yuchao; Qi, Jieqiong; Han, Cuifang; Zhang, Xinling; Bi, Chuanlin; Yu, Wengong

    2016-02-01

    p120-catenin (p120) contains a large central armadillo repeat domain, via which it binds to E‑cadherin to stabilize the latter, thereby regulating cell‑to‑cell adhesion. A previous study by our group demonstrated that O‑linked N‑acetylglucosamine (O‑GlcNAc) is involved in the regulation of the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. As O‑GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is able to directly bind to the majority of its target proteins, the present study hypothesized that OGT may additionally regulate the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. To verify this hypothesis, a catalytically inactive OGT mutant was expressed in H1299 cells, and its effects on the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex were assessed. A cytoskeleton‑binding protein extraction assay confirmed that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. In addition, co‑immunoprecipitation and pull‑down assays were used to evaluate the interaction between OGT and p120. Immunoblotting indicated that OGT was able to directly bind to p120. To determine the domain of p120 involved in binding to OGT, a series of deletion mutants of p120 were constructed and subjected to protein binding assays by pull‑down assays. Immunoblotting showed that OGT bound to the regulatory and armadillo domains of p120, which might interfere with the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. Finally, OGT, p120 and E‑cadherin cytoplasmic domains (ECD) were recombinantly expressed in BL21 (DE3) recombinant E. coli cells, and a glutathione S‑transferase (GST) pull‑down assay was performed to assess the interactions among the purified recombinant proteins. Immunoblotting indicated that maltose‑binding protein (MBP)‑OGT inhibited the binding of His‑p120 to GST‑ECD in a dose‑dependent manner. All of these results suggested that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex

  1. Characterization of the protein fraction of the temporary adhesive secreted by the tube feet of the sea star Asterias rubens.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Elise; Wattiez, Ruddy; Waite, J Herbert; Flammang, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Sea stars are able to make firm but temporary attachments to various substrata by secretions released by their tube feet. After tube foot detachment, the adhesive secretions remain on the substratum as a footprint. Proteins presumably play a key role in sea star adhesion, as evidenced by the removal of footprints from surfaces after a treatment with trypsin. However, until now, characterisation was hampered by their high insolubility. In this study, a non-hydrolytic method was used to render most of the proteins constituting the adhesive footprints soluble. After analysis by SDS-PAGE, the proteins separated into about 25 bands, which ranged from 25 to 450 kDa in apparent molecular weight. Using mass spectrometry and a homology-database search, it was shown that several of the proteins are known intracellular proteins, presumably resulting from contamination of footprint material with tube foot epidermal cells. However, 11 protein bands, comprising the most abundant proteins, were not identified and might correspond to novel adhesive proteins. They were named 'Sea star footprint proteins' (Sfps). Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the protein bands yielded 43 de novo-generated peptide sequences. Most of them were shared by several, if not all, Sfps. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against one of the peptides (HEASGEYYR from Sfp-115) and were used in immunoblotting. They specifically labelled Sfp-115 and other bands with lower apparent molecular weights. The different results suggest that all Sfps might belong to a single family of related proteins sharing similar motifs or, alternatively, they are the products of polymerization and/or degradation processes. PMID:22439774

  2. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  3. Expression of the E-cadherin repressors Snail, Slug and Zeb1 in urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: relation to stromal fibroblast activation and invasive behaviour of carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Julia; Weidig, Michaela; Balzer, Philipp; Richter, Petra; Franz, Marcus; Junker, Kerstin; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Wunderlich, Heiko; Östman, Arne; Petersen, Iver; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regulated by interaction of carcinoma and stromal cells and crucial for progression of urinary bladder carcinoma (UBC). Therefore, the influence of activated fibroblasts on the expression of E-cadherin repressors as well as EMT and invasion in UBC was investigated. A correlative analysis of the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast (ASMA, S100A4, FAP, SDF1, PDGFRβ) and EMT (Snail, Slug, Zeb1, E-cadherin) markers was performed on 49 UBC cases of different stages. The impact of distinguishable growth factor stimulated fibroblasts on invasion, EMT, and E-cadherin repressor expression was investigated in an invasion model. In situ, invasiveness was significantly correlated to the loss of membranous E-cadherin (E-cad_m) and increased Snail, Slug, Zeb1 in tumour cells, as well as to increased ASMA, S100A4, and PDGFRβ in stromal cells. A significant correlation to nodal metastasis could be evidenced for the loss of E-Cad_m, and for an increase in S100A4 and PDGFRβ. Comparison of stromal and EMT markers revealed significant correlations of ASMA to Snail and Slug; of S100A4 to the loss of E-cad_m and Zeb1; and of PDGFRβ to the loss of E-Cad_m, Slug and Zeb1. In vitro, TGFβ1 induced myofibroblasts were the strongest attractants, while aFGF or TGFβ1/aFGF stimulated fibroblasts were the most potent EMT inductors. As shown here for the first time, distinct sub-populations of fibroblasts are to various extents associated with EMT and tumour progression in UBC. These relevant findings might be the basis for the identification of new diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets selectively affecting tumour supporting CAF effects. PMID:22820858

  4. Novel Pyridazinone Inhibitors for Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1): Old target – New Inhibition Mode

    PubMed Central

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J.; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Though they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors. PMID:24304424

  5. Investigation of alginate binding to germanium and polystyrene substrata conditioned with mussel adhesive protein

    SciTech Connect

    Suci, P.A.; Geesey, G.G.

    1995-06-15

    Binding of alginate from Macrocystis pyrifera (kelp) to germanium and polystyrene substrata conditioned with mussel adhesive protein (MAP) from Mytilis edulis, to germanium substrata conditioned with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and polylysine, and to germanium substrata coated with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) was investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Binding of alginate to MAP appears to be proportional to surface coverage for levels tested. Distinct spectral features appear in the region associated with pyranose ring vibrations upon binding of alginate to MAP, polylysine, and APS, indicating that lysine residues play a prominent role in promoting irreversible adsorption with perturbation of pyranose ring atoms. BSA does not appear to enhance alginate adsorption over that observed on clean germanium and no new spectral features appear as a result of binding. The level of irreversible binding of alginate to germanium and polystyrene substrata conditioned with MAP is similar.

  6. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in nervous system development and disease.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, Tobias; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-09-01

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) class have emerged as crucial regulators of nervous system development, with important implications for human health and disease. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding of aGPCR functions during key steps in neural development, including cortical patterning, dendrite and synapse formation, and myelination. We focus on aGPCR modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signalling to control these varied aspects of neural development, and we discuss how impaired aGPCR function leads to neurological disease. We further highlight the emerging hypothesis that aGPCRs can be mechanically activated and the implications of this property in the nervous system. PMID:27466150

  7. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  8. Effect of dispersion method and CNT loading on the quality and performance of nanocomposite soy protein/CNTs adhesive for wood application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afolabi, Ayo Samuel; Oluwafolakemi Sadare, Olawumi; Olawale Daramola, Michael

    2016-09-01

    In this article the effect of dispersion method and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) loading on the quality and performance of a nanocomposite adhesive is reported. The nanocomposite soy protein isolate adhesive was successfully developed by incorporating CNTs into the soy protein isolate (SPI) for enhanced bond strength and water resistance. Dispersion methods, namely mechanical (shear) mixing and mechanical/sonication were employed to aid good dispersion and interfacial interaction between soy protein matrix and the carbon nanofillers during the preparation of the adhesive. The concentration of the CNT was varied from 0.1–0.7 wt% in the nanocomposite adhesive. The morphology and the surface chemistry of the adhesives were checked with SEM and FTIR, respectively. The shear strength of the developed adhesives was investigated according to European standard (EN-204) for interior wood application on a tensile testing machine. The morphological structure of the nanocomposite adhesive obtained from SEM images showed homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in SPI using the two dispersion methods; shear mixing and sonication/shear mixing. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed chemical functionalities and successful interaction between CNTs and SPI adhesive. Thermogravimetric profile of the adhesive samples showed that the newly developed nanocomposite adhesive was thermally stable at a temperature up to about 600 °C at a higher percentage loading of 0.5 wt% CNTs. The result showed that sonication method of dispersion of CNTs into the SPI adhesive had a higher shear strength compared to the mechanical method of dispersion both at dry and wet state.

  9. Diamagnetic levitation causes changes in the morphology, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion proteins expression in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Wang, L; Gao, X; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Han, J; Li, J B; Di, S M; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation technology is a novel simulated weightless technique and has recently been applied in life-science research. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels, namely, μg (diamagnetic levitation), 1g, and 2g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on the activity, morphology, and cytoskeleton (actin filament, microtubules, and vimentin intermediate filaments) in osteocyte - like cell line MLO-Y4 were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), respectively. The changes induced by LG-HMF in distribution and expression of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, paxillin, and talin in MLO-Y4 were determined by LSCM and Western blotting. The results showed that LG-HMF produced by superconducting magnet had no lethal effects on MLO-Y4. Compared to control, diamagnetic levitation (μg) affected MLO-Y4 morphology, nucleus size, cytoskeleton architecture, and FA proteins distribution and expression. The study indicates that osteocytes are sensitive to altered gravity and FA proteins (vinculin, paxillin, and talin) may be involved in osteocyte mechanosensation. The diamagnetic levitation may be a novel ground-based space-gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level. PMID:21216704

  10. Medium-density particleboards from modified rice husks and soybean protein concentrate-based adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Emiliano M; Stefani, Pablo M; Ruseckaite, Roxana A

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using rice husk (RH) as wood substitute in the production of environmentally sound medium-density particleboards using adhesives from soybean protein concentrate (SPC). Chemical modification of rice husk with sodium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide followed by hydrogen peroxide (bleaching) were undertaken to evaluate the effect of such treatments on the composition and topology of rice husk and the performance of produced panels. Both treatments were efficient in partially eliminating hemicelluloses, lignin and silica from RH, as evidenced by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy observations suggested that alkaline treatment resulted in a more damaged RH substrate than bleaching. The dependence of mechanical properties (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond) and the physical properties (water absorption and thickness swelling) on chemical treatments performed on both, rice husk and SPC was studied. Bleached-rice husk particleboards bonded with alkaline-treated soybean protein concentrate displayed the best set of final properties. Particleboards with this formulation met the minimum requirements of internal bond, modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture recommended by the US Standard ANSI/A208.1 specifications for M1, MS and M2-grade medium-density particleboards, but failed to achieve the thickness swelling value recommended for general use panels. This limitation of soybean protein concentrate-bonded rice husk particleboards was counterbalanced by the advantage of being formaldehyde-free which makes them a suitable alternative for indoor applications. PMID:19766482

  11. [AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelial cells and the underlying mechanism].

    PubMed

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-02-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelial cells and underlying molecular mechanism. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-activated human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were treated with different concentrations of AMPK agonist 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleotide (AICAR) or AMPK inhibitor compound C. And other HAECs were overexpressed with constitutive active or dominant negative AMPK protein and then treated with TNFα. The rates of monocytes adhering to endothelial cells were detected by fluorescent staining. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA levels and protein secretions were detected by quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. Acetylation of NF-κB p65 at lysine 221 site was assessed by Western blot. NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity was analyzed by an ELISA-based method. By using small interfering RNA based strategy, p300 expression in HAECs was down-regulated and then cells were incubated with TNFα. NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions and adhesion rates were detected, respectively. The activity of p300 was also detected by ELISA. The results showed that AICAR treatment significantly reduced monocyte-endothelial adhesion rate, as well as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA levels and protein secretions, in TNFα-activated HAECs. Moreover, transfection of constitutive active AMPKα but not dominant negative AMPKα strongly diminished TNFα-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions and secretions, as well as monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Furthermore, AMPK activation decreased TNFα-mediated acetylation of NF-κB p65 at Lys221 site and reduced NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity. Silencing p300 by siRNA significantly abolished the effect of TNFα- induced adhesion molecules expression and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Blocking AMPK activation by compound C almost

  12. The Terminal A Domain of the Fibrillar Accumulation-Associated Protein (Aap) of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mediates Adhesion to Human Corneocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Macintosh, Robin L.; Brittan, Jane L.; Bhattacharya, Ritwika; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Derrick, Jeremy; Upton, Mathew; Handley, Pauline S.

    2009-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis colonizes indwelling medical devices by biofilm formation but is primarily a skin resident. In many S. epidermidis strains biofilm formation is mediated by a cell wall-anchored protein, the accumulation-associated protein (Aap). Here, we investigate the role of Aap in skin adhesion. Aap is an LPXTG protein with a domain architecture including a terminal A domain and a B-repeat region. S. epidermidis NCTC 11047 expresses Aap as localized, lateral tufts of fibrils on one subpopulation of cells (Fib+), whereas a second subpopulation does not express these fibrils of Aap (Fib−). Flow cytometry showed that 72% of NCTC 11047 cells expressed Aap and that 28% of cells did not. Aap is involved in the adhesion of Fib+ cells to squamous epithelial cells from the hand (corneocytes), as the recombinant A-domain protein partially blocked binding to corneocytes. To confirm the role of the Aap A domain in corneocyte attachment, Aap was expressed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 as sparsely distributed, peritrichous fibrils. The expression of Aap increased corneocyte adhesion 20-fold compared to L. lactis carrying Aap without an A domain. S. epidermidis isolates from catheters, artificial joints, skin, and the nose also used the A domain of Aap to adhere to corneocytes, emphasizing the role of Aap in skin adhesion. In addition, L. lactis expressing Aap with different numbers of B repeats revealed a positive correlation between the number of B repeats and adhesion to corneocytes, suggesting an additional function for the B region in enhancing A-domain-dependent attachment to skin. Therefore, in addition to its established role in biofilm formation, Aap can also promote adhesion to corneocytes and is likely to be an important adhesin in S. epidermidis skin colonization. PMID:19749046

  13. Loss of intercellular adhesion leads to differential accumulation of hypericin in bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucky, S. Sasidharan; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Chin, William W. L.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Olivo, Malini C. D.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) exploits the photoactive nature of certain compounds, namely photosensitizers, in order to enhance the visual demarcation between normal and neoplastic tissue. Hypericin is one such potent photosensitizer that preferentially accumulate in neoplastic tissue, and fluoresce in the visible spectrum when illuminated with light of an appropriate wavelength. In our study, we investigated the role of E-cadherin in the selective permeation of hypericin in bladder cancer tissues. Clinical studies were done on a series of 43 histologically graded bladder cancer biopsy specimens, obtained from 28 patients who received intravesical instillations with 8μM hypericin solution for at least 2 hours. Immunohistochemical staining was used to assess the expression of E-cadherin, in the cryosectioned tissues. Hypericin uptake was examined by fluorescence microscopy. Immunohistochemical staining showed a clear expression of E-cadherin along the urothelial lining of the normal and pre-malignant tissues. Partial expression of these cell adhesion molecules were still observed in malignant tissues, however there was a loss of expression to variable extends along the urothelium. Thus, loss of intercellular adhesion can be associated with enhanced hypericin permeation through paracellular diffusion.

  14. Dihydromunduletone Is a Small-Molecule Selective Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stoveken, Hannah M; Bahr, Laura L; Anders, M W; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Smrcka, Alan V; Tall, Gregory G

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) have emerging roles in development and tissue maintenance and is the most prevalent GPCR subclass mutated in human cancers, but to date, no drugs have been developed to target them in any disease. aGPCR extracellular domains contain a conserved subdomain that mediates self-cleavage proximal to the start of the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM). The two receptor protomers, extracellular domain and amino terminal fragment (NTF), and the 7TM or C-terminal fragment remain noncovalently bound at the plasma membrane in a low-activity state. We recently demonstrated that NTF dissociation liberates the 7TM N-terminal stalk, which acts as a tethered-peptide agonist permitting receptor-dependent heterotrimeric G protein activation. In many cases, natural aGPCR ligands are extracellular matrix proteins that dissociate the NTF to reveal the tethered agonist. Given the perceived difficulty in modifying extracellular matrix proteins to create aGPCR probes, we developed a serum response element (SRE)-luciferase-based screening approach to identify GPR56/ADGRG1 small-molecule inhibitors. A 2000-compound library comprising known drugs and natural products was screened for GPR56-dependent SRE activation inhibitors that did not inhibit constitutively active Gα13-dependent SRE activation. Dihydromunduletone (DHM), a rotenoid derivative, was validated using cell-free aGPCR/heterotrimeric G protein guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding reconstitution assays. DHM inhibited GPR56 and GPR114/ADGRG5, which have similar tethered agonists, but not the aGPCR GPR110/ADGRF1, M3 muscarinic acetylcholine, or β2 adrenergic GPCRs. DHM inhibited tethered peptide agonist-stimulated and synthetic peptide agonist-stimulated GPR56 but did not inhibit basal activity, demonstrating that it antagonizes the peptide agonist. DHM is a novel aGPCR antagonist and potentially useful chemical probe that may be developed as a future aGPCR therapeutic. PMID:27338081

  15. Expression of E-Cadherin and N-Cadherin in Perinatal Hamster Ovary: Possible Involvement in Primordial Follicle Formation and Regulation by Follicle-Stimulating Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the expression and hormonal regulation of E-cadherin (CDH1) and N-cadherin (CDH2) with respect to primordial follicle formation. Hamster Cdh1 and Cdh2 cDNA and amino acid sequences were more than 90% similar to those of the mouse, rat, and human. Although CDH1 expression remained exclusively in the oocytes during neonatal ovary development, CDH2 expression shifted from the oocytes to granulosa cells of primordial follicles on postnatal day (P)8. Subsequently, strong CDH2 expression was restricted to granulosa cells of growing follicles. Cdh2 mRNA levels in the ovary decreased from embryonic d 13 through P10 with a transient increase on P7, which was the day before the appearance of primordial follicles. Cdh1 mRNA levels decreased from embryonic d 13 through P3 and then showed a transient increase on P8, coinciding with the formation of primordial follicles. CDH1 and CDH2 expression were consistent with that of mRNA. Neutralization of FSH in utero impaired primordial follicle formation with an associated decrease in Cdh2 mRNA and CDH2, but an increase in Cdh1 mRNA and CDH1 expression. The altered expression was reversed by equine chorionic gonadotropin treatment on P1. Whereas a CDH2 antibody significantly reduced the formation of primordial and primary follicles in vitro, a CDH1 antibody had the opposite effect. This is the first evidence to suggest that primordial follicle formation requires a differential spatiotemporal expression and action of CDH1 and CDH2. Further, FSH regulation of primordial follicle formation may involve the action of CDH1 and CDH2. PMID:20219978

  16. Zebularine reactivates silenced E-cadherin but unlike 5-Azacytidine does not induce switching from latent to lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection in Burkitt's lymphoma Akata cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sieta P; Rechsteiner, Markus P; Berger, Christoph; Sigrist, Jürg A; Nadal, David; Bernasconi, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of regulatory genes by aberrant methylation contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTI) represent promising new drugs for anti-cancer therapies. The DNMTI 5-Azacytidine is effective against myelodysplastic syndrome, but induces switching of latent to lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro and results in EBV DNA demethylation with the potential of induction of lytic EBV in vivo. This is of considerable concern given that recurrent lytic EBV has been linked with an increased incidence of EBV-associated lymphomas. Based on the distinct properties of action we hypothesized that the newer DNMTI Zebularine might differ from 5-Azacytidine in its potential to induce switching from latent to lytic EBV. Here we show that both 5-Azacytidine and Zebularine are able to induce expression of E-cadherin, a cellular gene frequently silenced by hypermethylation in cancers, and thus demonstrate that both DNMTI are active in our experimental setting consisting of EBV-harboring Burkitt's lymphoma Akata cells. Quantification of mRNA expression of EBV genes revealed that 5-Azacytidine induces switching from latent to lytic EBV and, in addition, that the immediate-early lytic infection progresses to early and late lytic infection. Furthermore, 5-Azacytidine induced upregulation of the latent EBV genes LMP2A, LMP2B, and EBNA2 in a similar fashion as observed following switching of latent to lytic EBV upon cross-linking of the B-cell receptor. In striking contrast, Zebularine did not exhibit any effect neither on lytic nor on latent EBV gene expression. Thus, Zebularine might be safer than 5-Azacytidine for the treatment of cancers in EBV carriers and could also be applied against EBV-harboring tumors, since it does not induce switching from latent to lytic EBV which may result in secondary EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:17214905

  17. Drosophila E-cadherin and its binding partner Armadillo/ beta-catenin are required for axonal pathway choices in the developing larval brain.

    PubMed

    Fung, Siaumin; Wang, Fay; Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-08-15

    The fly brain is formed by approximately hundred paired lineages of neurons, each lineage derived from one neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts undergo a small number of divisions and produce the primary neurons that form the functioning larval brain. In the larva, neuroblasts produce the secondary lineages that make up the bulk of the adult brain. Axons of a given secondary lineage fasciculate with each other and form a discrete bundle, the secondary axon tract (SAT). Secondary axon tracts prefigure the long axon connections of the adult brain, and therefore pathway choices of SATs made in the larva determine adult brain circuitry. Drosophila Shotgun/E-cadherin (DE-cad) and its binding partner Armadillo/beta-catenin (beta-cat) are expressed in newly born secondary neurons and their axons. The fact that the highly diverse, yet invariant pattern of secondary lineages and SATs has been recently mapped in the wild-type brain enabled us to investigate the role of DE-cad and beta-cat with the help of MARCM clones. Clones were validated by their absence of DE-cad immuno-reactivity. The most significant phenotype consists in the defasciculation and an increased amount of branching of SATs at the neuropile-cortex boundary, as well as subtle changes in the trajectory of SATs within the neuropile. In general, only a fraction of mutant clones in a given lineage showed structural abnormalities. Furthermore, although they all globally express DE-cad and beta-cat, lineages differ in their requirement for DE-cad function. Some lineages never showed morphological abnormalities in MARCM clones, whereas others reacted with abnormal branching and changes in SAT trajectory at a high frequency. We conclude that DE-cad/beta-cat form part of the mechanism that control branching and trajectory of axon tracts in the larval brain. PMID:19520071

  18. Drosophila E-cadherin and its binding partner Armadillo/ β-catenin are required for axonal pathway choices in the developing larval brain

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Siaumin; Wang, Fay; Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The fly brain is formed by approximately hundred paired lineages of neurons, each lineage derived from one neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts undergo a small number of divisions and produce the primary neurons that form the functioning larval brain. In the larva, neuroblasts produce the secondary lineages that make up the bulk of the adult brain. Axons of a given secondary lineage fasciculate with each other and form a discrete bundle, the secondary axon tract (SAT). Secondary axon tracts prefigure the long axon connections of the adult brain, and therefore pathway choices of SATs made in the larva determine adult brain circuitry. Drosophila Shotgun/E-cadherin (DE-cad) and its binding partner Armadillo/β-catenin (β-cat) are expressed in newly born secondary neurons and their axons. The fact that the highly diverse, yet invariant pattern of secondary lineages and SATs has been recently mapped in the wild-type brain enabled us to investigate the role of DE-cad and β-cat with the help of MARCM clones. Clones were validated by their absence of DE-cad immuno-reactivity. The most significant phenotype consists in the defasciculation and an increased amount of branching of SATs at the neuropile-cortex boundary, as well as subtle changes in the trajectory of SATs within the neuropile. In general, only a fraction of mutant clones in a given lineage showed structural abnormalities. Furthermore, although they all globally express DE-cad and β-cat, lineages differ in their requirement for DE-cad function. Some lineages never showed morphological abnormalities in MARCM clones, whereas others reacted with abnormal branching and changes in SAT trajectory at a high frequency. We conclude that DE-cad/β-cat form part of the mechanism that control branching and trajectory of axon tracts in the larval brain. PMID:19520071

  19. Osteoblast-specific factor 2: cloning of a putative bone adhesion protein with homology with the insect protein fasciclin I.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, S; Kikuno, R; Tezuka, K; Amann, E

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA library prepared from the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was screened for the presence of specifically expressed genes by employing a combined subtraction hybridization/differential screening approach. A cDNA was identified and sequenced which encodes a protein designated osteoblast-specific factor 2 (OSF-2) comprising 811 amino acids. OSF-2 has a typical signal sequence, followed by a cysteine-rich domain, a fourfold repeated domain and a C-terminal domain. The protein lacks a typical transmembrane region. The fourfold repeated domain of OSF-2 shows homology with the insect protein fasciclin I. RNA analyses revealed that OSF-2 is expressed in bone and to a lesser extent in lung, but not in other tissues. Mouse OSF-2 cDNA was subsequently used as a probe to clone the human counterpart. Mouse and human OSF-2 show a high amino acid sequence conservation except for the signal sequence and two regions in the C-terminal domain in which 'in-frame' insertions or deletions are observed, implying alternative splicing events. On the basis of the amino acid sequence homology with fasciclin I, we suggest that OSF-2 functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule in bone formation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8363580

  20. Cell adhesion and growth enabled by biomimetic oligopeptide modification of a polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) protein repulsive surface.

    PubMed

    Musilkova, Jana; Kotelnikov, Ilya; Novotna, Katarina; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypacek, Frantisek; Bacakova, Lucie; Proks, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Protein-repulsive surfaces modified with ligands for cell adhesion receptors have been widely developed for controlling the cell adhesion and growth in tissue engineering. However, the question of matrix production and deposition by cells on these surfaces has rarely been addressed. In this study, protein-repulsive polydopamine-poly(ethylene oxide) (PDA-PEO) surfaces were functionalized with an RGD-containing peptide (RGD), with a collagen-derived peptide binding fibronectin (Col), or by a combination of these peptides (RGD + Col, ratio 1:1) in concentrations of 90 fmol/cm(2) and 700 fmol/cm(2) for each peptide type. When seeded with vascular endothelial CPAE cells, the PDA-PEO surfaces proved to be completely non-adhesive for cells. On surfaces with lower peptide concentrations and from days 1 to 3 after seeding, cell adhesion and growth was restored practically only on the RGD-modified surface. However, from days 3 to 7, cell adhesion and growth was improved on surfaces modified with Col and with RGD + Col. At higher peptide concentrations, the cell adhesion and growth was markedly improved on all peptide-modified surfaces in both culture intervals. However, the collagen-derived peptide did not increase the expression of fibronectin in the cells. The deposition of fibronectin on the material surface was generally very low and similar on all peptide-modified surfaces. Nevertheless, the RGD + Col surfaces exhibited the highest cell adhesion stability under a dynamic load, which correlated with the highest expression of talin and vinculin in the cells on these surfaces. A combination of RGD + Col therefore seems to be the most promising for surface modification of biomaterials, e.g. vascular prostheses. PMID:26449443

  1. Adsorption and adhesion of common serum proteins to nanotextured gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Lauren E.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    , particularly when considering biological systems. It is well known that thin films and nanostructures feature different optical, electrical, and mechanical properties from their bulk composites; however, interactions taking place at the interface between nanomaterials and their surroundings are less understood. Here, we explore interactions between common serum proteins - serum albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G - and a nanotextured gallium nitride surface. Atomic force microscopy with a carboxyl-terminated colloid tip is used to probe the `activity' of proteins adsorbed onto the surface, including both the accessibility of the terminal amine to the tip as well as the potential for protein extension. By evaluating the frequency of tip-protein interactions, we can establish differences in protein behaviour on the basis of both the surface roughness as well as morphology, providing an assessment of the role of surface texture in dictating protein-surface interactions. Unidirectional surface features - either the half-unit cell steppes of as-grown GaN or those produced by mechanical polishing - appear to promote protein accessibility, with a higher frequency of protein extension events taking place on these surfaces when compared with less ordered surface features. Development of a full understanding of the factors influencing surface-biomolecule interactions can pave the way for specific surface modification to tailor the bio-material interface, offering a new path for device optimization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures demonstrating the adhesion force magnitude (Fig. S1) and lateral steppe surface topography (Fig. S2). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06353h

  2. Adsorption of parotid saliva proteins and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans ATCC 21752 to dental fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Johanna; Carlén, Anette; Söderling, Eva; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2003-07-15

    The use of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) in dentistry has increased during recent years. In marginal areas of crowns and removable partial dentures the fibers may become exposed and come into contact with oral tissues, saliva, and microbes. To date, few articles have been published on oral microbial adhesion to FRCs. The aim of this study was to compare different FRCs, their components, and conventional restorative materials with respect to S. mutans ATCC 21752 adhesion and adsorption of specific S. mutans binding proteins. Surface roughness of the materials was also determined. Four different FRCs, a restorative composite, and a high-leucite ceramic material were studied. Polyethylene FRC was found to be significantly rougher than all other materials. Aramid FRC also showed higher surface roughness in comparison with all materials but polyethylene FRC. Without a saliva pellicle, adhesion of S. mutans coincided with surface roughness and polyethylene and aramid FRC promoted S. mutans adhesion better than the other smoother materials. In the presence of salivary pellicle, ceramic and polyethylene FRC bound more bacteria than the other materials studied. Higher quantities of S. mutans binding proteins in the pellicles may in part account for the higher S. mutans adhesion to saliva-coated ceramic and polyethylene FRC. PMID:12808599

  3. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    PubMed

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states. PMID:19189961

  4. Overexpression of vascular adhesion protein-1 is associated with poor prognosis of astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Kostoro, Joanna; Chang, Shu-Jyuan; Clark Lai, Yen-Chang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Chai, Chee-Yin; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2016-06-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is one of the endothelial adhesion molecules that is believed to play a role in tumor progression and metastasis, supporting cancer cell extravasation. Very few studies have been performed on analyzing the contribution of VAP-1 in brain tumor. Astrocytomas are the most common type of brain tumors, which are classified by World Health O