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Sample records for adhesion protein paxillin

  1. A Role for the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase CD45 in Macrophage Adhesion through the Regulation of Paxillin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Joëlle; Ostergaard, Hanne L.

    2013-01-01

    CD45 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed on all cells of hematopoietic origin that is known to regulate Src family kinases. In macrophages, the absence of CD45 has been linked to defects in adhesion, however the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that bone marrow derived macrophages from CD45-deficient mice exhibit abnormal cell morphology and defective motility. These defects are accompanied by substantially decreased levels of the cytoskeletal-associated protein paxillin, without affecting the levels of other proteins. Degradation of paxillin in CD45-deficient macrophages is calpain-mediated, as treatment with a calpain inhibitor restores paxillin levels in these cells and enhances cell spreading. Inhibition of the tyrosine kinases proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), kinases that are capable of mediating tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin, also restored paxillin levels, indicating a role for these kinases in the CD45-dependent regulation of paxillin. These data demonstrate that CD45 functions to regulate Pyk2/FAK activity, likely through the activity of Src family kinases, which in turn regulates the levels of paxillin to modulate macrophage adhesion and migration. PMID:23936270

  2. Paxillin-dependent paxillin kinase linker and p21-activated kinase localization to focal adhesions involves a multistep activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; West, Kip A; Turner, Christopher E

    2002-05-01

    The precise temporal-spatial regulation of the p21-activated serine-threonine kinase PAK at the plasma membrane is required for proper cytoskeletal reorganization and cell motility. However, the mechanism by which PAK localizes to focal adhesions has not yet been elucidated. Indirect binding of PAK to the focal adhesion protein paxillin via the Arf-GAP protein paxillin kinase linker (PKL) and PIX/Cool suggested a mechanism. In this report, we demonstrate an essential role for a paxillin-PKL interaction in the recruitment of activated PAK to focal adhesions. Similar to PAK, expression of activated Cdc42 and Rac1, but not RhoA, stimulated the translocation of PKL from a generally diffuse localization to focal adhesions. Expression of the PAK regulatory domain (PAK1-329) or the autoinhibitory domain (AID 83-149) induced PKL, PIX, and PAK localization to focal adhesions, indicating a role for PAK scaffold activation. We show PIX, but not NCK, binding to PAK is necessary for efficient focal adhesion localization of PAK and PKL, consistent with a PAK-PIX-PKL linkage. Although PAK activation is required, it is not sufficient for localization. The PKL amino terminus, containing the PIX-binding site, but lacking paxillin-binding subdomain 2 (PBS2), was unable to localize to focal adhesions and also abrogated PAK localization. An identical result was obtained after PKLDeltaPBS2 expression. Finally, neither PAK nor PKL was capable of localizing to focal adhesions in cells overexpressing paxillinDeltaLD4, confirming a requirement for this motif in recruitment of the PAK-PIX-PKL complex to focal adhesions. These results suggest a GTP-Cdc42/GTP-Rac triggered multistep activation cascade leading to the stimulation of the adaptor function of PAK, which through interaction with PIX provokes a functional PKL PBS2-paxillin LD4 association and consequent recruitment to focal adhesions. This mechanism is probably critical for the correct subcellular positioning of PAK, thereby

  3. Endothelial paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) play a critical role in neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean A; Sharma, Ritu; Roccamatisi, Dawn L; Zhang, Hong; Petri, Björn; Kubes, Paul; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D

    2012-02-01

    During an inflammatory response, endothelial cells undergo morphological changes to allow for the passage of neutrophils from the blood vessel to the site of injury or infection. Although endothelial cell junctions and the cytoskeleton undergo reorganization during inflammation, little is known about another class of cellular structures, the focal adhesions. In this study, we examined several focal adhesion proteins during an inflammatory response. We found that there was selective loss of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) from focal adhesions in proximity to transmigrating neutrophils; in contrast the levels of the focal adhesion proteins β1-integrin and vinculin were unaffected. Paxillin was lost from focal adhesions during neutrophil transmigration both under static and flow conditions. Down-regulating endothelial paxillin with siRNA blocked neutrophil transmigration while having no effect on rolling or adhesion. As paxillin dynamics are regulated partly by FAK, the role of FAK in neutrophil transmigration was examined using two complementary methods. siRNA was used to down-regulate total FAK protein while dominant-negative, kinase-deficient FAK was expressed to block FAK signaling. Disruption of the FAK protein or FAK signaling decreased neutrophil transmigration. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel role for endothelial focal adhesion proteins paxillin and FAK in regulating neutrophil transmigration.

  4. Roles for the tubulin- and PTP-PEST-binding paxillin LIM domains in cell adhesion and motility.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; Turner, Christopher E

    2002-07-01

    Cell dynamics mediated through cell-extracellular matrix contacts, such as adhesion and motility involve the precise regulation of large complexes of structural and signaling molecules called focal adhesions (FAs). Paxillin is a multi-domain FA adaptor protein containing five amino-terminal paxillin leucine-aspartate repeat (LD) motifs and four carboxyl-terminal Lin-11 Isl-1 and Mec-3 (LIM) domains. The LD motifs support paxillin binding to actopaxin, integrin linked kinase (ILK), FA kinase (FAK), paxillin kinase linker (PKL) and vinculin. Of the LIM domains, LIM2 and 3 comprise the paxillin FA-targeting motif, with phosphorylation of these domains modulating paxillin targeting and cell adhesion to fibronectin (Fn). The identity of the paxillin FA targeting partner remains to be determined; however, the LIM domains mediate interactions with tubulin and the protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST. PTP-PEST binding requires both LIM3 and 4, whereas, the precise LIM target of tubulin binding is not known. In this report, we demonstrate that the individual paxillin LIM2 and 3 domains support specific binding to tubulin and suggest a potential role for this interaction in the regulation of paxillin sub-cellular compartmentalization. In addition, expression of paxillin molecules with mutations in the tubulin- and PTP-PEST-binding LIM domains differentially impaired Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO.K1) cell adhesion and migration to Fn. Perturbation of LIM3 or 4 inhibited adhesion while mutation of LIM2 or 4 decreased cell motility. Interestingly, expression of tandem LIM2-3 inhibited cell adhesion and spreading while LIM3-4 stimulated a well-spread polarized phenotype. These data offer further support for a critical role for paxillin in cell adhesion and motility.

  5. Selected Contribution: Skeletal muscle focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, and serum response factor are loading dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. E.; Fluck, M.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation examined the effect of mechanical loading state on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and serum response factor (SRF) in rat skeletal muscle. We found that FAK concentration and tyrosine phosphorylation, paxillin concentration, and SRF concentration are all lower in the lesser load-bearing fast-twitch plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles compared with the greater load-bearing slow-twitch soleus muscle. Of these three muscles, 7 days of mechanical unloading via tail suspension elicited a decrease in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation only in the soleus muscle and decreases in FAK and paxillin concentrations only in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. Unloading decreased SRF concentration in all three muscles. Mechanical overloading (via bilateral gastrocnemius ablation) for 1 or 8 days increased FAK and paxillin concentrations in the soleus and plantaris muscles. Additionally, whereas FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and SRF concentration were increased by < or =1 day of overloading in the soleus muscle, these increases did not occur until somewhere between 1 and 8 days of overloading in the plantaris muscle. These data indicate that, in the skeletal muscles of rats, the focal adhesion complex proteins FAK and paxillin and the transcription factor SRF are generally modulated in association with the mechanical loading state of the muscle. However, the somewhat different patterns of adaptation of these proteins to altered loading in slow- vs. fast-twitch skeletal muscles indicate that the mechanisms and time course of adaptation may partly depend on the prior loading state of the muscle.

  6. Nuclear transport of paxillin depends on focal adhesion dynamics and FAT domains

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Aneesh R.; Shivashankar, G. V.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear transport of paxillin appears to be crucial for paxillin function but the mechanism of transport remains unclear. Here, we show that the nuclear transport of paxillin is regulated by focal adhesion turnover and the presence of FAT domains. Focal adhesion turnover was controlled using triangular or circular fibronectin islands. Circular islands caused higher focal adhesion turnover and increased the nuclear transport of paxillin relative to triangular islands. Mutating several residues of paxillin had no effect on its nuclear transport, suggesting that the process is controlled by multiple domains. Knocking out FAK (also known as PTK2) and vinculin caused an increase in nuclear paxillin. This could be reversed by rescue with wild-type FAK but not by FAK with a mutated FAT domain, which inhibits paxillin binding. Expressing just the FAT domain of FAK not only brought down nuclear levels of paxillin but also caused a large immobile fraction of paxillin to be present at focal adhesions, as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies. Taken together, focal adhesion turnover and FAT domains regulate the nuclear localization of paxillin, suggesting a possible role for transcriptional control, through paxillin, by focal adhesions. PMID:27068537

  7. Evolution and Expression of Paxillin Genes in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Andrew E.; Turner, Christopher E.; Amack, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Paxillin family proteins regulate intracellular signaling downstream of extracellular matrix adhesion. Tissue expression patterns and cellular functions of Paxillin proteins during embryo development remain poorly understood. Additionally, the evolution of this gene family has not been thoroughly investigated. Results This report characterizes the evolution and expression of a novel Paxillin gene, called Paxillin-b, in Teleosts. Alignments indicate that Teleost Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b proteins are highly homologous to each other and to human Paxillin. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that these genes originated from the duplication of an ancestral Paxillin gene that was in a common ancestor of Teleosts and Tetrapods. Analysis of the spatiotemporal expression profiles of Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b using zebrafish revealed both overlapping and distinct domains for Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b during embryo development. Localization of zebrafish Paxillin orthologs expressed in mammalian cells demonstrated that both proteins localize to focal adhesions, similar to mammalian Paxillin. This suggests these proteins regulate adhesion-dependent processes in their endogenous tissues. Conclusion Paxillin-a and Paxillin-b were generated by duplication in Teleosts. These genes likely play similar roles as Paxillin genes in other organisms. This work provides a framework for functional investigation of Paxillin family members during development using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system. PMID:27806088

  8. Paxillin LD4 motif binds PAK and PIX through a novel 95-kD ankyrin repeat, ARF-GAP protein: A role in cytoskeletal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Turner, C E; Brown, M C; Perrotta, J A; Riedy, M C; Nikolopoulos, S N; McDonald, A R; Bagrodia, S; Thomas, S; Leventhal, P S

    1999-05-17

    Paxillin is a focal adhesion adaptor protein involved in the integration of growth factor- and adhesion-mediated signal transduction pathways. Repeats of a leucine-rich sequence named paxillin LD motifs (Brown M.C., M.S. Curtis, and C.E. Turner. 1998. Nature Struct. Biol. 5:677-678) have been implicated in paxillin binding to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Here we demonstrate that the individual paxillin LD motifs function as discrete and selective protein binding interfaces. A novel scaffolding function is described for paxillin LD4 in the binding of a complex of proteins containing active p21 GTPase-activated kinase (PAK), Nck, and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, PIX. The association of this complex with paxillin is mediated by a new 95-kD protein, p95PKL (paxillin-kinase linker), which binds directly to paxillin LD4 and PIX. This protein complex also binds to Hic-5, suggesting a conservation of LD function across the paxillin superfamily. Cloning of p95PKL revealed a multidomain protein containing an NH2-terminal ARF-GAP domain, three ankyrin-like repeats, a potential calcium-binding EF hand, calmodulin-binding IQ motifs, a myosin homology domain, and two paxillin-binding subdomains (PBS). Green fluorescent protein- (GFP-) tagged p95PKL localized to focal adhesions/complexes in CHO.K1 cells. Overexpression in neuroblastoma cells of a paxillin LD4 deletion mutant inhibited lamellipodia formation in response to insulin-like growth fac- tor-1. Microinjection of GST-LD4 into NIH3T3 cells significantly decreased cell migration into a wound. These data implicate paxillin as a mediator of p21 GTPase-regulated actin cytoskeletal reorganization through the recruitment to nascent focal adhesion structures of an active PAK/PIX complex potentially via interactions with p95PKL.

  9. Emerging role of paxillin-PKL in regulation of cell adhesion, polarity and migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    Cell adhesion and motility is of fundamental importance during development, normal physiology and pathologic conditions such as tumor metastasis. Focal adhesion proteins and their dynamic interactions play a critical role in the regulation of directed cell migration upon exposure to extracellular guidance cues. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout and knockdown cells and mutant protein expression, we recently reported that following adhesion and growth factor stimulation the dynamic interaction between paxillin and PKL(GIT2) is regulated by Src/FAK-dependent phosphorylation of PKL and that this interaction is necessary for the coordination of Rho family GTPase signaling controlling front-rear cell polarity and thus directional migration. Herein, we discuss the implications of these observations.

  10. Myoferlin depletion elevates focal adhesion kinase and paxillin phosphorylation and enhances cell-matrix adhesion in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, B N; Li, R; Ackerman, W E; Ghadiali, S N; Powell, H M; Kniss, D A

    2015-04-15

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of malignant death among women. A crucial feature of metastatic cancers is their propensity to lose adhesion to the underlying basement membrane as they transition to a motile phenotype and invade surrounding tissue. Attachment to the extracellular matrix is mediated by a complex of adhesion proteins, including integrins, signaling molecules, actin and actin-binding proteins, and scaffolding proteins. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is pivotal for the organization of focal contacts and maturation into focal adhesions, and disruption of this process is a hallmark of early cancer invasive potential. Our recent work has revealed that myoferlin (MYOF) mediates breast tumor cell motility and invasive phenotype. In this study we demonstrate that noninvasive breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased cell-substrate adhesion and that silencing of MYOF using RNAi in the highly invasive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 also enhances cell-substrate adhesion. In addition, we detected elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK (FAK(Y397)) and paxillin (PAX(Y118)), markers of focal adhesion protein activation. Morphometric analysis of PAX expression revealed that RNAi-mediated depletion of MYOF resulted in larger, more elongated focal adhesions, in contrast to cells transduced with a control virus (MDA-231(LVC) cells), which exhibited smaller focal contacts. Finally, MYOF silencing in MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a more elaborate ventral cytoskeletal structure near focal adhesions, typified by pronounced actin stress fibers. These data support the hypothesis that MYOF regulates cell adhesions and cell-substrate adhesion strength and may account for the high degree of motility in invasive breast cancer cells.

  11. Src and FAK kinases cooperate to phosphorylate paxillin kinase linker, stimulate its focal adhesion localization, and regulate cell spreading and protrusiveness.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; Cary, Leslie A; Jamieson, Jennifer S; Cooper, Jonathan A; Turner, Christopher E

    2005-09-01

    The ArfGAP paxillin kinase linker (PKL)/G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein (GIT)2 has been implicated in regulating cell spreading and motility through its transient recruitment of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) to focal adhesions. The Nck-PAK-PIX-PKL protein complex is recruited to focal adhesions by paxillin upon integrin engagement and Rac activation. In this report, we identify tyrosine-phosphorylated PKL as a protein that associates with the SH3-SH2 adaptor Nck, in a Src-dependent manner, after cell adhesion to fibronectin. Both cell adhesion and Rac activation stimulated PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. PKL is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues 286/392/592 by Src and/or FAK and these sites are required for PKL localization to focal adhesions and for paxillin binding. The absence of either FAK or Src-family kinases prevents PKL phosphorylation and suppresses localization of PKL but not GIT1 to focal adhesions after Rac activation. Expression of an activated FAK mutant in the absence of Src-family kinases partially restores PKL localization, suggesting that Src activation of FAK is required for PKL phosphorylation and localization. Overexpression of the nonphosphorylated GFP-PKL Triple YF mutant stimulates cell spreading and protrusiveness, similar to overexpression of a paxillin mutant that does not bind PKL, suggesting that failure to recruit PKL to focal adhesions interferes with normal cell spreading and motility.

  12. Retinoic acid induces nuclear FAK translocation and reduces breast cancer cell adhesion through Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angel Matías; Shortrede, Jorge Eduardo; Vargas-Roig, Laura María; Flamini, Marina Inés

    2016-07-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women, with metastases being the cause of death in 98%. In previous works we have demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA), the main retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ligand, is involved in the metastatic process by inhibiting migration through a reduced expression of the specific migration-related proteins Moesin, c-Src, and FAK. At present, our hypothesis is that RA also acts for short periods in a non-genomic action to cooperate with motility reduction and morphology of breast cancer cells. Here we identify that the administration of 10(-6) M RA (10-20 min) induces the activation of the migration-related proteins Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin in T-47D breast cancer cells. The phosphorylation exerted by the selective agonists for RARα and RARβ, on Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin was comparable to the activation exerted by RA. The RARγ agonist only led to a weak activation, suggesting the involvement of RARα and RARβ in this pathway. We then treated the cells with different inhibitors that are involved in cell signaling to regulate the mechanisms of cell motility. RA failed to activate Moesin, FAK, and Paxillin in cells treated with Src inhibitor (PP2) and PI3K inhibitor (WM), suggesting the participation of Src-PI3K in this pathway. Treatment with 10(-6) M RA for 20 min significantly decreased cell adhesion. However, when cells were treated with 10(-6) M RA and FAK inhibitor, the RA did not significantly inhibit adhesion, suggesting a role of FAK in the adhesion inhibited by RA. By immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analysis we demonstrated that RA induced nuclear FAK translocation leading to a reduced cellular adhesion. These findings provide new information on the actions of RA for short periods. RA participates in cell adhesion and subsequent migration, modulating the relocation and activation of proteins involved in cell migration.

  13. Paxillin mutations affect focal adhesions and lead to altered mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Ichiro; Hasina, Rifat; Lennon, Frances E; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Usatyuk, Peter; Tan, Yi-Hung C; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Arif, Qudsia; Carey, George; Hseu, Robyn D; Robinson, Matthew; Tretiakova, Maria; Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Ferguson, Mark K; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Vokes, Everett E; Singleton, Patrick A; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal and focal adhesion abnormalities are observed in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. We have previously reported that paxillin (PXN) was mutated, amplified, and overexpressed in a significant number of lung cancer patient samples, that PXN protein was upregulated in more advanced stages of lung cancer compared with lower stages, and that the PXN gene was also amplified in some pre-neoplastic lung lesions. Among the mutations investigated, we previously found that PXN variant A127T in lung cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation and focal adhesion formation and colocalized with the anti-apoptotic protein B Cell Lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), which is known to localize to the mitochondria, among other sites. To further explore the effects of activating mutations of PXN on mitochondrial function, we cloned and expressed wild-type PXN and variants containing the most commonly occurring PXN mutations (P46S, P52L, G105D, A127T, P233L, T255I, D399N, E423K, P487L, and K506R) in a GFP-tagged vector using HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells. Utilizing live-cell imaging to systematically study the effects of wild-type PXN vs. mutants, we created a model that recapitulates the salient features of the measured dynamics and conclude that compared with wild-type, some mutant clones confer enhanced focal adhesion and lamellipodia formation (A127T, P233L, and P487L) and some confer increased association with BCL-2, Dynamin-related Protein-1 (DRP-1), and Mitofusion-2 (MFN-2) proteins (P233L and D399N). Further, PXN mutants, through their interactions with BCL-2 and DRP-1, could regulate cisplatin drug resistance in human lung cancer cells. The data reported herein suggest that mutant PXN variants play a prominent role in mitochondrial dynamics with direct implications on lung cancer progression and hence, deserve further exploration as therapeutic targets. PMID:23792636

  14. Focal adhesion kinase and paxillin promote migration and adhesion to fibronectin by swine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Chun-Qi; Chen, Rong-Qiang; Jin, Cheng-Long; Li, Hai-Chang; Yan, Hui-Chao; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2016-05-24

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway contributes to the cell migration and adhesion that is critical for wound healing and regeneration of damaged muscle, but its function in skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) is less clear. We compared the migration and adhesion of SCs derived from two species of pig (Lantang and Landrace) in vitro, and explored how FAK signaling modulates the two processes. The results showed that Lantang SCs had greater ability to migrate and adhere to fibronection (P < 0.05) than Landrace SCs. Compared to Landrace SCs, Lantang SCs expressed many more focal adhesion (FA) sites, which were indicated by the presence of p-paxillin (Tyr118), and exhibited less F-actin reorganization 24 h after seeding onto fibronectin. Levels of p-FAK (Tyr397) and p-paxillin (Tyr118) were greater (P < 0.05) in Lantang SCs than Landrace SCs after migration for 24 h. Similarly, Lantang SCs showed much higher levels of p-FAK (Tyr397), p-paxillin (Tyr118) and p-Akt (Ser473) than Landrace SCs 2 h after adhesion. Treatment with the FAK inhibitor PF-573228 (5 or 10 μmol/L) inhibited Lantang SC migration and adhesion to fibronectin (P < 0.05), decreased levels of p-paxillin (Tyr118) and p-Akt (Ser473) (P < 0.05), and suppressed the formation of FA sites on migrating SCs. Thus FAK appears to play a key role in the regulation of SC migration and adhesion necessary for muscle regeneration.

  15. cAMP inhibits migration, ruffling and paxillin accumulation in focal adhesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells: effects of PKA and EPAC.

    PubMed

    Burdyga, Alex; Conant, Alan; Haynes, Lee; Zhang, Jin; Jalink, Kees; Sutton, Robert; Neoptolemos, John; Costello, Eithne; Tepikin, Alexei

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrated that increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations result in the inhibition of migration of PANC-1 and other pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell types. The rise of cAMP was accompanied by rapid and reversible cessation of ruffling, by inhibition of focal adhesion turnover and by prominent loss of paxillin from focal adhesions. All these phenomena develop rapidly suggesting that cAMP effectors have a direct influence on the cellular migratory apparatus. The role of two primary cAMP effectors, exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) and protein kinase A (PKA), in cAMP-mediated inhibition of PDAC cell migration and migration-associated processes was investigated. Experiments with selective activators of EPAC and PKA demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of cAMP on migration, ruffling, focal adhesion dynamics and paxillin localisation is mediated by PKA, whilst EPAC potentiates migration.

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β dictates podocyte motility and focal adhesion turnover by modulating paxillin activity: implications for the protective effect of low-dose lithium in podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Ge, Yan; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Rujun

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant focal adhesion turnover is centrally involved in podocyte actin cytoskeleton disorganization and foot process effacement. The structural and dynamic integrity of focal adhesions is orchestrated by multiple cell signaling molecules, including glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multitasking kinase lately identified as a mediator of kidney injury. However, the role of GSK3β in podocytopathy remains obscure. In doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-injured podocytes, lithium, a GSK3β inhibitor and neuroprotective mood stabilizer, obliterated the accelerated focal adhesion turnover, rectified podocyte hypermotility, and restored actin cytoskeleton integrity. Mechanistically, lithium counteracted the doxorubicin-elicited GSK3β overactivity and the hyperphosphorylation and overactivation of paxillin, a focal adhesion-associated adaptor protein. Moreover, forced expression of a dominant negative kinase dead mutant of GSK3β highly mimicked, whereas ectopic expression of a constitutively active GSK3β mutant abolished, the effect of lithium in doxorubicin-injured podocytes, suggesting that the effect of lithium is mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of GSK3β. Furthermore, paxillin interacted with GSK3β and served as its substrate. In mice with doxorubicin nephropathy, a single low dose of lithium ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Consistently, lithium therapy abrogated GSK3β overactivity, blunted paxillin hyperphosphorylation, and reinstated actin cytoskeleton integrity in glomeruli associated with an early attenuation of podocyte foot process effacement. Thus, GSK3β-modulated focal adhesion dynamics might serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy.

  17. Paxillin is essential for PTP-PEST-dependent regulation of cell spreading and motility: a role for paxillin kinase linker.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jennifer S; Tumbarello, David A; Hallé, Maxime; Brown, Michael C; Tremblay, Michel L; Turner, Christopher E

    2005-12-15

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST has been implicated in the regulation of cell spreading and migration through dephosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins and inhibition of Rac GTPase activity. The focal adhesion adaptor protein paxillin is also necessary for normal cell migration and binds directly to PTP-PEST. In this study, we have utilized PTP-PEST(-/-) and paxillin(-/-) fibroblasts to demonstrate that paxillin is essential for PTP-PEST inhibition of cell spreading and membrane protrusion as well as inhibition of adhesion-induced Rac activation. Furthermore, we show that paxillin-binding is necessary for PTP-PEST stimulation of cell migration. Mutation analysis indicates that PTP-PEST function involves binding to the paxillin C-terminal LIM domains, and signaling through the tyrosine 31 and 118 phosphorylation sites, as well as the LD4 motif of the paxillin N-terminus. Using 'substrate trapping' approaches and immunoprecipitation, we show that the ARF GAP paxillin kinase linker PKL/GIT2, a paxillin LD4 binding partner, is a substrate for PTP-PEST. Additionally, the PKL-paxillin interaction was necessary for PTP-PEST inhibition of cell spreading. These data provide mechanistic insight into how the paxillin-PTP-PEST interaction contributes to integrin signaling events associated with the spatiotemporal regulation of key modulators of the cytoskeleton and cell motility machinery.

  18. Paxillin: a crossroad in pathological cell migration.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; Lee-Rivera, Irene; Benavides-Hidalgo, Regina; López, Edith

    2017-02-18

    Paxilllin is a multifunctional and multidomain focal adhesion adapter protein which serves an important scaffolding role at focal adhesions by recruiting structural and signaling molecules involved in cell movement and migration, when phosphorylated on specific Tyr and Ser residues. Upon integrin engagement with extracellular matrix, paxillin is phosphorylated at Tyr31, Tyr118, Ser188, and Ser190, activating numerous signaling cascades which promote cell migration, indicating that the regulation of adhesion dynamics is under the control of a complex display of signaling mechanisms. Among them, paxillin disassembly from focal adhesions induced by extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated phosphorylation of serines 106, 231, and 290 as well as the binding of the phosphatase PEST to paxillin have been shown to play a key role in cell migration. Paxillin also coordinates the spatiotemporal activation of signaling molecules, including Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA GTPases, by recruiting GEFs, GAPs, and GITs to focal adhesions. As a major participant in the regulation of cell movement, paxillin plays distinct roles in specific tissues and developmental stages and is involved in immune response, epithelial morphogenesis, and embryonic development. Importantly, paxillin is also an essential player in pathological conditions including oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell barrier dysfunction, and cancer development and metastasis.

  19. Paxillin localizes to the lymphocyte microtubule organizing center and associates with the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Herreros, L; Rodríguez-Fernandez, J L; Brown, M C; Alonso-Lebrero, J L; Cabañas, C; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Longo, N; Turner, C E; Sánchez-Mateos, P

    2000-08-25

    Paxillin is a focal adhesion-associated protein that functions as a multi-domain adapter protein, binding several structural and signaling molecules. alpha-Tubulin was identified as an interacting protein in a two-hybrid screen using the paxillin C-terminal LIM domain as a bait. In vitro binding assays with glutathione S-transferase-paxillin demonstrated an interaction of alpha-tubulin with the C terminus of paxillin. Another member of the tubulin family, gamma-tubulin, bound to both the N and the C terminus of paxillin. The interaction between paxillin and both alpha- and gamma-tubulin in vivo was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from human T lymphoblasts. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that, in adherent T cells, paxillin localized to sites of cell-matrix interaction as well as to a large perinuclear region. Confocal microscopy revealed that this region corresponds to the lymphocyte microtubule organizing center, where paxillin colocalizes with alpha- and gamma-tubulin. The localization of paxillin to this area was observed in cells in suspension as well as during adhesion to integrin ligands. These data constitute the first characterization of the interaction of paxillin with the microtubule cytoskeleton, and suggest that paxillin, in addition to its well established role at focal adhesions, could also be associated with the lymphocyte microtubule network.

  20. A novel muscle LIM-only protein is generated from the paxillin gene locus in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Ryohei; Ishimaru, Satoshi; Yano, Hajime; Gaul, Ulrike; Hanafusa, Hidesaburo; Sabe, Hisataka

    2001-01-01

    Paxillin is a protein containing four LIM domains, and functions in integrin signaling. We report here that two transcripts are generated from the paxillin gene locus in Drosophila; one encodes a protein homolog of the vertebrate Paxillin (DPxn37), and the other a protein with only three LIM domains, partly encoded by its own specific exon (PDLP). At the myotendinous junctions of Drosophila embryos where integrins play important roles, both DPxn37 and PDLP are highly expressed with different patterns; DPxn37 is predominantly concentrated at the center of the junctions, whereas PDLP is highly enriched at neighboring sides of the junction centers, primarily expressed in the mesodermal myotubes. Northern blot analysis revealed that DPxn37 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the life cycle, whereas PDLP expression exhibits a biphasic pattern during development, largely concomitant with muscle generation and remodeling. Our results collectively reveal that a unique system exists in Drosophila for the generation of a novel type of LIM-only protein, highly expressed in the embryonic musclature, largely utilizing the Paxillin LIM domains. PMID:11520860

  1. Engineering Synthetic Antibody Inhibitors Specific for LD2 or LD4 Motifs of Paxillin.

    PubMed

    Nocula-Lugowska, Malgorzata; Lugowski, Mateusz; Salgia, Ravi; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2015-07-31

    Focal adhesion protein paxillin links integrin and growth factor signaling to actin cytoskeleton. Most of paxillin signaling activity is regulated via leucine-rich LD motifs (LD1-LD5) located at the N-terminus. Here, we demonstrate a method to engineer highly selective synthetic antibodies (sABs) against LD2 and LD4 that are binding sites for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and other proteins. Phage display selections against peptides were used to generate sABs recognizing each LD motif. In the obtained X-ray crystal structures of the LD-sAB complexes, the LD motifs are helical and bind sABs through a hydrophobic side, similarly as in the structures with natural paxillin partners. The sABs are capable of pulling down endogenous paxillin in complex with FAK and can visualize paxillin in focal adhesions in cells. They were also used as selective inhibitors to effectively compete with focal adhesion targeting domain of FAK for the binding to LD2 and LD4. The sABs are tools for investigation of paxillin LD binding "platforms" and are capable of inhibiting paxillin interactions, thereby useful as potential therapeutics in the future.

  2. Paxillin controls directional cell motility in response to physical cues.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; German, Alexandra E; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Physical cues from the extracellular environment that influence cell shape and directional migration are transduced into changes in cytoskeletal organization and biochemistry through integrin-based cell adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM). Paxillin is a focal adhesion (FA) scaffold protein that mediates integrin anchorage to the cytoskeleton, and has been implicated in regulation of FA assembly and cell migration. To determine whether paxillin is involved in coupling mechanical distortion with directional movement, cell shape was physically constrained by culturing cells on square-shaped fibronectin-coated adhesive islands surrounded by non-adhesive barrier regions that were created with a microcontact printing technique. Square-shaped cells preferentially formed FAs and extended lamellipodia from their corner regions when stimulated with PDGF, and loss of paxillin resulted in loss of this polarized response. Selective expression of the N- and C-terminal domains of paxillin produced opposite, but complementary, effects on suppressing or promoting lamellipodia formation in different regions of square cells, which corresponded to directional motility defects in vitro. Paxillin loss or mutation was also shown to affect the formation of circular dorsal ruffles, and this corresponded to changes in cell invasive behavior in 3D. This commentary addresses the implications of these findings in terms of how a multifunctional FA scaffold protein can link physical cues to cell adhesion, protrusion and membrane trafficking so as to control directional migration in 2D and 3D. We also discuss how microengineered ECM islands and in vivo model systems can be used to further elucidate the functions of paxillin in directional migration.

  3. The Chlamydia effector TarP mimics the mammalian leucine-aspartic acid motif of paxillin to subvert the focal adhesion kinase during invasion.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, Tristan; Nogueira, Ana T; Campeotto, Ivan; Silva, Ana P; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2014-10-31

    Host cell signal transduction pathways are often targets of bacterial pathogens, especially during the process of invasion when robust actin remodeling is required. We demonstrate that the host cell focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was necessary for the invasion by the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia caviae. Bacterial adhesion triggered the transient recruitment of FAK to the plasma membrane to mediate a Cdc42- and Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly. FAK recruitment was via binding to a domain within the virulence factor TarP that mimicked the LD2 motif of the FAK binding partner paxillin. Importantly, bacterial two-hybrid and quantitative imaging assays revealed a similar level of interaction between paxillin-LD2 and TarP-LD. The conserved leucine residues within the L(D/E)XLLXXL motif were essential to the recruitment of FAK, Cdc42, p34(Arc), and actin to the plasma membrane. In the absence of FAK, TarP-LD-mediated F-actin assembly was reduced, highlighting the functional relevance of this interaction. Together, the data indicate that a prokaryotic version of the paxillin LD2 domain targets the FAK signaling pathway, with TarP representing the first example of an LD-containing Type III virulence effector.

  4. FAK and PAX-illin get involved in leukocyte diapedesis.

    PubMed

    Luscinskas, Francis W

    2012-02-01

    A major focus of researchers studying leukocyte recruitment has been to identify and understand how cell surface endothelial adhesion molecules, cell-to-cell junctional protein complexes, secreted chemokines and chemoattractants, and the vessel basement membrane structure organization coordinate the process of leukocyte recruitment. As research expands beyond the components initially identified as being necessary for leukocyte recruitment, attention has turned to the structures that regulate endothelial cell-to-matrix adhesion. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Parsons et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2012. 42: 436-446] identify new players in the regulation of neutrophil diapedesis (transendothelial migration), namely the focal adhesion proteins, paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). While understudied, and indeed previously underappreciated, in leukocyte diapedesis, this Commentary discusses how the work by Parsons et al. implicates FAK and paxillin in the proximal (leukocyte rolling) and distal (diapedesis) steps of the multistep adhesion cascade of leukocyte recruitment.

  5. Reduced paxillin expression contributes to the antimetastatic effect of 4-hydroxycoumarin on B16-F10 melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A; Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Mendoza-Patiño, Nicandro; Mandoki, Juan J

    2008-01-01

    Background 4-Hydroxycoumarin (4-HC) is a coumarin that lacks anticoagulant activity. 4-HC affects the cytoskeletal stability and decreases cell adhesion and motility of the melanoma cell line B16-F10. Together with integrins and other cytoskeletal proteins, paxillin participates in the regulation of cell adhesion and motility, acting as an adapter protein at focal adhesions. The present study determined the participation of paxillin in the reported effects of 4-HC and analyzed the role of paxillin in the formation of melanoma metastases. Results 4-HC decreased protein and mRNA levels of α- and β-paxillin isoforms in B16-F10 cells. Paxillin downregulation correlated with an inadequate translocation of paxillin to focal adhesions and a reduced phosphotyr118-paxillin pool. Consequently, 4-HC altered paxillin-mediated signaling, decreasing the phosphorylation of FAK and the level of GTP-bound Rac-1. These results partially explain the mechanism of the previously reported effects of 4-HC. Additionally, we studied the effect of 4-HC on metastatic potential of B16-F10 cells through experimental metastasis assays. In vitro treatment of cells with 4-HC inhibited their capability to originate pulmonary metastases. 4-HC did not affect cell proliferation or survival, demonstrating that its antimetastatic effect is unrelated to changes on cell viability. We also studied the importance of paxillin in metastasis by transfecting melanoma cells with paxillin-siRNA. Transfection produced a modest reduction on metastatic potential, indicating that: i) paxillin plays a role as inducer of melanoma metastasis; and ii) paxillin downregulation is not sufficient to explain the antimetastatic effect of 4-HC. Therefore, we evaluated other changes in gene expression by differential display RT-PCR analysis. Treatment with 4-HC produced a downregulation of Adhesion Regulating Molecule-1 (ARM-1), which correlated with a decreased adhesion of melanoma cells to lung slides. Conclusion This study

  6. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Eloae, Florin Zugun; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Carasevici, Eugen; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  7. Paxillin-kinase-linker tyrosine phosphorylation regulates directional cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2009-11-01

    Directed cell migration requires the coordination of growth factor and cell adhesion signaling and is of fundamental importance during embryonic development, wound repair, and pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate that the ArfGAP, paxillin-kinase-linker (PKL/GIT2), is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, in an adhesion dependent manner and is necessary for directed cell migration. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout cells and kinase mutants, FAK, and Src family kinases were shown to mediate PDGF-dependent PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. In fibroblasts, expression of a PKL mutant lacking the principal tyrosine phosphorylation sites resulted in loss of wound-induced cell polarization as well as directional migration. PKL phosphorylation was necessary for PDGF-stimulated PKL binding to the focal adhesion protein paxillin and expression of paxillin or PKL mutants defective in their respective binding motifs recapitulated the polarization defects. RNA interference or expression of phosphorylation mutants of PKL resulted in disregulation of PDGF-stimulated Rac1 and PAK activities, reduction of Cdc42 and Erk signaling, as well as mislocalization of betaPIX. Together these studies position PKL as an integral component of growth factor and cell adhesion cross-talk signaling, controlling the development of front-rear cell polarity and directional cell migration.

  8. Activity-dependent dephosphorylation of paxillin contributed to nociceptive plasticity in spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Tai; Zheng, Rui; Suo, Zhan-Wei; Liu, Yan-Ni; Zhang, Zi-Yang; Ma, Zheng-An; Xue, Ye; Xue, Man; Yang, Xian; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The enzymatic activity of protein tyrosine kinase Src is subjected to the regulation by C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Aberrant Src activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn is pivotal for the induction and development of nociceptive behavioral sensitization. In this study, we found that paxillin, one of the well-characterized cell adhesion components involved in cell migration and survival, integrated CSK and PTPs' signaling to regulate Src-dependent nociceptive plasticity. Paxillin localized at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the spinal dorsal horn of mice, and the phosphorylation of Tyr118 on paxillin was necessary to associate with and target CSK at synapses. After peripheral tissue injury, the enhanced neuronal activity stimulated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype glutamate receptors, which initiated PTPs' signaling to catalyze Tyr118 dephosphorylation. The reduced Tyr118 phosphorylation disrupted paxillin interaction with CSK, leading to the dispersal of CSK out of synapses. With the loss of CSK-mediated inhibition, Src activity was persistently increased. The active Src potentiated the synaptic transmission specifically mediated by GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors. The active Src also facilitated the induction of long-term potentiation of C fiber-evoked field potentials and exaggerated painful responses. In complete Freund's adjuvant-injected mice, viral expression of phosphomimicking paxillin mutant to resume CSK synaptic localization repressed Src hyperactivity. Meanwhile, this phosphomimicking paxillin mutant blunted NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and alleviated chronic inflammatory pain. These data showed that PTPs-mediated dephosphorylation of paxillin at Tyr118 was involved in the modification of nociceptive plasticity through CSK-Src signaling.

  9. Platelet rich plasma promotes skeletal muscle cell migration in association with up-regulation of FAK, paxillin, and F-Actin formation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Mioa-Sui; Tsai, Ting-Ta; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2017-02-24

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) contains various cytokines and growth factors which may be beneficial to the healing process of injured muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of PRP on migration of skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells intrinsic to Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with PRP. The cell migration was evaluated by transwell filter migration assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The spreading of cells was evaluated microscopically. The formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. The protein expressions of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Transfection of paxillin small-interfering RNA (siRNAs) to muscle cells was performed to validate the role of paxillin in PRP-mediated promotion of cell migration. Dose-dependently PRP promotes migration of and spreading and muscle cells. Protein expressions of paxillin and FAK were up-regulated dose-dependently. F-actin formation was also enhanced by PRP treatment. Furthermore, the knockdown of paxillin expression impaired the effect of PRP to promote cell migration. It was concluded that PRP promoting migration of muscle cells is associated with up-regulation of proteins expression of paxillin and FAK as well as increasing F-actin formation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  10. The LD4 motif of paxillin regulates cell spreading and motility through an interaction with paxillin kinase linker (PKL).

    PubMed

    West, K A; Zhang, H; Brown, M C; Nikolopoulos, S N; Riedy, M C; Horwitz, A F; Turner, C E

    2001-07-09

    The small GTPases of the Rho family are intimately involved in integrin-mediated changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany cell spreading and motility. The exact means by which the Rho family members elicit these changes is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the interaction of paxillin via its LD4 motif with the putative ARF-GAP paxillin kinase linker (PKL) (Turner et al., 1999), is critically involved in the regulation of Rac-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany cell spreading and motility. Overexpression of a paxillin LD4 deletion mutant (paxillinDeltaLD4) in CHO.K1 fibroblasts caused the generation of multiple broad lamellipodia. These morphological changes were accompanied by an increase in cell protrusiveness and random motility, which correlated with prolonged activation of Rac. In contrast, directional motility was inhibited. These alterations in morphology and motility were dependent on a paxillin-PKL interaction. In cells overexpressing paxillinDeltaLD4 mutants, PKL localization to focal contacts was disrupted, whereas that of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin was not. In addition, FAK activity during spreading was not compromised by deletion of the paxillin LD4 motif. Furthermore, overexpression of PKL mutants lacking the paxillin-binding site (PKLDeltaPBS2) induced phenotypic changes reminiscent of paxillinDeltaLD4 mutant cells. These data suggest that the paxillin association with PKL is essential for normal integrin-mediated cell spreading, and locomotion and that this interaction is necessary for the regulation of Rac activity during these events.

  11. FAK and paxillin, two potential targets in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanteti, Rajani; Batra, Surinder K.; Lennon, Frances E.; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating cancer in large part due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective screening tests. In spite of recent progress in imaging, surgery and new therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer, the overall five-year survival still remains unacceptably low. Numerous studies have shown that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is activated in many cancers including PDAC and promotes cancer progression and metastasis. Paxillin, an intracellular adaptor protein that plays a key role in cytoskeletal organization, connects integrins to FAK and plays a key role in assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions. Here, we have reviewed evidence in support of FAK as a potential therapeutic target and summarized related combinatorial therapies. PMID:26980710

  12. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  13. Paxillin mediates sensing of physical cues and regulates directional cell motility by controlling lamellipodia positioning.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Thodeti, Charles K; Mammoto, Akiko; Bakal, Chris; Thomas, Sheila; Ingber, Donald E

    2011-01-01

    Physical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) guide directional migration by spatially controlling where cells form focal adhesions (FAs), which in turn regulate the extension of motile processes. Here we show that physical control of directional migration requires the FA scaffold protein paxillin. Using single-cell sized ECM islands to constrain cell shape, we found that fibroblasts cultured on square islands preferentially activated Rac and extended lamellipodia from corner, rather than side regions after 30 min stimulation with PDGF, but that cells lacking paxillin failed to restrict Rac activity to corners and formed small lamellipodia along their entire peripheries. This spatial preference was preceded by non-spatially constrained formation of both dorsal and lateral membrane ruffles from 5-10 min. Expression of paxillin N-terminal (paxN) or C-terminal (paxC) truncation mutants produced opposite, but complementary, effects on lamellipodia formation. Surprisingly, pax-/- and paxN cells also formed more circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs) than pax+ cells, while paxC cells formed fewer CDRs and extended larger lamellipodia even in the absence of PDGF. In a two-dimensional (2D) wound assay, pax-/- cells migrated at similar speeds to controls but lost directional persistence. Directional motility was rescued by expressing full-length paxillin or the N-terminus alone, but paxN cells migrated more slowly. In contrast, pax-/- and paxN cells exhibited increased migration in a three-dimensional (3D) invasion assay, with paxN cells invading Matrigel even in the absence of PDGF. These studies indicate that paxillin integrates physical and chemical motility signals by spatially constraining where cells will form motile processes, and thereby regulates directional migration both in 2D and 3D. These findings also suggest that CDRs may correspond to invasive protrusions that drive cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices.

  14. Monitoring in real-time focal adhesion protein dynamics in response to a discrete mechanical stimulus.

    PubMed

    von Bilderling, Catalina; Caldarola, Martín; Masip, Martín E; Bragas, Andrea V; Pietrasanta, Lía I

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix is a hierarchical, force-dependent, multistage process that evolves at several temporal scales. An understanding of this complex process requires a precise measurement of forces and its correlation with protein responses in living cells. We present a method to quantitatively assess live cell responses to a local and specific mechanical stimulus. Our approach combines atomic force microscopy with fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, we evaluated the recruitment of adhesion proteins such as vinculin, focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, and zyxin triggered by applying forces in the nN regime to live cells. We observed in real time the development of nascent adhesion sites, evident from the accumulation of early adhesion proteins at the position where the force was applied. We show that the method can be used to quantify the recruitment characteristic times for adhesion proteins in the formation of focal complexes. We also found a spatial remodeling of the mature focal adhesion protein zyxin as a function of the applied force. Our approach allows the study of a variety of complex biological processes involved in cellular mechanotransduction.

  15. Paxillin Contracts the Osteoclast Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; DeSelm, Carl J.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.; Pol, Scott Vande; Choi, Kyunghee; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone resorption depends upon the cell’s ability to organize its cytoskeleton via the αvβ3 integrin and osteoclastogenic cytokines. Since paxillin associates with αvβ3, we asked if it participates in skeletal degradation. Unlike deletion of other αvβ3-associated cytoskeleton-regulating molecules, which impairs the cell’s ability to spread, paxillin-deficient (Pax−/−) osteoclasts, generated from embryonic stem cells, “superspread” in response to RANK ligand (RANKL) and form large, albeit dynamically atypical, actin bands. Despite their increased size, Pax−/− osteoclasts resorb bone poorly, excavating pits approximately 1/3 normal depth. Ligand-occupied αvβ3 or RANKL promotes paxillin serine and tyrosine phosphorylation, the latter via c-Src. The abnormal Pax−/− phenotype is rescued by WT paxillin but not that lacking its LD4 domain. In keeping with the appearance of mutant osteoclasts, WT paxillin, overexpressed in WT cells, contracts the cytoskeleton. Most importantly, the abnormal phenotype of Pax−/− osteoclasts likely represents failed RANKL-mediated delivery of myosin IIA to the actin cytoskeleton via the paxillin LD4 domain but is independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, in response to RANKL, paxillin associates with myosin IIA to contract the osteoclast cytoskeleton thereby promoting its bone-degrading capacity. PMID:22807029

  16. Paxillin promotes colorectal tumor invasion and poor patient outcomes via ERK-mediated stabilization of Bcl-2 protein by phosphorylation at Serine 87.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chou; Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Lee, Huei

    2015-04-20

    Stabilization of Bcl-2 protein by paxillin (PXN)-mediated ERK activation was recently reported to cause an unfavorable response to 5-Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Here, we present evidence from cell and animal models to demonstrate that stabilization of Bcl-2 protein by phosphorylation at Serine 87 (pBcl-2-S87) via PXN-mediated ERK activation is responsible for cancer cell invasiveness and occurs via upregulation of MMP2 expression. Immunostainings of 190 tumors resected from colorectal cancer patients indicated that PXN expression was positively correlated with Bcl-2, pBcl-2-S87, and MMP2 expression. A positive correlation of pBcl-2-S87 with Bcl-2 and MMP2 was also observed in this study population. Patients with high PXN, Bcl-2, pBcl-2-S87, and MMP2 had poor overall survival (OS) and shorter relapse free survival (RFS). In conclusion, PXN promotes Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Serine 87 via PXN-mediated ERK activation, and its stabilization associated with increased tumor formation efficacy in mice and poor patient outcome in colorectal cancer patients.

  17. Focal adhesion kinase maintains, but not increases the adhesion of dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuyan; Shao, Meiying; Zou, Wenlin; Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Ran; Hu, Tao

    2017-02-25

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as a key enzyme in the integrin-mediated adhesion-signalling pathway. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of FAK on adhesion of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. We transfected lentiviral vectors to silence or overexpress FAK in HDP cells ex vivo. Early cell adhesion, cell survival and focal contacts (FCs)-related proteins (FAK and paxillin) were examined. By using immunofluorescence, the formation of FCs and cytoskeleton was detected, respectively. We found that both adhesion and survival of HDP cells were suppressed by FAK inhibition. However, FAK overexpression slightly inhibited cell adhesion and exhibited no change in cell survival compared with the control. A thick rim of cytoskeleton accumulated and smaller dot-shaped FCs appeared in FAK knockdown cells. Phosphorylation of paxillin (p-paxillin) was inhibited in FAK knockdown cells, verifying that the adhesion was inhibited. Less cytoskeleton and elongated FCs were observed in FAK-overexpressed cells. However, p-paxillin had no significant difference compared with the control. In conclusion, the data suggest that FAK maintains cell adhesion, survival and cytoskeleton formation, but excessive FAK has no positive effects on these aspects.

  18. Diamagnetic levitation causes changes in the morphology, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion proteins expression in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Wang, L; Gao, X; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Han, J; Li, J B; Di, S M; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation technology is a novel simulated weightless technique and has recently been applied in life-science research. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels, namely, μg (diamagnetic levitation), 1g, and 2g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on the activity, morphology, and cytoskeleton (actin filament, microtubules, and vimentin intermediate filaments) in osteocyte - like cell line MLO-Y4 were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), respectively. The changes induced by LG-HMF in distribution and expression of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, paxillin, and talin in MLO-Y4 were determined by LSCM and Western blotting. The results showed that LG-HMF produced by superconducting magnet had no lethal effects on MLO-Y4. Compared to control, diamagnetic levitation (μg) affected MLO-Y4 morphology, nucleus size, cytoskeleton architecture, and FA proteins distribution and expression. The study indicates that osteocytes are sensitive to altered gravity and FA proteins (vinculin, paxillin, and talin) may be involved in osteocyte mechanosensation. The diamagnetic levitation may be a novel ground-based space-gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level.

  19. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of avian p95-APP2, an ARF-GAP orthologous to mammalian paxillin kinase linker.

    PubMed

    Paris, Simona; Za, Lorena; Sporchia, Barbara; de Curtis, Ivan

    2002-07-01

    We describe here the identification and characterization of avian p95-APP2, a multi-domain protein of a recently identified family of ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)-GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) including mammalian G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK)-interactor 1 (GIT1), paxillin kinase linker (PKL), and GIT2, as well as avian p95-APP1. The p95-APP2 is eluted from Rac-GTP-gamma-S, but not from Rac-GDP-beta-S columns. As other members of the family, p95-APP2 has binding regions for the focal adhesion protein paxillin, and for the Rac exchanging factor PIX. Sequence comparison indicates that p95-APP2 is the avian orthologue of mammalian PKL. Expression studies showed a largely diffuse distribution of the full length p95-APP2, without evident effects on cell morphology. We observed a dramatic difference between the localization of the amino-terminal portion of the protein, including the ARF-GAP domain and the three ankyrin repeats, and the carboxy-terminal portion including the paxillin-binding site. Moreover, the expression of truncated carboxy-terminal polypeptides including both the PIX- and paxillin-binding regions leads to a marked localization of the protein together with paxillin at large vesicles. Comparison of the expression of corresponding ARF-GAP-deficient constructs from p95-APP2 and p95-APP1 shows their distribution at distinct endocytic compartments. Altogether, these data support a role of distinct members of this family of ARF-GAPs in the regulation of different steps of membrane traffic during cell motility, and suggest that p95-APP2 may shuttle between an intracellular compartment and the cell periphery, although, further work will be needed to address this point.

  20. The adhesive properties of coacervated recombinant hybrid mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Song, Young Hoon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    Marine mussels attach to substrates using adhesive proteins. It has been suggested that complex coacervation (liquid-liquid phase separation via concentration) might be involved in the highly condensed and non-water dispersed adhesion process of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, as purified natural MAPs are difficult to obtain, it has not been possible to experimentally validate the coacervation model. In the present work, we demonstrate complex coacervation in a system including recombinant MAPs and hyaluronic acid (HA). Our recombinant hybrid MAPs, fp-151 and fp-131, can be produced in large quantities, and are readily purified. We observed successful complex coacervation using cationic fp-151 or fp-131, and an anionic HA partner. Importantly, we found that highly condensed complex coacervates significantly increased the bulk adhesive strength of MAPs in both dry and wet environments. In addition, oil droplets were successfully engulfed using a MAP-based interfacial coacervation process, to form microencapsulated particles. Collectively, our results indicate that a complex coacervation system based on MAPs shows superior adhesive properties, combined with additional valuable features including liquid/liquid phase separation and appropriate viscoelasticity. Our microencapsulation system could be useful in the development of new adhesive biomaterials, including self-adhesive microencapsulated drug carriers, for use in biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  1. Specific Dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 by Ptprz Promotes Its Association with Paxillin and Hic-5

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masahito; Kuboyama, Kazuya; Suzuki, Ryoko; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 1 (Git1) is involved in cell motility control by serving as an adaptor that links signaling proteins such as Pix and PAK to focal adhesion proteins. We previously demonstrated that Git1 was a multiply tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, its primary phosphorylation site was Tyr-554 in the vicinity of the focal adhesion targeting-homology (FAH) domain, and this site was selectively dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (Ptprz). In the present study, we showed that Tyr-554 phosphorylation reduced the association of Git1 with the FAH-domain-binding proteins, paxillin and Hic-5, based on immunoprecipitation experiments using the Tyr-554 mutants of Git1. The Tyr-554 phosphorylation of Git1 was higher, and its binding to paxillin was consistently lower in the brains of Ptprz-deficient mice than in those of wild-type mice. We then investigated the role of Tyr-554 phosphorylation in cell motility control using three different methods: random cell motility, wound healing, and Boyden chamber assays. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Git1 impaired cell motility in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. The motility defect was rescued by the exogenous expression of wild-type Git1 and a Git1 mutant, which only retained Tyr-554 among the multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites, but not by the Tyr-554 phosphorylation-defective or phosphorylation-state mimic Git1 mutant. Our results suggested that cyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 was crucial for dynamic interactions between Git1 and paxillin/Hic-5 in order to ensure coordinated cell motility. PMID:25742295

  2. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  3. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  4. Insights into the Utility of the Focal Adhesion Scaffolding Proteins in the Anaerobic Fungus Orpinomyces sp. C1A

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Shelby; Youssef, Noha H.

    2016-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are large eukaryotic multiprotein complexes that are present in all metazoan cells and function as stable sites of tight adhesion between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell’s cytoskeleton. FAs consist of anchor membrane protein (integrins), scaffolding proteins (e.g. α-actinin, talin, paxillin, and vinculin), signaling proteins of the IPP complex (e.g. integrin-linked kinase, α-parvin, and PINCH), and signaling kinases (e.g. focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src kinase). While genes encoding complete focal adhesion machineries are present in genomes of all multicellular Metazoa; incomplete machineries were identified in the genomes of multiple non-metazoan unicellular Holozoa, basal fungal lineages, and amoebozoan representatives. Since a complete FA machinery is required for functioning, the putative role, if any, of these incomplete FA machineries is currently unclear. We sought to examine the expression patterns of FA-associated genes in the anaerobic basal fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A under different growth conditions and at different developmental stages. Strain C1A lacks clear homologues of integrin, and the two signaling kinases FAK and Src, but encodes for all scaffolding proteins, and the IPP complex proteins. We developed a protocol for synchronizing growth of C1A cultures, allowing for the collection and mRNA extraction from flagellated spores, encysted germinating spores, active zoosporangia, and late inactive sporangia of strain C1A. We demonstrate that the genes encoding the FA scaffolding proteins α-actinin, talin, paxillin, and vinculin are indeed transcribed under all growth conditions, and at all developmental stages of growth. Further, analysis of the observed transcriptional patterns suggests the putative involvement of these components in alternative non-adhesion-specific functions, such as hyphal tip growth during germination and flagellar assembly during zoosporogenesis. Based on these results

  5. Regulation of the L-type calcium channel by alpha 5beta 1 integrin requires signaling between focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Davis, G E; Meininger, G A; Wilson, E; Davis, M J

    2001-08-10

    The L-type calcium channel is the major calcium influx pathway in vascular smooth muscle and is regulated by integrin ligands, suggesting an important link between extracellular matrix and vascular tone regulation in tissue injury and remodeling. We examined the role of integrin-linked tyrosine kinases and focal adhesion proteins in regulation of L-type calcium current in single vascular myocytes. Soluble tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked the increase in current produced by alpha(5) integrin antibody or fibronectin, whereas tyrosine phosphatase inhibition enhanced the effect. Cell dialysis with an antibody to focal adhesion kinase or with FRNK, the C-terminal noncatalytic domain of focal adhesion kinase, produced moderate (24 or 18%, respectively) inhibition of basal current but much greater inhibition (63 or 68%, respectively) of integrin-enhanced current. A c-Src antibody and peptide inhibitors of the Src homology-2 domain or a putative Src tyrosine phosphorylation site on the channel produced similar inhibition. Antibodies to the cytoskeletal proteins paxillin and vinculin, but not alpha-actinin, inhibited integrin-dependent current by 65-80%. Therefore, alpha(5)beta(1) integrin appears to regulate a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade involving Src and various focal adhesion proteins that control the function of the L-type calcium channel. This interaction may represent a novel mechanism for control of calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types.

  6. ACTH Modulates PTP-PEST Activity and Promotes Its Interaction With Paxillin.

    PubMed

    Gorostizaga, Alejandra Beatriz; Mori Sequeiros Garcia, M Mercedes; Acquier, Andrea B; Lopez-Costa, Juan J; Mendez, Carlos F; Maloberti, Paula M; Paz, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) treatment has been proven to promote paxillin dephosphorylation and increase soluble protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in rat adrenal zona fasciculata (ZF). Also, in-gel PTP assays have shown the activation of a 115-kDa PTP (PTP115) by ACTH. In this context, the current work presents evidence that PTP115 is PTP-PEST, a PTP that recognizes paxillin as substrate. PTP115 was partially purified from rat adrenal ZF and PTP-PEST was detected through Western blot in bioactive samples taken in each purification step. Immunohistochemical and RT-PCR studies revealed PTP-PEST expression in rat ZF and Y1 adrenocortical cells. Moreover, a PTP-PEST siRNA decreased the expression of this phosphatase. PKA phosphorylation of purified PTP115 isolated from non-ACTH-treated rats increased KM and VM . Finally, in-gel PTP assays of immunoprecipitated paxillin from control and ACTH-treated rats suggested a hormone-mediated increase in paxillin-PTP115 interaction, while PTP-PEST and paxillin co-localize in Y1 cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate PTP-PEST expression in adrenal ZF and its regulation by ACTH/PKA and also suggest an ACTH-induced PTP-PEST-paxillin interaction. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2170-2181, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Purification of adhesive proteins from mussels.

    PubMed

    Pardo, J; Gutierrez, E; Sáez, C; Brito, M; Burzio, L O

    1990-11-01

    The adhesive polyphenolic proteins from the mussels Mytilus chilensis and Choromytilus chorus have been purified based on their solubility in dilute perchloric acid and on differential precipitation with acetone containing about 0.3 N HCl. The specific activity of the proteins obtained was 0.16 mg of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine per milligram of protein, or higher. The proteins have an apparent molecular weight of about 100,000 and they contain a high proportion of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, lysine, and proline.

  8. Soy and cottonseed protein blends as wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As an environmentally friendlier alternative to adhesives from petroleum feedstock, soy proteins are currently being formulated as wood adhesives. Cottonseed proteins have also been found to provide good adhesive properties. In at least some cases, cottonseed proteins appear to form greater shear ...

  9. Phospholipase C-gamma1 potentiates integrin-dependent cell spreading and migration through Pyk2/paxillin activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Yang, Yong-Ryoul; Lee, Seul Ki; Kim, Il-Shin; Ha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Bae, Yun Soo; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2007-08-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), which generates two second messengers, namely, inositol-1, 4, 5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, is implicated in growth factor-mediated chemotaxis. However, the exact role of PLC-gamma1 in integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that PLC-gamma1 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization and cell motility through the regulation of Pyk2 and paxillin activation. After fibronectin stimulation, PLC-gamma1 directly interacted with the cytoplasmic tail of integrin beta1. In PLC-gamma1-silenced cells, integrin-induced Pyk2 and paxillin phosphorylation were significantly reduced and PLC-gamma1 potentiated the integrin-induced Pyk2/paxillin activation in its enzymatic activity-dependent manner. In addition, specific knock-down of PLC-gamma1 resulted in a failure to form focal adhesions dependent on fibronectin stimulation, which appeared to be caused by the suppression of Pyk2 and paxillin phosphorylation. Interestingly, PLC-gamma1 potentiated the activations of Rac, thus integrin-induced lamellipodia formation was up-regulated. Consequently, the strength of cell-substratum interaction and cell motility were profoundly up-regulated by PLC-gamma1. Taken together, these results suggest that PLC-gamma1 is a key player in integrin-mediated cell spreading and motility achieved by the activation of Pyk2/paxillin/Rac signaling.

  10. Protein conformation as a regulator of cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2014-04-14

    The dynamic regulation of cell-matrix adhesion is essential for tissue homeostasis and architecture, and thus numerous pathologies are linked to altered cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and ECM scaffold. The molecular machinery involved in cell-matrix adhesion is complex and involves both sensory and matrix-remodelling functions. In this review, we focus on how protein conformation controls the organization and dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion. The conformational changes in various adhesion machinery components are described, including examples from ECM as well as cytoplasmic proteins. The discussed mechanisms involved in the regulation of protein conformation include mechanical stress, post-translational modifications and allosteric ligand-binding. We emphasize the potential role of intrinsically disordered protein regions in these processes and discuss the role of protein networks and co-operative protein interactions in the formation and consolidation of cell-matrix adhesion and extracellular scaffolds.

  11. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-28

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  12. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  13. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  14. Urea modified cottonseed protein adhesive for wood composite products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed protein has the potential to be used as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives in wood products industry. However, the industry application was limited by its low mechanical properties, low water resistance and viscosity. In this work, urea modified cottonseed protein adhesive w...

  15. Cytoplasmic cyclin D1 regulates cell invasion and metastasis through the phosphorylation of paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Noel P.; Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Cemeli, Tània; Mirantes, Cristina; Pedraza, Neus; Rafel, Marta; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Colomina, Neus; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Dolcet, Xavier; Garí, Eloi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) together with its binding partner Cdk4 act as a transcriptional regulator to control cell proliferation and migration, and abnormal Ccnd1·Cdk4 expression promotes tumour growth and metastasis. While different nuclear Ccnd1·Cdk4 targets participating in cell proliferation and tissue development have been identified, little is known about how Ccnd1·Cdk4 controls cell adherence and invasion. Here, we show that the focal adhesion component paxillin is a cytoplasmic substrate of Ccnd1·Cdk4. This complex phosphorylates a fraction of paxillin specifically associated to the cell membrane, and promotes Rac1 activation, thereby triggering membrane ruffling and cell invasion in both normal fibroblasts and tumour cells. Our results demonstrate that localization of Ccnd1·Cdk4 to the cytoplasm does not simply act to restrain cell proliferation, but constitutes a functionally relevant mechanism operating under normal and pathological conditions to control cell adhesion, migration and metastasis through activation of a Ccnd1·Cdk4-paxillin-Rac1 axis. PMID:27181366

  16. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  17. Adhesion of mussel foot proteins to different substrate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qingye; Danner, Eric; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Mussel foot proteins (mfps) have been investigated as a source of inspiration for the design of underwater coatings and adhesives. Recent analysis of various mfps by a surface forces apparatus (SFA) revealed that mfp-1 functions as a coating, whereas mfp-3 and mfp-5 resemble adhesive primers on mica surfaces. To further refine and elaborate the surface properties of mfps, the force–distance profiles of the interactions between thin mfp (i.e. mfp-1, mfp-3 or mfp-5) films and four different surface chemistries, namely mica, silicon dioxide, polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene, were measured by an SFA. The results indicate that the adhesion was exquisitely dependent on the mfp tested, the substrate surface chemistry and the contact time. Such studies are essential for understanding the adhesive versatility of mfps and related/similar adhesion proteins, and for translating this versatility into a new generation of coatings and (including in vivo) adhesive materials. PMID:23173195

  18. Adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion-class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) constitute the second largest GPCR sub-family in humans. Adhesion-GPCRs are defined by the chimeric structure of an unusually large extracellular cell-adhesion domain and a GPCR-like seven-pass transmembrane domain. Adhesion-GPCRs are hence expected to display both cellular adhesion and signaling functions in many biological systems. Adhesion-GPCRs are normally expressed in the central nervous, immune, and reproductive systems in a cell type- or tissue-restricted fashion. However, aberrant expression of distinct adhesion-GPCR molecules has been identified in various human cancers with some of the receptors closely associated with cancer development. Tumor-associated adhesion-GPCRs are thought to involve in tumorigenesis by affecting the growth of tumor cells, angiogenesis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis either positively or negatively. Furthermore, some adhesion-GPCRs are considered potential biomarkers for specific types of cancers. In this review article, the expressional characteristics and functional role of cancer-associated adhesion-GPCRs are discussed in depth.

  19. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  20. Spatial distribution of proteins in the quagga mussel adhesive apparatus.

    PubMed

    Rees, David J; Hanifi, Arash; Manion, Joseph; Gantayet, Arpita; Sone, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The invasive freshwater mollusc Dreissena bugensis (quagga mussel) sticks to underwater surfaces via a proteinacious 'anchor' (byssus), consisting of a series of threads linked to adhesive plaques. This adhesion results in the biofouling of crucial underwater industry infrastructure, yet little is known about the proteins responsible for the adhesion. Here the identification of byssal proteins extracted from freshly secreted byssal material is described. Several new byssal proteins were observed by gel electrophoresis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to characterize proteins in different regions of the byssus, particularly those localized to the adhesive interface. Byssal plaques and threads contain in common a range of low molecular weight proteins, while several proteins with higher mass were observed only in the plaque. At the adhesive interface, a plaque-specific ~8.1 kDa protein had a relative increase in signal intensity compared to the bulk of the plaque, suggesting it may play a direct role in adhesion.

  1. Mussel-mimetic protein-based adhesive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Jin; Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Dong Soo; Masic, Admir; Han, Dong Keun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-05-12

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials which could provide both adhesion and cohesion in wet environment have been considered as a promising formulation of tissue adhesives. Inspired by marine mussel adhesion, many researchers have tried to exploit the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) molecule as a cross-linking mediator of synthetic polymer-based hydrogels which is known to be able to achieve cohesive hardening as well as adhesive bonding with diverse surfaces. Beside DOPA residue, composition of other amino acid residues and structure of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) have also been considered important elements for mussel adhesion. Herein, we represent a novel protein-based hydrogel system using DOPA-containing recombinant MAP. Gelation can be achieved using both oxdiation-induced DOPA quinone-mediated covalent and Fe(3+)-mediated coordinative noncovalent cross-linking. Fe(3+)-mediated hydrogels show deformable and self-healing viscoelastic behavior in rheological analysis, which is also well-reflected in bulk adhesion strength measurement. Quinone-mediated hydrogel has higher cohesive strength and can provide sufficient gelation time for easier handling. Collectively, our newly developed MAP hydrogel can potentially be used as tissue adhesive and sealant for future applications.

  2. Novel protein-repellent dental adhesive containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biofilms at tooth-restoration margins can produce acids and cause secondary caries. A protein-repellent adhesive resin can potentially inhibition bacteria attachment and biofilm growth. However, there has been no report on protein-repellent dental resins. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent bonding agent incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), and to investigate its resistance to protein adsorption and biofilm growth for the first time. Methods MPC was incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) at 0%, 3.75%, 7.5%, 11.25%, and 15% by mass. Extracted human teeth were used to measure dentin shear bond strengths. Protein adsorption onto resins was determined by a micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to measure biofilm metabolic activity and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts. Results Adding 7.5% MPC into primer and adhesive did not decrease the dentin bond strength, compared to control (p > 0.1). Incorporation of 7.5% of MPC achieved the lowest protein adsorption, which was 20-fold less than that of control. Incorporation of 7.5% of MPC greatly reduced bacterial adhesion, yielding biofilm total microorganism, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci CFU that were an order of magnitude less than control. Conclusions A protein-repellent dental adhesive resin was developed for the first time. Incorporation of MPC into primer and adhesive at 7.5% by mass greatly reduced the protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, without compromising the dentin bond strength. The novel protein-repellent primer and adhesive are promising to inhibit biofilm formation and acid production, to protect the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. PMID:25234652

  3. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Asthma Model Occurs Independently of Secretion of β1 Integrins in Airway Wall and Focal Adhesions Proteins Down Regulation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Santos, Mayra; Carbajal, Verónica; Tellez-Jiménez, Olivia; Martínez-Cordero, Erasmo; Ruiz, Victor; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Lascurain, Ricardo; Santibañez-Salgado, Alfredo; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca

    2016-10-01

    The extracellular domains of some membrane proteins can be shed from the cell. A similar phenomenon occurs with β1 integrins (α1β1 and α2β1) in guinea pig. The putative role of β1 integrin subunit alterations due to shedding in airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an allergic asthma model was evaluated. Guinea pigs were sensitized and challenged with antigen. Antigenic challenges induced bronchoobstruction and hyperresponsiveness at the third antigenic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectronmicroscopy studies showed that the cytosolic and extracellular domains of the β1 integrin subunit shared the same distribution in airway structures in both groups. Various polypeptides with similar molecular weights were detected with both the cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit antibodies in isolated airway myocytes and the connective tissue that surrounds the ASM bundle. Flow cytometry and Western blot studies showed that the expression of cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit domains in ASM was similar between groups. An increment of ITGB1 mRNA in ASM was observed in the asthma model group. RACE-PCR of ITGB1 in ASM did not show splicing variants. The expression levels of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and paxillin diminished in the asthma model, but not talin. The levels of phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) at Thr(696) increased in asthma model. Our work suggests that β1 integrin is secreted in guinea pig airway wall. This secretion is not altered in asthma model; nevertheless, β1 integrin cytodomain assembly proteins in focal cell adhesions in which ILK and paxillin are involved are altered in asthma model. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2385-2396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto; Hernández-González, Enrique O

    2016-09-15

    Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca(2+) dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L.; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R.; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J.; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca2+ dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27402964

  6. Nanoscale adhesion forces between enamel pellicle proteins and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Vukosavljevic, D; Hutter, J L; Helmerhorst, E J; Xiao, Y; Custodio, W; Zaidan, F C; Oppenheim, F G; Siqueira, W L

    2014-05-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle (AEP) is important for minimizing the abrasion caused by parafunctional conditions as they occur, for instance, during bruxism. It is a remarkable feature of the AEP that a protein/peptide film can provide enough protection in normofunction to prevent teeth from abrasion and wear. Despite its obvious critical role in the protection of tooth surfaces, the essential adhesion features of AEP proteins on the enamel surface are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to measure the adhesion force between histatin 5, a primary AEP component, and hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. Both biotinylated histatin 5 and biotinylated human serum albumin were allowed to adsorb to streptavidin-coated silica microspheres attached to atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. A multimode AFM with a Nanoscope IIIa controller was used to measure the adhesion force between protein-functionalized silica microspheres attached to cantilever tips and the HA surface. The imaging was performed in tapping mode with a Si3N4 AFM cantilever, while the adhesion forces were measured in AFM contact mode. A collection of force-distance curves (~3,000/replicate) was obtained to generate histograms from which the adhesion forces between histatin 5 or albumin and the HA surface were measured. We found that histatin 5 exhibited stronger adhesion forces (90% >1.830 nN) to the HA surface than did albumin (90% > 0.282 nN). This study presents an objective approach to adhesion force measurements between histatin 5 and HA, and provides the experimental basis for measuring the same parameters for other AEP constituents. Such knowledge will help in the design of synthetic proteins and peptides with preventive and therapeutic benefits for tooth enamel.

  7. Nanoimaging of Focal Adhesion Dynamics in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Aguilar, Jose S.; Tsai, Connie Y.; Wu, GuiKai; Gratton, Enrico; Digman, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Organization and dynamics of focal adhesion proteins have been well characterized in cells grown on two-dimensional (2D) cell culture surfaces. However, much less is known about the dynamic association of these proteins in the 3D microenvironment. Limited imaging technologies capable of measuring protein interactions in real time and space for cells grown in 3D is a major impediment in understanding how proteins function under different environmental cues. In this study, we applied the nano-scale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation (nSPIRO) technique and combined the scaning-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (sFCS) and the number and molecular brightness (N&B) methods to investigate paxillin and actin dynamics at focal adhesions in 3D. Both MDA-MB-231 cells and U2OS cells produce elongated protrusions with high intensity regions of paxillin in cell grown in 3D collagen matrices. Using sFCS we found higher percentage of slow diffusing proteins at these focal spots, suggesting assembling/disassembling processes. In addition, the N&B analysis shows paxillin aggregated predominantly at these focal contacts which are next to collagen fibers. At those sites, actin showed slower apparent diffusion rate, which indicated that actin is either polymerizing or binding to the scaffolds in these locals. Our findings demonstrate that by multiplexing these techniques we have the ability to spatially and temporally quantify focal adhesion assembly and disassembly in 3D space and allow the understanding tumor cell invasion in a more complex relevant environment. PMID:24959851

  8. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  9. Dancing to Another Tune—Adhesive Moonlighting Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Veera; Korhonen, Timo K.

    2014-01-01

    Biological moonlighting refers to proteins which express more than one function. Moonlighting proteins occur in pathogenic and commensal as well as in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The canonical functions of moonlighting proteins are in essential cellular processes, i.e., glycolysis, protein synthesis, chaperone activity, and nucleic acid stability, and their moonlighting functions include binding to host epithelial and phagocytic cells, subepithelia, cytoskeleton as well as to mucins and circulating proteins of the immune and hemostatic systems. Sequences of the moonlighting proteins do not contain known motifs for surface export or anchoring, and it has remained open whether bacterial moonlighting proteins are actively secreted to the cell wall or whether they are released from traumatized cells and then rebind onto the bacteria. In lactobacilli, ionic interactions with lipoteichoic acids and with cell division sites are important for surface localization of the proteins. Moonlighting proteins represent an abundant class of bacterial adhesins that are part of bacterial interactions with the environment and in responses to environmental changes. Multifunctionality in bacterial surface proteins appears common: the canonical adhesion proteins fimbriae express also nonadhesive functions, whereas the mobility organelles flagella as well as surface proteases express adhesive functions. PMID:24833341

  10. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  11. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  12. Silk Fibroin Aqueous-Based Adhesives Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kelly A; Roberts, Dane C; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-11

    Silk fibroin from the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori is a naturally occurring biopolymer with charged hydrophilic terminal regions that end-cap a hydrophobic core consisting of repeating sequences of glycine, alanine, and serine residues. Taking inspiration from mussels that produce proteins rich in L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) to adhere to a variety of organic and inorganic surfaces, the silk fibroin was functionalized with catechol groups. Silk fibroin was selected for its high molecular weight, tunable mechanical and degradation properties, aqueous processability, and wide availability. The synthesis of catechol-functionalized silk fibroin polymers containing varying amounts of hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG, 5000 g/mol) side chains was carried out to balance silk hydrophobicity with PEG hydrophilicity. The efficiency of the catechol functionalization reaction did not vary with PEG conjugation over the range studied, although tuning the amount of PEG conjugated was essential for aqueous solubility. Adhesive bonding and cell compatibility of the resulting materials were investigated, where it was found that incorporating as little as 6 wt % PEG prior to catechol functionalization resulted in complete aqueous solubility of the catechol conjugates and increased adhesive strength compared with silk lacking catechol functionalization. Furthermore, PEG-silk fibroin conjugates maintained their ability to form β-sheet secondary structures, which can be exploited to reduce swelling. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) proliferated on the silks, regardless of PEG and catechol conjugation. These materials represent a protein-based approach to catechol-based adhesives, which we envision may find applicability as biodegradable adhesives and sealants.

  13. Development and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for paxilline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrati...

  14. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene inhibits adhesion and migration of human triple-negative breast cancer cells by suppressing β1 integrin function and surface protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hua; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kung, Po-Hsiung; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibits an aggressive clinical course by high metastatic potential. It is known that integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration are important for cancer metastasis. In the present study, a synthetic compound, 3, 4-methyenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene (MNS), significantly inhibited adhesion of TNBC cell lines to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The antimetastatic capacity of MNS was also observed through reducing TNBC cells migration and invasion without affecting cell viability. Confocal microscopy revealed that MNS disrupted the formation of focal adhesion complex and actin stress fiber networks. Consistent with this finding, MNS inhibited phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin as detected by Western blot analysis. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we found that MNS inhibited phosphorylation of FAK as a result of reducing β1 integrin activation and clustering. A cell-impermeable dithiol reagent, 2, 3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid abrogated all of MNS's actions, indicating that MNS may react with thiol groups of cell surface proteins that are involved in regulation of β1 integrin function as well as cell adhesion and migration. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been reported to be essential for the affinity modulation of β integrins. We also demonstrated that MNS inhibited PDI activity both in a pure enzyme system and in intact cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that MNS inhibits in vitro metastatic properties of TNBC cells through suppression of β1 integrin activation and focal adhesion signaling. Moreover, inhibition of surface PDI may contribute, at least in part, to the actions of MNS. These results suggest that MNS has a potential to be developed as an anticancer agent for treatment of TNBC.

  15. ZF21 protein regulates cell adhesion and motility.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Makoto; Hoshino, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Kawasaki, Noritaka; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu

    2010-07-02

    Cell migration on an extracellular matrix (ECM) requires continuous formation and turnover of focal adhesions (FAs) along the direction of cell movement. However, our knowledge of the components of FAs and the mechanism of their regulation remains limited. Here, we identify ZF21, a member of a protein family characterized by the presence of a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding FYVE domain, to be a new regulator of FAs and cell movement. Knockdown of ZF21 expression in cells increased the number of FAs and suppressed cell migration. Knockdown of ZF21 expression also led to a significant delay in FA disassembly following induction of synchronous disassembly of FAs by nocodazole treatment. ZF21 bound to focal adhesion kinase, localized to FAs, and was necessary for dephosphorylation of FAK at Tyr(397), which is important for disassembly of FAs. Thus, ZF21 represents a new component of FAs, mediates disassembly of FAs, and thereby regulates cell motility.

  16. MT1-MMP promotes cell growth and ERK activation through c-Src and paxillin in three-dimensional collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Takahisa; Tsuge, Hisashi; Ozawa, Terumasa; Sato, Hiroshi

    2010-06-11

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is essential for tumor invasion and growth. We show here that MT1-MMP induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in cancer cells cultured in collagen gel, which is indispensable for their proliferation. Inhibition of MT1-MMP by MMP inhibitor or small interfering RNA suppressed activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK in MT1-MMP-expressing cancer cells, which resulted in up-regulation of p21{sup WAF1} and suppression of cell growth in collagen gel. Cell proliferation was also abrogated by the inhibitor against ERK pathway without affecting FAK phosphorylation. MT1-MMP and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} were shown to be involved in c-Src activation, which induced FAK and ERK activation in collagen gel. These MT1-MMP-mediated signal transductions were paxillin dependent, as knockdown of paxillin reduced cell growth and ERK activation, and co-expression of MT1-MMP with paxillin induced ERK activation. The results suggest that MT1-MMP contributes to proliferation of cancer cells in the extracellular matrix by activating ERK through c-Src and paxillin.

  17. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  18. Live cell imaging of paxillin in rolling neutrophils by dual-color quantitative dynamic footprinting (DqDF)

    PubMed Central

    Sundd, Prithu; Gutierrez, Edgar; Petrich, Brian G.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation involves P-selectin dependent rolling. Quantitative dynamic footprinting is a useful tool to visualize the topography of the neutrophil footprint as it interacts with the substrate. However, elucidating the role of specific proteins in addition to topography requires simultaneous visualization of two fluorochromes. Methods To validate dual-color quantitative dynamic footprinting, mouse neutrophils were labeled with the membrane dyes DiO and DiI and perfused into microchannels coated with P-selectin-Fc. Footprints of rolling neutrophils were recorded as two separate images, one for each fluorochrome. To assess the localization of the cytoskeletal protein paxillin, we applied dual-color quantitative dynamic footprinting to DiO stained neutrophils of mice expressing an mCherry-paxillin fusion protein. Results The footprint topographies obtained from DiO and DiI in the plasma membrane were identical. The z-coordinates of the microvilli tips obtained with the two fluorochromes in the footprint were also identical. Paxillin was found to be localized to some, but not all ridges in the neutrophil footprint. Conclusions Our data suggest that the spectral properties of the fluorochrome do not affect the results. Dual-color quantitative dynamic footprinting will be useful for simultaneous visualization of two fluorochromes in the footprint of rolling cells. PMID:21418380

  19. Use of additives to enhance the properties of cottonseed protein as wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein is currently being used commercially as a “green” wood adhesive. Previous work in this laboratory has shown that cottonseed protein isolate, tested on maple wood veneer, produced higher adhesive strength and hot water resistance relative to soy protein. In the present study, cottonseed...

  20. Extracellular proteins from Lactobacillus plantarum BMCM12 prevent adhesion of enteropathogens to mucin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Urdaci, María C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to study the interference of the extracellular proteins produced by Lactobacillus plantarum BMCM12 with the adhesion of some well-known gut pathogens. The extracellular proteins secreted by L. plantarum BMCM12 in MRS broth were precipitated, resolved by SDS-PAGE, and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Discordances between the observed and the theoretical molecular masses of several proteins suggested the presence of protein glycosylation, corroborated with specific glycoprotein staining after protein de-glycosylation using trifluoromethanesulfonic acid. Experiments of exclusion, competition, or prevention of the pathogen adhesion to mucin were performed using BMCM12 extracellular proteins, using Escherichia coli LMG2092 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica LMG15860. Extracellular proteins from BMCM12 reduced significantly the adhesion of the pathogens when they were added prior to adhesion assays. These proteins play thus important roles in preventing pathogen adhesion to the mucin layer.

  1. Paxilline inhibits BK channels by an almost exclusively closed-channel block mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Lingle, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Paxilline, a tremorogenic fungal alkaloid, potently inhibits large conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK)-type channels, but little is known about the mechanism underlying this inhibition. Here we show that inhibition is inversely dependent on BK channel open probability (Po), and is fully relieved by conditions that increase Po, even in the constant presence of paxilline. Manipulations that shift BK gating to more negative potentials reduce inhibition by paxilline in accordance with the increase in channel Po. Measurements of Po times the number of channels at negative potentials support the idea that paxilline increases occupancy of closed states, effectively reducing the closed-open equilibrium constant, L(0). Gating current measurements exclude an effect of paxilline on voltage sensors. Steady-state inhibition by multiple paxilline concentrations was determined for four distinct equilibration conditions, each with a distinct Po. The IC50 for paxilline shifted from around 10 nM when channels were largely closed to near 10 µM as maximal Po was approached. Model-dependent analysis suggests a mechanism of inhibition in which binding of a single paxilline molecule allosterically alters the intrinsic L(0) favoring occupancy of closed states, with affinity for the closed conformation being >500-fold greater than affinity for the open conformation. The rate of inhibition of closed channels was linear up through 2 µM paxilline, with a slope of 2 × 10(6) M(-1)s(-1). Paxilline inhibition was hindered by either the bulky cytosolic blocker, bbTBA, or by concentrations of cytosolic sucrose that hinder ion permeation. However, paxilline does not hinder MTSET modification of the inner cavity residue, A313C. We conclude that paxilline binds more tightly to the closed conformation, favoring occupancy of closed-channel conformations, and propose that it binds to a superficial position near the entrance to the central cavity, but does not hinder access of smaller

  2. Paxilline inhibits BK channels by an almost exclusively closed-channel block mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Paxilline, a tremorogenic fungal alkaloid, potently inhibits large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK)-type channels, but little is known about the mechanism underlying this inhibition. Here we show that inhibition is inversely dependent on BK channel open probability (Po), and is fully relieved by conditions that increase Po, even in the constant presence of paxilline. Manipulations that shift BK gating to more negative potentials reduce inhibition by paxilline in accordance with the increase in channel Po. Measurements of Po times the number of channels at negative potentials support the idea that paxilline increases occupancy of closed states, effectively reducing the closed–open equilibrium constant, L(0). Gating current measurements exclude an effect of paxilline on voltage sensors. Steady-state inhibition by multiple paxilline concentrations was determined for four distinct equilibration conditions, each with a distinct Po. The IC50 for paxilline shifted from around 10 nM when channels were largely closed to near 10 µM as maximal Po was approached. Model-dependent analysis suggests a mechanism of inhibition in which binding of a single paxilline molecule allosterically alters the intrinsic L(0) favoring occupancy of closed states, with affinity for the closed conformation being >500-fold greater than affinity for the open conformation. The rate of inhibition of closed channels was linear up through 2 µM paxilline, with a slope of 2 × 106 M−1s−1. Paxilline inhibition was hindered by either the bulky cytosolic blocker, bbTBA, or by concentrations of cytosolic sucrose that hinder ion permeation. However, paxilline does not hinder MTSET modification of the inner cavity residue, A313C. We conclude that paxilline binds more tightly to the closed conformation, favoring occupancy of closed-channel conformations, and propose that it binds to a superficial position near the entrance to the central cavity, but does not hinder access of smaller

  3. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  4. Connexin 43 expressed in endothelial cells modulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion by regulating cell adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongdong; Sun, Guoliang; Zhang, Rui; Luo, Chenfang; Ge, Mian; Luo, Gangjian; Hei, Ziqing

    2015-11-01

    Adhesion between circulating monocytes and vascular endothelial cells is a key initiator of atherosclerosis. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that the expression of connexin (Cx)43 in monocytes modulates cell adhesion, however, the effects of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of the expression of Cx43 in endothelial cells in the process of cell adhesion. A total of four different methods with distinct mechanisms were used to change the function and expression of Cx43 channels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Cx43 channel inhibitor (oleamide), enhancer (retinoic acid), overexpression of Cx43 by transfection with pcDNA‑Cx43 and knock‑down of the expression of Cx43 by small interfering RNA against Cx43. The results indicated that the upregulation of the expression of Cx43 enhanced monocyte‑endothelial adhesion and this was markedly decreased by downregulation of Cx43. This mechanism was associated with Cx43‑induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule‑1. The effects of Cx43 in endothelial cells was independent of Cx37 or Cx40. These experiments suggested that local regulation of endothelial Cx43 expression within the vasculature regulates monocyte‑endothelial adhesion, a critical event in the development of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory pathologies, with baseline adhesion set by the expression of Cx43. This balance may be crucial in controlling leukocyte involvement in inflammatory cascades.

  5. Protein-based underwater adhesives and the prospects for their biotechnological production

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnological approaches to practical production of biological protein-based adhesives have had limited success over the last several decades. Broader efforts to produce recombinant adhesive proteins may have been limited by early disappointments. More recent synthetic polymer approaches have successfully replicated some aspects of natural underwater adhesives. For example, synthetic polymers, inspired by mussels, containing the catecholic functional group of 3,4-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine adhere strongly to wet metal oxide surfaces. Synthetic complex coacervates inspired by the Sandcastle worm are water-borne adhesives that can be delivered underwater without dispersing. Synthetic approaches offer several advantages, including versatile chemistries and scalable production. In the future, more sophisticated mimetic adhesives may combine synthetic copolymers with recombinant or agriculture-derived proteins to better replicate the structural and functional organization of natural adhesives. PMID:20890598

  6. Protein-based underwater adhesives and the prospects for their biotechnological production.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnological approaches to practical production of biological protein-based adhesives have had limited success over the last several decades. Broader efforts to produce recombinant adhesive proteins may have been limited by early disappointments. More recent synthetic polymer approaches have successfully replicated some aspects of natural underwater adhesives. For example, synthetic polymers, inspired by mussels, containing the catecholic functional group of 3,4-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine adhere strongly to wet metal oxide surfaces. Synthetic complex coacervates inspired by the Sandcastle worm are water-borne adhesives that can be delivered underwater without dispersing. Synthetic approaches offer several advantages, including versatile chemistries and scalable production. In the future, more sophisticated mimetic adhesives may combine synthetic copolymers with recombinant or agriculture-derived proteins to better replicate the structural and functional organization of natural adhesives.

  7. Processing of mussel adhesive protein analog thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Patz, T.; Narayan, R. J.; Menegazzo, N.; Mizaikoff, B.; Mihaiescu, D. E.; Messersmith, P. B.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2005-07-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins are a new class of biologically-derived materials that possess unique biocompatibility, bioactivity, and adhesion properties. We have demonstrated successful thin film growth of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl- L-alanine modified poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (DOPA modified- PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer, a mussel adhesive protein analog, using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation. We have demonstrated that the main functional groups of the mussel adhesive protein analog are present in the transferred film. The effect of increasing of chain length of the mussel adhesive protein analog on film structure was also examined. These novel polymer thin films could have numerous medical and technological applications if their thin film properties are similar to what is found in bulk. This is the first report of successful MAPLE deposition of this material as thin films.

  8. Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors: elusive hybrids come of age.

    PubMed

    Simundza, Julia; Cowin, Pamela

    2013-12-01

    Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most recently identified and least understood subfamily of GPCRs. Adhesion GPCRs are characterized by unusually long ectodomains with adhesion-related repeats that facilitate cell- cell and cell-cell matrix contact, as well as a proteolytic cleavage site-containing domain that is a structural hallmark of the family. Their unusual chimeric structure of adhesion-related ectodomain with a seven-pass transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic signaling makes these proteins highly versatile in mediating cellular signaling in response to extracellular adhesion or cell motility events. The ligand binding and cytoplasmic signaling modes for members of this family are beginning to be elucidated, and recent studies have demonstrated critical roles for Adhesion GPCRs in planar polarity and other important cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during development and morphogenesis, as well as heritable diseases and cancer.

  9. Biomimetic soy protein nanocomposites with calcium carbonate crystalline arrays for use as wood adhesive.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Chen, Huihuang; Chang, Peter R; Wu, Qinglin; Li, Kaifu; Guan, Litao

    2010-08-01

    Despite the biodegradability, non-toxicity, and renewability, commercially available soy protein-based adhesives still have not been widely adopted by industry, partially due to their disappointing performances, i.e., low glue strength in the dry state and no glue strength in the wet state. In this study, biomimetic soy protein/CaCO(3) hybrid wood glue was devised and an attempt made to improve the adhesion strength. The structure and morphology of the adhesive and its fracture bonding interface and adhesion strength were investigated. Results showed that the compact rivets or interlocking links, and ion crosslinking of calcium, carbonate, hydroxyl ions in the adhesive greatly improving the water-resistance and bonding strength of soy protein adhesives. Glue strength of soy protein hybrid adhesive was higher than 6 MPa even after three water-immersion cycles. This green and sustainable proteinous hybrid adhesive, with high glue strength and good water-resistance, is a good substitute for formaldehyde wood glues.

  10. Protein Recovery from Secondary Paper Sludge and Its Potential Use as Wood Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervaiz, Muhammad

    Secondary sludge is an essential part of biosolids produced through the waste treatment plant of paper mills. Globally paper mills generate around 3.0 million ton of biosolids and in the absence of beneficial applications, the handling and disposal of this residual biomass poses a serious environmental and economic proposition. Secondary paper sludges were investigated in this work for recovery of proteins and their use as wood adhesive. After identifying extracellular polymeric substances as adhesion pre-cursors through analytical techniques, studies were carried out to optimize protein recovery from SS and its comprehensive characterization. A modified physicochemical protocol was developed to recover protein from secondary sludge in substantial quantities. The combined effect of French press and sonication techniques followed by alkali treatment resulted in significant improvement of 44% in the yield of solubilized protein compared to chemical methods. The characterization studies confirmed the presence of common amino acids in recovered sludge protein in significant quantities and heavy metal concentration was reduced after recovery process. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed the presence of both low and high molecular weight protein fractions in recovered sludge protein. After establishing the proof-of-concept in the use of recovered sludge protein as wood adhesive, the bonding mechanism of protein adhesives with cellulose substrate was further elucidated in a complementary protein-modification study involving soy protein isolate and its glycinin fractions. The results of this study validated the prevailing bonding theories by proving that surface wetting, protein structure, and type of wood play important role in determining final adhesive strength. Recovered sludge protein was also investigated for its compatibility to formulate hybrid adhesive blends with formaldehyde and bio-based polymers. Apart from chemical

  11. Embedded proteins and sacrificial bonds provide the strong adhesive properties of gastroliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thormann, Esben; MizunoPresent Address: Nihon L'Oreal, Research; Innovation Center, 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan., Hiroyasu; Jansson, Kjell; Hedin, Niklas; Fernández, M. Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Rutland, Mark W.; PaiPresent Address: CenterFunctional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 735 Brookhaven Avenue, Upton, New York 11973., Ranjith Krishna; Bergström, Lennart

    2012-06-01

    The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO3. The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude.The adhesive properties of gastroliths from a freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) were quantified by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) between heavily demineralized gastrolith microparticles and gastrolith substrates of different composition. Combined AFM and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the sequential detachment and large adhesion energies that characterise the adhesive behaviour of a native gastrolith substrate are dominated by sacrificial bonds between chitin fibres and between chitin fibres and CaCO3. The sacrificial bonds were shown to be strongly related to the gastrolith proteins and when the majority of these proteins were removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the sequential detachment disappeared and the adhesive energy was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30536d

  12. Experimental strategies for the identification and characterization of adhesive proteins in animals: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hennebert, Elise; Maldonado, Barbara; Ladurner, Peter; Flammang, Patrick; Santos, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive secretions occur in both aquatic and terrestrial animals, in which they perform diverse functions. Biological adhesives can therefore be remarkably complex and involve a large range of components with different functions and interactions. However, being mainly protein based, biological adhesives can be characterized by classical molecular methods. This review compiles experimental strategies that were successfully used to identify, characterize and obtain the full-length sequence of adhesive proteins from nine biological models: echinoderms, barnacles, tubeworms, mussels, sticklebacks, slugs, velvet worms, spiders and ticks. A brief description and practical examples are given for a variety of tools used to study adhesive molecules at different levels from genes to secreted proteins. In most studies, proteins, extracted from secreted materials or from adhesive organs, are analysed for the presence of post-translational modifications and submitted to peptide sequencing. The peptide sequences are then used directly for a BLAST search in genomic or transcriptomic databases, or to design degenerate primers to perform RT-PCR, both allowing the recovery of the sequence of the cDNA coding for the investigated protein. These sequences can then be used for functional validation and recombinant production. In recent years, the dual proteomic and transcriptomic approach has emerged as the best way leading to the identification of novel adhesive proteins and retrieval of their complete sequences. PMID:25657842

  13. Modulation of cell adhesion complexes by surface protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Haviland, David B

    2009-03-01

    Cell adhesion is an important process in several biological phenomena. To investigate the formation and organization of focal adhesions, we developed a patterning approach based on electron beam lithography. Nanodots (radius <1230 nm) and nanorings (inner radius <320 nm) of fibronectin (FN) were patterned on a K-Casein background. Intracellular vinculin immunofluorescence mirrored the FN nanopatterns. Atomic force microscopy showed that FN nanodots and nanorings organize the immediate cytoskeleton into straight fibrils and diverging fibril bundles, respectively. Our results suggest that a minimum of approximately 40 FN molecules is required for a cell to form a focal adhesion.

  14. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  15. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein Mefp-1 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-01-17

    The present invention comprises a Mytilus edulis cDNA sequenc having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (Mefp-1), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-1 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-1 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-1 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-1 gene sequence will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  16. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein MEFP-2 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-02-07

    The present invention includes a Mytilus edulis cDNA having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-2 (Mefp-2), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-2 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-2 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-2 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-2 gene sequences will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  17. Adhesion-Linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0496 TITLE: Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL...Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, DAMD17-03-1-0496 Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression 6. AUTHOR(S) Valerie M. Weaver, Ph.D. 7...we identified the Band 4.1 PTPs MEG1 and D1 as two candidate PTP metastasis suppressors. Our studies show that during MEC differentiation PTP MEG1

  18. A bioinspired elastin-based protein for a cytocompatible underwater adhesive.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M Jane; Kilbride, Bridget F; Wilker, Jonathan J; Liu, Julie C

    2017-04-01

    The development of adhesives that can be applied and create strong bonds underwater is a significant challenge for materials engineering. When the adhesive is intended for biomedical applications, further criteria, such as biocompatibility, must be met. Current biomedical adhesive technologies do not meet these needs. In response, we designed a bioinspired protein system that shows promise to achieve biocompatible underwater adhesion coupled with environmentally responsive behavior that is "smart" - that is, it can be tuned to suit a specific application. The material, ELY16, is constructed from an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that can be produced in high yields from Escherichia coli and can coacervate in response to environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and salinity. To confer wet adhesion, we utilized design principles from marine organisms such as mussels and sandcastle worms. When expressed, ELY16 is rich in tyrosine. Upon modification with the tyrosinase enzyme to form mELY16, the tyrosine residues are converted to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Both ELY16 and mELY16 exhibit cytocompatibility and significant dry adhesion strength (>2 MPa). Modification with DOPA increases protein adsorption to glass and provides moderate adhesion strength (∼240 kPa) in a highly humid environment. Furthermore, this ELP exhibits a tunable phase transition behavior that can be formulated to coacervate in physiological conditions and provides a convenient mechanism for application underwater. Finally, mELY16 possesses significantly higher adhesion strength in dry, humid, and underwater environments compared with a commercially available fibrin sealant. To our knowledge, mELY16 provides the strongest bonds of any rationally designed protein when used completely underwater, and its high yields make it more viable for commercial application compared to natural adhesive proteins. In conclusion, this ELP shows great potential to be a new "smart" underwater adhesive.

  19. Phosphoproteome reveals an atlas of protein signaling networks during osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Milani, Renato; Ferreira, Carmen V; Granjeiro, José M; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Silva, Rodrigo A; Justo, Giselle Z; Nader, Helena B; Galembeck, Eduardo; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2010-04-01

    Cell adhesion on surfaces is a fundamental process in the emerging biomaterials field and developmental events as well. However, the mechanisms regulating this biological process in osteoblasts are not fully understood. Reversible phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases is probably the most important regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. Therefore, the goal of this study is to assess osteoblast adhesion through a molecular prism under a peptide array technology, revealing essential signaling proteins governing adhesion-related events. First, we showed that there are main morphological changes on osteoblast shape during adhesion up to 3 h. Second, besides classical proteins activated upon integrin activation, our results showed a novel network involving signaling proteins such as Rap1A, PKA, PKC, and GSK3beta during osteoblast adhesion on polystyrene. Third, these proteins were grouped in different signaling cascades including focal adhesion establishment, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and cell-cycle arrest. We have thus provided evidence that a global phosphorylation screening is able to yield a systems-oriented look at osteoblast adhesion, providing new insights for understanding of bone formation and improvement of cell-substratum interactions. Altogether, these statements are necessary means for further intervention and development of new approaches for the progress of tissue engineering.

  20. Are conformational changes, induced by osmotic pressure variations, the underlying mechanism of controlling the adhesive activity of mussel adhesive proteins?

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, Mieke C

    2005-11-22

    The mussel adhesive protein Mefp-1, under physiological conditions, presumably has a self-avoiding random walk conformation with helix-like or turned deca-peptide segments. Such a conformation may coil up under osmotic pressure induced by surrounding macromolecules. As a consequence, the orientation of the 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine groups (dopa), essential for the adhesive strength as well as the cohesive strength in Mefp-1, will be altered. Changing the concentration of the protein itself or of different-type surrounding macromolecules may therefore be a tool to control the protein's adhesive activity. The effect of osmotic pressure on the conformation and dopa reactivity of Mefp-1 is studied by the addition of (poly)ethylene oxide (PEO) as a model macromolecule (Mw = 100 kD). From UV-spectroscopy measurements, it can be concluded that dopa reactivity in Mefp-1 changes with increasing PEO concentration. Fitting of the measured absorbance intensity data of the oxidation product dopaquinone versus time with a kinetic model points to the decreased accessibility of dopa groups in the Mefp-1 structure, a faster oxidation, and diminished cross linking under the influence of increasing PEO concentration up to 2.4 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 73 Pa. At higher PEO concentrations, the accessibility of the dopa groups for oxidation as well as cross-link formation decreases until about 20% of the dopa groups are oxidized at a PEO concentration of 3.8 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 113 Pa. FTIR measurements on the basis of amide I shifts qualitatively point to a transition to a more continuously turned structure of Mefp-1 in the presence of PEO. Therefore, it seems that conformational changes caused by variations of osmotic pressure determine the extent of steric hindrance of the dopa groups and hence the adhesive reactivity of Mefp-1.

  1. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  2. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  3. Dose-dependent effects of prostaglandin E2 in macrophage adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Osma-Garcia, Inés C; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage migration to the focus of infection is a hallmark of the innate immune response. Macrophage spreading, adhesion, and migration through the extracellular matrix require dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton associated to integrin clustering in podosomes and focal adhesions. Here, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), the main prostaglandin produced by macrophages during inflammation, promote the distinctive dose-dependent formation of podosomes or focal adhesions in macrophages. Low concentrations of PGE2 increased p110γ PI3K expression, phosphorylation of actin-related protein 2, and formation of podosomes, which enhanced macrophage migration in response to chemokines. However, high doses of PGE2 increased phosphorylation of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase, the expression of serine/threonine protein kinase 1, and promoted focal adhesion formation and macrophage adhesion, reducing macrophage chemotaxis. In summary, we describe the dual role of PGE2 as a promoter of macrophage chemotaxis and adhesion, proposing a new model of macrophage migration to the inflammatory focus in the presence of a gradient of PGE2 .

  4. A mucus adhesion promoting protein, MapA, mediates the adhesion of Lactobacillus reuteri to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Uchimura, Tai; Satoh, Eiichi

    2006-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is one of the dominant lactobacilli found in the gastrointestinal tract of various animals. A surface protein of L. reuteri 104R, mucus adhesion promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor of this strain. We investigated the relation between MapA and adhesion of L. reuteri to human intestinal (Caco-2) cells. Quantitative analysis of the adhesion of L. reuteri strains to Caco-2 cells showed that various L. reuteri strains bind not only to mucus but also to intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, purified MapA bound to Caco-2 cells, and this binding inhibited the adhesion of L. reuteri in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these observations, the adhesion of L. reuteri appears due to the binding of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. Further, far-western analysis indicated the existence of multiple receptor-like molecules in Caco-2 cells.

  5. Strong underwater adhesives made by self-assembling multi-protein nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Gurry, Thomas; Cheng, Allen A; Downey, Jordan; Deng, Zhengtao; Stultz, Collin M; Lu, Timothy K

    2014-10-01

    Many natural underwater adhesives harness hierarchically assembled amyloid nanostructures to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular design, self-assembly and structure-function relationships of these natural amyloid fibres remains limited. Thus, designing biomimetic amyloid-based adhesives remains challenging. Here, we report strong and multi-functional underwater adhesives obtained from fusing mussel foot proteins (Mfps) of Mytilus galloprovincialis with CsgA proteins, the major subunit of Escherichia coli amyloid curli fibres. These hybrid molecular materials hierarchically self-assemble into higher-order structures, in which, according to molecular dynamics simulations, disordered adhesive Mfp domains are exposed on the exterior of amyloid cores formed by CsgA. Our fibres have an underwater adhesion energy approaching 20.9 mJ m(-2), which is 1.5 times greater than the maximum of bio-inspired and bio-derived protein-based underwater adhesives reported thus far. Moreover, they outperform Mfps or curli fibres taken on their own and exhibit better tolerance to auto-oxidation than Mfps at pH ≥ 7.0.

  6. Strong underwater adhesives made by self-assembling multi-protein nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chao; Gurry, Thomas; Cheng, Allen A.; Downey, Jordan; Deng, Zhengtao; Stultz, Collin M.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-10-01

    Many natural underwater adhesives harness hierarchically assembled amyloid nanostructures to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular design, self-assembly and structure-function relationships of these natural amyloid fibres remains limited. Thus, designing biomimetic amyloid-based adhesives remains challenging. Here, we report strong and multi-functional underwater adhesives obtained from fusing mussel foot proteins (Mfps) of Mytilus galloprovincialis with CsgA proteins, the major subunit of Escherichia coli amyloid curli fibres. These hybrid molecular materials hierarchically self-assemble into higher-order structures, in which, according to molecular dynamics simulations, disordered adhesive Mfp domains are exposed on the exterior of amyloid cores formed by CsgA. Our fibres have an underwater adhesion energy approaching 20.9 mJ m-2, which is 1.5 times greater than the maximum of bio-inspired and bio-derived protein-based underwater adhesives reported thus far. Moreover, they outperform Mfps or curli fibres taken on their own and exhibit better tolerance to auto-oxidation than Mfps at pH ≥ 7.0.

  7. Adhesive proteins of stalked and acorn barnacles display homology with low sequence similarities.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Abram, Florence; Pires, Elisabete; Varela Coelho, Ana; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins 'sticky' has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia) by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes). It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa). Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7-16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k) showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes). Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18-26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa) are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa).

  8. Adhesive Proteins of Stalked and Acorn Barnacles Display Homology with Low Sequence Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Abram, Florence; Pires, Elisabete; Varela Coelho, Ana; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins ‘sticky’ has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia) by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes). It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa). Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7–16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k) showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes). Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18–26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa) are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa). PMID:25295513

  9. Attenuation of leukocyte adhesion by recombinant TNF-binding protein after hemorrhagic shock in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maier, Marcus; Ströbele, Hubert; Voges, Jaqueline; Bauer, Clemens; Marzi, Ingo

    2003-05-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury involves a large number of humoral and cellular mediators that activate leukocytes that subsequently migrate to local tissues. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha may be one of the most important mediators of this post-shock inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the influence of a recombinant Type I (55 kDa) TNF-binding protein (TNF-BP) on leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the liver after hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats (40 mmHg for 90 min) and a standardized resuscitation regimen was applied. At the time of resuscitation, animals were treated intravenously with either TNF-BP 4 mg/kg or placebo. The liver microcirculation was investigated using intravital fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry at 5 h and 48 h after reperfusion. At 5 h, treatment with TNF-BP significantly reduced temporary leukocyte adhesion in the liver sinusoids as well as mean adhesion time of leukocytes in the hepatic central vein. In contrast, after 48 h, permanent leukocyte adhesion in the central hepatic vein was significantly reduced in the group receiving TNF-BP, whereas temporary leukocyte adhesion and mean adhesion time did not differ between the two groups. Both types of leukocyte adhesion, rolling adhesion after 5 h and firm adhesion after 48 h, were reduced in the group treated with TNF-BP, thereby suggesting a long-lasting anti-inflammatory effect.

  10. Diatom Adhesive Mucilage Contains Distinct Supramolecular Assemblies of a Single Modular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dugdale, T. M.; Dagastine, R.; Chiovitti, A.; Wetherbee, R.

    2006-01-01

    A previous study used atomic force microscopy saw-tooth retraction curves to characterize the adhesive mucilage pads of the diatom Toxarium undulatum. The major mucilage component consisted of adhesive nanofibers (ANFs) made up of modular proteins arranged into cohesive units, each containing a set number of modular proteins aligned in parallel. This study shows that T. undulatum adhesive mucilage is a biocomposite containing four additional adhesive components, including single modular proteins that are likely to be the structural units from which the ANFs are assembled. Two further distinct supramolecular assemblies were observed to coexist with ANFs (ANFs II and III), along with a continuum of single modular proteins through oligomers made up of varying numbers of modular proteins arranged in parallel. All components of the adhesive biocomposite produce a characteristic force spectrum with the same interpeak distance (35.3 ± 0.3 (mean ± SE) nm), suggesting they are derived from discrete supramolecular assemblies of the same modular protein, but they are distinguishable from one another based on the rupture force, persistence length, and interpeak force measured from their saw-tooth curves. PMID:16443662

  11. Developmental regulation of the adhesive and enzymatic activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) in humans.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    2006-09-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a homodimeric glycoprotein that belongs to a unique subgroup of cell-surface-expressed oxidases. In adults, endothelial VAP-1 supports leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transmigration in both enzyme activity-dependent and enzyme activity-independent manner. Here we studied the induction and function of VAP-1 during human ontogeny. We show that VAP-1 is already found in the smooth muscle at embryonic week 7. There are marked time-dependent switches in VAP-1 expression in the sinusoids of the liver, in the peritubular capillaries of the kidney, in the capillaries of the heart, and in the venules in the lamina propria of the gut. Fetal VAP-1 is dimerized, and it is enzymatically active. VAP-1 in fetal-type venules is able to bind cord blood lymphocytes. Also, adenovirally transfected VAP-1 on human umbilical vein endothelial cells is involved in rolling and firm adhesion of cord blood lymphocytes under conditions of physiologic shear stress. We conclude that VAP-1 is synthesized from early on in human vessels and it is functionally intact already before birth. Thus, VAP-1 may contribute critically to the oxidase activities in utero, and prove important for lymphocyte trafficking during human ontogeny.

  12. Protein adhesion on dental surfaces-a combined surface analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Wald, Johanna; Hoth-Hannig, Wiebke; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scholz, Daniel; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is a field of huge interest in a number of application fields. Information on protein adhesion is accessible by a variety of methods. However, the results obtained are significantly influenced by the applied technique. The objective of this work was to understand the role of adhesion forces (obtained by scanning force spectroscopy, SFS) in the process of protein adsorption and desorption. In SFS, the protein is forced to and retracted from the surface, even under unfavorable conditions, in contrast to the natural situation. Furthermore, adhesion forces are correlated with adhesion energies, neglecting the entropic part in the Gibbs enthalpy. In this context, dynamic contact angle (DCA) measurements were performed to identify the potential of this method to complement SFS data. In DCA measurements, the protein diffuses voluntarily to the surface and information on surface coverage and reversibility of adsorption is obtained, including entropic effects (conformational changes and hydrophobic effect). It could be shown that the surface coverage (by DCA) of bovine serum albumin on dental materials correlates well with the adhesion forces (by SFS) if no hydrophobic surface is involved. On those, the entropic hydrophobic effect plays a major role. As a second task, the reversibility of the protein adsorption, i.e., the voluntary desorption as studied by DCA, was compared to the adhesion forces. Here, a correlation between low adhesion forces and good reversibility could be found as long as no covalent bonds were involved. The comparative study of DCA and SFS, thus, leads to a more detailed picture of the complete adsorption/desorption cycle.

  13. Both protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP coordinate adhesion of human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Netherton, Stuart J; Sutton, Jayda A; Wilson, Lindsay S; Carter, Rhonda L; Maurice, Donald H

    2007-10-12

    cAMP regulates integrin-dependent adhesions of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) to extracellular matrix proteins, their vascular endothelial cadherin-dependent intercellular adhesions, and their proliferation and migration in response to growth and chemotactic factors. Previously, we reported that cAMP-elevating agents differentially inhibited migration of human VECs isolated from large vascular structures (macro-VECs, human aortic endothelial cells [HAECs]) or small vascular structures (micro-VECs, human microvascular endothelial cells [HMVECs]) and that cAMP hydrolysis by phosphodiesterase (PDE)3 and PDE4 enzymes was important in coordinating this difference. Here we report that 2 cAMP-effector enzymes, namely protein kinase (PK)A and exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), each regulate extracellular matrix protein-based adhesions of both macro- and micro-VECs. Of interest and potential therapeutic importance, we report that although specific pharmacological activation of EPAC markedly stimulated adhesion of micro-VECs to extracellular matrix proteins when PKA was inhibited, this treatment only modestly promoted adhesion of macro-VECs. Consistent with an important role for cAMP PDEs in this difference, PDE3 or PDE4 inhibitors promoted EPAC-dependent adhesions in micro-VECs when PKA was inhibited but not in macro-VECs. At a molecular level, we identify multiple, nonoverlapping, PKA- or EPAC-based signaling protein complexes in both macro- and micro-VECs and demonstrate that each of these complexes contains either PDE3B or PDE4D but not both of these PDEs. Taken together, our data support the concept that adhesion of macro- and micro-VECs is differentially regulated by cAMP and that these differences are coordinated through selective actions of cAMP at multiple nonoverlapping signaling complexes that contain PKA or EPAC and distinct PDE variants.

  14. A hot water extract of Curcuma longa inhibits adhesion molecule protein expression and monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Norio; Murosaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of arterial leukocytes to endothelial cells is an important step in the progression of various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, its modulation is thought to be a prospective target for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hot water extract of Curcuma longa (WEC) on the protein expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion induced by TNF-α in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment of HUVECs with WEC significantly suppressed both TNF-α-induced protein expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion. WEC also suppressed phosphorylation and degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) induced by TNF-α in HUVECs, suggesting that WEC inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  15. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuvelier, Susan L.; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4–stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechanosensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking. PMID:16172263

  16. Eosinophil adhesion under flow conditions activates mechanosensitive signaling pathways in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cuvelier, Susan L; Paul, Smitha; Shariat, Neda; Colarusso, Pina; Patel, Kamala D

    2005-09-19

    Leukocyte transmigration can be affected by shear stress; however, the mechanisms by which shear stress modulates transmigration are unknown. We found that adhesion of eosinophils or an eosinophilic cell line to intereukin 4-stimulated endothelial cells led to a shear-dependent increase in endothelial cell intracellular calcium and increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Latex beads coated with antibodies were used to characterize the role of specific endothelial cell surface molecules in initiating signaling under shear conditions. We found that ligation of either vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or E-selectin, but not major histocompatibility complex class I, induced a shear-dependent increase in ERK2 phosphorylation in cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. Disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A prevented ERK2 phosphorylation after adhesion under flow conditions, supporting a role for the cytoskeleton in mechano-sensing. Rapid phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin occurred under identical conditions, suggesting that focal adhesions were also involved in mechanotransduction. Finally, we found that Rho-associated protein kinase and calpain were both critical in the subsequent transendothelial migration of eosinophils under flow conditions. These data suggest that ligation of leukocyte adhesion molecules under flow conditions leads to mechanotransduction in endothelial cells, which can regulate subsequent leukocyte trafficking.

  17. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline

    PubMed Central

    Maragos, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s) ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9) was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage. PMID:26426046

  18. Class A scavenger receptor-mediated cell adhesion requires the sequential activation of Lyn and PI3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Dejan M; Cholewa, Jill; Gass, Cecelia; Gong, Ming C; Post, Steven R

    2007-04-01

    Class A scavenger receptors (SR-A) participate in multiple macrophage functions including macrophage adhesion to modified proteins. SR-A-mediated adhesion may therefore contribute to chronic inflammation by promoting macrophage accumulation at sites of protein modification. The mechanisms that couple SR-A binding to modified proteins with increased cell adhesion have not been defined. In this study, SR-A expressing HEK cells and SR-A+/+ or SR-A-/- macrophages were used to delineate the signaling pathways required for SR-A-mediated adhesion to modified protein. Inhibiting G(i/o) activation, which decreases initial SR-A-mediated cell attachment, did not prevent the subsequent spreading of attached cells. In contrast, inhibition of Src kinases or PI3-kinase abolished SR-A-dependent cell spreading without affecting SR-A-mediated cell attachment. Consistent with these results, the Src kinase Lyn and PI3-kinase were sequentially activated during SR-A-mediated cell spreading. Furthermore, activation of both Lyn and PI3-kinase was required for enhancing paxillin phosphorylation. Activation of a Src kinase-PI3-kinase-Akt pathway was also observed in cells expressing a truncated SR-A protein that does not internalize indicating that SR-A-mediated activation of intracellular signaling cascades following adhesion to MDA-BSA is independent of receptor internalization. Thus SR-A binding to modified protein activates signaling cascades that have distinct roles in regulating initial cell attachment and subsequent cell spreading.

  19. Binding of the cell adhesive protein tropoelastin to PTFE through plasma immersion ion implantation treatment.

    PubMed

    Bax, Daniel V; Wang, Yiwei; Li, Zhe; Maitz, Peter K M; McKenzie, David R; Bilek, Marcela M M; Weiss, Anthony S

    2011-08-01

    The interaction of proteins and cells with polymers is critical to their use in scientific and medical applications. In this study, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was used to modify the surface of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), enabling the covalent binding of a cell adhesive protein, tropoelastin, without employing chemical linking molecules. Tropoelastin coating of untreated or PIII treated PFTE simultaneously promoted and blocked cell interactions respectively, i.e. PIII treatment of the PTFE surface completely inverses the cell interactive properties of bound tropoelastin. This activity persisted over long term storage of the PIII treated surfaces. The integrin binding C-terminus of tropoelastin was markedly less solvent exposed when bound to PIII treated PTFE than untreated PTFE, accounting for the modulation of cell adhesive activity. This presents a new methodology to specifically modulate cell behavior on a polymer surface using a simple one step treatment process, by adjusting the adhesive activity of a single extracellular matrix protein.

  20. Recent approaches in designing bioadhesive materials inspired by mussel adhesive protein

    PubMed Central

    Kord Forooshani, Pegah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine mussels secret protein‐based adhesives, which enable them to anchor to various surfaces in a saline, intertidal zone. Mussel foot proteins (Mfps) contain a large abundance of a unique, catecholic amino acid, Dopa, in their protein sequences. Catechol offers robust and durable adhesion to various substrate surfaces and contributes to the curing of the adhesive plaques. In this article, we review the unique features and the key functionalities of Mfps, catechol chemistry, and strategies for preparing catechol‐functionalized polymers. Specifically, we reviewed recent findings on the contributions of various features of Mfps on interfacial binding, which include coacervate formation, surface drying properties, control of the oxidation state of catechol, among other features. We also summarized recent developments in designing advanced biomimetic materials including coacervate‐forming adhesives, mechanically improved nano‐ and micro‐composite adhesive hydrogels, as well as smart and self‐healing materials. Finally, we review the applications of catechol‐functionalized materials for the use as biomedical adhesives, therapeutic applications, and antifouling coatings. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2017, 55, 9–33 PMID:27917020

  1. Single Adhesive Nanofibers from a Live Diatom Have the Signature Fingerprint of Modular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dugdale, T. M.; Dagastine, R.; Chiovitti, A.; Mulvaney, P.; Wetherbee, R.

    2005-01-01

    The adhesive and mechanical properties of a cell-substratum adhesive secreted by live diatom cells were examined in situ using atomic force microscopy. The resulting force curves have a regular saw-tooth pattern, the characteristic fingerprint of modular proteins, and when bridged between tip and surface can repeatedly be stretched and relaxed resulting in precisely overlaying saw-tooth curves (up to ∼600 successive cycles). The average rupture force of the peaks is 0.794 ± 0.007 (mean ± SE) nN at a loading rate of 0.8 μm/s and the average persistence length is 0.026 ± <0.001 (mean ± SE) nm (fit using the worm-like chain model). We propose that we are pulling on single adhesive nanofibers, each a cohesive unit composed of a set number of modular proteins aligned in register. Furthermore, we can observe and differentiate when up to three adhesive nanofibers are pulled based upon multimodal distributions of force and persistence length. The high force required for bond rupture, high extensibility (∼1.2 μm), and the accurate and rapid refolding upon relaxation, together provide strong and flexible properties ideally suited for the cell-substratum adhesion of this fouling diatom and allow us to understand the mechanism responsible for the strength of adhesion. PMID:16169972

  2. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Development of spermatozoa in adult mammalian testis during spermatogenesis involves extensive cell migration and differentiation. Spermatogonia that reside at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium differentiate into more advanced germ cell types that migrate toward the apical compartment until elongated spermatids are released into the tubule lumen during spermiation. Apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES; a testis-specific anchoring junction) is the only cell junction that anchors and maintains the polarity of elongating/elongated spermatids (step 8–19 spermatids) in the epithelium. Little is known regarding the signaling pathways that trigger the disassembly of the apical ES at spermiation. Here, we show that secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, is a crucial regulatory protein for spermiation. The expression of sFRP1 is tightly regulated in adult rat testis to control spermatid adhesion and sperm release at spermiation. Down-regulation of sFRP1 during testicular development was found to coincide with the onset of the first wave of spermiation at approximately age 45 d postpartum, implying that sFRP1 might be correlated with elongated spermatid adhesion conferred by the apical ES before spermiation. Indeed, administration of sFRP1 recombinant protein to the testis in vivo delayed spermiation, which was accompanied by down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tyr397 and retention of nectin-3 adhesion protein at the apical ES. To further investigate the functional relationship between p-FAK-Tyr397 and localization of nectin-3, we overexpressed sFRP1 using lentiviral vectors in the Sertoli-germ cell coculture system. Consistent with the in vivo findings, overexpression of sFRP1 induced down-regulation of p-FAK-Tyr397, leading to a decline in phosphorylation of nectin-3. In summary, this report highlights the critical role of s

  3. Analysis of the binding of the Src homology 2 domain of Csk to tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in the suppression and mitotic activation of c-Src.

    PubMed Central

    Sabe, H; Hata, A; Okada, M; Nakagawa, H; Hanafusa, H

    1994-01-01

    Csk (C-terminal Src kinase), a protein-tyrosine kinase, bearing the Src homology 2 and 3 (SH2 and SH3) domains, has been implicated in phosphorylation of c-Src Tyr-527, resulting in suppression of c-Src kinase activity. We found that mutations in the SH2 or SH3 domain of Csk, though they did not affect its kinase activity, resulted in a loss of suppression of c-Src activity in fibroblasts. In normal fibroblasts, tyrosine-phosphorylated paxillin and focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK, which colocalize at focal adhesion plaques, were the major proteins to which the Csk SH2 domain bound. Loss of binding to these proteins by the Csk SH2 mutants correlated with loss of the activity to suppress c-Src. Consistent with this observation, the levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK were greatly reduced during mitosis, whereas the kinase activity of c-Src was elevated. We suggest that the SH2 domain is required for Csk to suppress c-Src, perhaps in combination with the SH3 domain, by anchoring Csk to a particular subcellular location where c-Src may exist. Our data also indicate that a certain fraction of the Csk and Src family kinases function at the focal adhesion plaques. The activity of the c-Src kinase localized at the focal adhesion plaques appears to be regulated by cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Images PMID:7513429

  4. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  5. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa’s notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a Surface Forces Apparatus to investigate the adhesion of Mfp3 (mussel foot protein 3) slow, a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow like Mfp3 fast adhesion to mica is directly proportional to the mol% of Dopa present in the protein. At pH 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (Ead = −3 mJ/m2). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH-independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives. PMID:23214725

  6. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2013-01-09

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa's notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a surface forces apparatus to investigate the adhesion of mussel foot protein 3 (Mfp3) "slow", a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow, like Mfp3 "fast" adhesion to mica, is directly proportional to the mol % of Dopa present in the protein. At pH of 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH of 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (E(ad) = -3 mJ/m(2)). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives.

  7. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Cai, Ning; Gong, Yingxue; Chian, Kerm Sin; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2008-03-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10(-7) J m(-2)) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute.

  8. Restructuring of focal adhesion plaques by PI 3-kinase. Regulation by PtdIns (3,4,5)-p(3) binding to alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J A; Theibert, A B; Prestwich, G D; Murphy-Ullrich, J E

    2000-08-07

    Focal adhesions are an elaborate network of interconnecting proteins linking actin stress fibers to the extracellular matrix substrate. Modulation of the focal adhesion plaque provides a mechanism for the regulation of cellular adhesive strength. Using interference reflection microscopy, we found that activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) by PDGF induces the dissipation of focal adhesions. Loss of this close apposition between the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix coincided with a redistribution of alpha-actinin and vinculin from the focal adhesion complex to the Triton X-100-soluble fraction. In contrast, talin and paxillin remained localized to focal adhesions, suggesting that activation of PI 3-kinase induced a restructuring of the plaque rather than complete dispersion. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol (3,4, 5)-trisphosphate (PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3)), a lipid product of PI 3-kinase, was sufficient to induce restructuring of the focal adhesion plaque. We also found that PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3) binds to alpha-actinin in PDGF-treated cells. Further evidence demonstrated that activation of PI 3-kinase by PDGF induced a decrease in the association of alpha-actinin with the integrin beta subunit, and that PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3) could disrupt this interaction in vitro. Modification of focal adhesion structure by PI 3-kinase and its lipid product, PtdIns (3,4,5)-P(3), has important implications for the regulation of cellular adhesive strength and motility.

  9. Corneal Cell Adhesion to Contact Lens Hydrogel Materials Enhanced via Tear Film Protein Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Claire M.; Qi, Qin M.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2014-01-01

    Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS), borate buffered saline (BBS), or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes), either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes) exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo. PMID:25144576

  10. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Claire M; Qi, Qin M; Fuller, Gerald G

    2014-01-01

    Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS), borate buffered saline (BBS), or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes), either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes) exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  11. The role of serum proteins in Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to ethylene glycol coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Swen; Yu, Wenqi; Nega, Mulugeta; Chu, Ya-Yun; Zorn, Stefan; Zhang, Fajun; Götz, Friedrich; Schreiber, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion on implants is a first step in the development of chronic foreign body associated infections. Finding strategies to minimize bacterial adhesion may contribute to minimize such infections. It is known that surfaces with oligo-ethylene-glycol (EG3OMe) or poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG2k) terminations decrease unspecific protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. However, little is known about the influence of serum and its components on bacterial adhesion. We therefore prepared two coatings on gold surface with HS-(CH2)11EG3OMe (EG3OMe) and PEG2k-thiol and studied the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA), γ-globulins, and serum on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion. While BSA and lysozyme showed no adherence even when applied at very high concentrations (100 mg/ml), γ-globulins adsorbed already from 10 mg/ml on. The adsorption of γ-globulins was, however, significantly decreased when it was mixed with BSA in a ratio of 3:1, as it is in the serum. Pretreatment of EG3OMe and PEG2k coatings with γ-globulins or serum strongly promoted adherence of S. aureus when resuspended in buffer, suggesting that γ-globulins play a pivotal role in promoting S. aureus adhesion by its IgG binding proteins; the finding that a spa-deletion mutant, lacking the IgG binding protein A, showed decreased adherence corroborated this. Similarly, when S. aureus was pretreated with serum or γ-globulins its adherence was also significantly decreased. Our findings show that particularly γ-globulins bind to the coated surfaces thus mediating adherence of S. aureus via its protein A. As pretreatment of S. aureus with serum or γ-globulins significantly decreased adherence, treatment of patients with γ-globulins before implant surgery might lower the risk of implant-associated infections.

  12. Focal Adhesion Targeting: The Critical Determinant of FAK Regulation and Substrate Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu; Schaller, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is discretely localized to focal adhesions via its C-terminal focal adhesion–targeting (FAT) sequence. FAK is regulated by integrin-dependent cell adhesion and can regulate tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream substrates, like paxillin. By the use of a mutational strategy, the regions of FAK that are required for cell adhesion–dependent regulation and for inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin were determined. The results show that the FAT sequence was the single region of FAK that was required for each function. Furthermore, the FAT sequence of FAK was replaced with a focal adhesion–targeting sequence from vinculin, and the resulting chimera exhibited cell adhesion–dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and could induce paxillin phosphorylation like wild-type FAK. These results suggest that subcellular localization is the major determinant of FAK function. PMID:10436008

  13. Diversity of bone matrix adhesion proteins modulates osteoblast attachment and organization of actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Demais, V; Audrain, C; Mabilleau, G; Chappard, D; Baslé, M F

    2014-06-01

    Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix is an essential event for differentiation, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts. In bone, binding of osteoblasts to bone matrix is required to determine specific activities of the cells and to synthesize matrix bone proteins. Integrins are the major cell receptors involved in the cell linkage to matrix proteins such as fibronectin, type I collagen and vitronectin, via the RGD-sequences. In this study, cultures of osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) were done on coated glass coverslips in various culture conditions: DMEM alone or DMEM supplemented with poly-L-lysine (PL), fetal calf serum (FCS), fibronectin (FN), vitronectin (VN) and type I collagen (Col-I). The aim of the study was to determine the specific effect of these bone matrix proteins on cell adherence and morphology and on the cytoskeleton status. Morphological characteristics of cultured cells were studied using scanning electron microscopy and image analysis. The heterogeneity of cytoskeleton was studied using fractal analysis (skyscrapers and blanket algorithms) after specific preparation of cells to expose the cytoskeleton. FAK and MAPK signaling pathways were studied by western blotting in these various culture conditions. Results demonstrated that cell adhesion was reduced with PL and VN after 240 min. After 60 min of adhesion, cytoskeleton organization was enhanced with FN, VN and Col-I. No difference in FAK phosphorylation was observed but MAPK phosphorylation was modulated by specific adhesion on extracellular proteins. These results indicate that culture conditions modulate cell adhesion, cytoskeleton organization and intracellular protein pathways according to extracellular proteins present for adhesion.

  14. Effect of Milk Proteins on Adhesion of Bacteria to Stainless Steel Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, L.-M.; Lo, M. F.; Adams, M. R.; Chamberlain, A. H. L.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel coupons were treated with skim milk and subsequently challenged with individual bacterial suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fragi, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Serratia marcescens. The numbers of attached bacteria were determined by direct epifluorescence microscopy and compared with the attachment levels on clean stainless steel with two different surface finishes. Skim milk was found to reduce adhesion of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, and S. marcescens. P. fragi and E. coli attached in very small numbers to the clear surfaces, making the effect of any adsorbed protein layer difficult to assess. Individual milk proteins α-casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and α-lactalbumin were also found to reduce the adhesion of S. aureus and L. monocytogenes. The adhesion of bacteria to samples treated with milk dilutions up to 0.001% was investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the proportion of nitrogen in the adsorbed films. Attached bacterial numbers were inversely related to the relative atomic percentage of nitrogen on the surface. A comparison of two types of stainless steel surface, a 2B and a no. 8 mirror finish, indicated that the difference in these levels of surface roughness did not greatly affect bacterial attachment, and reduction in adhesion to a milk-treated surface was still observed. Cross-linking of adsorbed proteins partially reversed the inhibition of bacterial attachment, indicating that protein chain mobility and steric exclusion may be important in this phenomenon. PMID:10508087

  15. Low-Cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in gl...

  16. Low-cost Soybean Protein Products as Extenders in Plywood Adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean flour and meal were evaluated as alternate protein extenders in plywood adhesives. This research is part of our laboratory’s efforts to develop new uses for the proteinaceous co-products from soybean and cereal processing. Ground soybean meal was tested as replacement for wheat flour in glu...

  17. Comparison of the adhesive performances of soy meal, water washed meal fractions, and protein isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesive bonding of wood plays an increasing role in the forest products industry and is a key factor for efficiently utilizing timber and other lignocellulosic resources. In this work, we obtained five soy meal products through commercial sources or in-house preparations. The protein content was 49...

  18. RacGAP1-driven focal adhesion formation promotes melanoma transendothelial migration through mediating adherens junction disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Panying; Wu, Chengxiang; Ye, Qichao; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-03-27

    Melanoma cell migration across vascular endothelial cells is an essential step of tumor metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that RacGAP1, a cytokinesis-related Rho GTPase-activating protein, contributed to this process. Depletion of RacGAP1 with RacGAP1-targeting siRNA or overexpression of RacGAP1 mutant (T249A) attenuated melanoma cell transendothelial migration and concomitant changes of adherens junctions. In addition, RacGAP1 promoted the activations of RhoA, FAK, paxillin and triggered focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal rearrangement. By overexpressing FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) in endothelium, we showed that RacGAP1 mediated endothelial barrier function loss and melanoma transmigration in a focal adhesion-dependent manner. These results suggest that endothelial RacGAP1 may play critical roles in pathogenic processes of cancer by regulating endothelial permeability.

  19. Dominant-negative effect on adhesion by myelin Po protein truncated in its cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The myelin Po protein is believed to hold myelin together via interactions of both its extracellular and cytoplasmic domains. We have already shown that the extracellular domains of Po can interact in a homophilic manner (Filbin, M.T., F.S. Walsh, B.D. Trapp, J.A. Pizzey, and G.I. Tennekoon. 1990. Nature (Lond.). 344:871-872). In addition, we have shown that for this homophilic adhesion to take place, the cytoplasmic domain of Po must be intact and most likely interacting with the cytoskeleton; Po proteins truncated in their cytoplasmic domains are not adhesive (Wong, M.H., and M.T. Filbin, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:1089-1097). To determine if the presence of these truncated forms of Po could have an effect on the functioning of the full-length Po, we coexpressed both molecules in CHO cells. The adhesiveness of CHO cells expressing both full-length Po and truncated Po was then compared to cells expressing only full-length Po. In these coexpressors, both the full-length and the truncated Po proteins were glycosylated. They reached the surface of the cell in approximately equal amounts as shown by an ELISA and surface labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, the amount of full-length Po at the cell surface was equivalent to other cell lines expressing only full-length Po that we had already shown to be adhesive. Therefore, there should be sufficient levels of full-length Po at the surface of these coexpressors to measure adhesion of Po. However, as assessed by an aggregation assay, the coexpressors were not adhesive. By 60 min they had not formed large aggregates and were indistinguishable from the control transfected cells not expressing Po. In contrast, in the same time, the cells expressing only the full-length Po had formed large aggregates. This indicates that the truncated forms of Po have a dominant-negative effect on the adhesiveness of the full-length Po. Furthermore, from cross-linking studies, full-length Po, when expressed alone but not when

  20. Therapy with hydroxyurea is associated with reduced adhesion molecule gene and protein expression in sickle red cells with a concomitant reduction in adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Gambero, Sheley; Canalli, Andreia A; Traina, Fabiola; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Saad, Sara T O; Costa, Fernando F; Conran, Nicola

    2007-02-01

    Propagation of the vaso-occlusive process in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a complex process involving the adhesion of steady-state SCA patients red cells and reticulocytes to the vascular endothelium. The effect of hydroxyurea therapy (HUT) on the adhesive properties of sickle cells and the expression of adhesion molecule genes by erythroid cells of SCA individuals is not yet fully understood. The expressions of the CD36 gene and the VLA-4-integrin subunit genes, CD49d (alpha-subunit) and CD29 (beta-subunit), were compared in the reticulocytes of steady-state SCA patients and patients on HUT using real-time PCR. Basal adhesion of red cells from these subjects was also compared using static adhesion assays, as was surface protein expression, using flow cytometry. Basal sickle red cell adhesion to fibronectin was significantly greater than that of normal cells (P < 0.01); in contrast, HUT was associated with significantly lower levels (P < 0.01) of red cell adhesion that were similar to those of control cells; this decrease could not be justified solely by altered reticulocyte numbers in this population. Accordingly, flow cytometry demonstrated that reticulocytes from patients on HUT had significantly lower CD36 and CD49d surface expressions (P < 0.01) and, importantly, significantly lower expressions of the CD36, CD49d and CD29 genes (P < 0.05) than reticulocytes of SCA patients not on HUT. Taken together, data support the hypothesis that HUT reduces the adhesive properties of sickle cells and that this decrease appears to be mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in the gene and, consequently, surface protein expression of adhesion molecules such as VLA-4 and CD36.

  1. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca2+-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca2+-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of mussel adhesive protein repeating peptide segment.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M P; Wollman, R M; Alderfer, J L

    1997-12-01

    Mussel adhesive protein (MAP) is the adhesive agent used by the common blue sea mussel (Mytilus edulis) to attach the animal to various underwater surfaces. It is generally composed of 75 to 85 repeating decameric units with the reported primary sequence NH2-Ala(1)-Lyst(2)-Pro(3)-Ser(4)-Tyr(5)-Hyp(6)-Hyp(7)-Thr(8)-DOPA( 9)- Lys(10)-COOH. This study examines this peptide's solution-state conformation using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR and molecular modeling of the decamer before and after molecular dynamics calculations in water suggests a conformation that retains an overall bent helix.

  3. An Underwater Surface-Drying Peptide Inspired by a Mussel Adhesive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Petrone, Luigi; Tan, YerPeng; Cai, Hao; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Miserez, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Water hampers the formation of strong and durable bonds between adhesive polymers and solid surfaces, in turn hindering the development of adhesives for biomedical and marine applications. Inspired by mussel adhesion, a mussel foot protein homologue (mfp3S-pep) is designed, whose primary sequence is designed to mimic the pI, polyampholyte, and hydrophobic characteristics of the native protein. Noticeably, native protein and synthetic peptide exhibit similar abilities to self-coacervate at given pH and ionic strength. 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (Dopa) proves necessary for irreversible peptide adsorption to both TiO2 (anatase) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) surfaces, as confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, with the coacervate showing superior adsorption. The adsorption of Dopa-containing peptides is investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, revealing initially bidentate coordinative bonds on TiO2, followed by H-bonded and eventually long-ranged electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions. On HAP, mfp3s-pep-3Dopa adsorption occurs predominantly via H-bond and outer-sphere complexes of the catechol groups. Importantly, only the Dopa-bearing compounds are able to remove interfacial water from the target surfaces, with the coacervate achieving the highest water displacement arising from its superior wetting properties. These findings provide an impetus for developing coacervated Dopa-functionalized peptides/polymers adhesive formulations for a variety of applications on wet polar surfaces. PMID:27840600

  4. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs.

  5. The impact of grafted modification of silicone surfaces with quantum-sized materials on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nune, C; Xu, W; Misra, R D K

    2012-12-01

    The majority of the infections associated with the biomedical devices including cardiovascular implants and catheters are instigated by the adhesion of bacteria including staphylococcus aureus, which is subsequently followed by biofilm formation. Keeping in mind the detrimental effect of bacterial adhesion, the objective of the study is to probe the impact of grafted modification of silicone surfaces with quantum-sized carbon on biofilm formation. Also, explored is the effect of protein adsorption on modified surface and its subsequent influence on bacterial adhesion. We compare and contrast the architecture and foot print of protein adsorption on unmodified and modified model silicone surfaces on bacterial adhesion. The study underscores that protein adsorption on quantum-sized carbon-grafted surface acts as a repellant for bacterial adhesion because of steric repulsion between the negatively charged protein and bacteria. Thus, we establish here the efficacy of modified surfaces in preventing biofilm formation.

  6. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization.

  7. The oxidase activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is essential for function.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Thomas; Lukas, Susan; Peet, Gregory W; Pelletier, Josephine; Panzenbeck, Mark; Hanidu, Adedayo; Mazurek, Suzanne; Wasti, Ruby; Rybina, Irina; Roma, Teresa; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Shoultz, Alycia; Souza, Donald; Jiang, Huiping; Nabozny, Gerald; Modis, Louise Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and is suggested to play a role in immune cell trafficking. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated by the oxidase activity or by other features of the protein such as direct adhesion. In order to study the role of VAP-1 oxidase activity in vivo, we have generated mice carrying an oxidase activity-null VAP-1 protein. We demonstrate that the VAP-1 oxidase null mutant mice have a phenotype similar to the VAP-1 null mice in animal models of sterile peritonitis and antibody induced arthritis suggesting that the oxidase activity is responsible for the inflammatory function of VAP-1.

  8. The oxidase activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is essential for function

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Thomas; Lukas, Susan; Peet, Gregory W; Pelletier, Josephine; Panzenbeck, Mark; Hanidu, Adedayo; Mazurek, Suzanne; Wasti, Ruby; Rybina, Irina; Roma, Teresa; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Shoultz, Alycia; Souza, Donald; Jiang, Huiping; Nabozny, Gerald; Modis, Louise Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and is suggested to play a role in immune cell trafficking. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated by the oxidase activity or by other features of the protein such as direct adhesion. In order to study the role of VAP-1 oxidase activity in vivo, we have generated mice carrying an oxidase activity-null VAP-1 protein. We demonstrate that the VAP-1 oxidase null mutant mice have a phenotype similar to the VAP-1 null mice in animal models of sterile peritonitis and antibody induced arthritis suggesting that the oxidase activity is responsible for the inflammatory function of VAP-1. PMID:23885334

  9. Mechanical and water soaking properties of medium density fiberboard with wood fiber and soybean protein adhesive.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Yonghui; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Ratto, Jo A; Sheng, Kuichuan; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2009-07-01

    Soybean protein is a renewable and abundant material that offers an alternative to formaldehyde-based resins. In this study, soybean protein was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as an adhesive for wood fiber medium density fiberboard (MDF) preparation. Second-order response surface regression models were used to study the effects and interactions of initial moisture content (IMC) of coated wood fiber, press time (PT) and temperature on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Results showed that IMC of coated fiber was the dominant influencing factor. Mechanical and soaking properties improved as IMC increased and reached their highest point at an IMC of 35%. Press time and temperature also had a significant effect on mechanical and water soaking properties of MDF. Second-order regression results showed that there were strong relationships between mechanical and soaking properties of MDF and processing parameters. Properties of MDF made using soybean protein adhesive are similar to those of commercial board.

  10. OmpA-like protein influences cell shape and adhesive activity of Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Murakami, Y; Nagano, K; Hasegawa, Y; Moriguchi, K; Ohno, N; Shimozato, K; Yoshimura, F

    2011-12-01

    Tannerella forsythia, a gram-negative fusiform rod, is implicated in several types of oral anaerobic infections. Most gram-negative bacteria have OmpA-like proteins that are homologous to the OmpA protein in Escherichia coli. We identified an OmpA-like protein in T. forsythia encoded by the tf1331 gene as one of the major proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. Two-dimensional, diagonal electrophoresis showed that the OmpA-like protein formed a dimeric or trimeric structure via intermolecular disulfide bonds. A biotin labeling experiment revealed that a portion of the protein was exposed on the cell surface, even though T. forsythia possesses an S-layer at the outermost cell surface. Using a tf1331-deletion mutant, we showed that the OmpA-like protein affected cell morphology. The length of the mutant cell was reduced almost by half. Cell swelling was observed in more than 40% of the mutant cells. Moreover, the mutant exhibited decreased adhesion to fibronectin, retarded autoaggregation, and reduced cell surface hydrophobicity. These results suggest that the OmpA-like protein in T. forsythia plays an important role in cellular integrity and adhesive function.

  11. Ubiquitous distribution of salts and proteins in spider glue enhances spider silk adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chaurasia, Vishal; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Modern orb-weaving spiders use micron-sized glue droplets on their viscid silk to retain prey in webs. A combination of low molecular weight salts and proteins makes the glue viscoelastic and humidity responsive in a way not easily achieved by synthetic adhesives. Optically, the glue droplet shows a heterogeneous structure, but the spatial arrangement of its chemical components is poorly understood. Here, we use optical and confocal Raman microscopy to show that salts and proteins are present ubiquitously throughout the droplet. The distribution of adhesive proteins in the peripheral region explains the superior prey capture performance of orb webs as it enables the entire surface area of the glue droplet to act as a site for prey capture. The presence of salts throughout the droplet explains the recent Solid-State NMR results that show salts directly facilitate protein mobility. Understanding the function of individual glue components and the role of the droplet's macro-structure can help in designing better synthetic adhesives for humid environments.

  12. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen.

  13. Extracellular matrix protein patterns guide human chondrocytes adhesion and alignment characterized by vimentin and matrilin-3.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influences of collagen VI (col-VI) patterns on human chondrocytes behaviors. To this end, col-VI stripes with varying width and interstripe spacing are created on polystyrene (PS) surfaces by microcontact printing (μCP). Human chondrocytes are then seeded on these protein patterns and the cell adhesion and alignment are investigated by staining the vimentin and matrilin-3 secreted by seeded chondrocytes. The results indicate that the cells preferentially attach onto the protein areas, rendering cell patterns and the elongated cell shapes. The pattern dimensions can significantly influence cell adhesion, spreading and orientation. The stripe protein patterns can guide cell adhesion and alignment. The cell morphologies can be controlled by carefully designing the pattern shapes and sizes. Our results suggest that the protein patterns can be used to modify biomaterials' surfaces for selective cell-binding and cell alignment. It could provide some cues for the development of novel implantable biomaterials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds for cartilage replacement, where specific cell alignment is needed.

  14. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in type III group B streptococcal invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooan; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Maneesh, Paul-Satyaseela; Lee, Jong-Seok; Romer, Lewis H; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2006-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS), the leading cause of neonatal meningitis, has been shown to invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. GBS invasion of HBMEC has been shown to require the host cell actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The present study examined the mechanisms underlying actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that are involved in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC. We showed that type III GBS invasion was inhibited by genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mean 54% invasion decrease at 100 microM), and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase inhibitor (mean 70% invasion decrease at 50 microM), but not by PP2, an inhibitor of the Src family tyrosine kinases. We subsequently showed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was the one of the host proteins tyrosine phosphorylated by type III GBS. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of the FAK C-terminal domain significantly decreased type III GBS invasion of HBMEC (mean 51% invasion decrease). In addition, we showed that FAK phosphorylation correlated with its association of paxillin, an adapter protein of actin filament, and PI3-kinase subunit p85. This is the first demonstration that FAK phosphorylation and its association with paxillin and PI3 kinase play a key role in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC.

  15. Application of tung oil to improve adhesion strength and water resistance of cottonseed meal and protein adhesives on maple veneer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed meal-based products show promise in serving as environment-friendly wood adhesives. However, their practical utilization is currently limited due to low durability and water resistant properties. In this research, we tested the improvement of adhesion strength and water resistance of cott...

  16. TSOL18/HP6-Tsol, an immunogenic Taenia solium oncospheral adhesion protein and potential protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, R Michael E; Bonay, Pedro; González, Luis Miguel; Ferrer, Elizabeth; Gárate, Teresa; Aguilar, Cruz M; Cortez A, Milagros M; Harrison, Leslie J S

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we employed Taenia solium mRNA extracted from a tapeworm of Venezuelan origin to clone express and test the recombinant protein of the T. solium homologue of the 18-kDa oncospheral adhesion molecule of Taenia saginata (HP6-Tsag/TSA18). We first confirm the conserved nature of the sequence of the T. solium homologue (TSOL18/HP6-Tsol) and demonstrate that the recombinant protein, which, as with its T. saginata homologue, is characterised by a fibronectin type III homology region, functions as an adhesion molecule. This emphasises the possible importance of TSOL18/HP6-Tsol in tissue invasion, thus providing a rational explanation for its efficacy as a vaccine. As protection against Taenia spp., oncospheres is antibody mediated, logically, therefore, TSOL18/HP6-Tsol may also serve as a diagnostic antigen, as is indeed the case for recombinant HP6-Tsag/TSA18.

  17. Protein Adhesion and Ion Substitution (on/in)to Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, L.; Fernandez Martinez, A.; Chapron, Y.; Sahai, N.; Cuello, G.; Brendle, J.; Marichal, C.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic and pathogenic prion protein-scrapie (PrPsc) are important contaminants which may soil and water for decades, unless they are removed by sorption. Two sorption mechanisms will be discussed, namely the organics (Prp and single aminoacid) adsorption on clay and the arsenic substitution in gypsum. The elucidation of these contrasted mechanisms will be shown to request complementary molecular-mechanical simulations with experimental spectroscopic investigations. As first example, structural studies performed at ILL/ESRF on As-doped gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) using neutron and X-ray diffraction data and EXAFS were performed to determine how As fits into the bulk of gypsum structure. The combined Rietveld analysis of neutron and X-ray diffraction data shows an expansion of the unit cell volume proportional to the As concentration within the samples. to-sulfate substitution mechanisms were used as simulation starting hypotheses. DFT-based simulations (Mulliken analysis) were used to interpret charge distribution and to show that among the possible mechanisms, a sulphate substitution by either protonated, or fully deprotonated, arsenate ion, only the protonated arsenate substitution could best fit the EXAFS data. In the second example, we used Molecular Dynamics to understand the mechanism of strong binding of the pathogenic PrP peptide with clay mineral surfaces. We modeled only the infectious moiety, PrP92-138, of the whole PrPsc structure, with explicitly solvating water molecules in contact with the cleavage plane of pyrophillite, as a model for montmorillonite without any cationic substitution. Partial residual negative charges on the cleavage plane were balanced with K+ ions. The peptide anchored to the clay surface via up to 10 hydrogen bonds from lysine and histidine residues to oxygen atoms of the siloxane cavities, and a total adsorption energy of 3465 KJ.mol-1 was obtained. Our results were compared to the one obtained by chemical and thermal analysis, 23Na, 1H

  18. Adhesion of phospholipid vesicles to Chinese hamster fibroblasts: Role of cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, RE; Takeichi, M

    1977-01-01

    The adhesion of artificially generated lipid membrane vesicles to Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts in suspension was used as a model system for studying membrane interactions. Below their gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, vesicles comprised of dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL) or dimyristoyl lecithin (DML) absorbed to the surfaces of EDTA- dissociated cells. These adherent vesicles could not be removed by repeated washings of the treated cells but could be released into the medium by treatment with trypsin. EM autoradiographic studies of cells treated with[(3)H]DML or [(3)H]DPL vesicles showed that most of the radioactive lipids were confined to the cell periphery. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy further confirmed the presence of adherent vesicles at the cell surface. Adhesion of DML or DPL vesicles to EDTA-dissociated cells modified the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination pattern of the cell surface proteins; the inhibition of labeling of two proteins with an approximately 60,000- dalton mol wt was particularly evident. Incubation of cells wit h (3)H-lipid vesicles followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that some of the (3)H-lipid migrated preferentially with these approximately 60,000-mol wt proteins. Studies of the temperature dependence of vesicle uptake and subsequent release by trypsin showed that DML or DPL vesicle adhesion to EDTA- dissociated cells increased with decreasing temperatures. In contrast, cells trypsinized before incubation with vesicles showed practically no temperature dependence of vesicle uptake. These results suggest two pathways for adhesion of lipid vesicles to the cell surface-a temperature-sensitive one involving cell surface proteins, and a temperature-independent one. These findings are discussed in terms of current models for cell-cell interactions. PMID:407233

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) at subtoxic concentrations increases the adhesivity of human leukemic cells to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Pluskalová, Michaela; Brodská, Barbora; Otevrelová, Petra; Elknerová, Klára; Grebenová, Dana; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2010-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) which is being introduced into clinic for the treatment of hematological diseases. We studied the effect of this compound on six human hematopoietic cell lines (JURL-MK1, K562, CML-T1, Karpas-299, HL-60, and ML-2) as well as on normal human lymphocytes and on leukemic primary cells. SAHA induced dose-dependent and cell type-dependent cell death which displayed apoptotic features (caspase-3 activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation) in most cell types including the normal lymphocytes. At subtoxic concentrations (0.5-1 microM), SAHA increased the cell adhesivity to fibronectin (FN) in all leukemia/lymphoma-derived cell lines but not in normal lymphocytes. This increase was accompanied by an enhanced expression of integrin beta1 and paxillin, an essential constituent of focal adhesion complexes, both at the protein and mRNA level. On the other hand, the inhibition of ROCK protein, an important regulator of cytoskeleton structure, had no consistent effect on SAHA-induced increase in the cell adhesivity. The promotion of cell adhesivity to FN seems to be specific for SAHA as we observed no such effects with other HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A and sodium butyrate).

  20. Tunable Adsorption and Film Formation of Mussel Adhesive Protein by Potential Control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xie, Guoxin; Pan, Jinshan

    2017-01-23

    Mussel adhesive proteins are of great interest in many applications because of their outstanding adhesive property and film-forming ability. Understanding and controlling the film formation and its performance is crucial for the effective use of such proteins. In this study, we focus on the potential controlled film formation and compaction of one mussel adhesive protein, Mefp-1. The adsorption and film-forming behavior of Mefp-1 on a platinum (Pt) substrate under applied potentials were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, potential-controlled electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Moreover, microfriction measurements were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the Mefp-1 films formed at selected potentials. The results led to the conclusion that Mefp-1 adsorbs on the Pt substrate through both electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions and shows an effective blocking effect for the electroactive sites on the substrate. The properties of the adsorbed Mefp-1 film vary with the applied potential, and the compactness of the adsorbed Mefp-1 film can be reversibly tuned by the applied potential.

  1. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  2. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  3. Adhesion-modulating/matricellular ECM protein families: a structural, functional and evolutionary appraisal.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Deane F; Adams, Josephine C

    2012-04-01

    The thrombospondins are a family of secreted, oligomeric glycoproteins that interact with cell surfaces, multiple components of the extracellular matrix, growth factors and proteases. These interactions underlie complex roles in cell interactions and tissue homeostasis in animals. Thrombospondins have been grouped functionally with SPARCs, tenascins and CCN proteins as adhesion-modulating or matricellular components of the extracellular milieu. Although all these multi-domain proteins share various commonalities of domains, the grouping is not based on structural homologies. Instead, the terms emphasise the general observations that these proteins do not form large-scale ECM structures, yet act at cell surfaces and function in coordination with the structural ECM and associated extracellular proteins. The designation of adhesion-modulation thus depends on observed tissue and cell culture ECM distributions and on experimentally identified functional properties. To date, the evolutionary relationships of these proteins have not been critically compared: yet, knowledge of their evolutionary histories is clearly relevant to any consideration of functional similarities. In this article, we survey briefly the structural and functional knowledge of these protein families, consider the evolution of each family, and outline a perspective on their functional roles.

  4. The glue protein of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa): a natural adhesive with some features of collagen.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Hansen, D C; Little, K T

    1989-01-01

    The Atlantic ribbed mussel Geukensia (Modiolus) demissa attaches itself to the roots of cord grass and other hard objects in tidal salt marshes by spinning adhesive byssal threads. The precursor of a protein apparently present in the adhesive plaques of the threads was isolated in quantity from the foot of the mussel. The protein has an apparent molecular weight of 130,000, a pI of 8.1, and contains a high proportion of Gly, Glu/Gln, Lys and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (DOPA). Sequence of tryptic peptides suggests a pattern of repeated motifs, such as: Gly--DOPA--Lys, and X--Gly--DOPA--Y--Z--Gly--DOPA/Tyr--Lys, where X is Thr or Ala in octapeptides and Gln--Thr in nonapeptides. Y is variable, but more often than not hydrophobic; and Z is frequently Pro or 4-trans-hydroxyproline (Hyp). The presence of Pro--Gly and Hyp--Gly sequences of delta-hydroxylysine in the protein is reminiscent of typical collagens; however, the protein is not labile to clostridial collagenase, nor does collagen cross-react with antibodies raised against the mussel protein. Unlike typical collagens, Gly probably occurs only at every 4th or 5th residue in this unusual mussel protein.

  5. Chick neural retina adhesion and survival molecule is a retinol-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, D.; LaCorbiere, M.; Esch, F.

    1986-01-01

    A 20,000-D protein called purpurin has recently been isolated from the growth-conditioned medium of cultured embryonic chick neural retina cells. Purpurin is a constituent of adherons and promotes cell-adheron adhesion by interacting with a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It also prolongs the survival of cultured neural retina cells. This paper shows that purpurin is a secretory protein that has sequence homology with a human protein synthesized in the liver that transports retinol in the blood, the serum retinol-binding protein (RBP). Purpurin binds (/sup 3/H)retinol, and both purpurin and chick serum RBP stimulate the adhesion of neural retina cells, although the serum protein is less active than purpurin. Purpurin and the serum RBP are, however, different molecules, for the serum protein is approx.3.000 D larger than purpurin and has different silver-staining characteristics. Finally, purpurin supports the survival of dissociated ciliary ganglion cells, indicating that RBPs can act as ciliary neurotrophic factors.

  6. Identification of surface proteins involved in the adhesion of a probiotic Bacillus cereus strain to mucin and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, B; Arias, S; Chaignepain, S; Denayrolles, M; Schmitter, J M; Bressollier, P; Urdaci, M C

    2009-05-01

    Several Bacillus strains isolated from commercial probiotic preparations were identified at the species level, and their adhesion capabilities to three different model intestinal surfaces (mucin, Matrigel and Caco-2 cells) were assessed. In general, adhesion of spores was higher than that of vegetative cells to the three matrices, and overall strain Bacillus cereus(CH) displayed the best adhesion. Different biochemical treatments revealed that surface proteins of B. cereus(CH) were involved in the adhesion properties of the strain. Surface-associated proteins from vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus(CH) were extracted and identified, and some proteins such as S-layer components, flagellin and cell-bound proteases were found to bind to mucin or fibronectin. These facts suggest that those proteins might play important roles in the interaction of this probiotic Bacillus strain within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  8. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  9. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  10. In vitro investigation of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on inorganic biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lü, Xiaoying; Jingwu, Ma; Huang, Nan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the surface properties, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion behaviors of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium (Ti) films. The surface energy and microstructures of these films were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A modified Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) protein assay was used to study the amount of adsorbed proteins. Platelet adhesion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AFM results show that the DLC film is smoother than Ti. Protein adsorption results from CBB protein assay show that the ratio of adsorbed albumin (Alb) to IgG ( RA/I) on DLC is larger than Ti, which coincide with the sequence of the ratio of interfacial tension between solid surface and Alb ( γS,Alb) to interfacial tension between surface and IgG ( γS,IgG) ( γS,Alb/ γS,IgG). The DLC film has a preferential adsorption for Alb. The results suggest that the ratio of γS,Alb/ γS,IgG may indicate an Alb/IgG affinity ratio of materials. More platelets adhere on Ti film than on DLC, which may correspond to the surface roughness of materials. The conclusion is the blood compatibility of DLC seems to be better than Ti.

  11. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  12. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential.

  13. Processing of mussel-adhesive protein analog copolymer thin films by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patz, T.; Cristescu, R.; Narayan, R.; Menegazzo, N.; Mizaikoff, B.; Messersmith, P. B.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2005-07-01

    We have demonstrated the successful thin film growth of a mussel-adhesive protein analog, DOPA-modified PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer PF127, using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The MAPLE-deposited thin films were examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact-angle measurements. We have found that the main functional groups of the mussel-adhesive protein analog are present in the transferred film. These adhesive materials have several potential electronic, medical, and marine applications.

  14. A genome-wide screen identifies conserved protein hubs required for cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Toret, Christopher P.; D’Ambrosio, Michael V.; Vale, Ronald D.; Simon, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherins and associated catenins provide an important structural interface between neighboring cells, the actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular signaling pathways in a variety of cell types throughout the Metazoa. However, the full inventory of the proteins and pathways required for cadherin-mediated adhesion has not been established. To this end, we completed a genome-wide (∼14,000 genes) ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) screen that targeted Ca2+-dependent adhesion in DE-cadherin–expressing Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells in suspension culture. This novel screen eliminated Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion, integrin-based adhesion, cell spreading, and cell migration. We identified 17 interconnected regulatory hubs, based on protein functions and protein–protein interactions that regulate the levels of the core cadherin–catenin complex and coordinate cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion. Representative proteins from these hubs were analyzed further in Drosophila oogenesis, using targeted germline RNAi, and adhesion was analyzed in Madin–Darby canine kidney mammalian epithelial cell–cell adhesion. These experiments reveal roles for a diversity of cellular pathways that are required for cadherin function in Metazoa, including cytoskeleton organization, cell–substrate interactions, and nuclear and cytoplasmic signaling. PMID:24446484

  15. Mechanical Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein Through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Botello, Eric; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela L.; Frey, Eric W.; Patel, Jay M.; Nolasco, Leticia; Turner, Nancy A.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical force-induced activation of the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experiences high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force-induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF’s crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates plasma VWF (PVWF) multimers to bind platelets. Here, we showed that a pathological level of high shear stress exposure of PVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of the multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated PVWF multimers are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than nonsheared PVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of PVWF multimers.

  16. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion.

  17. A small fibronectin-mimicking protein from bacteria induces cell spreading and focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hartig, Roland; Delahay, Robin M; Rohde, Manfred; Brandt, Sabine; Conradi, Jens; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Smolka, Adam J; Sewald, Norbert; Backert, Steffen

    2010-07-23

    Fibronectin, a 250-kDa eukaryotic extracellular matrix protein containing an RGD motif plays crucial roles in cell-cell communication, development, tissue homeostasis, and disease development. The highly complex fibrillar fibronectin meshwork orchestrates the functions of other extracellular matrix proteins, promoting cell adhesion, migration, and intracellular signaling. Here, we demonstrate that CagL, a 26-kDa protein of the gastric pathogen and type I carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, mimics fibronectin in various cellular functions. Like fibronectin, CagL contains a RGD motif and is located on the surface of the bacterial type IV secretion pili as previously shown. CagL binds to the integrin receptor alpha(5)beta(1) and mediates the injection of virulence factors into host target cells. We show that purified CagL alone can directly trigger intracellular signaling pathways upon contact with mammalian cells and can complement the spreading defect of fibronectin(-/-) knock-out cells in vitro. During interaction with various human and mouse cell lines, CagL mimics fibronectin in triggering cell spreading, focal adhesion formation, and activation of several tyrosine kinases in an RGD-dependent manner. Among the activated factors are the nonreceptor tyrosine kinases focal adhesion kinase and Src but also the epidermal growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor family member Her3/ErbB3. Interestingly, fibronectin activates a similar range of tyrosine kinases but not Her3/ErbB3. These findings suggest that the bacterial protein CagL not only exhibits functional mimicry with fibronectin but is also capable of activating fibronectin-independent signaling events. We thus postulate that CagL may contribute directly to H. pylori pathogenesis by promoting aberrant signaling cross-talk within host cells.

  18. Redox Capacity of an Extracellular Matrix Protein Associated with Adhesion in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Spahn, Jamie E; Zhou, Hongjun; Gruian, Cristina M; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-05

    Adhesive mussel foot proteins (Mfps) rely in part on DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine) side chains to mediate attachment to mineral surfaces underwater. Oxidation of DOPA to Dopaquinone (Q) effectively abolishes the adsorption of Mfps to these surfaces. The thiol-rich mussel foot protein-6 (Mfp-6) rescues adhesion compromised by adventitious DOPA oxidation by reducing Q back to DOPA. The redox chemistry and kinetics of foot-extracted Mfp-6 were investigated by using a nonspecific chromogenic probe to equilibrate with the redox pool. Foot-extracted Mfp-6 has a reducing capacity of ~17 e(-) per protein; half of this comes from the cysteine residues, whereas the other half comes from other constituents, probably a cohort of four or five nonadhesive, redox-active DOPA residues in Mfp-6 with an anodic peak potential ~500 mV lower than that for oxidation of cysteine to cystine. At higher pH, DOPA redox reversibility is lost possibly due to Q scavenging by Cys thiolates. Analysis by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance identified a pronounced β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core in foot-extracted Mfp-6 protein. The structure endows redox-active side chains in Mfp-6, i.e., cysteine and DOPA, with significant reducing power over a broad pH range, and this power is measurably diminished in recombinant Mfp-6.

  19. Onion yellow phytoplasma P38 protein plays a role in adhesion to the hosts.

    PubMed

    Neriya, Yutaro; Maejima, Kensaku; Nijo, Takamichi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Yusa, Akira; Himeno, Misako; Netsu, Osamu; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2014-12-01

    Adhesins are microbial surface proteins that mediate the adherence of microbial pathogens to host cell surfaces. In Mollicutes, several adhesins have been reported in mycoplasmas and spiroplasmas. Adhesins P40 of Mycoplasma agalactiae and P89 of Spiroplasma citri contain a conserved amino acid sequence known as the Mollicutes adhesin motif (MAM), whose function in the host cell adhesion remains unclear. Here, we show that phytoplasmas, which are plant-pathogenic mollicutes transmitted by insect vectors, possess an adhesion-containing MAM that was identified in a putative membrane protein, PAM289 (P38), of the 'Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris,' OY strain. P38 homologs and their MAMs were highly conserved in related phytoplasma strains. While P38 protein was expressed in OY-infected insect and plant hosts, binding assays showed that P38 interacts with insect extract, and weakly with plant extract. Interestingly, the interaction of P38 with the insect extract depended on MAM. These results suggest that P38 is a phytoplasma adhesin that interacts with the hosts. In addition, the MAM of adhesins is important for the interaction between P38 protein and hosts.

  20. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Modjeski, Kristina L.; Ture, Sara K.; Field, David J.; Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis-associated pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a large scaffolding protein that localizes and organizes interacting proteins in other cells, such as neurons. We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. Western blots confirmed the mass spectrometry findings that GRIP1 interacts with GPIbα, GPIbβ, and 14-3-3. Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. PMID:27631377

  1. Nanometric protein-patch arrays on glass and polydimethylsiloxane for cell adhesion studies.

    PubMed

    Pi, Fuwei; Dillard, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent; Charrier, Anne; Sengupta, Kheya

    2013-07-10

    We present a simple cost-effective benchtop protocol to functionalize glass and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with nanometric protein patches for cell adhesion studies. Evaporation masks, covering macroscopic areas on glass, were made using improved strategies for self-assembly of colloidal microbeads which then served as templates for creating the protein patch arrays via the intermediate steps of organo-aminosilane deposition and polyethylene-glycol grafting. The diameter of the patches could be varied down to about 80 nm. The glass substrates were used for advanced optical imaging of T-lymphocytes to explore adhesion by reflection interference contrast microscopy and the possible colocalization of T-cell receptor microclusters and the activating protein patches by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The selectively functionalized glass could also serve as template for transferring the protein nanopatches to the surface of a soft elastomer. We demonstrated successful reverse contact printing onto the surface of thin layers of PDMS with stiffness ranging from 30 KPa to 3 MPa.

  2. Organization of pp60src and selected cytoskeletal proteins within adhesion plaques and junctions of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The localization of pp60src within adhesion structures of epithelioid rat kidney cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus was compared to the organization of actin, alpha-actinin, vinculin (a 130,000-dalton protein), tubulin, and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein. The adhesion structures included both adhesion plaques and previously uncharacterized adhesive regions formed at cell-cell junctions. We have termed these latter structures "adhesion junctions." Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were identified by interference-reflection microscopy and compared to the location of pp60src and the various cytoskeletal proteins by double fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the src gene product was found within both adhesion plaques and the adhesion junctions. In addition, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were also localized within the same pp60src-containing adhesion structures. In contrast, tubulin and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein were not associated with either adhesion plaques or adhesion junctions. Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were isolated as substratum-bound structures and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed that pp60src, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were organized within specific regions of the adhesion junctions. Heavy accumulations of actin and alpha-actinin were found on both sides of the junctions with a narrow gap of unstained material at the midline, whereas pp60src stain was more intense in this central region. Antibody to vinculin stained double narrow lines defining the periphery of the junctional complexes but was excluded from the intervening region. In addition, the distribution of vinculin relative to pp60src within adhesion plaques suggested an inverse relationship between the presence of these two proteins. Overall, these results establish a close link between the src gene product and components of the

  3. Regulation of cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and Rac-1 by integrin linked kinase.

    PubMed

    Boulter, Etienne; Grall, Dominique; Cagnol, Sébastien; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2006-07-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors of the integrin family initiate changes in cell shape and motility by recruiting signaling components that coordinate these events. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is one such partner of beta1 integrins that participates in dynamic rearrangement of cell-matrix adhesions and cell spreading by mechanisms that are not well understood. To further elucidate the role of ILK in these events, we engineered a chimeric molecule comprising ILK fused to a membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein (ILK-GFP-F). ILK-GFP-F is highly enriched in cell-matrix adhesions, and its expression in fibroblasts leads to an accumulation of focal adhesions (2-5 microm) and elongated adhesions (>5 microm). ILK-GFP-F enhances cell spreading on fibronectin and induces a constitutive increase in the levels of GTP-bound Rac-1. Conversely, ILK knock-down by siRNA transfection decreases active Rac-1. Endogenous ILK was found to associate with PKL (paxillin kinase linker) and the Rac/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor betaPIX. Further, expression of a dominant negative betaPIX mutant reversed the increase in active Rac-1 levels of ILK-GFP-F-expressing cells, thus placing betaPIX in the pathway leading from ILK to Rac-1 activation. However, expression of constitutively active Rac only partially restores the spreading defects of ILK-depleted cells, suggesting that an additional ILK-dependent signal is required for cell spreading.

  4. Proper Control of Caulobacter crescentus Cell Surface Adhesion Requires the General Protein Chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Daniel S.; Crosson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Growth in a surface-attached bacterial community, or biofilm, confers a number of advantages. However, as a biofilm matures, high-density growth imposes stresses on individual cells, and it can become less advantageous for progeny to remain in the community. Thus, bacteria employ a variety of mechanisms to control attachment to and dispersal from surfaces in response to the state of the environment. The freshwater oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus can elaborate a polysaccharide-rich polar organelle, known as the holdfast, which enables permanent surface attachment. Holdfast development is strongly inhibited by the small protein HfiA; mechanisms that control HfiA levels in the cell are not well understood. We have discovered a connection between the essential general protein chaperone, DnaK, and control of C. crescentus holdfast development. C. crescentus mutants partially or completely lacking the C-terminal substrate binding “lid” domain of DnaK exhibit enhanced bulk surface attachment. Partial or complete truncation of the DnaK lid domain increases the probability that any single cell will develop a holdfast by 3- to 10-fold. These results are consistent with the observation that steady-state levels of an HfiA fusion protein are significantly diminished in strains that lack the entire lid domain of DnaK. While dispensable for growth, the lid domain of C. crescentus DnaK is required for proper chaperone function, as evidenced by observed dysregulation of HfiA and holdfast development in strains expressing lidless DnaK mutants. We conclude that DnaK is an important molecular determinant of HfiA stability and surface adhesion control. IMPORTANCE Regulatory control of cell adhesion ensures that bacterial cells can transition between free-living and surface-attached states. We define a role for the essential protein chaperone, DnaK, in the control of Caulobacter crescentus cell adhesion. C. crescentus surface adhesion is mediated by an envelope

  5. Adhesion of Type 1-Fimbriated Escherichia coli to Abiotic Surfaces Leads to Altered Composition of Outer Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Karen; Norbeck, Joakim; Larsson, Thomas; Karlsson, Karl-Anders; Hermansson, Malte

    2001-01-01

    Phenotypic differences between planktonic bacteria and those attached to abiotic surfaces exist, but the mechanisms involved in the adhesion response of bacteria are not well understood. By the use of two-dimensional (2D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have demonstrated that attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces leads to alteration in the composition of outer membrane proteins. A major decrease in the abundance of resolved proteins was observed during adhesion of type 1-fimbriated E. coli strains, which was at least partly caused by proteolysis. Moreover, a study of fimbriated and nonfimbriated mutants revealed that these changes were due mainly to type 1 fimbria-mediated surface contact and that only a few changes occurred in the outer membranes of nonfimbriated mutant strains. Protein synthesis and proteolytic degradation were involved to different extents in adhesion of fimbriated and nonfimbriated cells. While protein synthesis appeared to affect adhesion of only the nonfimbriated strain, proteolytic activity mostly seemed to contribute to adhesion of the fimbriated strain. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, six of the proteins resolved by 2D analysis were identified as BtuB, EF-Tu, OmpA, OmpX, Slp, and TolC. While the first two proteins were unaffected by adhesion, the levels of the last four were moderately to strongly reduced. Based on the present results, it may be suggested that physical interactions between type 1 fimbriae and the surface are part of a surface-sensing mechanism in which protein turnover may contribute to the observed change in composition of outer membrane proteins. This change alters the surface characteristics of the cell envelope and may thus influence adhesion. PMID:11274103

  6. DLC-1, a GTPase-activating protein for Rho, is associated with cell proliferation, morphology, and migration in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tai Young; Lee, Jung Weon; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Jong, Hyun-Soon; Kim, Tae-You; Jung, Mira; Bang, Yung-Jue; E-mail: bangyj@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2007-03-30

    DLC-1 (deleted in liver cancer-1) is a tumor suppressor gene for hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers. To characterize its functions, we constructed recombinant adenovirus encoding the wild-type DLC-1 and examined its effects on behaviors of a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SNU-368), which does not express DLC-1. Here, we found that restoration of DLC-1 expression in the SNU-368 cells caused an inhibition of cell proliferation with an increase of a subG1 population. Furthermore, DLC-1 overexpression induced disassembly of stress fibers and extensive membrane protrusions around cells on laminin-1. DLC-1 overexpression also inhibited cell migration and dephosphorylated focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Cas (p130Cas; Crk-associated substrate), and paxillin. These observations suggest that DLC-1 plays important roles in signal transduction pathway regulating cell proliferation, cell morphology, and cell migration by affecting Rho family GTPases and focal adhesion proteins.

  7. Measurement of adhesive forces between bacteria and protein-coated surfaces using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Kathryn H.; Bowden, Gabriela; Hook, Magnus; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a primary cause of failure in implanted medical devices. Bacteria commonly found in device-related infections, such as S. aureus, have multiple cell surface adhesins which mediate specific adhesion to molecules found in extracellular matrix and blood plasma. Adhesins recognizing fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen, and elastin molecules have been isolated in S. aureus. We have used optical tweezers to measure the adhesive force between a single bacterium and a protein-coated surface. Various concentrations of fibronectin, fibrinogen, or whole plasma were immobilized onto 10-micrometers diameter polystyrene microspheres. We optically trapped a bacterium with a titanium-sapphire laser tuned to 830 nm and contacted the cell with a coated bead. We determined the minimum force necessary to separate the cell and bead. For beads coated with fibronectin and fibrinogen, detachment force values occurred as approximate integer multiples of an estimated single bond detachment force. With plasma-coated beads, only cells lacking the fibrinogen adhesin could be detached; therefore, we believe that either this adhesin is prevalent on wilde-type cells, or it is preferentially adsorbed onto the beads. Additionally, the whole plasma detachment forces appeared random; therefore, we believe that many adhesins participate in boding to plasma.

  8. Influence of preadsorbed milk proteins on adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to hydrophobic and hydrophilic silica surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    al-Makhlafi, H; McGuire, J; Daeschel, M

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-casein for 8 h and beta-lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin for 1 h at silanized silica surfaces of low and high hydrophobicity, followed by incubation in buffer and contact with Listeria monocytogenes, resulted in different numbers of cells adhered per unit of surface area. Adhesion to both surfaces was greatest when beta-lactoglobulin was present and was lowest when bovine serum albumin was present. Preadsorption of alpha-lactalbumin and beta-casein showed an intermediate effect on cell adhesion. Adsorption of beta-lactoglobulin for 1 h resulted in a generally lower number of cells adhered compared with the 8-h adsorption time, while the opposite result was observed with respect to bovine serum albumin. The adhesion data were explainable in terms of the relative rates of arrival to the surface and postadsorptive conformational change among the proteins, in addition to the extent of surface coverage in each case. PMID:7986033

  9. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  10. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  11. Serum protein layers on parylene-C and silicon oxide: effect on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Ouberai, Myriam M; Coffey, Paul D; Swann, Marcus J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Welland, Mark E

    2015-02-01

    Among the range of materials used in bioengineering, parylene-C has been used in combination with silicon oxide and in presence of the serum proteins, in cell patterning. However, the structural properties of adsorbed serum proteins on these substrates still remain elusive. In this study, we use an optical biosensing technique to decipher the properties of fibronectin (Fn) and serum albumin adsorbed on parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates. Our results show the formation of layers with distinct structural and adhesive properties. Thin, dense layers are formed on parylene-C, whereas thicker, more diffuse layers are formed on silicon oxide. These results suggest that Fn acquires a compact structure on parylene-C and a more extended structure on silicon oxide. Nonetheless, parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates coated with Fn host cell populations that exhibit focal adhesion complexes and good cell attachment. Albumin adopts a deformed structure on parylene-C and a globular structure on silicon oxide, and does not support significant cell attachment on either surface. Interestingly, the co-incubation of Fn and albumin at the ratio found in serum, results in the preferential adsorption of albumin on parylene-C and Fn on silicon oxide. This finding is supported by the exclusive formation of focal adhesion complexes in differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (CGR8), cultured on Fn/albumin coated silicon oxide, but not on parylene-C. The detailed information provided in this study on the distinct properties of layers of serum proteins on substrates such as parylene-C and silicon oxide is highly significant in developing methods for cell patterning.

  12. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurotobi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M.

    2003-05-01

    He + ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 × 10 13, 1 × 10 15 and 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was inhibited with fluences of 1 × 10 13, 1 × 10 15 and 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He + ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2. On the 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface.

  13. Sticky Situation: An Investigation of Robust Aqueous-Based Recombinant Spider Silk Protein Coatings and Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thomas I; Gaztambide, Danielle A; Day, Breton A; Brock, Cameron L; Ruben, Ashley L; Jones, Justin A; Lewis, Randolph V

    2016-11-14

    The mechanical properties and biocompatibility of spider silks have made them one of the most sought after and studied natural biomaterials. A biomimetic process has been developed that uses water to solvate purified recombinant spider silk proteins (rSSps) prior to material formation. The absence of harsh organic solvents increases cost effectiveness, safety, and decreases the environmental impact of these materials. This development allows for the investigation of aqueous-based rSSps as coatings and adhesives and their potential applications. In these studies it was determined that fiber-based rSSps in nonfiber formations have the capability to coat and adhere numerous substrates, whether rough, smooth, hydrophobic, or hydrophilic. Further, these materials can be functionalized for a variety of processes. Drug-eluting coatings have been made with the capacity to release a variety of compounds in addition to their inherent ability to prevent blood clotting and biofouling. Additionally, spider silk protein adhesives are strong enough to outperform some conventional glues and still display favorable tissue implantation properties. The physical properties, corresponding capabilities, and potential applications of these nonfibrous materials were characterized in this study. Mechanical properties, ease of manufacturing, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and functionality are the hallmarks of these revolutionary spider silk protein materials.

  14. Amigo Adhesion Protein Regulates Development of Neural Circuits in Zebrafish Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Aho, Vilma; Peltola, Marjaana A.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti; Rauvala, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    The Amigo protein family consists of three transmembrane proteins characterized by six leucine-rich repeat domains and one immunoglobulin-like domain in their extracellular moieties. Previous in vitro studies have suggested a role as homophilic adhesion molecules in brain neurons, but the in vivo functions remain unknown. Here we have cloned all three zebrafish amigos and show that amigo1 is the predominant family member expressed during nervous system development in zebrafish. Knockdown of amigo1 expression using morpholino oligonucleotides impairs the formation of fasciculated tracts in early fiber scaffolds of brain. A similar defect in fiber tract development is caused by mRNA-mediated expression of the Amigo1 ectodomain that inhibits adhesion mediated by the full-length protein. Analysis of differentiated neural circuits reveals defects in the catecholaminergic system. At the behavioral level, the disturbed formation of neural circuitry is reflected in enhanced locomotor activity and in the inability of the larvae to perform normal escape responses. We suggest that Amigo1 is essential for the development of neural circuits of zebrafish, where its mechanism involves homophilic interactions within the developing fiber tracts and regulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel to form functional neural circuitry that controls locomotion. PMID:24904058

  15. Amigo adhesion protein regulates development of neural circuits in zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Aho, Vilma; Peltola, Marjaana A; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti; Rauvala, Heikki

    2014-07-18

    The Amigo protein family consists of three transmembrane proteins characterized by six leucine-rich repeat domains and one immunoglobulin-like domain in their extracellular moieties. Previous in vitro studies have suggested a role as homophilic adhesion molecules in brain neurons, but the in vivo functions remain unknown. Here we have cloned all three zebrafish amigos and show that amigo1 is the predominant family member expressed during nervous system development in zebrafish. Knockdown of amigo1 expression using morpholino oligonucleotides impairs the formation of fasciculated tracts in early fiber scaffolds of brain. A similar defect in fiber tract development is caused by mRNA-mediated expression of the Amigo1 ectodomain that inhibits adhesion mediated by the full-length protein. Analysis of differentiated neural circuits reveals defects in the catecholaminergic system. At the behavioral level, the disturbed formation of neural circuitry is reflected in enhanced locomotor activity and in the inability of the larvae to perform normal escape responses. We suggest that Amigo1 is essential for the development of neural circuits of zebrafish, where its mechanism involves homophilic interactions within the developing fiber tracts and regulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel to form functional neural circuitry that controls locomotion.

  16. Adhesion of Candida albicans to various dental implant surfaces and the influence of salivary pellicle proteins.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Hahnel, Sebastian; Reichert, Torsten E; Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Gerlach, Till; Handel, Gerhard; Gosau, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Dental implants may be considered a potential reservoir for (re)infection with oral Candida albicans. Our aim was to evaluate initial fungal adhesion to three differentially textured titanium and one zirconia implant surface, and to correlate these findings to differences in specific surface characteristics (surface roughness (R(a)) and surface free energy (SFE)). Additionally, we investigated the influence of salivary protein films and two pellicle proteins (mucin and albumin). Implant surfaces were characterized by perthometer (R(a)) and goniometer (SFE) measurements. Implant specimens were rinsed with human whole saliva, mucin, albumin, or phosphate buffered saline and incubated in C. albicans suspension for 2.5h. Adherent fungi were quantified by means of a bioluminometric assay. The lowest amount of fungal cells was found on sand-blasted titanium, whereas zirconia implants did not show any reduced potential to adhere C. albicans. The influence of the implant SFE on fungal biofilm formation appears to be more important than the influence of R(a). The protein mucin enhanced C. albicans accumulation. In contrast, albumin is unlikely to be involved in the adhesion process of C. albicans.

  17. The effect of surface microtopography of poly(dimethylsiloxane) on protein adsorption, platelet and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Song, Wei; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Zhongkui; Huang, He; Zhang, Junhu; Lin, Quan; Yang, Bai

    2009-07-01

    Chemical homogeneous poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surface with dot-like protrusion pattern was used to investigate the individual effect of surface microtopography on protein adsorption and subsequent biological responses. Fibrinogen (Fg) and fibronectin (Fn) were chosen as model proteins due to their effect on platelet and cell adhesion, respectively. Fg labeled with (125)I and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to study its adsorption on flat and patterned surfaces. Patterned surface has a 46% increase in the adsorption of Fg when compared with flat surface. However, the surface area of the patterned surface was only 8% larger than that of the flat surface. Therefore, the increase in the surface area was not the only factor responsible for the increase in protein adsorption. Clear fluorescent pattern was visualized on patterned surface, indicating that adsorbed Fg regularly distributed and adsorbed most on the flanks and valleys of the protrusions. Such distribution and local enrichment of Fg presumably caused the specific location of platelets adhered from platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and flowing whole blood (FWB) on patterned surface. Furthermore, the different combination of surface topography and pre-adsorbed Fn could influence the adhesion of L929 cells. The flat surface with pre-adsorbed Fn was the optimum substrate while the virgin patterned surface was the poor substrate in terms of L929 cells spread.

  18. The effects of cell adhesion on the growth and protein productivity of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, K; Fujiki, T; Kojima, H; Iijima, S

    2000-07-01

    We investigated the effect of cell adhesion on cellgrowth and productivity of recombinant protein inChinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cells cultured innormal tissue culture dishes attached to the dishsurfaces and grew as a monolayer, while cells culturedin non-treated dishes proliferated in suspension assingle cells without adhering to the dish surfaces. On an agarose-coated dish surface, cell aggregatesformed without attaching to the dish. Growth rates inboth suspension cultures were slightly lower thanthose in monolayer culture. Cell cycle analysisindicated that the duration of the G(1) phase insuspension cultures was longer than that in monolayerculture, suggesting that attachment to the substratummainly affected the transition from the G(1) to theS phase. Consistent with this, CDK inhibitor p27,that inhibits the G(1)S transition, was induced inthe cells cultured in suspension.To assess the productivity of recombinant proteins,CHO cells were transfected with a plasmid containingmurine interferon gamma (mIFN-gamma) under thecontrol of the cytomegalovirus promoter. Insuspension culture, mIFN-gamma productivity wasslightly lower than that in the monolayer culture. When protein kinase C was activated by phorbol ester,mIFN-gamma production was enhanced in both themonolayer and suspension cultures. However, theproductivity in the suspension culture was lower thanthat in the adherent culture even in the presence ofhigh concentrations of phorbol ester. These resultssuggested that cell adhesion to the substratum affectsvarious features of CHO cells.

  19. Quantum dots as bio-labels for the localization of a small plant adhesion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, Sathyajith; Kim, Sunran; Martin, Rebecca; Lord, Elizabeth M.; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, semiconducting nanoparticles have been successfully applied in live mammalian cell cultures, as alternative biological labels for multicolour imaging, by verifying known physiological processes. Here, we report the application of semiconducting nanoparticles to live plant cells in culture. Utilizing this technique, we have uncovered new knowledge regarding the localization of a plant pollen tube adhesion protein, stigma/stylar cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA). The potential of these nanoparticles is evident when the results were compared with conventional immunolocalization methods using fluorescently labelled antibodies.

  20. Smooth muscle length-dependent PI(4,5)P2 synthesis and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sul, D; Baron, C B; Broome, R; Coburn, R F

    2001-07-01

    We studied effects of increasing the length of porcine trachealis muscle on 5.5 microM carbachol (CCh)-evoked phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] synthesis and other parameters of phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover. PI(4,5)P2 resynthesis rates in muscle held at 1.0 optimal length (L(o)), measured over the first 6 min of CCh stimulation, were 140 +/- 12 and 227 +/- 14% of values found in muscle held at 0.5 L(o) and in free-floating muscle, respectively. Time-dependent changes in cellular masses of PI(4,5)P2, PI, and phosphatidic acid, and PI resynthesis rates, were also altered by the muscle length at which contraction occurred. In free-floating muscle, CCh did not evoke increases in tyrosine-phosphorylated paxillin (PTyr-paxillin), an index of beta1-integrin signaling; however, there were progressive increases in PTyr-paxillin in muscle held at 0.5 and 1.0 L(o) during contraction, which correlated with increases in PI(4,5)P2 synthesis rates. These data indicate that PI(4,5)P2 synthesis rates and other parameters of CCh-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover are muscle length-dependent and provide evidence that supports the hypothesis that length-dependent beta1-integrin signals may exert control on CCh-activated PI(4,5)P2 synthesis.

  1. Parallel Control over Surface Charge and Wettability Using Polyelectrolyte Architecture: Effect on Protein Adsorption and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanshan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Li, Min; Shi, Liya; Ong, June Lay Ting; Jańczewski, Dominik; Neoh, Koon Gee

    2016-11-09

    Surface charge and wettability, the two prominent physical factors governing protein adsorption and cell adhesion, have been extensively investigated in the literature. However, a comparison between these driving forces in terms of their independent and cooperative effects in affecting adhesion is rarely explored on a systematic and quantitative level. Herein, we formulate a protocol that features two-dimensional control over both surface charge and wettability with limited cross-parameter influence. This strategy is implemented by controlling both the polyion charge density in the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly process and the polyion side-chain chemical structures. The 2D property matrix spans surface isoelectric points ranging from 5 to 9 and water contact angles from 35 to 70°, with other interferential factors (e.g., roughness) eliminated. The interplay between these two surface variables influences protein (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme) adsorption and 3T3 fibroblast cell adhesion. For proteins, we observe the presence of thresholds for surface wettability and electrostatic driving forces necessary to affect adhesion. Beyond these thresholds, the individual effects of electrostatic forces and wettability are observed. For fibroblast, both surface charge and wettability have an effect on its adhesion. The combined effects of positive charge and hydrophilicity lead to the highest cell adhesion, whereas negative charge and hydrophobicity lead to the lowest cell adhesion. Our design strategy can potentially form the basis for studying the distinct behaviors of electrostatic force or wettability driven interfacial phenomena and serve as a reference in future studies assessing protein adsorption and cell adhesion to surfaces with known charge and wettability within the property range studied here.

  2. Amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) exhibits stronger zinc-dependent neuronal adhesion than amyloid precursor protein and APLP2.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Magnus C; Schauenburg, Linda; Thompson-Steckel, Greta; Dunsing, Valentin; Kaden, Daniela; Voigt, Philipp; Schaefer, Michael; Chiantia, Salvatore; Kennedy, Timothy E; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its paralogs, amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APLP2, are metalloproteins with a putative role both in synaptogenesis and in maintaining synapse structure. Here, we studied the effect of zinc on membrane localization, adhesion, and secretase cleavage of APP, APLP1, and APLP2 in cell culture and rat neurons. For this, we employed live-cell microscopy techniques, a microcontact printing adhesion assay and ELISA for protein detection in cell culture supernatants. We report that zinc induces the multimerization of proteins of the amyloid precursor protein family and enriches them at cellular adhesion sites. Thus, zinc facilitates the formation of de novo APP and APLP1 containing adhesion complexes, whereas it does not have such influence on APLP2. Furthermore, zinc-binding prevented cleavage of APP and APLPs by extracellular secretases. In conclusion, the complexation of zinc modulates neuronal functions of APP and APLPs by (i) regulating formation of adhesion complexes, most prominently for APLP1, and (ii) by reducing the concentrations of neurotrophic soluble APP/APLP ectodomains. Earlier studies suggest a function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family proteins in neuronal adhesion. We report here that adhesive function of these proteins is tightly regulated by zinc, most prominently for amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1). Zinc-mediated APLP1 multimerization, which induced formation of new neuronal contacts and decreased APLP1 shedding. This suggests that APLP1 could function as a zinc receptor processing zinc signals to stabilized or new neuronal contacts.

  3. In vivo post-translational modifications of recombinant mussel adhesive protein in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Kim, Kyoung Ro; Choi, Yoo Seong; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Hwang, Daehee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2011-01-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) have been suggested as promising bioadhesives for diverse application fields, including medical uses. Previously, we successfully constructed and produced a new type of functional recombinant MAP, fp-151, in a prokaryotic Escherichia coli expression system. Even though the E. coli-derived MAP showed several excellent features, such as high production yield and efficient purification, in vitro enzymatic modification is required to convert tyrosine residues to l-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl alanine (dopa) molecules for its adhesive ability, due to the intrinsic inability of E. coli to undergo post-translational modification. In this work, we produced a soluble recombinant MAP in insect Sf9 cells, which are widely used as an effective and convenient eukaryotic expression system for eukaryotic foreign proteins. Importantly, we found that insect-derived MAP contained converted dopa residues by in vivo post-translational modification. In addition, insect-derived MAP also had other post-translational modifications including phosphorylation of serine and hydroxylation of proline that originally occurred in some natural MAPs. To our knowledge, this is the first report on in vivo post-translational modifications of MAP containing dopa and other modified amino acid residues.

  4. Adhesive surface proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bind to polystyrene, fibronectin, and type I and IV collagens.

    PubMed

    Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Osaki, Makoto; Kabeya, Hidenori; Maruyama, Soichi; Mikami, Takeshi; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2003-05-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a gram-positive bacterium that causes erysipelas in animals and erysipeloid in humans. We found two adhesive surface proteins of E. rhusiopathiae and determined the nucleotide sequences of the genes, which were colocalized and designated rspA and rspB. The two genes were present in all of the serovars of E. rhusiopathiae strains examined. The deduced RspA and RspB proteins contain the C-terminal anchoring motif, LPXTG, which is preceded by repeats of consensus amino acid sequences. The consensus sequences are composed of 78 to 92 amino acids and repeat 16 and 3 times in RspA and RspB, respectively. Adhesive surface proteins of other gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes adhesin-like protein, Streptococcus pyogenes protein F2 and F2-like protein, Streptococcus dysgalactiae FnBB, and Staphylococcus aureus Cna, share the same consensus repeats. Furthermore, the N-terminal regions of RspA and RspB showed characteristics of the collagen-binding domain that was described for Cna. RspA and RspB were expressed in Escherichia coli as histidine-tagged fusion proteins and purified. The recombinant proteins showed a high degree of capacity to bind to polystyrene and inhibited the binding of E. rhusiopathiae onto the abiotic surface in a dose dependent manner. In a solid-phase binding assay, both of the recombinant proteins bound to fibronectin, type I and IV collagens, indicating broad spectrum of their binding ability. It was suggested that both RspA and RspB were exposed on the cell surface of E. rhusiopathiae, as were the bacterial cells agglutinated by the anti-RspA immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-RspB IgG. RspA and RspB were present both in surface-antigen extracts and the culture supernatants of E. rhusiopathiae Fujisawa-SmR (serovar 1a) and SE-9 (serovar 2). The recombinant RspA, but not RspB, elicited protection in mice against experimental challenge. These results suggest that RspA and RspB participate in initiation

  5. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives. PMID:27217558

  6. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  7. Tethered agonists: a new mechanism underlying adhesion G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, Torsten; Liebscher, Ines; Luo, Rong; Monk, Kelly R; Piao, Xianhua

    2015-06-01

    The family of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) comprises 33 members in the human genome, which are subdivided into nine subclasses. Many aGPCRs undergo an autoproteolytic process via their GPCR Autoproteolysis-INducing (GAIN) domain during protein maturation to generate an N- and a C-terminal fragments, NTF and CTF, respectively. The NTF and CTF are non-covalently reassociated on the plasma membrane to form a single receptor unit. How aGPCRs are activated upon ligand binding remains one of the leading questions in the field of aGPCR research. Recent work from our labs and others shows that ligand binding can remove the NTF from the plasma membrane-bound CTF, exposing a tethered agonist which potently activates downstream signaling.

  8. A standardized bamboo leaf extract inhibits monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by modulating vascular cell adhesion protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunga; Park, Myoung Soo; Lee, Yu Ran; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Tae Woo; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Dong Seon

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo leaves (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel ex J. Houz (Poacea)) have a long history of food and medical applications in Asia, including Japan and Korea. They have been used as a traditional medicine for centuries. We investigated the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of a bamboo leaf extract (BLE) on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced monocyte adhesion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to BLE did not inhibit cell viability or cause morphological changes at concentrations ranging from 1 µg/ml to 1 mg/ml. Treatment with 0.1 mg/ml BLE caused 63% inhibition of monocyte adhesion in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, which was associated with 38.4% suppression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species generation was decreased to 47.9% in BLE treated TNF-α-activated HUVECs. BLE (0.05 mg/ml) also caused about 50% inhibition of interleukin-6 secretion from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocyte. The results indicate that BLE may be clinically useful as an anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant for human cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. PMID:23422838

  9. Spatiotemporal segregation of endothelial cell integrin and nonintegrin extracellular matrix-binding proteins during adhesion events

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) attachments to laminin, fibronectin, and fibrinogen are inhibited by soluble arginine-glycine- aspartate (RGD)-containing peptides, and YGRGDSP activity is responsive to titration of either soluble peptide or matrix protein. To assess the presence of RGD-dependent receptors, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting studies were conducted and demonstrated integrin beta 1, beta 3, and associated alpha subunits as well as a beta 1 precursor. Immunofluorescence of BAECs plated on laminin, fibronectin, and fibrinogen reveals different matrix-binding specificities of each of these integrin subclasses. By 1 h after plating, organization of beta 1 integrin into fibrillar streaks is influenced by laminin and fibronectin, whereas beta 3 integrin punctate organization is influenced by fibrinogen and the integrin spatial distribution changes with time in culture. In contrast, the nonintegrin laminin-binding protein LB69 only organizes after cell-substrate contact is well established several hours after plating. Migration of BAECs is also mediated by both integrin and nonintegrin matrix-binding proteins. Specifically, BAEC migration on laminin is remarkably sensitive to RGD peptide inhibition, and, in its presence, beta 1 integrin organization dissipates and reorganizes into perinuclear vesicles. However, RGD peptides do not alter LB69 linear organization during migration. Similarly, agents that block LB69--e.g., antibodies to LB69 as well as YIGSR-NH2 peptide--do not inhibit attachment of nonmotile BAECs to laminin. However, both anti-LB69 and YIGSR-NH2 inhibit late adhesive events such as spreading. Accordingly, we propose that integrin and nonintegrin extracellular matrix-binding protein organizations in BAECs are both temporally and spatially segregated during attachment processes. High affinity nonintegrin interaction with matrix may create necessary stable contacts for longterm attachment, while lower affinity integrins may be important

  10. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  11. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  12. Protein Kinase D1 regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell adhesion through Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-l γ

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Nisha; Bastea, Ligia I.; Long, Jason; Döppler, Heike; Ling, Kun; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are highly dynamic structures that are assembled and disassembled on a continuous basis. The balance between the two processes mediates various aspects of cell behavior, ranging from cell adhesion and spreading to directed cell migration. The turnover of FAs is regulated at multiple levels and involves a variety of signaling molecules and adaptor proteins. In the present study, we show that in response to integrin engagement, a subcellular pool of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) localizes to the FAs. PKD1 affects FAs by decreasing turnover and promoting maturation, resulting in enhanced cell adhesion. The effects of PKD1 are mediated through direct phosphorylation of FA-localized phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-l γ (PIP5Klγ) at serine residue 448. This phosphorylation occurs in response to Fibronectin-RhoA signaling and leads to a decrease in PIP5Klγs’ lipid kinase activity and binding affinity for Talin. Our data reveal a novel function for PKD1 as a regulator of FA dynamics and by identifying PIP5Klγ as a novel PKD1 substrate provide mechanistic insight into this process. PMID:27775029

  13. Protein Kinase D1 regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell adhesion through Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-l γ.

    PubMed

    Durand, Nisha; Bastea, Ligia I; Long, Jason; Döppler, Heike; Ling, Kun; Storz, Peter

    2016-10-24

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are highly dynamic structures that are assembled and disassembled on a continuous basis. The balance between the two processes mediates various aspects of cell behavior, ranging from cell adhesion and spreading to directed cell migration. The turnover of FAs is regulated at multiple levels and involves a variety of signaling molecules and adaptor proteins. In the present study, we show that in response to integrin engagement, a subcellular pool of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) localizes to the FAs. PKD1 affects FAs by decreasing turnover and promoting maturation, resulting in enhanced cell adhesion. The effects of PKD1 are mediated through direct phosphorylation of FA-localized phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-l γ (PIP5Klγ) at serine residue 448. This phosphorylation occurs in response to Fibronectin-RhoA signaling and leads to a decrease in PIP5Klγs' lipid kinase activity and binding affinity for Talin. Our data reveal a novel function for PKD1 as a regulator of FA dynamics and by identifying PIP5Klγ as a novel PKD1 substrate provide mechanistic insight into this process.

  14. Major Membrane Protein TDE2508 Regulates Adhesive Potency in Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Yuki; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation and genetic manipulation of Treponema denticola, a Gram-negative oral spirochaeta associated with periodontal diseases, is still challenging. In this study, we formulated a simple medium based on a commercially available one, and established a transformation method with high efficiency. We then analyzed proteins in a membrane fraction in T. denticola and identified 16 major membrane-associated proteins, and characterized one of them, TDE2508, whose biological function was not yet known. Although this protein, which exhibited a complex conformation, was presumably localized in the outer membrane, we did not find conclusive evidence that it was exposed on the cell surface. Intriguingly, a TDE2508-deficient mutant exhibited significantly increased biofilm formation and adherent activity on human gingival epithelial cells. However, the protein deficiency did not alter autoaggregation, coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis, hemagglutination, cell surface hydrophobicity, motility, or expression of Msp which was reported to be an adherent molecule in this bacteria. In conclusion, the major membrane protein TDE2508 regulates biofilm formation and the adhesive potency of T. denticola, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PMID:24586498

  15. Recombinant mussel adhesive protein fp-5 (MAP fp-5) as a bulk bioadhesive and surface coating material.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Lim, Seonghye; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Chang Sup; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2011-08-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) attach to all types of inorganic and organic surfaces, even in wet environments. MAP of type 5 (fp-5), in particular, has been considered as a key adhesive material. However, the low availability of fp-5 has hampered its biochemical characterization and practical applications. Here, soluble recombinant fp-5 is mass-produced in Escherichia coli. Tyrosinase-modified recombinant fp-5 showed ∼1.11 MPa adhesive shear strength, which is the first report of a bulk-scale adhesive force measurement for purified recombinant of natural MAP type. Surface coatings were also performed through simple dip-coating of various objects. In addition, complex coacervate using recombinant fp-5 and hyaluronic acid was prepared as an efficient adhesive formulation, which greatly improved the bulk adhesive strength. Collectively, it is expected that this work will enhance basic understanding of mussel adhesion and that recombinant fp-5 can be successfully used as a realistic bulk-scale bioadhesive and an efficient surface coating material.

  16. Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption on silicone rubber surface by ozone-induced grafted polymerization with carboxybetaine monomer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Yuan, Jiang; Zang, Xiaopeng; Shen, Jian; Lin, Sicong

    2005-03-10

    Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption on the silicone rubber film grafted with N,N'-dimethyl-N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N-(2-carboxyethyl) ammonium (DMMCA) was studied. The grafting was carried out by means of ozone-induced method and was confirmed by ATR-FTIR and XPS investigations. The grafted films possessed relatively hydrophilic surface revealed by contact angle measurement. The blood compatibility of the grafted film was evaluated in vitro by platelet adhesion in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and protein absorption in bovine fibrinogen (BFG) using silicone film as the reference. No substantial platelet adhesion was observed for the grafted films incubated in PRP for 60 and 180 min. The protein absorption was also significantly reduced after incubated in bovine fibrinogen for 60 min. Both the results indicated that the blood compatibility of silicone rubber was greatly improved by ozone-induced grafting of carboxybetaine zwitterionic polymer onto its surface.

  17. The phosphatase PTP-PEST/PTPN12 regulates endothelial cell migration and adhesion, but not permeability, and controls vascular development and embryonic viability.

    PubMed

    Souza, Cleiton Martins; Davidson, Dominique; Rhee, Inmoo; Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Davis, Elaine C; Veillette, André

    2012-12-14

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST (PTPN12) is ubiquitously expressed. It is essential for normal embryonic development and embryonic viability in mice. Herein we addressed the involvement of PTP-PEST in endothelial cell functions using a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches. By generating primary endothelial cells from an inducible PTP-PEST-deficient mouse, we found that PTP-PEST is not needed for endothelial cell differentiation and proliferation or for the control of endothelial cell permeability. Nevertheless, it is required for integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of endothelial cells. PTP-PEST-deficient endothelial cells displayed increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas, paxillin, and Pyk2, which were previously also implicated in integrin functions. By eliminating PTP-PEST in endothelial cells in vivo, we obtained evidence that expression of PTP-PEST in endothelial cells is required for normal vascular development and embryonic viability. Therefore, PTP-PEST is a key regulator of integrin-mediated functions in endothelial cells seemingly through its capacity to control Cas, paxillin, and Pyk2. This function explains at least in part the essential role of PTP-PEST in embryonic development and viability.

  18. Activation of cyclic amp/protein kinase: a signaling pathway enhances osteoblast cell adhesion on biomaterials for regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Ashe, Keshia M; Kan, Ho Man; Lee, Duron A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2011-04-01

    Osteoblast cell adhesion on biomaterials is an important goal for implants to be useful in bone regeneration technologies. The adhesion of osteoblastic cells to biomaterials has been investigated in the field of bone regenerative engineering. Previous work from our group demonstrated that osteoblastic cells adhering to biodegradable biomaterials require the expression of integrins on the cell surface. However, the underlying molecular signaling mechanism is still not fully clear. We report here that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a small signaling molecule, regulates osteoblast cell adhesion to biomaterial surfaces. We used an in vitro cell adhesion assay to demonstrate that at 0.1 mM, 8-Br-cAMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog, significantly enhances osteoblast-like cells' (MC3T3-E1) adherence to biomaterials. Moreover, we demonstrate that a commonly used cAMP-elevating agent, forskolin, promotes cell adhesion similar to that of the cell permeable cAMP analog. By using different target-specific cAMP analogs: 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP which specifically activates exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), and 6-Bnz-cAMP which specifically activates protein kinase A (PKA), we observed that the PKA signaling pathway plays a dominant role in this process. Thus, this report suggests a new method to enhance osteoblast cell adhesion on biodegradable biomaterials for bone regenerative engineering applications.

  19. The involvement of an integrin-like protein and protein kinase C in amoebic adhesion to fibronectin and amoebic cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Lee; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Myeong Heon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Im, Kyung-Il; Park, Soon-Jung

    2004-09-01

    Adherence of a pathogen to the host cell is one of the critical steps in microbial infections. Naegleria fowleri, a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans, is expected to interact with extracellular components of the host, such as fibronectin, in a receptor-mediated mode. In this study, we investigated the interaction between N. fowleri and fibronectin to understand its cytopathology. In binding assays using immobilized fibronectin, the number of amoebae bound to fibronectin was increased compared to the controls, and was dependent on the amount of coated fibronectin present. A fibronectin binding protein of 60 kDa was found in extracts of N. fowleri. Western blot and immunolocalization assays using integrin alpha(5)/FnR antibodies showed that a 60 kDa protein reacted with the antibodies in extracts of N. fowleri, which was localized on the surface of N. fowleri. Preincubation of N. fowleri with the integrin antibodies significantly inhibited amoebic binding to fibronectin and cytotoxicity to the CHO cells. Additionally, protein kinase C activity was detected in the extract of N. fowleri. When N. fowleri was pretreated with protein kinase C activator or inhibitor, the abilities of amoebic adhesion to fibronectin and cytotoxicity to the host cells were markedly affected compared to untreated amoebae. These results suggest that an amoebic integrin-like receptor and protein kinase C play important roles in amoebic cellular processes in response to fibronectin.

  20. Unraveling the Role of Surface Mucus-Binding Protein and Pili in Muco-Adhesion of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Duviau, Marie-Pierre; Meyrand, Mickael; Guérardel, Yann; Castelain, Mickaël; Loubière, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Dague, Etienne; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria to mucus may favor their persistence within the gut and their beneficial effects to the host. Interactions between pig gastric mucin (PGM) and a natural isolate of Lactococcus lactis (TIL448) were measured at the single-cell scale and under static conditions, using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In parallel, these interactions were monitored at the bacterial population level and under shear flow. AFM experiments with a L. lactis cell-probe and a PGM-coated surface revealed a high proportion of specific adhesive events (60%) and a low level of non-adhesive ones (2%). The strain muco-adhesive properties were confirmed by the weak detachment of bacteria from the PGM-coated surface under shear flow. In AFM, rupture events were detected at short (100−200 nm) and long distances (up to 600−800 nm). AFM measurements on pili and mucus-binding protein defective mutants demonstrated the comparable role played by these two surface proteinaceous components in adhesion to PGM under static conditions. Under shear flow, a more important contribution of the mucus-binding protein than the pili one was observed. Both methods differ by the way of probing the adhesion force, i.e. negative force contact vs. sedimentation and normal-to-substratum retraction vs. tangential detachment conditions, using AFM and flow chamber, respectively. AFM blocking assays with free PGM or O-glycan fractions purified from PGM demonstrated that neutral oligosaccharides played a major role in adhesion of L. lactis TIL448 to PGM. This study dissects L. lactis muco-adhesive phenotype, in relation with the nature of the bacterial surface determinants. PMID:24260308

  1. Leukocyte trafficking-associated vascular adhesion protein 1 is expressed and functionally active in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Silvola, Johanna M. U.; Virtanen, Helena; Siitonen, Riikka; Hellberg, Sanna; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Metsälä, Olli; Ståhle, Mia; Saanijoki, Tiina; Käkelä, Meeri; Hakovirta, Harri; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Saukko, Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Veres, Tibor Z.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Knuuti, Juhani; Saraste, Antti; Roivainen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Given the important role of inflammation and the potential association of the leukocyte trafficking-associated adhesion molecule vascular adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1) with atherosclerosis, this study examined whether functional VAP-1 is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and, if so, whether it could be targeted by positron emission tomography (PET). First, immunohistochemistry revealed that VAP-1 localized to endothelial cells of intra-plaque neovessels in human carotid endarterectomy samples from patients with recent ischemic symptoms. In low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice expressing only apolipoprotein B100 (LDLR−/−ApoB100/100), VAP-1 was expressed on endothelial cells lining inflamed atherosclerotic lesions; normal vessel walls in aortas of C57BL/6N control mice were VAP-1-negative. Second, we discovered that the focal uptake of VAP-1 targeting sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 based PET tracer [68Ga]DOTA-Siglec-9 in atherosclerotic plaques was associated with the density of activated macrophages (r = 0.58, P = 0.022). As a final point, we found that the inhibition of VAP-1 activity with small molecule LJP1586 decreased the density of macrophages in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques in mice. Our results suggest for the first time VAP-1 as a potential imaging target for inflamed atherosclerotic plaques, and corroborate VAP-1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27731409

  2. Preliminary studies of the effects of vascular adhesion protein-1 inhibitors on experimental corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Enzsöly, Anna; Dunkel, Petra; Récsán, Zsuzsa; Gyorffy, Hajnalka; Tóth, Jeanette; Marics, Gábor; Bori, Zoltán; Tóth, Miklós; Zelkó, Romána; Di Paolo, Maria Luisa; Mátyus, Péter; Németh, János

    2011-07-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) controls the adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells and is upregulated at sites of inflammation. Moreover, it expresses amine oxidase activity, due to the sequence identity with semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase. Recent studies indicate a significant role for VAP-1 in neovascularization, besides its contribution to inflammation. Pathological blood vessel development in severe ocular diseases (such as diabetes, age-related macula degeneration, trauma and infections) might lead to decreased visual acuity and finally to blindness, yet there is no clear consensus as to its appropriate treatment. In the present case study, the effects of two VAP-1 inhibitors on experimentally induced corneal neovascularization in rabbits were compared with the effects of a known inhibitor of angiogenesis, bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody. In accordance with recent literature data, the results of the preliminary study reported here indicate that the administration of VAP-1 inhibitors is a potentially valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of corneal neovascularization.

  3. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  4. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  5. Adhesion of mussel foot protein-3 to TiO2 surfaces: the effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Menyo, Matthew S; Masic, Admir; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-04-08

    The underwater adhesion of marine mussels relies on mussel foot proteins (mfps) rich in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa). As a side chain, Dopa is capable of strong bidentate interactions with a variety of surfaces, including many minerals and metal oxides. Titanium is among the most widely used medical implant material and quickly forms a TiO2 passivation layer under physiological conditions. Understanding the binding mechanism of Dopa to TiO2 surfaces is therefore of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using a surface forces apparatus, we explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of mussel foot protein 3 (mfp-3) to TiO2 surfaces at three different pHs (pH 3, 5.5 and 7.5). At pH 3, mfp-3 showed the strongest adhesion force on TiO2, with an adhesion energy of ∼-7.0 mJ/m(2). Increasing the pH gives rise to two opposing effects: (1) increased oxidation of Dopa, thus, decreasing availability for the Dopa-mediated adhesion, and (2) increased bidentate Dopa-Ti coordination, leading to the further stabilization of the Dopa group and, thus, an increase in adhesion force. Both effects were reflected in the resonance-enhanced Raman spectra obtained at the three deposition pHs. The two competing effects give rise to a higher adhesion force of mfp-3 on the TiO2 surface at pH 7.5 than at pH 5.5. Our results suggest that Dopa-containing proteins and synthetic polymers have great potential as coating materials for medical implant materials, particularly if redox activity can be controlled.

  6. Investigation of alginate binding to germanium and polystyrene substrata conditioned with mussel adhesive protein

    SciTech Connect

    Suci, P.A.; Geesey, G.G.

    1995-06-15

    Binding of alginate from Macrocystis pyrifera (kelp) to germanium and polystyrene substrata conditioned with mussel adhesive protein (MAP) from Mytilis edulis, to germanium substrata conditioned with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and polylysine, and to germanium substrata coated with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) was investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Binding of alginate to MAP appears to be proportional to surface coverage for levels tested. Distinct spectral features appear in the region associated with pyranose ring vibrations upon binding of alginate to MAP, polylysine, and APS, indicating that lysine residues play a prominent role in promoting irreversible adsorption with perturbation of pyranose ring atoms. BSA does not appear to enhance alginate adsorption over that observed on clean germanium and no new spectral features appear as a result of binding. The level of irreversible binding of alginate to germanium and polystyrene substrata conditioned with MAP is similar.

  7. Novel pyridazinone inhibitors for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1): old target-new inhibition mode.

    PubMed

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A

    2013-12-27

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific, and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity, and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Although they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors, and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors.

  8. Development of robust biocompatible silicone with high resistance to protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weifeng; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Shengfu

    2011-05-01

    A new biocompatible silicone comprising a carboxybetaine (CB) ester analogue, 3-methacryloxypropyltris(trimethylsiloxy)silane (TRIS) and an organic silicone macromer (bis-α,ω-(methacryloxypropyl) polydimethylsiloxane) has been developed using photo-polymerisation. Following interfacial hydrolysis of the CB ester, the resulting zwitterionic material became significantly more hydrophilic and exhibited high resistance to both non-specific protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. Moreover, the stability of these non-fouling properties was dramatically improved by using a slow and controlled rate of ester hydrolysis of the original protective hydrophobic matrix. The subsequent ability to maintain the original optical and mechanical properties of the bare silicone following surface activation makes this material an ideal candidate for preparing contact lenses and other medical devices.

  9. Novel Pyridazinone Inhibitors for Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1): Old target – New Inhibition Mode

    PubMed Central

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J.; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Though they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors. PMID:24304424

  10. Bioinspired Universal Monolayer Coatings by Combining Concepts from Blood Protein Adsorption and Mussel Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leixiao; Cheng, Chong; Ran, Qidi; Schlaich, Christoph; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Li, Wenzhong; Wei, Qiang; Haag, Rainer

    2017-02-22

    Despite the increasing need for universal polymer coating strategies, only a few approaches have been successfully developed, and most of them are suffering from color, high thickness, or high roughness. In this paper, we present for the first time a universal monolayer coating that is only a few nanometers thick and independent of the composition, size, shape, and structure of the substrate. The coating is based on a bioinspired synthetic amphiphilic block copolymer that combines two concepts from blood protein adsorption and mussel adhesion. This polymer can be rapidly tethered on various substrates including both planar surfaces and nanosystems with high grafting density. The resulting monolayer coatings are, on the one hand, inert to the adsorption of multiple polymer layers and prevent biofouling. On the other hand, they are chemically active for secondary functionalization and provide a new platform for selective material surface modification.

  11. A mutant form of the rho protein can restore stress fibers and adhesion plaques in v-src transformed fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T; Meyer, M; Janning, A; Schiedel, A C; Barnekow, A

    1999-03-25

    The organization of polymerized actin in the mammalian cell is regulated by several members of the rho family. Three rho proteins, cdc42, rac and rho act in a cascade to organize the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. Rho proteins are involved in the formation of actin stress fibers and adhesion plaques in fibroblasts. During transformation of mammalian cells by oncogenes the cytoskeleton is rearranged and stress fibers and adhesion plaques are disintegrated. In this paper we investigate the function of the rho protein in RR1022 rat fibroblasts transformed by the Rous sarcoma virus. Two activated mutants of the rho protein, rho G14V and rho Q63L, and a dominant negative mutant, rho N1171, were stably transfected into RR1022 cells. The resulting cell lines were analysed for the organization of polymerized actin and adhesion plaques. Cells expressing rho Q63L, but not rho wt, rho G14V or rho N1171, showed an altered morphology. These cells displayed a flat, fibroblast like shape when compared with the RR1022 ancestor cells. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that actin stress fibers and adhesion plaques were rearranged in these cells. We conclude from these data that an active rho protein can restore elements of the actin cytoskeleton in transformed cells by overriding the tyrosine kinase phosphorylation induced by the pp60(v-src).

  12. Link protein hyaluronan-binding motif abrogates CD44-hyaluronan-mediated leukemia-liver cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Na; Li, Gongchu

    2013-05-01

    The liver is a frequent site for the metastasis of cancer cells originating from other sites. Leukemic liver metastasis is associated with poor prognosis. The ligation of CD44 with hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to contribute to the drug resistance of leukemic cells. In this study, a link protein HA-binding motif was genetically fused with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) to generate an EGFP-L fusion protein. Furthermore, a coculture system was established to investigate the interaction of leukemic cells with liver cells. CD44-positive Kasumi-1, but not CD44-negative HL-60 cells, were observed to adhere to the liver cell line L02. This cell-cell adhesion was significantly blocked by HA, indicating that Kasumi-L02 cell adhesion was mediated by the CD44-HA interaction. Compared to EGFP, EGFP-L fusion protein bound to L02 and BEL7404 liver cells. EGFP-L partially abrogated the Kasumi-L02 adhesion, suggesting that the link protein-binding motif is able to inhibit CD44-HA-mediated leukemia-liver adhesion. These results may help provide insight into novel therapeutic methods for leukemic patients diagnosed with liver metastasis.

  13. Exported proteins in probiotic bacteria: adhesion to intestinal surfaces, host immunomodulation and molecular cross-talking with the host.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, María C

    2008-10-01

    The group of exported proteins of a bacterium are those proteins that are sorted from the cytoplasm to the bacterial surface or to the surroundings of the microorganism. In probiotic bacteria, these proteins are of special relevance because they might determine important traits such as adhesion to intestinal surfaces and molecular cross-talking with the host. Current knowledge about the presence and biological relevance of exported proteins produced by the main genera of probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal environment is reviewed in this minireview. As will be seen, some of these proteins are involved in host adhesion or are able to modify certain signalization pathways within host cells, whereas others are important for the physiology of probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Adhesive Properties of YapV and Paralogous Autotransporter Proteins of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manoj K. M.; De Masi, Leon; Yue, Min; Galván, Estela M.; Chen, Huaiqing; Wang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague. This bacterium evolved from an ancestral enteroinvasive Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain by gene loss and acquisition of new genes, allowing it to use fleas as transmission vectors. Infection frequently leads to a rapidly lethal outcome in humans, a variety of rodents, and cats. This study focuses on the Y. pestis KIM yapV gene and its product, recognized as an autotransporter protein by its typical sequence, outer membrane localization, and amino-terminal surface exposure. Comparison of Yersinia genomes revealed that DNA encoding YapV or each of three individual paralogous proteins (YapK, YapJ, and YapX) was present as a gene or pseudogene in a strain-specific manner and only in Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. YapV acted as an adhesin for alveolar epithelial cells and specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, as shown with recombinant Escherichia coli, Y. pestis, or purified passenger domains. Like YapV, YapK and YapJ demonstrated adhesive properties, suggesting that their previously related in vivo activity is due to their capacity to modulate binding properties of Y. pestis in its hosts, in conjunction with other adhesins. A differential host-specific type of binding to ECM proteins by YapV, YapK, and YapJ suggested that these proteins participate in broadening the host range of Y. pestis. A phylogenic tree including 36 Y. pestis strains highlighted an association between the gene profile for the four paralogous proteins and the geographic location of the corresponding isolated strains, suggesting an evolutionary adaption of Y. pestis to specific local animal hosts or reservoirs. PMID:25690102

  15. Effect of anticoagulants on the protein corona-induced reduced drug carrier adhesion efficiency in human blood flow.

    PubMed

    Sobczynski, Daniel J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2017-01-15

    Plasma proteins rapidly coat the surfaces of particulate drug carriers to form a protein corona upon their injection into the bloodstream. The high presence of immunoglobulins in the corona formed on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) vascular-targeted carrier (VTC) surfaces was recently shown to negatively impact their adhesion to activated endothelial cells (aECs) in vitro. Here, we characterized the influence of anticoagulants, or their absence, on the binding efficiency of VTCs of various materials via modulation of their protein corona. Specifically, we evaluated the adhesion of PLGA, poly(lactic acid) (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), silica, and polystyrene VTCs to aECs in heparinized, citrated, and non-anticoagulated (serum and whole) blood flows relative to buffer control. Particle adhesion is substantially reduced in non-anticoagulated blood flows regardless of the material type while only moderate to minimal reduction is observed for VTCs in anticoagulant-containing blood flow depending on the anticoagulant and material type. The substantial reduction in VTC adhesion in blood flows was linked to a high presence of immunoglobulin-sized proteins in the VTC corona via SDS-PAGE analysis. Of all the materials evaluated, PLGA was the most sensitive to plasma protein effects while PCL was the most resistant, suggesting particle hydrophobicity is a critical component of the observed negative plasma protein effects. Overall, this work demonstrates that anticoagulant positively alters the effect of plasma proteins in prescribing VTC adhesion to aECs in human blood flow, which has implication in the use of in vitro blood flow assays for functional evaluation of VTCs for in vivo use.

  16. Effect of dispersion method and CNT loading on the quality and performance of nanocomposite soy protein/CNTs adhesive for wood application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afolabi, Ayo Samuel; Oluwafolakemi Sadare, Olawumi; Olawale Daramola, Michael

    2016-09-01

    In this article the effect of dispersion method and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) loading on the quality and performance of a nanocomposite adhesive is reported. The nanocomposite soy protein isolate adhesive was successfully developed by incorporating CNTs into the soy protein isolate (SPI) for enhanced bond strength and water resistance. Dispersion methods, namely mechanical (shear) mixing and mechanical/sonication were employed to aid good dispersion and interfacial interaction between soy protein matrix and the carbon nanofillers during the preparation of the adhesive. The concentration of the CNT was varied from 0.1-0.7 wt% in the nanocomposite adhesive. The morphology and the surface chemistry of the adhesives were checked with SEM and FTIR, respectively. The shear strength of the developed adhesives was investigated according to European standard (EN-204) for interior wood application on a tensile testing machine. The morphological structure of the nanocomposite adhesive obtained from SEM images showed homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in SPI using the two dispersion methods; shear mixing and sonication/shear mixing. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed chemical functionalities and successful interaction between CNTs and SPI adhesive. Thermogravimetric profile of the adhesive samples showed that the newly developed nanocomposite adhesive was thermally stable at a temperature up to about 600 °C at a higher percentage loading of 0.5 wt% CNTs. The result showed that sonication method of dispersion of CNTs into the SPI adhesive had a higher shear strength compared to the mechanical method of dispersion both at dry and wet state.

  17. Nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins revealed by single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chamma, Ingrid; Levet, Florian; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The advent of superresolution imaging has created a strong need for both optimized labeling strategies and analysis methods to probe the nanoscale organization of complex biological structures. We present a thorough description of the distribution of synaptic adhesion proteins at the nanoscopic scale, namely presynaptic neurexin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), and its two postsynaptic binding partners neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2). We monitored these proteins in the membrane of neurons by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, after live surface labeling with Alexa647-conjugated monomeric streptavidin. The small probe ([Formula: see text]) efficiently penetrates into crowded synaptic junctions and reduces the distance to target. We quantified the organization of the single-molecule localization data using a tesselation-based analysis technique. We show that Nlg1 exhibits a fairly disperse organization within dendritic spines, while LRRTM2 is organized in compact domains, and [Formula: see text] in presynaptic terminals displays a dual-organization pattern intermediate between that of Nlg1 and LRRTM2. These results suggest that part of [Formula: see text] interacts transsynaptically with Nlg1 and the other part with LRRTM2.

  18. Mispolarization of desmosomal proteins and altered intercellular adhesion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Melina; Charron, Audra J; Bacallao, Robert; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2005-06-01

    Polycystin-1, the product of the major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), has been shown to associate with multiple epithelial cell junctions. Our hypothesis is that polycystin-1 is an important protein for the initial establishment of cell-cell junctions and maturation of the cell and that polycystin-1 localization is dependent on the degree of cell polarization. Using laser-scanning confocal microscopy and two models of cell polarization, polycystin-1 and desmosomes were found to colocalize during the initial establishment of cell-cell contact when junctions were forming. However, colocalization was lost in confluent monolayers. Parallel morphological and biochemical evaluations revealed a profound mispolarization of desmosomal components to both the apical and basolateral domains in primary ADPKD cells and tissue. Studies of the intermediate filament network associated with desmosomes showed that there is a decrease in cytokeratin levels and an abnormal expression of the mesenchymal protein vimentin in the disease. Moreover, we show for the first time that the structural alterations seen in adherens and desmosomal junctions have a functional impact, leaving the ADPKD cells with weakened cell-cell adhesion. In conclusion, in this paper we show that polycystin-1 transiently colocalizes with desmosomes and that desmosomal proteins are mislocalized as a consequence of polycystin-1 mutation.

  19. Medium-density particleboards from modified rice husks and soybean protein concentrate-based adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Emiliano M; Stefani, Pablo M; Ruseckaite, Roxana A

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using rice husk (RH) as wood substitute in the production of environmentally sound medium-density particleboards using adhesives from soybean protein concentrate (SPC). Chemical modification of rice husk with sodium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide followed by hydrogen peroxide (bleaching) were undertaken to evaluate the effect of such treatments on the composition and topology of rice husk and the performance of produced panels. Both treatments were efficient in partially eliminating hemicelluloses, lignin and silica from RH, as evidenced by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy observations suggested that alkaline treatment resulted in a more damaged RH substrate than bleaching. The dependence of mechanical properties (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond) and the physical properties (water absorption and thickness swelling) on chemical treatments performed on both, rice husk and SPC was studied. Bleached-rice husk particleboards bonded with alkaline-treated soybean protein concentrate displayed the best set of final properties. Particleboards with this formulation met the minimum requirements of internal bond, modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture recommended by the US Standard ANSI/A208.1 specifications for M1, MS and M2-grade medium-density particleboards, but failed to achieve the thickness swelling value recommended for general use panels. This limitation of soybean protein concentrate-bonded rice husk particleboards was counterbalanced by the advantage of being formaldehyde-free which makes them a suitable alternative for indoor applications.

  20. Catechol-functionalized adhesive polymer nanoparticles for controlled local release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 from titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jae; Koo, Ahn Na; Lee, Suk Won; Lee, Myung Hyun; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2013-09-10

    We report on a novel surface functionalization approach to equip the titanium (Ti) surfaces with osteogenic properties. A key feature of the approach is the treatment of the Ti surfaces with Ti-adhesive nanoparticles that can stably load and controllably release bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Ti-adhesive nanoparticles were prepared by self-assembly of a catechol-functionalized poly(amino acid) diblock copolymer, catechol-poly(L-aspartic acid)-b-poly(L-phenylalanine) (Cat-PAsp-PPhe). The nanoparticles consist of Ti-adhesive peripheral catechol groups, anionic PAsp shells, and PPhe inner cores. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (Fe-SEM) images showed that the Ti-adhesive nanoparticles could be uniformly immobilized on Ti surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the successful anchoring of nanoparticles onto Ti surfaces. After surface immobilization of the nanoparticles, the static water contact angle of the Ti substrate decreased from 75.3° to 50.0° or 36.4°, depending on the surface nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopic analysis showed that BMP-2 could be effectively incorporated onto the Ti surface with adhesive nanoparticles. BMP-2 was controllably released for up to 40 days. The Ti substrate functionalized with BMP-2-incorporated nanoparticles significantly promoted attachment, proliferation, spreading, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of human adipose-derived stem cell (hADSC). The catechol-functionalized adhesive nanoparticles may be applied to various medical devices to create surfaces for improved performance.

  1. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  2. Cytoplasmic Domain of Zebrafish Myelin Protein Zero: Adhesive Role Depends on β-Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, XiaoYang; Inouye, Hideyo; Gross, Abby A. R.; Hidalgo, Marla M.; Sharma, Deepak; Lee, Daniel; Avila, Robin L.; Salmona, Mario; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Solution spectroscopy studies on the cytoplasmic domain of human myelin protein zero (P0) (hP0-cyt) suggest that H-bonding between β-strands from apposed molecules is likely responsible for the tight cytoplasmic apposition in compact myelin. As a follow-up to these findings, in the current study we used circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction to analyze the same type of model membranes previously used for hP0-cyt to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the zebrafish cytoplasmic apposition. This space is significantly narrower in teleosts compared with that in higher vertebrates, and can be accounted for in part by the much shorter cytoplasmic domain in the zebrafish protein (zP0-cyt). Circular dichroism measurements on zP0-cyt showed similar structural characteristics to those of hP0-cyt, i.e., the protein underwent a β→α structural transition at lipid/protein (L/P) molar ratios >50, and adopted a β-conformation at lower L/P molar ratios. X-ray diffraction was carried out on lipid vesicle solutions with zP0-cyt before and after dehydration to study the effect of protein on membrane lipid packing. Solution diffraction revealed the electron-density profile of a single membrane bilayer. Diffraction patterns of dried samples suggested a multilamellar structure with the β-folded P0-cyt located at the intermembrane space. Our findings support the idea that the adhesive role of P0 at the cytoplasmic apposition in compact myelin depends on the cytoplasmic domain of P0 being in the β-conformation. PMID:17693467

  3. Adsorption and adhesion of common serum proteins to nanotextured gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Lauren E.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    , particularly when considering biological systems. It is well known that thin films and nanostructures feature different optical, electrical, and mechanical properties from their bulk composites; however, interactions taking place at the interface between nanomaterials and their surroundings are less understood. Here, we explore interactions between common serum proteins - serum albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G - and a nanotextured gallium nitride surface. Atomic force microscopy with a carboxyl-terminated colloid tip is used to probe the `activity' of proteins adsorbed onto the surface, including both the accessibility of the terminal amine to the tip as well as the potential for protein extension. By evaluating the frequency of tip-protein interactions, we can establish differences in protein behaviour on the basis of both the surface roughness as well as morphology, providing an assessment of the role of surface texture in dictating protein-surface interactions. Unidirectional surface features - either the half-unit cell steppes of as-grown GaN or those produced by mechanical polishing - appear to promote protein accessibility, with a higher frequency of protein extension events taking place on these surfaces when compared with less ordered surface features. Development of a full understanding of the factors influencing surface-biomolecule interactions can pave the way for specific surface modification to tailor the bio-material interface, offering a new path for device optimization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures demonstrating the adhesion force magnitude (Fig. S1) and lateral steppe surface topography (Fig. S2). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06353h

  4. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 regulates human embryonic stem cell adhesion, stemness, and survival via control of epithelial cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Seo Choi, Hong; Min Lee, Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2014-10-01

    B-Cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31) regulates the export of secreted membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the downstream secretory pathway. Previously, we generated a monoclonal antibody 297-D4 against the surface molecule on undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we found that 297-D4 antigen was localized to pluripotent hESCs and downregulated during early differentiation of hESCs and identified that the antigen target of 297-D4 was BAP31 on the hESC-surface. To investigate the functional role of BAP31 in hESCs, BAP31 expression was knocked down by small interfering RNA. BAP31 depletion impaired hESC self-renewal and pluripotency and drove hESC differentiation into multicell lineages. BAP31 depletion hindered hESC proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and inducing caspase-independent cell death. Interestingly, BAP31 depletion reduced hESC adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM). Analysis of cell surface molecules showed decreased expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in BAP31-depleted hESCs, while ectopic expression of BAP31 elevated the expression of EpCAM. EpCAM depletion also reduced hESC adhesion to ECM, arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and induced cell death, producing similar effects to those of BAP31 depletion. BAP31 and EpCAM were physically associated and colocalized at the ER and cell surface. Both BAP31 and EpCAM depletion decreased cyclin D1 and E expression and suppressed PI3K/Akt signaling, suggesting that BAP31 regulates hESC stemness and survival via control of EpCAM expression. These findings provide, for the first time, mechanistic insights into how BAP31 regulates hESC stemness and survival via control of EpCAM expression.

  5. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  6. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A.

    2012-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis. PMID:22222499

  7. Multifunctional and Redundant Roles of Borrelia burgdorferi Outer Surface Proteins in Tissue Adhesion, Colonization, and Complement Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Jennifer A.; Coburn, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease in the U.S., with at least 25,000 cases reported to the CDC each year. B. burgdorferi is thought to enter and exit the bloodstream to achieve rapid dissemination to distal tissue sites during infection. Travel through the bloodstream requires evasion of immune surveillance and pathogen clearance in the host, a process at which B. burgdorferi is adept. B. burgdorferi encodes greater than 19 adhesive outer surface proteins many of which have been found to bind to host cells or components of the extracellular matrix. Several others bind to host complement regulatory factors, in vitro. Production of many of these adhesive proteins is tightly regulated by environmental cues, and some have been shown to aid in vascular interactions and tissue colonization, as well as survival in the blood, in vivo. Recent work has described multifaceted and redundant roles of B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins in complement component interactions and tissue targeted adhesion and colonization, distinct from their previously identified in vitro binding capabilities. Recent insights into the multifunctional roles of previously well-characterized outer surface proteins such as BBK32, DbpA, CspA, and OspC have changed the way we think about the surface proteome of these organisms during the tick–mammal life cycle. With the combination of new and old in vivo models and in vitro techniques, the field has identified distinct ligand binding domains on BBK32 and DbpA that afford tissue colonization or blood survival to B. burgdorferi. In this review, we describe the multifunctional and redundant roles of many adhesive outer surface proteins of B. burgdorferi in tissue adhesion, colonization, and bloodstream survival that, together, promote the survival of Borrelia spp. throughout maintenance in their multi-host lifestyle. PMID:27818662

  8. Immunolocalization of specific keratin associated beta-proteins (beta-keratins) in the adhesive setae of Gekko gecko.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2013-08-01

    The previous identification of 21 proteins in the digital setae transcriptome of Gekko gecko, 2 alpha-keratins of 52-53kDa and 19 beta-proteins (beta-keratins) of 10-21kDa, has indicated that most of setal corneous proteins are cysteine-rich. The production of specific antibodies for two of the main beta-protein subfamilies expressed in gecko setae has allowed the ultrastructural localization of two beta-proteins indicated as Ge-cprp-9 (cysteine-rich) and Ge-gprp-6 (glycine-rich). Only Ge-cprp-9, representing most of the 16 cysteine-rich beta-proteins, is present in the oberhautchen, setae and in the terminal spatula where adhesion takes place, supporting the previous expression study. Instead, the glycine-rich beta-proteins (Ge-gprp-6), representing the 3 glycine-rich beta-proteins of digital epidermis is only present in the stiff beta-layer of the digital scales and in the thin beta layer of the pad lamella sustaining the setae. Ge-cprp-9 is representative for most of the remaining 15 cys-rich proteins (Ge-cprp 1-16) and may have a structural and functional role in the process of adhesion. Most of the cysteine-rich setal proteins have a net positive charge and it is here hypothesized that these proteins may induce the formation of dipoles at the surface interface between the spatula and the substrate, enhancing the van der Waals forces and therefore adhesion to the substrate. The selection and improvement of these proteins during the evolution of geckos may have represented a successful factor for the survival and ecological adaptations of these climbing lizards.

  9. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    PubMed

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states.

  10. Myelin Basic Protein Cleaves Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 and Promotes Neuritogenesis and Cell Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, David; Loers, Gabriele; Kleene, Ralf; Oezen, Iris; Kataria, Hardeep; Katagihallimath, Nainesh; Braren, Ingke; Harauz, George; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 is a Lewisx-carrying glycoprotein that plays important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to L1 in a Lewisx-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MBP is released by murine cerebellar neurons as a sumoylated dynamin-containing protein upon L1 stimulation and that this MBP cleaves L1 as a serine protease in the L1 extracellular domain at Arg687 yielding a transmembrane fragment that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cell culture. L1-induced neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival are reduced in MBP-deficient cerebellar neurons and in wild-type cerebellar neurons in the presence of an MBP antibody or L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site. Genetic ablation of MBP in shiverer mice and mutagenesis of the proteolytically active site in MBP or of the MBP cleavage site within L1 as well as serine protease inhibitors and an L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site abolish generation of the L1 fragment. Our findings provide evidence for novel functions of MBP in the nervous system. PMID:24671420

  11. Universal method for protein bioconjugation with nanocellulose scaffolds for increased cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Sämfors, Sanna; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is an emerging biomaterial since it is biocompatible, integrates well with host tissue and can be biosynthesized in desired architecture. However, being a hydrogel, it exhibits low affinity for cell attachment, which is crucial for the cellular fate process. To increase cell attachment, the surface of BNC scaffolds was modified with two proteins, fibronectin and collagen type I, using an effective bioconjugation method applying 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium (CDAP) tetrafluoroborate as the intermediate catalytic agent. The effect of CDAP treatment on cell adhesion to the BNC surface is shown for human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the mouse mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2. In both cases, the surface modification increased the number of cells attached to the surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells indicated more healthy and viable cells. CDAP activation of bacterial nanocellulose is shown to be a convenient method to conjugate extracellular proteins to the scaffold surfaces. CDAP treatment can be performed in a short period of time in an aqueous environment under heterogeneous and mild conditions preserving the nanofibrillar network of cellulose.

  12. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet; Ariestanti, Donna M; Aust, Gabriela; Bae, Byoung-il; Bista, Bigyan R; Bridges, James P; Duman, Joseph G; Engel, Felix B; Giera, Stefanie; Goffinet, André M; Hall, Randy A; Hamann, Jörg; Hartmann, Nicole; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Rong; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Prömel, Simone; Ressl, Susanne; Schiöth, Helgi B; Sigoillot, Séverine M; Song, Helen; Talbot, William S; Tall, Gregory G; White, James P; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-12-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region. In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF are associated noncovalently as a heterodimer at the plasma membrane. While the biological function of the GAIN domain-mediated autocleavage is not fully understood, mounting evidence suggests that the NTF and CTF possess distinct biological activities in addition to their function as a receptor unit. We discuss recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs.

  13. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPRC5A modulates integrin β1-mediated epithelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Daria R; Akimov, Yevhen A; Rokka, Anne; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Kouvonen, Petri; Pellinen, Teijo; Kuznetsov, Sergey G

    2016-10-07

    G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR), Class C, Group 5, Member A (GPRC5A) has been implicated in several malignancies. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Using a panel of human cell lines, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout and RNAi-mediated depletion of GPRC5A impairs cell adhesion to integrin substrates: collagens I and IV, fibronectin, as well as to extracellular matrix proteins derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) mouse sarcoma (Matrigel). Consistent with the phenotype, knock-out of GPRC5A correlated with a reduced integrin β1 (ITGB1) protein expression, impaired phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and lower activity of small GTPases RhoA and Rac1. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between GPRC5A and a receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2, an upstream regulator of FAK, although its contribution to the observed adhesion phenotype is unclear. Our findings reveal an unprecedented role for GPRC5A in regulation of the ITGB1-mediated cell adhesion and it's downstream signaling, thus indicating a potential novel role for GPRC5A in human epithelial cancers.

  14. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  15. Cell adhesion to proteins separated by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted onto a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane: a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-12-02

    Cell blotting, although conceptually simple, has failed to achieve wide practical application. Described here is a new cell-blotting technique which involves cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane at 4 degrees C. Cell bands adherent on PVDF are detected using hematoxylin, or propidium iodide (PI) staining followed by viewing under ultraviolet (UV) light. The technique allows quick microscopic visualization of adherent cells composing the bands, without requiring clearing of the membrane. Representative cell adhesion proteins from different sources, i.e., plant lectins (e.g., phytohemagglutinin, PHA; concanavalin A, ConA; and wheat germ agglutinin, WGA); extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; and integral membrane proteins (e.g., recombinant soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, rs VCAM-1) were tested for cell binding by the new cell-blotting technique using human lymphoid progenitor (NALM-6) and myeloid progenitor (KG1a) cell lines. Cell adhesion proteins retained their adhesion function in all cases tested. Specificity of cell binding on PVDF blot was demonstrated by inhibition of cell adhesion to WGA protein bands using an appropriate sugar, i.e., N-acetyl D-glucosamine. The cell blotting assay was comparable in sensitivity to Coomassie blue staining of protein bands. The ability to conduct protein extraction, separation and blotting at low temperature avoids thermal denaturation, thereby preserving the adhesion properties of the proteins. The electrophoretic/blotting system has unique detergent removal/protein renaturation properties and the ability to preserve functionally active adhesion protein complexes. The cell-blotting technique described is sufficiently robust for routine application in the investigation of novel cell adhesion proteins.

  16. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chagnot, Caroline; Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates) is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative), monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive) and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast) bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors) involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field. PMID:24133488

  17. Effects of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors on cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression by human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    May, M. J.; Wheeler-Jones, C. P.; Pearson, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Endothelial cells can be stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 alpha and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha to express the leukocyte adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 but the intracellular signalling mechanisms leading to this expression are incompletely understood. We have investigated the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) in adhesion molecule expression by cytokine-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) using the PTK inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, and the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. 2. Maximal E-selectin expression induced by incubation of HUVEC for 4 h with IL-1 alpha (100 u ml-1) and TNF alpha (100 u ml-1) was dose-dependently inhibited by genistein and herbimycin A. Although similar effects were seen on phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA)-induced expression, this was not due to inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) activity as the selective inhibitors of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide (BIM), Ro31-7549 or Ro31-8220 did not affect IL-1 alpha- or TNF alpha-induced E-selectin expression at concentrations which maximally inhibited PMA-induced expression. 3. Genistein inhibited VCAM-1 expression induced by incubation of HUVEC for 24 h with TNF alpha or IL-1 alpha whereas it did not affect ICAM-1 expression induced by 24 h incubation with either of these cytokines. Herbimycin A inhibited both VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced by TNF alpha. 4. Basal expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 was dose-dependently enhanced by sodium orthovanadate. In contrast, vanadate differentially affected TNF alpha-induced expression of these molecules with maximal E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression being slightly enhanced and VCAM-1 expression dose-dependently reduced. 5. We also studied the effects of PTK and PTP inhibitors on adhesion of the human pre-myeloid cell line U937 to TNF alpha-stimulated HUVEC

  18. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  19. Redox control of surface protein sulphhydryls in bovine spermatozoa reversibly modulates sperm adhesion to the oviductal epithelium and capacitation.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Roberto; Mollo, Valentina; Duma, Gennaro; Talevi, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    Oviductal fluid molecules, such as sulphated glycosaminoglycans and disulphide-reductants, may represent periovulatory signals for the release of spermatozoa from the oviductal reservoir in the bovine species. Disulphide-reductants release spermatozoa through the reduction of sperm-surface disulphides to sulphhydryls (SH). Herein, we studied sperm-surface protein SH through labelling with maleimidylpropionyl biocytin in the initial sperm suspension, in the subpopulations able and unable to adhere to the in vitro cultured oviductal epithelium, and in spermatozoa released either through the disulphide-reductant penicillamine (PEN) or the sulphated glycosaminoglycan heparin (HEP). Adhesion assays were performed to study the ability of released spermatozoa to readhere to the oviductal epithelium. Results showed that the level of SH in sperm-surface proteins was: 1) low in adhering spermatozoa; 2) high in spermatozoa unable to adhere; and 3) markedly increased in released spermatozoa. Adhesion assays showed that: 1) PEN-released spermatozoa promptly recovered adhesion after removal of the disulphide-reductant and could be released again in response to PEN; 2) conversely, a limited number of HEP-released spermatozoa was able to readhere to the oviductal epithelium and this ability was not affected by HEP removal. Recovery of adhesion was associated to reoxidation of sperm-surface protein SH and to the reversal of capacitation. In conclusion, redox modulation of sperm-surface protein SH is involved in the release of spermatozoa adhering to the oviduct in vitro; the reversible action of disulphide-reductants might be responsible for intermittent phases of adhesions and releases; and the irreversible action of HEP indicates that it may represent a terminal releasing signal.

  20. Human DCXR - another 'moonlighting protein' involved in sugar metabolism, carbonyl detoxification, cell adhesion and male fertility?

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Maser, Edmund

    2015-02-01

    Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase (DCXR; SDR20C1), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily catalyzes the reduction of α-dicarbonyl compounds and monosaccharides. Its role in the metabolism of L-xylulose has been known since 1970, when essential pentosuria was found to be associated with DCXR deficiency. Despite its early discovery, our knowledge about the role of human DCXR in normal physiology and pathophysiology is still incomplete. Sporadic studies have demonstrated aberrant expression in several cancers, but their physiological significance is unknown. In reproductive medicine, where DCXR is commonly referred to as 'sperm surface protein P34H', it serves as marker for epididymal sperm maturation and is essential for gamete interaction and successful fertilization. DCXR exhibits a multifunctional nature, both acting as a carbonyl reductase and also performing non-catalytic functions, possibly resulting from interactions with other proteins. Recent observations associate DCXR with a role in cell adhesion, pointing to a novel function involving tumour progression and possibly metastasis. This review summarizes the current knowledge about human DCXR and its orthologs from mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans (DHS-21) with an emphasis on its multifunctional characteristics. Due to its close structural relationship with DCXR, carbonyl reductase 2 (Cbr2), a tetrameric enzyme found in several non-primate species is also discussed. Similar to human DCXR, Cbr2 from golden hamster (P26h) and cow (P25b) is essential for sperm-zona pellucida interaction and fertilization. Because of the apparent similarity of these two proteins and the inconsistent use of alternative names previously, we provide an overview of the systematic classification of DCXR and Cbr2 and a phylogenetic analysis to illustrate their ancestry.

  1. Silk protein as a new optically transparent adhesion layer for an ultra-smooth sub-10 nm gold layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyungtaek; Umar, Muhammad; Ryu, Shinyoung; Lee, Soonil; Kim, Sunghwan

    2017-03-01

    Ultra-thin and ultra-smooth gold (Au) films are appealing for photonic applications including surface plasmon resonances and transparent contacts. However, poor adhesion at the Au–dielectric interface prohibits the formation of a mechanically stable, ultra-thin, and ultra-smooth Au film. A conventional solution is to use a metallic adhesion layer, such as titanium and chromium, however such layers cause the optical properties of pure Au to deteriorate. Here we report the use of silk protein to enhance the adhesion at the Au–dielectric interface, thus obtaining ultra-smooth sub-10 nm Au films. The Au films that were deposited onto the silk layer exhibited superior surface roughness to those deposited on SiO2, Si, and poly(methyl methacrylate), along with improved adhesion, electrical conductivity, and optical transparency. Additionally, we confirm that a metal–insulator–metal optical resonator can be successfully generated using a silk insulating layer without the use of a metallic adhesion layer.

  2. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  3. Contribution of the PI3K/MMPs/Ln-5γ2 and EphA2/FAK/Paxillin signaling pathways to tumor growth and vasculogenic mimicry of gallbladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin-Sui; Sun, Wei; Ge, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Wen-Zhong; Fan, Yue-Zu

    2013-06-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a new tumor blood supply in some highly aggressive malignant tumors. We previously reported VM in human gallbladder carcinomas, 3-D matrices in vitro and nude mouse xenografts in vivo of highly aggressive GBC-SD cells and its clinical significance. In this study, we further studied the underlying mechanisms of VM in gallbladder carcinomas via the 3-D matrix in vitro, the nude mouse xenografts in vivo of GBC-SD or SGC-996 cells, immunohistochemistry (H&E staining and CD31-PAS double staining), electron microscopy, expression of MMP-2, MT1-MMP, PI3K, Ln-5γ2, EphA2, FAK and Paxillin-P proteins/mRNAs determined by SABC, ELISA, immunofluorescence, western blotting and qRT-PCR, respectively. It was shown that all of untreated highly aggressive GBC-SD cells and xenografts formed vasculogenic-like structures within 2 weeks of seeding and injecting, and facilitated the growth of tumor cells or xenografts; whereas poorly aggressive SGC-996 cells or GBC-SD cells treated by TIMP-2 were unable to form the vasculogenic-like structures with the same conditions; and tumor xenograft growth was inhibited. Expression of MMP-2, MT1-MMP proteins/mRNAs from sections and supernates of 3-D matrix in vitro, expression of PI3K, MMP-2, MT1-MMP, Ln-5γ2, EphA2, FAK and Paxillin-P proteins/mRNAs from sections of xenografts in vivo in untreated GBC-SD group was upregulated significantly (all P<0.001); however, expression of these VM signal-related proteins/mRNAs in the SGC-996 group and GBC-SD treated by the TIMP-2 group was significantly downregulated (all P<0.001). Thus, we identified for the first time that highly aggressive GBC-SD cells formed VM in vitro and in vivo through the upregulation of PI3K/MMPs/Ln-5γ2 and/or EphA2/FAK/Paxillin signaling. PI3K/MMPs/Ln-5γ2 and EphA2/FAK/Paxillin as key signaling pathways in a coordinated manner contributed to tumor growth and VM of gallbladder carcinomas and provided novel targets that could be potentially exploited

  4. Transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) is an anti-adhesive protein regulating the invasive growth of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Pirjo; Lammi, Johanna; Soikkeli, Johanna; Saksela, Olli; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Hölttä, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    Melanoma is a malignancy characterized by high invasive/metastatic potential, with no efficient therapy after metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the invasive/metastatic tendency is therefore important. Our genome-wide gene expression analyses revealed that human melanoma cell lines WM793 and especially WM239 (vertical growth phase and metastatic cells, respectively) overexpress the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein transforming growth factor β induced (TGFBI). In adhesion assays, recombinant TGFBI was strongly anti-adhesive for both melanoma cells and skin fibroblasts. TGFBI further impaired the adhesion of melanoma cells to the adhesive ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen-I, and laminin, known to interact with it. Unexpectedly, WM239 cells migrated/invaded more effectively in three-dimensional collagen-I and Matrigel cultures after knockdown of TGFBI by shRNA expression. However, in the physiological subcutaneous microenvironment in nude mice, after TGFBI knockdown, these cells showed markedly impaired tumor growth and invasive capability; the initially formed small tumors later underwent myxoid degeneration and completely regressed. By contrast, the expanding control tumors showed intense TGFBI staining at the tumor edges, co-localizing with the fibrillar fibronectin/tenascin-C/periostin structures that characteristically surround melanoma cells at invasion fronts. Furthermore, TGFBI was found in similar fibrillar structures in clinical human melanoma metastases as well, co-localizing with fibronectin. These data imply an important role for TGFBI in the ECM deposition and invasive growth of melanoma cells, rendering TGFBI a potential target for therapeutic interventions.

  5. Mammalian adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) regulates cofilin function, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Ghai, Pooja; Wu, Huhehasi; Wang, Changhui; Field, Jeffrey; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2013-07-19

    CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was first identified in yeast as a protein that regulates both the actin cytoskeleton and the Ras/cAMP pathway. Although the role in Ras signaling does not extend beyond yeast, evidence supports that CAP regulates the actin cytoskeleton in all eukaryotes including mammals. In vitro actin polymerization assays show that both mammalian and yeast CAP homologues facilitate cofilin-driven actin filament turnover. We generated HeLa cells with stable CAP1 knockdown using RNA interference. Depletion of CAP1 led to larger cell size and remarkably developed lamellipodia as well as accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, we found that CAP1 depletion also led to changes in cofilin phosphorylation and localization as well as activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and enhanced cell spreading. CAP1 forms complexes with the adhesion molecules FAK and Talin, which likely underlie the cell adhesion phenotypes through inside-out activation of integrin signaling. CAP1-depleted HeLa cells also had substantially elevated cell motility as well as invasion through Matrigel. In summary, in addition to generating in vitro and in vivo evidence further establishing the role of mammalian CAP1 in actin dynamics, we identified a novel cellular function for CAP1 in regulating cell adhesion.

  6. Structural organization and function of mouse photoreceptor ribbon synapses involve the immunoglobulin protein synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Ribic, Adema; Liu, Xinran; Crair, Michael C; Biederer, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Adhesive interactions in the retina instruct the developmental specification of inner retinal layers. However, potential roles of adhesion in the development and function of photoreceptor synapses remain incompletely understood. This contrasts with our understanding of synapse development in the CNS, which can be guided by select adhesion molecules such as the Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (SynCAM 1/CADM1/nectin-like 2 protein). This immunoglobulin superfamily protein modulates the development and plasticity of classical excitatory synapses. We show here by immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblotting that SynCAM 1 is expressed on mouse rod photoreceptors and their terminals in the outer nuclear and plexiform layers in a developmentally regulated manner. Expression of SynCAM 1 on rods is low in early postnatal stages (P3-P7) but increases after eye opening (P14). In support of functional roles in the photoreceptors, electroretinogram recordings demonstrate impaired responses to light stimulation in SynCAM 1 knockout (KO) mice. In addition, the structural integrity of synapses in the OPL requires SynCAM 1. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis of SynCAM 1 KO retina measured fewer fully assembled, triadic rod ribbon synapses. Furthermore, rod synapse ribbons are shortened in KO mice, and protein levels of Ribeye, a major structural component of ribbons, are reduced in SynCAM 1 KO retina. Together, our results implicate SynCAM 1 in the synaptic organization of the rod visual pathway and provide evidence for novel roles of synaptic adhesion in the structural and functional integrity of ribbon synapses.

  7. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis.

  8. Overexpression of paxillin induced by miR-137 suppression promotes tumor progression and metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The deregulation of paxillin (PXN) has been involved in the progression and metastasis of different malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). miR-137 is frequently suppressed in CRC. PXN is predicted to be a direct target of miR-137 in CRC cells. On this basis, we hypothesized that overexpression of PXN induced by suppression of miR-137 may promote tumor progression and metastasis and predicts poor prognosis. We detected the expression of PXN and miR-137 in clinical tumor tissues by immunohistochemical analysis and real-time PCR, positive PXN staining was observed in 198 of the 247 (80.1%) cases, whereas no or weak PXN staining was observed in the adjacent non-cancerous area. Higher level of PXN messenger RNA (mRNA) and lower level of miR-137 was observed in cancer tissues than adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High expression of PXN and low expression of miR-137 was associated with aggressive tumor phenotype and adverse prognosis. Moreover, the expression of PXN was negatively correlated with miR-137 expression. A dual-luciferase reporter gene assay validated that PXN was a direct target of miR-137. The use of miR-137 mimics or inhibitor could decrease or increase PXN mRNA and protein levels in CRC cell lines. Knockdown of PXN or ectopic expression of miR-137 could markedly inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and repress tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these results demonstrated that overexpression of PXN induced by suppression of miR-137 promotes tumor progression and metastasis and could serve as an independent prognostic indicator in CRC patients. PMID:23275153

  9. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Wang, Hansen; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP) has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP. PMID:26288071

  10. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Wang, Hansen; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP) has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP.

  11. C1q/TNF-related protein-9 inhibits cytokine-induced vascular inflammation and leukocyte adhesiveness via AMP-activated protein kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Yu Mi; Lee, Yoo La; Seol, So Mi; Yoon, Hae Kyeong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2016-01-05

    Although recent studies have reported cardioprotective effects of C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9), the closet adiponectin paralog, its role on cytokine-induced endothelial inflammation is unknown. We investigated whether CTRP9 prevented inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inhibited the expression of adhesion molecules and a chemokine in the vascular endothelial cell. We used human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to examine the effects of CTRP9 on NF-κB activation and the expression of NF-κB-mediated genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was used as a representative proinflammatory cytokine. In an adhesion assay using THP-1 cells, CTRP9 reduced TNFα-induced adhesion of monocytes to HAECs. Treatment with CTRP9 significantly decreased TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB, as well as the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1. In addition, treatment with CTRP9 significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the downstream target of AMPK. The inhibitory effect of CTRP9 on the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 and monocyte adhesion to HAECs was abolished after transfection with an AMPKα1-specific siRNA. Our study is the first to demonstrate that CTRP9 attenuates cytokine-induced vascular inflammation in endothelial cells mediated by AMPK activation.

  12. Enhanced Adhesion of Campylobacter jejuni to Abiotic Surfaces Is Mediated by Membrane Proteins in Oxygen-Enriched Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sulaeman, Sheiam; Hernould, Mathieu; Schaumann, Annick; Coquet, Laurent; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Dé, Emmanuelle; Tresse, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the major foodborne bacterial enteritis in humans. In contradiction with its fastidious growth requirements, this microaerobic pathogen can survive in aerobic food environments, suggesting that it must employ a variety of protection mechanisms to resist oxidative stress. For the first time, C. jejuni 81–176 inner and outer membrane subproteomes were analyzed separately using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis (2-DE) of oxygen-acclimated cells and microaerobically grown cells. LC-MS/MS analyses successfully identified 42 and 25 spots which exhibited a significantly altered abundance in the IMP-enriched fraction and in the OMP-enriched fraction, respectively, in response to oxidative conditions. These spots corresponded to 38 membrane proteins that could be grouped into different functional classes: (i) transporters, (ii) chaperones, (iii) fatty acid metabolism, (iv) adhesion/virulence and (v) other metabolisms. Some of these proteins were up-regulated at the transcriptional level in oxygen-acclimated cells as confirmed by qRT-PCR. Downstream analyses revealed that adhesion of C. jejuni to inert surfaces and swarming motility were enhanced in oxygen-acclimated cells or paraquat-stressed cells, which could be explained by the higher abundance of membrane proteins involved in adhesion and biofilm formation. The virulence factor CadF, over-expressed in the outer membrane of oxygen-acclimated cells, contributes to the complex process of C. jejuni adhesion to inert surfaces as revealed by a reduction in the capability of C. jejuni 81–176 ΔCadF cells compared to the isogenic strain. Taken together, these data demonstrate that oxygen-enriched conditions promote the over-expression of membrane proteins involved in both the biofilm initiation and virulence of C. jejuni. PMID:23029510

  13. Adhesion protein VSIG1 is required for the proper differentiation of glandular gastric epithelia.

    PubMed

    Oidovsambuu, Odgerel; Nyamsuren, Gunsmaa; Liu, Shuai; Göring, Wolfgang; Engel, Wolfgang; Adham, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    VSIG1, a cell adhesion protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is preferentially expressed in stomach, testis, and certain gastric, esophageal and ovarian cancers. Here, we describe the expression patterns of three alternatively spliced isoforms of mouse Vsig1 during pre- and postnatal development of stomach and potential function of Vsig1 in differentiation of gastric epithelia. We show that isoforms Vsig1A and Vsig1B, which differ in the 3'untranslated region, are expressed in the early stages of stomach development. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that VSIG1 is restricted to the adherens junction of the glandular epithelium. The shorter transcript Vsig1C is restricted to the testis, encodes an N-terminal truncated protein and is presumably regulated by an internal promoter, which is located upstream of exon 1b. To determine whether the 5' flanking region of exon 1a specifically targets the expression of Vsig1 to stomach epithelia, we generated and analyzed transgenic mice. The 4.8-kb fragment located upstream of exon 1a was sufficient to direct the expression of the reporter gene to the glandular epithelia of transgenic stomach. To determine the role of VSIG1 during the development of stomach epithelia, an X-linked Vsig1 was inactivated in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Although Vsig1(-/Y) ESCs were only able to generate low coat color chimeric mice, no male chimeras transmitted the targeted allele to their progeny suggesting that the high contribution of Vsig1(-/Y) cells leads to the lethality of chimeric embryos. Analysis of chimeric stomachs revealed the differentiation of VSIG1-null cells into squamous epithelia inside the glandular region. These results suggest that VSIG1 is required for the establishment of glandular versus squamous epithelia in the stomach.

  14. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Radon, Yvonne; Sempou, Emily; Jechow, Katharina; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1) the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2) the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and zebrafish.

  15. Internalization of adhesion junction proteins and their association with recycling endosome marker proteins in rat seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Young, J'Nelle S; Takai, Yoshimi; Kojic, Katarina L; Vogl, A Wayne

    2012-03-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs) are elaborate cytoskeleton-related structures that are formed in association with intercellular junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. They consist of a cylindrical double-membrane core composed of the plasma membranes of the two attached cells, cuffed by a dendritic network of actin filaments. TBCs are proposed to be subcellular machines that internalize intercellular junctions during the extensive junction remodeling that occurs during spermatogenesis. At the apical sites of attachment between Sertoli cells and spermatids, junction disassembly is part of the sperm release mechanism. In this study, we used immunological probes to explore junction internalization and recycling at apical TBCs in the rat seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrate that β1-integrin and nectin 2 were concentrated at the ends of TBCs and for the first time show that the early endosome marker RAB5A was also distinctly localized at the ends of TBCs that appear to be the 'bulbar' regions of the complexes. Significantly, we also demonstrate that the 'long-loop' recycling endosome marker RAB11A was co-distributed with nectin 2 at junctions with early spermatids deeper in the epithelium. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that TBCs associated with late spermatids internalize adhesion junctions and also indicate that some of the internalized junction proteins may be recycled to form junctions with the next generation of spermatids.

  16. SDF-1-induced adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium is modulated by azelnidipine via protein kinase C inhibition.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keiko; Shimokado, Kentaro; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2006-12-15

    Monocyte-endothelial interaction and its modulation by chemokines play a key role in atherogenesis and inflammation. We examined the potential effects of stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1) and azelnidipine, a novel dihydropyridine derivative, toward monocyte-endothelial interaction. Human monocytes were prepared from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from healthy volunteers and pretreated with azelnidipine (1 microM) for 48 h, after which their adhesion to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was analyzed using an in vitro flow apparatus with a shear stress of 1 dyn/cm(2). In some experiments, monocytes were incubated in the presence of stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1), a chemokine, just prior to the assay. Pre-incubation of monocytes with SDF-1 enhanced their adhesion to activated HUVECs. When monocytes were pre-incubated in the presence of azelnidipine, baseline levels as well as SDF-1-induced monocyte adhesion levels were reduced. Interestingly, the surface expressions of the adhesion molecules CD11a, CD11b, and CD36, were not changed by azelnidipine treatment. Western blotting analysis revealed that activation of protein kinase C (PKC)alpha was inhibited by azelnidipine treatment, while it also reduced the SDF-1-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Further, pre-incubation of monocytes with Go6976, a potent inhibitor of PKCalpha, significantly reduced monocyte adhesion to HUVECs. Our results demonstrated an inhibitory action of azelnidipine toward adhesive interactions of monocytes to HUVECs, which involves inhibition of PKCalpha and a reduction in [Ca(2+)](i). These findings imply a protective role of azelnidipine against inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  17. KDM4B histone demethylase and G9a regulate expression of vascular adhesion proteins in cerebral microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Young; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Sang-Eun; Ahn Jo, Sangmee

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) mediates the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the endothelium, promoting inflammation. We investigated the epigenetic mechanism regulating ICAM1 expression. The pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α dramatically increased ICAM1 mRNA and protein levels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells and mouse brain microvessels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that TNF-α reduced methylation of histone H3 at lysines 9 and 27 (H3K9 and H3K27), well-known residues involved in gene suppression. Inhibition of G9a and EZH2, histone methyltransferases responsible for methylation at H3K9 and H3K27, respectively as well as G9a overexpression demonstrated the involvement of G9a in TNF-α-induced ICAM1 expression and leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. A specific role for KDM4B, a histone demethylase targeting H3K9me2, in TNF-α-induced ICAM1 upregulation was validated with siRNA. Moreover, treating mice with a KDM4 inhibitor ML324 blocked TNF-α-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Similarly, TNF-α-induced VCAM1 expression was suppressed by G9a overexpression and KDM4B knockdown. Collectively, we demonstrated that modification of H3K9me2 by G9a and KDM4B regulates expression of vascular adhesion molecules, and that depletion of these proteins or KDM4B reduces inflammation-induced leukocyte extravasation. Thus, blocking ICAM1 or KDM4B could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity treating brain diseases. PMID:28327608

  18. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages.

  19. A possible role of cellulose-binding protein A (CBPA) in the adhesion of Eubacterium cellulosolvens 5 to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Takano, Kazunori; Minato, Hajime

    2003-08-01

    The cellulose-binding protein A (CBPA) of Eubacterium cellulosolvens 5 is a modular enzyme comprised of a catalytic domain, a cellulose-binding domain and a cell wall-binding domain. Cellobiose-grown cells changed their adhesion ability to cellulose depending on the growth phase. On the other hand, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-grown cells bound to cellulose regardless of their growth phase. The distribution of CBPA in the culture supernatant and cell fractions changed depending on the carbon source contained in the medium and growth phase. The cellobiose-grown cells harvested from the culture of the late stationary growth phase did not bind to cellulose, but their adhesion ability was recovered by treatment with recombinant CBPA. Moreover, cellobiose-grown cells harvested from the culture of an early exponential growth phase bound to cellulose, but their adhesion ability was inhibited by treatment with anti-CBPA antiserum. CBPA rapidly decreased the viscosity of CMC, indicating that CBPA was endoglucanase. The results obtained in this study indicate that CBPA plays an important role in the adhesion of E. cellulosolvens 5 cells to cellulose.

  20. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  1. Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis of Talin and FAK Regulates Adhesion Dynamics Necessary for Axon Guidance.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Patrick C; Patel, Kevin M; Gomez, Timothy M

    2017-02-08

    Guidance of axons to their proper synaptic target sites requires spatially and temporally precise modulation of biochemical signals within growth cones. Ionic calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential signal for axon guidance that mediates opposing effects on growth cone motility. The diverse effects of Ca(2+) arise from the precise localization of Ca(2+) signals into microdomains containing specific Ca(2+) effectors. For example, differences in the mechanical and chemical composition of the underlying substrata elicit local Ca(2+) signals within growth cone filopodia that regulate axon guidance through activation of the protease calpain. However, how calpain regulates growth cone motility remains unclear. Here, we identify the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as proteolytic targets of calpain in Xenopus laevis spinal cord neurons both in vivo and in vitro Inhibition of calpain increases the localization of endogenous adhesion signaling to growth cone filopodia. Using live cell microscopy and specific calpain-resistant point-mutants of talin (L432G) and FAK (V744G), we find that calpain inhibits paxillin-based adhesion assembly through cleavage of talin and FAK, and adhesion disassembly through cleavage of FAK. Blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK inhibits repulsive turning from focal uncaging of Ca(2+) within filopodia. In addition, blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK in vivo promotes Rohon-Beard peripheral axon extension into the skin. These data demonstrate that filopodial Ca(2+) signals regulate axon outgrowth and guidance through calpain regulation of adhesion dynamics through specific cleavage of talin and FAK.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The proper formation of neuronal networks requires accurate guidance of axons and dendrites during development by motile structures known as growth cones. Understanding the intracellular signaling mechanisms that govern growth cone motility will clarify how the nervous system develops and regenerates

  2. Localization of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) in the human eye.

    PubMed

    Almulki, Lama; Noda, Kousuke; Nakao, Shintaro; Hisatomi, Toshio; Thomas, Kennard L; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Recently we showed a critical role for Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1) in rodents during acute ocular inflammation, angiogenesis, and diabetic retinal leukostasis. However, the expression of VAP-1 in the human eye is unknown. VAP-1 localization was therefore investigated by immunohistochemistry. Five micrometer thick sections were generated from human ocular tissues embedded in paraffin. Sections were incubated overnight with primary mAbs against VAP-1 (5 microg/ml), smooth muscle actin (1 microg/ml), CD31 or isotype-matched IgG at 4 degrees C. Subsequently, a secondary mAb was used for 30 min at room temperature, followed by Dako Envision + HRP (AEC) System for signal detection. The stained sections were examined using light microscopy and the signal intensity was quantified by two evaluators and graded into 4 discrete categories. In all examined ocular tissues, VAP-1 staining was confined to the vasculature. VAP-1 labeling showed the highest intensity in both arteries and veins of neuronal tissues: retina and optic nerve, and the lowest intensity in the iris vasculature (p < 0.05). Scleral and choroidal vessels showed moderate staining for VAP-1. VAP-1 intensity was significantly higher in the arteries compared to veins (p < 0.05). Furthermore, VAP-1 staining in arteries colocalized with both CD31 and smooth muscle actin (sm-actin) staining, suggesting expression of VAP-1 in endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells or potentially pericytes. In conclusion, immunohistochemistry reveals constitutive expression of VAP-1 in human ocular tissues. VAP-1 expression is nearly exclusive to the vasculature with arteries showing significantly higher expression than veins. Furthermore, VAP-1 expression in the ocular vasculature is heterogeneous, with the vessels of the optic nerve and the retina showing highest expressions. These results characterize VAP-1 expression in human ocular tissues.

  3. GPR133 (ADGRD1), an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor, is necessary for glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Bayin, N S; Frenster, J D; Kane, J R; Rubenstein, J; Modrek, A S; Baitalmal, R; Dolgalev, I; Rudzenski, K; Scarabottolo, L; Crespi, D; Redaelli, L; Snuderl, M; Golfinos, J G; Doyle, W; Pacione, D; Parker, E C; Chi, A S; Heguy, A; MacNeil, D J; Shohdy, N; Zagzag, D; Placantonakis, D G

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly primary brain malignancy with extensive intratumoral hypoxia. Hypoxic regions of GBM contain stem-like cells and are associated with tumor growth and angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms that regulate tumor growth in hypoxic conditions are incompletely understood. Here, we use primary human tumor biospecimens and cultures to identify GPR133 (ADGRD1), an orphan member of the adhesion family of G-protein-coupled receptors, as a critical regulator of the response to hypoxia and tumor growth in GBM. GPR133 is selectively expressed in CD133+ GBM stem cells (GSCs) and within the hypoxic areas of PPN in human biospecimens. GPR133 mRNA is transcriptionally upregulated by hypoxia in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α)-dependent manner. Genetic inhibition of GPR133 with short hairpin RNA reduces the prevalence of CD133+ GSCs, tumor cell proliferation and tumorsphere formation in vitro. Forskolin rescues the GPR133 knockdown phenotype, suggesting that GPR133 signaling is mediated by cAMP. Implantation of GBM cells with short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of GPR133 in the mouse brain markedly reduces tumor xenograft formation and increases host survival. Analysis of the TCGA data shows that GPR133 expression levels are inversely correlated with patient survival. These findings indicate that GPR133 is an important mediator of the hypoxic response in GBM and has significant protumorigenic functions. We propose that GPR133 represents a novel molecular target in GBM and possibly other malignancies where hypoxia is fundamental to pathogenesis. PMID:27775701

  4. Localization of Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1) in the Human Eye

    PubMed Central

    Almulki, Lama; Noda, Kousuke; Nakao, Shintaro; Hisatomi, Toshio; Thomas, Kennard L.; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Recently we showed a critical role for Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1) in rodents during acute ocular inflammation, angiogenesis, and diabetic retinal leukostasis. However, the expression of VAP-1 in the human eye is unknown. VAP-1 localization was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Five μm thick sections were generated from human ocular tissues embedded in paraffin. Sections were incubated overnight with primary mAbs against VAP-1 (5μg/ml), smooth muscle actin (1μg/ml), CD31 or isotype-matched IgG at 4°C. Subsequently, a secondary mAb was used for 30min at room temperature, followed by Dako Envision + HRP (AEC) System for signal detection. The stained sections were examined using light microscopy and the signal intensity was quantified by two masked evaluators and graded into 4 discrete categories. In all examined ocular tissues, VAP-1 staining was confined to the vasculature. VAP-1 labeling showed the highest intensity in both arteries and veins of neuronal tissues; retina, and optic nerve, and the lowest intensity in the iris vasculature (p<0.05). Scleral and choroidal vessels showed moderate staining for VAP-1. VAP-1 intensity was significantly higher in the arteries compared to veins (p<0.05). Furthermore, VAP-1 staining in arteries co-localized with both CD31 and smooth muscle actin (sm-actin) staining, suggesting expression of VAP-1 in endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells or potentially pericytes. In conclusion, Immunohistochemistry reveals constitutive expression of VAP-1 in human ocular tissues. VAP-1 expression is exclusive to the vasculature with arteries showing significantly higher expression than veins. Furthermore, VAP-1 expression in the ocular vasculature is heterogeneous, with the vessels of the optic nerve and the retina showing highest expressions. These results characterize VAP-1 expression in human ocular tissues. PMID:19761765

  5. Optical measurements of dynamic adhesive forces between bacteria and protein-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Kathryn H.; Bowden, Gabriela; Hook, Magnus; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-06-01

    Bacterial adhesion to host tissue is an initial step in the infectious process. Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen, has covalently anchored cell surface adhesins called microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) which mediate specific adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Understanding MSCRAMM binding is potentially useful in developing effective antibacterial drugs. In this study, optical tweezers were used in conjunction with a quadrant photodetector to measure adhesive forces between MSCRAMMs and surfaces coated with the ECM molecule fibronectin. Using a piezoelectrically driven stage, a fibronectin-coated microsphere adherent to a coverslip was brought into contact with a cell optically trapped at 830 nm. The microsphere was subsequently moved away from the cell, and a quadrant photodiode monitored the cell displacement from the trap center during the detachment process. The photodetector voltage signals were subsequently converted into the adhesive forces between MSCRAMMs and fibronectin based on a calibration using Stoke"s law for viscous drag. Optical detection of the trapped bead displacement allowed us to study both the dynamics of the detachment process and observe the effects of various loading rates. This technique can be extended to identify the contributions of various MSCRAMM domains to adhesion in order to develop new methods of treating infections.

  6. Calcium Dobesilate Inhibits the Alterations in Tight Junction Proteins and Leukocyte Adhesion to Retinal Endothelial Cells Induced by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Ermelindo C.; Martins, João; Voabil, Paula; Liberal, Joana; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Bauer, Jacques; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ambrósio, António F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Calcium dobesilate (CaD) has been used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in the last decades, but its mechanisms of action are not elucidated. CaD is able to correct the excessive vascular permeability in the retina of diabetic patients and in experimental diabetes. We investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CaD against the increase in blood–retinal barrier (BRB) permeability induced by diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and diabetic rats treated with CaD. The BRB breakdown was evaluated using Evans blue. The content or distribution of tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin-5, and zonula occluden-1 [ZO-1]), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was evaluated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Leukocyte adhesion was evaluated in retinal vessels and in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the detection of oxidized carbonyls and tyrosine nitration. NF-κB activation was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS Diabetes increased the BRB permeability and retinal thickness. Diabetes also decreased occludin and claudin-5 levels and altered the distribution of ZO-1 and occludin in retinal vessels. These changes were inhibited by CaD treatment. CaD also inhibited the increase in leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels or endothelial cells and in ICAM-1 levels, induced by diabetes or elevated glucose. Moreover, CaD decreased oxidative stress and p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation caused by diabetes. CONCLUSIONS CaD prevents the BRB breakdown induced by diabetes, by restoring tight junction protein levels and organization and decreasing leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels. The protective effects of CaD are likely to involve the inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation, possibly through the inhibition of oxidative

  7. Role of Lactobacillus reuteri cell and mucus-binding protein A (CmbA) in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hanne; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A; Axelsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, a symbiotic inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals, is marketed as a probiotic. The ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus is an interesting property with regard to probiotic features such as colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with the host. Here, we present a study performed to elucidate the role of sortase (SrtA), four putative sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs), and one C-terminal membrane-anchored cell surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 in adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus in vitro. This included mutagenesis of the genes encoding these proteins and complementation of mutants. A null mutation in hmpref0536_10255 encoding srtA resulted in significantly reduced adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus, indicating involvement of SDPs in adhesion. Evaluation of the bacterial adhesion revealed that of the five putative surface protein mutants tested, only a null mutation in the hmpref0536_10633 gene, encoding a putative SDP with an LPxTG motif, resulted in a significant loss of adhesion to both Caco-2 cells and mucus. Complementation with the functional gene on a plasmid restored adhesion to Caco-2 cells. However, complete restoration of adhesion to mucus was not achieved. Overexpression of hmpref0536_10633 in strain ATCC PTA 6475 resulted in an increased adhesion to Caco-2 cells and mucus compared with the WT strain. We conclude from these results that, among the putative surface proteins tested, the protein encoded by hmpref0536_10633 plays a critical role in binding of Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 to Caco-2 cells and mucus. Based on this, we propose that this LPxTG motif containing protein should be referred to as cell and mucus binding protein A (CmbA).

  8. Dualistic nature of adhesive protein function: fibronectin and its biologically active peptide fragments can autoinhibit fibronectin function

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Fibronectin and certain polypeptide regions of this adhesive glycoprotein mediate cell attachment and spreading on various substrates. We explored the theoretical prediction that this adhesive protein could become a competitive inhibitor of fibronectin-mediated processes if present in solution at appropriately high concentrations. Fibronectin function was inhibited by purified plasma fibronectin at 5- 10 mg/ml, by a 75,000-dalton cell-interaction fragment of the protein at 0.5-1 mg/ml, and even by two synthetic peptides containing a conserved, hydrophilic amino acid sequence at 0.1-0.5 mg/ml. Inhibition of fibronectin-dependent cell spreading was dose dependent, noncytotoxic, and reversible. It was competitive in nature, since increased quantities of substrate-adsorbed fibronectin or longer incubation periods decreased the inhibition. A peptide inhibitory for fibronectin-mediated cell spreading also inhibited fibronectin-mediated attachment of cells to type I collagen, but it did not affect concanavalin A-mediated spreading. These results demonstrate the potential of a cell adhesion molecule and its biologically active peptide fragments to act as competitive inhibitors, and they suggest that fibronectin may act by binding to a saturable cell surface receptor. PMID:6736130

  9. Exploring the Molecular Origins of Bio(in)compatibility: Adhesion Between Proteins and Individual Chains of Poly(ethylene oxide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixman, Monica A.; Ortiz, Christine

    2002-03-01

    A critical determinant of the biocompatibility of implanted blood-contacting devices is the initial noncovalent adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Using high-resolution force spectroscopy, we have measured the complex intermolecular interaction forces between individual end-grafted PEO chains and a probe tip covalently bound with human serum albumin, the most abundant blood plasma protein in the human body. On approach, a long-range, nonlinear repulsive force is observed. Upon retraction, however, adhesion between the HSA probe tip and PEO chain occurs, which in many cases is strong enough to allow long-range adhesion and stretching of the individual PEO chains. The known PEO strain-induced conformational transition from the helical (ttg) to the planar (ttt) conformation is clearly observed and seen to shift to lower force values. Statistical analysis of adhesion data, comparison to a variety of control experiments, and theoretical modeling enable us to interpret these experimental results in terms of electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and steric forces.

  10. TM9/Phg1 and SadA proteins control surface expression and stability of SibA adhesion molecules in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Froquet, Romain; le Coadic, Marion; Perrin, Jackie; Cherix, Nathalie; Cornillon, Sophie; Cosson, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    TM9 proteins form a family of conserved proteins with nine transmembrane domains essential for cellular adhesion in many biological systems, but their exact role in this process remains unknown. In this study, we found that genetic inactivation of the TM9 protein Phg1A dramatically decreases the surface levels of the SibA adhesion molecule in Dictyostelium amoebae. This is due to a decrease in sibA mRNA levels, in SibA protein stability, and in SibA targeting to the cell surface. A similar phenotype was observed in cells devoid of SadA, a protein that does not belong to the TM9 family but also exhibits nine transmembrane domains and is essential for cellular adhesion. A contact site A (csA)-SibA chimeric protein comprising only the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of SibA and the extracellular domain of the Dictyostelium surface protein csA also showed reduced stability and relocalization to endocytic compartments in phg1A knockout cells. These results indicate that TM9 proteins participate in cell adhesion by controlling the levels of adhesion proteins present at the cell surface.

  11. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  12. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, R; Zhang, H; He, Y; Ji, W; Min, W; Boggon, T

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all {alpha}-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  13. Crystal structure of CCM3, a cerebral cavernous malformation protein critical for vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Haifeng; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang; Boggon, Titus J

    2010-07-30

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 A crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all alpha-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  14. Adhesions of extracellular surface-layer associated proteins in Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingchun; Xiang, Xinling; Lu, Qianhui; Zhang, Lanwei; Ma, Fang; Wang, Linlin

    2016-02-01

    Surface-layer associated proteins (SLAP) that envelop Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei M5-L and Lactobacillus casei Q8-L cell surfaces are involved in the adherence of these strain to the human intestinal cell line HT-29. To further elucidate some of the properties of these proteins, we assessed the yields and expressions of SLAP under different incubation conditions. An efficient and selective extraction of SLAP was obtained when cells of Lactobacillus were treated with 5 M LiCl at 37°C in aerobic conditions. The SLAP of Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L in cell extracts were visualized by SDS-PAGE and identified by Western blotting with sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin-labeled HT-29 cells as adhesion proteins. Atomic force microscopy contact imaging revealed that Lactobacillus strains M5-L and Q8-L normally display a smooth, homogeneous surface, whereas the surfaces of M5-L and Q8-L treated with 5 M LiCl were rough and more heterogeneous. Analysis of adhesion forces revealed that the initial adhesion forces of 1.41 and 1.28 nN obtained for normal Lactobacillus M5-L and Q8-L strains, respectively, decreased to 0.70 and 0.48 nN, respectively, following 5 M LiCl treatment. Finally, the dominant 45-kDa protein bands of Lactobacillus Q8-L and Lactobacillus M5-L were identified as elongation factor Tu and surface antigen, respectively, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  15. Construction of multifunctional proteins for tissue engineering: epidermal growth factor with collagen binding and cell adhesive activities.

    PubMed

    Hannachi Imen, Elloumi; Nakamura, Makiko; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2009-01-01

    The development of different techniques based on natural and polymeric scaffolds are useful for the design of different biomimetic materials. These approaches, however, require supplementary steps for the chemical or physical modification of the biomaterial. To avoid such steps, in the present study, we constructed a new multifunctional protein that can be easily immobilized onto hydrophobic surfaces, and at the same time helps enhance specific cell adhesion and proliferation onto collagen substrates. A collagen binding domain was fused to a previously constructed protein, which had an epidermal growth factor fused to a hydrophobic peptide that allows for cell adhesion. The new fusion protein, designated fnCBD-ERE-EGF is produced in Escherichia coli, and its abilities to bind to collagen and promote cell proliferation were investigated. fnCBD-ERE-EGF was shown to keep both collagen binding and cell growth-promoting activities comparable to those of the corresponding unfused proteins. The results obtained in this study also suggest the use of a fnCBD-ERE-EGF as an alternative for the design of multifunctional ECM-bound growth factor based materials.

  16. Congeneric bio-adhesive mussel foot proteins designed by modified prolines revealed a chiral bias in unnatural translation.

    PubMed

    Larregola, Maud; Moore, Shannon; Budisa, Nediljko

    2012-05-18

    Chiral bias in the unnatural translation and 'sticky' mussel proteins. The residue-specific in vivo incorporation of hydroxylated amino acids as well as other synthetic analogs, such as fluoroprolines, emerges as the method of choice for recombinant synthesis of Pro-rich mussel adhesive protein congeners. Chemical diversifications introduced in this way provide a general route towards bio-adhesive congeners endowed with properties not developed by natural evolution. Most importantly, we have found that the co-translational incorporation of (4R)-, and (4S)-hyroxylated and fluorinated analogs into mussel proteins presented a chiral bias: the expressed protein was only detectable in samples incubated with analogs with (4R)-substituents. Possible relationship of these stereochemical preferences for (4R)-stereoisomers in the translation to intracellular tRNA concentrations, ribosomal editing and proofreading or structural effects such as preorganization remains to be addressed in future studies. These studies will generally provide a mechanistic framework for the flexibility of the translational machinery and establish the boundaries of the unnatural translation.

  17. The Adhesion of Lactobacillus salivarius REN to a Human Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line Requires S-layer Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ran; Jiang, Lun; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Sang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius REN, a novel probiotic isolated from Chinese centenarians, can adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently colonize the host. We show here that the surface-layer protein choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of L. salivarius REN was involved in adherence to the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. Adhesion of a cbpA deletion mutant was significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type, suggesting that CbpA acts as an adhesin that mediates the interaction between the bacterium and its host. To identify the molecular mechanism of adhesion, we determined the crystal structure of a truncated form of CbpA that is likely involved in binding to its cell-surface receptor. The crystal structure identified CbpA as a peptidase of the M23 family whose members harbor a zinc-dependent catalytic site. Therefore, we propose that CbpA acts as a multifunctional surface protein that cleaves the host extracellular matrix and participates in adherence. Moreover, we identified enolase as the CbpA receptor on the surface of HT-29 cells. The present study reveals a new class of surface-layer proteins as well as the molecular mechanism that may contribute to the ability of L. salivarius REN to colonize the human gut. PMID:28281568

  18. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-09-15

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest.

  19. The influence of cross-linking on protein-protein interactions in a marine adhesive: the case of two byssus plaque proteins from the blue mussel.

    PubMed

    Fant, Camilla; Elwing, Hans; Höök, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between two proteins, Mefp-1 and Mefp-2, from the byssal plaque of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique. The challenge in using a surface-sensitive technique to investigate the interaction between two strongly adhesive proteins was met by coupling a biotinylated version of one of the proteins (b-Mefp-1) to an inert two-dimensional arrangement of streptavidin (SA) formed on top of a biotin-doped supported phospholipid bilayer. The interaction between Mefp-1 and Mefp-2 was further investigated by addition of Mefp-2 to SA-coupled b-Mefp-1, where the latter was either in the native state or cross-linked using sodium periodate (NaIO(4)), Cu(2+), or mushroom tyrosinase. With this coupling strategy it is shown that a requirement for attraction between the two proteins is that tyrosinase is used as the cross-linking agent of b-Mefp-1. By inhibiting the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase it is also shown that enzymatic activity is required for both efficient binding of tyrosinase to SA-coupled b-Mefp-1 as well as for the subsequent binding of Mefp-2. In contrast, spontaneous adsorption of Mefp-1 to a methyl-terminated (thiolated) gold surface followed by addition of Mefp-2 results in binding of Mefp-2 for all cross-linking agents. This suggests that cross-linking of Mefp-1 adsorbed on a solid surface induces structural changes in the adsorbed protein layer, resulting in exposure of free surface patches on which Mefp-2 binds.

  20. Differential Impact of Plasma Proteins on the Adhesion Efficiency of Vascular-Targeted Carriers (VTCs) in Blood of Common Laboratory Animals.

    PubMed

    Namdee, Katawut; Sobczynski, Daniel J; Onyskiw, Peter J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2015-12-16

    Vascular-targeted carrier (VTC) interaction with human plasma is known to reduce targeted adhesion efficiency in vitro. However, the role of plasma proteins on the adhesion efficiency of VTCs in laboratory animals remains unknown. Here, in vitro blood flow assays are used to explore the effects of plasma from mouse, rabbit, and porcine on VTC adhesion. Porcine blood exhibited a strong negative plasma effect on VTC adhesion while no significant plasma effect was found with rabbit and mouse blood. A brush density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on VTCs was effective at improving adhesion of microsized, but not nanosized, VTCs in porcine blood. Overall, the results suggest that porcine models, as opposed to mouse, can serve as better models in preclinical research for predicting the in vivo functionality of VTCs for use in humans. These considerations hold great importance for the design of various pharmaceutical products and development of reliable drug delivery systems.

  1. Differential impact of plasma proteins on the adhesion efficiency of vascular-targeted carriers (VTCs) in blood of common laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Namdee, Katawut; Sobczynski, Daniel J.; Onyskiw, Peter J.; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2016-01-01

    Vascular-targeted carrier (VTC) interaction with human plasma is known to reduce targeted adhesion efficiency in vitro. However, the role of plasma proteins on the adhesion efficiency of VTCs in laboratory animals remains unknown. Here, in vitro blood flow assays are used to explore the effects of plasma from mouse, rabbit and porcine on VTC adhesion. Porcine blood exhibited a strong negative plasma effect on VTC adhesion while no significant plasma effect was found with rabbit and mouse blood. A brush density poly(ethylene)-glycol (PEG) on VTCs was effective at improving adhesion of micro-sized, but not nano-sized, VTCs in porcine blood. Overall, the results suggest that porcine models, as opposed to mouse, can serve as a better model in preclinical research for predicting the in vivo functionality of VTCs for use in humans. These considerations hold great importance for the design of various pharmaceutical products and development of reliable drug delivery systems. PMID:26505780

  2. Mechanism for adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR56-mediated RhoA activation induced by collagen III stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E; Lencer, Wayne I; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family.

  3. β Integrin-like protein-mediated adhesion and its disturbances during cell cultivation of the mussel Mytilus trossulus.

    PubMed

    Maiorova, Mariia A; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we focus on the specific contribution of β integrin-like protein to adhesion-mediated events in molluscan larval cells in culture that could not have been investigated within the whole animal. An analysis of disturbances to cell-substratum adhesion, caused by the integrin receptor inhibiting Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS)-peptide, the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-chelators and the stress influence of freezing-thawing, reveals that all these factors resulted in the partial destruction of the integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction in culture and, in particular, changes in the distribution and relative abundance of β integrin-positive cells. The experiments, carried out on selected substrates, found that β integrin-positive cells demonstrate different affinities for the substrates. This finding further supports the assumption that epithelial differentiation in cultivated cells of larval Mytilus may be mediated by β integrin-like proteins via binding to laminin; direct binding to other components of the ECM could not be demonstrated. The mussel β integrin-positive cells are not involved in myogenic or neuronal differentiation on any of the substrates but part of them has tubulin-positive cilia, forming some epithelia-like structures. Our data indicate that β integrin-positive cells are able to proliferate in vitro which suggests that they could participate in renewing the digestive epithelium in larvae. The findings provide evidence that the distribution pattern of β integrin-like protein depends on the cell type and the factors influencing the adhesion.

  4. Resistance to protein adsorption and adhesion of fibroblasts on nanocrystalline diamond films: the role of topography and boron doping.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, María; Papaioannou, Stavros; Taylor, Andrew; Fekete, Ladislav; Gurevich, Leonid; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) films exhibit outstanding electrochemical properties that make them very attractive for the fabrication of electrodes for novel neural interfaces and prosthetics. In these devices, the physicochemical properties of the electrode materials are critical to ensure an efficient long-term performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of topography and doping to the biological performance of BNCD films. For this purpose, undoped and boron-doped NCD films were deposited on low roughness (LR) and high roughness (HR) substrates, which were studied in vitro by means of protein adsorption and fibroblast growth assays. Our results show that BNCD films significantly reduce the adsorption of serum proteins, mostly on the LR substrates. As compared to fibroblasts cultured on LR BNCD films, cells grown on the HR BNCD films showed significantly reduced adhesion and lower growth rates. The mean length of fibronectin fibrils deposited by the cells was significantly increased in the BNCD coated substrates, mainly in the LR surfaces. Overall, the largest influence on protein adsorption, cell adhesion, proliferation, and fibronectin deposition was due to the underlying sub-micron topography, with little or no influence of boron doping. In perspective, BNCD films displaying surface roughness in the submicron range may be used as a strategy to reduce the fibroblast growth on the surface of neural electrodes.

  5. The adhesive protein of Choromytilus chorus (Molina, 1782) and Aulacomya ater (Molina, 1782): a proline-rich and a glycine-rich polyphenolic protein.

    PubMed

    Burzio, L A; Saéz, C; Pardo, J; Waite, J H; Burzio, L O

    2000-06-15

    The adhesive polyphenolic proteins from Aulacomya ater and Choromytilus chorus with apparent molecular masses of 135000 and 105000, respectively, were digested with trypsin and the peptides produced resolved by reversed phase liquid chromatography. About 5 and 12 major peptides were obtained from the protein of A. ater and C. chorus, respectively. The major peptides were purified by reverse-phase chromatography and the amino acid sequence indicates that both polyphenolic proteins consisted of repeated sequence motifs in their primary structure. The major peptides of A. ater contain seven amino acids corresponding to the consensus sequence AGYGGXK, whereas the tyrosine was always found as 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa), the X residue in position 6 was either valine, leucine or isoleucine, and the carboxy terminal was either lysine or hydroxylysine. On the other hand, the major peptides of C. chorus ranged in size from 6 to 21 amino acids and the majority correspond to the consensus sequence AKPSKYPTGYKPPVK. Both proteins differ markedly in the sequence of their tryptic peptides, but they share the common characteristics of other adhesive proteins in having a tandem sequence repeat in their primary structure.

  6. Small Heat Shock Protein αB-Crystallin Controls Shape and Adhesion of Glioma and Myoblast Cells in the Absence of Stress

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell shape and adhesion and their proper controls are fundamental for all biological systems. Mesenchymal cells migrate at an average rate of 6 to 60 μm/hr, depending on the extracellular matrix environment and cell signaling. Myotubes, fully differentiated muscle cells, are specialized for power-generation and therefore lose motility. Cell spreading and stabilities of focal adhesion are regulated by the critical protein vinculin from immature myoblast to mature costamere of differentiated myotubes where myofibril Z-band linked to sarcolemma. The Z-band is constituted from microtubules, intermediate filaments, cell adhesion molecules and other adapter proteins that communicate with the outer environment. Mesenchymal cells, including myoblast cells, convert actomyosin contraction forces to tension through mechano-responsive adhesion assembly complexes as Z-band equivalents. There is growing evidence that microtubule dynamics are involved in the generation of contractile forces; however, the roles of microtubules in cell adhesion dynamics are not well determined. Here, we show for the first time that αB-crystallin, a molecular chaperon for tubulin/microtubules, is involved in cell shape determination. Moreover, knockdown of this molecule caused myoblasts and glioma cells to lose their ability for adhesion as they tended to behave like migratory cells. Surprisingly, αB-crystallin knockdown in both C6 glial cells and L6 myoblast permitted cells to migrate more rapidly (2.7 times faster for C6 and 1.3 times faster for L6 cells) than dermal fibroblast. On the other hand, overexpression of αB-crystallin in cells led to an immortal phenotype because of persistent adhesion. Position of matured focal adhesion as visualized by vinculin immuno-staining, stress fiber direction, length, and density were clearly αB-crystallin dependent. These results indicate that the small HSP αB-crystallin has important roles for cell adhesion, and thus microtubule dynamics are necessary

  7. SpyAD, a moonlighting protein of group A Streptococcus contributing to bacterial division and host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gallotta, Marilena; Gancitano, Giovanni; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Mora, Marirosa; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Tuscano, Giovanna; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Taddei, Anna Rita; Rindi, Simonetta; Speziale, Pietro; Soriani, Marco; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada; Bensi, Giuliano

    2014-07-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen causing a wide repertoire of mild and severe diseases for which no vaccine is yet available. We recently reported the identification of three protein antigens that in combination conferred wide protection against GAS infection in mice. Here we focused our attention on the characterization of one of these three antigens, Spy0269, a highly conserved, surface-exposed, and immunogenic protein of unknown function. Deletion of the spy0269 gene in a GAS M1 isolate resulted in very long bacterial chains, which is indicative of an impaired capacity of the knockout mutant to properly divide. Confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the protein was mainly localized at the cell septum and could interact in vitro with the cell division protein FtsZ, leading us to hypothesize that Spy0269 is a member of the GAS divisome machinery. Predicted structural domains and sequence homologies with known streptococcal adhesins suggested that this antigen could also play a role in mediating GAS interaction with host cells. This hypothesis was confirmed by showing that recombinant Spy0269 could bind to mammalian epithelial cells in vitro and that Lactococcus lactis expressing Spy0269 on its cell surface could adhere to mammalian cells in vitro and to mice nasal mucosa in vivo. On the basis of these data, we believe that Spy0269 is involved both in bacterial cell division and in adhesion to host cells and we propose to rename this multifunctional moonlighting protein as SpyAD (Streptococcus pyogenes Adhesion and Division protein).

  8. Abnormal expression of paxillin correlates with tumor progression and poor survival in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paxillin (PXN) has been found to be aberrantly regulated in various malignancies and involved in tumor growth and invasion. The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of PXN in gastric cancer is still unclear. Methods The expression of PXN was determined in paired gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of PXN in 239 gastric cancer patients. Statistical analysis was applied to investigate the correlation between PXN expression and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in patients. Additionally, the effects of PXN on gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration were also evaluated. Results PXN was up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines as compared with adjacent normal tissues and normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. Overexpression of PXN was correlated with distant metastasis (P = 0.001) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.021) in gastric cancer patients. Patients with high PXN expression tended to have poor prognosis compared with patients with low PXN expression (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that PXN expression was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.020). Moreover, ectopic expression of PXN promotes cell proliferation and migration in AGS cells whereas knockdown of PXN inhibits cell proliferation and migration in SGC7901 cells. Conclusions PXN plays an important role in tumor progression and may be used as a potential prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. PMID:24180516

  9. Isolation of a laminin-binding protein from the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani that may mediate cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, A; Bandyopadhyay, K; Kole, L; Das, P K

    1999-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding proteins on the surface of Leishmania are thought to play a crucial role in the onset of leishmaniasis, as these parasites invade mononuclear phagocytes in various organs after migrating through the ECM. In a previous report, we presented several lines of evidence suggesting that Leishmania has a specific receptor for laminin, a major ECM protein, with a Kd in the nanomolar range. Here we describe the identification, purification and biochemical characterization of the Leishmania laminin receptor. When the outer membrane proteins of L. donovani were blotted on to nitrocellulose paper and probed with laminin, a prominent laminin-binding protein of 67 kDa was identified. The purified protein was isolated by a three-step process involving DEAE-cellulose, Con A (concanavalin A)-Sepharose and laminin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and was used to raise a monospecific antibody. The same protein was obtained when parasite membrane extracts were adsorbed to antibody affinity matrix and eluted with glycine. The affinity-purified protein bound to laminin in a detergent-solubilized form as well as after integration into artificial bilayers, and was subsequently characterized as an integral membrane protein. Metaperiodate oxidation and metabolic inhibition of glycosylation studies indicate the binding protein to be glycoprotein in nature and that N-linked oligosaccharides play a part in the interaction of laminin with the binding protein. Surface-labelled parasites attached to microtitre wells coated with laminin and the 67 kDa protein blocked the adhesion to laminin substrate. We propose that the 67 kDa protein is an adhesin involved in the attachment of Leishmania to host tissues. PMID:9895301

  10. The Role of TSC Proteins in Regulating Cell Adhesion and Motility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    regulate cell adhesion and motility as it relates to the genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The pathogenesis of TSC that develops due to the...from seizures, mental retardation, and autism . Thus, TSC represents a major cause of developmental disorders and epilepsy in the pediatric...insights on TSC1 and TSC2, and the pathogenesis of tuberous sclerosis. Cancer Biol. Ther. 2:471–476. Kwiatkowski, D.J., H. Zhang, J.L. Bandura, K.M

  11. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Renquan; Sun, Xinghui; Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Lei; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  12. An immediate-early protein of white spot syndrome virus modulates the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huasong; Ruan, Lingwei; Xu, Xun

    2011-10-25

    WSSV interacts with integrin during infection of shrimps and modulate the focal adhesion kinase which is known as a regulator of several downstream signaling pathways. Viral protein kinases are thought to be important for virus infection by regulating the host signaling pathways. WSV083 is an immediate-early gene of white spot syndrome virus that contains a Ser/Thr protein kinase domain. So, does WSSV modulate FAK phosphorylation via the WSV083 molecule? In this study, co-transfection of WSV083 and MjFAK genes proceeded in insect cells revealed that the MjFAK phosphorylation and cell adhesion activity could be inhibited by the expression of WSV083. Kinase domain mutants of WSV083 lost its ability of inhibiting FAK phosphorylation. Moreover, silencing of FAK gene through RNAi accelerated the shrimp death rate upon WSSV challenge. These results demonstrate for the first time that modulation of FAK phosphorylation by WSV083 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of WSSV infection.

  13. Adhesive properties, extracellular protein production, and metabolism in the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain when grown in the presence of mucin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Borja; Saad, Naima; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, Maria C

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, and how it reacts to the presence of mucin in its extracellular milieu. Parameters studied included cell clustering, adhesion to mucin, extracellular protein production, and formation of final metabolites. L. rhamnosus GG was found to grow efficiently in the presence of glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, or mucin (partially purified or purified) as sole carbon sources. However, it was unable to grow using other mucin constituents, such as fucose or glucuronic acid. Mucin induced noticeable changes in all the parameters studied when compared with growth using glucose, including in the formation of cell clusters, which were easily disorganized with trypsin. Mucin increased adhesion of the bacterium, and modulated the production of extracellular proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that mucin was not degraded during L. rhamnosus GG growth, suggesting that this bacterium is able to partially use the glucidic moiety of glycoprotein. This study goes some way towards developing an understanding of the metabolic and physiological changes that L. rhamnosus GG undergoes within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Differential Expression of Adhesion-Related Proteins and MAPK Pathways Lead to Suitable Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; López-Díaz, Annia; Barrera, Lourdes; Camacho-Morales, Alberto; Hernandez-Aguilar, Felipe; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Calderón-Pérez, Jaime; García-Álvarez, Jorge; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Piña-Barba, Cristina; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Lara-Arias, Jorge; Rivera-Bolaños, Nancy; López-Camarillo, César; Moncada-Saucedo, Nidia; Galván-De los Santos, Alejandra; Meza-Urzúa, Fátima; Villarreal-Gómez, Luis; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth

    2015-11-01

    Cellular adhesion enables communication between cells and their environment. Adhesion can be achieved throughout focal adhesions and its components influence osteoblast differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Because cell adhesion and osteoblast differentiation are closely related, this article aimed to analyze the expression profiles of adhesion-related proteins during osteoblastic differentiation of two hMSCs subpopulations (CD105(+) and CD105(-)) and propose a strategy for assembling bone grafts based on its adhesion ability. In vitro experiments of osteogenic differentiation in CD105(-) cells showed superior adhesion efficiency and 2-fold increase of α-actinin expression compared with CD105(+) cells at the maturation stage. Interestingly, levels of activated β1-integrin increased in CD105(-) cells during the process. Additionally, the CD105(-) subpopulation showed 3-fold increase of phosphorylated FAK(Y397) compared to CD105(+) cells. Results also indicate that ERK1/2 was activated during CD105(-) bone differentiation and participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 in CD105(+) differentiation through a focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-independent pathway. In vivo trial demonstrated that grafts containing CD105(-) showed osteocytes embedded in a mineralized matrix, promoted adequate graft integration, increased host vascular infiltration, and efficient intramembranous repairing. In contrast, grafts containing CD105(+) showed deficient endochondral ossification and fibrocartilaginous tissue. Based on the expression of α-actinin, FAKy,(397) and ERK1/2 activation, we define maturation stage as critical for bone graft assembling. By in vitro assays, CD105(-) subpopulation showed superior adhesion efficiency compared to CD105(+) cells. Considering in vitro and in vivo assays, this study suggests that integration of a scaffold with CD105(-) subpopulation at the maturation stage represents an attractive strategy for clinical use in

  15. Improved adhesion, growth and maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells on polyethylene grafted with bioactive molecules and carbon particles.

    PubMed

    Parizek, Martin; Kasalkova, Nikola; Bacakova, Lucie; Slepicka, Petr; Lisa, Vera; Blazkova, Martina; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2009-11-20

    High-density polyethylene (PE) foils were modified by an Ar(+) plasma discharge and subsequent grafting with biomolecules, namely glycine (Gly), polyethylene glycol (PEG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), colloidal carbon particles (C) or BSA and C (BSA + C). As revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), the surface chemical structure and surface morphology of PE changed dramatically after plasma treatment. The contact angle decreased for the samples treated by plasma, mainly in relation to the formation of oxygen structures during plasma irradiation. A further decrease in the contact angle was obvious after glycine and PEG grafting. The increase in oxygen concentration after glycine and PEG grafting proved that the two molecules were chemically linked to the plasma-activated surface. Plasma treatment led to ablation of the PE surface layer, thus the surface morphology was changed and the surface roughness was increased. The materials were then seeded with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) derived from rat aorta and incubated in a DMEM medium with fetal bovine serum. Generally, the cells adhered and grew better on modified rather than on unmodified PE samples. Immunofluorescence showed that focal adhesion plaques containing talin, vinculin and paxillin were most apparent in cells on PE grafted with PEG or BSA + C, and the fibres containing alpha-actin, beta-actin or SM1 and SM2 myosins were thicker, more numerous and more brightly stained in the cells on all modified PE samples than on pristine PE. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed increased concentrations of focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and also a cytoskeletal protein beta-actin in cells on PE modified with BSA + C. A contractile protein alpha-actin was increased in cells on PE grafted with PEG or Gly. These results showed that PE activated with plasma and subsequently grafted with bioactive molecules and colloidal C

  16. Improved Adhesion, Growth and Maturation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Polyethylene Grafted with Bioactive Molecules and Carbon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Parizek, Martin; Kasalkova, Nikola; Bacakova, Lucie; Slepicka, Petr; Lisa, Vera; Blazkova, Martina; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2009-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (PE) foils were modified by an Ar+ plasma discharge and subsequent grafting with biomolecules, namely glycine (Gly), polyethylene glycol (PEG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), colloidal carbon particles (C) or BSA and C (BSA + C). As revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), the surface chemical structure and surface morphology of PE changed dramatically after plasma treatment. The contact angle decreased for the samples treated by plasma, mainly in relation to the formation of oxygen structures during plasma irradiation. A further decrease in the contact angle was obvious after glycine and PEG grafting. The increase in oxygen concentration after glycine and PEG grafting proved that the two molecules were chemically linked to the plasma-activated surface. Plasma treatment led to ablation of the PE surface layer, thus the surface morphology was changed and the surface roughness was increased. The materials were then seeded with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) derived from rat aorta and incubated in a DMEM medium with fetal bovine serum. Generally, the cells adhered and grew better on modified rather than on unmodified PE samples. Immunofluorescence showed that focal adhesion plaques containing talin, vinculin and paxillin were most apparent in cells on PE grafted with PEG or BSA + C, and the fibres containing α-actin, β-actin or SM1 and SM2 myosins were thicker, more numerous and more brightly stained in the cells on all modified PE samples than on pristine PE. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed increased concentrations of focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and also a cytoskeletal protein β-actin in cells on PE modified with BSA + C. A contractile protein α-actin was increased in cells on PE grafted with PEG or Gly. These results showed that PE activated with plasma and subsequently grafted with bioactive molecules and colloidal C particles

  17. Paxillin kinase linker (PKL) regulates Vav2 signaling during cell spreading and migration.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew C; Machida, Kazuya; Mayer, Bruce J; Turner, Christopher E

    2013-06-01

    The Rho family of GTPases plays an important role in coordinating dynamic changes in the cell migration machinery after integrin engagement with the extracellular matrix. Rho GTPases are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and negatively regulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). However, the mechanisms by which GEFs and GAPs are spatially and temporally regulated are poorly understood. Here the activity of the proto-oncogene Vav2, a GEF for Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42, is shown to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dependent interaction with the ArfGAP PKL (GIT2). PKL is required for Vav2 activation downstream of integrin engagement and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. In turn, Vav2 regulates the subsequent redistribution of PKL and the Rac1 GEF β-PIX to focal adhesions after EGF stimulation, suggesting a feedforward signaling loop that coordinates PKL-dependent Vav2 activation and PKL localization. Of interest, Vav2 is required for the efficient localization of PKL and β-PIX to the leading edge of migrating cells, and knockdown of Vav2 results in a decrease in directional persistence and polarization in migrating cells, suggesting a coordination between PKL/Vav2 signaling and PKL/β-PIX signaling during cell migration.

  18. GPR116, an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor, promotes breast cancer metastasis via the Gαq-p63RhoGEF-Rho GTPase pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaolong; Jin, Rongrong; Qu, Guojun; Wang, Xiu; Li, Zhenxi; Yuan, Zengjin; Zhao, Chen; Siwko, Stefan; Shi, Tieliu; Wang, Ping; Xiao, Jianru; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Jian

    2013-10-15

    Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), which contain adhesion domains in their extracellular region, have been found to play important roles in cell adhesion, motility, embryonic development, and immune response. Because most adhesion molecules with adhesion domains have vital roles in cancer metastasis, we speculated that adhesion GPCRs are potentially involved in cancer metastasis. In this study, we identified GPR116 as a novel regulator of breast cancer metastasis through expression and functional screening of the adhesion GPCR family. We found that knockdown of GPR116 in highly metastatic (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells suppressed cell migration and invasion. Conversely, ectopic GPR116 expression in poorly metastatic (MCF-7 and Hs578T) cells promoted cell invasion. We further showed that knockdown of GPR116 inhibited breast cancer cell metastasis in two mammary tumor metastasis mouse models. Moreover, GPR116 modulated the formation of lamellipodia and actin stress fibers in cells in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. At a molecular level, GPR116 regulated cell motility and morphology through the Gαq-p63RhoGEF-RhoA/Rac1 pathway. The biologic significance of GPR116 in breast cancer is substantiated in human patient samples, where GPR116 expression is significantly correlated with breast tumor progression, recurrence, and poor prognosis. These findings show that GPR116 is crucial for the metastasis of breast cancer and support GPR116 as a potential prognostic marker and drug target against metastatic human breast cancer.

  19. Discovery of a novel and conserved Plasmodium falciparum exported protein that is important for adhesion of PfEMP1 at the surface of infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Claes, Aurélie; Roberts, Amy; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Mattei, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum virulence is linked to its ability to sequester in post-capillary venules in the human host. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is the main variant surface antigen implicated in this process. Complete loss of parasite adhesion is linked to a large subtelomeric deletion on chromosome 9 in a number of laboratory strains such as D10 and T9-96. Similar to the cytoadherent reference line FCR3, D10 strain expresses PfEMP1 on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes, however without any detectable cytoadhesion. To investigate which of the deleted subtelomeric genes may be implicated in parasite adhesion, we selected 12 genes for D10 complementation studies that are predicted to code for proteins exported to the red blood cell. We identified a novel single copy gene (PF3D7_0936500) restricted to P. falciparum that restores adhesion to CD36, termed here virulence-associated protein 1 (Pfvap1). Protein knockdown and gene knockout experiments confirmed a role of PfVAP1 in the adhesion process in FCR3 parasites. PfVAP1 is co-exported with PfEMP1 into the host cell via vesicle-like structures called Maurer's clefts. This study identifies a novel highly conserved parasite molecule that contributes to parasite virulence possibly by assisting PfEMP1 to establish functional adhesion at the host cell surface. PMID:25703704

  20. Enantiopure chiral poly(glycerol methacrylate) self-assembled monolayers knock down protein adsorption and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Köwitsch, Alexander; Zhou, Guoying; Groth, Thomas; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Niepel, Marcus; Amado, Elkin; Kressler, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Chirality plays a fundamental role not only in biological systems, but also in synthetic materials intended for bio-applications. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are prepared on gold surfaces through a "grafting to" method from racemic or enantiopure chiral poly(glycerol methacrylate)s (PGMA(rac), PGMA(R), and PGMA(S)), having a thiol endgroup. Such SAMs constitute a chemically and structurally well-defined model substrate for studying protein adsorption and cell adhesion as a function of the polymer chirality. Surface plasmon resonance measurements reveal that PGMA SAMs greatly reduce the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) compared to bare gold surfaces. Interestingly, enantiopure SAMs based on PGMA(R) or PGMA(S) show a significantly larger reduction in BSA adsorption than PGMA(rac)-covered surfaces. Studies with the monocytic cell line THP-1 show a similar relationship between enantiopurity of PGMA SAMs and the extent of cell adhesion. Ellipsometry and Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate that SAMs formed by PGMA(rac) have a higher grafting density compared to SAMs of PGMA(R) and PGMA(S). This seems to be due to the ability of PGMA(rac) to form more intermolecular hydrogen bonds among polymer chains compared to the enantiopure PGMAs. Circular dichroism spectroscopy provide evidence that enantiopure polymers adopt a chiral ordered conformation, most likely helical, in aqueous solutions. It is concluded that a higher water content of SAMs formed by enantiopure PGMA(S) and PGMA(R) SAMs arises from the macromolecular chiral conformation adopted by their enantiopure PGMA chains, and it is the decisive reason for the reduced BSA adsorption and cell adhesion as compared to PGMA(rac) SAMs.

  1. Nicotine stimulates adhesion molecular expression via calcium influx and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Liming; Zhao, Yangxing; Yao, Chenjiang; Wang, Lianyun; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of nicotine on endothelium dysfunction and development of vascular diseases, we investigated the influence on adhesion molecular expression mediated by nicotine and the mechanism of this effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The result showed that nicotine could induce surface/soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and endothelial selectin (E-selectin) expression in a time-response decline manner and the peak appeared at 15 min. This action could be mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) and MAPK/p38 because their activation could be distinctly blocked by MAPK inhibitors, PD098059 or SB203580. Mecamylamine (non-selective nicotinic receptor inhibitor), alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha7 nicotinic receptor inhibitor) could block Ca2+ accumulation, and then, prevented the phosphorylation on ERK1/2 and p38. They also inhibited the surface/soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin production of HUVECs modulated by nicotine. Therefore, we concluded that: (i) nicotine obviously up-regulates VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression at 15 min in HUVECs, (ii) nicotine activates HUVECs triggered by the ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation with an involvement of intracellular calcium mobilization chiefly mediated by alpha7 nicotinic receptor, (iii) intracellular Ca2+ activates a sequential pathway from alpha7 nicotinic receptor to the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38. These elucidate that nicotine activates HUVECs through fast signal transduction pathway and arguments their capacity of adhesion molecular production. Further more nicotine may contribute its influence to the progression of vascular disease such as atherosclerotic lesion.

  2. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) modulates adhesion, migration and invasion in bone tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mak, Isabella W Y; Turcotte, Robert E; Ghert, Michelle

    2013-07-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be an important factor in osteolysis in the setting of metastatic carcinoma to the bone. However, PTHrP may also be central in the setting of primary bone tumors. Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is an aggressive osteolytic bone tumor characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that are recruited by osteoblast-like stromal cells. The stromal cells of GCT are well established as the only neoplastic element of the tumor, and we have previously shown that PTHrP is highly expressed by these cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the stromal cells exposed to a monoclonal antibody to PTHrP exhibited rapid plate detachment and quickly died in vitro. Therefore, PTHrP may serve in an autocrine manner to increase cell proliferation and promote invasive properties in GCT. The purpose of this study was to use transcriptomic microarrays and functional assays to examine the effects of PTHrP neutralization on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Microarray and proteomics data identified genes that were differentially expressed in GCT stromal cells under various PTHrP treatment conditions. Treatment of GCT stromal cells with anti-PTHrP antibodies showed a change in the expression of 13 genes from the integrin family relative to the IgG control. Neutralization of PTHrP reduced cell migration and invasion as evidenced by functional assays. Adhesion and anoikis assays demonstrated that although PTHrP neutralization inhibits cell adhesion properties, cell detachment related to PTHrP neutralization did not result in associated cell death, as expected in mesenchymal stromal cells. Based on the data presented herein, we conclude that PTHrP excreted by GCT stromal cells increases bone tumor cell local invasiveness and migration.

  3. The oxidase activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) induces endothelial E- and P-selectins and leukocyte binding.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Sirpa; Karikoski, Marika; Mercier, Nathalie; Koskinen, Kaisa; Henttinen, Tiina; Elima, Kati; Salmivirta, Katriina; Salmi, Marko

    2007-09-15

    Leukocyte migration from the blood into tissues is pivotal in immune homeostasis and in inflammation. During the multistep extravasation cascade, endothelial selectins (P- and E-selectin) and vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), a cell-surface-expressed oxidase, are important in tethering and rolling. Here, we studied the signaling functions of the catalytic activity of VAP-1. Using human endothelial cells transfected with wild-type VAP-1 and an enzymatically inactive VAP-1 point mutant, we show that transcription and translation of E- and P-selectins are induced through the enzymatic activity of VAP-1. Moreover, use of VAP-1-deficient animals and VAP-1-deficient animals carrying the human VAP-1 as a transgene show a VAP-enzyme activity-dependent induction of P-selectin in vivo. Up-regulation of P-selectin was found both in high endothelial venules in lymphoid tissues and in flat-walled vessels in noninflamed tissues. VAP-1 activity in vivo led to increased P-selectin-dependent binding of lymphocytes to endothelial cells. These data show that the oxidase reaction catalyzed by VAP-1 alters the expression of other molecules involved in the leukocyte extravasation cascade. Our findings indicate cross-talk between adhesion molecules involved in the tethering and rolling of leukocytes and show that VAP-1-dependent signaling can prime the vessels for an enhanced inflammatory response.

  4. Structural analysis of the synaptic protein neuroligin and its beta-neurexin complex: determinants for folding and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fabrichny, Igor P; Leone, Philippe; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Comoletti, Davide; Miller, Meghan T; Taylor, Palmer; Bourne, Yves; Marchot, Pascale

    2007-12-20

    The neuroligins are postsynaptic cell adhesion proteins whose associations with presynaptic neurexins participate in synaptogenesis. Mutations in the neuroligin and neurexin genes appear to be associated with autism and mental retardation. The crystal structure of a neuroligin reveals features not found in its catalytically active relatives, such as the fully hydrophobic interface forming the functional neuroligin dimer; the conformations of surface loops surrounding the vestigial active center; the location of determinants that are critical for folding and processing; and the absence of a macromolecular dipole and presence of an electronegative, hydrophilic surface for neurexin binding. The structure of a beta-neurexin-neuroligin complex reveals the precise orientation of the bound neurexin and, despite a limited resolution, provides substantial information on the Ca2+-dependent interactions network involved in trans-synaptic neurexin-neuroligin association. These structures exemplify how an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold varies in surface topography to confer adhesion properties and provide templates for analyzing abnormal processing or recognition events associated with autism.

  5. Taking Orders from Light: Photo-Switchable Working/Inactive Smart Surfaces for Protein and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junji; Ma, Wenjing; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2017-03-15

    Photoresponsive smart surfaces are promising candidates for a variety of applications in optoelectronics and sensing devices. The use of light as an order signal provides advantages of remote and noninvasive control with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Modification of the photoswitches with target biomacromolecules, such as peptides, DNA, and small molecules including folic acid derivatives and sugars, has recently become a popular strategy to empower the smart surfaces with an improved detection efficiency and specificity. Herein, we report the construction of photoswitchable self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) based on sugar (galactose/mannose)-decorated azobenzene derivatives and determine their photoswitchable, selective protein/cell adhesion performances via electrochemistry. Under alternate UV/vis irradiation, interconvertible high/low recognition and binding affinity toward selective lectins (proteins that recognize sugars) and cells that highly express sugar receptors are achieved. Furthermore, the cis-SAMs with a low binding affinity toward selective proteins and cells also exhibit minimal response toward unselective protein and cell samples, which offers the possibility in avoiding unwanted contamination and consumption of probes prior to functioning for practical applications. Besides, the electrochemical technique used facilitates the development of portable devices based on the smart surfaces for on-demand disease diagnosis.

  6. Specific degradation of the mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA) of Lactobacillus reuteri to an antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Bøhle, Liv Anette; Brede, Dag Anders; Diep, Dzung B; Holo, Helge; Nes, Ingolf F

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal flora of mammals contains lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that may provide positive health effects for the host. Such bacteria are referred to as probiotic bacteria. From a pig, we have isolated a Lactobacillus reuteri strain that produces an antimicrobial peptide (AMP). The peptide was purified and characterized, and it was unequivocally shown that the AMP was a well-defined degradation product obtained from the mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA); it was therefore termed AP48-MapA. This finding demonstrates how large proteins might inherit unexpected pleiotropic functions by conferring antimicrobial capacities on the producer. The MapA/AP48-MapA system is the first example where a large protein of an intestinal LAB is shown to give rise to such an AMP. It is also of particular interest that the protein that provides this AMP is associated with the binding of the bacterium producing it to the surface/lining of the gut. This finding gives us new perspective on how some probiotic bacteria may successfully compete in this environment and thereby contribute to a healthy microbiota.

  7. The GPS motif is a molecular switch for bimodal activities of adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Prömel, Simone; Frickenhaus, Marie; Hughes, Samantha; Mestek, Lamia; Staunton, David; Woollard, Alison; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schnabel, Ralf; Russ, Andreas P; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-08-30

    Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCR) form the second largest group of seven-transmembrane-spanning (7TM) receptors whose molecular layout and function differ from canonical 7TM receptors. Despite their essential roles in immunity, tumorigenesis, and development, the mechanisms of aGPCR activation and signal transduction have remained obscure to date. Here, we use a transgenic assay to define the protein domains required in vivo for the activity of the prototypical aGPCR LAT-1/Latrophilin in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) motif, the molecular hallmark feature of the entire aGPCR class, is essential for LAT-1 signaling serving in two different activity modes of the receptor. Surprisingly, neither mode requires cleavage but presence of the GPS, which relays interactions with at least two different partners. Our work thus uncovers the versatile nature of aGPCR activity in molecular detail and places the GPS motif in a central position for diverse protein-protein interactions.

  8. A short-term Borrelia burgdorferi infection model identifies tissue tropisms and bloodstream survival conferred by adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Caine, Jennifer A; Coburn, Jenifer

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease in the United States, is able to persist in the joint, heart, skin, and central nervous system for the lifetime of its mammalian host. Borrelia species achieve dissemination to distal sites in part by entry into and travel within the bloodstream. Much work has been performed in vitro describing the roles of many B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins in adhesion to host cell surface proteins and extracellular matrix components, although the biological relevance of these interactions is only beginning to be explored in vivo. A need exists in the field for an in vivo model to define the biological roles of B. burgdorferi adhesins in tissue-specific vascular interactions. We have developed an in vivo model of vascular interaction of B. burgdorferi in which the bacteria are injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 1 h. This model has shown that the fibronectin binding protein BB0347 has a tropism for joint tissue. We also have shown an importance of the integrin binding protein, P66, in binding to vasculature of the ear and heart. This model also revealed unexpected roles for Borrelia adhesins BBK32 and OspC in bacterial burdens in the bloodstream. The intravenous inoculation model of short-term infection provides new insights into critical B. burgdorferi interactions with the host required for initial survival and tissue colonization.

  9. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  10. Downregulation of human platelet reactivity by neutrophils. Participation of lipoxygenase derivatives and adhesive proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Valles, J; Santos, M T; Marcus, A J; Safier, L B; Broekman, M J; Islam, N; Ullman, H L; Aznar, J

    1993-01-01

    Unstimulated neutrophils inhibited activation and recruitment of thrombin- or collagen-stimulated platelets in an agonist-specific manner. This occurred under conditions of close physical cell-cell contact, although biochemical adhesion between the cells as mediated by P-selectin was not required. Moreover, in the presence of monoclonal P-selectin antibodies that blocked biochemical platelet-neutrophil adhesion, thrombin-stimulated platelets were more efficiently downregulated by neutrophils. This suggested a prothrombotic role for P-selectin under these circumstances. The neutrophil downregulatory effect on thrombin-stimulated platelets was amplified by lipoxygenase inhibition with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid. In contrast, the neutrophil inhibitory effect on platelets was markedly reduced by platelet-derived 12S-hydroxy-5,8-cis, 10-trans, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (12S-HETE), as well as by the platelet-neutrophil transcellular product, 12S,20-dihydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12S,20-DiHETE), but not by another comparable metabolite, 5S,12S-dihydroxy-6-trans, 8-cis, 10-trans, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (5S,12S-DiHETE), or the neutrophil-derived hydroxy acid leukotriene B4. The neutrophil downregulatory effect on thrombin-induced platelet reactivity was enhanced by aspirin treatment. This may represent a novel action of aspirin as an inhibitor of platelet function. These results provide in vitro biochemical and functional evidence for the thromboregulatory role of neutrophils and emphasize the multicellular aspect of hemostasis and thrombosis. Images PMID:7690778

  11. Adhesion-Linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    baculoviral expression system to prepare a full length recombinant protein in Sf9 insect cells. We reasoned that expression of such a large protein...baculovirus expressing PTPN4 6 wild type and active site mutants as N terminally six histidine tagged proteins in Sf9 cells to facilitate rapid one step...from infected Sf9 cells from both wild type and active site mutant (band at ~116kDa present only in cells infected with PTPN4 recombinant baculovirus

  12. The Focal Adhesion: A Regulated Component of Aortic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Jensen, Mikkel H.; Gallant, Cynthia M.; Vetterkind, Susanne; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2013-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is an acknowledged predictor and cause of cardiovascular disease. The sources and mechanisms of vascular stiffness are not well understood, although the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been assumed to be a major component. We tested here the hypothesis that the focal adhesions (FAs) connecting the cortical cytoskeleton of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the matrix in the aortic wall are a component of aortic stiffness and that this component is dynamically regulated. First, we examined a model system in which magnetic tweezers could be used to monitor cellular cortical stiffness, serum-starved A7r5 aortic smooth muscle cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an activator of myosin that increases cell contractility, increased cortical stiffness. A small molecule inhibitor of Src-dependent FA recycling, PP2, was found to significantly inhibit LPA-induced increases in cortical stiffness, as well as tension-induced increases in FA size. To directly test the applicability of these results to force and stiffness development at the level of vascular tissue, we monitored mouse aorta ring stiffness with small sinusoidal length oscillations during agonist-induced contraction. The alpha-agonist phenylephrine, which also increases myosin activation and contractility, increased tissue stress and stiffness in a PP2- and FAK inhibitor 14-attenuated manner. Subsequent phosphotyrosine screening and follow-up with phosphosite-specific antibodies confirmed that the effects of PP2 and FAK inhibitor 14 in vascular tissue involve FA proteins, including FAK, CAS, and paxillin. Thus, in the present study we identify, for the first time, the FA of the VSMC, in particular the FAK-Src signaling complex, as a significant subcellular regulator of aortic stiffness and stress. PMID:23626821

  13. The tight-adhesion proteins TadGEF of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA 110 are involved in cell adhesion and infectivity on soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Mongiardini, Elías J; Parisi, Gustavo D; Quelas, Juan I; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of symbiotic bacteria to host plants is an essential early step of the infection process that leads to the beneficial interaction. In the Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-soybean symbiosis few molecular determinants of adhesion are known. Here we identified the tight-adhesion gene products TadGEF in the open-reading frames blr3941-blr3943 of the B. diazoefficiens USDA 110 complete genomic sequence. Predicted structure of TadG indicates a transmembrane domain and two extracytosolic domains, from which the C-terminal has an integrin fold. TadE and TadF are also predicted as bearing transmembrane segments. Mutants in tadG or the small cluster tadGEF were impaired in adhesion to soybean roots, and the root infection was delayed. However, nodule histology was not compromised by the mutations, indicating that these effects were restricted to the earliest contact of the B. diazoefficiens and root surfaces. Knowledge of preinfection determinants is important for development of inoculants that are applied to soybean crops worldwide.

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha orchestrates expression of cell adhesion proteins during the epithelial transformation of the developing liver.

    PubMed

    Battle, Michele A; Konopka, Genevieve; Parviz, Fereshteh; Gaggl, Alexandra Lerch; Yang, Chuhu; Sladek, Frances M; Duncan, Stephen A

    2006-05-30

    Epithelial formation is a central facet of organogenesis that relies on intercellular junction assembly to create functionally distinct apical and basal cell surfaces. How this process is regulated during embryonic development remains obscure. Previous studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that loss of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) blocks the epithelial transformation of the fetal liver, suggesting that HNF4alpha is a central regulator of epithelial morphogenesis. Although HNF4alpha-null hepatocytes do not express E-cadherin (also called CDH1), we show here that E-cadherin is dispensable for liver development, implying that HNF4alpha regulates additional aspects of epithelial formation. Microarray and molecular analyses reveal that HNF4alpha regulates the developmental expression of a myriad of proteins required for cell junction assembly and adhesion. Our findings define a fundamental mechanism through which generation of tissue epithelia during development is coordinated with the onset of organ function.

  15. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  16. Guiding Cell Attachment in 3D Microscaffolds Selectively Functionalized with Two Distinct Adhesion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Richter, Benjamin; Hahn, Vincent; Bertels, Sarah; Claus, Tanja K; Wegener, Martin; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The combination of three different photoresists into a single direct laser written 3D microscaffold permits functionalization with two bioactive full-length proteins. The cell-instructive microscaffolds consist of a passivating framework equipped with light activatable constituents featuring distinct protein-binding properties. This allows directed cell attachment of epithelial or fibroblast cells in 3D.

  17. Regulation of extracellular matrix proteins and integrin cell substratum adhesion receptors on epithelium during cutaneous human wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, I.; Murphy, G. F.; Yan, H. C.; Herlyn, M.; Albelda, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although changes in extracellular matrix proteins during wound healing have been well documented, little is known about the regulation of corresponding extracellular matrix adhesion receptors (integrins). To study this process in a human in vivo model, full thickness human skin grafts were transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficient mice and deep excisional wounds involving both the epidermal and dermal layers were then made. The changes in the expression of cell matrix proteins and epithelial integrins over time were analyzed with specific antibodies using immunohistochemistry. Wounding was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix proteins, namely, loss of laminin and type IV collagen in the region of the wound and expression of tenascin and fibronectin. Changes were also noted in the integrins on the migrating keratinocytes. There was marked up-regulation of the alpha v subunit and de novo expression of the fibronectin receptor (alpha 5 beta 1) during the stage of active migration (days 1 to 3 after wounding). In the later stages of wound healing, after epithelial integrity had been established, redistribution of the alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 4 collagen/laminin-binding integrin subunits to suprabasal epidermal layers was noted. Thus, during cutaneous wound healing, keratinocytes up-regulate fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding integrins and redistribute collagen/laminin-binding integrins. This study demonstrates that the human skin/severe combined immunodeficient chimera provides a useful model to study events during human wound repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7694470

  18. Human pathogens utilize host extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen for adhesion and invasion of the host.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Fleury, Christophe; Jalalvand, Farshid; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-11-01

    Laminin (Ln) and collagen are multifunctional glycoproteins that play an important role in cellular morphogenesis, cell signalling, tissue repair and cell migration. These proteins are ubiquitously present in tissues as a part of the basement membrane (BM), constitute a protective layer around blood capillaries and are included in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a component of BMs, both Lns and collagen(s), thus function as major mechanical containment molecules that protect tissues from pathogens. Invasive pathogens breach the basal lamina and degrade ECM proteins of interstitial spaces and connective tissues using various ECM-degrading proteases or surface-bound plasminogen and matrix metalloproteinases recruited from the host. Most pathogens associated with the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or urogenital tracts, as well as with the central nervous system or the skin, have the capacity to bind and degrade Lns and collagen(s) in order to adhere to and invade host tissues. In this review, we focus on the adaptability of various pathogens to utilize these ECM proteins as enhancers for adhesion to host tissues or as a targets for degradation in order to breach the cellular barriers. The major pathogens discussed are Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Yersinia, Treponema, Mycobacterium, Clostridium, Listeria, Porphyromonas and Haemophilus; Candida, Aspergillus, Pneumocystis, Cryptococcus and Coccidioides; Acanthamoeba, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas; retrovirus and papilloma virus.

  19. Adsorption and adhesion of common serum proteins to nanotextured gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lauren E; Hoffmann, Marc P; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-02-14

    As the broader effort towards device and material miniaturization progresses in all fields, it becomes increasingly important to understand the implications of working with functional structures that approach the size scale of molecules, particularly when considering biological systems. It is well known that thin films and nanostructures feature different optical, electrical, and mechanical properties from their bulk composites; however, interactions taking place at the interface between nanomaterials and their surroundings are less understood. Here, we explore interactions between common serum proteins - serum albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G - and a nanotextured gallium nitride surface. Atomic force microscopy with a carboxyl-terminated colloid tip is used to probe the 'activity' of proteins adsorbed onto the surface, including both the accessibility of the terminal amine to the tip as well as the potential for protein extension. By evaluating the frequency of tip-protein interactions, we can establish differences in protein behaviour on the basis of both the surface roughness as well as morphology, providing an assessment of the role of surface texture in dictating protein-surface interactions. Unidirectional surface features - either the half-unit cell steppes of as-grown GaN or those produced by mechanical polishing - appear to promote protein accessibility, with a higher frequency of protein extension events taking place on these surfaces when compared with less ordered surface features. Development of a full understanding of the factors influencing surface-biomolecule interactions can pave the way for specific surface modification to tailor the bio-material interface, offering a new path for device optimization.

  20. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  1. Comparative studies on the effect of growth conditions on adhesion, hydrophobicity, and extracellular protein profile of Streptococcus sanguis G9B.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, K W; Hardy, L N; Markevics, L J; Evans, J D; Wicken, A J

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguis G9B was grown in continuous culture at different generation times and pH values in media containing either glucose or fructose and differing in the concentrations of Na+ and K+. The growth pH, carbohydrate, and cation concentration each affected the yield of organisms, their ability to adhere to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads, and their hydrophobicity, as measured by adhesion to hexadecane. There was no correlation between adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads and hydrophobicity, the values for hydrophobicity varying between 44 and 83% for organisms that adhered poorly and between 24 and 75% for those that adhered effectively. For organisms grown in batch culture at pH 6.0 or 7.0 there was similarly no correlation between adhesion and hydrophobicity. The growth conditions also had a considerable influence on the production of extracellular protein. The total amount was greater at pH 7.5 than at other pH values, and there were also differences in the individual components in response to changes in generation time, pH, carbohydrate source, and cation concentration. Two protein bands were identified, namely, glucosyltransferase and protein P1 (also called antigen B or I/II). However, there was no correlation between a particular protein component and adhesion. Images PMID:4055033

  2. Laminin-511: a multi-functional adhesion protein regulating cell migration, tumor invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Normand; Kusuma, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Laminins are major constituents of basement membranes. At least 16 isoforms have now been described, each with distinct spatio-temporal expression patterns and functions. The laminin-511 heterotrimer (α5β1γ1) is one of the more recent isoforms to be identified and a potent adhesive and pro-migratory substrate for a variety of normal and tumor cell lines in vitro. As our understanding of its precise function in normal tissues and in pathologies is rapidly unraveling, current evidence suggests an important regulatory role in cancer. This review describes published data on laminin-511 expression in several malignancies and experimental evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies supporting its functional role during tumor progression. A particular emphasis is put on more recent studies from our laboratory and that of others indicating that laminin-511 contributes to tumor dissemination and metastasis in advanced breast carcinomas and other tumor types. Collectively, the experimental evidence suggests that high expression of laminin-511 has prognostic significance and that targeting tumor-laminin-511 interactions may have therapeutic potential in advanced cancer patients.

  3. A novel domain cassette identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 proteins binding ICAM-1 and is a target of cross-reactive, adhesion-inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S; Olsen, Rebecca W; Andersen, Marianne A; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G; Hviid, Lars; Higgins, Matthew K; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan; Jensen, Anja T R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1-binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1-binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding-like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum-exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1-specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration.

  4. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the olfactomedin domain from the sea urchin cell-adhesion protein amassin

    SciTech Connect

    Hillier, Brian J.; Sundaresan, Vidyasankar; Stout, C. David; Vacquier, Victor D.

    2006-01-01

    The olfactomedin (OLF) domain from the sea urchin cell-adhesion protein amassin has been crystallized. A native data set extending to 2.7 Å has been collected using an in-house X-ray source. A family of animal proteins is emerging which contain a conserved protein motif known as an olfactomedin (OLF) domain. Novel extracellular protein–protein interactions occur through this domain. The OLF-family member amassin, from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, has previously been identified to mediate a rapid cell-adhesion event resulting in a large aggregation of coelomocytes, the circulating immune cells. In this work, heterologous expression and purification of the OLF domain from amassin was carried out and initial crystallization trials were performed. A native data set has been collected, extending to 2.7 Å under preliminary cryoconditions, using an in-house generator. This work leads the way to the determination of the first structure of an OLF domain.

  6. Crystal structure of human programmed cell death 10 complexed with inositol-(1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate: a novel adaptor protein involved in human cerebral cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jingjin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, De-Feng; Hu, Yonglin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2010-09-03

    Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) is a novel adaptor protein involved in human cerebral cavernous malformation, a common vascular lesion mostly occurring in the central nervous system. By interacting with different signal proteins, PDCD10 could regulate various physiological processes in the cell. The crystal structure of human PDCD10 complexed with inositol-(1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate has been determined at 2.3A resolution. The structure reveals an integrated dimer via a unique assembly that has never been observed before. Each PDCD10 monomer contains two independent domains: an N-terminal domain with a new fold involved in the tight dimer assembly and a C-terminal four-helix bundle domain that closely resembles the focal adhesion targeting domain of focal adhesion kinase. An eight-residue flexible linker connects the two domains, potentially conferring mobility onto the C-terminal domain, resulting in the conformational variability of PDCD10. A variable basic cleft on the top of the dimer interface binds to phosphatidylinositide and regulates the intracellular localization of PDCD10. Two potential sites, respectively located on the two domains, are critical for recruiting different binding partners, such as germinal center kinase III proteins and the focal adhesion protein paxillin.

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymers for tuned QCM detection of protein adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, G B; Asandulesa, M; Topala, I; Pohoata, V; Dumitrascu, N; Barboiu, M

    2014-03-15

    Our efforts have been concentrated in preparing plasma polymeric thin layers at atmospheric pressure grown on Quartz Crystal Microbalance-QCM electrodes for which the non-specific absorption of proteins can be efficiently modulated, tuned and used for QCM biosensing and quantification. Plasma polymerization reaction at atmospheric pressure has been used as a simple and viable method for the preparation of QCM bioactive surfaces, featuring variable protein binding properties. Polyethyleneglycol (ppEG), polystyrene (ppST) and poly(ethyleneglycol-styrene) (ppST-EG) thin-layers have been grown on QCM electrodes. These layers were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The plasma ppST QCM electrodes present a higher adsorption of Concanavalin A (ConA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins when compared with the commercial coated polystyrene (ppST) ones. The minimum adsorption was found for ppEG, surface, known by their protein anti-fouling properties. The amount of adsorbed proteins can be tuned by the introduction of PEG precursors in the plasma discharge during the preparation of ppST polymers.

  8. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  9. Discovery of novel hematopoietic cell adhesion molecules from human bone marrow stromal cell membrane protein extracts by a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-05-01

    In an attempt to define the role of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in normal hematopoiesis and in leukemia development, a novel cell-blotting technique that involved cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane has been developed. Human BM stromal cell membrane fractions have been prepared from Dexter-type cultures after cell lysis by sonification and differential centrifugations of the sonification contents. The 20,000 g pellets representing membrane fractions have been solubilized by 2% Triton X-100, 0.575% LDS, and 8 mol/L urea in sequential order. The protein extracts are fractionated by LDS-PAGE and screened for CAMs by the new cell-blotting technique. This led to identification of nine protein bands in lanes containing LDS extracts showing adhesion of KG1a (CD34+ progenitor myeloid) cells. Evidence that the BM proteins exhibiting KG1a cell adhesion are novel CAMs is based on the observations that these proteins, in comparison with known CAMs, specifically VCAM-1, CD54, and CD44, show (1) contrasting detergent-solubility properties, (2) different temperature requirement for mediating cell adhesion function, and (3) markedly distinct electrophoretic mobilities. The various cell types tested, notably KG1a, NALM-6, WIL-2, Ramos, HS-Sultan, K562, JY B lymphoblastoid cells, and T lymphoblasts, showed distinctive patterns of binding to different subsets of BM CAMs. These results demonstrate a new approach to studies of molecular mechanisms that may determine specificity of hematopoietic cellular localization within BM microenvironment and may play an important role in controlling hematopoiesis.

  10. Induction of Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Increased Adhesion of Quinolone-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Subinhibitory Levels of Ciprofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Bisognano, Carmelo; Vaudaux, Pierre; Rohner, Peter; Lew, Daniel P.; Hooper, David C.

    2000-01-01

    We recently reported that strain EN1252a, a fluoroquinolone-resistant derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC8325 with mutations in grlA and gyrA, expressed increased levels of fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) and showed a significantly higher attachment to fibronectin-coated polymer surfaces after growth in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin. The present study evaluated the occurrence and frequency of fluoroquinolone-induced FnBP-mediated adhesion in clinical isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Eight of ten MRSA isolates and four of six MSSA isolates with grlA and gyrA mutations exhibited significant increases in attachment to fibronectin-coated surfaces after growth in the presence of one-quarter the MIC of ciprofloxacin. Fluoroquinolone-induced FnBP-mediated adhesion of one clinical MRSA strain and the double mutant strain EN1252a also occurred on coverslips removed from the subcutaneous space of guinea pigs. For strain EN1252a, the regulation of fnb transcription by sub-MICs of ciprofloxacin was studied on reporter plasmids carrying fnb-luxAB fusions. One-quarter of the MIC of ciprofloxacin significantly increased fnbB, but not fnbA, promoter activity of the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant but not its fluoroquinolone-susceptible parent ISP794. This response was abolished by pretreatment with rifampin, indicating an effect at the level of transcription. Activation of the fnbB promoter was not due to an indirect effect of ciprofloxacin on growth rate and still occurred in an agr mutant of strain EN1252a. These data suggest that sub-MIC levels of ciprofloxacin activate the fnbB promoter of some laboratory and clinical isolates, thus contributing to increased production of FnBP(s) and leading to higher levels of bacterial attachment to fibronectin-coated or subcutaneously implanted coverslips. PMID:10817688

  11. The focal adhesion-associated proteins DOCK5 and GIT2 comprise a rheostat in control of epithelial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Scott R.; Köllmann, Clemens P.; van Lidth de Jeude, Jooske F.; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Engelholm, Lars H.; Frödin, Morten; Hansen, Steen H.

    2016-01-01

    DOCK proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac and Cdc42 GTPases. DOCK1 is the founding member of the family and acts downstream of integrins via the canonical Crk-p130Cas complex to activate Rac GTPases in numerous contexts. In contrast, DOCK5, which possesses the greatest similarity to DOCK1, remains sparingly studied. Here we establish that DOCK5 plays a non-redundant role in regulating motile and invasive capacities of epithelial cells. DOCK1 is constitutively associated with sites of integrin attachment termed focal adhesions (FA). In contrast, we demonstrate that DOCK5 recruitment to FAs in Hela cells is restricted by GIT2, an established regulator of FA signaling. We determine that GIT2 is targeted to FAs in response to Rho-ROCK signaling and actomyosin contractility. Accordingly, inhibition of ROCK activity or MLC function promotes enrichment of DOCK5 in membrane protrusions and nascent cell-substratum adhesions. We further demonstrate that GIT2 inhibits the interaction of DOCK5 with Crk. Moreover, we show that depletion of GIT2 promotes DOCK5-dependent activation of the Crk-p130Cas signaling cascade to promote Rac1-mediated lamellipodial protrusion and FA turnover. The antagonism between GIT2 and DOCK5 extends to non-transformed MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, with DOCK5 “dialing-up” and GIT2 “dialing-down” invasiveness. Finally, we determine that DOCK5 inhibition attenuates invasion and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells and prolongs life span of mice injected with these cells. Collectively, our work identifies DOCK5 as a key regulator of epithelial invasion and metastasis, and demonstrates that suppression of DOCK5 by GIT2 represents a previously unappreciated mechanism for coordination of Rho and Rac GTPases. PMID:27669437

  12. In vivo selection for Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity protein expression in the absence of human carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Simms, Amy N; Jerse, Ann E

    2006-05-01

    The neisserial opacity (Opa) proteins are phase-variable, antigenically distinct outer membrane proteins that mediate adherence to and invasion of human cells. We previously reported that Neisseria gonorrhoeae Opa protein expression appeared to be selected for or induced during experimental murine genital tract infection. Here we further defined the kinetics of recovery of Opa variants from the lower genital tracts of female mice and investigated the basis for this initial observation. We found that the recovery of different Opa phenotypes from mice appears cyclical. Three phases of infection were defined. Following intravaginal inoculation with primarily Opa- gonococci, the majority of isolates recovered were Opa+ (early phase). A subsequent decline in the percentage of Opa+ isolates occurred in a majority of mice (middle phase) and was followed by a reemergence of Opa+ variants in mice that were infected for longer than 8 days (late phase). We showed the early phase was due to selection for preexisting Opa+ variants in the inoculum by constructing a chloramphenicol-resistant (Cm(r)) strain and following Cm(r) Opa+ populations mixed with a higher percentage of Opa- variants of the wild-type (Cm(s)) strain. Reciprocal experiments (Opa- Cm(r) gonococci spiked with Opa+ Cm(s) bacteria) were consistent with selection of Opa+ variants. Based on the absence in mice of human carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules, the major class of Opa protein adherence receptors, we conclude the observed selection for Opa+ variants early in infection is not likely due to a specific adherence advantage and may be due to Opa-mediated evasion of innate defenses.

  13. Silk-fibronectin protein alloy fibres support cell adhesion and viability as a high strength, matrix fibre analogue

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Li, David; Gyune Rim, Nae; Backman, Daniel; Smith, Michael L.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2017-01-01

    Silk is a natural polymer with broad utility in biomedical applications because it exhibits general biocompatibility and high tensile material properties. While mechanical integrity is important for most biomaterial applications, proper function and integration also requires biomaterial incorporation into complex surrounding tissues for many physiologically relevant processes such as wound healing. In this study, we spin silk fibroin into a protein alloy fibre with whole fibronectin using wet spinning approaches in order to synergize their respective strength and cell interaction capabilities. Results demonstrate that silk fibroin alone is a poor adhesive surface for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in the absence of serum. However, significantly improved cell attachment is observed to silk-fibronectin alloy fibres without serum present while not compromising the fibres’ mechanical integrity. Additionally, cell viability is improved up to six fold on alloy fibres when serum is present while migration and spreading generally increase as well. These findings demonstrate the utility of composite protein alloys as inexpensive and effective means to create durable, biologically active biomaterials. PMID:28378749

  14. The small G-protein MglA connects to the MreB actin cytoskeleton at bacterial focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Treuner-Lange, Anke; Macia, Eric; Guzzo, Mathilde; Hot, Edina; Faure, Laura M.; Jakobczak, Beata; Espinosa, Leon; Alcor, Damien; Ducret, Adrien; Keilberg, Daniela; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Lacas Gervais, Sandra; Franco, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In Myxococcus xanthus the gliding motility machinery is assembled at the leading cell pole to form focal adhesions, translocated rearward to propel the cell, and disassembled at the lagging pole. We show that MglA, a Ras-like small G-protein, is an integral part of this machinery. In this function, MglA stimulates the assembly of the motility complex by directly connecting it to the MreB actin cytoskeleton. Because the nucleotide state of MglA is regulated spatially and MglA only binds MreB in the guanosine triphosphate–bound form, the motility complexes are assembled at the leading pole and dispersed at the lagging pole where the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein MglB disrupts the MglA–MreB interaction. Thus, MglA acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate the motility machinery spatially. The function of MreB in motility is independent of its function in peptidoglycan synthesis, representing a coopted function. Our findings highlight a new function for the MreB cytoskeleton and suggest that G-protein–cytoskeleton interactions are a universally conserved feature. PMID:26169353

  15. Silk-fibronectin protein alloy fibres support cell adhesion and viability as a high strength, matrix fibre analogue.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Matthew M; Li, David; Gyune Rim, Nae; Backman, Daniel; Smith, Michael L; Wong, Joyce Y

    2017-04-05

    Silk is a natural polymer with broad utility in biomedical applications because it exhibits general biocompatibility and high tensile material properties. While mechanical integrity is important for most biomaterial applications, proper function and integration also requires biomaterial incorporation into complex surrounding tissues for many physiologically relevant processes such as wound healing. In this study, we spin silk fibroin into a protein alloy fibre with whole fibronectin using wet spinning approaches in order to synergize their respective strength and cell interaction capabilities. Results demonstrate that silk fibroin alone is a poor adhesive surface for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in the absence of serum. However, significantly improved cell attachment is observed to silk-fibronectin alloy fibres without serum present while not compromising the fibres' mechanical integrity. Additionally, cell viability is improved up to six fold on alloy fibres when serum is present while migration and spreading generally increase as well. These findings demonstrate the utility of composite protein alloys as inexpensive and effective means to create durable, biologically active biomaterials.

  16. Cyclic di-GMP contributes to adaption and virulence of Bacillus thuringiensis through a riboswitch-regulated collagen adhesion protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Yin, Kang; Qian, Hongliang; Zhao, Youwen; Wang, Wen; Chou, Shan-Ho; Fu, Yang; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes in bacteria by binding to various protein or riboswitch effectors. In Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171, a c-di-GMP riboswitch termed Bc2 RNA resides in the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of an mRNA that encodes a collagen adhesion protein (Cap). The expression of cap was strongly repressed in parent strain BMB171 because of the presence of Bc2 RNA but was significantly promoted in the Bc2 RNA markerless deletion mutant. Bc2 RNA acts as a genetic “on” switch, which forms an anti-terminator structure to promote cap read-through transcription upon c-di-GMP binding. As a result, cap transcription was de-repressed under high c-di-GMP levels. Therefore, Bc2 RNA regulates cap expression using a repression/de-repression model. Bc2 RNA-regulated Cap was also found to be tightly associated with motility, aggregation, exopolysaccharide secretion, biofilm formation, and virulence of B. thuringiensis BMB171 against its host insect Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:27381437

  17. Investigation of mussel adhesive protein adsorption on polystyrene and poly(octadecyl methacrylate) using angle dependent XPS, ATR-FTIR, and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, A.M.; Suci, P.A.; Tyler, B.J.; Geesey, G.G.

    1996-02-10

    Despite many years of research effort, the molecular interactions that are responsible for microbial adhesion and fouling of surfaces remain obscure. An understanding of these interactions would contribute to the development of surfaces that resist colonization of microorganisms. The irreversible adsorption of mussel adhesive proteins (MAP) from the marine mussel Mytilus edulis has been investigated on polystyrene (PS) and poly(octadecyl methacrylate) (POMA) surfaces using angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Angle resolved XPS was used to quantify the elemental composition with depth of the upper 90 {angstrom} of the surface, and AFM was used to obtain the surface topography. The adsorption pattern of MAP, revealed by AFM images, is distinctly different on the two polymer surfaces and suggests that the substratum influences protein adhesion. The depth profiles of MAP, obtained from angle resolved XPS, show differences in nitrogen composition with depth for MAP adsorbed to PS and POMA. Infrared spectra of hydrated adsorbed MAP revealed significant differences in the amide III region and in two bands which may originate from residues in the tandemly repeated sequences of MAP. This data demonstrates that the chemistry of the polymer film that is present at the protein-polymer interface can influence protein-protein and protein-surface interactions.

  18. Endothelial cell adhesion and growth within a bioassay chamber using microstamped ECM proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, David A.; Frame, Mary D.

    2011-06-01

    Our goal was to evaluate microvascular endothelial cell growth on microstamped patterns of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). A combination of photo- and soft-lithography was used to make features ˜100 μm deep and 150μm wide. Polydimethylsiloxane imprints of features produced positive molds used to stamp collagen I, IV, laminin and fibronectin onto cleaned hydrophilic or hydrophobic glass coverslips. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were seeded at an initial density of 800 cells cm-2, and cultured for three days. Explanted murine aortas, serving as an initial source for autologous endothelial cells, were perfused at 240 μL min-1 for 1 day. Cell morphology was also quantified on both the non-patterned glass and within the microstamped patterns. Viability was high (>90%) on all microstamped proteins, regardless of glass hydrophobicity. Viability was reduced on bare hydrophobic glass. Cell density was 4 or 8 fold higher on microstamped ECM proteins compared with hydrophilic or hydrophobic glass, respectively. Confluence was approached more rapidly on microstamped proteins. Thus, rapid concentrated growth of endothelial cells was markedly enhanced within microstamped ECM patterns on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass.

  19. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  20. Interleukin-6 enhances whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferons inhibit integrin expression and adhesion of human mast cells to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Schoeler, Dagmar; Grützkau, Andreas; Henz, Beate M; Küchler, Jens; Krüger-Krasagakis, Sabine

    2003-05-01

    Integrins are expressed on mast cells and constitute an essential prerequisite for the accumulation of the cells at sites of inflammation. In order to clarify a potential contribution of inflammatory cytokines to this process, we have studied the modulation of integrin expression and adhesion of immature human mast cells (HMC-1) to extracellular matrix proteins by interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma. Corticosteroids were used for comparison. On fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, preincubation of cells for 48 h with different concentrations of interleukin-6 induced a significant, up to 40%, increase of alpha v alpha 5, CD49b (alpha 2), CD49e (alpha 5), CD49f (alpha 6), and CD51 (alpha v). In contrast, different concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon-alpha, interferon-gamma, and dexamethasone (10-8-10-10 M) inhibited expression of adhesion receptors by up to 60%, reaching significance for some but not all integrins. On semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, interleukin-6, the other cytokines, and corticosteroids significantly modulated expression of alpha1, alpha v and alpha 5 integrin chains at mRNA level. Functional significance of these findings was proven in adhesion assays using fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin, with interleukin-6 causing significant enhancement of adhesion in all cases, tumor necrosis factor alpha and dexamethasone inducing significant reduction of adhesion to fibronectin and laminin, and interferon-gamma significantly inhibiting adhesion to fibronectin only. Specificity of interleukin-6-induced changes was demonstrated using antibodies against alpha1 and alpha 5 integrins in unstimulated and interleukin-6-prestimulated cells. These data show that interleukin-6 stimulates mast cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and thus allows for the accumulation of the cells at tissue sites by enhancing integrin expression, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha

  1. MPP2 is a postsynaptic MAGUK scaffold protein that links SynCAM1 cell adhesion molecules to core components of the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Nils; Schmerl, Bettina; Lardong, Jennifer A.; Wahl, Markus C.; Shoichet, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    At neuronal synapses, multiprotein complexes of trans-synaptic adhesion molecules, scaffold proteins and neurotransmitter receptors assemble to essential building blocks required for synapse formation and maintenance. Here we describe a novel role for the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein MPP2 (MAGUK p55 subfamily member 2) at synapses of rat central neurons. Through interactions mediated by its C-terminal SH3-GK domain module, MPP2 binds to the abundant postsynaptic scaffold proteins PSD-95 and GKAP and localises to postsynaptic sites in hippocampal neurons. MPP2 also colocalises with the synaptic adhesion molecule SynCAM1. We demonstrate that the SynCAM1 C-terminus interacts directly with the MPP2 PDZ domain and that MPP2 does not interact in this manner with other highly abundant postsynaptic transmembrane proteins. Our results highlight a previously unexplored role for MPP2 at postsynaptic sites as a scaffold that links SynCAM1 cell adhesion molecules to core proteins of the postsynaptic density. PMID:27756895

  2. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Chopp, Treasa; Qi Shengmei; Cutler, Mary Lou . E-mail: mcutler@usuhs.mil

    2005-05-15

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion.

  3. Protein N-glycosylation in oral cancer: dysregulated cellular networks among DPAGT1, E-cadherin adhesion and canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Bouchie, Meghan P; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-07-01

    N-Linked glycosylation (N-glycosylation) of proteins has long been associated with oncogenesis, but not until recently have the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship begun to be unraveled. Here, we review studies describing how dysregulation of the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1, drives oral cancer. DPAGT1 encodes the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor in the endoplasmic reticulum and thus mediates N-glycosylation of many cancer-related proteins. DPAGT1 controls N-glycosylation of E-cadherin, the major epithelial cell-cell adhesion receptor and a tumor suppressor, thereby affecting intercellular adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics. DPAGT1 also regulates and is regulated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, impacting the balance between proliferation and adhesion in homeostatic tissues. Thus, aberrant induction of DPAGT1 promotes a positive feedback network with Wnt/β-catenin that represses E-cadherin-based adhesion and drives tumorigenic phenotypes. Further, modification of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) with N-glycans is known to control their surface presentation via the galectin lattice, and thus increased DPAGT1 expression likely contributes to abnormal activation of RTKs in oral cancer. Collectively, these studies suggest that dysregulation of the DPAGT1/Wnt/E-cadherin network underlies the etiology and pathogenesis of oral cancer.

  4. Influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymer on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on stainless steel: modulation by surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Rouxhet, Paul G; Chudziak, Dorota; Telegdi, Judit; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the adhesion of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, a typical aerobic marine microorganism, on stainless steel (SS) substrate. More particularly, the potential effect on adhesion of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer is investigated. Bacterial attachment experiments were carried out using a modified parallel plate flow chamber, allowing different surface treatments to be compared in a single experiment. The amount of adhering bacteria was determined via DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface chemical composition of SS and hydrophobized SS before and after PEO-PPO-PEO adsorption. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, was investigated to test the resistance of PEO-PPO-PEO layers to protein adsorption. The results show that BSA adsorption and Pseudomonas 2021 adhesion are significantly reduced on hydrophobized SS conditioned with PEO-PPO-PEO. Although PEO-PPO-PEO is also found to adsorb on SS, it does not prevent BSA adsorption nor bacterial adhesion, which is attributed to different PEO-PPO-PEO adlayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The obtained results open the way to a new strategy to reduce biofouling on metal oxide surfaces using PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer.

  5. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  6. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  7. Expression, purification and crystallization of a BH domain from the GTPase regulatory protein associated with focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P J; Derewenda, U; Taylor, J; Parsons, T J; Derewenda, Z S

    1999-01-01

    Signaling by small GTPases is down-regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) which enhance the rate of GTP hydrolysis. The activity of GAPs specific for Rho GTPases resides in the BH domain, many homologues of which are found in any mammalian genome. One of them was identified in the GTPase regulator associated with focal-adhesion kinase (GRAF). It shares approximately 20% sequence identity with p50RhoGAP. This GAP activates RhoA and Cdc42Hs, but not Rac. In order to dissect the molecular basis of this specificity, a 231-residue-long fragment corresponding to the BH domain of GRAF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Trigonal crystals, of space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 63.5, c = 90.38 A were grown from solutions of PEG 6000. Data to 2.15 A were collected from a flash-frozen sample on an R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector mounted on a rotating anode X-ray generator.

  8. The C. elegans F-spondin family protein SPON-1 maintains cell adhesion in neural and non-neural tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Martin L.; Swale, Ryann E.; Goncharov, Alexandr

    2008-01-01

    Summary The F-spondin family of extracellular matrix proteins has been implicated in axon outgrowth, fasciculation, and neuronal cell migration, as well as differentiation and proliferation of non-neuronal cells. In screens for mutants defective in C. elegans embryonic morphogenesis we identified SPON-1, the only C. elegans member of the spondin family. SPON-1 is synthesized in body muscles and localizes to integrin-containing structures on body muscles and to other basement membranes. SPON-1 maintains strong attachments of muscles to epidermis; in the absence of SPON-1, muscles progressively detach from the epidermis, causing defective epidermal elongation. In animals with reduced integrin function SPON-1 becomes dose-dependent, suggesting SPON-1 and integrins function in concert to promote attachment of muscles to the basement membrane. Although spon-1 mutants display largely normal neurite outgrowth, spon-1 synergizes with outgrowth defective mutants, revealing a cryptic role for SPON-1 in axon extension. In motor neurons SPON-1 acts in axon guidance and fasciculation, whereas in interneurons SPON-1 maintains process position. Our results show that a spondin maintains cell-matrix adhesion in multiple tissues. PMID:18614580

  9. Adhesion Protein ApfA of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Is Required for Pathogenesis and Is a Potential Target for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Li, Lu; Chen, Zhaohui; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, which causes serious economic losses in the pig farming industry worldwide. Due to a lack of knowledge of its virulence factors and a lack of effective vaccines able to confer cross-serotype protection, it is difficult to place this disease under control. By analyzing its genome sequences, we found that type IV fimbrial subunit protein ApfA is highly conserved among different serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. Our study shows that ApfA is an adhesin since its expression was greatly upregulated (135-fold) upon contact with host cells, while its deletion mutant attenuated its capability of adhesion. The inactivation of apfA dramatically reduced the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to colonize mouse lung, suggesting that apfA is a virulence factor. Purified recombinant ApfA elicited an elevated humoral immune response and conferred robust protection against challenges with A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 strain 4074 and serovar 7 strain WF83 in mice. Importantly, the anti-ApfA serum conferred significant protection against both serovar 1 and serovar 7 in mice. These studies indicate that ApfA promotes virulence through attachment to host cells, and its immunogenicity renders it a promising novel subunit vaccine candidate against infection with A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:23269417

  10. Focal Adhesion Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation of Beclin1 Protein Suppresses Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Initiates Hypertrophic Growth*♦

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaokang; Zhu, Qiang; Dee, Rachel; Opheim, Zachary; Mack, Christopher P.; Cyr, Douglas M.; Taylor, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation/recycling system that is essential for cellular homeostasis but is dysregulated in a number of diseases, including myocardial hypertrophy. Although it is clear that limiting or accelerating autophagic flux can result in pathological cardiac remodeling, the physiological signaling pathways that fine-tune cardiac autophagy are poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that stimulation of cardiomyocytes with phenylephrine (PE), a well known hypertrophic agonist, suppresses autophagy and that activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is necessary for PE-stimulated autophagy suppression and subsequent initiation of hypertrophic growth. Mechanistically, we showed that FAK phosphorylates Beclin1, a core autophagy protein, on Tyr-233 and that this post-translational modification limits Beclin1 association with Atg14L and reduces Beclin1-dependent autophagosome formation. Remarkably, although ectopic expression of wild-type Beclin1 promoted cardiomyocyte atrophy, expression of a Y233E phosphomimetic variant of Beclin1 failed to affect cardiomyocyte size. Moreover, genetic depletion of Beclin1 attenuated PE-mediated/FAK-dependent initiation of myocyte hypertrophy in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify FAK as a novel negative regulator of Beclin1-mediated autophagy and indicate that this pathway can facilitate the promotion of compensatory hypertrophic growth. This novel mechanism to limit Beclin1 activity has important implications for treating a variety of pathologies associated with altered autophagic flux. PMID:27994061

  11. Controllable degradation of medical magnesium by electrodeposited composite films of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Li; Hou, Rui-Qing; Chen, Cheng-Dong; Sun, Lan; Dong, Shi-Gang; Pan, Jin-Shan; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2016-09-15

    To control the degradation rate of medical magnesium in body fluid environment, biocompatible films composed of Mussel Adhesive Protein (Mefp-1) and chitosan were electrodeposited on magnesium surface in cathodic constant current mode. The compositions and structures of the films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). And the corrosion protection performance was investigated using electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (Hanks' solution). The results revealed that Mefp-1 and chitosan successfully adhered on the magnesium surface and formed a protective film. Compared with either single Mefp-1 or single chitosan film, the composite film of chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan (CPC (chitosan/Mefp-1/chitosan)) exhibited lower corrosion current density, higher polarization resistance and more homogenous corrosion morphology and thus was able to effectively control the degradation rate of magnesium in simulated body environment. In addition, the active attachment and spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells on the CPC film coated magnesium indicated that the CPC film was significantly able to improve the biocompatibility of the medical magnesium.

  12. A family of ROP proteins that suppresses actin dynamics, and is essential for polarized growth and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Graham M; Baskin, Tobias I; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2015-07-15

    In plants, the ROP family of small GTPases has been implicated in the polarized growth of tip-growing cells, such as root hairs and pollen tubes; however, most of the data derive from overexpressing ROP genes or constitutively active and dominant-negative isoforms, whereas confirmation by using loss-of-function studies has generally been lacking. Here, in the model moss Physcomitrella patens, we study ROP signaling during tip growth by using a loss-of-function approach based on RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the entire moss ROP family. We find that plants with reduced expression of ROP genes, in addition to failing to initiate tip growth, have perturbed cell wall staining, reduced cell adhesion and have increased actin-filament dynamics. Although plants subjected to RNAi against the ROP family also have reduced microtubule dynamics, this reduction is not specific to loss of ROP genes, as it occurs when actin function is compromised chemically or genetically. Our data suggest that ROP proteins polarize the actin cytoskeleton by suppressing actin-filament dynamics, leading to an increase in actin filaments at the site of polarized secretion.

  13. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion on three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffolds with respect to plasma modification by etching and deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2014-11-01

    In this work, protein adsorption and cell adhesion on three-dimensional (3D) polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds treated by plasma etching and deposition were performed. The 3D PCL scaffold used as a substrate of a bone tissue was fabricated by recent rapid prototype techniques. To increase surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, roughness, and surface chemistry, through good protein adhesion on scaffolds, oxygen (O2) plasma etching and acrylic acid or allyamine plasma deposition were performed on the 3D PCL scaffolds. The O2 plasma etching induced the formation of random nanoporous structures on the roughened surfaces of the 3D PCL scaffolds. The plasma deposition with acrylic acid and allyamine induced the chemical modification for introducing a functional group. The protein adsorption increased on the O2 plasma-etched surface compared with an untreated 3D PCL scaffold. MC3T3-E1 cells adhered bioactively on the etched and deposited surface compared with the untreated surface. The present plasma modification might be sought as an effective technique for enhancing protein adsorption and cell adhesion.

  14. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of adhesive properties of Bacillus subtilis to extracellular matrix proteins through the fibronectin-binding protein YloA.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Ayala, Facundo; Bauman, Carlos; Bartolini, Marco; Saball, Ester; Salvarrey, Marcela; Leñini, Cecilia; Cogliati, Sebastián; Strauch, Mark; Grau, Roberto

    2017-03-13

    Bacterial adherence to extracellular matrix proteins (ECMp) plays important roles during host-pathogen interaction, however its genetic regulation remains poorly understood. yloA of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis shows high homology to genes encoding fibronectin-binding proteins of Gram-positive pathogens. Here, we characterized the regulatory network of YloA-dependent adhesive properties of the probiotic B. subtilis natto (Bsn). YloA-proficient, but not YloA-deficient, Bsn specifically bound to ECMp in a concentration-dependent manner and were proficient in biofilm formation. yloA expression showed a continuous increase in activity during the growth phase and decreased during the stationary phase. The transcription factors AbrB and DegU downregulated yloA expression during the logarithmic and stationary growth phases respectively. Analysis of the yloA promoter region revealed the presence of AT-rich direct and inverted repeats previously reported to function as DegU-recognized binding sites. In spo0A cells, yloA expression was completely turned off because of upregulation of AbrB throughout growth. Accordingly, DNase I footprinting analysis confirmed that AbrB bound to the promoter region of yloA. Interestingly, Bsn bound fibronectin with higher affinity, lower Kd, than several bacterial pathogens and competitively excluded them from binding to immobilized-fibronectin, a finding that might be important for the anti-infective properties of B. subtilis and its relatives.

  16. Reversible Conformational Change in the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Masks Its Adhesion Domains.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Kumar, Krishan; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Nguyen, Vu; Burkhardt, Martin; Reiter, Karine; Shimp, Richard; Howard, Randall F; Srinivasan, Prakash; Nold, Michael J; Ragheb, Daniel; Shi, Lirong; DeCotiis, Mark; Aebig, Joan; Lambert, Lynn; Rausch, Kelly M; Muratova, Olga; Jin, Albert; Reed, Steven G; Sinnis, Photini; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Duffy, Patrick E; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Narum, David L

    2015-10-01

    The extended rod-like Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is comprised of three primary domains: a charged N terminus that binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans, a central NANP repeat domain, and a C terminus containing a thrombospondin-like type I repeat (TSR) domain. Only the last two domains are incorporated in RTS,S, the leading malaria vaccine in phase 3 trials that, to date, protects about 50% of vaccinated children against clinical disease. A seroepidemiological study indicated that the N-terminal domain might improve the efficacy of a new CSP vaccine. Using a panel of CSP-specific monoclonal antibodies, well-characterized recombinant CSPs, label-free quantitative proteomics, and in vitro inhibition of sporozoite invasion, we show that native CSP is N-terminally processed in the mosquito host and undergoes a reversible conformational change to mask some epitopes in the N- and C-terminal domains until the sporozoite interacts with the liver hepatocyte. Our findings show the importance of understanding processing and the biophysical change in conformation, possibly due to a mechanical or molecular signal, and may aid in the development of a new CSP vaccine.

  17. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  18. Cloning of SEZ-12 encoding seizure-related and membrane-bound adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Nagasawa, H; Shimizu-Nishikawa, K; Ookura, T; Kimura, M; Sugaya, E

    1996-05-06

    SEZ-12 is one of the seizure-related cDNAs which was isolated by differential hybridization from primary cultured neurons from the mouse cerebral cortex with or without pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). SEZ-12 expression is transiently down-regulated in the mouse brain by injection of PTZ. To characterize SEZ-12, isolation of full-length cDNA and nucleotide sequence analysis were performed. The deduced amino acid sequence of SEZ-12 revealed that it encodes membrane-bound C-type lectin and has a significant homology to that of human cDNA, DGCR2 and IDD, which were cloned from a balanced translocation breakpoint associated with the DiGeorge syndrome. The isolated cDNA was about 4 kb in length and the message was expressed ubiquitously in various organs with low-abundance. Previously, we also cloned a transmembrane protein which is probably involved in cell-cell interaction by the differential hybridization technique. These findings suggest that transmembrane signaling in neuronal cells may have an important role in PTZ-induced seizure.

  19. In Vivo Role of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Regulating Pancreatic β-Cell Mass and Function Through Insulin Signaling, Actin Dynamics, and Granule Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Erica P.; Casimir, Marina; Schroer, Stephanie A.; Luk, Cynthia T.; Shi, Sally Yu; Choi, Diana; Dai, Xiao Qing; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F.; Zhu, Dan; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; MacDonald, Patrick E.; Woo, Minna

    2012-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as an adaptor at the focal contacts serving as a junction between the extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton. Actin dynamics is known as a determinant step in insulin secretion. Additionally, FAK has been shown to regulate insulin signaling. To investigate the essential physiological role of FAK in pancreatic β-cells in vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse model using rat insulin promoter (RIP)–driven Cre-loxP recombination system to specifically delete FAK in pancreatic β-cells. These RIPcre+fakfl/fl mice exhibited glucose intolerance without changes in insulin sensitivity. Reduced β-cell viability and proliferation resulting in decreased β-cell mass was observed in these mice, which was associated with attenuated insulin/Akt (also known as protein kinase B) and extracellular signal–related kinase 1/2 signaling and increased caspase 3 activation. FAK-deficient β-cells exhibited impaired insulin secretion with normal glucose sensing and preserved Ca2+ influx in response to glucose, but a reduced number of docked insulin granules and insulin exocytosis were found, which was associated with a decrease in focal proteins, paxillin and talin, and an impairment in actin depolymerization. This study is the first to show in vivo that FAK is critical for pancreatic β-cell viability and function through regulation in insulin signaling, actin dynamics, and granule trafficking. PMID:22498697

  20. Utility of cytokine, adhesion molecule and acute phase proteins in early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Fattah, M. A.; Omer, Al Fadhil A.; Asaif, S.; Manlulu, R.; Karar, T.; Ahmed, A.; Aljada, A.; Saleh, Ayman M.; Qureshi, Shoeb; Nasr, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Neonatal infection, including bacterial sepsis, is a major health care issue with an annual global mortality in excess of one million lives. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the potential diagnostic value of C-reactive protein (CRP), E-selectin, procalcitonin (PCT), interleukins-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) both independently and in combination for the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis in its earliest stages. Materials and Methods: A total of 320 subjects were included in this study. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted among neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, KSA during January 2013 to August 2015, the study based on three study groups categorized according to clinical symptoms and blood culture result. Study groups include healthy control neonates (n = 80), clinical sepsis (CS) group (n = 80) with clinical signs of sepsis but their blood culture was negative, and sepsis group with clinical signs of sepsis and their blood culture was positive. Results: The study observed significant difference in plasma levels of CRP, IL-6, TNF-α, E-selectin, and PCT in patients group when compared with control group (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the levels are significantly different between patient groups including CS and neonatal sepsis group. Moreover, result observed significant difference in CRP and IL-6 in early onset sepsis (EOS) when compared with late onset sepsis (LOS) neonates (P < 0.001 and 0.01), respectively, while there were no significant difference in TNF-α, E-selectin, and PCT between EOS and LOS (P = 0.44, 0.27 and 0.24), respectively. Regarding biomarkers accuracy, the result showed that CRP has the best diagnostic accuracy with cutoff value of 3.6 ng/ml (sensitivity 78% and specificity of 70%). The best combination is shown with CRP and IL-6 in which sensitivity increased to 89% and specificity to 79%. Conclusion: It was concluded that infected new

  1. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S.; Olsen, Rebecca W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1–binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1–binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding–like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum–exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1–specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration. PMID:23209327

  2. Arabidopsis NDR1 is an integrin-like protein with a role in fluid loss and plasma membrane-cell wall adhesion.

    PubMed

    Knepper, Caleb; Savory, Elizabeth A; Day, Brad

    2011-05-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) NON-RACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (NDR1), a plasma membrane-localized protein, plays an essential role in resistance mediated by the coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class of resistance (R) proteins, which includes RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE2 (RPS2), RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE PV MACULICOLA1, and RPS5. Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 expressing the bacterial effector proteins AvrRpt2, AvrB, and AvrPphB activates resistance by the aforementioned R proteins. Whereas the genetic requirement for NDR1 in plant disease resistance signaling has been detailed, our study focuses on determining a global, physiological role for NDR1. Through the use of homology modeling and structure threading, NDR1 was predicted to have a high degree of structural similarity to Arabidopsis LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT14, a protein implicated in abiotic stress responses. Specific protein motifs also point to a degree of homology with mammalian integrins, well-characterized proteins involved in adhesion and signaling. This structural homology led us to examine a physiological role for NDR1 in preventing fluid loss and maintaining cell integrity through plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions. Our results show a substantial alteration in induced (i.e. pathogen-inoculated) electrolyte leakage and a compromised pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune response in ndr1-1 mutant plants. As an extension of these analyses, using a combination of genetic and cell biology-based approaches, we have identified a role for NDR1 in mediating plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions. Taken together, our data point to a broad role for NDR1 both in mediating primary cellular functions in Arabidopsis through maintaining the integrity of the cell wall-plasma membrane connection and as a key signaling component of these responses during pathogen infection.

  3. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2016-07-12

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  4. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  5. Role of the actin-binding protein profilin1 in radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rust, Marco B; Kullmann, Jan A; Witke, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Profilins are small G-actin-binding proteins essential for cytoskeletal dynamics. Of the four mammalian profilin isoforms, profilin1 shows a broad expression pattern, profilin2 is abundant in the brain, and profilin3 and profilin4 are restricted to the testis. In vitro studies on cancer and epithelial cell lines suggested a role for profilins in cell migration and cell-cell adhesion. Genetic studies in mice revealed the importance of profilin1 in neuronal migration, while profilin2 has apparently acquired a specific function in synaptic physiology. We recently reported a mouse mutant line lacking profilin1 in the brain; animals display morphological defects that are typical for impaired neuronal migration. We found that during cerebellar development, profilin1 is specifically required for radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons. Profilin1 mutants showed cerebellar hypoplasia and aberrant organization of cerebellar cortex layers, with ectopically arranged granule neurons. In this commentary, we briefly introduce the profilin family and summarize the current knowledge on profilin activity in cell migration and adhesion. Employing cerebellar granule cells as a model, we shed some light on the mechanisms by which profilin1 may control radial migration and glial cell adhesion. Finally, a potential implication of profilin1 in human developmental neuropathies is discussed.

  6. Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: roles of protein expression and mechanical factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    In order to achieve selective targeting of affinity-ligand coated nanoparticles to the target tissue, it is essential to understand the key mechanisms that govern their capture by the target cell. Next-generation pharmacokinetic (PK) models that systematically account for proteomic and mechanical factors can accelerate the design, validation and translation of targeted nanocarriers (NCs) in the clinic. Towards this objective, we have developed a computational model to delineate the roles played by target protein expression and mechanical factors of the target cell membrane in determining the avidity of functionalized NCs to live cells. Model results show quantitative agreement with in vivo experiments when specific and non-specific contributions to NC binding are taken into account. The specific contributions are accounted for through extensive simulations of multivalent receptor-ligand interactions, membrane mechanics and entropic factors such as membrane undulations and receptor translation. The computed NC avidity is strongly dependent on ligand density, receptor expression, bending mechanics of the target cell membrane, as well as entropic factors associated with the membrane and the receptor motion. Our computational model can predict the in vivo targeting levels of the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1)-coated NCs targeted to the lung, heart, kidney, liver and spleen of mouse, when the contributions due to endothelial capture are accounted for. The effect of other cells (such as monocytes, etc.) do not improve the model predictions at steady state. We demonstrate the predictive utility of our model by predicting partitioning coefficients of functionalized NCs in mice and human tissues and report the statistical accuracy of our model predictions under different scenarios.

  7. Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: roles of protein expression and mechanical factors

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve selective targeting of affinity–ligand coated nanoparticles to the target tissue, it is essential to understand the key mechanisms that govern their capture by the target cell. Next-generation pharmacokinetic (PK) models that systematically account for proteomic and mechanical factors can accelerate the design, validation and translation of targeted nanocarriers (NCs) in the clinic. Towards this objective, we have developed a computational model to delineate the roles played by target protein expression and mechanical factors of the target cell membrane in determining the avidity of functionalized NCs to live cells. Model results show quantitative agreement with in vivo experiments when specific and non-specific contributions to NC binding are taken into account. The specific contributions are accounted for through extensive simulations of multivalent receptor–ligand interactions, membrane mechanics and entropic factors such as membrane undulations and receptor translation. The computed NC avidity is strongly dependent on ligand density, receptor expression, bending mechanics of the target cell membrane, as well as entropic factors associated with the membrane and the receptor motion. Our computational model can predict the in vivo targeting levels of the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1)-coated NCs targeted to the lung, heart, kidney, liver and spleen of mouse, when the contributions due to endothelial capture are accounted for. The effect of other cells (such as monocytes, etc.) do not improve the model predictions at steady state. We demonstrate the predictive utility of our model by predicting partitioning coefficients of functionalized NCs in mice and human tissues and report the statistical accuracy of our model predictions under different scenarios. PMID:27429783

  8. Contributions of adhesive proteins to the cellular and bacterial response to surfaces treated with bioactive polymers: case of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) grafted titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Aissa, Ines Ben; Evans, Margaret D M; Migonney, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The research developed on functionalized model or prosthetic surfaces with bioactive polymers has raised the possibility to modulate and/or control the biological in vitro and in vivo responses to synthetic biomaterials. The mechanisms underlying the bioactivity exhibited by sulfonated groups on surfaces involves both selective adsorption and conformational changes of adsorbed proteins. Indeed, surfaces functionalized by grafting poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) [poly(NaSS)] modulate the cellular and bacterial response by inducing specific interactions with fibronectin (Fn). Once implanted, a biomaterial surface is exposed to a milieu of many proteins that compete for the surface which dictates the subsequent biological response. Once understood, this can be controlled by dictating exposure of active binding sites. In this in vitro study, we report the influence of binary mixtures of proteins [albumin (BSA), Fn and collagen type I (Col I)] adsorbed on poly(NaSS) grafted Ti6Al4V on the adhesion and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells and the adhesion and proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Outcomes showed that poly(NaSS) stimulated cell spreading, attachment strength, differentiation and mineralization, whatever the nature of protein provided at the interface compared with ungrafted Ti6Al4V (control). While in competition, Fn and Col I were capable of prevailing over BSA. Fn played an important role in the early interactions of the cells with the surface, while Col I was responsible for increased alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphate productions associated with differentiation. Poly(NaSS) grafted surfaces decreased the adhesion of S. aureus and the presence of Fn on these chemically altered surfaces increased bacterial resistance ≈70% compared to the ungrafted Ti6Al4V. Overall, our study showed that poly(NaSS) grafted Ti6Al4V selectively adsorbed proteins (particularly Fn) promoting the adhesion and differentiation of osteoblast

  9. Cryptococcus neoformans activates RhoGTPase proteins followed by protein kinase C, focal adhesion kinase, and ezrin to promote traversal across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Chul; Crary, Benjamin; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Kim, Kee J

    2012-10-19

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis. Previous studies have demonstrated that Cryptococcus binding and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is a prerequisite for transmigration across the blood-brain barrier. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the cryptococcal blood-brain barrier traversal is poorly understood. In this study we examined the signaling events in HBMEC during interaction with C. neoformans. Analysis with inhibitors revealed that cryptococcal association, invasion, and transmigration require host actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Rho pulldown assays revealed that Cryptococcus induces activation of three members of RhoGTPases, e.g. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, and their activations are required for cryptococcal transmigration across the HBMEC monolayer. Western blot analysis showed that Cryptococcus also induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), ezrin, and protein kinase C α (PKCα), all of which are involved in the rearrangement of host actin cytoskeleton. Down-regulation of FAK, ezrin, or PKCα by shRNA knockdown, dominant-negative transfection, or inhibitors significantly reduces cryptococcal ability to traverse the HBMEC monolayer, indicating their positive role in cryptococcal transmigration. In addition, activation of RhoGTPases is the upstream event for phosphorylation of FAK, ezrin, and PKCα during C. neoformans-HBMEC interaction. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. neoformans activates RhoGTPases and subsequently FAK, ezrin, and PKCα to promote their traversal across the HBMEC monolayer, which is the critical step for cryptococcal brain infection and development of meningitis.

  10. Cryptosporidium parvum: identification of a new surface adhesion protein on sporozoite and oocyst by screening of a phage-display cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Yao, Longquan; Yin, Jigang; Zhang, Xichen; Liu, Quan; Li, Jianhua; Chen, Lifeng; Zhao, Yueping; Gong, Pengtao; Liu, Chengwu

    2007-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a significant cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. The specific molecules that mediate C. parvum-host interaction and the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are unknown. In this study we described a novel phage display method to identify surface adhesion proteins of C. parvum. A cDNA library of the sporozoite and oocyst stages of C. parvum expressed on the surface of T7 phage was screened with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from the newborn Cryptosporidium-free Holstein calves. Proteins that selectively and specifically bound to IECs were then enriched using a multi-step panning procedure. Two proteins of C. parvum were selected, one was previously reported (p23), which was an important surface adhesion protein; the other was a novel surface adherence protein (CP12). Sequence analysis showed that CP12 has a N-terminal signal peptide, a transmembrane region, a N-glycosylation site, a casein kinase II phosphorylation site and two N-myristoylation sites. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using antibody specific for rCP12 demonstrated that the antibody can specifically bind the surface of sporozoite and oocyst, especially apical region of sporozoite. The surface localization of CP12 and its involvement in the host-parasite interaction suggest that it may serve as an effective target for specific preventive and therapeutic measures for cryptosporidiosis.

  11. Microtubule-destabilizing agents induce focal adhesion structure disorganization and anoikis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deschesnes, Réna G; Patenaude, Alexandre; Rousseau, Jean L C; Fortin, Jessica S; Ricard, Christine; Côté, Marie-France; Huot, Jacques; C-Gaudreault, René; Petitclerc, Eric

    2007-02-01

    Microtubule disruption provokes cytoskeleton and cell adhesion changes whose importance for apoptosis induction remains unclear. The present study focuses on the functional and the molecular adhesion kinetics that are induced by microtubule disruption-mediated apoptosis. We showed that antimicrotubules induce a biphasic sequence of adhesion response that precedes the onset of apoptosis and focal adhesion kinase hydrolysis. Antimicrotubules first induced an increase of the cellular adhesion paralleled by the raise of focal adhesion sites and actin contractility, which was followed by a sharp decrease of cell adhesion and disorganization of focal adhesion and actin stress fibers. The latter sequence of events ends by cell rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and cell death. Microtubule-disrupting agents induced a sustained paxillin phosphorylation, before the activation of apoptosis, that requires the prior activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Interestingly, integrin-linked kinase overexpression rescued the antimicrotubule-mediated loss of cell viability. Altogether, these results propound that antimicrotubule agents induce anoikis through the loss of focal adhesion structure integrity.

  12. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  13. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-03-07

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  14. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Karin; Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew; Grawé, Jan; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Daley, George Q.; Welsh, Michael

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased

  15. Identification of a Monoclonal Antibody Against Pneumococcal Pilus 1 Ancillary Protein Impairing Bacterial Adhesion to Human Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Amerighi, Fulvia; Valeri, Maria; Donnarumma, Danilo; Maccari, Silvia; Moschioni, Monica; Taddei, Annarita; Lapazio, Lucia; Pansegrau, Werner; Buccato, Scilla; De Angelis, Gabriella; Ruggiero, Paolo; Masignani, Vega; Soriani, Marco; Pezzicoli, Alfredo

    2016-02-15

    The adhesion of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a key step during colonization of human respiratory tract mucosae. Here we demonstrate that pneumococcal type I pilus significantly increases the adhesiveness of poorly adhering highly capsulated strains in vitro. Interestingly, preincubation of bacteria with antibodies against the major pilus backbone subunit (RrgB) or the adhesin component (RrgA) impaired pneumococcal association to human epithelial cells. Screening for anti-RrgA monoclonal antibodies specifically affecting the adhesive capacity of S. pneumoniae led to the identification of the monoclonal 11B9/61 antibody, which greatly reduced pilus-dependent cell contact. Proteomic-based epitope mapping of 11B9/61 monoclonal antibody revealed a well-exposed epitope on the D2 domain of RrgA as the target of this functional antibody. The data presented here confirm the importance of pilus I for S. pneumoniae pathogenesis and the potential use of antipilus antibodies to prevent bacterial colonization.

  16. RhoGAP68F controls transport of adhesion proteins in Rab4 endosomes to modulate epithelial morphogenesis of Drosophila leg discs

    PubMed Central

    de Madrid, Beatriz Hernandez; Greenberg, Lina; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elongation and invagination of epithelial tissues are fundamental developmental processes that contribute to the morphogenesis of embryonic and adult structures and are dependent on coordinated remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The morphogenesis of Drosophila leg imaginal discs depends on extensive remodeling of cell contacts and thus provides a useful system with which to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The small Rho GTPase regulator RhoGAP68F has been previously implicated in leg morphogenesis. It consists of an N-terminal Sec14 domain and a C-terminal GAP domain. Here we examined the molecular function and role of RhoGAP68F in epithelial remodeling. We find that depletion of RhoGAP68F impairs epithelial remodeling from a pseudostratified to simple, while overexpression of RhoGAP68F causes tears of lateral cell-cell contacts and thus impairs epithelial integrity. We show that the RhoGAP68F protein localizes to Rab4 recycling endosomes and forms a complex with the Rab4 protein. The Sec14 domain is sufficient for localizing to Rab4 endosomes, while the activity of the GAP domain is dispensable. RhoGAP68F, in turn, inhibits the scission and movement of Rab4 endosomes involved in transport the adhesion proteins Fasciclin3 and E-cadherin back to cell-cell contacts. Expression of RhoGAP68F is upregulated during prepupal development suggesting that RhoGAP68F decreases the transport of key adhesion proteins to the cell surface during this developmental stage to decrease the strength of adhesive cell-cell contacts and thereby facilitate epithelial remodeling and leg morphogenesis. PMID:25617722

  17. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  18. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Kao, Hsien-Li; Lin, Mao-Shin; Wei, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects. Methods In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Results Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001). Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12–2.14, p<0.01) for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871–0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%). We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD

  19. Structural basis of focal adhesion targeting domain-mediated signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2017-02-01

    The focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exists in monomeric closed (c) or arm exchanged (ae) dimeric state. FAT interaction with Grb2 necessitates an intermediate open (o) state that interacts with Grb2 and activates signaling pathways leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation was carried out in order to capture the structure of the intermediate formed by opening of Helix1 (H1) from monomeric cFAT leading to the formation of monomeric aeFAT. During TMD, H1 separated from the four helices bundle of cFAT, completely unfolded and performed a full turn before folding back to a helix inclined at an acute angle to the helical bundle in aeFAT. The entire transition can be described in six distinct intermediate structural stages. The most significant correlation of H1 motion was observed with Loop3 (L3) and is the likely reason for the complete disruption of the FAT interaction with paxillin during the transition. High-affinity analogs of the paxillin LD4 region can be a promising strategy to drive the equilibrium towards cFAT, thus antagonizing FAT-Grb2 association. During transition, the overall shift in orientation of all the four helices rejects paxillin binding and approves Grb2 association. Exposure and β-turn conformation of the YENV motif (residues 925-928) in oFAT-facilitated phosphorylation and Grb2 binding. Docking, MD simulation and conservation analysis of oFAT-Grb2 complex provided insight into the structural determinants of binding and specificity. Our work provides a structural basis for pharmacological modulation of dynamic conformational changes and interactions of FAT.

  20. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  1. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  2. Bridging Adhesion of a Protein onto an Inorganic Surface Using Self-Assembled Dual-Functionalized Spheres.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sota; Ikemi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Takashi; Matsumura, Sachiko; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Fujita, Makoto

    2015-10-14

    For the bridging adhesion of different classes of materials in their intact functional states, the adhesion of biomolecules onto inorganic surfaces is a necessity. A new molecular design strategy for bridging adhesion was demonstrated by the introduction of two independent recognition groups on the periphery of spherical complexes self-assembled from metal ions (M) and bidentate ligands (L). These dual-functionalized M12L24 spheres were quantitatively synthesized in one step from two ligands, bearing either a biotin for streptavidin recognition or a titania-binding aptamer, and Pd(II) ions. The selective recognition of titania surfaces was achieved by ligands with hexapeptide aptamers (Arg-Lys-Leu-Pro-Asp-Ala: minTBP-1), whose fixation ability was enhanced by the accumulation effect on the surface of the M12L24 spheres. These well-defined spherical structures can be specifically tailored to promote interactions with both titania and streptavidin simultaneously without detrimentally affecting either recognition motif. The irreversible immobilization of the spheres onto titania was revealed quantitatively by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, and the adhesion of streptavidin to the titania surface mediated by the biotin surrounding the spheres was visually demonstrated by lithographic patterning experiments.

  3. A functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-based bioassay surface chemistry that facilitates bio-immobilization and inhibits non-specific protein, bacterial, and mammalian cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Harbers, Gregory M.; Emoto, Kazunori; Greef, Charles; Metzger, Steven W.; Woodward, Heather N.; Mascali, James J.; Grainger, David W.; Lochhead, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a new bioassay surface chemistry that effectively inhibits non-specific biomolecular and cell binding interactions, while providing a capacity for specific immobilization of desired biomolecules. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as the primary component in nonfouling film chemistry is well-established, but the multicomponent formulation described here is unique in that it (1) is applied in a single, reproducible, solution-based coating step; (2) can be applied to diverse substrate materials without the use of special primers; and (3) is readily functionalized to provide specific attachment chemistries. Surface analysis data are presented, detailing surface roughness, polymer film thickness, and film chemistry. Protein non-specific binding assays demonstrate significant inhibition of serum, fibrinogen, and lysozyme adsorption to coated glass, indium tin oxide, and tissue culture polystyrene dishes. Inhibition of S. aureus and K. pneumoniae microbial adhesion in a microfluidic flow cell, and inhibition of fibroblast cell adhesion from serum-based cell culture is shown. Effective functionalization of the coating is demonstrated by directing fibroblast adhesion to polymer surfaces activated with an RGD peptide. Batch-to-batch reproducibility data are included. The in situ cross-linked PEG-based coating chemistry is unique in its formulation, and its surface properties are attractive for a broad range of in vitro bioassay applications. PMID:18815622

  4. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-01-15

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII-IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research.

  5. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2013-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII–IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research. PMID:23169788

  6. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  7. Streptococcus suis Type 2 SSU0587 Protein is a Beta-Galactosidase That Contributes to Bacterial Adhesion but Not to Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    TANG, Yulong; ZHANG, Xiaoyan; YIN, Yulong; HARDWIDGE, Philip R.; FANG, Weihuan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial surface proteins play key roles in virulence and often contribute to bacterial adhesion and invasion. We discovered that the Streptococcus suis type 2 (SS2) gene SSU0587 encodes a protein of 1,491 amino acids that possesses β-galactosidase activity. The surface association of the protein was dependent upon sortase activity. Deleting SSU0587 from clinical SS2 isolate JX081101 caused a loss of both β-galactosidase activity and adherence to microvascular endothelial cells. Deleting SSU0587 had no measurable impact on either invasion of microvascular endothelial cells or on virulence in a murine infection model, although the concentration of JX081101ΔSSU0587 was reduced in the brains of infected mice, as compared with the pathogen loads of the wild-type strain. PMID:24670993

  8. Streptococcus suis type 2 SSU0587 protein is a beta-galactosidase that contributes to bacterial adhesion but not to virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yin, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R; Fang, Weihuan

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial surface proteins play key roles in virulence and often contribute to bacterial adhesion and invasion. We discovered that the Streptococcus suis type 2 (SS2) gene SSU0587 encodes a protein of 1,491 amino acids that possesses β-galactosidase activity. The surface association of the protein was dependent upon sortase activity. Deleting SSU0587 from clinical SS2 isolate JX081101 caused a loss of both β-galactosidase activity and adherence to microvascular endothelial cells. Deleting SSU0587 had no measurable impact on either invasion of microvascular endothelial cells or on virulence in a murine infection model, although the concentration of JX081101ΔSSU0587 was reduced in the brains of infected mice, as compared with the pathogen loads of the wild-type strain.

  9. Dual roles of protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa in coordinating angiogenesis induced by pro-angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping-Hui; Chen, Gang; Mason, Malcolm; Jiang, Wen G.; Ye, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A potential role may be played by receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPRK) in angiogenesis due to its critical function in coordinating intracellular signal transduction from various receptors reliant on tyrosine phosphorylation. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of PTPRK in the cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells (HECV) and its role in angiogenesis using in vitro assays and a PTPRK knockdown vascular endothelial cell model. PTPRK knockdown in HECV cells (HECVPTPRKkd) resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation and cell-matrix adhesion; however, increased cell spreading and motility were seen. Reduced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin protein levels were seen in the PTPRK knockdown cells which may contribute to the inhibitory effect on adhesion. HECVPTPRKkd cells were more responsive to the treatment of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) in their migration compared with the untreated control and cells treated with VEGF. Moreover, elevated c-Src and Akt1 were seen in the PTPRK knockdown cells. The FGF-promoted cell migration was remarkably suppressed by an addition of PLCγ inhibitor compared with other small inhibitors. Knockdown of PTPRK suppressed the ability of HECV cells to form tubules and also impaired the tubule formation that was induced by FGF and conditioned medium of cancer cells. Taken together, it suggests that PTPRK plays dual roles in coordinating angiogenesis. It plays a positive role in cell proliferation, adhesion and tubule formation, but suppresses cell migration, in particular, the FGF-promoted migration. PTPRK bears potential to be targeted for the prevention of tumour associated angiogenesis. PMID:28259897

  10. kakapo, a gene required for adhesion between and within cell layers in Drosophila, encodes a large cytoskeletal linker protein related to plectin and dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S L; Brown, N H

    1998-11-30

    Mutations in kakapo were recovered in genetic screens designed to isolate genes required for integrin-mediated adhesion in Drosophila. We cloned the gene and found that it encodes a large protein (>5,000 amino acids) that is highly similar to plectin and BPAG1 over the first 1,000-amino acid region, and contains within this region an alpha-actinin type actin-binding domain. A central region containing dystrophin-like repeats is followed by a carboxy domain that is distinct from plectin and dystrophin, having neither the intermediate filament-binding domain of plectin nor the dystroglycan/syntrophin-binding domain of dystrophin. Instead, Kakapo has a carboxy terminus similar to the growth arrest-specific protein Gas2. Kakapo is strongly expressed late during embryogenesis at the most prominent site of position-specific integrin adhesion, the muscle attachment sites. It is concentrated at apical and basal surfaces of epidermal muscle attachment cells, at the termini of the prominent microtubule bundles, and is required in these cells for strong attachment to muscles. Kakapo is also expressed more widely at a lower level where it is essential for epidermal cell layer stability. These results suggest that the Kakapo protein forms essential links among integrins, actin, and microtubules.

  11. Involvement of small G protein RhoB in the regulation of proliferation, adhesion and migration by dexamethasone in osteoblastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Yidong; Xu, Weidong; Lu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Long-term exposure to therapeutic doses of glucocorticoids (GCs) results in bone remodeling, which frequently causes osteoporosis and fracture healing retardation because of the abnormality of osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation. The mechanisms of GCs’ effect on osteoblasts are largely unknown. In this present study, we found that dexamethasone (Dex) could induce the expression of the small G protein, RhoB, in mRNA and protein levels in the osteoblast-derived osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63. The up-regulation of RhoB mRNA by Dex mainly occurs at posttranscriptional level by increasing its mRNA stability through PI-3K/Akt and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Over-expression of RhoB in MG-63 cells magnified while down-regulation of RhoB level by RNA interference impaired Dex-induced growth inhibition but not differentiation. What’s more, over-expression of RhoB mimicked the effect of Dex on cell adhesion and migration. And interfering RhoB expression partially suppressed Dex-induced pro-adhesion and anti-migration in MG-63 cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that RhoB plays an important role in the pathological effect of Dex on osteoblastic growth and migration, which is a part of the mechanisms of GCs’ adverse effect on bone remodeling. PMID:28323887

  12. The 18-kDa Translocator Protein Inhibits Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression via Inhibition of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Gun; Choi, Sunga; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein and is abundantly expressed in a variety of organ and tissues. To date, the functional role of TSPO on vascular endothelial cell activation has yet to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 250 nM), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), was used to induce vascular endothelial activation. Adenoviral TSPO overexpression (10–100 MOI) inhibited PMA-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in a dose dependent manner. PMA-induced VCAM-1 expressions were inhibited by Mito-TEMPO (0.1–0.5 μM), a specific mitochondrial antioxidants, and cyclosporin A (1–5 μM), a mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor, implying on an important role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the endothelial activation. Moreover, adenoviral TSPO overexpression inhibited mitochondrial ROS production and manganese superoxide dismutase expression. On contrasts, gene silencing of TSPO with siRNA increased PMA-induced VCAM-1 expression and mitochondrial ROS production. Midazolam (1–50 μM), TSPO ligands, inhibited PMA-induced VCAM-1 and mitochondrial ROS production in endothelial cells. These results suggest that mitochondrial TSPO can inhibit PMA-induced endothelial inflammation via suppression of VCAM-1 and mitochondrial ROS production in endothelial cells. PMID:26608360

  13. The Chlamydia outer membrane protein OmcB is required for adhesion and exhibits biovar-specific differences in glycosaminoglycan binding

    PubMed Central

    Moelleken, Katja; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, an obligate intracellular human pathogen, causes a number of respiratory diseases. We explored the role of the conserved OmcB protein in C. pneumoniae infections, using yeast display technology. (i) Yeast cells presenting OmcB were found to adhere to human epithelial cells. (ii) Pre-incubation of OmcB yeast cells with heparin, but not other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), abrogated adhesion. (iii) Pre-treatment of the target cells with heparinase inhibited adherence, and GAG-deficient CHO cell lines failed to bind OmcB yeast. (iv) A heparin-binding motif present near the N-terminus of OmcB is required for host cell binding. (v) Pre-treatment of chlamydial elementary bodies (EBs) with anti-OmcB antibody or pre-incubation of target cells with recombinant OmcB protein reduced infectivity upon challenge with C. pneumoniae. (vi) Adhesion of fluorescently labelled EBs to epithelial or endothelial cells was abrogated by prior addition of heparin or OmcB protein. Thus, C. pneumoniae OmcB is an adhesin that binds heparan sulphate-like GAGs. OmcB from Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L1 also adheres to human cells in a heparin-dependent way, unlike its counterpart from serovar E. We show that a single position in the OmcB sequence determines heparin dependence/independence, and variations there may reflect differences between the two serovars in cell tropism and disease pattern. PMID:18086188

  14. Effects of the knockdown of death-associated protein 3 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ahmad M A; Ye, Lin; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-05-01

    The death-associated protein 3 (DAP3) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP3 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we intended to determine the role of DAP3 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, and performed growth, adhesion, invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of post-wound migration of the cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, death ligand signal enhancer (DELE), IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS1), cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sub-lines. The knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 had significantly increased adhesion and decreased growth when compared to the controls. Furthermore, invasion and migration were significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231DAP3kd cells vs. the controls. The expression of caspase 9 and IPS1, known components of the apoptosis pathway, were significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP3kd cells (p=0.05 and p=0.003, respectively). We conclude that DAP3 silencing contributes to breast carcinogenesis by increasing cell adhesion, migration and invasion. It is possible that this may be due to the activity of focal adhesion kinase further downstream of the anoikis pathway. Further research in this direction would be beneficial in increasing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying human breast cancer.

  15. The conserved dual phosphorylation sites of the Candida albicans Hog1 protein are crucial for white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Han; Liang, Shen-Huan; Deng, Fu-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has a unique morphological transition between white and opaque phases. These two cells differ in virulence, mating capability, biofilm formation, and host-cell interaction. Previous studies revealed that deletion of the SSK2, PBS2, or HOG1 gene resulted in 100% opaque cell formation and suppressed the mating response. Thr-174 and Tyr-176 of the Hog1 protein are important phosphoacceptors and can be activated in response to stimuli. In this study, we first demonstrated the importance of two conserved phosphorylation sites in white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion. Six Hog1 point-mutated strains were generated, including nonphosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174A), Hog1(Y176F), and Hog1(T174A,Y176F)) and negatively charged phosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174D), Hog1(Y176D), and Hog1(T174D,Y176D)). Point mutation on Thr-174, Tyr-176 or in combination with the Hog1 protein in C. albicans MTL homozygous strains stimulated opaque cell formation at a frequency of 100%. Furthermore, mating projections of point-mutated strains were significantly shorter and their mating efficiencies and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesive numbers were lower than those of the wild-type. By investigating the effects of Hog1 phosphorylation in ssk1Δ and sln1Δ, we also demonstrate that the phosphorylation intensity of Hog1p is directly involved in the white-opaque switching. Taken together, the results of our study demonstrate that dual phosphorylation sites of C. albicans are crucial for white-opaque transition, sexual mating, and pheromone-induced cell adhesion.

  16. Immunolocalization of keratin-associated beta-proteins (beta-keratins) in pad lamellae of geckos suggest that glycine-cysteine-rich proteins contribute to their flexibility and adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    The epidermis of digital pads in geckos comprises superficial microornamentation from the oberhautchen layer that form long setae allowing these lizards to climb vertical surfaces. The beta-layer is reduced in pad lamellae but persists up to the apical free margin. Setae are made of different proteins including keratin-associated beta-proteins, formerly indicated as beta-keratins. In order to identify specific setal proteins the present ultrastructural study on geckos pad lamellae analyzes the immunolocalization of three beta-proteins previously found in the epidermis and adhesive setae of the green anolis. A protein rich in glycine but poor in cysteine (HgG5-like) is absent or masked in gecko pad lamellae. Another protein rich in glycine and cysteine (HgGC3-like) is weakly present in setae, oberhautchen and beta-layer. A glycine and cysteine medium rich beta-protein (HgGC10-like) is present in the lower part of the beta-layer but is absent in the oberhautchen, setae, and mesos layer. The latter two proteins may form intermolecular bonds that contribute to the flexibility of the corneous material sustaining the setae. The pliable alpha-layer present beneath the thin beta-layer and in the hinge region of the pad lamellae also contains HgGC10-like proteins. Based on the possibility that some HgGC3-like or other cys-rich beta-proteins are charged in the setae it is suggested that their charges influence the mechanism of adhesion increasing the induction of dipoles on the substrate and enhancing attractive van der Waals forces.

  17. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  18. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  19. Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation of a γ-Protocadherin C-terminal Lipid Binding Domain Regulates Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibition and Dendrite Arborization.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Austin B; Schreiner, Dietmar; Weiner, Joshua A

    2015-08-21

    The γ-protocadherins (γ-Pcdhs) are a family of 22 adhesion molecules with multiple critical developmental functions, including the proper formation of dendritic arbors by forebrain neurons. The γ-Pcdhs bind to and inhibit focal adhesion kinase (FAK) via a constant C-terminal cytoplasmic domain shared by all 22 proteins. In cortical neurons lacking the γ-Pcdhs, aberrantly high activity of FAK and of PKC disrupts dendrite arborization. Little is known, however, about how γ-Pcdh function is regulated by other factors. Here we show that PKC phosphorylates a serine residue situated within a phospholipid binding motif at the shared γ-Pcdh C terminus. Western blots using a novel phospho-specific antibody against this site suggest that a portion of γ-Pcdh proteins is phosphorylated in the cortex in vivo. We find that PKC phosphorylation disrupts both phospholipid binding and the γ-Pcdh inhibition of (but not binding to) FAK. Introduction of a non-phosphorylatable (S922A) γ-Pcdh construct into wild-type cortical neurons significantly increases dendrite arborization. This same S922A construct can also rescue dendrite arborization defects in γ-Pcdh null neurons cell autonomously. Consistent with these data, introduction of a phosphomimetic (S/D) γ-Pcdh construct or treatment with a PKC activator reduces dendrite arborization in wild-type cortical neurons. Together, these data identify a novel mechanism through which γ-Pcdh control of a signaling pathway important for dendrite arborization is regulated.

  20. Identification of the Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I-binding protein as a unique glycoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule in the olfactory sensory axons of adults rats.

    PubMed

    Pestean, A; Krizbai, I; Böttcher, H; Párducz, A; Joó, F; Wolff, J R

    1995-08-04

    Histochemical localization of two lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Tetragonolobus purpureus (TPA), was studied in the olfactory bulb of adult rats. In contrast to TPA, UEA-I detected a fucosylated glycoprotein that is only present in the surface membranes of olfactory sensory cells including the whole course of their neurites up to the final arborization in glomeruli. Immunoblotting revealed that UEA-I binds specifically to a protein of 205 kDa, while TPA stains several other glycoproteins. Affinity chromatography with the use of a UEA-I column identified the 205 kDa protein as a glycoform of neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), specific for the rat olfactory sensory nerves.

  1. Involvement of rho-gtpases in fibroblast adhesion and fibronectine fibrillogenesis under stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignandon, A.; Lambert, C.; Rattner, A.; Servotte, S.; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, B.; Vico, L.

    The Rho family small GTPases play a crucial role in mediating cellular adaptation to mechanical stimulation (MS), and possibly to microgravity (μg), through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion which is, in turn, mainly regulated by fibronectin fibrillogenesis (FnF). It remains unclear how mechanical stimulation is transduced to the Rho signaling pathways and how it impacts on fibronectin (fbn) fibrillogenesis (FnF). μg (2 days, mission STS-095) led to de-adhesion of fibroblasts and modification of the underlying extracellular matrix. To determine whether GTPases modulated FnF, we generated stable cell lines expressing high level of activated RhoA and Rac1 (QL) as compared to wild type (WI26-WT). After MS application [8% deformation, 1Hz, 15 min., 3 times/day for 1-2 days], we quantified focal adhesion (vinculin, paxillin, FAKY397), f-actin stress fibers (Sf) and FnF with home-developed softwares. We reported that after MS, Sf are more rapidly (30min) formed under the nucleus in Wi26-WT (+100%) and Rac1 (+200%) than in RhoA (+20%). Vinculin & paxillin were only restricted to the cell edge in static conditions and homogeneously distributed after MS in WT and Rac1. The relative area of contacts (vinculin & paxillin) was more dramatically enhanced by MS in Rac1 (+80%) than in WT (+40%) and RhoA (+25%) indicating that new focal contacts are formed under MS and supported the presence of Sf. MS Activation of FAK (FAKY397) was clear in WT and Rac1 and reduced in RhoA. FnF was restricted to cell-cell contacts zone without any change in the relative area of fbn after a 2-days MS. However we found more numerous spots of fbn at the cell center in Rac1 as compared with RhoA & WT suggesting that these fibrillar contacts will grow upon maturation and modulate FnF. The results indicate that MS induces formation of Sf and focal adhesions and enhances FF. RhoA has been shown to induce the formation of Sf and focal adhesions, and Rac1 activation decreases Rho activity in

  2. Participation of heparin binding proteins from the surface of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes in the adhesion of parasites to Lutzomyia longipalpis cells (Lulo) in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmania (V.) braziliensis is a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. During the parasite life cycle, the promastigotes adhere to the gut of sandflies, to avoid being eliminated with the dejection. The Lulo cell line, derived from Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae), is a suitable in vitro study model to understand the features of parasite adhesion. Here, we analyze the role of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) from Lulo cells and proteins from the parasites in this event. Methods Flagellar (Ff) and membrane (Mf) fractions from promastigotes were obtained by differential centrifugation and the purity of fractions confirmed by western blot assays, using specific antibodies for cellular compartments. Heparin-binding proteins (HBP) were isolated from both fractions using a HiTrap-Heparin column. In addition, binding of promastigotes to Lulo cells or to a heparin-coated surface was assessed by inhibition assays or surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. Results The success of promastigotes subcellular fractionation led to the obtainment of Ff and Mf proteins, both of which presented two main protein bands (65.0 and 55.0kDa) with affinity to heparin. The contribution of HBPs in the adherence of promastigotes to Lulo cells was assessed through competition assays, using HS or the purified HBPs fractions. All tested samples presented a measurable inhibition rate when compared to control adhesion rate (17 ± 2.0% of culture cells with adhered parasites): 30% (for HS 20μg/ml) and 16% (for HS 10μg/ml); HBP Mf (35.2% for 10μg/ml and 25.4% for 20μg/ml) and HBP Ff (10.0% for 10μg/ml and 31.4% for 20μg/ml). Additionally, to verify the presence of sulfated GAGs in Lulo cells surface and intracellular compartment, metabolic labeling with radioactive sulfate was performed, indicating the presence of an HS and chondroitin sulfate in both cell sections. The SPR analysis performed further confirmed the presence of GAGs ligands on L. (V

  3. Proteome profiling of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei extracellular proteins and identification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as an important adhesion factor for conidial attachment.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Tse, Herman; Chan, Joanna S Y; Zhou, Anna C; Curreem, Shirly O T; Lau, Candy C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2013-12-01

    Despite being the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia, the pathogenic mechanisms of Penicillium marneffei remain largely unknown. By comparing the extracellular proteomes of P. marneffei in mycelial and yeast phases, we identified 12 differentially expressed proteins among which glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) were found to be upregulated in mycelial and yeast phases respectively. Based on previous findings in other pathogens, we hypothesized that these two extracellular proteins may be involved in adherence during P. marneffei-host interaction. Using inhibition assays with recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) proteins and anti-rGAPDH sera, we demonstrated that adhesion of P. marneffei conidia to fibronectin and laminin was inhibited by rGAPDH or rabbit anti-rGAPDH serum in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, a dose-dependent inhibition of conidial adherence to A549 pneumocytes by rGAPDH or rabbit anti-rGAPDH serum was observed, suggesting that P. marneffei GAPDH can mediate binding of conidia to human extracellular matrix proteins and pneumocytes. However, HSP60 did not exhibit similar inhibition on conidia adherence, and neither GAPDH norHSP60 exhibited inhibition on adherence to J774 or THP-1 macrophage cell lines. This report demonstrates GAPDH as an adherence factor in P. marneffei by mediating conidia adherence to host bronchoalveolar epithelium during the early establishment phase of infection.

  4. Gastrin-stimulated Gα13 Activation of Rgnef Protein (ArhGEF28) in DLD-1 Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Masià-Balagué, Miriam; Izquierdo, Ismael; Garrido, Georgina; Cordomí, Arnau; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Miller, Nichol L G; Schlaepfer, David D; Gigoux, Véronique; Aragay, Anna M

    2015-06-12

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rgnef (also known as ArhGEF28 or p190RhoGEF) promotes colon carcinoma cell motility and tumor progression via interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Mechanisms of Rgnef activation downstream of integrin or G protein-coupled receptors remain undefined. In the absence of a recognized G protein signaling homology domain in Rgnef, no proximal linkage to G proteins was known. Utilizing multiple methods, we have identified Rgnef as a new effector for Gα13 downstream of gastrin and the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor. In DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells depleted of Gα13, gastrin-induced FAK Tyr(P)-397 and paxillin Tyr(P)-31 phosphorylation were reduced. RhoA GTP binding and promoter activity were increased by Rgnef in combination with active Gα13. Rgnef co-immunoprecipitated with activated Gα13Q226L but not Gα12Q229L. The Rgnef C-terminal (CT, 1279-1582) region was sufficient for co-immunoprecipitation, and Rgnef-CT exogenous expression prevented Gα13-stimulated SRE activity. A domain at the C terminus of the protein close to the FAK binding domain is necessary to bind to Gα13. Point mutations of Rgnef-CT residues disrupt association with active Gα13 but not Gαq. These results show that Rgnef functions as an effector of Gα13 signaling and that this linkage may mediate FAK activation in DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells.

  5. Gastrin-stimulated Gα13 Activation of Rgnef Protein (ArhGEF28) in DLD-1 Colon Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masià-Balagué, Miriam; Izquierdo, Ismael; Garrido, Georgina; Cordomí, Arnau; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Miller, Nichol L. G.; Schlaepfer, David D.; Gigoux, Véronique; Aragay, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rgnef (also known as ArhGEF28 or p190RhoGEF) promotes colon carcinoma cell motility and tumor progression via interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Mechanisms of Rgnef activation downstream of integrin or G protein-coupled receptors remain undefined. In the absence of a recognized G protein signaling homology domain in Rgnef, no proximal linkage to G proteins was known. Utilizing multiple methods, we have identified Rgnef as a new effector for Gα13 downstream of gastrin and the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor. In DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells depleted of Gα13, gastrin-induced FAK Tyr(P)-397 and paxillin Tyr(P)-31 phosphorylation were reduced. RhoA GTP binding and promoter activity were increased by Rgnef in combination with active Gα13. Rgnef co-immunoprecipitated with activated Gα13Q226L but not Gα12Q229L. The Rgnef C-terminal (CT, 1279–1582) region was sufficient for co-immunoprecipitation, and Rgnef-CT exogenous expression prevented Gα13-stimulated SRE activity. A domain at the C terminus of the protein close to the FAK binding domain is necessary to bind to Gα13. Point mutations of Rgnef-CT residues disrupt association with active Gα13 but not Gαq. These results show that Rgnef functions as an effector of Gα13 signaling and that this linkage may mediate FAK activation in DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells. PMID:25922072

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency in macrophages leads to defective p110γ PI3K signaling and impairs cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Osma-García, Inés C; Iñiguez, Miguel A; Fresno, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 dependent PGs modulate several functions in many pathophysiological processes, including migration of immune cells. In this study, we addressed the role of Cox-2 in macrophage migration by using in vivo and in vitro models. Upon thioglycolate challenge, CD11b(+) F4/80(+) macrophages showed a diminished ability to migrate to the peritoneal cavity in cox-2(-/-) mice. In vivo migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages from the peritoneal cavity to lymph nodes, as well as cell adhesion to the mesothelium, was reduced in response to LPS. In vitro migration of cox-2(-/-) macrophages toward MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-1β, as well as cell adhesion to ICAM-1 or fibronectin, was impaired. Defects in cell migration were not due to changes in chemokine receptor expression. Remarkably, cox-2(-/-) macrophages showed a deficiency in focal adhesion formation, with reduced phosphorylation of paxillin (Tyr(188)). Interestingly, expression of the p110γ catalytic subunit of PI3K was severely reduced in the absence of Cox-2, leading to defective Akt phosphorylation, as well as cdc42 and Rac-1 activation. Our results indicate that the paxillin/p110γ-PI3K/Cdc42/Rac1 axis is defective in cox-2(-/-) macrophages, which results in impaired cell adhesion and migration.

  7. Ankyrin-binding proteins related to nervous system cell adhesion molecules: candidates to provide transmembrane and intercellular connections in adult brain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A major class of ankyrin-binding glycoproteins have been identified in adult rat brain of 186, 155, and 140 kD that are alternatively spliced products of the same pre-mRNA. Characterization of cDNAs demonstrated that ankyrin-binding glycoproteins (ABGPs) share 72% amino acid sequence identity with chicken neurofascin, a membrane-spanning neural cell adhesion molecule in the Ig super-family expressed in embryonic brain. ABGP polypeptides have the following features consistent with a role as ankyrin-binding proteins in vitro and in vivo: (a) ABGPs and ankyrin associate as pure proteins in a 1:1 molar stoichiometry; (b) the ankyrin-binding site is located in the COOH-terminal 21 kD of ABGP186 which contains the predicted cytoplasmic domain; (c) ABGP186 is expressed at approximately the same levels as ankyrin (15 pmoles/milligram of membrane protein); and (d) ABGP polypeptides are co- expressed with the adult form of ankyrinB late in postnatal development and are colocalized with ankyrinB by immunofluorescence. Similarity in amino acid sequence and conservation of sites of alternative splicing indicate that genes encoding ABGPs and neurofascin share a common ancestor. However, the major differences in developmental expression reported for neurofascin in embryos versus the late postnatal expression of ABGPs suggest that ABGPs and neurofascin represent products of gene duplication events that have subsequently evolved in parallel with distinct roles. The predicted cytoplasmic domains of rat ABGPs and chicken neurofascin are nearly identical to each other and closely related to a group of nervous system cell adhesion molecules with variable extracellular domains, which includes L1, Nr-CAM, and Ng- CAM of vertebrates, and neuroglian of Drosophila. The ankyrin-binding site of rat ABGPs is localized to the C-terminal 200 residues which encompass the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting the hypothesis that ability to associate with ankyrin may be a shared feature of neurofascin and

  8. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia; Wang, Xudong

    2014-03-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI.

  9. The adaptor protein SAP directly associates with PECAM-1 and regulates PECAM-1-mediated-cell adhesion in T-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Proust, Richard; Crouin, Catherine; Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2014-04-01

    SAP is a small cytosolic adaptor protein expressed in hematopoietic lineages whose main function is to regulate intracellular signaling pathways induced by the triggering of members of the SLAM receptor family. In this paper, we have identified the adhesion molecule PECAM-1 as a new partner for SAP in a conditional yeast two-hybrid screen. PECAM-1 is an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes, which possesses both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about PECAM-1 functions in T cells. We show that SAP directly and specifically interacts with the cytosolic tyrosine 686 of PECAM-1. We generated different T-like cell lines in which SAP or PECAM-1 are expressed or down modulated and we demonstrate that a diminished SAP expression correlates with a diminished PECAM-1-mediated adhesion. Although SAP has mainly been shown to associate with SLAM receptors, we evidence here that SAP is a new actor downstream of PECAM-1.

  10. AmpA protein functions by different mechanisms to influence early cell type specification and to modulate cell adhesion and actin polymerization in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cost, Hoa N; Noratel, Elizabeth F; Blumberg, Daphne D

    2013-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum ampA gene encodes a multifunctional regulator protein that modulates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions and actin polymerization during growth and is necessary for correct cell type specification and patterning during development. Insertional inactivation of the ampA gene results in defects that define two distinct roles for the ampA gene during development. AmpA is necessary in a non-cell autonomous manner to prevent premature expression of a prespore gene marker. It is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for the anterior like cells, which express the ampA gene, to migrate to the upper cup during culmination. It is also necessary to prevent excessive cell-cell agglutination when cells are developed in a submerged suspension culture. Here, we demonstrate that a supernatant source of AmpA protein, added extracellularly, can prevent the premature mis-expression of the prespore marker. Synthetic oligopeptides are used to identify the domain of the AmpA protein that is important for preventing cells from mis-expressing the prespore gene. We further demonstrate that a factor capable of inducing additional cells to express the prespore gene marker accumulates extracellularly in the absence of AmpA protein. While the secreted AmpA acts extracellularly to suppress prespore gene expression, the effects of AmpA on cell agglutination and on actin polymerization in growing cells are not due to an extracellular role of secreted AmpA protein. Rather, these effects appear to reflect a distinct cell autonomous role of the ampA gene. Finally, we show that secretion of AmpA protein is brought about by elevating the levels of expression of ampA so that the protein accumulates to an excessive level.

  11. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, significantly enhances cell adhesion and induces a delay in G1 to S phase transition in rabbit corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yu-Mei; Hong, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells are a non-proliferative cell type. As a result of the increase in corneal endothelium disease, increasing numbers of studies have been conducted in order to promote corneal endothelial cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the proliferative effects of Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, on rabbit corneal endothelial cells (rCECs). Y-27632 (1, 10 or 30 μM) was added at two different time points to two groups of rCECs. The first group received Y-27632 when rCECs were initially plated, and the second following 72 h of cell growth. Cell morphology and cell adhesion ratios were subsequently observed using light microscopy. A cell counting kit was used to measure the number of viable cells that adhered to culture plates. Cell cycle transitions and levels of Annexin V-positive apoptotic cells were detected using flow cytometry. Cells treated with 1 μM Y-27632 and 10 μM Y-27632 retained their cell shape. At a concentration of 30 μM Y-27632, the cell shape became irregular. Cell adhesion ratios, in 1 μM Y-27632 (36.84%), 10 μM Y-27632 (84.21%) and 30 μM Y-27632 (84.21%) were higher than the adhesion ratio in the control group (P<0.01). The optical densities of rCECs treated with 10 μM or 30 μM Y-27632 following 72 h of cell growth was less than that of the control cells (P<0.01), but higher than that of cells which received Y-27632 at the time of plating (P<0.01). Flow cytometry results also demonstrated that there was a delay in G1 to S phase cell cycle progression in rCECs following administration of 10 μM Y-27632 (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis was inhibited when 10 μM Y-27632 was added, at the time of cell plating, as well as when added following 72 h of cell growth (P<0.01). At a concentration of 10 μM Y-27632, there was an improvement in cell adhesion and an inhibition of the cell cycle in rabbit corneal endothelial cells. In conclusion, Y-27632 has different effects on rCECs when

  12. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  13. Mutations in contactin-1, a neural adhesion and neuromuscular junction protein, cause a familial form of lethal congenital myopathy.

    PubMed

    Compton, Alison G; Albrecht, Douglas E; Seto, Jane T; Cooper, Sandra T; Ilkovski, Biljana; Jones, Kristi J; Challis, Daniel; Mowat, David; Ranscht, Barbara; Bahlo, Melanie; Froehner, Stanley C; North, Kathryn N

    2008-12-01

    We have previously reported a group of patients with congenital onset weakness associated with a deficiency of members of the syntrophin-alpha-dystrobrevin subcomplex and have demonstrated that loss of syntrophin and dystrobrevin from the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle can also be associated with denervation. Here, we have further studied four individuals from a consanguineous Egyptian family with a lethal congenital myopathy inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion and characterized by a secondary loss of beta2-syntrophin and alpha-dystrobrevin from the muscle sarcolemma, central nervous system involvement, and fetal akinesia. We performed homozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis and identified a mutation that segregates with disease within CNTN1, the gene encoding for the neural immunoglobulin family adhesion molecule, contactin-1. Contactin-1 transcripts were markedly decreased on gene-expression arrays of muscle from affected family members compared to controls. We demonstrate that contactin-1 is expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in mice and man in addition to the previously documented expression in the central and peripheral nervous system. In patients with secondary dystroglycanopathies, we show that contactin-1 is abnormally localized to the sarcolemma instead of exclusively at the NMJ. The cntn1 null mouse presents with ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and postnatal lethality, similar to the affected members in this family. We propose that loss of contactin-1 from the NMJ impairs communication or adhesion between nerve and muscle resulting in the severe myopathic phenotype. This disorder is part of the continuum in the clinical spectrum of congenital myopathies and congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  14. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) mi