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Sample records for adhesion related genes

  1. Highlights of glycosylation and adhesion related genes involved in myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myogenesis is initiated by myoblast differentiation and fusion to form myotubes and muscle fibres. A population of myoblasts, known as satellite cells, is responsible for post-natal growth of muscle and for its regeneration. This differentiation requires many changes in cell behaviour and its surrounding environment. These modifications are tightly regulated over time and can be characterized through the study of changes in gene expression associated with this process. During the initial myogenesis steps, using the myoblast cell line C2C12 as a model, Janot et al. (2009) showed significant variations in expression for genes involved in pathways of glycolipid synthesis. In this study we used murine satellite cells (MSC) and their ability to differentiate into myotubes or early fat storage cells to select glycosylation related genes whose variation of expression is myogenesis specific. Results The comparison of variant genes in both MSC differentiation pathways identified 67 genes associated with myogenesis. Comparison with data obtained for C2C12 revealed that only 14 genes had similar expression profiles in both cell types and that 17 genes were specifically regulated in MSC. Results were validated statistically by without a priori clustering. Classification according to protein function encoded by these 31 genes showed that the main regulated cellular processes during this differentiation were (i) remodeling of the extracellular matrix, particularly, sulfated structures, (ii) down-regulation of O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis, and (iii) an increase in adhesion protein expression. A functional study was performed on Itga11 and Chst5 encoding two highly up-regulated proteins. The inactivation of Chst5 by specific shRNA delayed the fusion of MSC. By contrast, the inactivation of Itga11 by specific shRNA dramatically decreased the fusion ability of MSC. This result was confirmed by neutralization of Itga11 product by specific antibodies. Conclusions Our

  2. Identification of hepatic microvascular adhesion-related genes of human colon cancer cells using random homozygous gene perturbation.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Joana; Kohli, Manu; Arteta, Beatriz; Chang, Shaojing; Li, Wu-Bo; Goldblatt, Michael; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Random homozygous gene perturbation (RHGP), in combination with liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) adhesion screening of clonal colon cancer cells with perturbed genes, was used to identify genes contributing to the hepatic microvascular adhesion of colon cancer cells. Plasmid vector encoding transactivator and gene search vector were transfected into HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells to create a HT-29 RHGP cell library; the adhesion of these library cells to primary cultured mouse LSEC significantly decreased in the presence of RSL1 ligand (inducer), indicating that most of the genes contributing to HT-29 adhesion to LSEC were altered. Next, HT-29 RHGP cell library fractions with upregulated or silenced LSEC adhesion-related genes were isolated. Around 160 clones having altered expression in LSEC adhesion-related genes were obtained, and nine relevant protein-coding genes were identified. Some were proadhesive genes detected because of their overexpression in adherent HT-29 cells (DGCR8 and EFEMP1 genes) and their silenced status in nonadherent HT-29 cells (DGKE, DPY19L1, KIAA0753, PVR and USP11 genes). Others were antiadhesive genes detected because of their overexpression in nonadherent HT-29 cells (ITPKC gene) and their silenced status in adherent HT-29 cells (PPP6R2 gene). Silencing of PVR, DGCR8 and EFEMP1 genes decreased adhesion to LSEC and hepatic microvascular retention of HT-29 cells. The results conclude that RHGP was a valuable strategy for the discovery of mechanisms regulating microvascular adhesion of circulating colon cancer cells before hepatic metastasis formation. Identified genes may contribute to understand the metastatic process of colon cancer and to discovering molecular targets for hepatic metastasis therapeutics.

  3. Profiling of adhesive-related genes in the freshwater cnidarian Hydra magnipapillata by transcriptomics and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo; Ostermann, Thomas; Kremeser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert; Beisel, Christian; Berezikov, Eugene; Hobmayer, Bert; Ladurner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The differentiated ectodermal basal disc cells of the freshwater cnidarian Hydra secrete proteinaceous glue to temporarily attach themselves to underwater surfaces. Using transcriptome sequencing and a basal disc-specific RNA-seq combined with in situ hybridisation a highly specific set of candidate adhesive genes was identified. A de novo transcriptome assembly of 55,849 transcripts (>200 bp) was generated using paired-end and single reads from Illumina libraries constructed from different polyp conditions. Differential transcriptomics and spatial gene expression analysis by in situ hybridisation allowed the identification of 40 transcripts exclusively expressed in the ectodermal basal disc cells. Comparisons after mass spectrometry analysis of the adhesive secretion showed a total of 21 transcripts to be basal disc specific and eventually secreted through basal disc cells. This is the first study to survey adhesion-related genes in Hydra. The candidate list presented in this study provides a platform for unravelling the molecular mechanism of underwater adhesion of Hydra. PMID:27661452

  4. Transcriptional changes in adhesion-related genes are site-specific during noise-induced cochlear pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qunfeng; Patel, Minal; Coling, Donald; Hu, Bo Hua

    2012-02-01

    Cell-cell junctions and junctions between cells and extracellular matrix are essential for maintenance of the structural and functional integrity of the cochlea, and are also a major target of acoustic trauma. While morphological assessments have revealed adhesion dysfunction in noise-traumatized cochleae, the molecular mechanisms responsible for adhesion disruption are not clear. Here, we screened the transcriptional expression of 49 adhesion-related genes in normal rat cochleae and measured the expression changes in the early phases of cochlear pathogenesis after acoustic trauma. We found that genes from four adhesion families, including the immunoglobulin superfamily and the integrin, cadherin, and selectin families, are expressed in the normal cochlea. Exposure to an intense noise at 120dB sound pressure level (SPL) for 2h caused site-specific changes in expression levels in the apical and the basal sections of the sensory epithelium. Expression changes that occurred in the cochlear sensory epithelium were biphasic, with early upregulation at 2h post-noise exposure and subsequent downregulation at 1day post-exposure. Importantly, the altered expression level of seven genes (Sgce, Sell, Itga5, Itgal, Selp, Cntn1 and Col5a1) is related to the level of threshold shift of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), an index reflecting functional change in the cochlea. Notably, the genes showing expression changes exhibited diverse constitutive expression levels and belong to multiple adhesion gene families. The finding of expression changes in multiple families of adhesion genes in a temporal fashion (2h vs. 1day) and a spatial fashion (the apical and the basal sensory epithelia as well as the lateral wall tissue) suggests that acoustic overstimulation provokes a complex response in adhesion genes, which likely involves multiple adhesion-related signaling pathways.

  5. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-04

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi.

  6. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. PMID:26941065

  7. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton via transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes by myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs/MAL/MKLs)

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    RhoA is a crucial regulator of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation through the activation of actin nucleation and polymerization. It also regulates the nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor-A and -B (MRTF-A/B, MAL or MKL 1/2), which are co-activators of serum response factor (SRF). In dominant-negative MRTF-A (DN-MRTF-A)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the expressions of several cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes were down-regulated, and the formation of stress fiber and focal adhesion was severely diminished. MRTF-A/B-knockdown cells also exhibited such cytoskeletal defects. In reporter assays, both RhoA and MRTF-A enhanced promoter activities of these genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner, and DN-MRTF-A inhibited the RhoA-mediated activation of these promoters. In dominant-negative RhoA (RhoA-N19)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the nuclear translocation of MRTF-A/B was predominantly prevented, resulting in the reduced expression of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins. Further, constitutive-active MRTF-A/B increased the expression of endogenous cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins, and thereby rescued the defective phenotype of stress fibers and focal adhesions in RhoA-N19 expressing cells. These results indicate that MRTF-A/B act as pivotal mediators of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation via the transcriptional regulation of a subset of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes.

  8. Expression of cell adhesion and differentiation related genes in MC3T3 osteoblasts plated on titanium alloys: role of surface properties.

    PubMed

    Sista, Subhash; Wen, Cuie; Hodgson, Peter D; Pande, Gopal

    2013-04-01

    It is important to understand the cellular and molecular events that take place at the cell-material interface of implants used for bone repair. An understanding of the mechanisms involved in the initial stages of osteoblast interactions with the surface of the implant material is fundamental in deciding the fate of the cells that come in contact with it. In this study, we compared the relative gene expression of markers that are known to be associated with cell adhesion and differentiation in MC3T3 osteoblast cells, at various time points after plating the cells on surfaces of titanium (Ti) and its two alloys, titanium-zirconium (TiZr) and titanium-niobium (TiNb) by using Quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Our analysis indicated that expression of adhesion supporting genes was higher on TiZr surface as compared to Ti and TiNb. The behavior of these genes is possibly driven by a higher surface energy of TiZr. However no significant difference in the expression of differentiation related genes could be seen between the two alloys, although on both substrates it was higher as compared to unalloyed Ti. We propose that substrate composition of the alloys can influence the adhesion and differentiation related gene expression and that Ti alloys are better substrates for inducing osteogenesis as compared to unalloyed Ti.

  9. Increased Cell Proliferation and Gene Expression of Genes Related to Bone Remodeling, Cell Adhesion and Collagen Metabolism in the Periodontal Ligament of Unopposed Molars in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorotheou, Domna; Farsadaki, Vassiliki; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Giannopoulou, Catherine; Halazonetis, Thanos D.; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Tooth eruption, the process by which teeth emerge from within the alveolar bone into the oral cavity, is poorly understood. The post-emergent phase of tooth eruption continues throughout life, in particular, if teeth are not opposed by antagonists. The aim of the present study was to better understand the molecular processes underlying post-emergent tooth eruption. Toward this goal, we removed the crowns of the maxillary molars on one side of the mouth of 14 young rats and examined gene expression patterns in the periodontal ligaments (PDLs) of the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular molars, 3 and 15 days later. Nine untreated rats served as controls. Expression of six genes, Adamts18, Ostn, P4ha3, Panx3, Pth1r, and Tnmd, was upregulated in unopposed molars relative to molars with antagonists. These genes function in osteoblast differentiation and proliferation, cell adhesion and collagen metabolism. Proliferation of PDL cells also increased following loss of the antagonist teeth. Interestingly, mutations in PTH1R have been linked to defects in the post-emergent phase of tooth eruption in humans. We conclude that post-emergent eruption of unopposed teeth is associated with gene expression patterns conducive to alveolar bone formation and PDL remodeling. PMID:28239357

  10. Expression of metadherin/AEG-1 gene is positively related to orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines of different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Deng, Huan; Yan, Wei; Huang, Huanjun; Deng, Yueling; Li, Yuan; Tian, De'an

    2012-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism through which a primary HCC cell develops into a metastatic phenotype is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between metadherin (MTDH)/astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) expression in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials and such metastatic phenotypes as orientation chemotaxis and adhesion. MTDH/AEG-1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H). Distribution of MTDH/AEG-1 was observed by immunofluorescence staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion and the index of interaction between HCC cell lines and microvascular endothelial cell lines (MVECs, including HUVECs and HPMECs) were measured by chemotaxis assay and adhesion assay, respectively. The results showed that MTDH/AEG-1 protein expression was significantly higher in high metastatic potential cancer cell lines (Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H) than in low metastatic potential cell lines (HepG2, Huh7) (P<0.05). The MTDH/AEG-1 protein was localized in the perinuclear region of HCC cells. Furthermore, the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells to HPMECs were increased as compared with those of HCC cells to HUVECs (P<0.05). The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion were much stronger in Sk-HEP-1 and MHCC-97H cells with MTDH/AEG-1 highly expressed than in HepG2 and Huh7 cells with MTDH/AEG-1 lowly expressed (P<0.05). These results suggested that the expression of MTDH/AEG-1 gene in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials was closely positively related to the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells. It was deduced that MTDH/AEG-1 might play a pivotal role in the lung-specific metastasis of HCC, which may be mediated through orientation chemotaxis and adhesion abilities of HCC cells. MTDH

  11. Virulence-related genes, adhesion and invasion of some Yersinia enterocolitica-like strains suggests its pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Imori, Priscilla F M; Passaglia, Jaqueline; Souza, Roberto A; Rocha, Lenaldo B; Falcão, Juliana P

    2017-03-01

    Yersina enterocolitica-like species have not been extensively studied regarding its pathogenic potential. This work aimed to assess the pathogenic potential of some Y. enterocolitica-like strains by evaluating the presence of virulence-related genes by PCR and their ability to adhere to and invade Caco-2 and HEp-2 cells. A total of 50 Y. frederiksenii, 55 Y. intermedia and 13 Y. kristensenii strains were studied. The strains contained the following genes: Y. frederiksenii, fepA(44%), fes(44%) and ystB(18%); Y. intermedia, ail(53%), fepA (35%), fepD(2%), fes(97%), hreP(2%), ystB(2%) and tccC(35%); Y. kristensenii, ail(62%), ystB(23%), fepA(77%), fepD(54%), fes(54%) and hreP(77%). Generally, the Y. enterocolitica-like strains had a reduced ability to adhere to and invade mammalian cells compared to the highly pathogenic Y. enterocolitica 8081. However, Y. kristensenii FCF410 and Y. frederiksenii FCF461 presented high invasion potentials in Caco-2 cells after five days of pre-incubation increased by 45- and 7.2-fold compared to Y. enterocolitica 8081, respectively; but, the ail gene was not detected in these strains. The presence of virulence-related genes in some of the Y. enterocolitica-like strains indicated their possible pathogenic potential. Moreover, the results suggest the existence of alternative virulence mechanisms and that the pathogenicity of Y. kristensenii and Y. frederiksenii may be strain-dependent.

  12. Optimization of intrinsic and extrinsic tendon healing through controllable water-soluble mitomycin-C release from electrospun fibers by mediating adhesion-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Shichao; Liu, Shen; Chen, Shuai; Lin, Zhi Yuan William; Pan, Guoqing; He, Fan; Li, Fengfeng; Fan, Cunyi; Cui, Wenguo

    2015-08-01

    To balance intrinsic and extrinsic healing during tendon repair is challenging in tendon surgery. We hypothesized that by mediating apoptotic gene and collagen synthesis of exogenous fibroblasts, the adhesion formation induced by extrinsic healing could be inhibited. With the maintenance of intrinsic healing, the tendon could be healed with proper function with no adhesion. In this study, we loaded hydrophilic mitomycin-C (MMC) into hyaluronan (HA) hydrosols, which were then encapsulated in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers by micro-sol electrospinning. This strategy successfully provided a controlled release of MMC to inhibit adhesion formations with no detrimental effect on intrinsic healing. We found that micro-sol electrospinning was an effective and facile approach to incorporate and control hydrophilic drug release from hydrophobic polyester fibers. MMC exhibited an initially rapid, and gradually steadier release during 40 days, and the release rates could be tuned by its concentration. In vitro studies revealed that low concentrations of MMC could inhibit fibroblast adhesion and proliferation. When lacerate tendons were healed using the MMC-HA loaded PLLA fibers in vivo, they exhibited comparable mechanical strength to the naturally healed tendons but with no significant presence of adhesion formation. We further identified the up-regulation of apoptotic protein Bax expression and down-regulation of proteins Bcl2, collage I, collagen III and α-SMA during the healing process associated with minimum adhesion formations. This approach presented here leverages new advances in drug delivery and nanotechnology and offers a promising strategy to balance intrinsic and extrinsic tendon healing through modulating genes associated with fibroblast apoptosis and collagen synthesis.

  13. kakapo, a gene required for adhesion between and within cell layers in Drosophila, encodes a large cytoskeletal linker protein related to plectin and dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S L; Brown, N H

    1998-11-30

    Mutations in kakapo were recovered in genetic screens designed to isolate genes required for integrin-mediated adhesion in Drosophila. We cloned the gene and found that it encodes a large protein (>5,000 amino acids) that is highly similar to plectin and BPAG1 over the first 1,000-amino acid region, and contains within this region an alpha-actinin type actin-binding domain. A central region containing dystrophin-like repeats is followed by a carboxy domain that is distinct from plectin and dystrophin, having neither the intermediate filament-binding domain of plectin nor the dystroglycan/syntrophin-binding domain of dystrophin. Instead, Kakapo has a carboxy terminus similar to the growth arrest-specific protein Gas2. Kakapo is strongly expressed late during embryogenesis at the most prominent site of position-specific integrin adhesion, the muscle attachment sites. It is concentrated at apical and basal surfaces of epidermal muscle attachment cells, at the termini of the prominent microtubule bundles, and is required in these cells for strong attachment to muscles. Kakapo is also expressed more widely at a lower level where it is essential for epidermal cell layer stability. These results suggest that the Kakapo protein forms essential links among integrins, actin, and microtubules.

  14. Prevention of peritoneal adhesions: A promising role for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Hussein M

    2011-01-01

    Adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominopelvic surgery, yet the extent of the problem, and its serious consequences, has not been adequately recognized. Adhesions evolved as a life-saving mechanism to limit the spread of intraperitoneal inflammatory conditions. Three different pathophysiological mechanisms can independently trigger adhesion formation. Mesothelial cell injury and loss during operations, tissue hypoxia and inflammation each promotes adhesion formation separately, and potentiate the effect of each other. Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that interruption of a single pathway does not completely prevent adhesion formation. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of adhesion formation and the results of single gene therapy interventions. It explores the promising role of combinatorial gene therapy and vector modifications for the prevention of adhesion formation in order to stimulate new ideas and encourage rapid advancements in this field. PMID:22171139

  15. Inhibition of Adhesion Molecule Gene Expression and Cell Adhesion by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays an important role in determining cell shape and function in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions. While links between metabolism and cell adhesion were previously suggested, the exact context and molecular details of such a cross-talk remain incompletely understood. Here we show that PGC-1α, a pivotal transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, acts to inhibit expression of cell adhesion genes. Using cell lines, primary cells and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate expression of a variety of cell adhesion molecules. Furthermore, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on cell adhesion gene expression. Interestingly, the L2/L3 motifs of PGC-1α, necessary for nuclear hormone receptor activation, are only partly required for inhibition of several cell adhesion genes by PGC-1α. Finally, PGC-1α is able to modulate adhesion of primary fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells to extracellular matrix proteins. Our results delineate a cross talk between a central pathway controlling metabolic regulation and cell adhesion, and identify PGC-1α as a molecular link between these two major cellular networks.

  16. Inhibition of Adhesion Molecule Gene Expression and Cell Adhesion by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays an important role in determining cell shape and function in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions. While links between metabolism and cell adhesion were previously suggested, the exact context and molecular details of such a cross-talk remain incompletely understood. Here we show that PGC-1α, a pivotal transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, acts to inhibit expression of cell adhesion genes. Using cell lines, primary cells and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate expression of a variety of cell adhesion molecules. Furthermore, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on cell adhesion gene expression. Interestingly, the L2/L3 motifs of PGC-1α, necessary for nuclear hormone receptor activation, are only partly required for inhibition of several cell adhesion genes by PGC-1α. Finally, PGC-1α is able to modulate adhesion of primary fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells to extracellular matrix proteins. Our results delineate a cross talk between a central pathway controlling metabolic regulation and cell adhesion, and identify PGC-1α as a molecular link between these two major cellular networks. PMID:27984584

  17. Universal binding energy relations in metallic adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rose, Smith, and Ferrante have discovered scaling relations which map the adhesive binding energy calculated by Ferrante and Smith onto a single universal binding energy curve. These binding energies are calculated for all combinations of Al(111), Zn(0001), Mg(0001), and Na(110) in contact. The scaling involves normalizing the energy by the maximum binding energy and normalizing distances by a suitable combination of Thomas-Fermi screening lengths. Rose et al. have also found that the calculated cohesive energies of K, Ba, Cu, Mo, and Sm scale by similar simple relations, suggesting the universal relation may be more general than for the simple free electron metals for which it was derived. In addition, the scaling length was defined more generally in order to relate it to measurable physical properties. Further this universality can be extended to chemisorption. A simple and yet quite accurate prediction of a zero temperature equation of state (volume as a function of pressure for metals and alloys) is presented. Thermal expansion coefficients and melting temperatures are predicted by simple, analytic expressions, and results compare favorably with experiment for a broad range of metals.

  18. Eimeria bovis modulates adhesion molecule gene transcription in and PMN adhesion to infected bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja

    2006-04-01

    Eimeria bovis is an important coccidian parasite of cattle causing severe diarrhea in young animals. Its first schizogony takes place in endothelial cells of the ileum resulting in the formation of macroschizonts 14-18 days p.i. This longlasting development suggests a particular immune evasion strategy of the parasite. Here, we analyse early innate immune reactions to E. bovis by determining the adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to infected endothelial cell layers under flow conditions and the transcription of adhesion molecule genes in infected host cells. Bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC) were infected with E. bovis sporozoites. Sporozoites invaded BUVEC within 1h and the first mature macroschizonts occurred 14 days p.i. PMN adhesion was enhanced in E. bovis-infected BUVEC layers as early as 8h p.i.; maximum adhesion occurred 48 h p.i. Increased adhesion rates persisted until the end of the observation period at 14 days p.i. PMN adhered to both infected and uninfected cells within monolayers, suggesting paracrine cell activation. E. bovis infection upregulated the transcription of genes encoding for P-selectin, E-selectin, vascular cellular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). Most marked effects concerned E-selectin followed by P-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Increased transcript levels were found beginning 30 min p.i. and maximum values occurred 1-2h p.i. (P-selectin) and 2-4h p.i. (E-selectin, VCAM-1, ICAM-1). By 12-24h p.i. levels had decreased to those of uninfected controls. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced PMN adhesion was significantly reduced in infected vs. uninfected BUVEC. Eimeria bovis also had suppressive effects on TNFalpha-mediated upregulation of adhesion molecule gene transcription. The data presented here suggest that infection of BUVEC with E. bovis on one hand induces proinflammatory reactions resulting in enhanced PMN adhesion mediated by upregulated adhesion

  19. Ice adhesions in relation to freeze stress.

    PubMed

    Olien, C R; Smith, M N

    1977-10-01

    In freezing, competitive interaction between ice and hydrophilic plant substances causes an energy of adhesion to develop through the interstitial liquid. The thermodynamic basis for the adhesion energy is discussed, with estimates of the energies involved. In this research, effects of adhesion energy were observed microscopically in conjunction with energies of crystallization and frost desiccation. The complex character of ice in intact crown tissue of winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the problems of sectioning frozen tissue without producing artifacts led to an alternative study of single barley cells in a mesh of ice and cell wall polymers. Adhesions between ice, cell wall polymers, and the plasmalemma form a complexly interacting system in which the pattern of crystallization is a major factor in determination of stress and injury.

  20. Human fibroblasts display a differential focal adhesion phenotype relative to chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Advani, Alexander S; Chen, Annie Y; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of documented differences between humans and our closest relatives in responses to wound healing and in disease susceptibilities, suggesting a differential cellular response to certain environmental factors. In this study, we sought to look at a specific cell type, fibroblasts, to examine differences in cellular adhesion between humans and chimpanzees in visualized cells and in gene expression. We have found significant differences in the number of focal adhesions between primary human and chimpanzee fibroblasts. Additionally, we see that adhesion related gene ontology categories are some of the most differentially expressed between human and chimpanzee in normal fibroblast cells. These results suggest that human and chimpanzee fibroblasts may have somewhat different adhesive properties, which could play a role in differential disease phenotypes and responses to external factors.

  1. Human fibroblasts display a differential focal adhesion phenotype relative to chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Alexander S.; Chen, Annie Y.; Babbitt, Courtney C.

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of documented differences between humans and our closest relatives in responses to wound healing and in disease susceptibilities, suggesting a differential cellular response to certain environmental factors. In this study, we sought to look at a specific cell type, fibroblasts, to examine differences in cellular adhesion between humans and chimpanzees in visualized cells and in gene expression. We have found significant differences in the number of focal adhesions between primary human and chimpanzee fibroblasts. Additionally, we see that adhesion related gene ontology categories are some of the most differentially expressed between human and chimpanzee in normal fibroblast cells. These results suggest that human and chimpanzee fibroblasts may have somewhat different adhesive properties, which could play a role in differential disease phenotypes and responses to external factors. PMID:26971204

  2. Enhancing Adhesion: Relative Merits of Different Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, L. S.; Pater, R.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesive performance is improved mainly by manipulation of the bimaterials interface zone, which is only a few molecules thick. There are three approaches to enhancement of interfacial adhesion at the molecular level. They are 1) changing the nonchemically bonded interactions across the interface from weak ones to strong ones, 2) making the true interfacial area much larger than the simple geometric area, and 3) inducing chemical bonding between the two materials forming the interface. Our goal this summer was to question some of the built-in assumptions contained within these approaches and to determine the most promising approach, both theoretically and practically, for enhancing adhesion in NASA structures. Our computations revealed that all three of these approaches have, in theory, the potential to enhance molecular adhesion approximately ten-fold. Experiments, however, revealed that this excellent level of enhancement is not likely to be reached in practice. Each approach was found to be severely limited by practical problems. In addition, some of the built-in assumptions associated with these approaches were found to be insufficient or inadequate. The first approach, changing the nonchemically bonded interactions from weak to strong, Is an example of one containing inadequate assumptions. The extensive literature on intermolecular interactions, based on solution studies, shows that certain functional group pairs interact much more strongly than others. It has always been assumed that these data can be reliably extended to systems where only one member of the pair is in solution and the other Is contained in a solid surface. Our experiments this summer demonstrated that solution data do not adequately predict the strength of functional group interaction at the solid-liquid interface. Furthermore, the strong solvents needed to dissolve the monomers or polymers to which the functional groups of interest are attached compete successfully with the solid surface

  3. Regulation of actin polymerization and adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusion by the Abl-related gene (Arg) tyrosine kinase and N-WASp.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew M; Lapetina, Stefanie; MacGrath, Stacey M; Sfakianos, Mindan K; Pollard, Thomas D; Koleske, Anthony J

    2010-03-16

    Extracellular cues stimulate the Abl family nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Arg to promote actin-based cell edge protrusions. Several Arg-interacting proteins are potential links to the actin cytoskeleton, but exactly how Arg stimulates actin polymerization and cellular protrusion has not yet been fully elucidated. We used affinity purification to identify N-WASp as a novel binding partner of Arg. N-WASp activates the Arp2/3 complex and is an effector of Abl. We find that the Arg SH3 domain binds directly to N-WASp. Arg phosphorylates N-WASp on Y256, modestly increasing the affinity of Arg for N-WASp, an interaction that does not require the Arg SH2 domain. The Arg SH3 domain stimulates N-WASp-dependent actin polymerization in vitro, and Arg phosphorylation of N-WASp weakly stimulates this effect. Arg and N-WASp colocalize to adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusions in vivo. The cell edge protrusion defects of arg-/- fibroblasts can be complemented by re-expression of an Arg-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion, but not by an N-WASp binding-deficient Arg SH3 domain point mutant. These results suggest that Arg promotes actin-based protrusions in response to extracellular stimuli through phosphorylation of and physical interactions with N-WASp.

  4. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  5. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  6. Quantitative differences in adhesiveness of type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli due to structural differences in fimH genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sokurenko, E V; Courtney, H S; Maslow, J; Siitonen, A; Hasty, D L

    1995-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are heteropolymeric surface organelles responsible for the D-mannose-sensitive (MS) adhesion of Escherichia coli. We recently reported that variation of receptor specificity of type 1 fimbriae can result solely from minor alterations in the structure of the gene for the FimH adhesin subunit. To further study the relationship between allelic variation of the fimH gene and adhesive properties of type 1 fimbriae, the fimH genes from five additional strains were cloned and used to complement the FimH deletion in E. coli KB18. When the parental and recombinant strains were tested for adhesion to immobilized mannan, a wide quantitative range in the ability of bacteria to adhere was noted. The differences in adhesion do not appear to be due to differences in the levels of fimbriation or relative levels of incorporation of FimH, because these parameters were similar in low-adhesion and high-adhesion strains. The nucleotide sequence for each of the fimH genes was determined. Analysis of deduced FimH sequences allowed identification of two sequence homology groups, based on the presence of Asn-70 and Ser-78 or Ser-70 and Asn-78 residues. The consensus sequences for each group conferred very low adhesion activity, and this low-adhesion phenotype predominated among a group of 43 fecal isolates. Strains isolated from a different host niche, the urinary tract, expressed type 1 fimbriae that conferred an increased level of adhesion. The results presented here strongly suggest that the quantitative variations in MS adhesion are due primarily to structural differences in the FimH adhesin. The observed differences in MS adhesion among populations of E. coli isolated from different host niches call attention to the possibility that phenotypic variants of FimH may play a functional role in populations dynamics. PMID:7601831

  7. Non-viral gene delivery regulated by stiffness of cell adhesion substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Hyun Joon; Liu, Jodi; Riddle, Kathryn; Matsumoto, Takuya; Leach, Kent; Mooney, David J.

    2005-06-01

    Non-viral gene vectors are commonly used for gene therapy owing to safety concerns with viral vectors. However, non-viral vectors are plagued by low levels of gene transfection and cellular expression. Current efforts to improve the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery are focused on manipulations of the delivery vector, whereas the influence of the cellular environment in DNA uptake is often ignored. The mechanical properties (for example, rigidity) of the substrate to which a cell adheres have been found to mediate many aspects of cell function including proliferation, migration and differentiation, and this suggests that the mechanics of the adhesion substrate may regulate a cell's ability to uptake exogeneous signalling molecules. In this report, we present a critical role for the rigidity of the cell adhesion substrate on the level of gene transfer and expression. The mechanism relates to material control over cell proliferation, and was investigated using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. This study provides a new material-based control point for non-viral gene therapy.

  8. Telephone cord buckles-A relation between wavelength and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faou, Jean-Yvon; Parry, Guillaume; Grachev, Sergey; Barthel, Etienne

    2015-02-01

    Thin films with low adhesion and large residual stresses may buckle. The resulting morphologies are varied, but one of the most commonly observed is an intriguing oscillating pattern - the so-called "telephone cord" - which has been extensively investigated in the recent years. We have studied the kinematics of formation of telephone cords using a geometrically non-linear plate model and mode dependent interfacial toughness, captured via a cohesive zone. Through extensive Finite Element Simulations, we have demonstrated a simple, non-trivial relation between telephone cord wavelength and interfacial toughness. To validate this prediction, highly stressed Mo thin films were deposited on Si wafers, with a well defined interface and very reproducible adhesion. Studying the morphology of the resulting buckles for different film thicknesses and stresses, we observed a trend which was fully consistent with our simulation results. From the data fit, an adhesion energy of 0.58±0.04 J m-2 for the SiO2/Ag interface was inferred, which compares well with literature estimates.

  9. Identification of genes affecting production of the adhesion organelle of Caulobacter crescentus CB2.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D; Smit, J

    1990-01-01

    Transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis was used to identify regions in the genome involved with production, regulation, or attachment to the cell surface of the adhesive holdfast of the freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus CB2. A total of 12,000 independently selected transposon insertion mutants were screened for defects in adhesion to cellulose acetate; 77 mutants were detected and examined by Southern blot hybridization mapping methods and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Ten unique sites of Tn5 insertion affecting holdfast function were identified that were clustered in four regions of the genome. Representative mutants of the 10 Tn5 insertion sites were examined by a variety of methods for differences in their phenotype leading to the loss of adhesiveness. Four phenotypes were identified: no holdfast production, production of a smaller or an altered holdfast, production of a holdfast that was unable to remain attached to the cell, and a fourth category in which a possible alteration of the stalk was related to impaired adhesion of the cell. With the possible exception of the last class, no pleiotropic mutants (those with multiple defects in the polar region of the cell) were detected among the adhesion-defective mutants. This was unexpected, since holdfast deficiency is often a characteristic of pleiotropic mutants obtained when selecting for loss of other polar structures. Overall, the evidence suggests that we have identified regions containing structural genes for the holdfast, genes involved with proper attachment or positioning on the caulobacter surface, and possibly regions that regulate the levels of holdfast production. Images PMID:2168382

  10. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  11. On the relation between surface roughness of metallic substrates and adhesion of human primary bone cells.

    PubMed

    Anselme, K; Bigerelle, M

    2014-01-01

    Surface characteristics of materials, whether their topography, chemistry, or surface energy, play an essential part in osteoblast adhesion on biomaterials. Thus, the quality of cell adhesion will influence the cell's capacity to proliferate and differentiate in contact with a biomaterial. We have developed for more than ten years numerous studies on the influence of topography and chemistry of metallic substrates on the response of primary human bone cells. The originality of our approach is that contrary to most of other authors, we quantified the adhesion of primary human bone cells on metallic substrates with perfectly characterized surface topography after some hours but also over 21 days. Moreover, we have developed original statistical approaches for characterizing the relation between surface roughness and cell-adhesion parameters. In this article, we will illustrate different studies we did these last ten years concerning the development of a new adhesion parameter, the adhesion power; the correlation between short-term adhesion, long-term adhesion, and proliferation; the influence of roughness organization on cell adhesion and the development of the order parameter; our modeling approach of cell adhesion on surface topography; the relative influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell adhesion and contact angle; the relation between surface features dimensions and cell adhesion. Further, some considerations will be given on the methods for scanning surface topography for cell-adhesion studies. Finally, perspectives will be given to elucidate these intracellular mechanotransduction mechanisms induced by the deformation of cells on model sinusoidal peaks-or-valleys surfaces.

  12. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  13. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  14. Human cell adhesion molecules: annotated functional subtypes and overrepresentation of addiction-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoming; Drgonova, Jana; Li, Chuan-Yun; Uhl, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are essential both for a) proper development, modulation and maintenance of interactions between cells and for b) cell-to-cell (and matrix-to-cell) communication about these interactions. CAMs are thus key to proper development and plasticity of organs and tissues that include the brain. Despite recognition of the existence of these dual CAM roles and appreciation of the differential functional significance of these roles, there have been surprisingly few systematic studies that have carefully enumerated the universe of CAMs, identified the preferred roles for specific CAMs in distinct types of cellular connections and communication, or related these issues to specific brain disorders or brain circuits. In this paper, we substantially update and review the set of human genes that are likely to encode CAMs based on searches of databases, literature reviews and annotations. We describe the likely CAMs and the functional CAM subclasses into which they fall. These include “iCAMs”, whose contacts largely mediate cell to cell communication, those involved in focal adhesions, CAM genes whose products are preferentially involved with stereotyped and morphologically-identifiable connections between cells (adherens junctions, gap junctions) and smaller numbers of genes in other classes. We discuss a novel proposed mechanism involving selective anchoring of the constituents of iCAM-containing lipid rafts in zones of close neuronal apposition to membranes expressing binding partners of these iCAMs. CAM data from genetic and genomic studies of addiction in humans and mouse models provide examples of the ways in which CAM variation is likely to contribute to a specific brain-based disorder. We discuss how differences in CAM splicing mediated by differences in the addiction-associated splicing regulator RBFOX1/A2BP1 could enrich this picture. CAM expression in dopamine neurons provides one of the ways in which variations in cell adhesion

  15. Ice Adhesions in Relation to Freeze Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Olien, C. R.; Smith, Myrtle N.

    1977-01-01

    In freezing, competitive interaction between ice and hydrophilic plant substances causes an energy of adhesion to develop through the interstitial liquid. The thermodynamic basis for the adhesion energy is discussed, with estimates of the energies involved. In this research, effects of adhesion energy were observed microscopically in conjunction with energies of crystallization and frost desiccation. The complex character of ice in intact crown tissue of winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the problems of sectioning frozen tissue without producing artifacts led to an alternative study of single barley cells in a mesh of ice and cell wall polymers. Adhesions between ice, cell wall polymers, and the plasmalemma form a complexly interacting system in which the pattern of crystallization is a major factor in determination of stress and injury. Images PMID:16660124

  16. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When... requirements apply. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the description “Paint” is the proper...

  17. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When... requirements apply. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the description “Paint” is the proper...

  18. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When... requirements apply. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the description “Paint” is the proper...

  19. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When... requirements apply. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the description “Paint” is the proper...

  20. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When... requirements apply. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the description “Paint” is the proper...

  1. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Development of spermatozoa in adult mammalian testis during spermatogenesis involves extensive cell migration and differentiation. Spermatogonia that reside at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium differentiate into more advanced germ cell types that migrate toward the apical compartment until elongated spermatids are released into the tubule lumen during spermiation. Apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES; a testis-specific anchoring junction) is the only cell junction that anchors and maintains the polarity of elongating/elongated spermatids (step 8–19 spermatids) in the epithelium. Little is known regarding the signaling pathways that trigger the disassembly of the apical ES at spermiation. Here, we show that secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, is a crucial regulatory protein for spermiation. The expression of sFRP1 is tightly regulated in adult rat testis to control spermatid adhesion and sperm release at spermiation. Down-regulation of sFRP1 during testicular development was found to coincide with the onset of the first wave of spermiation at approximately age 45 d postpartum, implying that sFRP1 might be correlated with elongated spermatid adhesion conferred by the apical ES before spermiation. Indeed, administration of sFRP1 recombinant protein to the testis in vivo delayed spermiation, which was accompanied by down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tyr397 and retention of nectin-3 adhesion protein at the apical ES. To further investigate the functional relationship between p-FAK-Tyr397 and localization of nectin-3, we overexpressed sFRP1 using lentiviral vectors in the Sertoli-germ cell coculture system. Consistent with the in vivo findings, overexpression of sFRP1 induced down-regulation of p-FAK-Tyr397, leading to a decline in phosphorylation of nectin-3. In summary, this report highlights the critical role of s

  2. The role of photobiomodulation on gene expression of cell adhesion molecules in diabetic wounded fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ayuk, Sandra M; Abrahamse, Heidi; Houreld, Nicolette N

    2016-08-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are cell surface glycoproteins that facilitate cell-cell contacts and adhesion with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cellular adhesion is affected by various disease conditions, such as diabetes mellitus (DM) and inflammation. Photobiomodulation (PBM) stimulates biological processes and expression of these cellular molecules. The aim of this experimental work was to demonstrate the role of PBM at 830nm on CAMs in diabetic wounded fibroblast cells. Isolated human skin fibroblast cells were used. Normal (N-) and diabetic wounded (DW-) cells were irradiated with a continuous wave diode laser at 830nm with an energy density of 5J/cm(2). Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the relative gene expression of 39 CAMs 48h post-irradiation. Normalized expression levels from irradiated cells were calculated relative to non-irradiated control cells according to the 2^(-ΔΔCt) method. Thirty-one genes were significantly regulated in N-cells (28 were genes up-regulated and three genes down-regulated), and 22 genes in DW-cells (five genes were up-regulated and 17 genes down-regulated). PBM induced a stimulatory effect on various CAMs namely cadherins, integrins, selectins and immunoglobulins, and hence may be used as a complementary therapy in advancing treatment of non-healing diabetic ulcers. The regulation of CAMs as well as evaluating the role of PBM on the molecular effects of these genes may expand knowledge and prompt further research into the cellular mechanisms in diabetic wound healing that may lead to valuable clinical outcomes.

  3. Therapy with hydroxyurea is associated with reduced adhesion molecule gene and protein expression in sickle red cells with a concomitant reduction in adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Gambero, Sheley; Canalli, Andreia A; Traina, Fabiola; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Saad, Sara T O; Costa, Fernando F; Conran, Nicola

    2007-02-01

    Propagation of the vaso-occlusive process in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a complex process involving the adhesion of steady-state SCA patients red cells and reticulocytes to the vascular endothelium. The effect of hydroxyurea therapy (HUT) on the adhesive properties of sickle cells and the expression of adhesion molecule genes by erythroid cells of SCA individuals is not yet fully understood. The expressions of the CD36 gene and the VLA-4-integrin subunit genes, CD49d (alpha-subunit) and CD29 (beta-subunit), were compared in the reticulocytes of steady-state SCA patients and patients on HUT using real-time PCR. Basal adhesion of red cells from these subjects was also compared using static adhesion assays, as was surface protein expression, using flow cytometry. Basal sickle red cell adhesion to fibronectin was significantly greater than that of normal cells (P < 0.01); in contrast, HUT was associated with significantly lower levels (P < 0.01) of red cell adhesion that were similar to those of control cells; this decrease could not be justified solely by altered reticulocyte numbers in this population. Accordingly, flow cytometry demonstrated that reticulocytes from patients on HUT had significantly lower CD36 and CD49d surface expressions (P < 0.01) and, importantly, significantly lower expressions of the CD36, CD49d and CD29 genes (P < 0.05) than reticulocytes of SCA patients not on HUT. Taken together, data support the hypothesis that HUT reduces the adhesive properties of sickle cells and that this decrease appears to be mediated, at least in part, by a decrease in the gene and, consequently, surface protein expression of adhesion molecules such as VLA-4 and CD36.

  4. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  5. The roles of Tenascin C and Fibronectin 1 in adhesive capsulitis: a pilot gene expression study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Carina; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Cohen, Moises; Ejnisman, Benno; Faloppa, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated mRNA expression levels of genes that encode TGF-β1; the TGF-β1 receptor; the collagen-modifying enzymes LOX, PLOD1, and PLOD2; and the extracellular matrix proteins COMP, FN1, TNC and TNXB in synovial/capsule specimens from patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. Possible associations between the measured mRNA levels and clinical parameters were also investigated. METHODS: We obtained glenohumeral joint synovium/capsule specimens from 9 patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis who had not shown improvement in symptoms after 5 months of physiotherapy. Adhesive capsulitis was confirmed in all patients by magnetic resonance imaging. We also obtained specimens from 8 control patients who had underwent surgery for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation and who had radiological indication of glenohumeral capsule alteration based on arthroscopic evaluation. mRNA expression in the synovium/capsule specimens was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The B2M and HPRT1 genes were used as references to normalize target gene expression in the shoulder tissue samples. RESULTS: The synovium/capsule samples from the patients with adhesive capsulitis had significantly higher TNC and FN1 expression than those from the controls. Additionally, symptom duration directly correlated with expression of TGFβ1 receptor I. CONCLUSION: Elevated levels of TNC and FN1 expression may be a marker of capsule injury. Upregulation of TGFβ1 receptor I seems to be dependent on symptom duration; therefore, TGFβ signaling may be involved in adhesive capsulitis. As such, TNC, FN1 and TGFβ1 receptor I may also play roles in adhesive capsulitis by contributing to capsule inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27438566

  6. Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 regulates adhesion and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YE, LIN; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; SUN, PING-HUI; MASON, MALCOLM D.; JIANG, WEN G.

    2014-01-01

    Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2), also known as anthrax toxin receptor 2, has been indicated in the formation of new vasculature and in the internalisation of the anthrax toxin. Anti-angiogenesis therapy that targets this molecule has been investigated. However, our recent studies of this molecule have indicated that this gene may also play certain roles in cancer cells. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CMG2 in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines, and also its impact on cellular functions. The expression of CMG2 was detectable in normal and prostate cancer tissues. The prostate cancer cell lines appeared to have relatively high expression compared with the prostatic epithelial cells. Knockdown of CMG2 impaired the adherence of the prostate cancer cells. CMG2 overexpression resulted in decreasing invasiveness, while the knockdown of CMG2 contrastingly enhanced this ability. The altered expression of CMG2 in the prostate cancer cells did not affect the in vitro or in vivo growth of the cells. Taken together, these results show that CMG2 is expressed in prostatic epithelia and cancer cells. In addition to its role in the angiogenesis and the internalisation of anthrax toxin, CMG2 also plays an important role in regulating the adhesion and invasion of prostate cancer cells. PMID:24932305

  7. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  8. Role of relative size of asperities and adhering particles on the adhesion force.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aditya; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Adhesion force between silica microspheres of different sizes and different rough surfaces (silicon and diamond like carbon) has been measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Surface roughness, asperity geometry, and size of adhering particles play an important role in determining the adhesion force. Adhesion force linearly increases with size of adhering particle for smooth surfaces and can be described by the JRK model. Adhesion force of adhering particle bigger than in size to the asperities decreases with surface roughness and can be described by the Rabinovich model. For the particles smaller than or similar in size to the asperities, the adhesion force increases with surface roughness. In later case, the interaction of adhering particles with valley portion of asperities is dominated and the contact area increases. On the basis of Rabinovich model, a new equation, which takes the relative size of adhering particles and asperities into account, is derived and compared with experimental results. The normalized adhesion force decreases with ratio of root-mean-square (rms) roughness to radius of adhering particle up to 0.0025, followed by increasing normalized adhesion forces.

  9. Adhesive systems: important aspects related to their composition and clinical use

    PubMed Central

    SILVA E SOUZA JUNIOR, Mario Honorato; CARNEIRO, Karina Gama Kato; LOBATO, Marcelo Figueiredo; SILVA E SOUZA, Patrícia de Almeida Rodrigues; de GÓES, Mário Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This literature review article addresses the types and the main components of different etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems available in the market, and relates them to their function, possible chemical interactions and influence of handling characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images are presented to characterize the interface between adhesives and dentin. Adhesive systems have been recently classified according to their adhesion approaches in etch-and-rinse, self-etch and glass ionomer. The etch-andrinse systems require a specific acid-etch procedure and may be performed in two or three steps. Self-etch systems employ acidic monomers that demineralize and impregnate dental substrates almost at the same time. These systems are separated in one or two steps. Some advantages and deficiencies were noted for etch-and-rinse and self-etch approaches, mainly for the simplified ones due to some chemical associations and interactions. The SeM micrographs illustrate different relationships between adhesive systems and dental structures, particularly dentin. The knowledge of composition, characteristics and mechanisms of adhesion of each adhesive system is of fundamental importance to permit the adoption of ideal bonding strategies under clinical conditions. PMID:20856995

  10. Adhesive pad differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster depends on the Polycomb group gene Su(z)2.

    PubMed

    Hüsken, Mirko; Hufnagel, Kim; Mende, Katharina; Appel, Esther; Meyer, Heiko; Peisker, Henrik; Tögel, Markus; Wang, Shuoshuo; Wolff, Jonas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Paululat, Achim

    2015-04-15

    The ability of many insects to walk on vertical smooth surfaces such as glass or even on the ceiling has fascinated biologists for a long time, and has led to the discovery of highly specialized adhesive organs located at the distal end of the animals' legs. So far, research has primarily focused on structural and ultrastructural investigations leading to a deeper understanding of adhesive organ functionality and to the development of new bioinspired materials. Genetic approaches, e.g. the analysis of mutants, to achieve a better understanding of adhesive organ differentiation have not been used so far. Here, we describe the first Drosophila melanogaster mutant that develops malformed adhesive organs, resulting in a complete loss of climbing ability on vertical smooth surfaces. Interestingly, these mutants fail to make close contact between the setal tips and the smooth surface, a crucial condition for wet adhesion mediated by capillary forces. Instead, these flies walk solely on their claws. Moreover, we were able to show that the mutation is caused by a P-element insertion into the Su(z)2 gene locus. Remobilization of the P-element restores climbing ability. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the P-element insertion results in an artificial Su(z)2 transcript, which most likely causes a gain-of-function mutation. We presume that this transcript causes deregulation of yet unknown target genes involved in pulvilli differentiation. Our results nicely demonstrate that the genetically treatable model organism Drosophila is highly suitable for future investigations on adhesive organ differentiation.

  11. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Gökbayrak, Merve Ertan; Mutlu, Oguz; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. Material/Methods The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 μg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. Results The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. Conclusions Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  12. Gene expression analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex cortical tubers reveals increased expression of adhesion and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Crino, Peter B.; Gorter, Jan A.; Nellist, Mark; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G.M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Breit, Timo M.; Troost, Dirk; Wadman, Wytse J.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are associated with disabling neurological manifestations, including intractable epilepsy. While these malformations are believed to result from the effects of TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations, the molecular mechanisms leading to tuber formation, as well as the onset of seizures remain largely unknown. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip platform to provide the first genome wide investigation of gene expression in surgically resected tubers, compared with histological normal perituberal tissue from the same patients or autopsy control tissue. We identified 2501 differentially expressed genes in cortical tubers compared with autopsy controls. Expression of genes associated with cell adhesion e.g., VCAM1, integrins and CD44, or with the inflammatory response, including complement factors, serpinA3, CCL2 and several cytokines, was increased in cortical tubers, whereas genes related to synaptic transmission e.g., the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1, and voltage-gated channel activity, exhibited lower expression. Gene expression in perituberal cortex was distinct from autopsy control cortex suggesting that even in the absence of tissue pathology the transcriptome is altered in TSC. Changes in gene expression yield insights into new candidate genes that may contribute to tuber formation or seizure onset, representing new targets for potential therapeutic development. PMID:19912235

  13. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion.

  14. Antimicrobial efficacy of denture adhesives on some oral malodor-related microbes.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Gregory; Stefaniotis, Theodoros; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Donta, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of three denture adhesives toward Streptococcus oralis, mutans, Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Adhesives used were Corega Ultra(®), Fixodent Pro Original(®) and Biotene(®) Denture Grip. For Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mutans, four tubes of Trypticase Soy Broth 10 mL and 1 g denture of adhesive were used. In addition four tubes of Trypticase Soy Broth 10 mL without any denture adhesive was employed as control. For Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, four tubes of thioglycolate 10 mL and 1 g denture adhesive were used for each one, while four tubes of thioglycolate 10 mL without adhesive served as control. All samples were incubated for 48 h at 37°C. After 48 h, the number of colonies was counted and the mean was extracted as cfu/mL. The results were evaluated with ANOVA on ranked data and Tukey's post hoc test at α = 0.05. Streptococcus oralis, mutans, Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed decreased number of colonies for each denture adhesive compared to the control. Under the conditions of this in vitro study, all the tested denture adhesives showed antimicrobial efficacy. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, there were differences among them. Corega Ultra(®) and Biotene(®) Denture Grip were more effective for all the tested oral malodor-related microbes than Fixodent Pro Original(®).

  15. Nuclear FAK: a New Mode of Gene Regulation from Cellular Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) crucial in regulation of cell migration and proliferation. In addition to its canonical roles as a cytoplasmic kinase downstream of integrin and growth factor receptor signaling, recent studies revealed new aspects of FAK action in the nucleus. Nuclear FAK promotes p53 and GATA4 degradation via ubiquitination, resulting in enhanced cell proliferation and reduced inflammatory responses. FAK can also serve as a co-transcriptional regulator that alters a gene transcriptional activity. These findings established a new paradigm of FAK signaling from cellular adhesions to the nucleus. Although physiological stimuli for controlling FAK nuclear localization have not been completely characterized, FAK shuttles from focal adhesions to the nucleus to directly convey extracellular signals. Interestingly, nuclear translocation of FAK becomes prominent in kinase-inhibited conditions such as in de-adhesion and pharmacological FAK inhibition, while a small fraction of nuclear FAK is observed a normal growth condition. In this review, roles of nuclear FAK in regulating transcription factors will be discussed. Furthermore, a potential use of a pharmacological FAK inhibitor to target nuclear FAK function in diseases such as inflammation will be emphasized. PMID:23686429

  16. Testing the Oncogenic Relevance of Cell Adhesion and Cytosketal Genes Affected by DNA Deletions in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    and hair follicle derived cells as targets for the v-rasHa oncogene in mouse skin carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis 12, 1119–1124. Wicki, A., Lehembre, F...potential oncogenic significance of genes directly involved in cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton. The aim of this study was therefore to directly test ...expression of candidate cancer genes belonging to the cytoskeletal/cell adhesion category, (2) use these tools to test the oncogenic significance of

  17. The afimbrial adhesive sheath encoded by the afa-3 gene cluster of pathogenic Escherichia coli is composed of two adhesins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M I; Gounon, P; Courcoux, P; Labigne, A; Le Bouguenec, C

    1996-02-01

    The afa-3 gene cluster determines the formation of an afimbrial adhesive sheath that is expressed by uropathogenic as well as diarrhoea-associated Escherichia coli strains. It contains six genes (afaA-afaF), among which the afaE3 gene is known to code for the structural AfaE-III adhesin (previously designated AFA-III), whereas no role has yet been identified for the afaD gene product. The afa-3 gene cluster is closely related to the daa operon that codes for an adhesin, the F1845 adhesin, which is highly related to the AfaE-III adhesin; however, unlike the AfaE-III adhesin, F1845 is a fimbrial adhesin. Reported in this work is the construction of chimeras between the afa-3 and daa operons. Analyses of the phenotypes conferred by these afa-3/daa chimeric clusters allowed us to conclude that the biogenesis of a fimbrial or an afimbrial adhesin is fully determined by the amino acid sequence of the AfaE-III and F1845 adhesins. Moreover, the role of the AfaD product in the biosynthesis of the afimbrial sheath was assessed by immunogold and immunofluorescence experiments. The AfaD and the AfaE-III products were purified and used to raise rabbit and mouse antisera. Similar to AfaE-III, AfaD was found to be a surface-exposed protein as well as an adhesin; both AfaD and AfaE-III are concomittantly expressed by the bacterial cell. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that the afimbrial adhesive sheath expressed by pathogenic E. coli is composed of two adhesins.

  18. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) modulates adhesion, migration and invasion in bone tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mak, Isabella W Y; Turcotte, Robert E; Ghert, Michelle

    2013-07-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be an important factor in osteolysis in the setting of metastatic carcinoma to the bone. However, PTHrP may also be central in the setting of primary bone tumors. Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is an aggressive osteolytic bone tumor characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that are recruited by osteoblast-like stromal cells. The stromal cells of GCT are well established as the only neoplastic element of the tumor, and we have previously shown that PTHrP is highly expressed by these cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the stromal cells exposed to a monoclonal antibody to PTHrP exhibited rapid plate detachment and quickly died in vitro. Therefore, PTHrP may serve in an autocrine manner to increase cell proliferation and promote invasive properties in GCT. The purpose of this study was to use transcriptomic microarrays and functional assays to examine the effects of PTHrP neutralization on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Microarray and proteomics data identified genes that were differentially expressed in GCT stromal cells under various PTHrP treatment conditions. Treatment of GCT stromal cells with anti-PTHrP antibodies showed a change in the expression of 13 genes from the integrin family relative to the IgG control. Neutralization of PTHrP reduced cell migration and invasion as evidenced by functional assays. Adhesion and anoikis assays demonstrated that although PTHrP neutralization inhibits cell adhesion properties, cell detachment related to PTHrP neutralization did not result in associated cell death, as expected in mesenchymal stromal cells. Based on the data presented herein, we conclude that PTHrP excreted by GCT stromal cells increases bone tumor cell local invasiveness and migration.

  19. Gene therapy: pursuing restoration of dermal adhesion in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Cutlar, Lara; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2014-01-01

    The replacement of a defective gene with a fully functional copy is the goal of the most basic gene therapy. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is characterised by a lack of adhesion of the epidermis to the dermis. It is an ideal target for gene therapy as all variants of hereditary RDEB are caused by mutations in a single gene, COL7A1, coding for type VII collagen, a key component of anchoring fibrils that secure attachment of the epidermis to the dermis. RDEB is one of the most severe variants in the epidermolysis bullosa (EB) group of heritable skin diseases. Epidermolysis bullosa is defined by chronic fragility and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes due to mutations in the genes responsible for production of the basement membrane proteins. This condition has a high personal, medical and socio-economic impact. People with RDEB require a broad spectrum of medications and specialised care. Due to this being a systemic condition, most research focus is in the area of gene therapy. Recently, preclinical works have begun to show promise. They focus on the virally mediated ex vivo correction of autologous epithelium. These corrected cells are then to be expanded and grafted onto the patient following the lead of the first successful gene therapy in dermatology being a grafting of corrected tissue for junctional EB treatment. Current progress, outstanding challenges and future directions in translating these approaches in clinics are reviewed in this article.

  20. Insights into the relation between adhesion force and chalcopyrite-bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianyu; Wang, Qianfen; Zhou, Shuang; Li, Qian; Gan, Min; Jiang, Hao; Qin, Wenqing; Liu, Xueduan; Hu, Yuehua; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a study on the relation between bacterial adhesion force and bioleaching rate of chalcopyrite, which sheds light on the influence of interfacial interaction on bioleaching behavior. In our research, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans) were adapted to grow with FeSO4 · 7H2O, element sulfur or chalcopyrite. Then, surface properties of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and chalcopyrite were analyzed by contact angle, zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Adhesion force between bacteria and chalcopyrite was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Attachment and bioleaching behaviors were also monitored. The results showed that A. ferrooxidans adapted with chalcopyrite exhibited the strongest adhesion force to chalcopyrite and the highest bioleaching rate. Culture adapted with sulfur bacteria took second place and FeSO4 · 7H2O-adapted bacteria were the lowest. Bioleaching rate and bacterial attachment capacity were positively related to bacterial adhesion force, which is affected by the nature of energy source. According to this work, the attachment of bacteria to chalcopyrite surface is one of the most important aspects that influence the bioleaching process of chalcopyrite.

  1. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion and biofilm-producing genes and their expression during internalization in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Elizabet A L; Picech, Florencia; Renna, María S; Baravalle, Celina; Andreotti, Carolina S; Russi, Romina; Calvinho, Luis F; Diez, Cristina; Dallard, Bibiana E

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent pathogens isolated from bovine mastitis, causing chronic intramammary infections (IMI) that limit profitable dairying. The course of infection is often associated with factors both related to the host and the bacterium. Aims of this study were to select S. aureus isolates from bovine IMI with different genotypic profiles harboring genes involved in adherence and biofilm production, to determine the behavior of these strains in contact with bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T) and the expression of those genes during bacterial-cell early interactions. The genetic diversity of 20 S. aureus strains that were isolated from milk samples taken from cows with persistent-P and non-persistent-NP IMI was high, discriminated into 13 fingerprint groups. The occurrence of genes coding for S. aureus surface proteins (clfA, clfB, fnbA, fnbB, fib, cna) and biofilm formation (icaA, icaD, icaC, bap) and in vitro biofilm-forming ability was not related to strain clinical origin (NP or P). Internalization of S. aureus into MAC-T cells was strain-dependent and internalized bacteria overexpressed adherence and biofilm-forming genes compared with those that remained in the supernatant of co-cultures; particularly those genes encoding FnBPs and IcaD. Strains yielding highest invasion percentages were those able to overexpress fnBP, irrespectively of the presence of other evaluated genes. Strains from NP IMI showed a greater multiplication capacity in vitro compared with strains from P IMI. These results provide new insights about S. aureus differential gene expression of adhesion-internalization factors during early interaction with mammary epithelial cells.

  2. PERP regulates enamel formation via effects on cell–cell adhesion and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jheon, Andrew H.; Mostowfi, Pasha; Snead, Malcolm L.; Ihrie, Rebecca A.; Sone, Eli; Pramparo, Tiziano; Attardi, Laura D.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of cell–cell adhesion in the development of mineralized tissues. Here we report that PERP, a tetraspan membrane protein essential for epithelial integrity, regulates enamel formation. PERP is necessary for proper cell attachment and gene expression during tooth development, and its expression is controlled by P63, a master regulator of stratified epithelial development. During enamel formation, PERP is localized to the interface between the enamel-producing ameloblasts and the stratum intermedium (SI), a layer of cells subjacent to the ameloblasts. Perp-null mice display dramatic enamel defects, which are caused, in part, by the detachment of ameloblasts from the SI. Microarray analysis comparing gene expression in teeth of wild-type and Perp-null mice identified several differentially expressed genes during enamel formation. Analysis of these genes in ameloblast-derived LS8 cells upon knockdown of PERP confirmed the role for PERP in the regulation of gene expression. Together, our data show that PERP is necessary for the integrity of the ameloblast–SI interface and that a lack of Perp causes downregulation of genes that are required for proper enamel formation. PMID:21285247

  3. Distribution of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules in human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Torlakovic, Hong; Bjerkan, Louise; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2012-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are glycoproteins produced in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules mediate cell-cell contact and host-pathogen interactions. The aims of this study were to map the distribution and examine the regulation of CEACAMs in human gingival sites. Quantitative real-time PCR performed on human gingival biopsies from periodontitis sites revealed mRNA coding for CEACAM1, -5, -6, and -7. Immunohistochemistry showed that CEACAMs were not found in oral gingival epithelium, except for CEACAM5 in periodontitis. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules 1, 5, and 6 were present in the oral sulcular epithelium of periodontitis but not in that of healthy gingiva. In junctional epithelium, all three molecules were present in healthy gingiva, but in periodontitis only CEACAM1 and -6 were detected. Staining for CEACAM1 and -6 was also seen in the inflammatory cell infiltrate in periodontitis. No staining for CEACAM7 was found. Proinflammatory mediators, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), increased the expression of CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs in cultured human oral keratinocytes. CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs were also strongly up-regulated upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. In conclusion, the distribution of different CEACAMs was related to specific sites in the gingiva. This might reflect different functional roles in this tissue.

  4. Knockdown of ALR (MLL2) Reveals ALR Target Genes and Leads to Alterations in Cell Adhesion and Growth▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Issaeva, Irina; Zonis, Yulia; Rozovskaia, Tanya; Orlovsky, Kira; Croce, Carlo M.; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Mazo, Alex; Eisenbach, Lea; Canaani, Eli

    2007-01-01

    ALR (MLL2) is a member of the human MLL family, which belongs to a larger SET1 family of histone methyltransferases. We found that ALR is present within a stable multiprotein complex containing a cohort of proteins shared with other SET1 family complexes and several unique components, such as PTIP and the jumonji family member UTX. Like other complexes formed by SET1 family members, the ALR complex exhibited strong H3K4 methyltransferase activity, conferred by the ALR SET domain. By generating ALR knockdown cell lines and comparing their expression profiles to that of control cells, we identified a set of genes whose expression is activated by ALR. Some of these genes were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation as direct ALR targets. The ALR complex was found to associate in an ALR-dependent fashion with promoters and transcription initiation sites of target genes and to induce H3K4 trimethylation. The most characteristic features of the ALR knockdown cells were changes in the dynamics and mode of cell spreading/polarization, reduced migration capacity, impaired anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, and decreased tumorigenicity in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that ALR is a transcriptional activator that induces the transcription of target genes by covalent histone modification. ALR appears to be involved in the regulation of adhesion-related cytoskeletal events, which might affect cell growth and survival. PMID:17178841

  5. Neural cell adhesion molecule 2 as a target molecule for prostate and breast cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shu; Kato, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nakano, Rika; Kubota, Kazuishi; Hamada, Hirofumi

    2011-04-01

    In adenovirus-derived gene therapy, one of the problems is the difficulty in specific targeting. We have recently demonstrated that monoclonal antibody (mAb) libraries screened by fiber-modified adenovirus vector (Adv-FZ33), which is capable of binding to immunoglobulin-G (IgG), provide a powerful approach for the identification of suitable target antigens for prostate cancer therapy. Hybridoma libraries from mice immunized with androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line LNCaP were screened and mAb were selected. Through this screening, we obtained one mAb, designated LNI-29, that recognizes a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 100 kD. It was identified as neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2). Some prostate and breast cancer cell lines highly expressed NCAM2 whereas normal prostate cell lines expressed NCAM2 at low levels. In contrast to the low efficiency of gene transduction by Adv-FZ33 with a control antibody, LNI-29-mediated Adv-FZ33 infection induces high rates of gene delivery in NCAM2-positive cancers. NCAM2-mediated therapeutic gene transduction of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) had a highly effective cytotoxic effect on NCAM2-positive cancer cells, whereas it had less of an effect in cases with a control antibody. In conclusion, NCAM2 should be a novel gene therapy target for the treatment of prostate and breast cancer.

  6. PBRM1 Regulates the Expression of Genes Involved in Metabolism and Cell Adhesion in Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Porter, Elizabeth G.; Stewart, Jane C.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Dykhuizen, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) is a component of the PBAF (Polybromo-associated-BRG1- or BRM-associated factors) chromatin remodeling complex and is the second most frequently mutated gene in clear-cell renal cell Carcinoma (ccRCC). Mutation of PBRM1 is believed to be an early event in carcinogenesis, however its function as a tumor suppressor is not understood. In this study, we have employed Next Generation Sequencing to profile the differentially expressed genes upon PBRM1 re-expression in a cellular model of ccRCC. PBRM1 re-expression led to upregulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, apoptotic process and response to hypoxia, and a downregulation of genes involved in different stages of cell division. The decrease in cellular proliferation upon PBRM1 re-expression was confirmed, validating the functional role of PBRM1 as a tumor suppressor in a cell-based model. In addition, we identified a role for PBRM1 in regulating metabolic pathways known to be important for driving ccRCC, including the regulation of hypoxia response genes, PI3K signaling, glucose uptake, and cholesterol homeostasis. Of particular novelty is the identification of cell adhesion as a major downstream process uniquely regulated by PBRM1 expression. Cytoskeletal reorganization was induced upon PBRM1 reexpression as evidenced from the increase in the number of cells displaying cortical actin, a hallmark of epithelial cells. Genes involved in cell adhesion featured prominently in our transcriptional dataset and overlapped with genes uniquely regulated by PBRM1 in clinical specimens of ccRCC. Genes involved in cell adhesion serve as tumor suppressor and maybe involved in inhibiting cell migration. Here we report for the first time genes linked to cell adhesion serve as downstream targets of PBRM1, and hope to lay the foundation of future studies focusing on the role of chromatin remodelers in bringing about these alterations during malignancies. PMID:27100670

  7. Genome-Wide Detection of Predicted Non-coding RNAs Related to the Adhesion Process in Vibrio alginolyticus Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lixing; Hu, Jiao; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Kong, Wendi; Zhao, Lingmin; Ma, Ying; Xu, Xiaojin; Lin, Mao; Zheng, Jiang; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to adhere to fish mucus can be affected by environmental conditions and is considered to be a key virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this ability remains unclear. Our previous study showed that stress conditions such as exposure to Cu, Pb, Hg, and low pH are capable of reducing the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play a crucial role in the intricate regulation of bacterial gene expression, thereby affecting bacterial pathogenicity. Thus, we hypothesized that ncRNAs play a key role in the V. alginolyticus adhesion process. To validate this, we combined high-throughput sequencing with computational techniques to detect ncRNA dynamics in samples after stress treatments. The expression of randomly selected novel ncRNAs was confirmed by QPCR. Among the significantly altered ncRNAs, 30 were up-regulated and 2 down-regulated by all stress treatments. The QPCR results reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Target prediction and KEGG pathway analysis indicated that these ncRNAs are closely related to pathways associated with in vitro adhesion, and our results indicated that chemical stress-induced reductions in the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus might be due to the perturbation of ncRNA expression. Our findings provide important information for further functional characterization of ncRNAs during the adhesion process of V. alginolyticus. PMID:27199948

  8. Influence of Adhesion Force on icaA and cidA Gene Expression and Production of Matrix Components in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Chen, Yun; Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of human infections are caused by biofilms. The biofilm mode of growth enhances the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus spp. considerably, because once they adhere, staphylococci embed themselves in a protective, self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of forces of staphylococcal adhesion to different biomaterials on icaA (which regulates the production of EPS matrix components) and cidA (which is associated with cell lysis and extracellular DNA [eDNA] release) gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Experiments were performed with S. aureus ATCC 12600 and its isogenic mutant, S. aureus ATCC 12600 Δpbp4, deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking. Deletion of pbp4 was associated with greater cell wall deformability, while it did not affect the planktonic growth rate, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, or zeta potential of the strains. The adhesion forces of S. aureus ATCC 12600 were the strongest on polyethylene (4.9 ± 0.5 nN), intermediate on polymethylmethacrylate (3.1 ± 0.7 nN), and the weakest on stainless steel (1.3 ± 0.2 nN). The production of poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, and expression of icaA genes decreased with increasing adhesion forces. However, no relation between adhesion forces and cidA expression was observed. The adhesion forces of the isogenic mutant S. aureus ATCC 12600 Δpbp4 (deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking) were much weaker than those of the parent strain and did not show any correlation with the production of poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, or expression of the icaA and cidA genes. This suggests that adhesion forces modulate the production of the matrix molecule poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, and icaA gene expression by inducing nanoscale cell wall deformation, with cross-linked peptidoglycan layers playing a pivotal role in this adhesion force sensing. PMID:25746995

  9. PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC) negatively regulates endothelial adhesion of monocytes via inhibition of NF κB activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chengye, Zhan; Daixing, Zhou Qiang, Zhong; Shusheng, Li

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •First time to display that LPS downregulate the expression of PRC. •First time to show that PRC inhibits the induction of VCAM-1 and E-selectin. •First time to show that PRC inhibit monocytes attachment to endothelial cells. •First time to display that PRC inhibits transcriptional activity of NF-κB. •PRC protects the respiration rate and suppresses the glycolysis rate against LPS. -- Abstract: PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC) is a growth-regulated transcriptional cofactor known to activate many of the nuclear genes specifying mitochondrial respiratory function. Endothelial dysfunction is a prominent feature found in many inflammatory diseases. Adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1, mediate the attachment of monocytes to endothelial cells, thereby playing an important role in endothelial inflammation. The effects of PRC in regards to endothelial inflammation remain unknown. In this study, our findings show that PRC can be inhibited by the inflammatory cytokine LPS in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the presence of LPS, the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecular, such as VCAM1 and E-selectin, is found to be increased. These effects can be negated by overexpression of PRC. Importantly, monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells caused by LPS is significantly attenuated by PRC. In addition, overexpression of PRC protects mitochondrial metabolic function and suppresses the rate of glycolysis against LPS. It is also found that overexpression of PRC decreases the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. These findings suggest that PRC is a negative regulator of endothelial inflammation.

  10. C1q/TNF-related protein-9 inhibits cytokine-induced vascular inflammation and leukocyte adhesiveness via AMP-activated protein kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Yu Mi; Lee, Yoo La; Seol, So Mi; Yoon, Hae Kyeong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2016-01-05

    Although recent studies have reported cardioprotective effects of C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9), the closet adiponectin paralog, its role on cytokine-induced endothelial inflammation is unknown. We investigated whether CTRP9 prevented inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inhibited the expression of adhesion molecules and a chemokine in the vascular endothelial cell. We used human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to examine the effects of CTRP9 on NF-κB activation and the expression of NF-κB-mediated genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was used as a representative proinflammatory cytokine. In an adhesion assay using THP-1 cells, CTRP9 reduced TNFα-induced adhesion of monocytes to HAECs. Treatment with CTRP9 significantly decreased TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB, as well as the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1. In addition, treatment with CTRP9 significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the downstream target of AMPK. The inhibitory effect of CTRP9 on the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 and monocyte adhesion to HAECs was abolished after transfection with an AMPKα1-specific siRNA. Our study is the first to demonstrate that CTRP9 attenuates cytokine-induced vascular inflammation in endothelial cells mediated by AMPK activation.

  11. Characterization of the porcine sperm adhesion molecule gene SPAM1- expression analysis, genomic structure, and chromosomal mapping.

    PubMed

    Day, A E; Quilter, C R; Sargent, C A; Mileham, A J

    2002-06-01

    Sequence analysis of cDNA products, derived from adult porcine testis mRNA, gave overlapping nucleotide sequence correlating to 1952 bp of the sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) gene. This sequence was shown to be homologous to SPAM1 genes known in other mammalian species and contained an open reading frame encoding a 493-amino acid protein. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone from the PigE BAC library, was used to map SPAM1 to chromosome 18 of the pig. This finding is consistent with comparative mapping experiments performed between pig and human chromosomes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the 1952 bp of cDNA sequence spans approximately 9 kb of genomic DNA and comprises of at least four exons, with its size and structure being relatively conserved between mouse, human and pig. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis of mRNA from nine porcine tissues has also suggested that expression of SPAM1 is limited to the testis.

  12. Adhesion of K88ab fimbriated E. coli in piglet small intestines in relation with iron transport molecules.

    PubMed

    Grange, P; Védrine, B; Mouricout, M

    1997-01-01

    Enteropathogenic K88 fimbricated E. coli colonize the piglet small intestine. In swine, it has been previously established that some pigs lack intestinal receptors for K88 lectins and that these animals are resistant to infections by K88-positive E. coli. The receptor is inherited as a simple mendelian character. The interactions established between the glycoconjugate receptors of pig brush borders and K88 lectins are mediated by O- and N-linked glycoproteins which differ between adhesive and non-adhesive piglets. In this study the adhesion of E. coli K88+ in crossbred F2 (LW x MS) x (LW x MS) populations. By using in vitro brush border test, we observed modulation of the adhesion of K88 fimbriae and distinguished high and low affinity receptors. Furthermore, we correlated the attachment with glycoprotein pattern of epithelial cells and mucus. Epithelial cells and mucus contained several glycopeptides (from 42 to 74 kDa) recognized by K88ab fimbriae. The 74 kDa glycoprotein was characteristic of adhesive phenotype and was a mucosal transferrin (iTf). It appeared that iTf was more abundant in adhesive intestines than in non-adhesive ones, suggesting that susceptibility/resistance phenotype could be related to iron metabolism in the intestinal tract. Furthermore, we visualized the intestinal transferrin receptors on the brush border membrane of epithelial cells, probably implicated in iron absorption.

  13. Comparative in vitro study for orthodontic adhesives relatively to sorption and solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, A.; Mesaros, A.; Festila, D.; Moldovan, M.; Boboia, S.; Mesaros, M.

    2015-12-01

    Water sorption and solubility correspond to undesirable physical characteristics because it may cause micro leakage and dissolution for composite materials used for orthodontic attachment bonding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of four composite materials employed in orthodontic as adhesives, relatively to water and 50% alcoholic solution, by means of in vitro tests of sorption and solubility. We used an experimental composite sealer SO® (ICCRR Cluj Napoca) and 3 commercial products already on the market: Blugloo® (Ormco), Opal Bond MV® (Ultradent) and Bond It® (DB orthodontics). Data were recorded and specific statistic tests were performed, revealing significant differences for all materials relatively to tested solutions. The materials expressed an adequate performance in terms of sorption and solubility, offering various alternatives for orthodontists.

  14. Diatomic molecules and metallic adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption - A single binding-energy relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Potential-energy relations involving a few parameters in simple analytic forms have been found to represent well the energetics of a wide variety of diatomic molecules. However, such two-atom potential functions are not appropriate for metals. It is well known that, in the case of metals, there exist strong volume-dependent forces which can never be expressed as pairwise interactions. The present investigation has the objective to show that, in spite of the observation concerning metals, a single binding-energy relation can be found which accurately describes diatomic molecules as well as adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption on metals. This universality reveals a commonality between the molecular and metallic bond.

  15. Identification and characterization of the intercellular adhesion molecule-2 gene as a novel p53 target

    PubMed Central

    Ogi, Kazuhiro; Nakagaki, Takafumi; Koyama, Ryota; Idogawa, Masashi; Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi; Tokino, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor inhibits cell growth through the activation of both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which maintain genome stability and prevent cancer development. Here, we report that intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM2) is transcriptionally activated by p53. Specifically, ICAM2 is induced by the p53 family and DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. We identified a p53 binding sequence located within the ICAM2 gene that is responsive to wild-type p53, TAp73, and TAp63. In terms of function, we found that the ectopic expression of ICAM2 inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that silencing endogenous ICAM2 in cancer cells caused a marked increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation levels, suggesting that ICAM2 inhibits migration and invasion of cancer cells by suppressing ERK signaling. Moreover, ICAM2 is underexpressed in human cancer tissues containing mutant p53 as compared to those with wild-type p53. Notably, the decreased expression of ICAM2 is associated with poor survival in patients with various cancers. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM2 induction by p53 has a key role in inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:27556181

  16. Correction of the disease phenotype in canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency using ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Hai, Mehreen; Tuschong, Laura M.; Burkholder, Tanya H.; Gu, Yu-chen; Sokolic, Robert A.; Ferguson, Cole; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2006-01-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) represents the canine counter-part of the human disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). Defects in the leukocyte integrin CD18 adhesion molecule in both CLAD and LAD lead to recurrent, life-threatening bacterial infections. We evaluated ex vivo retroviral-mediated gene therapy in CLAD using 2 nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens—200 cGy total body irradiation (TBI) or 10 mg/kg busulfan—with or without posttransplantation immunosuppression. In 6 of 11 treated CLAD dogs, therapeutic levels of CD18+ leukocytes were achieved. Conditioning with either TBI or busulfan allowed long-term engraftment, and immunosuppression was not required for efficacy. The percentage of CD18+ leukocytes in the peripheral blood progressively increased over 6 to 8 months after infusion to levels ranging from 1.26% to 8.37% at 1-year follow-up in the 6 dogs. These levels resulted in reversal or moderation of the severe CLAD phenotype. Linear amplification–mediated polymerase chain reaction assays indicated polyclonality of insertion sites. These results describe ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer in a disease-specific, large animal model using 2 clinically applicable conditioning regimens, and they provide support for the use of nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens in preclinical protocols of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for nonmalignant hematopoietic diseases such as LAD. PMID:16868255

  17. Glycan-related gene expression signatures in breast cancer subtypes; relation to survival.

    PubMed

    Potapenko, Ivan O; Lüders, Torben; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Åslaug; Sørlie, Therese; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Lingjærde, Ole C; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in glycan structures are early signs of malignancy and have recently been proposed to be in part a driving force behind malignant transformation. Here, we explore whether differences in expression of genes related to the process of glycosylation exist between breast carcinoma subtypes - and look for their association to clinical parameters. Five expression datasets of 454 invasive breast carcinomas, 31 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 79 non-malignant breast tissue samples were analysed. Results were validated in 1960 breast carcinomas. 419 genes encoding glycosylation-related proteins were selected. The DCIS samples appeared expression-wise similar to carcinomas, showing altered gene expression related to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and N-glycans when compared to non-malignant samples. In-situ lesions with different aggressiveness potentials demonstrated changes in glycosaminoglycan sulfation and adhesion proteins. Subtype-specific expression patterns revealed down-regulation of genes encoding glycan-binding proteins in the luminal A and B subtypes. Clustering basal-like samples using a consensus list of genes differentially expressed across discovery datasets produced two clusters with significantly differing prognosis in the validation dataset. Finally, our analyses suggest that glycolipids may play an important role in carcinogenesis of breast tumors - as demonstrated by association of B3GNT5 and UGCG genes to patient survival. In conclusion, most glycan-specific changes occur early in the carcinogenic process. We have identified glycan-related alterations specific to breast cancer subtypes including a prognostic signature for two basal-like subgroups. Future research in this area may potentially lead to markers for better prognostication and treatment stratification of breast cancer patients.

  18. Complex Regulatory Network Controls Initial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli via Regulation of the csgD Gene

    PubMed Central

    Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Brombacher, Eva; Vidal, Olivier; Ambert, Arnaud; Lejeune, Philippe; Landini, Paolo; Dorel, Corinne

    2001-01-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop. PMID:11717281

  19. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  20. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  1. Modulation of an adhesion-related surface antigen on equine neutrophils by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Bochsler, P N; Slauson, D O; Neilsen, N R

    1990-10-01

    The essential role of the CD11/CD18 family of leukocyte adhesion molecules (LeuCams) in neutrophil-substrate adhesion is well documented. We have found that a monoclonal antibody designated 60.3 (MoAb 60.3) that recognizes the common beta-subunit (CD18) on human neutrophils (PMN) also recognizes a surface antigen on equine PMN. Antigen expression as assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry was enhanced by zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. Pretreatment of equine PMN with MoAb 60.3 inhibited ZAS-stimulated aggregation, indicating that the monoclonal recognized a functional epitope on equine PMN involved in adhesion-related functions. Cells pretreated only with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 microgram/ml) exhibited moderate increased binding of MoAb 60.3 as determined by fluorescence intensity. Preincubation of PMN with LPS resulted in a slight increase in MoAb 60.3 binding after subsequent ZAS stimulation, greater than that with either LPS or ZAS as sole stimulus. Similarly, enhanced binding of MoAb 60.3 was observed with LPS preincubation when PMA was used as a stimulus, but this effect was dose dependent and was observed at only one of three PMA concentrations tested (1 ng/ml). In other experiments, preincubation of PMN with antiinflammatory drugs inhibited 41.5-45.1% of ZAS-stimulated PMN adhesion to monolayers of equine endothelial cells. To determine whether modulation of expression of the adhesion-related antigen recognized by MoAb 60.3 correlated with these observed adhesive responses of PMN, we used immunofluorescence flow cytometry to assess expression of the antigen on drug-treated PMN. Using 10% ZAS as a stimulus, phenylbutazone (PBZ; 100 micrograms/ml) pretreatment of PMN reduced subsequent MoAb 60.3 binding by only 12.3%, and dexamethasone (DEX; 10(-5) M) reduced binding by only 1.0%; reductions of 16.4% with PBZ and 9.3% with DEX occurred when PMA (10 ng/ml) was used as the PMN stimulant

  2. Cigarette smoke condensate increases C. albicans adhesion, growth, biofilm formation, and EAP1, HWP1 and SAP2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Smokers are more prone to oral infections than are non-smokers. Cigarette smoke reaches the host cells but also microorganisms present in the oral cavity. The contact between cigarette smoke and oral bacteria promotes such oral diseases as periodontitis. Cigarette smoke can also modulate C. albicans activities that promote oral candidiasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate on C. albicans adhesion, growth, and biofilm formation as well as the activation of EAP1, HWP1 and secreted aspartic protease 2. Results Cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) increased C. albicans adhesion and growth, as well as biofilm formation. These features may be supported by the activation of certain important genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrated that CSC-exposed C. albicans expressed high levels of EAP1, HWP1 and SAP2 mRNA and that this gene expression increased with increasing concentrations of CSC. Conclusion CSC induction of C. albicans adhesion, growth, and biofilm formation may explain the increased persistence of this pathogen in smokers. These findings may also be relevant to other biofilm-induced oral diseases. PMID:24618025

  3. Tuberin, the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 tumor suppressor gene product, regulates Rho activation, cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Cash, Timothy P; Hunter, Deborah S; Walker, Cheryl L; Chernoff, Jonathan; Henske, Elizabeth P

    2002-12-05

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, autism, and tumors of the brain, kidney, heart, retina, and skin. TSC is caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2, both of which are tumor suppressor genes. Hamartin, the protein product of TSC1, was found to interact with the ezrin-radixin-moesin family of cytoskeletal proteins and to activate the small GTPase Rho. To determine whether tuberin, the TSC2 product, can also activate Rho, we stably expressed full-length human tuberin in two cell types: MDCK cells and ELT3 cells. ELT3 cells lack endogenous tuberin expression. We found that expression of human tuberin in both MDCK and ELT3 cells was associated with an increase in the amount of Rho-GTP, but not in Rac1-GTP or cdc42-GTP. Tuberin expression increased cell adhesion in both cell types, and decreased chemotactic cell migration in ELT3 cells. In MDCK cells, there was a decrease in the amount of total Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and an increase in the fraction of phosphorylated FAK. These findings demonstrate for the first time that tuberin activates Rho and regulates cell adhesion and migration. Pathways involving Rho activation may have relevance to the clinical manifestations of TSC, including pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  4. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Kishimoto, Keishi; Kato, Ayumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Sato, Ryuichiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-03-10

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration.

  5. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and m

  6. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  7. Reduced Hepatic Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Level in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Garrett; Muturi, Harrison T.; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Bowman, Thomas A.; Ghadieh, Hilda E.; Ghanem, Simona S.; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S.; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of insulin clearance is being increasingly recognized as a critical step in the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes insulin clearance. Null deletion or liver-specific inactivation of Ceacam1 in mice causes a defect in insulin clearance, insulin resistance, steatohepatitis, and visceral obesity. Immunohistological analysis revealed reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obese subjects with fatty liver disease. Thus, we aimed to determine whether this occurs at the hepatocyte level in response to systemic extrahepatic factors and whether this holds across species. Northern and Western blot analyses demonstrate that CEACAM1 mRNA and protein levels are reduced in liver tissues of obese individuals compared to their lean age-matched counterparts. Furthermore, Western analysis reveals a comparable reduction of CEACAM1 protein in primary hepatocytes derived from the same obese subjects. Similar to humans, Ceacam1 mRNA level, assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, is significantly reduced in the livers of obese Zucker (fa/fa, ZDF) and Koletsky (f/f) rats relative to their age-matched lean counterparts. These studies demonstrate that the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obesity occurs at the level of hepatocytes and identify the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 as a common denominator of obesity across multiple species.

  8. TIEG1-null tenocytes display age-dependent differences in their gene expression, adhesion, spreading and proliferation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Oualid; Gumez, Laurie; Hawse, John R.; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Bensamoun, Sabine F.

    2011-07-15

    The remodeling of extracellular matrix is a crucial mechanism in tendon development and the proliferation of fibroblasts is a key factor in this process. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the role of TIEG1 in mediating important tenocyte properties throughout the aging process. Wildtype and TIEG1 knockout tenocytes adhesion, spreading and proliferation were characterized on different substrates (fibronectin, collagen type I, gelatin and laminin) and the expression levels of various genes known to be involved with tendon development were analyzed by RT-PCR. The experiments revealed age-dependent and substrate-dependent properties for both wildtype and TIEG1 knockout tenocytes. Taken together, our results indicate an important role for TIEG1 in regulating tenocytes adhesion, spreading, and proliferation throughout the aging process. Understanding the basic mechanisms of TIEG1 in tenocytes may provide valuable information for treating multiple tendon disorders.

  9. The Global Regulatory hns Gene Negatively Affects Adhesion to Solid Surfaces by Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli by Modulating Expression of Flagellar Genes and Lipopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Landini, Paolo; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    2002-01-01

    The initial binding of bacterial cells to a solid surface is a critical and essential step in biofilm formation. In this report we show that stationary-phase cultures of Escherichia coli W3100 (a K-12 strain) can efficiently attach to sand columns when they are grown in Luria broth medium at 28°C in fully aerobic conditions. In contrast, growth in oxygen-limited conditions results in a sharp decrease in adhesion to hydrophilic substrates. We show that the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and of flagella, as well as the transcription of the fliC gene, encoding the major flagellar subunit, increases under oxygen-limited conditions. Inactivation of the global regulatory hns gene counteracts increased production of LPS and flagella in response to anoxia and allows E. coli W3100 to attach to sand columns even when it is grown under oxygen-limited conditions. We propose that increased production of the FliC protein and of LPS in response to oxygen limitation results in the loss of the ability of E. coli W3100 to adhere to hydrophilic surfaces. Indeed, overexpression of the fliC gene results in a decreased adhesion to sand even when W3100 is grown in fully aerobic conditions. Our observations strongly suggest that anoxia is a negative environmental signal for adhesion in E. coli. PMID:11872702

  10. Identification of genes associated with copper tolerance in an adhesion-defective mutant of Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria.

    PubMed

    Francki, K T; Chang, B J; Mee, B J; Collignon, P J; Susai, V; Keese, P K

    2000-10-01

    TnphoA mutagenesis was used to identify adhesins of Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria 3767, a strain isolated from a diarrhoeal stool specimen. Six mutants, from a library of 154, exhibited significantly reduced levels of adhesion to HEp-2 cells. Primers to the terminal regions of TnphoA were used for inverse PCR and the product from one mutant was cloned into pBluescript and partial sequence data obtained. Scanning GenBank and EMBL data bases revealed DNA sequence similarity to the copA gene of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato which confers resistance to copper and other heavy metals. The transposon was located within the copA gene and the mutant exhibited a reduced tolerance to copper. Primer walking, using the inverse PCR product as a template, revealed three open reading frames (ORFs) copA, B and C in A. veronii biovar sobria 3767. The predicted amino acid sequences of ORFs A and B had significant homology (55 and 34% respectively) to the copA and B proteins of P. syringae. No amino acid or DNA sequence homology existed between ORF C of strain 3767 and any other gene in the data bases scanned. Further analysis of the nucleotide sequence failed to reveal the presence of typical copper regulatory genes within the vicinity of the Aeromonas sequence. The association between copper tolerance and adhesion in A. veronii biovar sobria requires further study.

  11. Long-Term Follow-up of Foamy Viral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R; Tuschong, Laura M; Calvo, Katherine R; Shive, Heather R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Karlsson, Eleanor K; West, Robert R; Russell, David W; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2013-01-01

    The development of leukemia following gammaretroviral vector-mediated gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has emphasized the need for long-term follow-up in animals treated with hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. In this study, we report the long-term follow-up (4–7 years) of four dogs with canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) treated with foamy viral (FV) vector-mediated gene therapy. All four CLAD dogs previously received nonmyeloablative conditioning with 200 cGy total body irradiation followed by infusion of autologous, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced by a FV vector expressing canine CD18 from an internal Murine Stem Cell Virus (MSCV) promoter. CD18+ leukocyte levels were >2% following infusion of vector-transduced cells leading to ongoing reversal of the CLAD phenotype for >4 years. There was no clinical development of lymphoid or myeloid leukemia in any of the four dogs and integration site analysis did not reveal insertional oncogenesis. These results showing disease correction/amelioration of disease in CLAD without significant adverse events provide support for the use of a FV vector to treat children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) in a human gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:23531552

  12. [Computer databases on cancer-related genes].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, N; Minoshima, S

    2000-06-01

    A database of mutations in various cancer-related genes has been constructed and named as KMcancerDB (Keio Mutation DataBase for cancer-related genes). This KMcancerDB utilizes a database software called MutationView which we designed to compile various mutation data and to provide graphical presentation of data analysis through the network using ordinary internet browser softwares such as Netscape. Currently, the KMcancerDB accommodates 1261 mutation data of different genes for cancers in 9 different organs/tissues (breast, stomach, uterus, liver, prostate, colon, ovary, thymus and retinoblastoma). KMcancerDB is accessible through http:¿mutview.dmb.med.keio.ac.jp. OMIM is an important document database for human Mendelian traits and hereditary diseases. The information from OMIM is also used in MutationView/KMcancerDB. Some display windows of OMIM and KMcancerDB are presented.

  13. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  14. Expression of the mucus adhesion genes Mub and MapA, adhesion-like factor EF-Tu and bacteriocin gene plaA of Lactobacillus plantarum 423, monitored with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ramiah, K; van Reenen, C A; Dicks, L M T

    2007-05-30

    Expression of the mucus adhesion genes Mub and MapA, adhesion-like factor EF-Tu and bacteriocin gene plaA by Lactobacillus plantarum 423, grown in the presence of bile, pancreatin and at low pH, was studied by real-time PCR. Mub, MapA and EF-Tu were up-regulated in the presence of mucus, proportional to increasing concentrations. Expression of MapA was up-regulated in the presence of 3.0 g/l bile and 3.0 g/l pancreatin at pH 6.5. Similar results were recorded in the presence of 10.0 g/l bile and 10.0 g/l pancreatin at pH 6.5. Expression of Mub was down-regulated in the presence of bile and pancreatin, whilst the expression of EF-Tu and plaA remained unchanged. Expression of Mub and MapA remained unchanged at pH 4.0, whilst expression of EF-Tu and plaA were up-regulated. Expression of MapA was down-regulated in the presence of 1.0 g/l l-cysteine HCl, suggesting that the gene is regulated by transcription attenuation that involves cysteine.

  15. Candida albicans Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Formation is Closely Related to Surface Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Zhigang; Chu, Haoyue; Guo, Jing; Jiang, Guangshui; Qi, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans persisters have so far been observed only in biofilm environment; the biofilm element(s) that trigger(s) persister formation are still unknown. In this study, we tried to further elucidate the possible relationship between C. albicans persisters and the early phases of biofilm formation, especially the surface adhesion phase. Three C. albicans strains were surveyed for the formation of persisters. We tested C. albicans persister formation dynamically at different time points during the process of adhesion and biofilm formation. The number of persister cells was determined based on an assessment of cell viability after amphotericin B treatment and colony-forming unit assay. None of the planktonic cultures contained persisters. Immediately following adhesion of C. albicans cells to the surface, persister cells emerged and the proportion of persisters reached a peak of 0.2-0.69 % in approximately 2-h biofilm. As the biofilm matured, the proportion of persisters decreased and was only 0.01-0.02 % by 24 h, while the number of persisters remained stable with no significant change. Persisters were not detected in the absence of an attachment surface which was pre-coated. Persisters were also absent in biofilms that were scraped to disrupt surface adhesion prior to amphotericin B treatment. These results indicate that C. albicans antifungal-tolerant persisters are produced mainly in surface adhesion phase and surface adhesion is required for the emergence and maintenance of C. albicans persisters.

  16. Virulence gene expression, adhesion and invasion of Campylobacter jejuni exposed to oxidative stress (H2O2).

    PubMed

    Koolman, Leonard; Whyte, Paul; Burgess, Catherine; Bolton, Declan

    2016-03-02

    Studies were undertaken to investigate the effect of oxidative stress conditions (exposure to hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) on [1] the expression of 14 Campylobacter jejuni virulence-associated genes associated with motility and/or invasion (flaA, flaB, flhA, flhB, ciaB, iamA), adhesion (cadF), cytotoxin production (cdtA, cdtB, cdtC) as well as some of the regulators of these genes (rpoN, fliA, luxS, cj1000), in 10 C. jejuni strains (5 poultry and 5 human) and [2] the ability of these cells to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. Using 16S rRNA as the reference gene (preliminary research demonstrated that this gene was stably expressed), the expression of the 14 virulence associated genes was investigated under normal and oxidative stress conditions using reverse transcription PCR. A Caco-2 cell tissue culture assay was used to examine adhesion and invasion. The response to oxidative stress was strain-dependent. Two strains showed significant (p<0.05) up or down regulation in 7 of the 14 genes tested, while only 1-2 genes were affected in the remaining strains. Expression of cadF was significantly (p<0.05) changed in all strains, cdt B in 4 strains and cj1000 in 3 strains. Expression of the remaining genes was either unaffected or significantly altered in 1-2 strains. NCTC 11168 completely lost the ability to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. One other strain also demonstrated reduced adherence while two others were unable to invade Caco-2 cells after exposure to oxidative stress conditions. In contrast strain 7, a poultry isolate, showed increased invasion. It was concluded that oxidative stress affects expression of C. jejuni virulence genes in a strain-dependent manner, CadF may have a secondary survival function and the cdtB gene may have a different promoter than cdtA and cdtC.

  17. Glycosylation Genes Expressed in Seam Cells Determine Complex Surface Properties and Bacterial Adhesion to the Cuticle of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gravato-Nobre, Maria J.; Stroud, Dave; O'Rourke, Delia; Darby, Creg; Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The surface of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is poorly understood but critical for its interactions with the environment and with pathogens. We show here that six genes (bus-2, bus-4, and bus-12, together with the previously cloned srf-3, bus-8, and bus-17) encode proteins predicted to act in surface glycosylation, thereby affecting disease susceptibility, locomotory competence, and sexual recognition. Mutations in all six genes cause resistance to the bacterial pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum, and most of these mutations also affect bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation by Yersinia species, demonstrating that both infection and biofilm formation depend on interaction with complex surface carbohydrates. A new bacterial interaction, involving locomotory inhibition by a strain of Bacillus pumilus, reveals diversity in the surface properties of these mutants. Another biological property—contact recognition of hermaphrodites by males during mating—was also found to be impaired in mutants of all six genes. An important common feature is that all are expressed most strongly in seam cells, rather than in the main hypodermal syncytium, indicating that seam cells play the major role in secreting surface coat and consequently in determining environmental interactions. To test for possible redundancies in gene action, the 15 double mutants for this set of genes were constructed and examined, but no synthetic phenotypes were observed. Comparison of the six genes shows that each has distinctive properties, suggesting that they do not act in a linear pathway. PMID:20980242

  18. Neuronal cell adhesion genes: Key players in risk for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other neurodevelopmental brain disorders?

    PubMed

    Corvin, Aiden P

    2010-01-01

    The major mental disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are substantially heritable. Recent genomic studies have identified a small number of common and rare risk genes contributing to both disorders and support epidemiological evidence that genetic susceptibility overlaps between them. Prompted by the question of whether risk genes cluster in specific molecular pathways or implicate discrete mechanisms we and others have developed hypothesis-free methods of investigating genome-wide association datasets at a pathway-level. The application of our method to the 212 experimentally-derived pathways in the Kyoto Encycolpaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database identified significant association between the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) pathway and both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder susceptibility across three GWAS datasets. Interestingly, a similar approach applied to an autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) sample identified a similar pathway and involved many of the same genes. Disruption of a number of these genes (including NRXN1, CNTNAP2 and CASK) are known to cause diverse neurodevelopmental brain disorder phenotypes including schizophenia, autism, learning disability and specific language disorder. Taken together these studies bring the CAM pathway sharply into focus for more comprehensive DNA sequencing to identify the critical genes, and investigate their relationships and interaction with environmental risk factors in the expression of many seemingly different neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. The novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 promotes the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Kauttu, Tuuli; Seppänen, Hanna; Vainionpää, Sanna; Wang, Shan; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2013-02-01

    Kindlin-2 is a novel focal adhesion gene mediating the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in linking chronic inflammation to cancer progression. Both kindlin-2 and TAMs have been found to promote the invasion of gastric cancer cells in our previous studies. However, the correlation between kindlin-2 and TAMs remains unclear. Real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate kindlin-2 expression in the AGS, NCI and Hs-746T gastric cancer cell lines co-cultured with TAMs under normal or hypoxic conditions. IL8, IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL18, IL22 and IL24 expressions were measured by real-time RT-PCR in the gastric cancer lines with varying levels of kindlin-2 expression, as well as after downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA expression by the siRNA method. We found that kindlin-2 was upregulated in all three gastric cancer cell lines when co-cultured with TAMs under normal conditions. Under hypoxic conditions, the induction of kindlin-2 expression induced by macrophages was significantly downregulated in the Hs-746T cell line. IL8, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression was significantly higher in gastric cell lines with high kindlin-2 expression. Downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA decreased IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression but IL8 and IL18 expression was upregulated. Therefore, the novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 may play an important role in promoting the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by TAMs through regulating interleukin expression.

  20. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  1. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  2. Information Sources on Scientific Research Related to the Preservation of Books, Paper, and Adhesives. Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access, Washington, DC.

    Produced as part of an effort by the Commission on Preservation and Access to assist with the formation of a preservation research agenda, this report contains: (1) a directory of laboratories and organizations working in the four specific areas of concern in preservation--books, paper, adhesives, and mold; (2) directories of indexes, abstracts,…

  3. Mouse mutants for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ß2 subunit display changes in cell adhesion and neurodegeneration response genes.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Carol M; van der List, Deborah A; Ballesteros, Jose M; Goloshchapov, Andrey V; Chalupa, Leo M; Chapman, Barbara

    2011-04-25

    Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs). Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2-/- mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4), during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1), a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (Ccl21) mRNAs in Chrnb2-/- mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2-/- mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2-/- mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression.

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide as inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jochen; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Fischer, Axel; Groneberg, David A

    2003-01-01

    Sensory neuropeptides have been proposed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic cough. Next to prominent neuropeptides such as tachykinins or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been suggested to participate in airway physiology and pathophysiology. CGRP is a 37 amino-acid peptide which is expressed by nerve fibers projecting to the airways and by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. The most prominent effects of CGRP in the airways are vasodilatation and in a few instances bronchoconstriction. A further pulmonary effect of CGRP is the induction of eosinophil migration and the stimulation of beta-integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to fibronectin at the site of inflammation. By contrast, CGRP inhibits macrophage secretion and the capacity of macrophages to activate T-cells, indicating a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Due to the complex pulmonary effects of CGRP with bronchoconstriction and vasodilatation and diverse immunomodulatory actions, potential anti-asthma drugs based on this peptide have not been established so far. However, targeting the effects of CGRP may be of value for future strategies in nerve modulation.

  5. flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion by controlling the expression of critical virulence genes in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin; Zhao, Lingmin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence trait of Vibrio alginolyticus. Bacterial adhesion is influenced by environmental conditions; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. The expression levels of flrA, flrB and flrC were significantly downregulated in adhesion-deficient V. alginolyticus strains cultured under Cu2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and low-pH stresses. Silencing these genes led to deficiencies in adhesion, motility, flagellar assembly, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The expression levels of fliA, flgH, fliS, fliD, cheR, cheV and V12G01_22158 (Gene ID) were significantly downregulated in all of the RNAi groups, whereas the expression levels of toxT, ctxB, acfA, hlyA and tlh were upregulated in flrA- and flrC-silenced groups. These genes play a key role in the virulence mechanisms of most pathogenic Vibrio species. Furthermore, the expression of flrA, flrB and flrC was significantly influenced by temperature, salinity, starvation and pH. These results indicate that (1) flrA, flrB and flrC are important for V. alginolyticus adhesion; (2) flrA, flrB and flrC significantly influence bacterial adhesion, motility, biofilm formation and EPS production by controlling expression of key genes involved in those phenotypes; and (3) flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion in the natural environment with different temperatures, pH levels, salinities and starvation time. PMID:27485498

  6. The relation between a microscopic threshold-force model and macroscopic models of adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues our recent work on the relationship between discrete contact interactions at the microscopic scale and continuum contact interactions at the macroscopic scale (Hulikal et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 76, 144-161, 2015). The focus of this work is on adhesion. We show that a collection of a large number of discrete elements governed by a threshold-force based model at the microscopic scale collectively gives rise to continuum fracture mechanics at the macroscopic scale. A key step is the introduction of an efficient numerical method that enables the computation of a large number of discrete contacts. Finally, while this work focuses on scaling laws, the methodology introduced in this paper can also be used to study rough-surface adhesion.

  7. Relative resistance of long junctional epithelial adhesions and connective tissue attachments to plaque-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, R H; O'Leary, T J; Kafrawy, A H

    1984-04-01

    This study compared the resistance to periodontal disease of the long junctional epithelial adhesion and the naturally occurring dentogingival junction. Two groups were used, each containing three young male beagle dogs with all permanent teeth erupted. Periodontitis was induced around maxillary and mandibular premolars in the experimental dogs over a 42-day period, using subgingival ligatures and a soft diet. Fourteen days after ligature removal, flaps were reflected, granulation tissue was removed and the roots were planed to the alveolar crest. Reference grooves were placed in the root surfaces at the level of the alveolar bone, the flaps were positioned over the alveolar crests, and sutures were placed. A 60-day period permitted healing with formation of long junctional epithelial adhesions. During this 116-day period control dogs were maintained in gingival health by daily brushing and by prophylaxis every 14 days. Both groups had a high level of health (GI scores of 0) at the beginning of the 20-day combined disease phase. Inflammation was induced in both groups by subgingival ligature placement and a plaque-promoting diet. Right and left sides of both groups represented separate time intervals within the 20-day period. Block sections were secured at time of killing and the tissues were prepared for light and fluorescent microscopic evaluation. Mean GI scores and mean probing depths increased similarly in both groups. Tagge index scores of gingival inflammation were higher at the longer time periods in the experimental animals. However, they displayed an intact long junctional epithelial adhesion throughout the study, while control animals frequently showed ulceration of the sulcular epithelium. Neither group showed significant changes in location of the apical cells of the attachment epithelium. Crestal osteoblastic activity, confirmed with Procion labeling, predominated in the experimental animals, while osteoclastic activity predominated in the control

  8. Inside-out Signaling Promotes Dynamic Changes in the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (CEACAM1) Oligomeric State to Control Its Cell Adhesion Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prerna C.; Lee, Hannah S. W.; Ming, Aaron Y. K.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.; Yip, Christopher M.; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Gray-Owen, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded 432GXXXG436 motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the 432GXXXG436 motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the 432GXXXG436 mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling. PMID:24005674

  9. Single-gene tuning of Caulobacter cell cycle period and noise, swarming motility, and surface adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Scherer, Norbert F

    2010-01-01

    Sensor histidine kinases underlie the regulation of a range of physiological processes in bacterial cells, from chemotaxis to cell division. In the gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the membrane-bound histidine kinase, DivJ, is a polar-localized regulator of cell cycle progression and development. We show that DivJ localizes to the cell pole through a dynamic diffusion and capture mechanism rather than by active localization. Analysis of single C. crescentus cells in microfluidic culture demonstrates that controlled expression of divJ permits facile tuning of both the mean and noise of the cell division period. Simulations of the cell cycle that use a simplified protein interaction network capture previously measured oscillatory protein profiles, and recapitulate the experimental observation that deletion of divJ increases the cell cycle period and noise. We further demonstrate that surface adhesion and swarming motility of C. crescentus in semi-solid media can also be tuned by divJ expression. We propose a model in which pleiotropic control of polar cell development by the DivJ–DivK–PleC signaling pathway underlies divJ-dependent tuning of cell swarming and adhesion behaviors. PMID:21179017

  10. Increased liposome-mediated gene transfer into haematopoietic cells grown in adhesion to stromal or fibroblast cell line monolayers.

    PubMed

    Marit, G; Cao, Y; Froussard, P; Ripoche, J; Dupouy, M; Elandaloussi, A; Lacombe, F; Mahon, F X; Keller, H; Pla, M; Reiffers, J; Theze, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigated transfection rates of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or haematopoietic cell lines (TF-1, KG1a and K562) using the LacZ gene as a reporter and cationic liposomes. The transfection efficiency of CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) or TF-1, KG1a and K562 grown in suspension is very low (average percentage of 0.013 for HPC and 0.03 for cell lines). Adhesion of HPC or cell lines to plates by immunological or physical methods significantly enhances transfection efficiency; however, the percentage of transfected cells still remained low. We found that adhesion of TF-1, KG1a and K562 HC to MS-5 stroma cells or NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells increased transfection efficiency. Under these conditions transfection is achieved in 11.2-25% (mean 18.30%) for the cell lines and 13.6% (range 8.2-24.2%) for CD34+ HPC. These results indicate that liposome-mediated transfection of HC is significantly increased when cells are grown in adherence to stroma or fibroblast monolayers.

  11. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  12. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  13. Mouse Mutants for the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor ß2 Subunit Display Changes in Cell Adhesion and Neurodegeneration Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carol M.; van der List, Deborah A.; Ballesteros, Jose M.; Goloshchapov, Andrey V.; Chalupa, Leo M.; Chapman, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs). Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2−/− mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4), during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1), a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (Ccl21) mRNAs in Chrnb2−/− mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2−/− mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2−/− mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression. PMID:21547082

  14. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypertension-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mark C; Katki, Khurshed A; Rao, Arundhati; Koehler, Michael; Patel, Parag; Spiekerman, Alvin; DiPette, Donald J; Supowit, Scott C

    2005-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide, a potent vasodilator neuropeptide, is localized in perivascular sensory nerves. We have reported that alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout mice have elevated baseline blood pressure and enhanced hypertension-induced renal damage compared with wild-type controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the mechanism and functional significance of this increased hypertension-induced renal damage. We previously demonstrated by telemetric recording that the deoxycorticosterone-salt protocol produces a 35% increase in mean arterial pressure in both alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout and wild-type mice. Both strains of mice were studied at 0, 14, and 21 days after deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension. Renal sections from hypertensive wild-type mice showed no pathological changes at any time point studied. However, on days 14 and 21, hypertensive knockout mice displayed progressive increases in glomerular proliferation, crescent formation, and tubular protein casts, as well as the inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. There was a significant increase in 24-hour urinary isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation, levels at days 14 and 21 in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Urinary microalbumin was significantly higher (2-fold) at day 21 and creatinine clearance was significantly decreased 4-fold in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Therefore, in the absence of alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension induces enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and renal histopathologic damage, resulting in reduced renal function. Thus, sensory nerves, via alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, appear to be renoprotective against hypertension-induced damage.

  15. Ankyrin-binding proteins related to nervous system cell adhesion molecules: candidates to provide transmembrane and intercellular connections in adult brain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A major class of ankyrin-binding glycoproteins have been identified in adult rat brain of 186, 155, and 140 kD that are alternatively spliced products of the same pre-mRNA. Characterization of cDNAs demonstrated that ankyrin-binding glycoproteins (ABGPs) share 72% amino acid sequence identity with chicken neurofascin, a membrane-spanning neural cell adhesion molecule in the Ig super-family expressed in embryonic brain. ABGP polypeptides have the following features consistent with a role as ankyrin-binding proteins in vitro and in vivo: (a) ABGPs and ankyrin associate as pure proteins in a 1:1 molar stoichiometry; (b) the ankyrin-binding site is located in the COOH-terminal 21 kD of ABGP186 which contains the predicted cytoplasmic domain; (c) ABGP186 is expressed at approximately the same levels as ankyrin (15 pmoles/milligram of membrane protein); and (d) ABGP polypeptides are co- expressed with the adult form of ankyrinB late in postnatal development and are colocalized with ankyrinB by immunofluorescence. Similarity in amino acid sequence and conservation of sites of alternative splicing indicate that genes encoding ABGPs and neurofascin share a common ancestor. However, the major differences in developmental expression reported for neurofascin in embryos versus the late postnatal expression of ABGPs suggest that ABGPs and neurofascin represent products of gene duplication events that have subsequently evolved in parallel with distinct roles. The predicted cytoplasmic domains of rat ABGPs and chicken neurofascin are nearly identical to each other and closely related to a group of nervous system cell adhesion molecules with variable extracellular domains, which includes L1, Nr-CAM, and Ng- CAM of vertebrates, and neuroglian of Drosophila. The ankyrin-binding site of rat ABGPs is localized to the C-terminal 200 residues which encompass the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting the hypothesis that ability to associate with ankyrin may be a shared feature of neurofascin and

  16. Organ Preference of Cancer Metastasis and Metastasis-Related Cell Adhesion Molecules Including Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    This review starts on one of our special interests, the organ preference of metastasis. We examined data on 1,117 autopsy cases and found that the organ distribution of metastasis of cancers of the lung, pancreas, stomach, colon, rectum, uterine cervix, liver, bile duct, and esophagus involved the lung, liver, adrenal gland, bone/bone marrow, lymph node, and pleura/peritoneum. Cancers of the kidney, thyroid, ovary, choriocarcinoma, and breast, however, manifested different metastatic patterns. The distribution of leukemia and lymphoma metastases was quite different from that of epithelial cancers. On the basis of experimental studies, we believe that the anatomical-mechanical hypothesis should be replaced by the microinjury hypothesis, which suggests that tissue microinjury induced by temporal tumor cell embolization is crucial for successful metastasis. This hypothesis may actually reflect the so-called inflammatory oncotaxis concept. To clarify the mechanisms underlying metastasis, we developed an experimental model system of a rat hepatoma AH7974 that embraced substrate adhesiveness. This model did not prove a relationship between substrate-adhesion potential and metastatic lung-colonizing potential of tumor cells, but metastatic potential was correlated with the expression of the laminin carbohydrate that was recognized by Griffonia (Bandeiraea) simplicifolia isolectin G4. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between carbohydrate expression profiles and metastasis and prognosis. We indeed found an intimate relationship between the carbohydrate expression of cancer cells and the progression of malignant tumors, organ preference of metastasis, metastatic potential of tumor cells, and prognosis of patients.

  17. Temporal gene expression profile of human precursor B leukemia cells induced by adhesion receptor: identification of pathways regulating B-cell survival.

    PubMed

    Astier, Anne Laurence; Xu, Ronghui; Svoboda, Marek; Hinds, Esther; Munoz, Olivier; de Beaumont, Rosalie; Crean, Colin Daniel; Gabig, Theodore; Freedman, Arnold Stephen

    2003-02-01

    The physical interactions between B cells and stromal cells from the lymphoid tissue microenvironment are critical to the survival of normal and malignant B cells. They are principally mediated by integrins expressed on B cells and counterreceptors on stromal cells. Specifically, alpha4beta1 integrin engagement rescues B cells from physiological or drug-induced apoptosis. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms by which integrins prevent apoptosis in leukemia B cells, we compared the temporal gene expression profiles induced by beta1-integrin ligation with fibronectin (Fn) or adhesion by poly-L-Lysine in serum-starved precursor B leukemia cells. Among the 38 selected differentially expressed genes, 6 genes involved in adhesion (VAV2, EPB41L1, CORO1A), proliferation (FRAP1, CCT4), and intercellular communication (GJB3) were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-Q-PCR). Gene expression modulation could also be validated at the protein level for 5 other genes. We show that integrin stimulation up-regulated FBI-1 expression but inhibited CD79a, Requiem, c-Fos, and caspase 7 induction when the cells underwent apoptosis. We further demonstrate that Fn stimulation also inhibits caspase 3 activation but increases XIAP and survivin expression. Moreover, integrin stimulation also prevents caspase activation induced by doxorubicin. Therefore, we identified genes modulated by adhesion of human precursor B leukemia cells that regulate proliferation and apoptosis, highlighting new pathways that might provide insights into future therapy aiming at targeting apoptosis of leukemia cells.

  18. Polymorphisms in the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene and cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weifeng; Wang, Yafeng; Chen, Yuanmei; Gu, Haiyong; Chen, Shuchen; Kang, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The correlation between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) common polymorphisms (rs5498 A>G and rs3093030 C>T) and cancer susceptibility has been explored in various ethnic groups and different cancer types; however, these investigations have yielded contradictory results. To address the relationship more precisely, we performed this meta-analysis. Design and methods: EmBase, PubMed and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched by two authors independently for eligible publications before April 8, 2015. Random-effects or fixed-effects model was harnessed to calculate the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) when appropriate. Results: The result suggested that the ICAM-1 rs5498 A>G polymorphism is not associated with cancer susceptibility in overall cancer. In a stratified analysis by ethnicity, a significant increased cancer risk was identified among Asians, but the inverse association was found among Caucasians. In a stratified analysis by cancer type, ICAM-1 rs5498 A>G polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of oral cancer, but with protection from colorectal cancer and melanoma. ICAM-1 rs3093030 C>T polymorphism is not correlated with cancer susceptibility. Conclusions: In summary, this meta-analysis highlights that the ICAM-1 rs5498 A>G polymorphism probably contributes to decreased susceptibility to cancer, especially in Caucasians, in melanoma and colorectal cancer subgroup, but it may be a risk factor for oral cancer and Asians. PMID:26550112

  19. Surface Polarity Of Beta-hmx Crystal And The Related Adhesive Forces With Estane Binder

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lu; Hanson, David E

    2008-01-01

    Here we present the results on the study of surface properties of {beta}-HMX crystal utilizing molecular simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces are investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles agree excellently with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain with and without nitroplasticizer from the three principal crystal surfaces were calculated using umbrella sampling technique. We find that the detaching free energy/force increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, our results also show that nitroplasticizer plays an important role in the adhesion forces between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  20. Influence of β2-Integrin Adhesion Molecule Expression and Pulmonary Infection with Pasteurella haemolytica on Cytokine Gene Expression in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haa-Yung; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Brogden, Kim A.; Gallup, Jack M.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2000-01-01

    β2-Integrins are leukocyte adhesion molecules composed of alpha (CD11a, -b, -c, or -d) and beta (CD18) subunit heterodimers. Genetic CD18 deficiency results in impaired neutrophil egress into tissues that varies between conducting airways and alveoli of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether CD18 deficiency in cattle affects proinflammatory cytokine (PIC) expression in pulmonary tissue after respiratory infection with Pasteurella haemolytica. Cattle were infected with P. haemolytica via fiberoptic deposition of organisms into the posterior part of the right cranial lung lobe. Animals were euthanized at 2 or 4 h postinoculation (p.i.), and tissues were collected to assess PIC gene expression using antisense RNA probes specific for bovine interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) along with the β-actin (β-Act) housekeeping gene. Expression of PIC was induced at 2 h p.i. in P. haemolytica-infected cattle and continued to 4 h p.i. At 2 h p.i., induction of gene expression and increase of cells that expressed PIC were observed both in CD18+ and CD18− cattle after inoculation of P. haemolytica. The induction of gene expression with P. haemolytica inoculation was more prominent in CD18− cattle than in CD18+ cattle by comparison to pyrogen-free saline (PFS)-inoculated control animals. At 4 h p.i., however, the induction of PIC, especially IL-1α, IL-6, and IFN-γ, in the lungs of CD18+ cattle inoculated with P. haemolytica was greater than that in lungs of the CD18− cattle. IFN-γ and TNF-α genes were not increased in P. haemolytica-inoculated CD18− cattle lungs compared to the PFS-inoculated control lungs at 4 h p.i. In PFS-inoculated lungs, we generally observed a higher percentage of cells and higher level of gene expression in the lungs of CD18− cattle than in the lungs of CD18+ cattle, especially at 4 h p.i. The rate of neutrophil infiltration into the lungs of CD18− cattle at

  1. Differential Expression of Adhesion-Related Proteins and MAPK Pathways Lead to Suitable Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; López-Díaz, Annia; Barrera, Lourdes; Camacho-Morales, Alberto; Hernandez-Aguilar, Felipe; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Calderón-Pérez, Jaime; García-Álvarez, Jorge; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Piña-Barba, Cristina; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Lara-Arias, Jorge; Rivera-Bolaños, Nancy; López-Camarillo, César; Moncada-Saucedo, Nidia; Galván-De los Santos, Alejandra; Meza-Urzúa, Fátima; Villarreal-Gómez, Luis; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth

    2015-11-01

    Cellular adhesion enables communication between cells and their environment. Adhesion can be achieved throughout focal adhesions and its components influence osteoblast differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Because cell adhesion and osteoblast differentiation are closely related, this article aimed to analyze the expression profiles of adhesion-related proteins during osteoblastic differentiation of two hMSCs subpopulations (CD105(+) and CD105(-)) and propose a strategy for assembling bone grafts based on its adhesion ability. In vitro experiments of osteogenic differentiation in CD105(-) cells showed superior adhesion efficiency and 2-fold increase of α-actinin expression compared with CD105(+) cells at the maturation stage. Interestingly, levels of activated β1-integrin increased in CD105(-) cells during the process. Additionally, the CD105(-) subpopulation showed 3-fold increase of phosphorylated FAK(Y397) compared to CD105(+) cells. Results also indicate that ERK1/2 was activated during CD105(-) bone differentiation and participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 in CD105(+) differentiation through a focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-independent pathway. In vivo trial demonstrated that grafts containing CD105(-) showed osteocytes embedded in a mineralized matrix, promoted adequate graft integration, increased host vascular infiltration, and efficient intramembranous repairing. In contrast, grafts containing CD105(+) showed deficient endochondral ossification and fibrocartilaginous tissue. Based on the expression of α-actinin, FAKy,(397) and ERK1/2 activation, we define maturation stage as critical for bone graft assembling. By in vitro assays, CD105(-) subpopulation showed superior adhesion efficiency compared to CD105(+) cells. Considering in vitro and in vivo assays, this study suggests that integration of a scaffold with CD105(-) subpopulation at the maturation stage represents an attractive strategy for clinical use in

  2. Gold nanoprobe-based method for sensing activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) gene expression, as a breast cancer biomarker.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Leila; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    In breast cancer, a proper biomarker for the assessment of metastasis and poor prognosis is the RNA of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) gene, which is expressed at high levels in breast tumor. We applied DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles as the target-specific probes, for detecting specific sequences of DNA or RNA. At high MgCL2 concentrations, nanoprobes aggregate in the absence of the complementary DNA sequence and alteration in the solution color is detectable by evaluating the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). But in the presence of complementary DNA, nanoprobes hybridize to the complementary sequence; therefore, no aggregation takes place, and no color change is observed. We designed a gold nanoprobe-based method that promptly detects the ALCAM gene expression in a low reaction volume with high sensitivity and specificity. This method is simple, fast, selective, and quantitative and can be done with small concentrations of the target (fmol/μL). Limit of detection of the method corresponded to 300 fmol/μL of synthetic ALCAM target.

  3. SNPs in the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 gene (NCAM1) may be associated with human neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Kristen L.; Boyles, Abee L.; Etchevers, Heather C.; Melvin, Elizabeth C.; Siegel, Deborah G.; Graham, Felicia L.; Slifer, Susan H.; Enterline, David S.; George, Timothy M.; Vekemans, Michel; McClay, David; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Kessler, John A.; Linney, Elwood; Gilbert, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects, occurring in approximately 1/1,000 births; both genetic and environmental factors are implicated. To date, no major genetic risk factors have been identified. Throughout development, cell adhesion molecules are strongly implicated in cell–cell interactions, and may play a role in the formation and closure of the neural tube. To evaluate the role of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) in risk of human NTDs, we screened for novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the gene. Eleven SNPs across NCAM1 were genotyped using TaqMan. We utilized a family-based approach to evaluate evidence for association and/or linkage disequilibrium. We evaluated American Caucasian simplex lumbosacral myelomeningocele families (n=132 families) using the family based association test (FBAT) and the pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT). Association analysis revealed a significant association between risk for NTDs and intronic SNP rs2298526 using both the FBAT test (P=0.0018) and the PDT (P=0.0025). Using the HBAT version of the FBAT to look for haplotype association, all pairwise comparisons with SNP rs2298526 were also significant. A replication study set, consisting of 72 additional families showed no significant association; however, the overall trend for overtransmission of the less common allele of SNP rs2298526 remained significant in the combined sample set. In addition, we analyzed the expression pattern of the NCAM1 protein in human embryos, and while NCAM1 is not expressed within the neural tube at the time of closure, it is expressed in the surrounding and later in differentiated neurons of the CNS. These results suggest variations in NCAM1 may influence risk for human NTDs. PMID:15883837

  4. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  5. A novel laminin β gene BmLanB1-w regulates wing-specific cell adhesion in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Chen, Jun; Hu, Hai; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important basement membrane (BM) components with crucial roles in development. The numbers of laminin isoforms in various organisms are determined by the composition of the different α, β, and γ chains, and their coding genes, which are variable across spieces. In insects, only two α, one β, and one γ chains have been identified thus far. Here, we isolated a novel laminin β gene, BmLanB1-w, by positional cloning of the mutant (crayfish, cf) with blistered wings in silkworm. Gene structure analysis showed that a 2 bp deletion of the BmLanB1-w gene in the cf mutant caused a frame-shift in the open reading frame (ORF) and generated a premature stop codon. Knockdown of the BmLanB1-w gene produced individuals exhibiting blistered wings, indicating that this laminin gene was required for cell adhesion during wing development. We also identified laminin homologs in different species and showed that two copies of β laminin likely originated in Lepidoptera during evolution. Furthermore, phylogenetic and gene expression analyses of silkworm laminin genes revealed that the BmLanB1-w gene is newly evolved, and is required for wing-specific cell adhesion. This is the first report showing the tissue specific distribution and functional differentiation of β laminin in insects. PMID:26212529

  6. A novel laminin β gene BmLanB1-w regulates wing-specific cell adhesion in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Chen, Jun; Hu, Hai; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2015-07-27

    Laminins are important basement membrane (BM) components with crucial roles in development. The numbers of laminin isoforms in various organisms are determined by the composition of the different α, β, and γ chains, and their coding genes, which are variable across spieces. In insects, only two α, one β, and one γ chains have been identified thus far. Here, we isolated a novel laminin β gene, BmLanB1-w, by positional cloning of the mutant (crayfish, cf) with blistered wings in silkworm. Gene structure analysis showed that a 2 bp deletion of the BmLanB1-w gene in the cf mutant caused a frame-shift in the open reading frame (ORF) and generated a premature stop codon. Knockdown of the BmLanB1-w gene produced individuals exhibiting blistered wings, indicating that this laminin gene was required for cell adhesion during wing development. We also identified laminin homologs in different species and showed that two copies of β laminin likely originated in Lepidoptera during evolution. Furthermore, phylogenetic and gene expression analyses of silkworm laminin genes revealed that the BmLanB1-w gene is newly evolved, and is required for wing-specific cell adhesion. This is the first report showing the tissue specific distribution and functional differentiation of β laminin in insects.

  7. Degeneration of neural cells in the central nervous system of mice deficient in the gene for the adhesion molecule on Glia, the beta 2 subunit of murine Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Magyar, J P; Bartsch, U; Wang, Z Q; Howells, N; Aguzzi, A; Wagner, E F; Schachner, M

    1994-11-01

    We generated mice, null mutant in the adhesion molecule on glia (AMOG), the beta 2 subunit of the murine Na,K-ATPase gene. These mice exhibit motor incoordination at 15 d of age, subsequently tremor and paralysis of extremities, and die at 17-18 d after birth. At these ages, the mutants have enlarged ventricles, degenerating photoreceptor cells, and swelling and degeneration of astrocytic endfeet, leading to vacuoles adjoining capillaries of brain stem, thalamus, striatum, and spinal cord. In tissue homogenates from entire brains of 16-17-d-old mutants, Na,K-ATPase activity and expression of the beta 1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase and of the neural adhesion molecules L1, N-CAM, and MAG appear normal. We suggest that the mutant phenotype can be related primarily to reduced pump activity, with neural degeneration as a possible consequence of osmotic imbalance.

  8. Discovery of immune-related genes expressed in hemocytes of the tarantula spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Daniel M; da Silva, Pedro I; Soares, Marcelo B; Arruda, Paulo; Setubal, João; Daffre, Sirlei

    2006-01-01

    The present study reports the identification of immune related transcripts from hemocytes of the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana by high throughput sequencing of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). To generate ESTs from hemocytes, two cDNA libraries were prepared: one by directional cloning (primary) and the other by the normalization of the first (normalized). A total of 7584 clones were sequenced and the identical ESTs were clustered, resulting in 3723 assembled sequences (AS). At least 20% of these sequences are putative novel genes. The automatic functional annotation of AS based on Gene Ontology revealed several abundant transcripts related to the following functional classes: hemocyanin, lectin, and structural constituents of ribosome and cytoskeleton. From this annotation, 73 transcripts possibly involved in immune response were also identified, suggesting the existence of several molecular processes not previously described for spiders, such as: pathogen recognition, coagulation, complement activation, cell adhesion and intracellular signaling pathway for the activation of cellular defenses.

  9. PCR arrays indicate that the expression of extracellular matrix and cell adhesion genes in human adipocytes is regulated by IL-1β (interleukin-1β).

    PubMed

    Kępczyńska, Malgorzata A; Zaibi, Mohamed S; Alomar, Suliman Y; Trayhurn, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The role of IL-1β in regulating the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell adhesion genes in human adipocytes has been examined. Adipocytes differentiated in culture were incubated with IL-1β for 4 or 24 h and RNA probed with PCR arrays for 84 ECM and cell adhesion genes. Treatment with IL-1β resulted in changes in the expression at one or both time points of ∼50% of the genes probed by the arrays, the majority being down-regulated. Genes whose expression was down-regulated by IL-1β included those encoding several collagen chains and integrin subunits. In contrast, IL-1β induced substantial increases (>10-fold) in the expression of ICAM1, VCAM1, MMP1 and MMP3; the secretion of the encoded proteins was also markedly stimulated. IL-1β has a pervasive effect on the expression of ECM and cell adhesion genes in human adipocytes, consistent with the derangement of tissue structure during inflammation in white fat.

  10. The multiple myeloma–associated MMSET gene contributes to cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth, and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Garay, Joseph P.; Gustin, John P.; Wang, Qiuju; Arceci, Robert J.; Matsui, William

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematologic malignancy characterized by recurrent chromosomal translocations. Patients with t(4;14)(p16;q32) are the worst prognostic subgroup in MM, although the basis for this poor prognosis is unknown. The t(4;14) is unusual in that it involves 2 potential target genes: fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and multiple myeloma SET domain (MMSET). MMSET is universally overexpressed in t(4;14) MM, whereas FGFR3 expression is lost in one-third of cases. Nonetheless, the role of MMSET in t(4;14) MM has remained unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for MMSET in t(4;14) MM cells. Down-regulation of MMSET expression in MM cell lines by RNA interference and by selective disruption of the translocated MMSET allele using gene targeting dramatically reduced colony formation in methylcellulose but had only modest effects in liquid culture. In addition, MMSET knockdown led to cell-cycle arrest of adherent MM cells and reduced the ability of MM cells to adhere to extracellular matrix. Finally, MMSET knockdown and knockout reduced tumor formation by MM xenografts. These results provide the first direct evidence that MMSET plays a significant role in t(4;14) MM and suggest that therapies targeting this gene could impact this particular subset of poor-prognosis patients. PMID:17942756

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeting alters gene expression and restores the adhesion function of cancerous cells as measured by single cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Shohreh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Omidvar, Ramin; Moradi, Lida; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Loss of cell-cell adhesion function is a common characteristic of many human epithelial carcinomas that is frequently due to loss of E-cadherin expression. In cancer progression, loss of E-cadherin is associated with invasion and metastasis potential, hence restoration of its function may contribute to the metastasis inhibition. This study examined effect of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/Her1) blockade on the E-cadherin expression, cellular adherence, and cell elasticity in two human epithelial cancer cell lines, MCF7 and A431. EGFR blocking agents as antibodies or small molecules target EGFR directly. Furthermore, due to intracellular signaling pathways they influence cell behavior and activities. The idea here is to investigate the effect of reduced activity of this signaling pathway using anti-EGFR Antibody (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Lapatinib) on cell-cell adhesion and cell mechanical properties. Real-Time PCR analysis demonstrated that treatment of cells with considered drugs increased the expression of E-cadherin gene among samples. The atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy technique was used to measure adhesive force of cancerous cells. Results indicated that inhibition of EGFR activity elevated cell-cell adhesion force, accompanied by stiffening of the cell bodies. In summary, Cetuximab and Lapatinib have been found to mediate cell-cell adhesion by restoration of E-cadherin expression and function. Our data suggest possible therapeutic potential for inhibition of metastasis via the blockade of EGFR signaling.

  12. Binding affinity and adhesion force of organophosphate hydrolase enzyme with soil particles related to the isoelectric point of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Yeasmin, Shabina; Islam, Md Saiful; Islam, Md Shariful

    2017-03-16

    The binding affinity of organophosphate hydrolase enzyme (OphB) with soil particles in relation to the isoelectric point (pI) was studied. Immobilization of OphB with soil particles was observed by confocal microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The calculated pI of OphB enzyme was increased from 8.69 to 8.89, 9.04 and 9.16 by the single, double and triple mutant of OphB enzyme, respectively through the replacement of negatively charged aspartate with positively charged histidine. Practically, the binding affinity was increased to 5.30%, 11.50%, and 16.80% for single, double and triple mutants, respectively. In contrast, enzyme activity of OphB did not change by the mutation of the enzyme. On the other hand, adhesion forces were gradually increased for wild type OphB enzyme (90 pN) to 96, 100 and 104 pN for single, double and triple mutants of OphB enzyme, respectively. There was an increasing trend of binding affinity and adhesion force by the increase of isoelectric point (pI) of OphB enzyme.

  13. Identification of cancer-related genes and motifs in the human gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Carson, Matthew B; Gu, Jianlei; Yu, Guangjun; Lu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    The authors investigated the regulatory network motifs and corresponding motif positions of cancer-related genes. First, they mapped disease-related genes to a transcription factor regulatory network. Next, they calculated statistically significant motifs and subsequently identified positions within these motifs that were enriched in cancer-related genes. Potential mechanisms of these motifs and positions are discussed. These results could be used to identify other disease- and cancer-related genes and could also suggest mechanisms for how these genes relate to co-occurring diseases.

  14. Increasing α7β1-integrin promotes muscle cell proliferation, adhesion, and resistance to apoptosis without changing gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianming; Burkin, Dean J.; Kaufman, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    The dystrophin-glycoprotein complex maintains the integrity of skeletal muscle by associating laminin in the extracellular matrix with the actin cytoskeleton. Several human muscular dystrophies arise from defects in the components of this complex. The α7β1-integrin also binds laminin and links the extracellular matrix with the cytoskeleton. Enhancement of α7-integrin levels alleviates pathology in mdx/utrn−/− mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and thus the integrin may functionally compensate for the absence of dystrophin. To test whether increasing α7-integrin levels affects transcription and cellular functions, we generated α7-integrin-inducible C2C12 cells and transgenic mice that overexpress the integrin in skeletal muscle. C2C12 myoblasts with elevated levels of integrin exhibited increased adhesion to laminin, faster proliferation when serum was limited, resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis, and normal differentiation. Transgenic expression of eightfold more integrin in skeletal muscle did not result in notable toxic effects in vivo. Moreover, high levels of α7-integrin in both myoblasts and in skeletal muscle did not disrupt global gene expression profiles. Thus increasing integrin levels can compensate for defects in the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton linkage caused by compromises in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex without triggering apparent overt negative side effects. These results support the use of integrin enhancement as a therapy for muscular dystrophy. PMID:18045857

  15. MITF is a critical regulator of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Nico; Löffek, Stefanie; Horn, Susanne; Ennen, Marie; Sánchez-Del-Campo, Luis; Zhao, Fang; Breitenbuecher, Frank; Davidson, Irwin; Singer, Bernhard B; Schadendorf, Dirk; Goding, Colin R; Helfrich, Iris

    2015-11-01

    The multifunctional Ig-like carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is neo-expressed in the majority of malignant melanoma lesions. CEACAM1 acts as a driver of tumor cell invasion, and its expression correlates with poor patient prognosis. Despite its importance in melanoma progression, how CEACAM1 expression is regulated is largely unknown. Here, we show that CEACAM1 expression in melanoma cell lines and melanoma tissue strongly correlates with that of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a key regulator of melanoma proliferation and invasiveness. MITF is revealed as a direct and positive regulator for CEACAM1 expression via binding to an M-box motif located in the CEACAM1 promoter. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of CEACAM1 expression and suggests an MITF-CEACAM1 axis as a potential determinant of melanoma progression.

  16. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D.; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori. In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA. Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity. PMID:26930708

  17. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity.

  18. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  19. Screening and identification of distant metastasis-related differentially expressed genes in human squamous cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zhou, Fachen; Xiong, Hai; Du, Sha; Ma, Jianwei; Okai, Issac; Wang, Jian; Suo, Jing; Hao, Lihong; Song, Yang; Hu, Jun; Shao, Shujuan

    2012-05-01

    Distant metastasis is one of the leading causes of lung cancer death. Detecting the early-stage molecular alternations in primary tumors, such as gene expression differences, provides a "prognostic" value to the precaution of tumor metastasis. The aim of this article is to screen and identify the metastasis-related genes in human squamous cell lung carcinoma. Primary tumor tissues of nine patients with subsequent metastasis and eight patients without metastasis were selected to perform the gene microarray experiment. GO and pathway analyses were used to determine the differentially expressed genes. Two identified genes were further validated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (real-time qRT-PCR). Two hundred and thirty-eight differentially expressed genes were detected in gene chip experiment, including 51 up-regulated genes and 187 down-regulated genes. These genes were involved in several cellular processes, including cell adhesion, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. GO analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes participated in a wide ranging of metastasis-related processes, including extracellular region and regulation of liquid surface tension. In addition, pathway analysis demonstrated that the differentially expressed genes were enriched in pathways related to cell cycle and Wnt signaling. Real-time qRT-PCR validation experiment of LCN2 and PDZK1IP1 showed a consistent up-regulation in the metastasis group. The metastasis of human squamous cell lung carcinoma is a complex process that is regulated by multiple gene alternations on the expression levels. The 238 differentially expressed genes identified in this study presumably contain a core set of genes involved in tumor metastasis. The real-time qRT-PCR results of PDZK1IP1 and LCN2 validated the reliability of this gene microarray experiment.

  20. Targeted disruption of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 promotes diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elaine; Dubois, Marie-Julie; Leung, Nelly; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Turbide, Claire; Avramoglu, Rita Kohen; DeMarte, Luisa; Elchebly, Mounib; Streichert, Thomas; Lévy, Emile; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2009-08-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CC1) is a cell adhesion molecule within the Ig superfamily. The Tyr-phosphorylated isoform of CC1 (CC1-L) plays an important metabolic role in the regulation of hepatic insulin clearance. In this report, we show that CC1-deficient (Cc1(-/-)) mice are prone to hepatic steatosis, as revealed by significantly elevated hepatic triglyceride and both total and esterified cholesterol levels compared with age-matched wild-type controls. Cc1(-/-) mice were also predisposed to lipid-induced hepatic steatosis and dysfunction as indicated by their greater susceptibility to store lipids and express elevated levels of enzymatic markers of liver damage after chronic feeding of a high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis in the Cc1(-/-) mice was linked to a significant increase in the expression of key lipogenic (fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase) and cholesterol synthetic (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase) enzymes under the control of sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c and -2 transcription factors. Cc1(-/-) mice also exhibited impaired insulin clearance, glucose intolerance, liver insulin resistance, and elevated hepatic expression of the key gluconeogenic transcriptional activators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 and Forkhead box O1. Lack of CC1 also exacerbated both glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat feeding, but insulin clearance was not further deteriorated in the high-fat-fed Cc1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, our data indicate that CC1 is a key regulator of hepatic lipogenesis and that Cc1(-/-) mice are predisposed to liver steatosis, leading to hepatic insulin resistance and liver damage, particularly when chronically exposed to dietary fat.

  1. Emerging Role and Targeting of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 6 (CEACAM6) in Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Benny; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a member of the CEA family of cell adhesion proteins that belong to the immunoglobulin superfamily. CEACAM6 is normally expressed on the surface of myeloid (CD66c) and epithelial surfaces. Stiochiomertic expression of members of the CEA family (CEACAM1, 5, 6, 7) on epithelia maintains normal tissue architecture through homo-and hetero-philic interactions. Dysregulated over-expression of CEACAM6 is oncogenic, is associated with anoikis resistance and an invasive phenotype mediated by excessive TGFβ, AKT, FAK and SRC signaling in human malignancies. Methods: Extensive literature review through PubMed was conducted to identify relevant preclinical and clinical research publications regarding CEACAM6 over the last decade and was summarized in this manuscript. Results: CEACAM5 and 6 are over-expressed in nearly 70% of epithelial malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), hepatobiliary, gastric, breast, non-small cell lung and head/neck cancers. Importantly, CEACAM6 is a poor prognostic marker in CRC, while its expression correlates with tumor stage, metastasis and post-operative survival in PDA. CEACAM6 appears to be an immune checkpoint suppressor in hematologic malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Several therapeutic monoclonal antibodies or antibody fragments targeting CEACAM6 have been designed and developed as a targeted therapy for human malignancies. A Llama antibody targeting CEACAM6 is being evaluated in early phase clinical trials. Conclusion: This review focuses on the role of CEACAM6 in the pathogenesis and signaling of the malignant phenotype in solid and hematologic malignancies and highlights its potential as a therapeutic target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27595061

  2. A relatively small change in sodium chloride concentration has a strong effect on adhesion of ocular bacteria to contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Cowell, B A; Willcox, M D; Schneider, R P

    1998-06-01

    Adhesion of bacteria to hydrogel lenses is thought to be an initial step of ocular colonization allowing evasion of normal host defences. The salt concentration of media is an important parameter controlling microbial adhesion. Salinity varies from 0.97% NaCl equivalents in the open eye to 0.89% in the closed eye state. In this study, the effect of sodium chloride in the concentration range of 0.8-1.0% (w/v) NaCl on adhesion of ocular bacteria to soft contact lenses was investigated using a static adhesion assay. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to adhere to lenses in significantly greater amounts than Serratia marcescens, Flavobacterium meningosepticum, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Staphylococcus intermedius. Increasing NaCl from 0.8% to 1.0% (w/v) increased adhesion of all bacteria tested. This adhesion was strong since the organisms could not be removed by washing in low ionic buffer. Adhesion of these organisms did not correlate with their cell surface properties as determined by bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) and retention on sepharose columns.

  3. Cell cycle- and cancer-associated gene networks activated by Dsg2: evidence of cystatin A deregulation and a potential role in cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhilasha; Nitoiu, Daniela; Brennan-Crispi, Donna; Addya, Sankar; Riobo, Natalia A; Kelsell, David P; Mahoney, Mỹ G

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is paramount in providing and maintaining multicellular structure and signal transmission between cells. In the skin, disruption to desmosomal regulated intercellular connectivity may lead to disorders of keratinization and hyperproliferative disease including cancer. Recently we showed transgenic mice overexpressing desmoglein 2 (Dsg2) in the epidermis develop hyperplasia. Following microarray and gene network analysis, we demonstrate that Dsg2 caused a profound change in the transcriptome of keratinocytes in vivo and altered a number of genes important in epithelial dysplasia including: calcium-binding proteins (S100A8 and S100A9), members of the cyclin protein family, and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA). CSTA is deregulated in several skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and loss of function mutations lead to recessive skin fragility disorders. The microarray results were confirmed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. CSTA was detected at high level throughout the newborn mouse epidermis but dramatically decreased with development and was detected predominantly in the differentiated layers. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of Dsg2 by siRNA or shRNA reduced CSTA expression. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of CSTA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of Dsg2, perturbed cytokeratin 14 staining and reduced levels of desmoplakin in response to mechanical stretching. Both knockdown of either Dsg2 or CSTA induced loss of cell adhesion in a dispase-based assay and the effect was synergistic. Our findings here offer a novel pathway of CSTA regulation involving Dsg2 and a potential crosstalk between Dsg2 and CSTA that modulates cell adhesion. These results further support the recent human genetic findings that loss of function mutations in the CSTA gene result in skin fragility due to impaired cell-cell adhesion: autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis or acral peeling skin syndrome.

  4. Cell Cycle- and Cancer-Associated Gene Networks Activated by Dsg2: Evidence of Cystatin A Deregulation and a Potential Role in Cell-Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Abhilasha; Nitoiu, Daniela; Brennan-Crispi, Donna; Addya, Sankar; Riobo, Natalia A.; Kelsell, David P.; Mahoney, Mỹ G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is paramount in providing and maintaining multicellular structure and signal transmission between cells. In the skin, disruption to desmosomal regulated intercellular connectivity may lead to disorders of keratinization and hyperproliferative disease including cancer. Recently we showed transgenic mice overexpressing desmoglein 2 (Dsg2) in the epidermis develop hyperplasia. Following microarray and gene network analysis, we demonstrate that Dsg2 caused a profound change in the transcriptome of keratinocytes in vivo and altered a number of genes important in epithelial dysplasia including: calcium-binding proteins (S100A8 and S100A9), members of the cyclin protein family, and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA). CSTA is deregulated in several skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and loss of function mutations lead to recessive skin fragility disorders. The microarray results were confirmed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. CSTA was detected at high level throughout the newborn mouse epidermis but dramatically decreased with development and was detected predominantly in the differentiated layers. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of Dsg2 by siRNA or shRNA reduced CSTA expression. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of CSTA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of Dsg2, perturbed cytokeratin 14 staining and reduced levels of desmoplakin in response to mechanical stretching. Both knockdown of either Dsg2 or CSTA induced loss of cell adhesion in a dispase-based assay and the effect was synergistic. Our findings here offer a novel pathway of CSTA regulation involving Dsg2 and a potential crosstalk between Dsg2 and CSTA that modulates cell adhesion. These results further support the recent human genetic findings that loss of function mutations in the CSTA gene result in skin fragility due to impaired cell-cell adhesion: autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis or acral peeling skin syndrome. PMID:25785582

  5. Endometrial Expression of Homeobox Genes and Cell Adhesion Molecules in Infertile Women With Intramural Fibroids During Window of Implantation.

    PubMed

    Makker, Annu; Goel, Madhu Mati; Nigam, Dipti; Bhatia, Vikram; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Das, Vinita; Pandey, Amita

    2017-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the expression and cellular distribution of homeobox ( HOX) genes ( HOXA10 and HOXA11) and cell adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and β-catenin) during the window of implantation in infertile women with noncavity-distorting intramural (IM) fibroids (n = 18) and in fertile controls (n = 12). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and protein expression, respectively. When compared to fertile controls, reduced HOXA10 and HOXA11 transcript and protein levels were observed in infertile women. However, changes only in the expression of HOXA10 mRNA (-1.72-fold; P = .03) and stromal protein ( P = .001) were statistically significant. Significantly lower E-cadherin mRNA (-10.97-fold; P = .02) and protein levels were seen in infertile patients. E-cadherin immunostaining was significantly reduced both in the luminal ( P = .048) and in the glandular ( P = .014) epithelium of endometrium from infertile patients when compared to controls. No significant change was observed either in the mRNA levels or in the immunoexpression of N-cadherin and β-catenin. However, a trend toward lower N-cadherin expression in the luminal epithelium ( P = .054) and decreased β-catenin expression in the glandular epithelium ( P = .070) was observed in infertile patients. The present findings suggest that altered endometrial HOXA10 and E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression observed in infertile women with IM fibroids during the mid-secretory phase might impair endometrial receptivity leading to infertility in these patients.

  6. Murine MicroRNA-214 regulates intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM1) gene expression in genital Chlamydia muridarum infection

    PubMed Central

    Arkatkar, Tanvi; Gupta, Rishein; Li, Weidang; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Wali, Shradha; Neal Guentzel, M; Chambers, James P; Christenson, Lane K; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of chlamydial infection is the development of upper genital pathology in the form of hydrosalpinx and oviduct and/or tubal dilatation. Although molecular events leading to genital tissue presentation and cellular architectural remodelling are unclear, early-stage host immune responses are believed to contribute to these long-term sequelae. Recently, we reported the contribution of selected infection-associated microRNAs (miRs) in the generation of host immunity at early-stage infection (day 6 after intravaginal Chlamydia muridarum challenge in C57BL/6 mice). In this report, we describe the contribution of an infection-associated microRNA, i.e. miR-214, to host immunity. Chlamydia muridarum infection in the C57BL/6 mouse genital tract significantly down-regulated miR-214 while up-regulating intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) gene expression. These in vivo observations were confirmed by establishing direct regulation of ICAM-1 by miR-214 in ex vivo genital cell cultures in the presence of miR-214 mimic and inhibitor. Because, ICAM-1 contributes to recruitment of neutrophils following infection, we also demonstrated that alteration of ICAM1 by miR-214 in interleukin-17A-deficient (IL-17A−/−) mice correlated with reduction of neutrophils infiltrating genital tissue at day 6 after challenge. Additionally, these early-stage events resulted in significantly decreased genital pathology in IL-17A−/− mice compared with C57BL/6 mice. This report provides evidence for early-stage regulation of ICAM1 by microRNAs, resulting in reduction of genital pathology associated with chlamydial infection. PMID:25865776

  7. In vitro adhesiveness and biotype of Gardnerella vaginalis strains in relation to the occurrence of clue cells in vaginal discharges.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, T G; Smyth, C J; Keane, C T

    1987-01-01

    Haemagglutination and tissue culture adherence tests using a McCoy cell line were used to examine the adherence characteristics of 105 strains of Gardnerella vaginalis. Each strain represented one isolate per patient. For each patient, a direct smear of vaginal discharge was examined for clue cells. The relation between in vitro adherence and the presence of clue cells was examined. There seemed to be no appreciable relation between the presence of clue cells in smears and the haemagglutinating activity of strains. In contrast, adherence as judged by the McCoy tissue culture system showed a significant relation to the presence of clue cells (p less than 0.001). Though both adhesive characteristics were not inhibited by mannose, the mechanism of haemagglutination of human red cells appeared to differ from that of adherence of tissue culture cells. The findings imply that the clue cell phenomenon is due to attachment of adherent strains of G vaginalis to epithelial cells. Adherent strains of G vaginalis may play a part in the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis. Images PMID:3493202

  8. Fruit growth-related genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Lamia; Deluche, Cynthia; Gévaudant, Frédéric; Frangne, Nathalie; Delmas, Frédéric; Hernould, Michel; Chevalier, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) represents a model species for all fleshy fruits due to its biological cycle and the availability of numerous genetic and molecular resources. Its importance in human nutrition has made it one of the most valuable worldwide commodities. Tomato fruit size results from the combination of cell number and cell size, which are determined by both cell division and expansion. As fruit growth is mainly driven by cell expansion, cells from the (fleshy) pericarp tissue become highly polyploid according to the endoreduplication process, reaching a DNA content rarely encountered in other plant species (between 2C and 512C). Both cell division and cell expansion are under the control of complex interactions between hormone signalling and carbon partitioning, which establish crucial determinants of the quality of ripe fruit, such as the final size, weight, and shape, and organoleptic and nutritional traits. This review describes the genes known to contribute to fruit growth in tomato.

  9. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-10-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 h following acute CPF exposure in 7-day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (registered) . Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276 to 905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NF{Kappa}B, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  10. Structure and linkage of the D2 dopamine receptor and neural cell adhesion molecule genes on human chromosome 11q23

    SciTech Connect

    Eubanks, J.H.; Djabali, M.; Selleri, L.; McElligott, D.L.; Evans, G.A. ); Grandy, D.K.; Civelli, O. )

    1992-12-01

    The gene encoding the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) is located on human chromosome 11q23 and has been circumstantially associated with a number of human disorders including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and susceptibility to alcoholism. To determine the physical structure of the DRD2 gene, the authors utilized cosmid cloning, isolation of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to construct a long-range physical map of human chromosome 11q23 linking the genes for the DRD2 and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). The D2 dopamine receptor gene extends over 270 kb and includes an intron of approximately 250 kb separating the putative first exon from the exons encoding the receptor protein. The resulting physical map spans more than 1.5 mb of chromosome band 11q23 and links the DRD2 gene with the gene encoding the NCAM located 150 kb 3[prime] of the DRD2 gene and transcribed from the same DNA strand. They additionally located the sites of at least four hypomethylated HTF islands within the physical map, which potentially indicate the sites of additional genes. High-resolution fluorescent in situ suppression hybridization using cosmid and YAC clones localized this gene cluster between the ApoAI and STMY loci at the interface of bands 11q22.3 and 11q23.1. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Short communication: Conservation of Streptococcus uberis adhesion molecule and the sua gene in strains of Streptococcus uberis isolated from geographically diverse areas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Dego, Oudessa Kerro; Chen, Xueyan; Abadin, Eurife; Chan, Shangfeng; Jory, Lauren; Kovacevic, Steven; Almeida, Raul A; Oliver, Stephen P

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to identify and sequence the sua gene (GenBank no. DQ232760; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) and detect Streptococcus uberis adhesion molecule (SUAM) expression by Western blot using serum from naturally S. uberis-infected cows in strains of S. uberis isolated in milk from cows with mastitis from geographically diverse areas of the world. All strains evaluated yielded a 4.4-kb sua-containing PCR fragment that was subsequently sequenced. Deduced SUAM AA sequences from those S. uberis strains evaluated shared >97% identity. The pepSUAM sequence located at the N terminus of SUAM was >99% identical among strains of S. uberis. Streptococcus uberis adhesion molecule expression was detected in all strains of S. uberis tested. These results suggest that sua is ubiquitous among strains of S. uberis isolated from diverse geographic locations and that SUAM is immunogenic.

  12. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  13. The relative roles of collagen adhesive receptor DDR2 activation and matrix stiffness on the downregulation of focal adhesion kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Chung, Koo-Hyun; Spurlin, Tighe A; Haynes, Ross J; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2009-12-01

    Cells within tissues derive mechanical anchorage and specific molecular signals from the insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds them. Understanding the role of different cues that extracellular matrices provide cells is critical for controlling and predicting cell response to scaffolding materials. Using an engineered extracellular matrix of Type I collagen we examined how the stiffness, supramolecular structure, and glycosylation of collagen matrices influence the protein levels of cellular FAK and the activation of myosin II. Our results show that (1) cellular FAK is downregulated on collagen fibrils, but not on a non-fibrillar monolayer of collagen, (2) the downregulation of FAK is independent of the stiffness of the collagen fibrils, and (3) FAK levels are correlated with levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the collagen adhesion receptor DDR2. Further, siRNA depletion of DDR2 blocks FAK downregulation. Our results suggest that the collagen receptor DDR2 is involved in the regulation of FAK levels in vSMC adhered to Type I collagen matrices, and that regulation of FAK levels in these cells appears to be independent of matrix stiffness.

  14. Bending amplitude - a new quantitative assay of C. elegans locomotion: identification of phenotypes for mutants in genes encoding muscle focal adhesion components.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, John F; Qadota, Hiroshi; Stirman, Jeffrey N; Lu, Hang; Benian, Guy M

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans uses striated muscle in its body wall for locomotion. The myofilament lattice is organized such that all the thin filament attachment structures (dense bodies, analogous to Z-disks) and thick filament organizing centers (M-lines) are attached to the muscle cell membrane. Thus, the force of muscle contraction is transmitted through these structures and allows locomotion of the worm. Dense bodies and M-lines are compositionally similar to focal adhesions and costameres, and are based on integrin and associated proteins. Null mutants for many of the newly discovered dense body and M-line proteins do not have obvious locomotion defects when observed casually, or when assayed by counting the number of times a worm moves back and forth in liquid. We hypothesized that many of these proteins, located as they are in muscle focal adhesions, function in force transmission, but we had not used an appropriate or sufficiently sensitive assay to reveal this function. Recently, we have developed a new quantitative assay of C. elegans locomotion that measures the maximum bending amplitude of an adult worm as it moves backwards. The assay had been used to reveal locomotion defects for null mutants of genes encoding ATN-1 (α-actinin) and PKN-1 (protein kinase N). Here, we describe the details of this method, and apply it to 21 loss of function mutants in 17 additional genes, most of which encode components of muscle attachment structures. As compared to wild type, mutants in 11 genes were found to have less ability to bend, and mutants in one gene were found to have greater ability to bend. Loss of function mutants for eight proteins had been reported to have normal locomotion (ZYX-1 (zyxin), ALP-1 (Enigma), DIM-1, SCPL-1), or locomotion that was not previously investigated (FRG-1 (FRG1), KIN-32 (focal adhesion kinase), LIM-8), or had only slightly decreased locomotion (PFN-3 (profilin)).

  15. Identification of Development and Pathogenicity Related Gene in Botrytis cinerea via Digital Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Si, He Long; Sun, Zhi Ying; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Zhan; Zhang, Jin lin; Xing, Ji Hong; Dong, Jin Gao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Botrytis cinerea, a haploid Euascomycete fungus that infects numerous crops, has been used as a model system for studying molecular phytopathology. Botrytis cinerea adopts various modes of infection, which are mediated by a number of pathogenicity and virulence-related genes. Many of these genes have not been reported previously. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate development and pathogenicity-related genes between a novel nonpathogenic mutant and the Wild Type (WT) in B. cinerea. Materials and Methods: Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling can reveal novel genes that may be involved in development and pathogenicity of plant pathogen. A large volume of B. cinerea tag-seq was generated to identify differential expressed genes by the Illumina DGE tag profiling technology. Results: A total of 4,182,944 and 4,182,021 clean tags were obtained from the WT and a nonpathogenic mutant stain (BCt89), respectively, and 10,410 differentially expressed genes were identified. In addition, 84 genes were expressed in the WT only while 34 genes were expressed in the mutant only. A total of 664 differentially expressed genes were involved in 91 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathways, including signaling and metabolic pathways. Conclusions: Expression levels of 1,426 genes were significantly up-regulated in the mutant compared to WT. Furthermore, 301 genes were down-regulated with False Discovery Rates (FDR) of < 0.001 and absolute value of log2 Ratio of ≥ 1. PMID:26034553

  16. Cloning of SEZ-12 encoding seizure-related and membrane-bound adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Nagasawa, H; Shimizu-Nishikawa, K; Ookura, T; Kimura, M; Sugaya, E

    1996-05-06

    SEZ-12 is one of the seizure-related cDNAs which was isolated by differential hybridization from primary cultured neurons from the mouse cerebral cortex with or without pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). SEZ-12 expression is transiently down-regulated in the mouse brain by injection of PTZ. To characterize SEZ-12, isolation of full-length cDNA and nucleotide sequence analysis were performed. The deduced amino acid sequence of SEZ-12 revealed that it encodes membrane-bound C-type lectin and has a significant homology to that of human cDNA, DGCR2 and IDD, which were cloned from a balanced translocation breakpoint associated with the DiGeorge syndrome. The isolated cDNA was about 4 kb in length and the message was expressed ubiquitously in various organs with low-abundance. Previously, we also cloned a transmembrane protein which is probably involved in cell-cell interaction by the differential hybridization technique. These findings suggest that transmembrane signaling in neuronal cells may have an important role in PTZ-induced seizure.

  17. Neutrophil-platelet adhesion: relative roles of platelet P-selectin and neutrophil beta2 (DC18) integrins.

    PubMed

    Brown, K K; Henson, P M; Maclouf, J; Moyle, M; Ely, J A; Worthen, G S

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophils and platelets interact both physically and metabolically during inflammation and thrombosis, but the mechanisms responsible for their adhesion remain incompletely understood. Neutrophil-platelet adhesion was measured after specific stimulation of neutrophils, platelets, or both and quantified by flow cytometry. Specific stimulation of either the neutrophil or the platelet led to a marked increase in the percentage of neutrophils that bound platelets, although platelet stimulation led to a large increase and neutrophil stimulation to only a small increase in the number of platelets per neutrophil. Stimulation of both cells further increased the number of neutrophil-platelet adhesive events and led to large numbers of platelets binding to each neutrophil. Confirming previous observations, blocking antibodies to platelet P-selectin (CD62P) partially inhibited adhesion. However, blockade of the neutrophil beta2 integrin CD11b/CD18 also inhibited the percentage of neutrophils that bound platelets. Combining P-selectin and CD11b/18 blockade further inhibited the stimulated increase in the percentage of neutrophils binding platelets and the increased number of platelets per neutrophil. Both cell adhesion molecules were active even when only a single cell type was primarily activated, supporting physiologically important transcellular activation. These data suggest that: (1) neutrophil-platelet adhesion can be initiated by specific activation of either the neutrophil or the platelet and that specific activation of either cell type leads to distinct patterns of adhesion, and (2) neutrophil-platelet adhesion uses both platelet P-selectin and the neutrophil beta2 integrin CD11b/CD18 when the cells are primarily or secondarily activated.

  18. Cell Migration in the Immune System: the Evolving Inter-Related Roles of Adhesion Molecules and Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Graesser, Donnasue

    2000-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation into perivascular tissue during inflammation and lymphocyte homing to lymphoid organs involve transient adhesion to the vessel endothelium, followed by transmigration through the endothelial cell (EC) layer and establishment of residency at the tissue site for a period of time. In these processes, leukocytes undergo multiple attachments to, and detachments from, the vessel-lining endothelial cells, prior to transendothelial cell migration. Transmigrating leukocytes must traverse a subendothelial basement membrane en route to perivascular tissues and utilize enzymes known as matrix metalloproteinases to make selective clips in the extracellular matrix components of the basement membrane. This review will focus on the evidence for a link between adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, the induction of matrix metalloproteinases mediated by engagement of adhesion receptors on leukocytes, and the ability to utilize these matrix metalloproteinases to facilitate leukocyte invasion of tissues. Leukocytes with invasive phenotypes express high levels of MMPs, and expression of MMPs enhances the migratory and invasive properties of these cells. Furthermore, MMPs may be used by lymphocytes to proteolytically cleave molecules such as adhesion receptors and membrane bound cytokines, increasing their efficiency in the immune response. Engagement of leukocyte adhesion receptors may modulate adhesive (modulation of integrin affinities and expression), synthetic (proteinase induction and activation), and surface organization (clustering of proteolyric complexes) behaviors of invasive leukocytes. Elucidation of these pathways will lead to better understanding of controlling mechanisms in order to develop rational therapeutic approaches in the areas of inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:11097205

  19. Inhibitive Effects of Mulberry Leaf-Related Extracts on Cell Adhesion and Inflammatory Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, P.-Y.; Lin, K.-H.; Chiu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-Y.; Huang, M.-Y.; Yang, C.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of mulberry leaf-related extracts (MLREs) on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes and on inflammatory signaling pathways in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were studied. The tested MLREs were rich in flavonols, especially bombyx faces tea (BT) in quercetin and kaempferol. Polyphenols, flavonoids, and anthocyanidin also abounded in BT. The best trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was generated from the acidic methanolic extracts of BT. Acidic methanolic and water extracts of mulberry leaf tea (MT), mulberry leaf (M), and BT significantly inhibited DNA oxidative damage to lymphocytes based on the comet assay as compared to the H2O2-treated group. TNF-α-induced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion was significantly suppressed by MLREs. Additionally, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression was significantly reduced by BT and MT. Significant reductions were also observed in both NF-κB and activator protein (AP)-1 DNA binding by MLREs. Significant increases in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ DNA binding by MLREs were also detected in M and MT extracts, but no evidence for PPAR α DNA binding in 50 μg/mL MT extract was found. Apparently, MLREs can provide distinct cytoprotective mechanisms that may contribute to its putative beneficial effects on suppressing endothelial responses to cytokines during inflammation. PMID:24371453

  20. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0568 Aggressiveness 5c. PROGRAM...examine whether altered vitamin D status (as measured by serum metabolites and by functional polymorphisms within genes related to vitamin D...potential to provide insights into a chronically underserved population carrying an unequal burden of disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D, prostate

  1. In Silico Analysis of Usher Encoding Genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Characterization of Their Role in Adhesion and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Fida; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Dufayard, Jean François; Brisse, Sylvain; Forestier, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone/usher (CU) assembly pathway is used by a wide range of Enterobacteriaceae to assemble adhesive surface structures called pili or fimbriae that play a role in bacteria-host cell interactions. In silico analysis revealed that the genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae LM21 harbors eight chromosomal CU loci belonging to γκп and ϭ clusters. Of these, only two correspond to previously described operons, namely type 1 and type 3-encoding operons. Isogenic usher deletion mutants of K. pneumoniae LM21 were constructed for each locus and their role in adhesion to animal (Intestine 407) and plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, biofilm formation and murine intestinal colonization was investigated. Type 3 pili usher deleted mutant was impaired in all assays, whereas type 1 pili usher deleted mutant only showed attenuation in adhesion to plant cells and in intestinal colonization. The LM21ΔkpjC mutant was impaired in its capacity to adhere to Arabidopsis cells and to colonize the murine intestine, either alone or in co-inoculation experiments. Deletion of LM21kpgC induced a significant decrease in biofilm formation, in adhesion to animal cells and in colonization of the mice intestine. The LM21∆kpaC and LM21∆kpeC mutants were only attenuated in biofilm formation and the adhesion abilities to Arabidopsis cells, respectively. No clear in vitro or in vivo effect was observed for LM21∆kpbC and LM21∆kpdC mutants. The multiplicity of CU loci in K. pneumoniae genome and their specific adhesion pattern probably reflect the ability of the bacteria to adhere to different substrates in its diverse ecological niches. PMID:25751658

  2. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  3. High-throughput comparison of gene fitness among related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The contribution of a gene to the fitness of a bacterium can be assayed by whether and to what degree the bacterium tolerates transposon insertions in that gene. We use this fact to compare the fitness of syntenic homologous genes among related Salmonella strains and thereby reveal differences not apparent at the gene sequence level. Results A transposon Tn5 derivative was used to construct mutants in Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC14028 (STM1) and Salmonella Typhi Ty2 (STY1), which were then grown in rich media. The locations of 234,152 and 53,556 integration sites, respectively, were mapped by sequencing. These data were compared to similar data available for a different Ty2 isolate (STY2) and essential genes identified in E. coli K-12 (ECO). Of 277 genes considered essential in ECO, all had syntenic homologs in STM1, STY1, and STY2, and all but nine genes were either devoid of transposon insertions or had very few. For three of these nine genes, part of the annotated gene lacked transposon integrations (yejM, ftsN and murB). At least one of the other six genes, trpS, had a potentially functionally redundant gene encoded elsewhere in Salmonella but not in ECO. An additional 165 genes were almost entirely devoid of transposon integrations in all three Salmonella strains examined, including many genes associated with protein and DNA synthesis. Four of these genes (STM14_1498, STM14_2872, STM14_3360, and STM14_5442) are not found in E. coli. Notable differences in the extent of gene selection were also observed among the three different Salmonella isolates. Mutations in hns, for example, were selected against in STM1 but not in the two STY strains, which have a defect in rpoS rendering hns nonessential. Conclusions Comparisons among transposon integration profiles from different members of a species and among related species, all grown in similar conditions, identify differences in gene contributions to fitness among syntenic homologs. Further differences in

  4. Short Term Exposure of Beta Cells to Low Concentrations of Interleukin-1β Improves Insulin Secretion through Focal Adhesion and Actin Remodeling and Regulation of Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Arous, Caroline; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Halban, Philippe A.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes involves defective insulin secretion with islet inflammation governed in part by IL-1β. Prolonged exposure of islets to high concentrations of IL-1β (>24 h, 20 ng/ml) impairs beta cell function and survival. Conversely, exposure to lower concentrations of IL-1β for >24 h improves these same parameters. The impact on insulin secretion of shorter exposure times to IL-1β and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and were the focus of this study. Treatment of rat primary beta cells, as well as rat or human whole islets, with 0.1 ng/ml IL-1β for 2 h increased glucose-stimulated (but not basal) insulin secretion, whereas 20 ng/ml was without effect. Similar differential effects of IL-1β depending on concentration were observed after 15 min of KCl stimulation but were prevented by diazoxide. Studies on sorted rat beta cells indicated that the enhancement of stimulated secretion by 0.1 ng/ml IL-1β was mediated by the NF-κB pathway and c-JUN/JNK pathway acting in parallel to elicit focal adhesion remodeling and the phosphorylation of paxillin independently of upstream regulation by focal adhesion kinase. Because the beneficial effect of IL-1β was dependent in part upon transcription, gene expression was analyzed by RNAseq. There were 18 genes regulated uniquely by 0.1 but not 20 ng/ml IL-1β, which are mostly involved in transcription and apoptosis. These results indicate that 2 h of exposure of beta cells to a low but not a high concentration of IL-1β enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through focal adhesion and actin remodeling, as well as modulation of gene expression. PMID:25586177

  5. Rare Copy Number Variants Disrupt Genes Regulating Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Adhesion and Contractility in Sporadic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth K.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Russell, Ludivine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Golabbakhsh, Hossein; Johnson, Ralph J.; Safi, Hazim J.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Bray, Molly S.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Belmont, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) cause significant morbidity and mortality, but the genetic origins of TAAD remain largely unknown. In a genome-wide analysis of 418 sporadic TAAD cases, we identified 47 copy number variant (CNV) regions that were enriched in or unique to TAAD patients compared to population controls. Gene ontology, expression profiling, and network analysis showed that genes within TAAD CNVs regulate smooth muscle cell adhesion or contractility and interact with the smooth muscle-specific isoforms of α-actin and β-myosin, which are known to cause familial TAAD when altered. Enrichment of these gene functions in rare CNVs was replicated in independent cohorts with sporadic TAAD (STAAD, n = 387) and inherited TAAD (FTAAD, n = 88). The overall prevalence of rare CNVs (23%) was significantly increased in FTAAD compared with STAAD patients (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.03). Our findings suggest that rare CNVs disrupting smooth muscle adhesion or contraction contribute to both sporadic and familial disease. PMID:21092924

  6. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  7. Identification of feature genes for smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma based on gene expression profile data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ni, Ran; Zhang, Hui; Miao, Lijun; Wang, Jing; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes and pathways associated with smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. Three lung adenocarcinoma associated datasets (GSE43458, GSE10072, and GSE50081), the subjects of which included smokers and nonsmokers, were downloaded to screen the differentially expressed feature genes between smokers and nonsmokers. Based on the identified feature genes, we constructed the protein–protein interaction (PPI) network and optimized feature genes using closeness centrality (CC) algorithm. Then, the support vector machine (SVM) classification model was constructed based on the feature genes with higher CC values. Finally, pathway enrichment analysis of the feature genes was performed. A total of 213 down-regulated and 83 up-regulated differentially expressed genes were identified. In the constructed PPI network, the top ten nodes with higher degrees and CC values included ANK3, EPHA4, FGFR2, etc. The SVM classifier was constructed with 27 feature genes, which could accurately identify smokers and nonsmokers. Pathways enrichment analysis for the 27 feature genes revealed that they were significantly enriched in five pathways, including proteoglycans in cancer (EGFR, SDC4, SDC2, etc.), and Ras signaling pathway (FGFR2, PLA2G1B, EGFR, etc.). The 27 feature genes, such as EPHA4, FGFR2, and EGFR for SVM classifier construction and cancer-related pathways of Ras signaling pathway and proteoglycans in cancer may play key roles in the progression and development of smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27994470

  8. Targeted Gene Deletion Demonstrates that Cell Adhesion MoleculeICAM-4 is Critical for Erythroblastic Island Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Lo, Annie; Short, Sarah A.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Spring, Frances; Parsons, Stephen F.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2006-02-15

    Erythroid progenitors differentiate in erythroblastic islands, bone marrow niches composed of erythroblasts surrounding a central macrophage. Evidence suggests that within islands adhesive interactions regulate erythropoiesis and apoptosis. We are exploring whether erythroid intercellular adhesion molecule-4 (ICAM-4), animmunoglobulin superfamily member, participates in island formation. Earlier, we identified alpha V integrins as ICAM-4 counter receptors. Since macrophages express alpha V, ICAM-4 potentially mediates island attachments. To test this, we generated ICAM-4 knockout mice and developed quantitative, live cell techniques for harvesting intact islands and for reforming islands in vitro. We observed a 47 percent decrease in islands reconstituted from ICAM-4 null marrow compared to wild type. We also found a striking decrease in islands formed in vivo in knockout mice. Further, peptides that block ICAM-4 alpha V adhesion produced a 53-57 percent decrease in reconstituted islands, strongly suggesting that ICAM-4 binding to macrophage alpha V functions in island integrity. Importantly, we documented that alpha V integrin is expressed in macrophages isolated from erythro blastic islands. Collectively, these data provide convincing evidence that ICAM-4 is critical in erythroblastic island formation via ICAM-4/alpha V adhesion and also demonstrate that the novel experimental strategies we developed will be valuable in exploring molecular mechanisms of erythroblastic island formation and their functional role in regulating erythropoiesis.

  9. Transcription of functionally related constitutive genes is not coordinated.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Saumil J; Zenklusen, Daniel; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Expression of an individual gene can vary considerably among genetically identical cells because of stochastic fluctuations in transcription. However, proteins comprising essential complexes or pathways have similar abundances and lower variability. It is not known whether coordination in the expression of subunits of essential complexes occurs at the level of transcription, mRNA abundance or protein expression. To directly measure the level of coordination in the expression of genes, we used highly sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to count individual mRNAs of functionally related and unrelated genes within single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Our results revealed that transcript levels of temporally induced genes are highly correlated in individual cells. In contrast, transcription of constitutive genes encoding essential subunits of complexes is not coordinated because of stochastic fluctuations. The coordination of these functional complexes therefore must occur post-transcriptionally, and likely post-translationally.

  10. Influence of wool and thermo-binder fibers relative fractions on the adhesion of non-woven Alfa fibers reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Omri, Med; Triki, A.; Ben Hassen, Med; Arous, M.; Bulou, A.

    2016-10-01

    Alfa/wool/thermo-binder fibers hybrid composites were investigated in order to analyze adhesion state. Bearing in mind the chemical structure of wool and thermo-binder fibers, this study revealed a good compatibility between the reinforcement and the matrix. Dielectric measurements revealed the presence of two dielectric relaxations in the composite. The first relaxation was attributed to the α mode relaxation and the second one was associated with the conductivity noted for high temperature. This study allowed the analysis of the interfacial polarization effect using the Havrilliak-Negami model in the electric modulus formalism. The lowness of this relaxation intensity revealed a good adhesion of the fibers in the matrix. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed a slow decrease of the Tg glass transition temperature compared to the matrix, which could be explained by the existence of interactions between the fibers and the matrix. Vibrational analysis, based on FTIR measurements, showed a less hydrophilic character of Alfa fibers owing to a basic dissociation that occurs between the wool fibers and the water molecules associated with Alfa fibers. Furthermore, adhesion mechanism in the composite material was established by covalent and hydrogen bonds. Tensile testing performed on this composite confirmed that such adhesion was improved by increasing the thermo-binder fibers relative fraction.

  11. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice.

  12. More than one way to produce protein diversity: duplication and limited alternative splicing of an adhesion molecule gene in basal arthropods.

    PubMed

    Brites, Daniela; Brena, Carlo; Ebert, Dieter; Du Pasquier, Louis

    2013-10-01

    Exon duplication and alternative splicing evolved multiple times in metazoa and are of overall importance in shaping genomes and allowing organisms to produce many fold more proteins than there are genes in the genome. No other example is as striking as the one of the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) of insects and crustaceans (pancrustaceans) involved in the nervous system differentiation and in the immune system. To elucidate the evolutionary history of this extraordinary gene, we investigated Dscam homologs in two basal arthropods, the myriapod Strigamia maritima and the chelicerate Ixodes scapularis. In both, Dscam diversified extensively by whole gene duplications resulting in multigene expansions. Within some of the S. maritima genes, exons coding for one of the immunoglobulin domains (Ig7) duplicated and are mutually exclusively alternatively spliced. Our results suggest that Dscam diversification was selected independently in chelicerates, myriapods, and pancrustaceans and that the usage of Dscam diversity by immune cells evolved for the first time in basal arthropods. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the appearance of the highly variable Dscam gene of pancrustaceans, adding to the understanding of how alternative splicing, exon, and gene duplication contribute to create molecular diversity associated with potentially new cellular functions.

  13. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  14. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  15. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-01-01

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  16. Gene expression profiling and association with prion-related lesions in the medulla oblongata of symptomatic natural scrapie animals.

    PubMed

    Filali, Hicham; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Lyahyai, Jaber; Zaragoza, Pilar; Pumarola, Martí; Badiola, Juan J; Bossers, Alex; Bolea, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases remains unclear. Examining transcriptome variations in infected versus control animals may highlight new genes potentially involved in some of the molecular mechanisms of prion-induced pathology. The aim of this work was to identify disease-associated alterations in the gene expression profiles of the caudal medulla oblongata (MO) in sheep presenting the symptomatic phase of natural scrapie. The gene expression patterns in the MO from 7 sheep that had been naturally infected with scrapie were compared with 6 controls using a Central Veterinary Institute (CVI) custom designed 4×44K microarray. The microarray consisted of a probe set on the previously sequenced ovine tissue library by CVI and was supplemented with all of the Ovis aries transcripts that are currently publicly available. Over 350 probe sets displayed greater than 2-fold changes in expression. We identified 148 genes from these probes, many of which encode proteins that are involved in the immune response, ion transport, cell adhesion, and transcription. Our results confirm previously published gene expression changes that were observed in murine models with induced scrapie. Moreover, we have identified new genes that exhibit differential expression in scrapie and could be involved in prion neuropathology. Finally, we have investigated the relationship between gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-related lesions, including prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis. In this context, the potential impacts of these gene expression changes in the MO on scrapie development are discussed.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling and Association with Prion-Related Lesions in the Medulla Oblongata of Symptomatic Natural Scrapie Animals

    PubMed Central

    Filali, Hicham; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Lyahyai, Jaber; Zaragoza, Pilar; Pumarola, Martí; Badiola, Juan J.; Bossers, Alex; Bolea, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases remains unclear. Examining transcriptome variations in infected versus control animals may highlight new genes potentially involved in some of the molecular mechanisms of prion-induced pathology. The aim of this work was to identify disease-associated alterations in the gene expression profiles of the caudal medulla oblongata (MO) in sheep presenting the symptomatic phase of natural scrapie. The gene expression patterns in the MO from 7 sheep that had been naturally infected with scrapie were compared with 6 controls using a Central Veterinary Institute (CVI) custom designed 4×44K microarray. The microarray consisted of a probe set on the previously sequenced ovine tissue library by CVI and was supplemented with all of the Ovis aries transcripts that are currently publicly available. Over 350 probe sets displayed greater than 2-fold changes in expression. We identified 148 genes from these probes, many of which encode proteins that are involved in the immune response, ion transport, cell adhesion, and transcription. Our results confirm previously published gene expression changes that were observed in murine models with induced scrapie. Moreover, we have identified new genes that exhibit differential expression in scrapie and could be involved in prion neuropathology. Finally, we have investigated the relationship between gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-related lesions, including prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis. In this context, the potential impacts of these gene expression changes in the MO on scrapie development are discussed. PMID:21629698

  18. Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) supports adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells through interaction with RGD-binding integrins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yueqing; Hu Xiaobo; Tian Ruiyang; Wei Wangui; Hu Wei; Chen Xia; Han Wei; Chen Huayou; Gong Yi . E-mail: ygong@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-08-18

    Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) is a newly identified member of angiopoietin-related proteins (ARPs)/angiopoietin-like proteins (Angptls). AGF has been considered as a novel growth factor in accelerating cutaneous wound healing, as it is capable of stimulating keratinocytes proliferation as well as angiogenesis. But in our paper, we demonstrate that AGF stimulates keratinocytes proliferation only at high protein concentration, however, it can potently promote adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirm that the adhesion and migration cellular events are mediated by RGD-binding integrins, most possibly the {alpha}{sub v}-containing integrins, by in vitro inhibition assays using synthetic competitive peptides. Our results strongly suggest that AGF is an integrin ligand as well as a mitogenic growth factor and theoretically participates in cutaneous wound healing in a more complex mechanism.

  19. Organization of pp60src and selected cytoskeletal proteins within adhesion plaques and junctions of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The localization of pp60src within adhesion structures of epithelioid rat kidney cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus was compared to the organization of actin, alpha-actinin, vinculin (a 130,000-dalton protein), tubulin, and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein. The adhesion structures included both adhesion plaques and previously uncharacterized adhesive regions formed at cell-cell junctions. We have termed these latter structures "adhesion junctions." Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were identified by interference-reflection microscopy and compared to the location of pp60src and the various cytoskeletal proteins by double fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the src gene product was found within both adhesion plaques and the adhesion junctions. In addition, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were also localized within the same pp60src-containing adhesion structures. In contrast, tubulin and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein were not associated with either adhesion plaques or adhesion junctions. Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were isolated as substratum-bound structures and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed that pp60src, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were organized within specific regions of the adhesion junctions. Heavy accumulations of actin and alpha-actinin were found on both sides of the junctions with a narrow gap of unstained material at the midline, whereas pp60src stain was more intense in this central region. Antibody to vinculin stained double narrow lines defining the periphery of the junctional complexes but was excluded from the intervening region. In addition, the distribution of vinculin relative to pp60src within adhesion plaques suggested an inverse relationship between the presence of these two proteins. Overall, these results establish a close link between the src gene product and components of the

  20. Cloning of a balanced translocation breakpoint in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region and isolation of a novel potential adhesion receptor gene in its vicinity.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, S; Aledo, R; Zucman, J; Delattre, O; Desmaze, C; Dauphinot, L; Jalbert, P; Rouleau, G A; Thomas, G; Aurias, A

    1995-04-01

    Deletions of the 22q11.2 have been associated with a wide range of developmental defects (notably DiGeorge syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, conotruncal anomaly face syndrome and isolated conotruncal cardiac defects) classified under the acronym CATCH 22. A DiGeorge syndrome patient bearing a balanced translocation whose breakpoint maps within the critical region has been previously described. We report the construction of a cosmid contig spanning the translocation breakpoint and the isolation of a gene mapping 10 kb telomeric to the breakpoint. This gene encodes a novel putative adhesion receptor protein, which could play a role in neural crest cells migration, a process which has been proposed to be altered in DiGeorge syndrome.

  1. Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mice with a Conditional Ablation of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However,…

  2. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  3. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  4. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong-Xia; Wang, Honglan; Wang, Yuchun; Song, Juan; Tian, Hua; Xia, Chunhui; Shen, Yetong

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the carbohydrate structure on the surface of tumor cells is an important feature of cancer metastasis. The specific role of sialic acids in the glycoconjugate terminal has not yet been clearly elucidated in these processes. Previously, we reported that α2,3-sialic acid residues in breast cancer are associated with metastatic potential. The α2,3-sialyltransferase ST3Gal III, which adds α2,3-sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in various tumors, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor metastasis, yet its mechanistic role has not been fully evaluated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of ST3Gal III on key steps in the process of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III-overexpressing and ST3Gal III-silenced breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell lines were generated. They showed an increase or decrease in the tumor-associated antigen sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX). The E-selectin binding capacity of the transfectants was proportional to cell surface SLeX levels. Cell migration and invasion were positively correlated with ST3Gal III levels. Moreover, ST3Gal III expression modulated the protein expression of invasion-related molecules, including β1 integrin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and cyclooxygenase-2, which may account for the mechanism involved in the effects of ST3Gal III on breast cancer invasiveness. In conclusion, our findings in these novel models of ST3Gal III expression revealed a critical requirement for ST3Gal III in several steps of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying metastasis and suggests a new target for the effective drug treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  5. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  6. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  7. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  8. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO2 + 2% O2, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism. PMID:27983700

  9. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-12-15

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO₂ + 2% O₂, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism.

  10. The Innate Immune-Related Genes in Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; He, Chongbo; Liu, Xueguang; Su, Hao; Gao, Xianggang; Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Catfish is one of the most important aquaculture species in America (as well as in Asia and Africa). In recent years, the production of catfish has suffered massive financial losses due to pathogen spread and breakouts. Innate immunity plays a crucial role in increasing resistance to pathogenic organisms and has generated increasing interest in the past few years. This review summarizes the current understanding of innate immune-related genes in catfish, including pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, complements, lectins, cytokines, transferrin and gene expression profiling using microarrays and next generation sequencing technologies. This review will benefit the understanding of innate immune system in catfish and further efforts in studying the innate immune-related genes in fish. PMID:23203058

  11. Validation of internal reference genes for relative quantitation studies of gene expression in human laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; He, Jinting; Wang, Wei; Ren, Ming; Gao, Sujie; Zhao, Guanjie

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the expression stabilities of 12 common internal reference genes for the relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in human laryngeal cancer. Methods Hep-2 cells and 14 laryngeal cancer tissue samples were investigated. The expression characteristics of 12 internal reference gene candidates (18S rRNA, GAPDH, ACTB, HPRT1, RPL29, HMBS, PPIA, ALAS1, TBP, PUM1, GUSB, and B2M) were assessed by RT-qPCR. The data were analyzed by three commonly used software programs: geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Results The use of the combination of four internal reference genes was more appropriate than the use of a single internal reference gene. The optimal combination was PPIA + GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 for both the cell line and tissues; while the most appropriate combination was GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 + HMBS for the tissues. Conclusions Our recommended internal reference genes may improve the accuracy of relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by the RT-qPCR method in further gene expression research on laryngeal tumors. PMID:27957397

  12. Identification and Characterization of an Aeromonas hydrophila Oligopeptidase Gene pepF Negatively Related to Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hechao; Pang, Maoda; Dong, Yuhao; Wu, Yafeng; Wang, Nannan; Liu, Jin; Awan, Furqan; Lu, Chengping; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in adaptation to complex environments and are responsible for persistent bacterial infections. Biofilm formation is a highly complex process during which multifarious genes work together regularly. In this study, we screened the EZ-Tn5 transposon mutant library to identify genes involved in biofilm formation of Aeromonas hydrophila. A total of 24 biofilm-associated genes were identified, the majority of which encoded proteins related to cell structure, transcription and translation, gene regulation, growth and metabolism. The mutant strain TM90, in which a gene encoding oligopeptidase F (pepF) was disturbed, showed significant upregulation of biofilm formation compared to the parental strain. The TM90 colony phenotype was smaller, more transparent, and splendent. The adhesive ability of TM90 to HEp-2 cells was significantly increased compared with the parental strain. Fifty percent lethal dose (LD50) determinations in zebrafish demonstrated that the enhanced-biofilm mutant TM90 was highly attenuated relative to the wild-type strain. In conclusion, the pepF gene is demonstrated for the first time to be a negative factor for biofilm formation and is involved in A. hydrophila pathogenicity. PMID:27713736

  13. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  14. Identification of Differentially Expressed IGFBP5-Related Genes in Breast Cancer Tumor Tissues Using cDNA Microarray Experiments.

    PubMed

    Akkiprik, Mustafa; Peker, İrem; Özmen, Tolga; Amuran, Gökçe Güllü; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır M; Kaya, Handan; Özer, Ayşe

    2015-11-10

    IGFBP5 is an important regulatory protein in breast cancer progression. We tried to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between breast tumor tissues with IGFBP5 overexpression and their adjacent normal tissues. In this study, thirty-eight breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissue samples were used to determine IGFBP5 expression by qPCR. cDNA microarrays were applied to the highest IGFBP5 overexpressed tumor samples compared to their adjacent normal breast tissue. Microarray analysis revealed that a total of 186 genes were differentially expressed in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissues. Of the 186 genes, 169 genes were downregulated and 17 genes were upregulated in the tumor samples. KEGG pathway analyses showed that protein digestion and absorption, focal adhesion, salivary secretion, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, and phenylalanine metabolism pathways are involved. Among these DEGs, the prominent top two genes (MMP11 and COL1A1) which potentially correlated with IGFBP5 were selected for validation using real time RT-qPCR. Only COL1A1 expression showed a consistent upregulation with IGFBP5 expression and COL1A1 and MMP11 were significantly positively correlated. We concluded that the discovery of coordinately expressed genes related with IGFBP5 might contribute to understanding of the molecular mechanism of the function of IGFBP5 in breast cancer. Further functional studies on DEGs and association with IGFBP5 may identify novel biomarkers for clinical applications in breast cancer.

  15. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  16. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs1...

  17. Validation of commonly used reference genes for sleep-related gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kil S; Alvarenga, Tathiana A; Guindalini, Camila; Andersen, Monica L; Castro, Rosa MRPS; Tufik, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background Sleep is a restorative process and is essential for maintenance of mental and physical health. In an attempt to understand the complexity of sleep, multidisciplinary strategies, including genetic approaches, have been applied to sleep research. Although quantitative real time PCR has been used in previous sleep-related gene expression studies, proper validation of reference genes is currently lacking. Thus, we examined the effect of total or paradoxical sleep deprivation (TSD or PSD) on the expression stability of the following frequently used reference genes in brain and blood: beta-actin (b-actin), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). Results Neither TSD nor PSD affected the expression stability of all tested genes in both tissues indicating that b-actin, B2M, GAPDH and HPRT are appropriate reference genes for the sleep-related gene expression studies. In order to further verify these results, the relative expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1) was evaluated in brain and blood, respectively. The normalization with each of four reference genes produced similar pattern of expression in control and sleep deprived rats, but subtle differences in the magnitude of expression fold change were observed which might affect the statistical significance. Conclusion This study demonstrated that sleep deprivation does not alter the expression stability of commonly used reference genes in brain and blood. Nonetheless, the use of multiple reference genes in quantitative RT-PCR is required for the accurate results. PMID:19445681

  18. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  19. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis.

  20. Gene-Diet Interactions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50 % of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation is the only available treatment option for the dry form of the disease known to slow progression of AMD. Despite an excellent understanding of genes and nutrition in AMD, there is remarkably little known about gene-diet interactions that may identify efficacious approaches to treat individuals. This review will summarize our current understanding of gene-diet interactions in AMD with a focus on animal models and human epidemiological studies.

  1. Th17-Related Genes and Celiac Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Luz María; García-Magariños, Manuel; Dema, Bárbara; Espino, Laura; Maluenda, Carlos; Polanco, Isabel; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD), recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA), were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk. PMID:22359581

  2. Neural stem cell- and neurogenesis-related gene expression profiles in the young and aged dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Geetha A; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis, important for memory and mood function, wanes greatly in old age. Studies in rat models have implied that this decrease is not due to loss of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) but rather due to an increased quiescence of NSCs. Additional studies have suggested that changes in the microenvironment, particularly declines in the concentrations of neurotrophic factors, underlie this change. In this study, we compared the expression of 84 genes that are important for NSC proliferation and neurogenesis between the DG of young (4 months old) and aged (24 months old) Fischer 344 rats, using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Interestingly, the expression of a vast majority of genes that have been reported previously to positively or negatively regulate NSC proliferation was unaltered with aging. Furthermore, most genes important for cell cycle arrest, regulation of cell differentiation, growth factors and cytokine levels, synaptic functions, apoptosis, cell adhesion and cell signaling, and regulation of transcription displayed stable expression in the DG with aging. The exceptions included increased expression of genes important for NSC proliferation and neurogenesis (Stat3 and Shh), DNA damage response and NF-kappaB signaling (Cdk5rap3), neuromodulation (Adora1), and decreased expression of a gene important for neuronal differentiation (HeyL). Thus, age-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis is not associated with a decline in the expression of selected genes important for NSC proliferation and neurogenesis in the DG.

  3. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  4. The Type VI Secretion System Modulates Flagellar Gene Expression and Secretion in Citrobacter freundii and Contributes to Adhesion and Cytotoxicity to Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyun; Hao, Shuai; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Guangxia; Xiao, Di; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a virulence factor-releasing system contributes to virulence development of various pathogens and is often activated upon contact with target cells. Citrobacter freundii strain CF74 has a complete T6SS genomic island (GI) that contains clpV, hcp-2, and vgr T6SS genes. We constructed clpV, hcp-2, vgr, and T6SS GI deletion mutants in CF74 and analyzed their effects on the transcriptome overall and, specifically, on the flagellar system at the levels of transcription and translation. Deletion of the T6SS GI affected the transcription of 84 genes, with 15 and 69 genes exhibiting higher and lower levels of transcription, respectively. Members of the cell motility class of downregulated genes of the CF74ΔT6SS mutant were mainly flagellar genes, including effector proteins, chaperones, and regulators. Moreover, the production and secretion of FliC were also decreased in clpV, hcp-2, vgr, or T6SS GI deletion mutants in CF74 and were restored upon complementation. In swimming motility assays, the mutant strains were found to be less motile than the wild type, and motility was restored by complementation. The mutant strains were defective in adhesion to HEp-2 cells and were restored partially upon complementation. Further, the CF74ΔT6SS, CF74ΔclpV, and CF74Δhcp-2 mutants induced lower cytotoxicity to HEp-2 cells than the wild type. These results suggested that the T6SS GI in CF74 regulates the flagellar system, enhances motility, is involved in adherence to host cells, and induces cytotoxicity to host cells. Thus, the T6SS plays a wide-ranging role in C. freundii.

  5. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum.

  6. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  7. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  8. Primary function analysis of human mental retardation related gene CRBN.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wang; Xiaohua, Ni; Peilin, Chen; Xin, Chen; Yaqiong, Sun; Qihan, Wu

    2008-06-01

    The mutation of human cereblon gene (CRBN) is revealed to be related with mild mental retardation. Since the molecular characteristics of CRBN have not been well presented, we investigated the general properties of CRBN. We analyzed its gene structure and protein homologues. The CRBN protein might belong to a family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent Lon protease. We also found that CRBN was widely expressed in different tissues, and the expression level in testis is significantly higher than other tissues. This may suggested it could play some important roles in several other tissues besides brain. Transient transfection experiment in AD 293 cell lines suggested that both CRBN and CRBN mutant (nucleotide position 1,274(C > T)) are located in the whole cells. This may suggest new functions of CRBN in cell nucleolus besides its mitochondria protease activity in cytoplasm.

  9. [Progress on the research of apomixis related genes in plant].

    PubMed

    Hu, Long-Xing

    2008-02-01

    Apomixis is a special asexual reproduction that plants can form embryo and produce progenies via seeds without sperm-egg fusion. Since apomitic embryo is a complete genetic clone of maternal parent without the participation of sperm, it is an ideal pathway to fix and utilize hybrid vigor and has unpredictable potential value in crop breeding, thus be called "the asexual revolution". According to the formation of the apomitic embryos, apomixis could be divided into three major types: diplospory, apospory and adventive embryony. This review is focused on the recent research progresses of related genes in the development of embryo, endosperm, and miosis, and several genes may involved in the regulation of apomitic development.

  10. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  11. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze colorectal carcinogenesis and age-related DNA methylation alterations of gene sequences associated with epigenetic clock CpG sites. METHODS In silico DNA methylation analysis of 353 epigenetic clock CpG sites published by Steve Horvath was performed using methylation array data for a set of 123 colonic tissue samples [64 colorectal cancer (CRC), 42 adenoma, 17 normal; GEO accession number: GSE48684]. Among the differentially methylated age-related genes, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1) promoter methylation was further investigated in colonic tissue from 8 healthy adults, 19 normal children, 20 adenoma and 8 CRC patients using bisulfite-specific PCR followed by methylation-specific high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. mRNA expression of age-related “epigenetic clock” genes was studied using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 whole transcriptome data of 153 colonic biopsy samples (49 healthy adult, 49 adenoma, 49 CRC, 6 healthy children) (GEO accession numbers: GSE37364, GSE10714, GSE4183, GSE37267). Whole promoter methylation analysis of genes showing inverse DNA methylation-gene expression data was performed on 30 colonic samples using methyl capture sequencing. RESULTS Fifty-seven age-related CpG sites including hypermethylated PPP1R16B, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated MGP, PIPOX were differentially methylated between CRC and normal tissues (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In the adenoma vs normal comparison, 70 CpG sites differed significantly, including hypermethylated DKK3, SDC2, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated CEMIP, SPATA18 (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In MS-HRM analysis, the SFRP1 promoter region was significantly hypermethylated in CRC (55.0% ± 8.4 %) and adenoma tissue samples (49.9% ± 18.1%) compared to normal adult (5.2% ± 2.7%) and young (2.2% ± 0.7%) colonic tissue (P < 0.0001). DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was slightly, but significantly increased in healthy adults compared to normal young samples (P < 0.02). This correlated

  12. Gene mutations in primary ciliary dyskinesia related to otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children and is strongly associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Approximately half of the children with PCD require otolaryngology care, posing a major problem in this population. Early diagnosis of PCD is critical in these patients to minimise the collateral damage related to OME. The current gold standard for PCD diagnosis requires determining ciliary structure defects by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or clearly documenting ciliary dysfunction via digital high-speed video microscopy (DHSV). Although both techniques are useful for PCD diagnosis, they have limitations and need to be supported by new methodologies, including genetic analysis of genes related to PCD. In this article, we review classical and recently associated mutations related to ciliary alterations leading to PCD, which can be useful for early diagnosis of the disease and subsequent early management of OME.

  13. Association and gene-gene interactions study of reelin signaling pathway related genes with autism in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yidong; Xun, Guanglei; Guo, Hui; He, Yiqun; Ou, Jianjun; Dong, Huixi; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with unclear etiology. Reelin had been proposed to participate in the etiology of autism due to its important role in brain development. The goal of this study was to explore the association and gene-gene interactions of reelin signaling pathway related genes (RELN, VLDLR, LRP8, DAB1, FYN, and CDK5) with autism in Han Chinese population. Genotyping data of the six genes were obtained from a recent genome-wide association study performed in 430 autistic children who fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and 1,074 healthy controls. Single marker case-control association analysis and haplotype case-control association analysis were conducted after the data was screened. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) was applied to further test gene-gene interactions. Neither the single marker nor the haplotype association tests found any significant difference between the autistic group and the control group after permutation test of 1,000 rounds. The 4-locus MDR model (comprising rs6143734, rs1858782, rs634500, and rs1924267 which belong to RELN and DAB1) was determined to be the model with the highest cross-validation consistency (CVC) and testing balanced accuracy. The results indicate that an interaction between RELN and DAB1 may increase the risk of autism in the Han Chinese population. Furthermore, it can also be inferred that the involvement of RELN in the etiology of autism would occur through interaction with DAB1.

  14. Embracing the Concept, Defining the Practice, and Changing the Outcome: Setting the Standard for Medical Adhesive-Related Skin Injury Interventions in WOC Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Heinecke, Steven B; Gray, Mikel

    Medical adhesive-related skin injury (MARSI) is a comparatively new category of skin damage. Our current understanding of MARSI originates from an interdisciplinary consensus conference held in 2012 that generated and disseminated 25 statements pertaining to the assessment, prevention, and management of MARSI, along with gaps in research and knowledge related to this area. The 2012 MARSI Consensus Group also challenged each organization to refine the original statements to make them more relevant to their particular area of practice. In order to accomplish this refinement for WOC specialty nursing practice, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to create statements that extended recommendations to patients with an acute or chronic wound, ostomy, or incontinence. This article describes the formal consensus process used to generate consensus statements concerning MARSI in our specialty practice, presents the 8 statements, and provides a brief overview of the advances that underlie the medical adhesive end products used by WOC and other clinicians practicing in all health care settings.

  15. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  16. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  17. Substance P and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulators of Cutaneous Microbiota Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    N’Diaye, Awa; Gannesen, Andrei; Borrel, Valérie; Maillot, Olivier; Enault, Jeremy; Racine, Pierre-Jean; Plakunov, Vladimir; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Neurohormones diffuse in sweat and epidermis leading skin bacterial microflora to be largely exposed to these host factors. Bacteria can sense a multitude of neurohormones, but their role in skin homeostasis was only investigated recently. The first study focused on substance P (SP), a neuropeptide produced in abundance by skin nerve terminals. SP is without effect on the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria. However, SP is stimulating the virulence of Bacillus and Staphylococci. The action of SP is highly specific with a threshold below the nanomolar level. Mechanisms involved in the response to SP are different between bacteria although they are all leading to increased adhesion and/or virulence. The moonlighting protein EfTu was identified as the SP-binding site in B. cereus and Staphylococci. In skin nerve terminals, SP is co-secreted with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which was shown to modulate the virulence of S. epidermidis. This effect is antagonized by SP. Identification of the CGRP sensor, DnaK, allowed understanding this phenomenon as EfTu and DnaK are apparently exported from the bacterium through a common system before acting as SP and CGRP sensors. Many other neuropeptides are expressed in skin, and their potential effects on skin bacteria remain to be investigated. Integration of these host signals by the cutaneous microbiota now appears as a key parameter in skin homeostasis. PMID:28194136

  18. Gene duplication, exon gain and neofunctionalization of OEP16-related genes in land plants.

    PubMed

    Drea, Sinéad C; Lao, Nga T; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2006-06-01

    OEP16, a channel protein of the outer membrane of chloroplasts, has been implicated in amino acid transport and in the substrate-dependent import of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A. Two major clades of OEP16-related sequences were identified in land plants (OEP16-L and OEP16-S), which arose by a gene duplication event predating the divergence of seed plants and bryophytes. Remarkably, in angiosperms, OEP16-S genes evolved by gaining an additional exon that extends an interhelical loop domain in the pore-forming region of the protein. We analysed the sequence, structure and expression of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes (atOEP16-S and atOEP16-L) and demonstrated that following duplication, both genes diverged in terms of expression patterns and coding sequence. AtOEP16-S, which contains multiple G-box ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in the promoter region, is regulated by ABI3 and ABI5 and is strongly expressed during the maturation phase in seeds and pollen grains, both desiccation-tolerant tissues. In contrast, atOEP-L, which lacks promoter ABREs, is expressed predominantly in leaves, is induced strongly by low-temperature stress and shows weak induction in response to osmotic stress, salicylic acid and exogenous ABA. Our results indicate that gene duplication, exon gain and regulatory sequence evolution each played a role in the divergence of OEP16 homologues in plants.

  19. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERRalpha in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERRalpha and ERRalpha-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1beta, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERRalpha-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPARgamma, and PGC-1alpha in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERRalpha and PGC-1beta mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERRalpha in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERRalpha may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  20. Natural Underwater Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Ransom, Todd C; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)(3) coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  1. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  2. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  3. Targeted gene disruption in Candida parapsilosis demonstrates a role for CPAR2_404800 in adhesion to a biotic surface and in a murine model of ascending urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Alessia; Zoppo, Marina; Lombardi, Lisa; Rizzato, Cosmeri; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Tavanti, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an emerging opportunistic pathogen, second in frequency only to C. albicans and commonly associated with both mucosal and systemic infections. Adhesion to biotic surfaces is a key step for the development of mycoses. The C. parapsilosis genome encodes 5 predicted agglutinin-like sequence proteins and their precise role in the adhesion process still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we focused on the putative adhesin Cpar2_404800, in view of its high homology to the most important adhesion molecule in C. albicans. Two independent lineages of C. parapsilosis CPAR2_404800 heterozygous and null mutants were obtained by site-specific deletion. CPAR2_404800 mutants did not differ from wild-type strain in terms of in vitro growth or in their ability to undergo morphogenesis. However, when compared for adhesion to a biotic surface, CPAR2_404800 null mutants exhibited a marked reduction in their adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (>60% reduction of adhesion index). Reintroduction of one copy of CPAR2_404800 gene in the null background restored wild type phenotype. A murine model of urinary tract infection was used to elucidate the in vivo contribution of CPAR2_404800. A 0.5 and 1 log10 reduction in colony forming unit numbers (per gram) was observed respectively in bladder and kidneys obtained from mice infected with null mutant compared to wild-type infected ones. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a direct role of CPAR2_404800 in C. parapsilosis adhesion to host surfaces and demonstrate its contribution to the pathogenesis of murine urinary candidiasis. PMID:26632333

  4. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  5. Tumor-related gene changes in immunosuppressive Syrian hamster cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Juasook, Amornrat; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Sudsarn, Pakkayanee; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-10-01

    The results of a previous study demonstrated that prednisolone enhanced cholangiocarcinogenesis. Therefore, to clarify molecular changes during immunosuppressive cholangiocarcinogenesis, Syrian hamsters were divided into 8 groups: uninfected controls; immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters using prednisolone (P); normal Syrian hamsters administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (ND); immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDis); normal Syrian hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini (OV); immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini (OVis); normal Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini and administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (CCA); and immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini and administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (CCAis). Syrian hamster livers were used for analysis of tumor-related gene expression and immunohistochemistry through cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. The tumor-related gene expression results show that CCAis groups at all time points exhibited upregulation of COX-2, IL-6, SOD1, CAT and iNOS and downregulation of p53, which correlated with the predominant expression of CK19 and PCNA in liver tissue. These results suggest that prednisolone enhances cholangiocarcinoma development, which was confirmed by molecular changes.

  6. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  7. Gene Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Constable, Ian Jeffery; Blumenkranz, Mark Scott; Schwartz, Steven D; Barone, Sam; Lai, Chooi-May; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate safety and signals of efficacy of gene therapy with subretinal rAAV.sFlt-1 for wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). A phase 1 dose-escalating single-center controlled unmasked human clinical trial was followed up by extension of the protocol to a phase 2A single-center trial. rAAV.sFlt-1 vector was used to deliver a naturally occurring anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent, sFlt-1, into the subretinal space. In phase 1, step 1 randomized 3 subjects to low-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm; step 2 randomized an additional 3 subjects to treatment with high-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm. Follow-up studies demonstrated that rAAV.sFlt-1 was well tolerated with a favorable safety profile in these elderly subjects with wet AMD. Subretinal injection was highly reproducible, and no drug-related adverse events were reported. Procedure-related adverse events were mild and self-resolving. Two phakic patients developed cataract and underwent cataract surgery. Four of the 6 patients responded better than the small control group in this study and historical controls in terms of maintaining vision and a relatively dry retina with zero ranibizumab retreatments per annum. Two patients required 1 ranibizumab injection over the 52-week follow-up period. rAAV.sFlt-1 gene therapy may prove to be a potential adjunct or alternative to conventional intravitreal injection for patients with wet AMD by providing extended delivery of a naturally occurring antiangiogenic protein.

  8. The TCA Pathway is an Important Player in the Regulatory Network Governing Vibrio alginolyticus Adhesion Under Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lixing; Huang, Li; Yan, Qingpi; Qin, Yingxue; Ma, Ying; Lin, Mao; Xu, Xiaojin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is a critical step in the initial stage of Vibrio alginolyticus infection; therefore, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms governing the adhesion of V. alginolyticus and determine if environmental factors have any effect. A greater understanding of this process may assist in developing preventive measures for reducing infection. In our previous research, we presented the first RNA-seq data from V. alginolyticus cultured under stress conditions that resulted in reduced adhesion. Based on the RNA-seq data, we found that the Tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA pathway) might be closely related to adhesion. Environmental interactions with the TCA pathway might alter adhesion. To validate this, bioinformatics analysis, quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR), RNAi, and in vitro adhesion assays were performed, while V. alginolyticus was treated with various stresses including temperature, pH, salinity, and starvation. The expression of genes involved in the TCA pathway was confirmed by qPCR, which reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Silencing of these genes was capable of reducing the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus. Adhesion of V. alginolyticus is influenced substantially by environmental factors and the TCA pathway is sensitive to some environmental stresses, especially changes in pH and starvation. Our results indicated that (1) the TCA pathway plays a key role in V. alginolyticus adhesion: (2) the TCA pathway is sensitive to environmental stresses. PMID:26870007

  9. The TCA Pathway is an Important Player in the Regulatory Network Governing Vibrio alginolyticus Adhesion Under Adversity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lixing; Huang, Li; Yan, Qingpi; Qin, Yingxue; Ma, Ying; Lin, Mao; Xu, Xiaojin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is a critical step in the initial stage of Vibrio alginolyticus infection; therefore, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms governing the adhesion of V. alginolyticus and determine if environmental factors have any effect. A greater understanding of this process may assist in developing preventive measures for reducing infection. In our previous research, we presented the first RNA-seq data from V. alginolyticus cultured under stress conditions that resulted in reduced adhesion. Based on the RNA-seq data, we found that the Tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA pathway) might be closely related to adhesion. Environmental interactions with the TCA pathway might alter adhesion. To validate this, bioinformatics analysis, quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR), RNAi, and in vitro adhesion assays were performed, while V. alginolyticus was treated with various stresses including temperature, pH, salinity, and starvation. The expression of genes involved in the TCA pathway was confirmed by qPCR, which reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Silencing of these genes was capable of reducing the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus. Adhesion of V. alginolyticus is influenced substantially by environmental factors and the TCA pathway is sensitive to some environmental stresses, especially changes in pH and starvation. Our results indicated that (1) the TCA pathway plays a key role in V. alginolyticus adhesion: (2) the TCA pathway is sensitive to environmental stresses.

  10. Multifunctional interleukin-1beta promotes metastasis of human lung cancer cells in SCID mice via enhanced expression of adhesion-, invasion- and angiogenesis-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Yano, Seiji; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Kanematsu, Takanori; Miki, Toyokazu; Uehara, Hisanori; Saijo, Yasuo; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Sone, Saburo

    2003-03-01

    We examined whether interleukin-1 (IL-1), a multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, progresses or regresses metastasis of lung cancer. Exogenous IL-1beta enhanced expression of various cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by A549, PC14, RERF-LC-AI, and SBC-3 cells expressing IL-1 receptors. A549 cells transduced with human IL-1beta-gene with the growth-hormone signaling-peptide sequence (A549/IL-1beta) secreted a large amount of IL-1beta protein. Overexpression of IL-1beta resulted in augmentation of expression of the cytokines, ICAM-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). A549/IL-1beta cells intravenously inoculated into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice distributed to the lung more efficiently and developed lung metastasis much more rapidly than did control A549 cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-IL-1beta antibody inhibited formation of lung metastasis by A549/IL-1beta cells. Moreover, A549/IL-1beta cells inoculated in the subcutis grew more rapidly, without necrosis, than did control A549 cells, which produced smaller tumors with central necrosis, suggesting involvement of angiogenesis in addition to enhanced binding in the high metastatic potential of A549/IL-1beta cells. Histological analyses showed that more host-cell infiltration, fewer apoptotic cells, more vascularization, and higher MMP activity were observed in tumors derived from A549/IL-1beta cells, compared with tumors derived from control A549 cells. These findings suggest that IL-1beta facilitates metastasis of lung cancer via promoting multiple events, including adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis.

  11. Bcl-2-related protein family gene expression during oligodendroglial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takayuki; Itoh, Aki; Pleasure, David

    2003-06-01

    Oligodendroglial lineage cells (OLC) vary in susceptibility to both necrosis and apoptosis depending on their developmental stages, which might be regulated by differential expression of Bcl-2-related genes. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we examined the expression of 19 Bcl-2-related genes in purified cultures of rat oligodendroglial progenitors, immature and mature oligodendrocytes. All 'multidomain' anti-apoptotic members (Bcl-x, Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Bcl2l10/Diva/Boo) except Bcl2a1/A1 are expressed in OLC. Semiquantitative and real-time RT-PCR revealed that Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 mRNAs are the dominant anti-apoptotic members and increase four- and twofold, respectively, with maturation. Bcl-2 mRNA is less abundant than Bcl-xL mRNA in progenitors and falls an additional 10-fold during differentiation. Bcl-w mRNA also increases, with significant changes in its splicing pattern, as OLC mature. Transfection studies demonstrated that Bcl-xL overexpression protects against kainate-induced excitotoxicity, whereas Bcl-2 overexpression does not. As for 'multidomain' pro-apoptotic members (Bax, Bad and Bok/Mtd), Bax and Bak are highly expressed throughout differentiation. Among 'BH3 domain-only' members examined (Bim, Biklk, DP5/Hrk, Bad, Bid, Noxa, Puma/Bbc3, Bmf, BNip3 and BNip3L), BNip3 and Bmf mRNAs increase markedly during differentiation. These results provide basic information to guide further studies on the roles for Bcl-2-related family proteins in OLC death.

  12. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  13. Platelet concentrates transfusion in cardiac surgery in relation to preoperative point-of-care assessment of platelet adhesion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Cristina; Hartmann, Jennifer; Osthaus, Alexander; Schöchl, Herbert; Raymondos, Kostas; Koppert, Wolfgang; Rahe-Meyer, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Platelet dysfunction is an important cause of bleeding early after cardiac surgery. Whole-blood multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), investigating the adhesion and aggregation of activated platelets onto metal electrodes, has shown correlations with platelet concentrates transfusion in this setting. Platelet activity in vivo is dependent on shear stress, an aspect that cannot be investigated with MEA, but with the cone and plate(let) analyzer (CPA) Impact-R that measures the interaction of platelets and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in whole blood under shear. We hypothesized that preoperative CPA may show better correlation with platelet concentrates transfusion post-cardiac surgery than MEA, since it is dependent on both platelet activity and platelet interaction with vWF multimers. Blood was obtained preoperatively from 30 patients undergoing aorto-coronary bypass (ACB) and 20 patients with aortic valve (AV) surgery. MEA was performed in hirudin-anticoagulated blood. The Impact-R analyses were performed in blood anticoagulated with hirudin, heparin or the standard anticoagulant citrate. For the light microscopy images obtained, the parameter surface coverage (SC) was calculated. Preoperative Impact-R results were abnormally decreased in AV patients and significantly lower than in ACB patients. For the Impact-R analysis performed in citrated blood, no correlation with platelet concentrates transfusion was observed. In contrast, MEA was comparable between the groups and correlated significantly with intraoperative platelet concentrates transfusion in both groups (rho between -0.47 and -0.62, p < 0.05). Multiple electrode aggregometry appeared more useful and easier to apply than CPA for preoperatively identifying patients with platelet concentrates transfusion in cardiac surgery.

  14. M-cadherin, a candidate gene for type 2 diabetes and related phenotypes in a KK/Ta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shiina, K; Gohda, T; Murakoshi, M; Yamada, K; Aoki, T; Yamazaki, T; Tanimoto, M; Tomino, Y

    2007-03-01

    The KK/Ta strain serves as a suitable polygenic mouse model for type 2 diabetes associated with fasting hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, mild obesity and dyslipidaemia. Recently, we reported the susceptibility loci contributing to type 2 diabetes and related phenotypes in KK/Ta mice. In the present study, to identify susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes and related disorders, GeneChip Expression Analysis was employed to survey the gene expression profile in the liver of KK/Ta and BALB/c mice. M-cadherin, a calciumdependent intercellular adhesion molecule, showed increased expression in the liver of KK/Ta mice, and sequence analysis revealed three missense mutations. The relationship between these polymorphisms and various phenotypes in 208 KK/Ta x (BALB/c x KK/Ta) F1 backcross mice was analysed. Statistical analysis revealed that M-cadherin exhibits linkage to levels of triglyceride and insulin in sera, glucose tolerance and body weight. Although it has been postulated that M-cadherin may be important for the regulation of morphogenesis of skeletal muscle cells, these results suggest that M-cadherin may influence hypertriglyceridaemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinaemia and obesity in KK/Ta mice.

  15. Clique-based data mining for related genes in a biomedical database

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Tsutomu; Yonemori, Chikara; Tomita, Etsuji; Muramatsu, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    Background Progress in the life sciences cannot be made without integrating biomedical knowledge on numerous genes in order to help formulate hypotheses on the genetic mechanisms behind various biological phenomena, including diseases. There is thus a strong need for a way to automatically and comprehensively search from biomedical databases for related genes, such as genes in the same families and genes encoding components of the same pathways. Here we address the extraction of related genes by searching for densely-connected subgraphs, which are modeled as cliques, in a biomedical relational graph. Results We constructed a graph whose nodes were gene or disease pages, and edges were the hyperlink connections between those pages in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. We obtained over 20,000 sets of related genes (called 'gene modules') by enumerating cliques computationally. The modules included genes in the same family, genes for proteins that form a complex, and genes for components of the same signaling pathway. The results of experiments using 'metabolic syndrome'-related gene modules show that the gene modules can be used to get a coherent holistic picture helpful for interpreting relations among genes. Conclusion We presented a data mining approach extracting related genes by enumerating cliques. The extracted gene sets provide a holistic picture useful for comprehending complex disease mechanisms. PMID:19566964

  16. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  17. Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study allows large-scale analyses of breast and prostate cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions that affect hormone metabolism.

  18. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  19. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  20. MicroRNA-151 and its hosting gene FAK (focal adhesion kinase) regulate tumor cell migration and spreading of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom

    2010-09-01

    Recurrent chromosomal aberrations are often observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about the functional non-coding sequences, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), at the chromosomal breakpoints in HCC. Here we show that 22 miRNAs are often amplified or deleted in HCC. MicroRNA-151 (miR-151), a frequently amplified miRNA on 8q24.3, is correlated with intrahepatic metastasis of HCC. We further show that miR-151, which is often expressed together with its host gene FAK, encoding focal adhesion kinase, significantly increases HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo, mainly through miR-151-5p, but not through miR-151-3p. Moreover, miR-151 exerts this function by directly targeting RhoGDIA, a putative metastasis suppressor in HCC, thus leading to the activation of Rac1, Cdc42 and Rho GTPases. In addition, miR-151 can function synergistically with FAK to enhance HCC cell motility and spreading. Thus, our findings indicate that chromosome gain of miR-151 is a crucial stimulus for tumour invasion and metastasis of HCC.

  1. Gene Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pechan, Peter; Wadsworth, Samuel; Scaria, Abraham

    2014-12-18

    Pathological neovascularization is a key component of the neovascular form (also known as the wet form) of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Several preclinical studies have shown that antiangiogenesis strategies are effective for treating neovascular AMD in animal models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main inducers of ocular neovascularization, and several clinical trials have shown the benefits of neutralizing VEGF in patients with neovascular AMD or diabetic macular edema. In this review, we summarize several preclinical and early-stage clinical trials with intraocular gene therapies, which have the potential to reduce or eliminate the repeated intravitreal injections that are currently required for the treatment of neovascular AMD.

  2. Glia-related genes and their contribution to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyao; Aleksic, Branko; Ozaki, Norio

    2015-08-01

    Schizophrenia, a debilitating disease with 1% prevalence in the general population, is characterized by major neuropsychiatric symptoms, including delusions, hallucinations, and deficits in emotional and social behavior. Previous studies have directed their investigations on the mechanism of schizophrenia towards neuronal dysfunction and have defined schizophrenia as a 'neuron-centric' disorder. However, along with the development of genetics and systematic biology approaches in recent years, the crucial role of glial cells in the brain has also been shown to contribute to the etiopathology of schizophrenia. Here, we summarize comprehensive data that support the involvement of glial cells (including oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglial cells) in schizophrenia and list several acknowledged glia-related genes or molecules associated with schizophrenia. Instead of purely an abnormality of neurons in schizophrenia, an additional 'glial perspective' provides us a novel and promising insight into the causal mechanisms and treatment for this disease.

  3. Suitable in vitro Eimeria arloingi macromeront formation in host endothelial cells and modulation of adhesion molecule, cytokine and chemokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana M R; Vila-Viçosa, Maria J M; Cortes, Helder C E; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Eimeria arloingi infections can cause severe haemorrhagic enteritis in young goat kids, thereby leading to high economic losses in goat industry worldwide. We aimed to isolate a new E. arloingi strain and establish a suitable in vitro culture system for the first merogony. E. arloingi oocysts were collected from naturally infected goat kids in the province of Alentejo, Portugal. For the maintenance of E. arloingi (strain A), kids kept under strict parasite-free conditions were orally infected with 10(3) sporulated oocysts each. Further, a new excystation protocol was successfully established to obtain viable sporozoites for further in vitro development in primary bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC). Overall, E. arloingi first merogony was successfully accomplished in BUVEC leading to macromeront formation (up to 150 μm) and the release of fully developed merozoites I stages. Moreover, host endothelial cell-parasite interactions were investigated in order to determine the extent of modulation carried out by E. arloingi in BUVEC during the first merogony. Gene transcription of adhesion molecules (E-selectin, P-selectin, VCAM-1, ICAM-1) was enhanced in the first hours post-infection (p.i.) in E. arloingi-infected BUVEC. BUVEC activation due to invasion was also shown by increased chemokine (CXCL8, CCL2, CCL5), cytokine (GM-CSF) and COX-2 gene transcription. The new E. arloingi (strain A) will be useful for better comprehension of early host innate immune reactions against this parasite in vitro/in vivo as well as to further our investigations in the complex Eimeria-host endothelial cell interactions.

  4. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  5. Effect of vitreomacular adhesion and vitreous gel on age-related reduction of macular thickness: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Hangai, Masanori; Furukawa, Mariko; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of vitreomacular adhesion (VMA), vitreomacular separation (VMS) and absence of vitreous gel due to vitrectomy on macular thickness measured in the spectral domain optical coherence tomographic (SD-OCT) images. Design A longitudinal, retrospective, observational study. Setting Secondary multicentre study. Participants 218 eyes of 218 healthy patients and 119 vitrectomised eyes of 119 patients were studied. The healthy individuals were classified into a VMA group (54 eyes) and a VMS group (164 eyes), while the vitrectomised patients were classified into an internal limiting membrane (ILM)-on group (26 eyes) and an ILM-off group (93 eyes). In all participants, 2 Cirrus HD-OCT recordings were made with an average interval of 36 months (range 24–60 months). Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the rate of change in macular thickness in the central sector. The secondary outcomes were the rates of change in macular thickness in the inner 4 sectors. Results The annual rate of change in the macular thickness of the central sector was 0.76±1.8 µm/year in the VMA group, −0.58±2.3 µm/year in the VMS group, −1.57±1.9 µm/year in the ILM-on group and −0.86±3.1 µm/year in the ILM-off group. There was a significant difference between the rate of the central sector thickness change in the VMA and VMS groups (p=0.0001). The presence of VMA was a significant factor associated with an increase in the central sector thickness (p=0.0055). When the healthy and ILM-on groups were compared, the rate of decrease in the central sector thickness was faster in the ILM-on group (p=0.0043). Multiple regression analyses showed that not peeling the ILM during the vitrectomy was a significant factor associated with a decrease in the central sector thickness (p=0.044). Conclusions The presence of a VMA and a vitreous gel may help restrain the macular thickness reduction. PMID:27694490

  6. Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Kong, X H; Ruan, M; Ma, F M; Jiang, Y F; Liu, M Z; Chen, Y; Zuo, X H

    2010-10-28

    General characteristics of waxes, adhesives and lubricants as well as the recent fundamental investigations on their physical and mechanical behaviour are introduced. The current R&D status for new type/generation of waxes, adhesives and lubricants from natural products is reviewed, with an emphasis on their tribological applications. In particular, some crucial issues and challenges relating to technological improvement and materials development are discussed. Based on the current predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental concerns, prospective research on the development of green waxes, adhesives and lubricants is suggested.

  7. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  8. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  9. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  10. Identification of ORF636 in phage phiSLT carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes, acting as an adhesion protein for a poly(glycerophosphate) chain of lipoteichoic acid on the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Jun; Narita-Yamada, Sachiko; Wakabayashi, Yukari; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The temperate phage phiSLT of Staphylococcus aureus carries genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Here, we identify ORF636, a constituent of the phage tail tip structure, as a recognition/adhesion protein for a poly(glycerophosphate) chain of lipoteichoic acid on the cell surface of S. aureus. ORF636 bound specifically to S. aureus; it did not bind to any other staphylococcal species or to several gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Evolution of xyloglucan-related genes in green plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cell shape and morphology of plant tissues are intimately related to structural modifications in the primary cell wall that are associated with key processes in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The primary cell wall is composed mainly of cellulose immersed in a matrix of hemicellulose, pectin, lignin and some structural proteins. Xyloglucan is a hemicellulose polysaccharide present in the cell walls of all land plants (Embryophyta) and is the main hemicellulose in non-graminaceous angiosperms. Results In this work, we used a comparative genomic approach to obtain new insights into the evolution of the xyloglucan-related enzymatic machinery in green plants. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were done for enzymes involved in xyloglucan synthesis (xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, α-xylosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase and α-fucosidase) and mobilization/degradation (β-(1→4)-glucan synthase, α-fucosyltransferases, β-galactosyltransferases and α-xylosyl transferase) based on 12 fully sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tags from 29 species of green plants. Evidence from Chlorophyta and Streptophyta green algae indicated that part of the Embryophyta xyloglucan-related machinery evolved in an aquatic environment, before land colonization. Streptophyte algae have at least three enzymes of the xyloglucan machinery: xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, β-(1→4)-glucan synthase from the celullose synthase-like C family and α-xylosidase that is also present in chlorophytes. Interestingly, gymnosperm sequences orthologs to xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolases with exclusively hydrolytic activity were also detected, suggesting that such activity must have emerged within the last common ancestor of spermatophytes. There was a positive correlation between the numbers of founder genes within each gene family and the complexity of the plant cell wall. Conclusions Our data support the idea that a primordial xyloglucan

  12. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone. PMID:24451392

  13. Associations between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Viral Receptors and Attachment Factor-Related Genes and Humoral Immunity to Rubella Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Haralambieva, Iana H.; Lambert, Nathaniel D.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Larrabee, Beth R.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Poland, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral attachment and cell entry host factors are important for viral replication, pathogenesis, and the generation and sustenance of immune responses after infection and/or vaccination, and are plausible genetic regulators of vaccine-induced immunity. Methods Using a tag-SNP approach in candidate gene study, we assessed the role of selected cell surface receptor genes, attachment factor-related genes, along with other immune genes in the genetic control of immune response variations after live rubella vaccination in two independent study cohorts. Results Our analysis revealed evidence for multiple associations between genetic variants in the PVR, PVRL2, CD209/DC-SIGN, RARB, MOG, IL6 and other immune function-related genes and rubella-specific neutralizing antibodies after vaccination (meta p-value <0.05). Conclusion Our results indicate that multiple SNPs from genes involved in cell adhesion, viral attachment, and viral entry, as well as others in genes involved in signaling and/or immune response regulation, play a role in modulating humoral immune responses following live rubella vaccination. PMID:24945853

  14. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  15. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  16. Age-related changes in cellular protection, purification, and inflammation-related gene expression: role of dietary phytonutrients.

    PubMed

    Mastaloudis, Angela; Wood, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Oxidative injury and inflammation are intimately involved in the aging process and the development of age-related diseases. To date, most nutritional antiaging strategies have focused solely on the delivery of exogenous antioxidants to combat the negative effects of aging. A promising new strategy is to identify nutrients and phytochemicals that can directly target intrinsic cytoprotective mechanisms, including modulation of the expression of (1) genes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics, (2) genes involved in the synthesis and regulation of intrinsic antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes, (3) genes involved in the regulation of inflammation, and (4) vitagenes. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the age-related changes in gene expression related to oxidative stress, detoxification, and inflammatory processes, and to discuss natural compounds with the potential to oppose age-related changes in gene expression related to these processes, which therefore may be suitable for use in human antiaging research.

  17. Identifying genes related with rheumatoid arthritis via system biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Lin, Xinmei; Yu, Hongjian

    2015-10-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory joint disease that mainly attacks synovial joints. However, the underlying systematic relationship among different genes and biological processes involved in the pathogenesis are still unclear. By analyzing and comparing the transcriptional profiles from RA, OA (osteoarthritis) patients as well as ND (normal donors) with bioinformatics methods, we tend to uncover the potential molecular networks and critical genes which play important roles in RA and OA development. Initially, hierarchical clustering was performed to classify the overall transcriptional profiles. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ND and RA and OA patients were identified. Furthermore, PPI networks were constructed, functional modules were extracted, and functional annotation was also applied. Our functional analysis identifies 22 biological processes and 2 KEGG pathways enriched in the commonly-regulated gene set. However, we found that number of set of genes differentially expressed genes only between RA and ND reaches up to 244, indicating this gene set may specifically accounts for processing to disease of RA. Additionally, 142 biological processes and 19 KEGG pathways are over-represented by these 244 genes. Meanwhile, although another 21 genes were differentially expressed only in OA and ND, no biological process nor pathway is over-represented by them.

  18. Regulation of Gene Expression by Exercise-Related Micrornas.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laureane Nunes; Serdan, Tamires Duarte Afonso; Levada-Pires, Adriana Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine; Silveira, Leonardo Dos Reis; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Curi, Rui; Gorjão, Renata; Hirabara, Sandro Massao

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression control by microRNAs (miRs) is an important mechanism for maintenance of cellular homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions as well as in response to different stimuli including nutritional factors and exercise. MiRs are involved in regulation of several processes such as growth and development, fuel metabolism, insulin secretion, immune function, miocardium remodeling, cell proliferation, differenciation, survival, and death. These molecules have also been proposed to be potential biomarkers and/or therapeutical targets in obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. MiRs are released by most cells and potentially act on intercellular communication to borderer or distant cells. Various studies have been performed to elucidate the involvement of miRs in exercise-induced effects. The aims of this review are: 1) to bring up the main advances for the comprehension of the mechanisms of action of miRs; 2) to present the main results on miR involvement in physical exercise; 3) to discuss the physiological effects of miRs modified by exercise. The state of the art and the perspectives on miRs associated with physical exercise will be presented. Thus, this review is important for updating recent advances and driving further strategies and studies on the exercise-related miR research.

  19. Gene transfer for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Campochiaro, Peter A

    2011-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease that has two phases: a degenerative phase often referred to as nonneovascular AMD (non-NVAMD) or dry AMD and a phase dominated by growth of new blood vessels in the subretinal space, referred to as NVAMD or wet AMD. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of NVAMD have led to new drug therapies that have provided major benefits to patients. However, those treatments require frequent intraocular injections that in many patients must be continued indefinitely to maintain visual benefits. Gene transfer to augment expression of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term stability in patients with NVAMD. Studies in animal models that mimic aspects of NVAMD have identified several possible transgenes, and a clinical trial in patients with advanced NVAMD has suggested that the approach may be feasible. Many important questions remain, but the rationale and preliminary data are compelling. The results of two ongoing clinical trials may answer several of the questions and help direct future research.

  20. Calcitonin gene related peptide as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Meini, S; Santicioli, P

    1995-07-01

    A dense plexus of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) containing nerve fibres is present in the mammalian ureter, from which CGRP is released by depolarizing stimuli, including chemical normally present in the urine. CGRP exerts a profound, receptor-mediated, inhibitory effect on the evoked motility of the ureter by suppressing latent pacemakers in the smooth muscle. This effect is largely glibenclamide sensitive, indicating the activation of potassium (K) channels in its genesis. Electrical stimulation of intramural nerves in the guinea-pig ureter produces a transient membrane hyperpolarization, which is blocked by glibenclamide or by capsaicin pretreatment, enhanced in a low-K medium, and inhibited by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Thus endogenous CGRP acts as a neurotransmitter K channel opener in the ureter. The refractory period of the guinea-pig ureter is markedly and similarly reduced by capsaicin pretreatment or administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist, indicating that endogenous CGRP can modulate the maximal frequency of ureteral peristalsis. Using a three-chamber organ bath that enabled the separate perfusion of the renal, middle, and bladder regions of the organ, evidence was obtained that CGRP blocks propagation of impulses along the ureter through a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism. These findings indicate a role of CGRP in the local regulation of ureteral motility and peristalsis.

  1. Differential expression of genes related to gain and intake in the liver of beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To better understand which genes play a role in cattle feed intake and gain, we evaluated differential expression of genes related to gain and intake in the liver of crossbred beef steers. Based on past transcriptomics studies on cattle liver, we hypothesized that genes related to metabo...

  2. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  3. Apoptosis-related genes change their expression with age and hearing loss in the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Sherif F.; D’Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2010-01-01

    To understand possible causative roles of apoptosis gene regulation in age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), apoptotic gene expression patterns in the CBA mouse cochlea of four different age and hearing loss groups were compared, using GeneChip and real-time (qPCR) microarrays. GeneChip transcriptional expression patterns of 318 apoptosis-related genes were analyzed. Thirty eight probes (35 genes) showed significant differences in expression. The significant gene families include Caspases, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2 family, P53, Cal-pains, Mitogen activated protein kinase family, Jun oncogene, Nuclear factor of kappa light chain gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor-related and tumor necrosis factor-related genes. The GeneChip results of 31 genes were validated using the new TaqMan® Low Density Array (TLDA). Eight genes showed highly correlated results with the GeneChip data. These genes are: activating transcription factor3, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2, Bcl2-like1, caspase4 apoptosis-related cysteine protease 4, Calpain2, dual specificity phosphatase9, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member12a, and Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member13b, suggesting they may play critical roles in inner ear aging. PMID:18839313

  4. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Follis, Jack L.; Smith, Caren E.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Garaulet, Marta; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Bartz, Traci M.; Kovanen, Leena; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Muka, Taulant; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Mikkilä, Vera; Ordovás, José M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. RESULTS We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (<7 h) and higher FG and replicated known MTNR1B associations with glycemic traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed nominally significant interactions (all P < 0.01) between carbohydrate intake and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for FG with a 0.003 mmol/L higher FG with each additional 1% carbohydrate intake in the presence of the T allele, between sleep duration and CRY2-rs11605924 for HDL-cholesterol with a 0.010 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol with each additional hour of sleep in the presence of the A allele, and between long sleep duration (≥9 h) and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for BMI with a 0.60 kg/m2 higher BMI with long sleep duration in the presence of the T allele relative to normal sleep duration (≥7 to <9 h). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that lower carbohydrate intake and normal sleep duration may ameliorate cardiometabolic abnormalities conferred by common circadian-related genetic variants

  5. Chronic social isolation is related to both upregulation of plasticity genes and initiation of proapoptotic signaling in Wistar rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Ana; Adzic, Miroslav; Djordjevic, Jelena; Radojcic, Marija B

    2009-12-01

    Successful adaptation to stress involves actions of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a steroid-dependent transcription factor, abundant in hippocampus. Another transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B (NFjB) is considered as an important stress sensor implicated in adaptive synaptic plasticity. Numerous stress-related genes are regulated by both hippocampal GR and NFjB, including neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAM and L1), involved in plasticity, and genes that encode apoptotic proteins (bax and bcl-2). We presumed that the ratio of nuclear NFjB to nuclear GR may determine the degree of proplastic or proapoptotic signaling under stress. To test this presumption we have investigated effects of acute, chronic and combined stress on compartmental levels and ratios of NFjB and GR proteins, and in parallel, changes in their mRNA expression. In addition, the expression of plasticity (NCAM, L1) and apoptotic (bax, bcl-2) genes, as well as, Bax and Bcl-2 proteins redistribution between mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments, were followed. When glucocorticoid levels were low, as found in chronic stress, GR was not efficiently translocated to the nucleus. This resulted in its lower nuclear level relative to the nuclear NFjB. Such conditions did not affect proplastic induction of NCAM mRNA, but were related to the onset of proapoptotic signaling illustrated by relocation of mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein to its soluble cytoplasmic form. Because these Bcl-2 rearrangements were not reversed by subsequent acute stress, representing more stable alterations, it is concluded that chronic social isolation of Wistar rats led to the initiation of proapoptotic signaling that may be etiologically related to compromised adaptive response of central nervous system.

  6. Psychological factors and DNA methylation of genes related to immune/inflammatory system markers: the VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Kubzansky, Laura D; Baccarelli, Andrea; Sparrow, David; Spiro, Avron; Tarantini, Letizia; Cantone, Laura; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although psychological factors have been associated with chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD), the underlying pathways for these associations have yet to be elucidated. DNA methylation has been posited as a mechanism linking psychological factors to CHD risk. In a cohort of community-dwelling elderly men, we explored the associations between positive and negative psychological factors with DNA methylation in promoter regions of multiple genes involved in immune/inflammatory processes related to atherosclerosis. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Greater Boston, Massachusetts area. Participants Samples of 538 to 669 men participating in the Normative Aging Study cohort with psychological measures and DNA methylation measures, collected on 1–4 visits between 1999 and 2006 (mean age=72.7 years at first visit). Outcome measures We examined anxiety, depression, hostility and life satisfaction as predictors of leucocyte gene-specific DNA methylation. We estimated repeated measures linear mixed models, controlling for age, smoking, education, history of heart disease, stroke or diabetes, % lymphocytes, % monocytes and plasma folate. Results Psychological distress measured by anxiety, depression and hostility was positively associated, and happiness and life satisfaction were inversely associated with average Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and coagulation factor III (F3) promoter methylation levels. There was some evidence that hostility was positively associated with toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) promoter methylation, and that life satisfaction was inversely associated with TLR-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter methylation. We observed less consistent and significant associations between psychological factors and average methylation for promoters of the genes for glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Conclusions These findings suggest that positive and negative

  7. The evolution of reproduction-related NLRP genes.

    PubMed

    Duéñez-Guzmán, Edgar A; Haig, David

    2014-04-01

    NLRP proteins are important components of inflammasomes with a major role in innate immunity. A subset of NLRP genes, with unknown functions, are expressed in oocytes and early embryos. Mutations of Nlrp5 in mice are associated with maternal-effect embryonic lethality and mutations of NLRP7 in women are associated with conception of biparental complete hydatidiform moles (biCHMs), suggesting perturbed processes of genomic imprinting. Recessive mutations on NLRP2/7 in humans are associated with reproductive disorders and appear to be induced by a demethylation of the maternal pronucleus. In this study, we find that radiation of NLRP genes occurred before the common ancestor of Afrotheria and Boreoeutheria, with the clade of oocyte-expressed genes originating before the divergence of marsupial and eutherian mammals. There have been multiple independent duplications of NLRP2 genes one of which produced the NLRP7 gene associated with biCHMs.

  8. Biology-Driven Gene-Gene Interaction Analysis of Age-Related Cataract in the eMERGE Network

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Molly A; Verma, Shefali S; Wallace, John; Lucas, Anastasia; Berg, Richard L; Connolly, John; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F; Haines, Jonathan L; Harley, John B; Jarvik, Gail P; Kitchner, Terrie; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Larson, Eric B; Carrell, David S; Tromp, Gerard; Vrabec, Tamara R; Pendergrass, Sarah A; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics approaches to examine gene-gene models provide a means to discover interactions between multiple genes that underlie complex disease. Extensive computational demands and adjusting for multiple testing make uncovering genetic interactions a challenge. Here, we address these issues using our knowledge-driven filtering method, Biofilter, to identify putative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) interaction models for cataract susceptibility, thereby reducing the number of models for analysis. Models were evaluated in 3,377 European Americans (1,185 controls, 2,192 cases) from the Marshfield Clinic, a study site of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, using logistic regression. All statistically significant models from the Marshfield Clinic were then evaluated in an independent dataset of 4,311 individuals (742 controls, 3,569 cases), using independent samples from additional study sites in the eMERGE Network: Mayo Clinic, Group Health/University of Washington, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Geisinger Health System. Eighty-three SNP-SNP models replicated in the independent dataset at likelihood ratio test P < 0.05. Among the most significant replicating models was rs12597188 (intron of CDH1)–rs11564445 (intron of CTNNB1). These genes are known to be involved in processes that include: cell-to-cell adhesion signaling, cell-cell junction organization, and cell-cell communication. Further Biofilter analysis of all replicating models revealed a number of common functions among the genes harboring the 83 replicating SNP-SNP models, which included signal transduction and PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. These findings demonstrate the utility of Biofilter as a biology-driven method, applicable for any genome-wide association study dataset. PMID:25982363

  9. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    2000-06-27

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  10. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  11. Bravo/Nr-CAM is closely related to the cell adhesion molecules L1 and Ng-CAM and has a similar heterodimer structure

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Diverse cell-surface molecules of the nervous system play an important role in specifying cell interactions during development. Using a method designed to generate mAbs against neural surface molecules of defined molecular weight, we have previously reported on the surface protein, Bravo, found in the developing avian retinotectal system. Bravo is immunologically detected on developing optic fibers in the retina, but absent from distal regions of the same fibers in the tectum. We have isolated cDNA clones encompassing the entire coding region of Bravo, including clones containing five alternative sequences of cDNA. These putative alternatively spliced sequences encode stretches of polypeptide ranging in length from 10-93 amino acids and are predicted to be both extra- and intracellular. The deduced primary structure of Bravo reveals that, like the cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) chicken Ng- CAM and mouse L1, Bravo is composed of six Ig-like domains, five fibronectin type III repeats, a transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmic region. Recently, the cDNA sequence of a related molecule, Nr-CAM, was reported and its possible identity with Bravo discussed (Grumet, M., V. Mauro, M. P. Burgoon, G. E. Edelman, and B. A. Cunningham. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 113:1399-1412). Here we confirm this identity and moreover show that Bravo is found on Muller glial processes and end-feet in the developing retina. In contrast to the single polypeptide chain structure of Nr-CAM reported previously, we show that Bravo has a heterodimer structure composed of an alpha chain of M(r) 140/130 and a beta chain of 60-80 kD. As with L1 and Ng-CAM, the two chains of Bravo are generated from an intact polypeptide by cleavage at identical locations and conserved sites within all three molecules (Ser-Arg/Lys-Arg). The similar domain composition and heterodimer structure, as well as the 40% amino acid sequence identity of these molecules, defines them as an evolutionarily related subgroup of CAMs

  12. Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 5 Is an Important Surface Attachment Factor That Facilitates Entry of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Che-Man; Chu, Hin; Wang, Yixin; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Dong; Leung, Sze Pui; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Yeung, Man-Lung; Yan, Jinghua; Lu, Guangwen; Gao, George Fu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spike proteins of coronaviruses are capable of binding to a wide range of cellular targets, which contributes to the broad species tropism of coronaviruses. Previous reports have demonstrated that Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) predominantly utilizes dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) for cell entry. However, additional cellular binding targets of the MERS-CoV spike protein that may augment MERS-CoV infection have not been further explored. In the current study, using the virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA), we identified carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) as a novel cell surface binding target of MERS-CoV. CEACAM5 coimmunoprecipitated with the spike protein of MERS-CoV in both overexpressed and endogenous settings. Disrupting the interaction between CEACAM5 and MERS-CoV spike with anti-CEACAM5 antibody, recombinant CEACAM5 protein, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of CEACAM5 significantly inhibited the entry of MERS-CoV. Recombinant expression of CEACAM5 did not render nonpermissive baby hamster kidney (BHK21) cells susceptible to MERS-CoV infection. Instead, CEACAM5 overexpression significantly enhanced the attachment of MERS-CoV to the BHK21 cells. More importantly, the entry of MERS-CoV was increased when CEACAM5 was overexpressed in permissive cells, which suggested that CEACAM5 could facilitate MERS-CoV entry in conjunction with DPP4 despite not being able to support MERS-CoV entry independently. Taken together, the results of our study identified CEACAM5 as a novel cell surface binding target of MERS-CoV that facilitates MERS-CoV infection by augmenting the attachment of the virus to the host cell surface. IMPORTANCE Infection with the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with the highest mortality rate among all known human-pathogenic coronaviruses. Currently, there are no approved vaccines or therapeutics against MERS-CoV infection. The

  13. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulator of Cutaneous Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Granstein, Richard D.; Wagner, John A.; Stohl, Lori L.; Ding, Wanhong

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been viewed as a neuropeptide and vasodilator. However, CGRP is more appropriately thought of as a pleiotropic signaling molecule. Indeed, CGRP has key regulatory functions on immune and inflammatory processes within the skin. CGRP-containing nerves are intimately associated with epidermal LCs and CGRP has profound regulatory effects on Langerhans cell antigen-presenting capability. When LCs are exposed to CGRP in vitro, their ability to present antigen for in vivo priming of naïve mice or elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity is inhibited in at least some situations. Administration of CGRP intradermally inhibits acquisition of immunity to Th1-dominant haptens applied to the injected site while augmenting immunity to Th2-dominant haptens, although the cellular targets of activity in these experiments remains unclear. Although CGRP can be a pro-inflammatory agent, several studies have demonstrated that administration of CGRP can inhibit the elicitation of inflammation by inflammatory stimuli in vivo. In this regard, CGRP inhibits the release of certain chemokines by stimulated endothelial cells. This is likely to be physiologically relevant since cutaneous blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves. Exciting new studies suggest a significant role for CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and, most strikingly, that CGRP inhibit the ability of LCs to transmit the human immunodeficiency virus 1 to T lymphocytes. A more complete understanding of the role of CGRP in the skin immune system may lead to new and novel approaches for the therapy of immune mediated skin disorders. PMID:25534428

  14. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  15. Positive evolution of the glycoprotein (GP) gene is related to transmission of the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y X; Wang, L N; Wu, X M; Song, C X

    2016-03-28

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a fatal disease caused by the negative-strand RNA of the Ebola virus. A high-intensity outbreak of this fever was reported in West Africa last year; however, there is currently no definitive treatment strategy available for this disease. In this study, we analyzed the molecular evolutionary history and attempted to determine the positive selection sites in the Ebola genes using multiple-genomic sequences of the various Ebola virus subtypes, in order to gain greater clarity into the evolution of the virus and its various subtypes. Only the glycoprotein (GP) gene was positively selected among the 8 Ebola genes, with the other genes remaining in the purification stage. The positive selection sites in the GP gene were identified by a random-site model; these sites were found to be located in the mucin-like region, which is associated with transmembrane protein binding. Additionally, different branches of the phylogenetic tree displayed different positive sites, which in turn was responsible for differences in the cell adhesion ability of the virus. In conclusion, the pattern of positive sites in the GP gene is associated with the epidemiology and prevalence of Ebola in different areas.

  16. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament related genes identification using microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Hailong; Mao, Lingzhou; Xu, Peng; Xi, Yanhai; Xu, Ning; Xue, Mingtao; Yu, Jiangming; Ye, Xiaojian

    2014-01-10

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a kind of disease with physical barriers and neurological disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in OPLL patient ligament cells and identify the target sites for the prevention and treatment of OPLL in clinic. Gene expression data GSE5464 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus; then DEGs were screened by limma package in R language, and changed functions and pathways of OPLL cells compared to normal cells were identified by DAVID (The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery); finally, an interaction network of DEGs was constructed by string. A total of 1536 DEGs were screened, with 31 down-regulated and 1505 up-regulated genes. Response to wounding function and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway may involve in the development of OPLL. Genes, such as PDGFB, PRDX2 may involve in OPLL through response to wounding function. Toll-like receptor signaling pathway enriched genes such as TLR1, TLR5, and TLR7 may involve in spine cord injury in OPLL. PIK3R1 was the hub gene in the network of DEGs with the highest degree; INSR was one of the most closely related genes of it. OPLL related genes screened by microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis may be helpful for elucidating the mechanism of OPLL.

  17. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  18. Bilberry anthocyanin-rich extract alters expression of genes related to atherosclerosis development in aorta of apo E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mauray, A; Felgines, C; Morand, C; Mazur, A; Scalbert, A; Milenkovic, D

    2012-01-01

    Intake of anthocyanin-rich foods has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. We recently reported that a nutritional supplementation with a bilberry anthocyanin-rich extract (BE) attenuates atherosclerotic lesion development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE⁻/⁻) mice. However, the mechanism(s) of their preventive action are not completely understood. Anthocyanins may alter mRNA levels of genes related to atherosclerosis in cultured macrophages and endothelial cells, but in vivo studies remain scarce. The aim of the present study was to explore the in vivo mechanisms of action of the same bilberry extract, administered by supplementation at a nutritional level, in the aorta of apo E⁻/⁻ mice using a global transcriptomic approach. This study focused on the early stage of atherosclerosis development for better assessment of BE action on initiation mechanisms of this pathology. After a two week period, plasma lipid and antioxidant capacity were evaluated and the global genomic analysis was carried out using pangenomic microarrays. BE supplementation significantly improved hypercholesterolemia whereas the plasmatic antioxidant status remained unchanged. Nutrigenomic analysis identified 1261 genes which expression was modulated by BE in the aorta. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these genes are implicated in different cellular processes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, transendothelial migration and angiogenesis, processes associated with atherosclerosis development/protection. Some of the most significantly down-regulated genes included genes coding for AOX1, CYP2E1 or TXNIP implicated in the regulation of oxidative stress, JAM-A coding for adhesion molecules or VEGFR2 implicate in regulation of angiogenesis. Other genes were up-regulated, such as CRB3, CLDN14 or CDH4 potentially associated with increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased paracellular permeability. These results provide a global integrated view of the

  19. LGscore: A method to identify disease-related genes using biological literature and Google data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Kim, Hyunjin; Yoon, Youngmi; Park, Sanghyun

    2015-04-01

    Since the genome project in 1990s, a number of studies associated with genes have been conducted and researchers have confirmed that genes are involved in disease. For this reason, the identification of the relationships between diseases and genes is important in biology. We propose a method called LGscore, which identifies disease-related genes using Google data and literature data. To implement this method, first, we construct a disease-related gene network using text-mining results. We then extract gene-gene interactions based on co-occurrences in abstract data obtained from PubMed, and calculate the weights of edges in the gene network by means of Z-scoring. The weights contain two values: the frequency and the Google search results. The frequency value is extracted from literature data, and the Google search result is obtained using Google. We assign a score to each gene through a network analysis. We assume that genes with a large number of links and numerous Google search results and frequency values are more likely to be involved in disease. For validation, we investigated the top 20 inferred genes for five different diseases using answer sets. The answer sets comprised six databases that contain information on disease-gene relationships. We identified a significant number of disease-related genes as well as candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, colon cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Our method was up to 40% more accurate than existing methods.

  20. Discovering Implicit Entity Relation with the Gene-Citation-Gene Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min; Han, Nam-Gi; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Ding, Ying; Chambers, Tamy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the entitymetrics model to our constructed Gene-Citation-Gene (GCG) network. Based on the premise there is a hidden, but plausible, relationship between an entity in one article and an entity in its citing article, we constructed a GCG network of gene pairs implicitly connected through citation. We compare the performance of this GCG network to a gene-gene (GG) network constructed over the same corpus but which uses gene pairs explicitly connected through traditional co-occurrence. Using 331,411 MEDLINE abstracts collected from 18,323 seed articles and their references, we identify 25 gene pairs. A comparison of these pairs with interactions found in BioGRID reveal that 96% of the gene pairs in the GCG network have known interactions. We measure network performance using degree, weighted degree, closeness, betweenness centrality and PageRank. Combining all measures, we find the GCG network has more gene pairs, but a lower matching rate than the GG network. However, combining top ranked genes in both networks produces a matching rate of 35.53%. By visualizing both the GG and GCG networks, we find that cancer is the most dominant disease associated with the genes in both networks. Overall, the study indicates that the GCG network can be useful for detecting gene interaction in an implicit manner. PMID:24358368

  1. The urease gene cluster of Vibrio parahaemolyticus does not influence the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene or the TDH-related hemolysin gene.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Okuda, Jun; Iida, Tetsuya; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate why the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are produced at low levels from urease-positive strains, the effect of the functional urease gene cluster of V. parahaemolyticus on the expression of the tdh and trh genes was examined. Transcriptional lacZ fusions with the tdh1, tdh2, trh1 and trh2 genes representing variants of the tdh and trh genes were integrated into the chromosome of an Escherichia coli strain and a urease-negative V. parahaemolyticus strain. The plasmid-borne urease gene cluster introduced and expressed in these constructs did not affect expression of any of the fusion genes. The amount of TDH produced from a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive V. parahaemolyticus did not change by introduction of the urease gene cluster either. It was concluded therefore that the urease gene cluster is not involved in the regulation of tdh and trh expression.

  2. Integrin-mediated adhesion complex

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau

    2010-01-01

    The integrin-mediated adhesion machinery is the primary cell-matrix adhesion mechanism in Metazoa. The integrin adhesion complex, which modulates important aspects of the cell physiology, is composed of integrins (alpha and beta subunits) and several scaffolding and signaling proteins. Integrins appeared to be absent in all non-metazoan eukaryotes so-far analyzed, including fungi, plants and choanoflagellates, the sister-group to Metazoa. Thus, integrins and, therefore, the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling mechanism was considered a metazoan innovation. Recently, a broad comparative genomic analysis including new genome data from several unicellular organisms closely related to fungi and metazoans shattered previous views. The integrin adhesion and signaling complex is not specific to Metazoa, but rather it is present in apusozoans and holozoan protists. Thus, this important signaling and adhesion system predated the origin of Fungi and Metazoa, and was subsequently lost in fungi and choanoflagellates. This finding suggests that cooption played a more important role in the origin of Metazoa than previously believed. Here, we hypothesize that the integrin adhesome was ancestrally involved in signaling. PMID:21057645

  3. Age-related changes in cerebellar and hypothalamic function accompany non-microglial immune gene expression, altered synapse organization, and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission deficits

    PubMed Central

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Arikkath, Jyothi; Boska, Michael D.; Chaudoin, Tammy R.; DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Evan H.; Hoke, Traci A.; Mojtahedzedah, Vahid; Reyelts, Crystal D.; Sajja, Balasrinivasa; Schenk, A. Katrin; Tecott, Laurence H.; Volden, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe age-related molecular and neuronal changes that disrupt mobility or energy balance based on brain region and genetic background. Compared to young mice, aged C57BL/6 mice exhibit marked locomotor (but not energy balance) impairments. In contrast, aged BALB mice exhibit marked energy balance (but not locomotor) impairments. Age-related changes in cerebellar or hypothalamic gene expression accompany these phenotypes. Aging evokes upregulation of immune pattern recognition receptors and cell adhesion molecules. However, these changes do not localize to microglia, the major CNS immunocyte. Consistent with a neuronal role, there is a marked age-related increase in excitatory synapses over the cerebellum and hypothalamus. Functional imaging of these regions is consistent with age-related synaptic impairments. These studies suggest that aging reactivates a developmental program employed during embryogenesis where immune molecules guide synapse formation and pruning. Renewed activity in this program may disrupt excitatory neurotransmission, causing significant behavioral deficits. PMID:27689748

  4. Broadly distributed T cell reactivity, with no immunodominant loci, to the pre-erythrocytic antigen thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Plasmodium falciparum in West Africans.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, K L; Plebanski, M; Akinwunmi, P; Lee, E A; Reece, W H; Robson, K J; Hill, A V; Pinder, M

    1999-06-01

    Protective immunity to malaria has been achieved in human volunteers utilizing the pre-erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum antigen, the circumsporozoite protein (CS). However, T cell reactivity to CS is focused on several highly polymorphic T cell epitope regions, potentially limiting the efficacy of any vaccine to specific malaria strains. Another important pre-erythrocytic malaria antigen, the thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP), can induce protection in animal models of malaria, but knowledge of human T cell responses is limited to the identification of CD8 T cell epitopes, with no CD4 epitopes identified to date. This comprehensive study assessed reactivity to overlapping peptides spanning almost the whole of P. falciparum TRAP (PfTRAP), as well as peptides selected on the basis of HLA class II-binding motifs. A total of 50 naturally exposed Gambian adults were assessed to define 26 T cell epitopes in PfTRAP capable of inducing rapid IFN-gamma or IL-4 production, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunospot assays. In contrast to the CS protein, this reactivity was broadly distributed along the length of TRAP. Moreover, of the 26 epitopes identified, 10 were found to be conserved in West Africa.

  5. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  6. Increased Glucose-induced Secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Mice Lacking the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 2 (CEACAM2)*

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Simona S.; Heinrich, Garrett; Lester, Sumona G.; Pfeiffer, Verena; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Patel, Payal R.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Dai, Tong; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Smiley, Zachary N.; Jung, Dae Y.; Lee, Yongjin; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ergun, Suleyman; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Kim, Jason K.; Giovannucci, David R.; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 2 (CEACAM2) regulates food intake as demonstrated by hyperphagia in mice with the Ceacam2 null mutation (Cc2−/−). This study investigated whether CEACAM2 also regulates insulin secretion. Ceacam2 deletion caused an increase in β-cell secretory function, as assessed by hyperglycemic clamp analysis, without affecting insulin response. Although CEACAM2 is expressed in pancreatic islets predominantly in non-β-cells, basal plasma levels of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin, islet areas, and glucose-induced insulin secretion in pooled Cc2−/− islets were all normal. Consistent with immunofluorescence analysis showing CEACAM2 expression in distal intestinal villi, Cc2−/− mice exhibited a higher release of oral glucose-mediated GLP-1, an incretin that potentiates insulin secretion in response to glucose. Compared with wild type, Cc2−/− mice also showed a higher insulin excursion during the oral glucose tolerance test. Pretreating with exendin(9–39), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed the effect of Ceacam2 deletion on glucose-induced insulin secretion. Moreover, GLP-1 release into the medium of GLUTag enteroendocrine cells was increased with siRNA-mediated Ceacam2 down-regulation in parallel to an increase in Ca2+ entry through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Thus, CEACAM2 regulates insulin secretion, at least in part, by a GLP-1-mediated mechanism, independent of confounding metabolic factors. PMID:26586918

  7. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  8. Megakaryocyte- and megakaryocyte precursor–related gene therapies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be safely collected from the body, genetically modified, and re-infused into a patient with the goal to express the transgene product for an individual’s lifetime. Hematologic defects that can be corrected with an allogeneic bone marrow transplant can theoretically also be treated with gene replacement therapy. Because some genetic disorders affect distinct cell lineages, researchers are utilizing HSC gene transfer techniques using lineage-specific endogenous gene promoters to confine transgene expression to individual cell types (eg, ITGA2B for inherited platelet defects). HSCs appear to be an ideal target for platelet gene therapy because they can differentiate into megakaryocytes which are capable of forming several thousand anucleate platelets that circulate within blood vessels to establish hemostasis by repairing vascular injury. Platelets play an essential role in other biological processes (immune response, angiogenesis) as well as diseased states (atherosclerosis, cancer, thrombosis). Thus, recent advances in genetic manipulation of megakaryocytes could lead to new and improved therapies for treating a variety of disorders. In summary, genetic manipulation of megakaryocytes has progressed to the point where clinically relevant strategies are being developed for human trials for genetic disorders affecting platelets. Nevertheless, challenges still need to be overcome to perfect this field; therefore, strategies to increase the safety and benefit of megakaryocyte gene therapy will be discussed. PMID:26787735

  9. Megakaryocyte- and megakaryocyte precursor-related gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, David A

    2016-03-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be safely collected from the body, genetically modified, and re-infused into a patient with the goal to express the transgene product for an individual's lifetime. Hematologic defects that can be corrected with an allogeneic bone marrow transplant can theoretically also be treated with gene replacement therapy. Because some genetic disorders affect distinct cell lineages, researchers are utilizing HSC gene transfer techniques using lineage-specific endogenous gene promoters to confine transgene expression to individual cell types (eg, ITGA2B for inherited platelet defects). HSCs appear to be an ideal target for platelet gene therapy because they can differentiate into megakaryocytes which are capable of forming several thousand anucleate platelets that circulate within blood vessels to establish hemostasis by repairing vascular injury. Platelets play an essential role in other biological processes (immune response, angiogenesis) as well as diseased states (atherosclerosis, cancer, thrombosis). Thus, recent advances in genetic manipulation of megakaryocytes could lead to new and improved therapies for treating a variety of disorders. In summary, genetic manipulation of megakaryocytes has progressed to the point where clinically relevant strategies are being developed for human trials for genetic disorders affecting platelets. Nevertheless, challenges still need to be overcome to perfect this field; therefore, strategies to increase the safety and benefit of megakaryocyte gene therapy will be discussed.

  10. Ancient origin of the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling machinery.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Roger, Andrew J; Lang, Franz B; King, Nicole; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2010-06-01

    The evolution of animals (metazoans) from their unicellular ancestors required the emergence of novel mechanisms for cell adhesion and cell-cell communication. One of the most important cell adhesion mechanisms for metazoan development is integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling. The integrin adhesion complex mediates critical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix, modulating several aspects of cell physiology. To date this machinery has been considered strictly metazoan specific. Here we report the results of a comparative genomic analysis of the integrin adhesion machinery, using genomic data from several unicellular relatives of Metazoa and Fungi. Unexpectedly, we found that core components of the integrin adhesion complex are encoded in the genome of the apusozoan protist Amastigomonas sp., and therefore their origins predate the divergence of Opisthokonta, the clade that includes metazoans and fungi. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that key components of this apparatus have been lost independently in fungi and choanoflagellates. Our data highlight the fact that many of the key genes that had formerly been cited as crucial for metazoan origins have a much earlier origin. This underscores the importance of gene cooption in the unicellular-to-multicellular transition that led to the emergence of the Metazoa.

  11. Ancient origin of the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling machinery

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Roger, Andrew J.; Lang, Franz B.; King, Nicole; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of animals (metazoans) from their unicellular ancestors required the emergence of novel mechanisms for cell adhesion and cell–cell communication. One of the most important cell adhesion mechanisms for metazoan development is integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling. The integrin adhesion complex mediates critical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix, modulating several aspects of cell physiology. To date this machinery has been considered strictly metazoan specific. Here we report the results of a comparative genomic analysis of the integrin adhesion machinery, using genomic data from several unicellular relatives of Metazoa and Fungi. Unexpectedly, we found that core components of the integrin adhesion complex are encoded in the genome of the apusozoan protist Amastigomonas sp., and therefore their origins predate the divergence of Opisthokonta, the clade that includes metazoans and fungi. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that key components of this apparatus have been lost independently in fungi and choanoflagellates. Our data highlight the fact that many of the key genes that had formerly been cited as crucial for metazoan origins have a much earlier origin. This underscores the importance of gene cooption in the unicellular-to-multicellular transition that led to the emergence of the Metazoa. PMID:20479219

  12. Evolutionary history of the Rh blood group-related genes in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kitano, T; Saitou, N

    2000-08-01

    Rh and its homologous Rh50 gene products are considered to form heterotetramers on erythrocyte membranes. Rh protein has Rh blood group antigen sites, while Rh50 protein does not, and is more conserved than Rh protein. We previously determined both Rh and Rh50 gene cDNA coding regions from mouse and rat, and carried out phylogenetic analyses. In this study, we determined Rh50 gene cDNA coding regions from African clawed frog and Japanese medaka fish, and examined the long-term evolution of the Rh blood group and related genes. We constructed the phylogenetic tree from amino acid sequences. Rh50 genes of African clawed frog and Japanese medaka fish formed a cluster with mammalian Rh50 genes. The gene duplication time between Rh and Rh50 genes was estimated to be about 510 million years ago based on this tree. This period roughly corresponds to the Cambrian, before the divergence between jawless fish and jawed vertebrates. We also BLAST-searched an amino acid sequence database, and the Rh blood group and related genes were found to have homology with ammonium transporter genes of many organisms. Ammonium transporter genes can be classified into two major groups (amt alpha and amt beta). Both groups contain genes from three domains (bacteria, archaea, and eukaryota). The Rh blood group and related genes are separated from both amt alpha and beta groups.

  13. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-03-20

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans.

  14. Characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance against specific diseases is affecting profitability in fish production systems including rainbow trout. Limited information is known about functions and mechanisms of the immune gene pathways in teleosts. Immunogenomics are powerful tools to determine immune-related genes/gene pathways a...

  15. Characterization and expression analysis of a Retinoblastoma-related gene from Chinese wild Vitis pseudoreticulata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) genes, a conserved gene family in higher eukaryotes, plays an important role in cell differentiation, development and mammalian cell death in animals; however, little is known about its function in plants. In this study, an RBR gene was isolated from the Chinese wild gr...

  16. Understanding the Role of Housekeeping and Stress-Related Genes in Transcription-Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison; Kavraki, Lydia; Balázsi, Gábor

    2008-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of completely sequenced genomes, much remains to be learned about how living cells process environmental information and respond to changes in their surroundings. Accumulating evidence indicates that eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes can be classified in two distinct categories that we will call class I and class II. Class I genes are housekeeping genes, often characterized by stable, noise resistant expression levels. In contrast, class II genes are stress-related genes and often have noisy, unstable expression levels. In this work we analyze the large scale transcription-regulatory networks (TRN) of E. coli and S. cerevisiae and preliminary data on H. sapien. We find that stable, housekeeping genes (class I) are preferentially utilized as transcriptional inputs while stress related, unstable genes (class II) are utilized as transcriptional integrators. This might be the result of convergent evolution that placed the appropriate genes in the appropriate locations within transcriptional networks according to some fundamental principles that govern cellular information processing.

  17. Adhesive interactions between vesicles in the strong adhesion limit

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Arun; Anderson, Travers H.; Leal, L. Gary; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the adhesive interaction energy between a pair of vesicles in the strong adhesion limit, in which bending forces play a negligible role in determining vesicle shape compared to forces due to membrane stretching. Although force-distance or energy distance relationships characterizing adhesive interactions between fluid bilayers are routinely measured using the surface forces apparatus, the atomic force microscope and the biomembrane force probe, the interacting bilayers in these methods are supported on surfaces (e.g. mica sheet) and cannot be deformed. However, it is known that in a suspension, vesicles composed of the same bilayer can deform by stretching or bending, and can also undergo changes in volume. Adhesively interacting vesicles can thus form flat regions in the contact zone, which will result in an enhanced interaction energy as compared to rigid vesicles. The focus of this paper is to examine the magnitude of the interaction energy between adhesively interacting, deformed vesicles relative to free, undeformed vesicles as a function of the intervesicle separation. The modification of the intervesicle interaction energy due to vesicle deformability can be calculated knowing the undeformed radius of the vesicles, R0, the bending modulus kb, the area expansion modulus Ka, and the adhesive minimum WP(0) and separation DP(0) in the energy of interaction between two flat bilayers, which can be obtained from the force-distance measurements made using the above supported-bilayer methods. For vesicles with constant volumes, we show that adhesive potentials between non-deforming bilayers such as ∣WP(0)∣∼5×10−4mJ/m2, which are ordinarily considered weak in colloidal physics literature, can result in significantly deep (>10×) energy minima due to increase in vesicle area and flattening in the contact region. If the osmotic expulsion of water across the vesicles driven by the tense, stretched membrane in the presence of an osmotically active

  18. A hybrid computational method for the discovery of novel reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Guohua; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying reproduction is of great importance to infertility treatment and to the generation of healthy offspring. In this study, we discovered novel reproduction-related genes with a hybrid computational method, integrating three different types of method, which offered new clues for further reproduction research. This method was first executed on a weighted graph, constructed based on known protein-protein interactions, to search the shortest paths connecting any two known reproduction-related genes. Genes occurring in these paths were deemed to have a special relationship with reproduction. These newly discovered genes were filtered with a randomization test. Then, the remaining genes were further selected according to their associations with known reproduction-related genes measured by protein-protein interaction score and alignment score obtained by BLAST. The in-depth analysis of the high confidence novel reproduction genes revealed hidden mechanisms of reproduction and provided guidelines for further experimental validations.

  19. Relative Dominance of Physical versus Chemical Effects on the Transport of Adhesion-Deficient Bacteria in Intact Cores from South Oyster, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hailang; Onstott, Tullis C.; Deflaun, Mary F.; Fuller, Mark E.; Scheibe, Timothy D. ); Streger, Sheryl H.; Rothmel, Randi K.; Mailloux, Brian J.

    2002-03-01

    Bacterial transport experiments were conducted using intact sediment cores collected near South Oyster, VA to delineate the relative importance of physical and chemical heterogeneity in controlling transport of an adhesion-deficient bacterial strain. The sediments consisted of quartz and feldspar with a variable amount of clay and metal hydroxide coatings on the grains. A nonmotile, gram-negative indigenous groundwater strain, designated as Comamonas sp. DA001, was injected into the cores along with a conservative tracer bromide (Br). Bacterial breakthrough preceded the arrival of Br. This differential advection phenomenon can be accounted for by reduction of the effective porosity for the bacteria relative to Br. The distribution of cells remaining in the core was highly variable, ranging from nearly uniform concentrations to exponentially decreasing concentrations. The fraction of bacterial retention in the core was positively correlated with the abundance of the metal hydroxides and negatively correlated with grain size. Because grain size was correlated with the abundance of the metal hydroxide coatings, it was difficult to separate the effects of grain size and mineralogy. The fraction of the bacterial retention accounted for by the effect of grain size exhibited no correlation with the abundance of the metal hydroxides, indicating that the bacterial retention was primarily controlled by grain size. Reasons for the lack of influence of mineralogy on bacterial retention include (1) the slightly negatively charged bacterial surfaces; (2) insufficient heterogeneity of sediment surface properties; and (3) the masking of the positive charge of the metal hydroxide surfaces by adsorbed organic carbon (up to 1180 ppm). This study demonstrates that the laboratory based bacterial transport experiments are effective in delineating physical versus chemical controlling factors, and provide an important link to field-based bacterial transport studies.

  20. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Aurora; Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain.

  1. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  2. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies related to lung injury in a preterm lamb model

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Fantini, Prue M.; Rajapaksa, Anushi E.; Oakley, Regina; Tingay, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Preterm newborns often require invasive support, however even brief periods of supported ventilation applied inappropriately to the lung can cause injury. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) has been extensively employed in studies of ventilation-induced lung injury with the reference gene 18S ribosomal RNA (18S RNA) most commonly employed as the internal control reference gene. Whilst the results of these studies depend on the stability of the reference gene employed, the use of 18S RNA has not been validated. In this study the expression profile of five candidate reference genes (18S RNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TOP1 and RPS29) in two geographical locations, was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, Bestkeeper and ΔCt method and the overall stability of these candidate genes determined (RefFinder). Secondary studies examined the influence of reference gene choice on the relative expression of two well-validated lung injury markers; EGR1 and IL1B. In the setting of the preterm lamb model of lung injury, RPS29 reference gene expression was influenced by tissue location; however we determined that individual ventilation strategies influence reference gene stability. Whilst 18S RNA is the most commonly employed reference gene in preterm lamb lung studies, our results suggest that GAPDH is a more suitable candidate. PMID:27210246

  3. cDNA cloning reveals the molecular structure of a sperm surface protein, PH-20, involved in sperm-egg adhesion and the wide distribution of its gene among mammals

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida in mammals is a cell-cell adhesion process that is generally species specific. The guinea pig sperm protein PH-20 has a required function in sperm adhesion to the zona pellucida of guinea pig eggs. PH-20 is located on both the sperm plasma membrane and acrosomal membrane. We report here the isolation and sequence of a full-length cDNA for PH-20 (available from EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ under accession number X56332). The derived amino acid sequence shows a mature protein of 468 amino acids containing six N-linked glycosylation sites and twelve cysteines, eight of which are tightly clustered near the COOH terminus. The sequence indicates PH-20 is a novel protein with no relationship to the mouse sperm adhesion protein galactosyl transferase and no significant homology with other known proteins. The two PH-20 populations, plasma membrane and acrosomal membrane, could arise because one form of PH-20 is encoded and differentially targeted at different spermatogenic stages. Alternatively, two different forms of PH-20 could be encoded. Our evidence thus far reveals only one sequence coding for PH-20: Southern blots of guinea pig genomic DNA indicated there is a single PH-20 gene, Northern blots showed a single size PH-20 message (approximately 2.2 kb), and no sequence variants were found among the sequenced cDNA clones. Cross-species Southern blots reveal the presence of a homologue of the PH-20 gene in mouse, rat, hamster, rabbit, bovine, monkey, and human genomic DNA, showing the PH-20 gene is conserved among mammals. Since genes for zona glycoproteins are also conserved among mammals, the general features of sperm and zona proteins involved in mammalian sperm-egg adhesion may have been evolutionarily maintained. Species specificity may result from limited changes in these molecules, either in their binding domains or in other regions that affect the ability of the binding domains to interact. PMID:2269661

  4. Laughter up-regulates the genes related to NK cell activity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Tsujii, Satoru; Iburi, Tadao; Tamanaha, Tamiko; Yamagami, Keiko; Ishibashi, Rieko; Hori, Miyo; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Ishii, Hitoshi; Murakami, Kazuo

    2007-12-01

    To elucidate the sustainable effects of laughter on gene expression, we recruited type 2 diabetic patients who were in-patient for receiving self-management education and examined time-dependent regulation for gene expression by laughter. Two-day experiment was performed. On one day, the patients watched comic video and laughed together with hospital staffs. On the other day, they participated in an inpatient diabetes educational program. Blood samples were collected before and 1.5, 4 h after watching comic video or spending lecture time, and changes in gene expression were comprehensively analyzed by microarray technique. Of the 41,000 genes analyzed, the laughter relatively up-regulated 39 genes, among which, 27 genes were relatively increased in the expression for all the observation period after watching comic video. By functional classification of these genes, 14 genes were found to be related to natural killer cell activity. No genes were included that are directly involved in blood glucose regulation, though successive suppression of postprandial blood glucose levels was observed. These results suggest that the laughter influences the expression of many genes classified into immune responses, and may contribute to amelioration of postprandial blood glucose elevation through a modulation of NK cell activity caused by up-regulation of relating genes.

  5. Transcriptome-Wide Differential Gene Expression in Bicyclus anynana Butterflies: Female Vision-Related Genes Are More Plastic.

    PubMed

    Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Smith, Gilbert; Monteiro, Antónia; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-01-01

    Vision is energetically costly to maintain. Consequently, over time many cave-adapted species downregulate the expression of vision genes or even lose their eyes and associated eye genes entirely. Alternatively, organisms that live in fluctuating environments, with different requirements for vision at different times, may evolve phenotypic plasticity for expression of vision genes. Here, we use a global transcriptomic and candidate gene approach to compare gene expression in the heads of a polyphenic butterfly. Bicyclus anynana have two seasonal forms that display sexual dimorphism and plasticity in eye morphology, and female-specific plasticity in opsin gene expression. Nonchoosy dry season females downregulate opsin expression, consistent with the high physiological cost of vision. To identify other genes associated with sexually dimorphic and seasonally plastic differences in vision, we analyzed RNA-sequencing data from whole head tissues. We identified two eye development genes (klarsicht and warts homologs) and an eye pigment biosynthesis gene (henna) differentially expressed between seasonal forms. By comparing sex-specific expression across seasonal forms, we found that klarsicht, warts, henna, and another eye development gene (domeless) were plastic in a female-specific manner. In a male-only analysis, white (w) was differentially expressed between seasonal forms. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that warts and white are expressed in eyes only, whereas klarsicht, henna and domeless are expressed in both eyes and brain. We find that differential expression of eye development and eye pigment genes is associated with divergent eye phenotypes in B. anynana seasonal forms, and that there is a larger effect of season on female vision-related genes.

  6. Identifying and Analyzing Novel Epilepsy-Related Genes Using Random Walk with Restart Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Shang, Dong-Mei; Cao, Jing-Hui; Feng, Kaiyan; Wang, ShaoPeng

    2017-01-01

    As a pathological condition, epilepsy is caused by abnormal neuronal discharge in brain which will temporarily disrupt the cerebral functions. Epilepsy is a chronic disease which occurs in all ages and would seriously affect patients' personal lives. Thus, it is highly required to develop effective medicines or instruments to treat the disease. Identifying epilepsy-related genes is essential in order to understand and treat the disease because the corresponding proteins encoded by the epilepsy-related genes are candidates of the potential drug targets. In this study, a pioneering computational workflow was proposed to predict novel epilepsy-related genes using the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm. As reported in the literature RWR algorithm often produces a number of false positive genes, and in this study a permutation test and functional association tests were implemented to filter the genes identified by RWR algorithm, which greatly reduce the number of suspected genes and result in only thirty-three novel epilepsy genes. Finally, these novel genes were analyzed based upon some recently published literatures. Our findings implicate that all novel genes were closely related to epilepsy. It is believed that the proposed workflow can also be applied to identify genes related to other diseases and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases. PMID:28255556

  7. Identification of genes related to beak deformity of chickens using digital gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Yanyan; Liu, Ranran; Liu, Nian; Li, Dongli; Wen, Jie; Chen, Jilan

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of up to 3% of beak deformity (normally a crossed beak) occur in some indigenous chickens in China, such as and Beijing-You. Chickens with deformed beaks have reduced feed intake, growth rate, and abnormal behaviors. Beak deformity represents an economic as well as an animal welfare problem in the poultry industry. Because the genetic basis of beak deformity remains incompletely understood, the present study sought to identify important genes and metabolic pathways involved in this phenotype. Digital gene expression analysis was performed on deformed and normal beaks collected from Beijing-You chickens to detect global gene expression differences. A total of >11 million cDNA tags were sequenced, and 5,864,499 and 5,648,877 clean tags were obtained in the libraries of deformed and normal beaks, respectively. In total, 1,156 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were identified in the deformed beak with 409 being up-regulated and 747 down-regulated in the deformed beaks. qRT-PCR using eight genes was performed to verify the results of DGE profiling. Gene ontology (GO) analysis highlighted that genes of the keratin family on GGA25 were abundant among the DEGs. Pathway analysis showed that many DEGs were linked to the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids and glycerolipid metabolism. Combining the analyses, 11 genes (MUC, LOC426217, BMP4, ACAA1, LPL, ALDH7A1, GLA, RETSAT, SDR16C5, WWOX, and MOGAT1) were highlighted as potential candidate genes for beak deformity in chickens. Some of these genes have been identified previously, while others have unknown function with respect to thus phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide study to investigate the transcriptome differences in the deformed and normal beaks of chickens. The DEGs identified here are worthy of further functional characterization.

  8. Identification of Genes Related to Beak Deformity of Chickens Using Digital Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanyan; Liu, Ranran; Liu, Nian; Li, Dongli; Wen, Jie; Chen, Jilan

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of up to 3% of beak deformity (normally a crossed beak) occur in some indigenous chickens in China, such as and Beijing-You. Chickens with deformed beaks have reduced feed intake, growth rate, and abnormal behaviors. Beak deformity represents an economic as well as an animal welfare problem in the poultry industry. Because the genetic basis of beak deformity remains incompletely understood, the present study sought to identify important genes and metabolic pathways involved in this phenotype. Digital gene expression analysis was performed on deformed and normal beaks collected from Beijing-You chickens to detect global gene expression differences. A total of >11 million cDNA tags were sequenced, and 5,864,499 and 5,648,877 clean tags were obtained in the libraries of deformed and normal beaks, respectively. In total, 1,156 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were identified in the deformed beak with 409 being up-regulated and 747 down-regulated in the deformed beaks. qRT-PCR using eight genes was performed to verify the results of DGE profiling. Gene ontology (GO) analysis highlighted that genes of the keratin family on GGA25 were abundant among the DEGs. Pathway analysis showed that many DEGs were linked to the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids and glycerolipid metabolism. Combining the analyses, 11 genes (MUC, LOC426217, BMP4, ACAA1, LPL, ALDH7A1, GLA, RETSAT, SDR16C5, WWOX, and MOGAT1) were highlighted as potential candidate genes for beak deformity in chickens. Some of these genes have been identified previously, while others have unknown function with respect to thus phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide study to investigate the transcriptome differences in the deformed and normal beaks of chickens. The DEGs identified here are worthy of further functional characterization. PMID:25198128

  9. The PMP22 Gene and Its Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Parker, Brett; Martyn, Colin; Natarajan, Chandramohan; Guo, Jiasong

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) is primarily expressed in the compact myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Levels of PMP22 have to be tightly regulated since alterations of PMP22 levels by mutations of the PMP22 gene are responsible for >50% of all patients with inherited peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth type-1A (CMT1A) with trisomy of PMP22, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of PMP22, and CMT1E with point mutations of PMP22. While over-expression and point-mutations of the PMP22 gene may produce gain-of-function phenotypes, deletion of PMP22 results in a loss-of-function phenotype that reveals the normal physiological functions of the PMP22 protein. In this article, we will review the basic genetics, biochemistry and molecular structure of PMP22, followed by discussion of the current understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involving in the inherited neuropathies with mutations in PMP22 gene. PMID:23224996

  10. Replicon-dependent differentiation of symbiosis-related genes in Sinorhizobium strains nodulating Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui Juan; Wang, En Tao; Zhang, Xing Xing; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yan Ming; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-02-01

    In order to investigate the genetic differentiation of Sinorhizobium strains nodulating Glycine max and related microevolutionary mechanisms, three housekeeping genes (SMc00019, truA, and thrA) and 16 symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome (7 genes), pSymA (6 genes), and pSymB (3 genes) were analyzed. Five distinct species were identified among the test strains by calculating the average nucleotide identity (ANI) of SMc00019-truA-thrA: Sinorhizobium fredii, Sinorhizobium sojae, Sinorhizobium sp. I, Sinorhizobium sp. II, and Sinorhizobium sp. III. These species assignments were also supported by population genetics and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes and symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome and pSymB. Different levels of genetic differentiation were observed among these species or different replicons. S. sojae was the most divergent from the other test species and was characterized by its low intraspecies diversity and limited geographic distribution. Intergenic recombination dominated the evolution of 19 genes from different replicons. Intraspecies recombination happened frequently in housekeeping genes and symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome and pSymB, whereas pSymA genes showed a clear pattern of lateral-transfer events between different species. Moreover, pSymA genes were characterized by a lower level of polymorphism and recombination than those on the chromosome and pSymB. Taken together, genes from different replicons of rhizobia might be involved in the establishment of symbiosis with legumes, but these symbiosis-related genes might have evolved differently according to their corresponding replicons.

  11. T (Thomsen-Friedenreich) and Tn epitope location and their spatial relations to adhesion plaques on human breast carcinoma cells: immunogold-silver staining studies at scanning electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Wang, B L; Springer, G F; Harwick, L C

    1998-10-01

    T and Tn are pancarcinoma epitopes (EPs) which can be immunodetected in about 90% of adenocarcinomas (CAs). To study the location of T and Tn EPs and their relations to adhesion plaques on CA cells, immunogold-silver staining method was employed at scanning electron microscope (SEM) level. Human breast CA cells grown on coverslips were fixed in paraformaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, reacted with cocktails of monoclonal antibodies against T or Tn EPs, followed by incubation with 10 nm gold conjugated goat anti-mouse immuno-globulins. The positive gold particle labelling was amplified with silver enhancement solution, and the specimens were then routinely critical point dried, sputter-coated with palladium and observed under SEM. The studies show that T and Tn EPs are not randomly distributed on CA cell surface; they are aggregated at the adhesion plaque area. These results confirm that T and Tn EPs play roles in CA cell adhesion, and suggest that they may represent the initial points of contact by immuno-effectors and therefore can be utilized in immunointervention and anti-adhesion therapy against CA.

  12. Adrenomedullin and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in endocrine-related cancers: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Poyner, David R

    2011-02-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), adrenomedullin 2 (AM2/intermedin) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are members of the calcitonin family of peptides. They can act as growth or survival factors for a number of tumours, including those that are endocrine-related. One mechanism through which this occurs is stimulating angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. AM is expressed by numerous tumour types and for some cancers, plasma AM levels can be correlated with the severity of the disease. In cancer models, lowering AM content or blocking AM receptors can reduce tumour mass. AM receptors are complexes formed between a seven transmembrane protein, calcitonin receptor-like receptor and one of the two accessory proteins, receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 2 or 3 to give the AM1 and AM2 receptors respectively. AM also has affinity at the CGRP receptor, which uses RAMP1. Unfortunately, due to a lack of selective pharmacological tools or antibodies to distinguish AM and CGRP receptors, the precise receptors and signal transduction pathways used by the peptides are often uncertain. Two other membrane proteins, RDC1 and L1/G10D (the 'ADMR'), are not currently considered to be genuine CGRP or AM receptors. In order to properly evaluate whether AM or CGRP receptor inhibition has a role in cancer therapy, it is important to identify which receptors mediate the effects of these peptides. To effectively distinguish AM1 and AM2 receptors, selective receptor antagonists need to be developed. The development of specific CGRP receptor antagonists suggests that this is now feasible.

  13. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  14. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  15. Learning-related synaptic growth mediated by internalization of Aplysia cell adhesion molecule is controlled by membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Shim, Jaehoon; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Nuribalhae; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Bailey, Craig H; Kandel, Eric R; Jang, Deok-Jin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2012-11-14

    Long-term facilitation in Aplysia is accompanied by the growth of new synaptic connections between the sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. One of the initial steps leading to the growth of these synapses is the internalization, induced by 5-HT, of the transmembrane isoform of Aplysia cell-adhesion molecule (TM-apCAM) from the plasma membrane of sensory neurons (Bailey et al., 1992). However, the mechanisms that govern the internalization of TM-apCAM and how this internalization is coupled to the molecular events that initiate the structural changes are not fully understood. Here, we report that the synthesis of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)], which is known to be mediated by a signaling cascade through Aplysia Sec7 protein (ApSec7) and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type I α (PIP5KIα) is required for both the internalization of TM-apCAM and the initiation of synaptic growth during 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation. Pharmacological blockade of PI(4,5)P(2) synthesis by the application of the inhibitor phenylarsine oxide blocked the internalization of apCAM. Furthermore, perturbation of the endogenous activation of ApSec7 and its downstream target PIP5KIα also blocked 5-HT-mediated internalization of TM-apCAM and synaptic growth. Finally, long-term facilitation was specifically impaired by blocking the ApSec7 signaling pathway at sensory-to-motor neuron synapses. These data indicate that the ApSec7/PIP5KIα signaling pathway is actively recruited during learning-related 5-HT signaling and acts as a key regulator of apCAM internalization associated with the formation of new synaptic connections during long-term facilitation.

  16. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  17. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  18. Human speech- and reading-related genes display partially overlapping expression patterns in the marmoset brain.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaki; Okanoya, Kazuo; Koike, Taku; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shigeru; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Language is a characteristic feature of human communication. Several familial language impairments have been identified, and candidate genes for language impairments already isolated. Studies comparing expression patterns of these genes in human brain are necessary to further understanding of these genes. However, it is difficult to examine gene expression in human brain. In this study, we used a non-human primate (common marmoset; Callithrix jacchus) as a biological model of the human brain to investigate expression patterns of human speech- and reading-related genes. Expression patterns of speech disorder- (FoxP2, FoxP1, CNTNAP2, and CMIP) and dyslexia- (ROBO1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319) related genes were analyzed. We found the genes displayed overlapping expression patterns in the ocular, auditory, and motor systems. Our results enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying language impairments.

  19. [The effect of topology of quorum sensing-related genes in Pectobacterium atrosepticumon their expression].

    PubMed

    Gogoleva, N E; Shlykova, L V; Gorshkov, V Iu; Daminova, A G; Gogolev, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    In prokaryotic genomes, the neighboring genes are often located on the complementary DNA strands and adjoin each other by their 5'- or 3'-ends or even overlap by their open reading frames. It was suggested that such gene topology hasfunctional purpose providing the regulation of their expression. For those genes that overlap by their coding 3'-termini this assumption has not been confirmed experimentally. In a broad group of bacteria that belong to proteobacteria such a convergent gene arrangement is typical for functionally connected quorum sensing-related genes "P" and "R" that encode synthases of N-acyl homoserine lactones and their sensors, respectively. In the present study on the example of overlapping quorum sensing-related genes of plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043--expI and expR it was shown that the topology of these genes determines the regula- tion of their expression.

  20. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain. PMID:27322383

  1. Transcription regulatory mechanism of Pitx in the papilla-forming region in the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi, implies conserved involvement of Otx as the upstream gene in the adhesive organ development of chordates.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keita; Ueno, Motoko; Niwano, Tomoko; Saiga, Hidetoshi

    2012-08-01

    Pitx genes play important roles in a variety of developmental processes in vertebrates. In an ascidian species, Halocynthia roretzi, Hr-Pitx, the only Pitx gene of this species, has been reported to be expressed in the left epidermis at the tailbud stage. In the present study, first, we have shown that Hr-Pitx is also expressed in the papilla-forming region at the neurula to tailbud stages, and then we addressed transcription regulatory mechanisms for the expression of Hr-Pitx in the papilla-forming region. We have identified the genomic region ranging from 850 to 1211 bp upstream from the translation start site of the Hr-Pitx gene as an enhancer region that drives the transcription of Hr-Pitx in the papilla-forming region. Within the enhancer region, putative transcriptional factor binding sites for Otx as well as Fox were shown to be required for its activity. Finally, we carried out knocking down experiments of Hr-Otx function using an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide, in which the knocking down of Hr-Otx function resulted in reduction of the enhancer activity and loss of the expression of Hr-Pitx in the papilla-forming region. In Xenopus laevis, it has been reported that Pitx genes are expressed downstream of Otx function during development of the cement gland, an adhesive organ of its larva. Taken together, it is suggested that the expression regulatory mechanism of Pitx, involving Otx as the upstream gene, in the developing adhesive organ is conserved between ascidians and vertebrates.

  2. Connecting myelin-related and synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia with SNP-rich gene expression hubs

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Hedi

    2017-01-01

    Combining genome-wide mapping of SNP-rich regions in schizophrenics and gene expression data in all brain compartments across the human life span revealed that genes with promoters most frequently mutated in schizophrenia are expression hubs interacting with far more genes than the rest of the genome. We summed up the differentially methylated “expression neighbors” of genes that fall into one of 108 distinct schizophrenia-associated loci with high number of SNPs. Surprisingly, the number of expression neighbors of the genes in these loci were 35 times higher for the positively correlating genes (32 times higher for the negatively correlating ones) than for the rest of the ~16000 genes. While the genes in the 108 loci have little known impact in schizophrenia, we identified many more known schizophrenia-related important genes with a high degree of connectedness (e.g. MOBP, SYNGR1 and DGCR6), validating our approach. Both the most connected positive and negative hubs affected synapse-related genes the most, supporting the synaptic origin of schizophrenia. At least half of the top genes in both the correlating and anti-correlating categories are cancer-related, including oncogenes (RRAS and ALDOA), providing further insight into the observed inverse relationship between the two diseases. PMID:28382934

  3. Genome-Wide Gene Expression in relation to Age in Large Laboratory Cohorts of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kimberly A.; Gardner, Kylee; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carlson, Darby J.; Yu, Fang; Eudy, James D.; Zhang, Chi; Harshman, Lawrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a complex process characterized by a steady decline in an organism's ability to perform life-sustaining tasks. In the present study, two cages of approximately 12,000 mated Drosophila melanogaster females were used as a source of RNA from individuals sampled frequently as a function of age. A linear model for microarray data method was used for the microarray analysis to adjust for the box effect; it identified 1,581 candidate aging genes. Cluster analyses using a self-organizing map algorithm on the 1,581 significant genes identified gene expression patterns across different ages. Genes involved in immune system function and regulation, chorion assembly and function, and metabolism were all significantly differentially expressed as a function of age. The temporal pattern of data indicated that gene expression related to aging is affected relatively early in life span. In addition, the temporal variance in gene expression in immune function genes was compared to a random set of genes. There was an increase in the variance of gene expression within each cohort, which was not observed in the set of random genes. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that D. melanogaster immune function genes lose control of gene expression as flies age. PMID:26090231

  4. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri: Control of Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-04

    The pool of mutagenized plasmids was used to transform E . coli cells containing pHIK555 a plasmid compatible with pHK724 which possesses functional...inclusion bodies form upon overexpression of a foreign protein in E . coli . WORK PLAN (Year 2): The mutations described define two regions in the terminal...RR04106 411d019 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) U. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression

  5. Gene regulations in HBV-related liver cirrhosis closely correlate with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seram; Kim, Soyoun

    2007-09-30

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is defined as comprising diffuse fibrosis and regenerating nodules of the liver. The biochemical and anatomical dysfunction in LC results from both reduced liver cell number and portal vascular derangement. Although several studies have investigated dysregulated genes in cirrhotic nodules, little is known about the genes implicated in the pathophysiologic change of LC or about their relationship with the degree of decompensation. Here, we applied cDNA microarray analysis using 38 HBsAg-positive LC specimens to identify the genes dysregulated in HBV-associated LC and to evaluate their relation to disease severity. Among 1063 known cancer- and apoptosis-related genes, we identified 104 genes that were significantly up- (44) or down- (60) regulated in LC. Interestingly, this subset of 104 genes was characteristically correlated with the degree of decompensation, called the Pugh-Child classification (20 Pugh-Child A, 10 Pugh-Child B, and 8 Pugh-Child C). Patient samples from Pugh-Child C exhibited a distinct pattern of gene expression relative to those of Pugh-Child A and B. Especially in Pugh-Child C, genes encoding hepatic proteins and metabolizing enzymes were significantly down-regulated, while genes encoding various molecules related to cell replication were up-regulated. Our results suggest that subsets of genes in liver cells correspond to the pathophysiologic change of LC according to disease severity and possibly to hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, RuiJie; Li, Xia; Jiang, YongShuai; Liu, GuiYou; Li, ChuanXing; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Gong, BinSheng

    2009-02-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Tests, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alcoholism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1 approximately 22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes precisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with existing knowledge framework.

  7. Age-related regulation of genes: slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Kotoku; Zhang, Kezhong; Huo, Jeffrey; Ameri, Afshin; Kuwahara, Mitsuhiro; Fontaine, Jean-Marc; Yamamoto, Kei; Kurachi, Sumiko

    2002-11-01

    Through systematic studies of pro- and anti-blood coagulation factors, we have determined molecular mechanisms involving two genetic elements, age-related stability element (ASE), GAGGAAG and age-related increase element (AIE), a unique stretch of dinucleotide repeats (AIE). ASE and AIE are essential for age-related patterns of stable and increased gene expression patterns, respectively. Such age-related gene regulatory mechanisms are also critical for explaining homeostasis in various physiological reactions as well as slow homeostatic changes in them. The age-related increase expression of the human factor IX (hFIX) gene requires the presence of both ASE and AIE, which apparently function additively. The anti-coagulant factor protein C (hPC) gene uses an ASE (CAGGAG) to produce age-related stable expression. Both ASE sequences (G/CAGAAG) share consensus sequence of the transcriptional factor PEA-3 element. No other similar sequences, including another PEA-3 consensus sequence, GAGGATG, function in conferring age-related gene regulation. The age-regulatory mechanisms involving ASE and AIE apparently function universally with different genes and across different animal species. These findings have led us to develop a new field of research and applications, which we named “age-dimension technology (ADT)”. ADT has exciting potential for modifying age-related expression of genes as well as associated physiological processes, and developing novel, more effective prophylaxis or treatments for age-related diseases.

  8. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoman; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Lan-Dian; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature. PMID:26543496

  9. Circadian rhythm-related genes: implication in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lebailly, B; Boitard, C; Rogner, U C

    2015-09-01

    Recent gene association and functional studies have proven the implication of several circadian rhythm-related genes in diabetes. Diabetes has been related to variation in central circadian regulation and peripheral oscillation. Different transcriptional regulators have been identified. Circadian genes are clearly implicated in metabolic pathways, pancreatic function and in type 2 diabetes. Much less evidence has been shown for the link between circadian regulation and type 1 diabetes. The hypothesis that circadian genes are involved in type 1 diabetes is reinforced by findings that the immune system undergoes circadian variation and that several autoimmune diseases are associated with circadian genes. Recent findings in the non-obese diabetic mouse model pinpoint to specific mechanisms controlling type 1 diabetes by the clock-related gene Arntl2 in the immune system.

  10. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  11. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1978-03-01

    Late sequelae (adhesive arachnoiditis) have been reported following myelography with the oily contrast medium (Pantopaque) and with the ionic water-soluble contrast media methiodal sodium (Abrodil, Conturex, Kontrast U) meglumine iothalamate (Conray Meglumine) and meglumine iocarmate (Bis-Conray, Dimer-X). Adhesive arachnoiditis has not yet been reported after the use of the nonionic water-soluble contrast medium metrizamide (Amipaque). Thus, this is considered the contrast medium of choice for lumbar myelography. Using the recommended dose of 10 ml with an iodine concentration of 170 mg/ml for this examination, adhesive arachnoiditis is unlikely to occur. Increased osmolality of spinal fluid after injection of contrast medium is related to increased frequency of arachnoiditis.

  12. Adhesion to and invasion of HeLa cells by pathogenic Escherichia coli carrying the afa-3 gene cluster are mediated by the AfaE and AfaD proteins, respectively.

    PubMed

    Jouve, M; Garcia, M I; Courcoux, P; Labigne, A; Gounon, P; Le Bouguénec, C

    1997-10-01

    The afa-3 gene cluster, expressed by uropathogenic and diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli strains, determines the formation of an afimbrial adhesive sheath composed of the AfaD and AfaE-III adhesins. The adherence to HeLa cells by recombinant HB101 strains producing both or only one of these two adhesins was investigated. Ultrastructural analyses of the interaction and gentamicin protection assays showed adherence to HeLa cells by HB101 producing both the AfaD and AfaE-III proteins and internalization of a subpopulation of the bacteria into the cells. The interactions of HeLa cells either with HB101 mutants producing AfaD or AfaE-III or with polystyrene beads coated with purified His6-tagged AfaD or His6-tagged AfaE-III proteins were studied. These experiments demonstrated that AfaE-III allows binding to HeLa cells and that AfaD mediates the internalization of the adherent bacteria. Ultrastructural analyses of the interaction of His6-AfaD-gold complexes with HeLa cells confirmed that AfaD is able to bind to the HeLa cell surface and indicated that it penetrates the cells via clathrin vesicles. These data demonstrate that the afa gene cluster is unique among bacteria, as alone it encodes both adhesion to and invasion of epithelial cells.

  13. A functional and phylogenetic comparison of quorum sensing related genes in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2014-08-01

    A quorum-sensing (QS) system is involved in Brucella melitensis survival inside the host cell. Two transcriptional regulators identified in B. melitensis, BlxR and VjbR, regulate the expression of virB, an operon required for bacterial intracellular persistence. In this work, 628 genes affected by VjbR and 124 by BlxR were analyzed to gain insights into their functional and taxonomical distributions among the Bacteria and Archaea cellular domains. In this regard, the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) genes and orthologous genes in 789 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes were obtained and compared against a group of randomly selected genes. From these analyses, we found 71 coaffected genes between VjbR and BlxR. In the COG comparison, VjbR activated genes associated with intracellular trafficking, secretion and vesicular transport and defense mechanisms, while BlxR affected genes related to energy production and conversion (with an equal effect) and translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis, posttranslational modifications and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism (with a negative effect). When the taxonomical distribution of orthologous genes was evaluated, the VjbR- and BlxR-related genes presented more orthologous genes in Crenarchaeota (Archaea), Firmicutes, and Tenericutes and fewer genes in Proteobacteria than expected by chance. These findings suggest that QS system exert a fine-tuning modulation of gene expression, by which VjbR activates genes related to infection persistence and defense, while BlxR represses general bacterial metabolism for intracellular adaptations. Finally, these affected genes present a degree of presence among Bacteria and Archaea genomes that is different from that expected by chance.

  14. Characteristics analysis of the luzA gene encoding chaperone from Photobacterium leiognathi related to bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Lin, B J; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1998-03-27

    Nucleotide sequence of the luzA gene (GenBank accession No. AF039303) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 (NCIMB 2193) has been determined, and the chaperone encoded by the luzA gene was deduced. The LuzA chaperone has a calculated M(r) 26,295 and comprises 230 amino acid residues; the hydrophobic alpha-helix N-terminal 21 amino acid residues MKKTIFALLFMSVFI SYPSFA is the leader peptide, therefore the matured LuzA chaperone has a calculated M(r) 23,871 and comprises 209 amino acid residues only. The periplasmic LuzA chaperone is the protein concerned with the protein folding, assembly and stability. The luzA gene and the related genes are closely linked to the sod gene, that encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase enables to enhance bioluminescence of the lux operon; the gene order of the luzA gene and related genes is -ufo'-luzA-ufoI-ufoII-ter->-R&R'-sod-ufo-- >. In trans complementation bioluminoassays in vivo elicit that the LuzA chaperone might be not directly concerned with bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi in E. coli, but might enable to stabilize the proteins related to bioluminescence. The unidentified ufoII gene closely linked to the luzA gene is able to enhance bioluminescence.

  15. An integrated database of wood-formation related genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Ma, Tao; Hu, Quanjun; Liu, Jianquan

    2015-06-16

    Wood, which consists mainly of plant cell walls, is an extremely important resource in daily lives. Genes whose products participate in the processes of cell wall and wood formation are therefore major subjects of plant science research. The Wood-Formation Related Genes database (WFRGdb, http://me.lzu.edu.cn/woodformation/) serves as a data resource center for genes involved in wood formation. To create this database, we collected plant genome data published in other online databases and predicted all cell wall and wood formation related genes using BLAST and HMMER. To date, 47 gene families and 33 transcription factors from 57 genomes (28 herbaceous, 22 woody and 7 non-vascular plants) have been covered and more than 122,000 genes have been checked and recorded. To provide easy access to these data, we have developed several search methods, which make it easy to download targeted genes or groups of genes free of charge in FASTA format. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses are also available online. WFRGdb brings together cell wall and wood formation related genes from all available plant genomes, and provides an integrative platform for gene inquiry, downloading and analysis. This database will therefore be extremely useful for those who focuses on cell wall and wood research.

  16. Evolutionary analysis of the jacalin-related lectin family genes in 11 fishes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Lv, Yueqing

    2016-09-01

    Jacalin-related lectins are a type of carbohydrate-binding proteins, which are distributed across a wide variety of organisms and involved in some important biological processes. The evolution of this gene family in fishes is unknown. Here, 47 putative jacalin genes in 11 fish species were identified and divided into 4 groups through phylogenetic analysis. Conserved gene organization and motif distribution existed in each group, suggesting their functional conservation. Some fishes have eleven jacalin genes, while others have only one or zero gene in their genomes, suggesting dynamic changes in the number of jacalin genes during the evolution of fishes. Intragenic recombination played a key role in the evolution of jacalin genes. Synteny analyses of jacalin genes in some fishes implied conserved and dynamic evolution characteristics of this gene family and related genome segments. Moreover, a few functional divergence sites were identified within each group pairs. Divergent expression profiles of the zebra fish jacalin genes were further investigated in different stresses. The results provided a foundation for exploring the characterization of the jacalin genes in fishes and will offer insights for additional functional studies.

  17. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-06

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand.

  18. Antioxidant response and related gene expression in aged oat seed.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingqi; Huo, Heqiang; Mao, Peisheng

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate deterioration of oat seeds during storage, we analyzed oxygen radicals, antioxidant enzyme activity, proline content, and gene transcript levels in oat seeds with different moisture contents (MCs; 4, 16, and 28% w/w) during storage for 0, 6, and 12 months (CK, LT-6, and LT-12 treatments, respectively) at 4°C. The germination percentage decreased significantly with higher seed MCs and longer storage duration. The concentrations of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide increased with seed MC increasing. The activities of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) may have had a complementary or interacting role to scavenge reactive oxygen species. As the storage duration extended, the proline content decreased in seeds with 4 and 16% MC and increased in 28%. These findings suggest that proline played the main role in adaptation to oxidative stress in seeds with higher MC (28%), while antioxidant enzymes played the main role in seeds with lower MCs (4%, 16%). In the gene transcript analyses, SOD1 transcript levels were not consistent with total SOD activity. The transcript levels of APX1 and CAT1 showed similar trends to those of APX and CAT activity. The transcript levels of P5CS1, which encodes a proline biosynthetic enzyme, increased with seed MC increasing in CK. Compared with changing of proline content in seeds stored 12 months, PDH1 transcript levels showed the opposite trend and maintained the lower levels in seeds of 16 and 28% MCs. The transcript level of P5CS1 was significantly affected by MC, and PDH1 could improve stress resistance for seed aging and maintain seed vigor during long-term storage.

  19. Caspofungin-induced in-vitro post-antifungal effect and its impact on adhesion related traits of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Ellepola, Arjuna Nishantha Bandara; Chandy, Rachel; Khan, Zia Uddin; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BEC) and denture acrylic surfaces (DAS), germ tube (GT) formation and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) are all virulence traits involved in the pathogenicity of Candida. Post-antifungal effect (PAFE) also have a bearing on pathogenicity and virulence of Candida. Candida dubliniensis is associated with oral and systemic candidosis, which can be managed with caspofungin. There is no published information on caspofungin-induced PAFE and its impact on adhesion traits of C. dubliniensis isolates. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the in vitro duration of PAFE on 20 C. dubliniensis isolates following transient exposure to caspofungin. Furthermore the impacts of caspofungin-induced PAFE on adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH of these isolates were also determined. After establishing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of caspofungin, C. dubliniensis isolates were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (×3 MIC) of caspofungin for 1 hr. Thereafter the duration of PAFE, adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH were determined by previously described in-vitro assays. MIC (μg/mL) of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin ranged from 0.004 to 0.19. Caspofungin-induced mean PAFE on C. dubliniensis isolates was 2.17 hr. Exposure to caspofungin suppressed the ability of C. dubliniensis isolates to adhere to BEC and DAS, form GT and CSH by 69.97%, 71.95%, 90.06% and 32.29% (P < 0.001 for all), respectively. Thus, transient exposure of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin produces an antifungal effect not only by suppressing its growth but also by altering its adhesion traits.

  20. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Flowering-Related Genes in Arabidopsis, Wheat, and Barley

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fred Y.; Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Early flowering is an important trait influencing grain yield and quality in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in short-season cropping regions. However, due to large and complex genomes of these species, direct identification of flowering genes and their molecular characterization remain challenging. Here, we used a bioinformatic approach to predict flowering-related genes in wheat and barley from 190 known Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) flowering genes. We identified 900 and 275 putative orthologs in wheat and barley, respectively. The annotated flowering-related genes were clustered into 144 orthologous groups with one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-one, and many-to-many orthology relationships. Our approach was further validated by domain and phylogenetic analyses of flowering-related proteins and comparative analysis of publicly available microarray data sets for in silico expression profiling of flowering-related genes in 13 different developmental stages of wheat and barley. These further analyses showed that orthologous gene pairs in three critical flowering gene families (PEBP, MADS, and BBX) exhibited similar expression patterns among 13 developmental stages in wheat and barley, suggesting similar functions among the orthologous genes with sequence and expression similarities. The predicted candidate flowering genes can be confirmed and incorporated into molecular breeding for early flowering wheat and barley in short-season cropping regions. PMID:26435710

  1. Discovery of new candidate genes related to brain development using protein interaction information.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development.

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

  3. Myelination-related genes are associated with decreased white matter integrity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Siles, Ivan; White, Tonya; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Goudriaan, Andrea; Lips, Esther; Ehrlich, Stefan; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D; Gollub, Randy L; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ho, Beng-Choon; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    Disruptions in white matter (WM) tract structures have been implicated consistently in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Global WM integrity--as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA)--is highly heritable and may provide a good endophenotype for genetic studies of schizophrenia. WM abnormalities in schizophrenia are not localized to one specific brain region but instead reflect global low-level decreases in FA coupled with focal abnormalities. In this study, we sought to investigate whether functional gene sets associated with schizophrenia are also associated with WM integrity. We analyzed FA and genetic data from the Mind Research Network Clinical Imaging Consortium to study the effect of multiple oligodendrocyte gene sets on schizophrenia and WM integrity using a functional gene set analysis in 77 subjects with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls. We found that a gene set involved in myelination was significantly associated with schizophrenia and FA. This gene set includes 17 genes that are expressed in oligodendrocytes and one neuronal gene (NRG1) that is known to regulate myelination. None of the genes within the gene set were associated with schizophrenia or FA individually, suggesting that no single gene was driving the association of the gene set. Our findings support the hypothesis that multiple genetic variants in myelination-related genes contribute to the observed correlation between schizophrenia and decreased WM integrity as measured by FA.

  4. Identification of Immunity Related Genes to Study the Physalis peruviana – Fusarium oxysporum Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A.; López, Camilo E.; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC–NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  5. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A; López, Camilo E; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  6. Physicochemical properties of starches and expression and activity of starch biosynthesis-related genes in sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung C; Wang, Shu Y; Gao, Huan Y; Nguyen, Khiem M; Nguyen, Chinh H; Shih, Ming C; Lin, Kuan H

    2016-05-15

    The functional properties of starches from six sweet potato varieties containing various starch components and structures were studied in an attempt to identify starch sources for industrial uses. Tainan 18 (TNN18) with high-amylose (AM) starch exhibited high setback and breakdown viscosities, high water solubility at 85°C but low swelling volume at 65°C, and high hardness and adhesiveness; in contrast, the low-AM starch of Tainung 31 (TNG31) had opposite characteristics. Seven genes related to starch biosynthesis were tested, and GBSS, SS, SBEII, ISA, and AGPase were highly expressed in TNN18 and TNG31; however, transcript levels in DBE and SBE were extremely low. GBSS and SS activity reflected the abundance of GBSS and SS mRNA in TNG31 and TNN18, and expression of AGPase, GBSS, SS, and SBE in TNN18 substantially increased content of AM. The expression and activity of DBE had a significant effect on TNG31 with increased AP content.

  7. Discovery of rice essential genes by characterizing a CRISPR-edited mutation of closely related rice MAP kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Minkenberg, Bastian; Xie, Kabin; Yang, Yinong

    2017-02-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system depends on a guide RNA (gRNA) to specify its target. By efficiently co-expressing multiple gRNAs that target different genomic sites, the polycistronic tRNA-gRNA gene (PTG) strategy enables multiplex gene editing in the family of closely related mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) genes in Oryza sativa (rice). In this study, we identified MPK1 and MPK6 (Arabidopsis AtMPK6 and AtMPK4 orthologs, respectively) as essential genes for rice development by finding the preservation of MPK functional alleles and normal phenotypes in CRISPR-edited mutants. The true knock-out mutants of MPK1 were severely dwarfed and sterile, and homozygous mpk1 seeds from heterozygous parents were defective in embryo development. By contrast, heterozygous mpk6 mutant plants completely failed to produce homozygous mpk6 seeds. In addition, the functional importance of specific MPK features could be evaluated by characterizing CRISPR-induced allelic variation in the conserved kinase domain of MPK6. By simultaneously targeting between two and eight genomic sites in the closely related MPK genes, we demonstrated 45-86% frequency of biallelic mutations and the successful creation of single, double and quadruple gene mutants. Indels and fragment deletion were both stably inherited to the next generations, and transgene-free mutants of rice MPK genes were readily obtained via genetic segregation, thereby eliminating any positional effects of transgene insertions. Taken together, our study reveals the essentiality of MPK1 and MPK6 in rice development, and enables the functional discovery of previously inaccessible genes or domains with phenotypes masked by lethality or redundancy.

  8. Autophagy-related genes from a tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Umemiya, Rika; Matsuo, Tomohide; Hatta, Takeshi; Sakakibara, Shin-Ichi; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2008-01-01

    Ticks are gorging-fasting organisms;(1) their life cycle is characterized by alternate off-host (starvation) and on-host (meal) conditions. Their generation time is estimated in several years and many ticks spend more than 95% of their life off the host. They seem to have a unique strategy to endure the off-host state for a long period. Thus, we focused on autophagy, which is induced by starvation and is essential for extension of the lifespan,(2-4) and hypothesized that ticks also have a system of autophagy to overcome the starved condition. Recently, we showed the existence of a homologue of an ATG gene, ATG12, and its expression pattern from nymphal to adult stages in a three-host tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. The expression level of HlATG12 was downregulated at the beginning of feeding and was highest at 3 months after engorgement. In addition, the HlAtg12 protein was localized to the region around granule-like structures within midgut cells of unfed adults. These results indicate that HlATG12 functions during unfed stages. Here, a potential role of autophagy in unfed ticks is discussed with regard to reports in other animals, such as yeast, mammal, and fruit fly.

  9. Identification of immune response-related genes in the Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Wang, Lei; Wei, Guo-Qing; Dai, Li-Shang; Lin, Kun-Zhang; Sun, Yu; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Fu, Wei-Wei; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Insects possess an innate immune system that responds to invading microorganisms. In this study, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed to screen for immune response-related genes in the fat bodies of Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) pupa challenged with Escherichia coli. Four hundred putative EST clones were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), including 50 immune response-related genes, three cytoskeleton genes, eight cell cycle and apoptosis genes, five respiration and energy metabolism genes, five transport genes, 40 metabolism genes, ten stress response genes, four transcription and translation regulation genes and 77 unknown genes. To verify the reliability of the SSH data, the transcription of a set of randomly selected immune response-related genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). These identified immune response-related genes provide insight into understanding the innate immunity in A. pernyi.

  10. Identification and characterization of stress resistance related genes of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Seo, Mi-Suk; Kumar, Thamilarasan Senthil; Lee, In-Ho; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2012-05-01

    Two biotic stress resistance related genes from the full-length cDNA library of Brassica rapa cv. Osome were identified from EST analysis and determined to be pathogenesis-related (PR) 12 Brassica defensin-like family protein (BrDLFP) and PR-10 Brassica Betv1 allergen family protein (BrBetv1AFP) after sequence analysis and homology study with other stress resistance related same family genes. In the expression analysis, both genes expressed in different organs and during all developmental growth stages in healthy plants. Expression of BrDLFP significantly increased and BrBetv1AFP gradually decreased after infection with Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in Chinese cabbage. Expression of these two genes significantly changed after cold, salt, drought and ABA stress treatments. These two PR genes may therefore be involved in the plant resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses.

  11. Spatial Variation in Genetic Diversity and Natural Selection on the Thrombospondin-Related Adhesive Protein Locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP)

    PubMed Central

    Kosuwin, Rattiporn; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito’s salivary gland and vertebrate’s hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP) exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006–2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25), Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29) and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30). In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36) and 2006–2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope scores

  12. Spatial variation in genetic diversity and natural selection on the thrombospondin-related adhesive protein locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP).

    PubMed

    Kosuwin, Rattiporn; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito's salivary gland and vertebrate's hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP) exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006-2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25), Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29) and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30). In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36) and 2006-2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope scores. Knowledge

  13. SARS-CoV regulates immune function-related gene expression in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wanchung; Yen, Yu-Ting; Singh, Sher; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2012-08-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis, and monocytes/macrophages are the key players in the pathogenesis of SARS. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-infected monocytic cells against that infected by coronavirus 229E (CoV-229E). Total RNA was extracted from infected DC-SIGN-transfected monocytes (THP-1-DC-SIGN) at 6 and 24 h after infection, and the gene expression was profiled in oligonucleotide-based microarrays. Analysis of immune-related gene expression profiles showed that at 24 h after SARS-CoV infection: (1) IFN-α/β-inducible and cathepsin/proteasome genes were downregulated; (2) hypoxia/hyperoxia-related genes were upregulated; and (3) TLR/TLR-signaling, cytokine/cytokine receptor-related, chemokine/chemokine receptor-related, lysosome-related, MHC/chaperon-related, and fibrosis-related genes were differentially regulated. These results elucidate that SARS-CoV infection regulates immune-related genes in monocytes/macrophages, which may be important to the pathogenesis of SARS.

  14. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  15. The human gene map for performance and health-related fitness phenotypes: the 2005 update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current review presents the 2005 update of the human gene map for physical performance and health-related fitness phenotypes. It is based on peer-reviewed papers published by the end of 2005. The genes and markers with evidence of association or linkage with a performance or fitness phenotype in...

  16. Centrin protein and genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and close relatives.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    2000-01-01

    Anti-centrin monoclonal antibodies 20H5 and 11B2 produced against Clamydomononas centrin decorated the group of basal bodies as well as very closely attached structures in all trichomonads studied and in the devescovinids Foaina and Devescovina. Moreover, these antibodies decorated the undulating membrane in Trichomonas vaginalis, Trichomitus batrachorum, and Tritrichomonas foetus, and the cresta in Foaina. Centrin was not demonstrated in the dividing spindle and paradesmosis. Immunogold labeling, both in pre- and post-embedding, confirmed that centrin is associated with the basal body cylinder and is a component of the nine anchoring arms between the terminal plate of flagellar bases and the plasma-membrane. Centrin is also associated with the hook-shaped fibers attached to basal bodies (F1, F3), the X-fiber, and along sigmoid fibers (F2) at the pelta-axostyle junction, which is the microtubule organizing center for pelta-axostyle microtubules. There was no labeling on the striated costa and parabasal fibers nor on microtubular pelta-axostyle, but the fibrous structure inside the undulating membrane was labeled in T. vaginalis. Two proteins of 22-20 kDa corresponding to the centrin molecular mass were recognized by immunoblotting using these antibodies in the three trichomonad species examined. By screening a T. vaginalis cDNA library with 20H5 antibody, two genes encoding identical protein sequences were found. The sequence comprises the 4 typical EF-hand Ca++-binding domains present in every known centrin. Trichomonad centrin is closer to the green algal cluster (70% identity) than to the yeast Cdc31 cluster (55% identity) or the Alveolata cluster (46% identity).

  17. Gene Expression Profile Related to the Progression of Preneoplastic Nodules toward Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Rats1*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; López-García, Cristina; Fattel-Fazenda, Samia; Arce-Popoca, Evelia; Alemán-Lazarini, Leticia; Hernández-García, Sergio; Le Berre, Véronique; Sokol, Sergueï; Francois, Jean Marie; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated the time course gene expression profile of preneoplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) to define the genes implicated in cancer progression in a resistant hepatocyte model. Tissues that included early nodules (1 month, ENT-1), persistent nodules (5 months, ENT-5), dissected HCC (12 months), and normal livers (NL) from adult rats were analyzed by cDNA arrays including 1185 rat genes. Differential genes were derived in each type of sample (n = 3) by statistical analysis. The relationship between samples was described in a Venn diagram for 290 genes. From these, 72 genes were shared between tissues with nodules and HCC. In addition, 35 genes with statistical significance only in HCC and with extreme ratios were identified. Differential expression of 11 genes was confirmed by comparative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, whereas that of 2 genes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Members involved in cytochrome P450 and second-phase metabolism were downregulated, whereas genes involved in glutathione metabolism were upregulated, implicating a possible role of glutathione and oxidative regulation. We provide a gene expression profile related to the progression of nodules into HCC, which contributes to the understanding of liver cancer development and offers the prospect for chemoprevention strategies or early treatment of HCC. PMID:16790086

  18. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both.

  19. Age-dependent expression of osteochondrosis-related genes in equine leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L.; Piquemal, D.; Lejeune, J. P.; Vander Heyden, L.; Noguier, F.; Bruno, R.; Sandersen, C.; Serteyn, D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:  Osteochondrosis (OC) is a developmental disease in horses which has a significant impact on the horse's welfare and performance. The early disturbance in the process of endochondral ossification progresses to inflammatory and repair processes in older horses. Previously, differentially expressed genes in leukocytes of OC-affected horses have been identified. The aim of the present study is to detect age-related changes in these differentially expressed genes. Materials and Methods:  The expression of OC-related genes was analysed by real-time PCR and subsequent statistical analysis (ΔΔCT) in the leukocytes of 135 Belgian Warmblood horses divided into three different age groups: <12 months (n=47), 18–24 months (n=50) >30 months (n=38). Results:  Relative expression of genes of horses less than 12 months of age showed significant induction of the genes MGAT4A, PRKCG, MHCI, ApoB, ApoB3G, B4GALT6 and a significantly lower expression of the genes OAS3. Horses of 18–24 months of age, showed a significantly higher expression of the genes TBC1D9, MGAT4A, IFIH1, MHCIIa and MMP1. Horses of more than 30 months of age showed a significantly higher expression of the genes MGAT4A, HP, SECTM1 compared with their age-matched control groups. Conclusions:  The study demonstrates that OC-related genes are differentially expressed in horses of different ages compared with their age-matched controls. Some of the genes may be implicated in cell signalling and differentiation as well as carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and inflammation. However, the causal relationship between the differentially expressed genes and the development and progression of the OC lesions needs to be determined. PMID:26392886

  20. Cloning of apoptosis-related genes by representational difference analysis of cDNA.

    PubMed

    Hubank, Michael; Bryntesson, Fredrik; Regan, Jennifer; Schatz, David G

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis is frequently triggered by events that alter the expression of key target genes. Under these circumstances, the genes involved can be identified by techniques that analyze gene expression. Researchers now have a choice of reliable and effective methods for differential gene expression analysis. Comparative approaches, including gene microarray analysis, serial analysis of gene expression, and differential display provide global information about expression levels. Subtractive approaches like complementary DNA representational difference analysis (cDNA RDA) and suppression subtraction polymerase chain reaction identify a focused set of differentially expressed genes. The most suitable technique to apply depends on individual circumstances. cDNA RDA is particularly useful in nonstandard model organisms for which comprehensive gene microarrays are not available and is best used for the identification of genes with a large difference in expression levels between two populations. The technique involves the generation of amplified mixtures of cDNA fragments that are typically smaller than 1000 base pairs and represent >86% of mRNA species from each starting population. Transcriptional differences between two populations can then be identified by subtraction of cDNA amplicons followed by further polymerase chain reaction amplification. The technique is capable of detecting differences for genes expressed at less than one copy per cell and is achievable using standard laboratory apparatus. cDNA RDA can identify genes not previously described in the database, can detect low abundance transcripts (e.g., from mixed cell populations), and is best applied in experiments where relatively few differentially expressed genes are expected. Here, we describe the application of cDNA RDA to the identification of apoptosis-related genes.

  1. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Chopp, Treasa; Qi Shengmei; Cutler, Mary Lou . E-mail: mcutler@usuhs.mil

    2005-05-15

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion.

  2. Mapping of a family of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein [hnRNP] genes related to the fragile X gene - fmr1

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S.; Siomi, M.; Siomi, H.

    1994-09-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in a wide range of cellular processes in the nucleus and cytoplasm including regulation of pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA stability, translation efficiency and the transport of RNAs between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The gene involved in the Fragile X syndrome encodes a protein that contains two types of sequence motifs found in RNA binding proteins: an RGG box as seen in hnRNP U and two KH (hnRNP K homology) domains. The FMR1 gene product binds RNA in vitro and a missense mutation in a highly conserved isoleucine residue in the KH domain of fmr1 impairs RNA binding, demonstrating the importance of the KH domain in the RNA binding ability of FMR1. We have identified a new gene, fxr1 (fmr1 cross-hybridizing related), that bears striking homology to the fmr1 gene. The two genes are highly homologous at the amino acid level. Fxr1 has two KH domains, as does fmr1. This suggests that fmr1 may be only one of a family of RNA binding proteins that have yet to be characterized, but are potentially important for normal cellular function. We are systematically mapping hnRNP genes related to fmrl as a first step towards investigating the role of these proteins in human disease states. We have mapped fxr1 to chromosome 12 using a somatic cell hybrid panel and are currently using YACs containing fxr1 to perform FISH to further pinpoint the exact location of fxr1. HnRNP K and U share common sequence motifs with fmr1 and fxr1 that seem to be important for RNA binding function. We are also mapping these genes by both somatic cell hybrid panels and by FISH with the corresponding YACs.

  3. SVM-T-RFE: a novel gene selection algorithm for identifying metastasis-related genes in colorectal cancer using gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Peng, Sihua; Chen, Jian; Lü, Bingjian; Zhang, Honghe; Lai, Maode

    2012-03-09

    Although metastasis is the principal cause of death cause for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC metastasis are still not fully understood. In an attempt to identify metastasis-related genes in CRC, we obtained gene expression profiles of 55 early stage primary CRCs, 56 late stage primary CRCs, and 34 metastatic CRCs from the expression project in Oncology (http://www.intgen.org/expo/). We developed a novel gene selection algorithm (SVM-T-RFE), which extends support vector machine recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) algorithm by incorporating T-statistic. We achieved highest classification accuracy (100%) with smaller gene subsets (10 and 6, respectively), when classifying between early and late stage primary CRCs, as well as between metastatic CRCs and late stage primary CRCs. We also compared the performance of SVM-T-RFE and SVM-RFE gene selection algorithms on another large-scale CRC dataset and the five public microarray datasets. SVM-T-RFE bestowed SVM-RFE algorithm in identifying more differentially expressed genes, and achieving highest prediction accuracy using equal or smaller number of selected genes. A fraction of selected genes have been reported to be associated with CRC development or metastasis.

  4. Contribution of WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) genes to identify the phylogenetic relationships among Petunia species.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ana Lúcia Anversa; Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Freitas, Loreta Brandão

    2016-01-01

    Developmental genes are believed to contribute to major changes during plant evolution, from infrageneric to higher levels. Due to their putative high sequence conservation, developmental genes are rarely used as molecular markers, and few studies including these sequences at low taxonomic levels exist. WUSCHEL-related homeobox genes (WOX) are transcription factors exclusively present in plants and are involved in developmental processes. In this study, we characterized the infrageneric genetic variation of Petunia WOX genes. We obtained phylogenetic relationships consistent with other phylogenies based on nuclear markers, but with higher statistical support, resolution in terminals, and compatibility with flower morphological changes.

  5. Contribution of WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) genes to identify the phylogenetic relationships among Petunia species

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Ana Lúcia Anversa; Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Freitas, Loreta Brandão

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Developmental genes are believed to contribute to major changes during plant evolution, from infrageneric to higher levels. Due to their putative high sequence conservation, developmental genes are rarely used as molecular markers, and few studies including these sequences at low taxonomic levels exist. WUSCHEL-related homeobox genes (WOX) are transcription factors exclusively present in plants and are involved in developmental processes. In this study, we characterized the infrageneric genetic variation of Petunia WOX genes. We obtained phylogenetic relationships consistent with other phylogenies based on nuclear markers, but with higher statistical support, resolution in terminals, and compatibility with flower morphological changes. PMID:27768156

  6. Gene regulatory mechanisms orchestrated by p63 in epithelial development and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing

    2015-06-01

    The transcription factor p63 belongs to the p53 family and is a key regulator in epithelial commitment and development. Mutations in p63 give rise to several epithelial related disorders with defects in skin, limb and orofacial structures. Since the discovery of p63, efforts have been made to identify its target genes using individual gene approaches and to understand p63 function in normal epithelial development and related diseases. Recent genome-wide approaches have identified tens of thousands of potential p63-regulated target genes and regulatory elements, and reshaped the concept of gene regulation orchestrated by p63. These data also provide insights into p63-related disease mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the regulatory role of p63 in normal and diseased epithelial development in light of these novel findings. We also propose future perspectives for dissecting the molecular mechanism of p63-mediated epithelial development and related disorders as well as for potential therapeutic strategies.

  7. AGE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS INDUCED BY MMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-Related Gene Expression Changes In Human Skin Fibroblasts Induced By methyl methanesulfonate. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan H. Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Prote...

  8. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  9. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  10. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2016-11-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  11. Ultrasound-based molecular imaging and specific gene delivery to mesenteric vasculature by endothelial adhesion molecule targeted microbubbles in a mouse model of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tlaxca, José L.; Rychak, Joshua J.; Ernst, Peter B.; Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Shevchenko, Talent I.; Pizzaro, Theresa T.; Rivera-Nieves, Jesús; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) for which treatments with immunosuppressive drugs have significant side-effects. Consequently, there is a clinical need for site-specific and non-toxic delivery of therapeutic genes or drugs for CD and related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to validate a gene delivery platform based on ultrasound-activated lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs) targeted to inflamed mesenteric endothelium in the CD-like TNFΔARE mouse model. MBs bearing luciferase plasmid were functionalized with antibodies to MAdCAM-1 (MB-M) or VCAM-1 (MB-V), biomarkers of gut endothelial cell inflammation and evaluated in an in vitro flow chamber assay with appropriate ligands to confirm targeting specificity. Following MB retro-orbital injection in TNFΔARE mice, the mean contrast intensity in the ileocecal region from accumulated MB-M and MB-V was 8.5-fold and 3.6-fold greater, respectively, compared to MB-C. Delivery of luciferase plasmid to the GI tract in TNFΔARE mice was achieved by insonating the endothelial cell-bound agents using a commercial sonoporator. Luciferase expression in the midgut was detected 48 h later by bioluminescence imaging and further confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The liver, spleen, heart, and kidney had no detectable bioluminescence following insonation. Transfection of the microcirculation guided by a targeted, acoustically-activated platform such as an ultrasound contrast agent microbubble has the potential to be a minimally-invasive treatment strategy to ameliorate CD and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:23142578

  12. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  13. Identification and Expression Profiles of Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis and Transport Related Genes in Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xiu-Yun; Fang, Li-Ping; He, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Geng; Sun, Liang; Ye, Zhan-Feng; Deng, Dao-Gui; Li, Jin-Bu

    2015-01-01

    Although the general pathway of sex pheromone synthesis in moth species has been established, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The common cutworm Spodoptera litura is an important agricultural pest worldwide and causes huge economic losses annually. The female sex pheromone of S. litura comprises Z9,E11-14:OAc, Z9,E12-14:OAc, Z9-14:OAc, and E11-14:OAc. By sequencing and analyzing the transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands, we identified 94 candidate genes related to pheromone biosynthesis (55 genes) or chemoreception (39 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that two desaturase genes (SlitDes5 and SlitDes11) and one fatty acyl reductase gene (SlitFAR3) showed pheromone gland (PG) biased or specific expression, and clustered with genes known to be involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Furthermore, 4 chemoreception related genes (SlitOBP6, SlitOBP11, SlitCSP3, and SlitCSP14) also showed higher expression in the PG, and could be additional candidate genes involved in sex pheromone transport. This study provides the first solid background information that should facilitate further elucidation of sex pheromone biosynthesis and transport, and indicates potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. litura for a novel pest management strategy. PMID:26445454

  14. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  15. Identification and Expression Profiles of Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis and Transport Related Genes in Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xiu-Yun; Fang, Li-Ping; He, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Geng; Sun, Liang; Ye, Zhan-Feng; Deng, Dao-Gui; Li, Jin-Bu

    2015-01-01

    Although the general pathway of sex pheromone synthesis in moth species has been established, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The common cutworm Spodoptera litura is an important agricultural pest worldwide and causes huge economic losses annually. The female sex pheromone of S. litura comprises Z9,E11-14:OAc, Z9,E12-14:OAc, Z9-14:OAc, and E11-14:OAc. By sequencing and analyzing the transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands, we identified 94 candidate genes related to pheromone biosynthesis (55 genes) or chemoreception (39 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that two desaturase genes (SlitDes5 and SlitDes11) and one fatty acyl reductase gene (SlitFAR3) showed pheromone gland (PG) biased or specific expression, and clustered with genes known to be involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Furthermore, 4 chemoreception related genes (SlitOBP6, SlitOBP11, SlitCSP3, and SlitCSP14) also showed higher expression in the PG, and could be additional candidate genes involved in sex pheromone transport. This study provides the first solid background information that should facilitate further elucidation of sex pheromone biosynthesis and transport, and indicates potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. litura for a novel pest management strategy.

  16. Addiction and reward-related genes show altered expression in the postpartum nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changjiu; Eisinger, Brian Earl; Driessen, Terri M.; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Motherhood involves a switch in natural rewards, whereby offspring become highly rewarding. Nucleus accumbens (NAC) is a key CNS region for natural rewards and addictions, but to date no study has evaluated on a large scale the events in NAC that underlie the maternal change in natural rewards. In this study we utilized microarray and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate postpartum NAC gene expression changes in mice. Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET) indicated that postpartum (relative to virgin) NAC gene expression profile was significantly enriched for genes related to addiction and reward in five of five independently curated databases (e.g., Malacards, Phenopedia). Over 100 addiction/reward related genes were identified and these included: Per1, Per2, Arc, Homer2, Creb1, Grm3, Fosb, Gabrb3, Adra2a, Ntrk2, Cry1, Penk, Cartpt, Adcy1, Npy1r, Htr1a, Drd1a, Gria1, and Pdyn. ToppCluster analysis found maternal NAC expression profile to be significantly enriched for genes related to the drug action of nicotine, ketamine, and dronabinol. Pathway analysis indicated postpartum NAC as enriched for RNA processing, CNS development/differentiation, and transcriptional regulation. Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis (WGCNA) identified possible networks for transcription factors, including Nr1d1, Per2, Fosb, Egr1, and Nr4a1. The postpartum state involves increased risk for mental health disorders and MSET analysis indicated postpartum NAC to be enriched for genes related to depression, bipolar disorder (BPD), and schizophrenia. Mental health related genes included: Fabp7, Grm3, Penk, and Nr1d1. We confirmed via quantitative PCR Nr1d1, Per2, Grm3, Penk, Drd1a, and Pdyn. This study indicates for the first time that postpartum NAC involves large scale gene expression alterations linked to addiction and reward. Because the postpartum state also involves decreased response to drugs, the findings could provide insights into how to mitigate addictions. PMID:25414651

  17. Endocrine-related genes are altered by antibacterial agent triclosan in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Urien, Josune; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis

    2017-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antibacterial agent widely used in personal care and consumer products and commonly detected in aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, the effects of TCS on endocrine-related genes of Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology, were evaluated. Twenty-four-hour in vivo exposures at 10µg/L, 100µg/L, and 1000µg/L TCS revealed that this xenobiotic was able to alter the transcriptional activity of ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the ultraspiracle gene (usp), the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), and the E74 early ecdysone-inducible gene, as measured by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, the hsp70 gene, a heat shock protein gene, was upregulated after exposure to TCS. The results of the present work provide the first evidence of the potential disruptive effects of TCS in endocrine-related genes suggesting a mode of action that mimics ecdysteroid hormones in insects.

  18. Viral oncogenes, proto-oncogenes and homoeotic genes related to cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Antohi, S; Antohi-Talle, O

    1987-01-01

    Molecular studies on viral oncogenes and their products have led to the discovery of physiological proto-oncogenes, involved in the control of cell proliferation and gene activation. Other genetic and molecular investigations, initiated in Drosophila melanogaster and continued in different multicellular eukaryotes, have made evident the homoeotic genes, which are directly correlated with cell specialization, in the complex processes of differentiation and morphogenesis. Both gene classes are conserved to a high extent during evolution. They are involved in the eukaryotic mechanisms of differentiation control and proto-oncogenes, in particular, are related to malignant transformation. Some available data suggest a certain extent of relatedness between the gene products of both gene classes. A differentiation trigger model, including retroviral transposition, homoeotic genes and proto-oncogenes is discussed.

  19. Adhesive proteins of stalked and acorn barnacles display homology with low sequence similarities.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Abram, Florence; Pires, Elisabete; Varela Coelho, Ana; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins 'sticky' has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia) by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes). It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa). Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7-16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k) showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes). Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18-26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa) are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa).

  20. Adhesive Proteins of Stalked and Acorn Barnacles Display Homology with Low Sequence Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; Abram, Florence; Pires, Elisabete; Varela Coelho, Ana; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins ‘sticky’ has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia) by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes). It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa). Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7–16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k) showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes). Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18–26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa) are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa). PMID:25295513

  1. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  2. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  3. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  4. Prediction of the Ebola virus infection related human genes using protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuanming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-03-10

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes.

  5. Differences in driver genes between smoking-related and non-smoking-related lung cancer in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Gou, Lan-Ying; Niu, Fei-Yu; Wu, Yi-Long; Zhong, Wen-Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Recently, non-smoking-related lung cancer was classified as an independent disease entity because it is different from tobacco-associated lung cancer. Non-smoking-related lung cancer occurs more often in women than men, and the predominant histological type is adenocarcinoma (ADC) rather than squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the driver gene alterations that have been identified in ADC in never-smokers include epidermal growth factor receptor mutations, KRAS mutations, echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4/anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion, and ROS1 fusion, among others. Meanwhile, significant progress has been made in the treatment of ADC. However, in comparison with ADC, no such available molecular targets exist for smoking-associated lung cancer, for which treatment strategies are limited. Next-generation sequencing has been widely applied to the discovery of more genetic profiles of lung cancers. This review summarizes the differences between smoking-related and non-smoking-related lung cancer as follows: different somatic mutation burdens, C:G→A:T transversions, common and novel driver genes, and treatment strategies. Overall, smoking-related lung cancer is more complicated than non-smoking-related lung cancer. Furthermore, we review the prevalence of driver genes in smoking-associated and non-smoking-associated lung cancers in the Chinese population.

  6. Increased expression of neutrophil-related genes in patients with early sepsis-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Kangelaris, Kirsten Neudoerffer; Prakash, Arun; Liu, Kathleen D; Aouizerat, Bradley; Woodruff, Prescott G; Erle, David J; Rogers, Angela; Seeley, Eric J; Chu, Jeffrey; Liu, Tom; Osterberg-Deiss, Thomas; Zhuo, Hanjing; Matthay, Michael A; Calfee, Carolyn S

    2015-06-01

    The early sequence of events leading to the development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with sepsis remains inadequately understood. The purpose of this study was to identify changes in gene expression early in the course of illness, when mechanisms of injury may provide the most relevant treatment and prognostic targets. We collected whole blood RNA in critically ill patients admitted from the Emergency Department to the intensive care unit within 24 h of admission at a tertiary care center. Whole genome expression was compared in patients with sepsis and ARDS to patients with sepsis alone. We selected genes with >1 log2 fold change and false discovery rate <0.25, determined their significance in the literature, and performed pathway analysis. Several genes were upregulated in 29 patients with sepsis with ARDS compared with 28 patients with sepsis alone. The most differentially expressed genes included key mediators of the initial neutrophil response to infection: olfactomedin 4, lipocalin 2, CD24, and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. These gene expression differences withstood adjustment for age, sex, study batch, white blood cell count, and presence of pneumonia or aspiration. Pathway analysis demonstrated overrepresentation of genes involved in known respiratory and infection pathways. These data indicate that several neutrophil-related pathways may be involved in the early pathogenesis of sepsis-related ARDS. In addition, identifiable gene expression differences occurring early in the course of sepsis-related ARDS may further elucidate understanding of the neutrophil-related mechanisms in progression to ARDS.

  7. Sexual dimorphism in the expression of mitochondria-related genes in rat heart at different ages.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L; Kwekel, Joshua C; Fuscoe, James C; Desai, Varsha G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males.

  8. Sexual Dimorphism in the Expression of Mitochondria-Related Genes in Rat Heart at Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Fuscoe, James C.; Desai, Varsha G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males. PMID:25615628

  9. Identification of developmental competence-related genes in mature porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Ida, Jennifer M; Paczkowski, Melissa; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2011-08-01

    Oocyte competence is a key factor limiting female fertility, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to oocyte competence remain unclear. The objective of this study was to elucidate specific genes whose function contributes to oocyte competence. We observed that 6 of 20 target genes examined were differentially expressed between adult (more competent) and prepubertal (less competent) porcine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. These genes were the cholesterol synthesis-related gene HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), fatty acid oxidation genes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3 (ACSL3) and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL), glycolytic genes fructose 1,6 bisphosphate aldolase (ALDOA) and lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). These 6 genes, as well as 3 other genes [porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), transcribed loci 10 (TL10), serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1)], were further analyzed by comparing transcript abundance in IVM and in vivo matured (VVM) prepubertal and adult porcine oocytes. Among these 9 target genes, 5 were differentially expressed between IVM and VVM prepubertal oocytes, while 8 genes were differentially expressed between IVM and VVM adult oocytes. No genes were differentially expressed between VVM prepubertal and adult oocytes. A functional study of TNF demonstrated that depletion of endogenous TNF decreased oocyte competence and TNFAIP6 expression in cumulus cells, while TNF in IVM medium regulated TNFAIP6 expression in cumulus cells. Differential expression of the genes identified in this study suggests that these genes may be functionally relevant to oocyte competence.

  10. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes. PMID:26407127

  11. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes.

  12. Recognition- and defense-related gene expression at 3 resynthesis stages in lichen symbionts.

    PubMed

    Athukorala, Sarangi N P; Piercey-Normore, Michele D

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and defense responses are early events in plant-pathogen interactions and between lichen symbionts. The effect of elicitors on responses between lichen symbionts is not well understood. The objective of this study was to compare the difference in recognition- and defense-related gene expression as a result of culture extracts (containing secreted water-soluble elicitors) from compatible and incompatible interactions at each of 3 resynthesis stages in the symbionts of Cladonia rangiferina. This study investigated gene expression by quantitative PCR in cultures of C. rangiferina and its algal partner, Asterochloris glomerata/irregularis, after incubation with liquid extracts from cultures of compatible and incompatible interactions at 3 early resynthesis stages. Recognition-related genes were significantly upregulated only after physical contact, demonstrating symbiont recognition in later resynthesis stages than expected. One of 3 defense-related genes, chit, showed significant downregulation in early resynthesis stages and upregulation in the third resynthesis stage, demonstrating a need for the absence of chitinase early in thallus formation and a need for its presence in later stages as an algal defense reaction. This study revealed that recognition- and defense-related genes are triggered by components in culture extracts at 3 stages of resynthesis, and some defense-related genes may be induced throughout thallus growth. The parasitic nature of the interaction shows parallels between lichen symbionts and plant pathogenic systems.

  13. Relationship between DNA mismatch repair genes expression, Ku-genes expression and ploidy-related parameters in the progression of pigmented lesions of the skin.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Ruschenburg, Ilka; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Defects of DNA repair systems in cutaneous tumours are related to DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2) and Ku70/80 genes involved in double- strand repair. In this study we investigated the statistical relationship between these systems and DNA-ploidy-related parameters in 19 naevus cell naevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas and 31 melanoma metastases, applying the correlation coefficient according to Spearman. In naevi significant correlations were found between Ku70/80 gene expression and some ploidy-related parameters. In lentigos, additionally, some significant correlations between the expression of DNA mismatch repair genes were found. Similar results were demonstrated for primary melanomas. In metastases no one significant correlation between DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku-genes was present. We postulate that DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku70/80 genes are functionally independent and that some of them are able to influence ploidy-related parameters.

  14. Expression of immune-related genes of common carp during cyprinid herpesvirus 3 infection.

    PubMed

    Sunarto, Agus; McColl, Kenneth A

    2015-03-09

    Fish herpesviruses and their hosts may have coevolved for 400 to 450 million yr. During this coexistence, the hosts have equipped themselves with an elaborate immune system to defend themselves from invading viruses, whereas the viruses have developed strategies to evade host immunity, including the expression of cytokine genes that have been captured from the host. Taking advantage of our experimental model for cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) persistence in carp, we studied the gene expression of host and virus immune-related genes in each stage of infection: acute, persistent and reactivation phases. IFNγ-1, IFNγ-2, IL-12 and IL-10 host genes, and the CyHV-3 vIL-10 gene (khvIL-10) were highly significantly up-regulated in different phases of CyHV-3 infection. Similarly, host IL-1β was up-regulated in the acute phase of CyHV-3 infection. There was no significant difference in the expression of host TNFα-1 and MHC-II genes during all phases of CyHV-3 infection. Based on the expression profile of carp immune-related genes in each stage of CyHV-3 infection, we propose a possible interaction between carp IL-12, carp IL-10 and khvIL-10 during the course of viral infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the expression of cytokine genes during all phases (acute, persistent and reactivation) of CyHV-3 infection.

  15. Age-related changes in the expression of schizophrenia susceptibility genes in the human prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Colantuoni, Carlo; Hyde, Thomas M; Mitkus, Shruti; Joseph, Andrew; Sartorius, Leah; Aguirre, Claudia; Creswell, Johanna; Johnson, Elizabeth; Deep-Soboslay, Amy; Herman, Mary M; Lipska, Barbara K; Weinberger, Daniel R; Kleinman, Joel E

    2008-09-01

    The molecular basis of complex neuropsychiatric disorders most likely involves many genes. In recent years, specific genetic variations influencing risk for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported. We have used custom DNA microarrays and qPCR to investigate the expression of putative schizophrenia susceptibility genes and related genes of interest in the normal human brain. Expression of 31 genes was measured in Brodmann's area 10 (BA10) in the prefrontal cortex of 72 postmortem brain samples spanning half a century of human aging (18-67 years), each without history of neuropsychiatric illness, neurological disease, or drug abuse. Examination of expression across age allowed the identification of genes whose expression patterns correlate with age, as well as genes that share common expression patterns and that possibly participate in common cellular mechanisms related to the emergence of schizophrenia in early adult life. The expression of GRM3 and RGS4 decreased across the entire age range surveyed, while that of PRODH and DARPP-32 was shown to increase with age. NRG1, ERBB3, and NGFR show expression changes during the years of greatest risk for the development of schizophrenia. Expression of FEZ1, GAD1, and RGS4 showed especially high correlation with one another, in addition to the strongest mean levels of absolute correlation with all other genes studied here. All microarray data are available at NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus: GEO Series accession number GSE11546 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo) [corrected

  16. Glycosylation-related genes in NS0 cells are insensitive to moderately elevated ammonium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Arthur Nathan; Caldwell, Mary; Bae, Sooneon; Harcum, Sarah W

    2014-10-10

    NS0 and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines are used to produce recombinant proteins for human therapeutics; however, ammonium accumulation can negatively impact cell growth, recombinant protein production, and protein glycosylation. To improve product quality and decrease costs, the relationship between ammonium and protein glycosylation needs to be elucidated. While ammonium has been shown to adversely affect glycosylation-related gene expression in CHO cells, NS0 studies have not been performed. Therefore, this study sought to determine if glycosylation in NS0 cells were ammonium-sensitive at the gene expression level. Using a DNA microarray that contained mouse glycosylation-related and housekeeping genes, these genes were analyzed in response to various culture conditions - elevated ammonium, elevated salt, and elevated ammonium with proline. Surprisingly, no significant differences in gene expression levels were observed between the control and these conditions. Further, the elevated ammonium cultures were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) for key glycosylation genes, and the qRT-PCR results corroborated the DNA microarray results, demonstrating that NS0 cells are ammonium-insensitive at the gene expression level. Since NS0 are known to have elevated nucleotide sugar pools under ammonium stress, and none of the genes directly responsible for these metabolic pools were changed, consequently cellular control at the translational or substrate-level must be responsible for the universally observed decreased glycosylation quality under elevated ammonium.

  17. Identification of Genes Related to Paulownia Witches’ Broom by AFLP and MSAP

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB) infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L−1 MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB. PMID:25196603

  18. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  19. Massive Expansion of Ubiquitination-Related Gene Families within the Chlamydiae

    PubMed Central

    Domman, Daryl; Collingro, Astrid; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Gehre, Lena; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Subtil, Agathe; Horn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Gene loss, gain, and transfer play an important role in shaping the genomes of all organisms; however, the interplay of these processes in isolated populations, such as in obligate intracellular bacteria, is less understood. Despite a general trend towards genome reduction in these microbes, our phylogenomic analysis of the phylum Chlamydiae revealed that within the family Parachlamydiaceae, gene family expansions have had pronounced effects on gene content. We discovered that the largest gene families within the phylum are the result of rapid gene birth-and-death evolution. These large gene families are comprised of members harboring eukaryotic-like ubiquitination-related domains, such as F-box and BTB-box domains, marking the largest reservoir of these proteins found among bacteria. A heterologous type III secretion system assay suggests that these proteins function as effectors manipulating the host cell. The large disparity in copy number of members in these families between closely related organisms suggests that nonadaptive processes might contribute to the evolution of these gene families. Gene birth-and-death evolution in concert with genomic drift might represent a previously undescribed mechanism by which isolated bacterial populations diversify. PMID:25069652

  20. Identification of genes related to Paulownia witches' broom by AFLP and MSAP.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-08-21

    DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L(-1) MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB.

  1. Microevolution of Virulence-Related Genes in Helicobacter pylori Familial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yoshikazu; Konno, Mutsuko; Osaki, Takako; Yonezawa, Hideo; Ishige, Taichiro; Imai, Misaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Shibata-Hatta, Mari; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that can infect human stomach causing gastritis, ulcers and cancer, is known to have a high degree of genome/epigenome diversity as the result of mutation and recombination. The bacteria often infect in childhood and persist for the life of the host. One of the reasons of the rapid evolution of H. pylori is that it changes its genome drastically for adaptation to a new host. To investigate microevolution and adaptation of the H. pylori genome, we undertook whole genome sequencing of the same or very similar sequence type in multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) with seven genes in members of the same family consisting of parents and children in Japan. Detection of nucleotide substitutions revealed likely transmission pathways involving children. Nonsynonymous (amino acid changing) mutations were found in virulence-related genes (cag genes, vacA, hcpDX, tnfα, ggt, htrA and the collagenase gene), outer membrane protein (OMP) genes and other cell surface-related protein genes, signal transduction genes and restriction-modification genes. We reconstructed various pathways by which H. pylori can adapt to a new human host, and our results raised the possibility that the mutational changes in virulence-related genes have a role in adaptation to a child host. Changes in restriction-modification genes might remodel the methylome and transcriptome to help adaptation. This study has provided insights into H. pylori transmission and virulence and has implications for basic research as well as clinical practice. PMID:25978460

  2. Bilateral ovarian carcinomas differ in the expression of metastasis-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Smebye, Marianne Lislerud; Haugom, Lisbeth; Davidson, Ben; Trope, Claes Göran; Heim, Sverre; Skotheim, Rolf Inge; Micci, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms behind bilaterality of ovarian carcinomas are not fully understood, as the two tumors could possibly represent two primary tumors, a primary tumor and a metastasis, or two metastases. The gene expression profiles from bilateral high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) and clear cell carcinomas (CCCs) of the ovary were compared to study the association between the tumors of the two sides. A separate analysis of genes from chromosome 19 was also performed, since this chromosome is frequently rearranged in ovarian carcinomas. Tumors from four patients were included (three pairs of HGSC and one pair of CCC). The gene expression was analyzed at the exon level, and bilateral tumors were compared to identify within-pair differences. Gene expression data were also compared with genomic information on the same tumors. Similarities in gene expression were observed between the tumors within each pair, as expected if the two tumors were clonally related. However, certain genes exhibited differences in expression between the two sides, indicating metastasis involvement. Among the most differently expressed genes, one gene was common to all four pairs: Immunoglobulin J. In all HGSC pairs, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 2, serpin family E member 1 and phospholipase A2, group IIA (platelets, synovial fluid) were also among the differentially expressed genes. The specific analysis of chromosome 19 highlighted expression differences in the zinc finger protein 36 gene. These results indicate that bilateral ovarian tumors represent different stages during progression of a single clonal process. Several of the genes observed to be differently expressed are known to be metastasis-related, and are likely to be also involved in spreading from one side to the other in the bilateral cancer cases examined. PMID:28123539

  3. Use of Fluorescence Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the Detection of Escherichia coli Adhesion to Pig Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, C H; Gan, L N; Qin, W U; Zi, C; Zhu, G Q; Wu, S L; Bao, W B

    2016-09-01

    An efficient and accurate method to test Escherichia coli (E. coli) adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells will contribute to the study of bacterial pathogenesis and the function of genes that encode receptors related to adhesion. This study used the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. qPCR primers were designed from the PILIN gene of E. coli F18ab, F18ac, and K88ac, and the pig β-ACTIN gene. Total deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from E. coli and intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 cells) were used as templates for qPCR. The 2-ΔΔCt formula was used to calculate the relative number of bacteria in cultures of different areas. We found that the relative numbers of F18ab, F18ac, and K88ac that adhered to IPEC-J2 cells did not differ significantly in 6-, 12-, and 24-well culture plates. This finding indicated that there was no relationship between the relative adhesion number of E. coli and the area of cells, so the method of qPCR could accurately test the relative number of E. coli. This study provided a convenient and reliable testing method for experiments involving E. coli adhesion, and also provided innovative ideas for similar detection methods.

  4. Influence of different initiators on the degree of conversion of experimental adhesive blends in relation to their hydrophilicity and solvent content

    PubMed Central

    Cadenaro, Milena; Antoniolli, Francesca; Codan, Barbara; Agee, Kelli; Tay, Franklin R; De Stefano Dorigo, Elettra; Pashley, David H; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the curing reaction of five experimental adhesive blends containing different photo-initiating systems. The hypothesis tested was that degree of conversion (DC) of resin blends is affected by resin type, solvent content and photo-initiating system. Methods The experimental methacrylate resin blends were ranked from hydrophobic (R2) to hydrophilic (R3 and R4) and tested as neat, or solvated with 10% or 20% ethanol, or 10% ethanol and 10% water. Three different photo-initiators were used: IS-1 = 0.25% CQ (camphorquinone) + 1% EDMAB (ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate); IS-2 = 1.25% TPO (diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)-phosphine oxide); IS-3 = 0.25% CQ + 0.50% EDMAB + 0.50% TPO. DC of resin blends was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter. Data were analyzed with a three-way ANOVA. Results Neat resin type influenced DC, as R4 showed the highest values compared to R2 and R3 (p<0.05). Solvent had a significant effect on DC (p<0.05): dilution of resin blends with 10% or 20% ethanol or 10% ethanol + 10% water increased the DC of all resins, except for R4. Initiators influenced the polymerization since neat resins and mixtures solvated with 10 or 20% ethanol showed their highest DC values when polymerized with IS-1 or IS-3 (p>0.05), while IS-2 or IS-3 increased the DC values of resins diluted with 10% ethanol and 10% water (p<0.05). Conclusions Water-compatible photo-initiators such as TPO should be included in the hydrophilic solvated adhesive formulation to ensure an appropriate DC of the adhesive layer. PMID:20018363

  5. Molecular Evolution of Candidate Genes for Crop-Related Traits in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; McAssey, Edward V.; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations. PMID:24914686

  6. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Predicting Gene Expression Level from Relative Codon Usage Bias: An Application to Escherichia coli Genome

    PubMed Central

    Roymondal, Uttam; Das, Shibsankar; Sahoo, Satyabrata

    2009-01-01

    We present an expression measure of a gene, devised to predict the level of gene expression from relative codon bias (RCB). There are a number of measures currently in use that quantify codon usage in genes. Based on the hypothesis that gene expressivity and codon composition is strongly correlated, RCB has been defined to provide an intuitively meaningful measure of an extent of the codon preference in a gene. We outline a simple approach to assess the strength of RCB (RCBS) in genes as a guide to their likely expression levels and illustrate this with an analysis of Escherichia coli (E. coli) genome. Our efforts to quantitatively predict gene expression levels in E. coli met with a high level of success. Surprisingly, we observe a strong correlation between RCBS and protein length indicating natural selection in favour of the shorter genes to be expressed at higher level. The agreement of our result with high protein abundances, microarray data and radioactive data demonstrates that the genomic expression profile available in our method can be applied in a meaningful way to the study of cell physiology and also for more detailed studies of particular genes of interest. PMID:19131380

  8. An integrative evolution theory of histo-blood group ABO and related genes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The ABO system is one of the most important blood group systems in transfusion/transplantation medicine. However, the evolutionary significance of the ABO gene and its polymorphism remained unknown. We took an integrative approach to gain insights into the significance of the evolutionary process of ABO genes, including those related not only phylogenetically but also functionally. We experimentally created a code table correlating amino acid sequence motifs of the ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases with GalNAc (A)/galactose (B) specificity, and assigned A/B specificity to individual ABO genes from various species thus going beyond the simple sequence comparison. Together with genome information and phylogenetic analyses, this assignment revealed early appearance of A and B gene sequences in evolution and potentially non-allelic presence of both gene sequences in some animal species. We argue: Evolution may have suppressed the establishment of two independent, functional A and B genes in most vertebrates and promoted A/B conversion through amino acid substitutions and/or recombination; A/B allelism should have existed in common ancestors of primates; and bacterial ABO genes evolved through horizontal and vertical gene transmission into 2 separate groups encoding glycosyltransferases with distinct sugar specificities. PMID:25307962

  9. An integrative evolution theory of histo-blood group ABO and related genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-10-13

    The ABO system is one of the most important blood group systems in transfusion/transplantation medicine. However, the evolutionary significance of the ABO gene and its polymorphism remained unknown. We took an integrative approach to gain insights into the significance of the evolutionary process of ABO genes, including those related not only phylogenetically but also functionally. We experimentally created a code table correlating amino acid sequence motifs of the ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases with GalNAc (A)/galactose (B) specificity, and assigned A/B specificity to individual ABO genes from various species thus going beyond the simple sequence comparison. Together with genome information and phylogenetic analyses, this assignment revealed early appearance of A and B gene sequences in evolution and potentially non-allelic presence of both gene sequences in some animal species. We argue: Evolution may have suppressed the establishment of two independent, functional A and B genes in most vertebrates and promoted A/B conversion through amino acid substitutions and/or recombination; A/B allelism should have existed in common ancestors of primates; and bacterial ABO genes evolved through horizontal and vertical gene transmission into 2 separate groups encoding glycosyltransferases with distinct sugar specificities.

  10. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations.

  11. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  12. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  13. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Thomas, Susan N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell–cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner. PMID:26349809

  14. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  15. Epithelial cells secrete interleukin-8 in response to adhesion and invasion of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli lacking Afa/Dr genes.

    PubMed

    Meraz, Ismail Mustafa; Arikawa, Kentaro; Ogasawara, Jun; Hase, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli that sparsely adhere to human epithelial cells are known as diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC), and the role of the Afa/Dr family of adhesins is now understood. Strains that do not possess Afa/Dr, however, comprise another group of DAEC, of which the pathogenicity remains unknown. The ability to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from intestinal epithelial cells might be a feature of enterovirulent bacteria. We previously found that some Afa/Dr DAEC strains induce IL-8 by stimulating epithelial cells with flagella. The present study examines whether non-Afa/Dr DAEC can induce IL-8 in epithelial cells (HEp-2, INT407, and T84). Among 21 strains, 11 (52%; 11/21) induced as much IL-8 as high inducer strains of Afa/Dr DAEC. Adhesion did not significantly differ between high and low inducers; therefore diffuse adhesion alone is probably insufficient to induce IL-8. It was shown that IL-8 induction and the number of intracellular bacteria directly correlated. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase, reduced both intracellular bacteria and IL-8 secretion. Motile strains were significantly more prevalent among high (10/11) than low (4/10) inducers. However, 4 low invasive strains hardly induced IL-8 despite their motility. In conclusion, some non-Afa/Dr DAEC invoke the induction of high levels of inflammatory cytokines. Unlike Afa/Dr DAEC, however, non-Afa/Dr strains may require invasion to cause strong induction. These non-Afa/Dr high inducers can be enteropathogenic for the cytokine-inducing properties.

  16. Insertion/deletion-related polymorphisms in the human T cell receptor beta gene complex

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Insertion/deletion related polymorphisms (IDRP) involving stretches of 15-30 kb within the human TCR-beta gene complex were revealed by pulse- field gel electrophoresis. Two independent IDRP systems were detected by analysis of Sfi I- and Sal I-digested human DNA samples using probes for TCR C and V region gene segments. The allelic nature of these systems was verified in family studies, and mapping data allowed localization of one area of insertion/deletion among the V gene segments and the other near the C region genes. All but one of 50 individuals tested could be typed for the two allelic systems, and gene frequencies for the two allelic forms were 0.37/0.61 and 0.46/0.54, indicating that these polymorphisms are widespread. PMID:2571667

  17. Environment effect on fruit ripening related gene to develop a new post harvest technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivany, Fenny; Esyanti, Rizkita Rahmi; Robertlee, Jekson; Paramaputra, Indra Chandra; Permatadewi, Rinda Kania; Tambun, Dina Hermawaty; Handayani, Resnanti Utami; Pratiwi, Aksarani'Sa; Zaskia, Herafi

    2014-03-01

    Ripening process of fruits is a very complex process, which involves ethylene production, causing alteration on molecular and physiology level. Environmental stress caused by biotic and abiotic stress conditions (such as pathogen, mechanical stress, physical and physiology stress) can stimulate ethylene production. High levels of ethylene in turn can also inhibit growth, cause premature ripening and induce the onset of senescence, which then potentially reduce plant productivity. The ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) genes are genes that have role in the ethylene production. By regulating those genes, especially ethylene biosynthesis genes, we might improve the quality of fruit at post harvest condition. Therefore, in this research we studied fruit ripening related genes expression on banana such as MaACS family at different environment condition. The result of study can give contributions in developing of new plants with desired traits or new post harvest technologies.

  18. Accelerated alcoholic fermentation caused by defective gene expression related to glucose derepression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Mizuno, Megumi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Sake yeast strains maintain high fermentation rates, even after the stationary growth phase begins. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this advantageous brewing property, we compared the gene expression profiles of sake and laboratory yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the stationary growth phase. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the sake yeast strain examined had defects in expression of the genes related to glucose derepression mediated by transcription factors Adr1p and Cat8p. Furthermore, deletion of the ADR1 and CAT8 genes slightly but statistically significantly improved the fermentation rate of a laboratory yeast strain. We also identified two loss-of-function mutations in the ADR1 gene of existing sake yeast strains. Taken together, these results indicate that the gene expression program associated with glucose derepression for yeast acts as an impediment to effective alcoholic fermentation under glucose-rich fermentative conditions.

  19. Age-related decreased inhibitory vs. excitatory gene expression in the adult autistic brain.

    PubMed

    van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Nijhof, Bonnie; Bosch, Daniëlle G M; Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Heimel, J Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and restricted behavior and interests. A disruption in the balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission has been hypothesized to underlie these disorders. Here we demonstrate that genes of both pathways are affected by ASD, and that gene expression of inhibitory and excitatory genes is altered in the cerebral cortex of adult but not younger autistic individuals. We have developed a measure for the difference in the level of excitation and inhibition based on gene expression and observe that in this measure inhibition is decreased relative to excitation in adult ASD compared to control. This difference was undetectable in young autistic brains. Given that many psychiatric features of autism are already present at an early age, this suggests that the observed imbalance in gene expression is an aging phenomenon in ASD rather than its underlying cause.

  20. Universal aspects of brittle fracture, adhesion, and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1989-01-01

    This universal relation between binding energy and interatomic separation was originally discovered for adhesion at bimetallic interfaces involving the simple metals Al, Zn, Mg, and Na. It is shown here that the same universal relation extends to adhesion at transition-metal interfaces. Adhesive energies have been computed for the low-index interfaces of Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Fe, and W, using the equivalent-crystal theory (ECT) and keeping the atoms in each semiinfinite slab fixed rigidly in their equilibrium positions. These adhesive energy curves can be scaled onto each other and onto the universal adhesion curve. The effect of tip shape on the adhesive forces in the atomic-force microscope (AFM) is studied by computing energies and forces using the ECT. While the details of the energy-distance and force-distance curves are sensitive to tip shape, all of these curves can be scaled onto the universal adhesion curve.

  1. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  2. DNMT3B modulates the expression of cancer-related genes and downregulates the expression of the gene VAV3 via methylation.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Arrieta, Irlanda; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    Altered promoter DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic abnormalities in human cancer. DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferase, is clearly related to abnormal methylation of tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes and its overexpression contributes to oncogenic processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells on global gene expression and on the methylation of selected genes to the identification of genes that can be target of DNMT3B. We found that the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells, modulate the expression of genes related to cancer, downregulated the expression of 151 genes with CpG islands and downregulated the expression of the VAV3 gene via methylation of its promoter. These results highlight the importance of DNMT3B in gene expression and human cancer.

  3. DNMT3B modulates the expression of cancer-related genes and downregulates the expression of the gene VAV3 via methylation

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Arrieta, Irlanda; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    Altered promoter DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic abnormalities in human cancer. DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferase, is clearly related to abnormal methylation of tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes and its overexpression contributes to oncogenic processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells on global gene expression and on the methylation of selected genes to the identification of genes that can be target of DNMT3B. We found that the overexpression of DNMT3B in HaCaT cells, modulate the expression of genes related to cancer, downregulated the expression of 151 genes with CpG islands and downregulated the expression of the VAV3 gene via methylation of its promoter. These results highlight the importance of DNMT3B in gene expression and human cancer. PMID:28123849

  4. Evolution of Mhc class II B genes in Darwin's finches and their closest relatives: birth of a new gene.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Mayer, W E; Tichy, H; Grant, P R; Grant, B R; Klein, J

    2001-12-01

    The 15 extant species of Darwin's finches on the Galápagos and Cocos Islands are the products of an unfinished adaptive radiation from a founder flock of birds related to the South American species Tiaris obscura. Molecular characterization of their major histocompatibility complex ( Mhc) class II B genes has revealed the existence of several related groups of sequences (presumably encoded in distinct loci) from which one (group 5) stands out because of its low divergence over extended time periods. Analysis of group 5 exon 2 and intron 2 sequences has revealed that the encoding locus apparently arose 2-3 million years ago in the Tiaris group of South and Central American Thraupini. The locus shows no evidence of inactivation, but displays a very low degree of polymorphism, both in terms of number of alleles and genetic distances between alleles. Some of the polymorphism, however, appears to be trans-specific. All the observed intergenic differences can be explained by point mutations and most of the exon 2 changes represent non-synonymous substitutions, although the rate of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions appears to be the same. The origin of the new locus is explained by the birth-and-death model of Mhc evolution with two important extensions. First, the ancestor of the group 5 genes may have arisen without new gene duplication and second, the birth of the new group may have been brought about by a switch from balancing to directional selection. The ancestor of the group 5 genes may have been a classical class II B allele (one of many) which directional selection fixed in the ancestral population and drove into the category of nonclassical genes.

  5. Characterization and functional analysis of the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in human papillomavirus-related disease of cervical keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, N.; Greenfield, I. M.; Hare, J.; Kruger-Gray, H.; Chain, B. M.; Stanley, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in squamous neoplasia of the cervix and have noted a significant induction of the molecule in high-grade intra-epithelial lesions. Using monolayer and organotypic in vitro tissue culture systems, we have shown that there is no constitutive ICAM-1 expression on cervical keratinocytes immortalized but not transformed by human papillomavirus type 16, whereas two human papillomaviruses type 16 containing and fully transformed cervical keratinocyte lines do constitutively express the molecule. All cell types, including human papillomavirus-negative normal cervical keratinocytes, can be induced to up-regulate their expression of ICAM-1 by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma. In addition, we have used an in vitro adhesion assay to show that ICAM-1:lymphocyte function antigen-1 interaction is functionally important in lymphocyte binding to cervical keratinocytes, suggesting a role for ICAM-1 in retaining and enabling functional activity of lymphocytes in the cervix in intraepithelial neoplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 9 PMID:8102029

  6. The effect of bending on the stresses in adhesive joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of stress distribution in adhesive joints where two orthotropic plates are bonded through a flexible adhesive layer is analyzed. It is shown that the effect of bending of the adherends on the stresses in the adhesive layer is very significant. The transverse shear deformations of the adherends appear to have little influence on the adhesive layer stresses. The maximum transverse normal stress in the adhesive is shown to be larger than the maximum longitudinal shear stress. The method of solution is applied to several examples of specific joint geometries and material combinations, and is proven to be applicable to other related problems.

  7. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization.

  8. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  9. Genotype relative risks: Methods for design and analysis of candidate-gene association studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. )

    1993-11-01

    Design and analysis methods are presented for studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease by using parental data in place of nonrelated controls. This alternating design eliminates spurious differences in allele frequencies between cases and nonrelated controls resulting from different ethnic origins and population stratification for these two groups. The authors present analysis methods which are based on two genetic relative risks: (1) the relative risk of disease for homozygotes with two copies of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene and (2) the relative risk for heterozygotes with one copy of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene. In addition to estimating the magnitude of these relative risks, likelihood methods allow specific hypotheses to be tested, namely, a test for overall association of the candidate gene with disease, as well as specific genetic hypotheses, such as dominant or recessive inheritance. Two likelihood methods are presented: (1) a likelihood method appropriate when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds and (2) a likelihood method in which the authors condition on parental genotype data when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold. The results for the relative efficiency of these two methods suggest that the conditional approach may at times be preferable, even when equilibrium holds. Sample-size and power calculations are presented for a multitiered design. Tier 1 detects the presence of an abnormal sequence for a postulated candidate gene among a small group of cases. Tier 2 tests for association of the abnormal variant with disease, such as by the likelihood methods presented. Tier 3 confirms positive results from tier 2. Results indicate that required sample sizes are smaller when expression of disease is recessive, rather than dominant, and that, for recessive disease and large relative risks, necessary sample sizes may be feasible. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. History of a prolific family: the Hes/Hey-related genes of the annelid Platynereis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hes superfamily or Hes/Hey-related genes encompass a variety of metazoan-specific bHLH genes, with somewhat fuzzy phylogenetic relationships. Hes superfamily members are involved in a variety of major developmental mechanisms in metazoans, notably in neurogenesis and segmentation processes, in which they often act as direct effector genes of the Notch signaling pathway. Results We have investigated the molecular and functional evolution of the Hes superfamily in metazoans using the lophotrochozoan Platynereis dumerilii as model. Our phylogenetic analyses of more than 200 Metazoan Hes/Hey-related genes revealed the presence of five families, three of them (Hes, Hey and Helt) being pan-metazoan. Those families were likely composed of a unique representative in the last common metazoan ancestor. The evolution of the Hes family was shaped by many independent lineage specific tandem duplication events. The expression patterns of 13 of the 15 Hes/Hey-related genes in Platynereis indicate a broad functional diversification. Nevertheless, a majority of these genes are involved in two crucial developmental processes in annelids: neurogenesis and segmentation, resembling functions highlighted in other animal models. Conclusions Combining phylogenetic and expression data, our study suggests an unusual evolutionary history for the Hes superfamily. An ancestral multifunctional annelid Hes gene may have undergone multiples rounds of duplication-degeneration-complementation processes in the lineage leading to Platynereis, each gene copies ensuring their maintenance in the genome by subfunctionalisation. Similar but independent waves of duplications are at the origin of the multiplicity of Hes genes in other metazoan lineages. PMID:25250171

  11. Mutant p53 promotes ovarian cancer cell adhesion to mesothelial cells via integrin β4 and Akt signals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Jin Kim, Tae; Ho Lee, Jae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-07-30

    Missense mutations in the TP53 gene resulting in the accumulation of mutant proteins are extremely common in advanced ovarian cancer, which is characterised by peritoneal metastasis. Attachment of cancer cells to the peritoneal mesothelium is regarded as an initial, key step for the metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of a p53 mutant in the mesothelial adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. We found that OVCAR-3 cells with the R248 TP53 mutation (p53(R248)) were more adhesive to mesothelial Met5A cells than were A2780 cells expressing wild-type p53. In addition, ectopic expression of p53(R248) in p53-null SKOV-3 cells significantly increased adhesion to Met5A cells. Knockdown of mutant p53 significantly compromised p53(R248)-induced cell adhesion to Met5A cells. Microarray analysis revealed that several adhesion-related genes, including integrin β4, were markedly up-regulated, and certain signalling pathways, including PI3K/Akt, were activated in p53(R248) transfectants of SKOV-3 cells. Inhibition of integrin β4 and Akt signalling using blocking antibody and the inhibitor LY294002, respectively, significantly attenuated p53(R248)-mediated ovarian cancer-mesothelial adhesion. These data suggest that the p53(R248) mutant endows ovarian cancer cells with increased adhesiveness and that integrin β4 and Akt signalling are associated with the mutation-enhanced ovarian cancer-mesothelial cell adhesion.

  12. The transcription factor ultraspiracle influences honey bee social behavior and behavior-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ament, Seth A; Wang, Ying; Chen, Chieh-Chun; Blatti, Charles A; Hong, Feng; Liang, Zhengzheng S; Negre, Nicolas; White, Kevin P; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Mizzen, Craig A; Sinha, Saurabh; Zhong, Sheng; Robinson, Gene E

    2012-01-01

    Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF), ultraspiracle (usp; the insect homolog of the Retinoid X Receptor), working in complex transcriptional networks, can regulate behavioral plasticity and associated changes in gene expression. We first show that RNAi knockdown of USP in honey bee abdominal fat bodies delayed the transition from working in the hive (primarily "nursing" brood) to foraging outside. We then demonstrate through transcriptomics experiments that USP induced many maturation-related transcriptional changes in the fat bodies by mediating transcriptional responses to juvenile hormone. These maturation-related transcriptional responses to USP occurred without changes in USP's genomic binding sites, as revealed by ChIP-chip. Instead, behaviorally related gene expression is likely determined by combinatorial interactions between USP and other TFs whose cis-regulatory motifs were enriched at USP's binding sites. Many modules of JH- and maturation-related genes were co-regulated in both the fat body and brain, predicting that usp and cofactors influence shared transcriptional networks in both of these maturation-related tissues. Our findings demonstrate how "single gene effects" on behavioral plasticity can involve complex transcriptional networks, in both brain and peripheral tissues.

  13. The Transcription Factor Ultraspiracle Influences Honey Bee Social Behavior and Behavior-Related Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Blatti, Charles A.; Hong, Feng; Liang, Zhengzheng S.; Negre, Nicolas; White, Kevin P.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Mizzen, Craig A.; Sinha, Saurabh; Zhong, Sheng; Robinson, Gene E.

    2012-01-01

    Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF), ultraspiracle (usp; the insect homolog of the Retinoid X Receptor), working in complex transcriptional networks, can regulate behavioral plasticity and associated changes in gene expression. We first show that RNAi knockdown of USP in honey bee abdominal fat bodies delayed the transition from working in the hive (primarily “nursing” brood) to foraging outside. We then demonstrate through transcriptomics experiments that USP induced many maturation-related transcriptional changes in the fat bodies by mediating transcriptional responses to juvenile hormone. These maturation-related transcriptional responses to USP occurred without changes in USP's genomic binding sites, as revealed by ChIP–chip. Instead, behaviorally related gene expression is likely determined by combinatorial interactions between USP and other TFs whose cis-regulatory motifs were enriched at USP's binding sites. Many modules of JH– and maturation-related genes were co-regulated in both the fat body and brain, predicting that usp and cofactors influence shared transcriptional networks in both of these maturation-related tissues. Our findings demonstrate how “single gene effects” on behavioral plasticity can involve complex transcriptional networks, in both brain and peripheral tissues. PMID:22479195

  14. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27149165

  15. Molecular characterization of stress resistance-related chitinase genes of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo; Hur, Yoonkang; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2012-09-01

    Brassica is an important vegetable group worldwide that is impacted by biotic and abiotic stresses. Molecular biology techniques offer the most efficient approach to address these concerns. Inducible plant defense responses include the production of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, and chitinases are very important PR proteins. We collected 30 chitinase like genes, three from our full-length cDNA library of Brassica rapa cv. Osome and 27 from Brassica databases. Sequence analysis and comparison study confirmed that they were all class I-V and VII chitinase genes. These genes also showed a high degree of homology with other biotic stress resistance-related plant chitinases. An organ-specific expression of these genes was observed and among these, seven genes showed significant responses after infection with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans in cabbage and sixteen genes showed responsive expression after abiotic stress treatments in Chinese cabbage. BrCLP1, 8, 10, 17 and 18 responded commonly after biotic and abiotic stress treatments indicating their higher potentials. Taken together, the results presented herein suggest that these chitinase genes may be useful resources in the development of stress resistant Brassica.

  16. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-05-05

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer.

  17. Expression of mitochondria-related genes is elevated in overfeeding-induced goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rashid H; Shao, Dan; Liu, Long; Xia, Lili; Sun, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Yun; Wang, Laidi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yihui; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Daoqing; Geng, Tuoyu

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrion, the power house of the cell, is an important organelle involving in energy homeostasis. Change in mitochondrial mass and function may lead to metabolic disorders. Previous studies indicate that mitochondrial mass loss and dysfunction are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and mouse. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial genes are involved in the development of goose fatty liver. To address this, we determined the response of goose mitochondrial genes to overfeeding and other fatty liver-related factors (e.g., hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia). We first employed RNA-seq technology to determine the differentially expressed genes in the livers from normally-fed vs. overfed geese, followed by bioinformatics analysis and quantitative PCR validation. Data indicated that a majority of mitochondrial genes in the liver were induced by overfeeding. To understand how these genes are regulated in the context of fatty liver, we treated goose primary hepatocytes with high levels of glucose, fatty acids and insulin. The results indicated that these factors had an influence on the expression of some mitochondria related genes. Together, these findings suggest that the induction of mitochondrial gene expression by overfeeding is required for the development of goose fatty liver, and this induction is partially attributable to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of immune-related genes in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) during ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Quispe, Ruth L; Justino, Emily B; Vieira, Felipe N; Jaramillo, Michael L; Rosa, Rafael D; Perazzolo, Luciane M

    2016-11-01

    We have performed here a gene expression analysis to determine the developmental stage at the main genes involved in crustacean immune response begin to be expressed and their changes in mRNA abundance during shrimp development. By using a quantitative PCR-based approach, we have measured the mRNA abundance of 24 immune-related genes from different functional categories in twelve developmental stages ranging from fertilized eggs to larval and postlarval stages and also in juveniles. We showed for the first time that the main genes from the RNAi-based post-transcriptional pathway involved in shrimp antiviral immunity are transcribed in all developmental stages, but exhibit a diverse pattern of gene expression during shrimp ontogenesis. On the other hand, hemocyte-expressed genes mainly involved in antimicrobial defenses appeared to be transcribed in larval stages, indicating that hematopoiesis initiates early in development. Moreover, transcript levels of some genes were early detected in fertilized eggs at 0-4 h post-spawning, suggesting a maternal contribution of immune-related transcripts to shrimp progeny. Altogether, our results provide important clues regarding the ontogenesis of hemocytes as well the establishment of antiviral and antimicrobial defenses in shrimp.

  19. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  20. Associations between DNA methylation and schizophrenia-related intermediate phenotypes - a gene set enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Hass, Johanna; Walton, Esther; Wright, Carrie; Beyer, Andreas; Scholz, Markus; Turner, Jessica; Liu, Jingyu; Smolka, Michael N; Roessner, Veit; Sponheim, Scott R; Gollub, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-06-03

    Multiple genetic approaches have identified microRNAs as key effectors in psychiatric disorders as they post-transcriptionally regulate expression of thousands of target genes. However, their role in specific psychiatric diseases remains poorly understood. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, which affect the expression of both microRNAs and coding genes, are critical for our understanding of molecular mechanisms in schizophrenia. Using clinical, imaging, genetic, and epigenetic data of 103 patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium (MCIC) study of schizophrenia, we conducted gene set enrichment analysis to identify markers for schizophrenia-associated intermediate phenotypes. Genes were ranked based on the correlation between DNA methylation patterns and each phenotype, and then searched for enrichment in 221 predicted microRNA target gene sets. We found the predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene set to be significantly enriched for genes (EPHA4, PKNOX1, ESR1, among others) whose methylation status is correlated with hippocampal volume independent of disease status. Our results were strengthened by significant associations between hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene methylation patterns and hippocampus-related neuropsychological variables. IPA pathway analysis of the respective predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes revealed associated network functions in behavior and developmental disorders. Altered methylation patterns of predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes are associated with a structural aberration of the brain that has been proposed as a possible biomarker for schizophrenia. The (dys)regulation of microRNA target genes by epigenetic mechanisms may confer additional risk for developing psychiatric symptoms. Further study is needed to understand possible interactions between microRNAs and epigenetic changes and their impact on risk for brain-based disorders such as schizophrenia.