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Sample records for adhesion signaling pathways

  1. Ghrelin Inhibits Post-Operative Adhesions via Blockage of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Boekelheide, Kim; Sigman, Mark; Lamb, Dolores J.; Hall, Susan J.; Hwang, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative adhesions are a critical problem in pelvic and abdominal surgery despite a multitude of studies dedicated to finding modalities to prevent their occurrence. Ghrelin administration promotes an anti-fibrotic response in a surgical mouse model of adhesion-induction, but the mechanisms mediating this effect have not been established. In the current study, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the anti-adhesion effect of ghrelin were investigated. Post-surgical adhesions were experimentally created in C57BL/6 wild-type mice via a combination of ischemic peritoneal buttons and cecal multiple abrasions. Ghrelin or saline intraperitoneal injections were given twice daily from two days before surgery to selected time points post-surgically to assess the phenotypic and molecular effects of treatment (1 day (n = 20), 4 days (n = 20) and 20 days (n = 40) after surgery). Endpoints included the scoring of adhesions and gene and protein expression analysis of pro-fibrogenic factors conducted on peritoneal ischemic tissue by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Ghrelin administration significantly reduced post-surgical adhesions and down-regulated pro-inflammatory gene and protein expression, including Tgfb3 and Tgfbr2. The up-regulation of inhibitory proteins Smad6 and Smad7 confirmed the ghrelin-induced blockage of TGF-β signaling. Ghrelin is a candidate therapeutic drug for post-operative adhesion prevention, inhibiting inflammatory responses via blockage of the TGF-β signaling pathway at the onset of surgery before the occurrence of the granulation-remodeling phase. PMID:27082244

  2. Hydroxycamptothecin induces apoptosis of fibroblasts and prevents intraarticular scar adhesion in rabbits by activating the IRE-1 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolei; Sun, Yu; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Gengyao; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Jingcheng; Yan, Lianqi

    2016-06-15

    Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) has been proven to prevent intraarticular scar adhesion, but the mechanism is still unclear. ER stress is known to participate in many diseases, and the IRE-1 signal pathway has been reported in fibrotic diseases. The aim of this study was to illustrate the mechanism of HCPT-induced apoptosis in fibroblasts and the prevention of intraarticular scar adhesion. The effects of HCPT on fibroblasts were determined by CCK-8 assay, Hoechst staining and Western blot. The effect of HCPT on intraarticular scar adhesion was detected by macroscopic evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological evaluation, fibroblast counting and immunohistochemical analysis. HCPT induced apoptosis of fibroblasts, according to CCK-8 assays, Hoechst staining and Western blot analysis. As the concentration of HCPT increased, the expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol-requiring kinase1 (IRE-1), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and Bax were all increased, but the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Knockdown of IRE-1 alleviated the HCPT-induced apoptosis in our fibroblast model. HCPT could prevent intraarticular scar adhesion, according to the results of macroscopic evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological evaluation and fibroblast counting in a rabbit model. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IRE-1 expression increased as the concentration increased. The present study showed that the IRE-1 signal pathway might be involved in HCPT-induced apoptosis of fibroblast and might play a role in preventing intraarticular scar adhesion. PMID:27068147

  3. Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol suppresses monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by attenuation of JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Kanamori, Yuta; Matsutomo, Toshiaki; Morihara, Naoaki

    2015-09-25

    Several clinical studies have shown that the intake of aged garlic extract improves endothelial dysfunction. Lignan compounds, (+)-(2S,3R)-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDC) and (-)-(2R,3S)-dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDDC), have been isolated as antioxidants in aged garlic extract. There is evidence showing the importance of oxidative stress in endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we examined whether DDC and DDDC enhance endothelial cell function in vitro. Cell adhesion assay was performed using THP-1 monocyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-BSA. Cellular ELISA method was used for the evaluation of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression on HUVECs. DDC and DDDC suppressed the adhesion of THP-1 to HUVECs which was activated by LPS or AGEs-BSA. DDC and DDDC also inhibited VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS or AGEs-BSA, but DDDC was less effective than DDC. In addition, the inhibitory effect of DDC on VCAM-1 expression involved suppressing JNK/c-Jun pathway rather than NF-κB pathway. DDC has an inhibitory effect on VCAM-1 expression via JNK pathway in endothelial cells and therefore may serve as a novel pharmacological agent to improve endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26271597

  4. The Overexpression of TGF-β and CCN2 in Intrauterine Adhesions Involves the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiang; Chen, Qing; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Jin-Yan; Duan, Zhao; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine adhesions (IUA) are a significant cause of menstrual disturbance and infertility, but their pathogenesis still remains unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of TGF-β and CCN2 in IUA endometrial tissue by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and qRT-PCR assays, and found the expression of TGF-β and CCN2 in the endometrial tissue of IUA was significantly increased compared to normal endometrium and uterine septum (P<0.01), suggesting that TGF-β and CCN2 may play an important role in the formation of IUA. Moreover, the activity of the NF-κB signaling pathway in endometrial tissue of IUA was also significantly enhanced compared to normal endometrial and uterine septum (P<0.01) and positively correlated with the expression of TGF-β and CCN2, which suggested that TGF-β and CCN2 expression may be involved in the NF-κB signaling pathway. Blocking the NF-κB signaling pathway using SN50 resulted in the reduced expression of TGF-β in RL95-2 cells, which confirmed the association of the NF-κB signaling pathway and TGF-β in endometrial cells. Additionally, the expression of TGF-β and CCN2 was associated with IUA recurrence, which provides a potential prognostic indictor for IUA. Together, these results demonstrated that TGF-β and CCN2 play an important role in IUA formation, whose mechanism was associated with the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26719893

  5. Role of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Smads Signaling Pathway in Intrauterine Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Salma, Umme; Xue, Min; Ali Sheikh, Md Sayed; Guan, Xiaoming; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Aiqian; Huang, Lihua; Xu, Dabao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of Smad3, Smad7, and TGF-β1 in intrauterine adhesion (IUA) patients and experimental rabbit models. 60 IUA patients, 30 control participants, and 18 female rabbits were enrolled in this study. We found that the plasma concentrations and protein expressions of TGF-β1 were significantly increased in patients and experimental rabbits compared to those in controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Smad3 were significantly elevated, while Smad7 level was markedly decreased in the patients and experimental rabbits compared with controls (P < 0.05). This altered ratio recommended that IUA was positively correlated to the mRNA and protein expression levels of Smad3, Smad7, and TGF-β1 in blood and uterine tissue. Moreover, we used the specific inhibitor of Smad3 (SIS3) in experimental rabbit. SIS3 obviously reduced the mRNA and protein expression of smad3 and TGF-β1, while it increased Smad7 expression in the treatment groups as compared with IUA rabbits (P < 0.05). Our study suggested that TGF-β1/Smad3/smad7 is a major pathway which plays an important role in the regulation of the IUA and specific inhibitor of Smad3 (SIS3) may provide a new therapeutic strategy for IUA. PMID:26997760

  6. Estrogen down-regulates nicotine-induced adhesion molecule expression via nongenomic signal pathway in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lianyun; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Yangxing; Liu, Liming; Yao, Chenjiang; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2006-06-01

    Although gonadal hormone mostly causes genotropic actions through the members of nuclear receptor family, it also can regulate these actions via membrane receptor. To explore the possibility of plasma membrane estrogen receptors (mER) mediating genotropic events, we have investigated estrogen's effect on nicotine-stimulated adhesion molecule expression and evaluated whether this effect depends on calcium, MAPK signal pathway. Fluorescence Spectroscopy analysis of Ca2+ from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed through mER, estrogen induced a rapid rise of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration and this rise could not be inhibited by tamoxifen (classic ER inhibitor). In the context of nicotine stimulating, however, estrogen attenuated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 but not c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) in HUVECs and this effect could not still be prevented by tamoxifen. In the meantime, estrogen also down-regulated surface/soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1, sVCAM-1) and endothelial selectin (E-selectin, sE-selectin) levels, which was not abolished by tamoxifen either. Moreover, calcium chelator BAPTA, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203580 significantly reduced the production of nicotine-activated surface/soluble VCAM-1 and E-selectin and both of the remained levels were no longer regulated by estrogen. Our study here provides the information of decrease effect of mER-mediated estrogen through Ca2+ and ERK1/2, p38 MAPK signaling pathway on nicotine-stimulated expression of surface/soluble VCAM-1 and E-selectin in HUVECs. PMID:16644474

  7. Identification of methyl violet 2B as a novel blocker of focal adhesion kinase signaling pathway in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Jiyeon; Han, Gyoonhee; Sim, Taebo

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •FAK signaling cascade in cancer cells is profoundly inhibited by methyl violet 2B. •Methyl violet 2B identified by virtual screening is a novel allosteric FAK inhibitor. •Methyl violet 2B possesses extremely high kinase selectivity. •Methyl violet 2B suppresses strongly the proliferation of cancer cells. •Methyl violet 2B inhibits focal adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells. -- Abstract: The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling cascade in cancer cells was profoundly inhibited by methyl violet 2B identified with the structure-based virtual screening. Methyl violet 2B was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of full-length FAK enzyme vs. ATP. It turned out that methyl violet 2B possesses extremely high kinase selectivity in biochemical kinase profiling using a large panel of kinases. Anti-proliferative activity measurement against several different cancer cells and Western blot analysis showed that this substance is capable of suppressing significantly the proliferation of cancer cells and is able to strongly block FAK/AKT/MAPK signaling pathways in a dose dependent manner at low nanomolar concentration. Especially, phosphorylation of Tyr925-FAK that is required for full activation of FAK was nearly completely suppressed even with 1 nM of methyl violet 2B in A375P cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, it has never been reported that methyl violet possesses anti-cancer effects. Moreover, methyl violet 2B significantly inhibited FER kinase phosphorylation that activates FAK in cell. In addition, methyl violet 2B was found to induce cell apoptosis and to exhibit strong inhibitory effects on the focal adhesion, invasion, and migration of A375P cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Taken together, these results show that methyl violet 2B is a novel, potent and selective blocker of FAK signaling cascade, which displays strong anti-proliferative activities against a variety of human cancer cells and suppresses adhesion

  8. Identification of a novel agrin-dependent pathway in cell signaling and adhesion within the erythroid niche

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, A; Lauranzano, E; Soldani, C; Ploia, C; Angioni, R; D'amico, G; Sarukhan, A; Mazzon, C; Viola, A

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of cell–cell adhesion is crucial in embryonic development as well as within the stem cell niches of an adult. Adhesion between macrophages and erythroblasts is required for the formation of erythroblastic islands, specialized niches where erythroblasts proliferate and differentiate to produce red blood cells throughout life. The Eph family is the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and controls cell adhesion, migration, invasion and morphology by modulating integrin and adhesion molecule activity and by modifying the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we identify the proteoglycan agrin as a novel regulator of Eph receptor signaling and characterize a novel mechanism controlling cell–cell adhesion and red cell development within the erythroid niche. We demonstrate that agrin induces clustering and activation of EphB1 receptors on developing erythroblasts, leading to the activation of α5β1 integrins. In agreement, agrin knockout mice display severe anemia owing to defective adhesion to macrophages and impaired maturation of erythroid cells. These results position agrin-EphB1 as a novel key signaling couple regulating cell adhesion and erythropoiesis. PMID:26990660

  9. Identification of a novel agrin-dependent pathway in cell signaling and adhesion within the erythroid niche.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, A; Lauranzano, E; Soldani, C; Ploia, C; Angioni, R; D'amico, G; Sarukhan, A; Mazzon, C; Viola, A

    2016-08-01

    Establishment of cell-cell adhesion is crucial in embryonic development as well as within the stem cell niches of an adult. Adhesion between macrophages and erythroblasts is required for the formation of erythroblastic islands, specialized niches where erythroblasts proliferate and differentiate to produce red blood cells throughout life. The Eph family is the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and controls cell adhesion, migration, invasion and morphology by modulating integrin and adhesion molecule activity and by modifying the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we identify the proteoglycan agrin as a novel regulator of Eph receptor signaling and characterize a novel mechanism controlling cell-cell adhesion and red cell development within the erythroid niche. We demonstrate that agrin induces clustering and activation of EphB1 receptors on developing erythroblasts, leading to the activation of α5β1 integrins. In agreement, agrin knockout mice display severe anemia owing to defective adhesion to macrophages and impaired maturation of erythroid cells. These results position agrin-EphB1 as a novel key signaling couple regulating cell adhesion and erythropoiesis. PMID:26990660

  10. TNF-α enhances vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the NF-κB, ERK and JNK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    LU, ZI-YUAN; CHEN, WAN-CHENG; LI, YONG-HUA; LI, LI; ZHANG, HANG; PANG, YAN; XIAO, ZHI-FANG; XIAO, HAO-WEN; XIAO, YANG

    2016-01-01

    The migration of circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to injured tissue is an important step in tissue regeneration and requires adhesion to the microvascular endothelium. The current study investigated the underlying mechanism of MSC adhesion to endothelial cells during inflammation. In in vitro MSC culture, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased the level of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in a dose-dependent manner. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), U0126 and SP600125, respectively, suppressed VCAM-1 expression induced by TNF-α at the mRNA and protein levels (P<0.05). TNF-α augmented the activation of NF-κB, ERK and JNK, and promoted MSC adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells; however, the inhibitors of NF-κB, ERK and JNK did not affect this process in these cells. The results of the current study indicate that adhesion of circulating MSCs to the endothelium is regulated by TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression, which is potentially mediated by the NF-κB, ERK and JNK signaling pathways. PMID:27221006

  11. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor promotes vascular adhesion molecule-1 expression via the PI-3K/Akt-NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiangsong; Zheng, Liduan; Lin, Li; Li, Bo; Wang, Danming; Li, Dechun

    2006-10-01

    Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF), also known as FIZZ1 (found in inflammatory zone 1), is an important player in lung inflammation. However, the effects of HIMF on cell adhesion molecules involved in lung inflammation remain largely unknown. In the present work, we tested whether HIMF modulates vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression, and dissected the possible signaling pathways that link HIMF to VCAM-1 upregulation. Recombinant HIMF protein, instilled intratracheally into adult mouse lungs, results in a significant increase of VCAM-1 production in vascular endothelial, alveolar type II, and airway epithelial cells. In cultured mouse endothelial SVEC 4-10 and lung epithelial MLE-12 cells, we demonstrated that HIMF induces VCAM-1 expression via the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/Akt-nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB signaling pathway. Knockdown of HIMF expression by small interference RNA attenuated LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression in vitro. We showed that HIMF induced phosphorylation of the IkappaB kinase signalsome and, subsequently, IkappaBalpha, leading to activation of NF-kappaB. Meanwhile, VCAM-1 production was correspondingly upregulated. Blocking NF-kappaB signaling pathway by expression of dominant-negative mutants of IkappaB kinase and IkappaBalpha suppressed HIMF-induced VCAM-1 upregulation. HIMF also strongly induced phosphorylation of Akt. A dominant-negative mutant of PI-3K, Deltap85, as well as PI-3K inhibitor, LY294002, also blocked HIMF-induced NF-kappaB activation and attenuated VCAM-1 production. Furthermore, LY294002 pretreatment abolished HIMF-enhanced mononuclear cells adhesion to endothelial and epithelial cells. Our findings connect HIMF to signaling pathways that regulate inflammation, and thus reveal the critical roles that HIMF plays in lung inflammation. PMID:16709959

  12. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  13. Extracellular matrix protein ITGBL1 promotes ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion through Wnt/PCP signaling and FAK/SRC pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Wang, Defeng; Li, Xiaotian; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances in cancer treatment and the progresses in tumor biological, ovarian cancer remains a bad situation. In current study, we found a novel extracellular matrix protein, ITGBL1, which is highly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry examination. The expression pattern of ITGBL1 in malignant tissues inspired us to investigate its role in ovarian cancer progression. Both loss- and gain-function assays revealed that ITGBL1 could promote ovarian cancer cell migration and adhesion. As it's a secreted protein, we further used recombinant ITGBL1 protein treated cancer cells and found that ITGBL1 promotes cell migration and adhesion in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that ITGBL1 not only influences the activity of Wnt/PCP signaling but also affects FAK/src pathway in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that highly expressed ITGBL1 could promotes cancer cell migration and adhesion in ovarian cancer and as a secreted protein, ITGBL1 might be a novel biomarker for ovarian cancer diagnosis. PMID:27261588

  14. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight. PMID:26421979

  15. Luteolin protects against vascular inflammation in mice and TNF-alpha-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells via suppressing IΚBα/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Liu, Dongmin; Shah, Halley; Li, Jason Z; Chitrakar, Rojin; Si, Hongwei; McCormick, John; Zhu, Hong; Zhen, Wei; Li, Yunbo

    2015-03-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Luteolin, a naturally occurring flavonoid present in many medicinal plants and some commonly consumed fruits and vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of luteolin at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that luteolin as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells, a key event in triggering vascular inflammation. Luteolin potently suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), key mediators involved in enhancing endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, luteolin inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation, expression of IκB kinase β and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that luteolin can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 0% or 0.6% luteolin for 3 weeks, and luteolin supplementation greatly suppressed TNF-α-induced increase in circulating levels of MCP-1/JE, CXCL1/KC and sICAM-1 in C57BL/6 mice. Consistently, dietary intake of luteolin significantly reduced TNF-α-stimulated adhesion of monocytes to aortic endothelial cells ex vivo. Histology shows that luteolin treatment prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers' delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies further show that luteolin treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In

  16. Nuclear Signaling from Cadherin Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Pierre D.; Maher, Meghan T.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell–cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of “outside-in” or “inside-out” signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure–function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell–cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell–cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  17. Nuclear signaling from cadherin adhesion complexes.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Pierre D; Maher, Meghan T; Gottardi, Cara J

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell-cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of "outside-in" or "inside-out" signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure-function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell-cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell-cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  18. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  19. Terbium promotes adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via activation of the Smad-dependent TGF-β/BMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Ge, Kun; Jin, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Meng-Su; Zhang, Jin-Chao

    2014-08-01

    With its special physical and chemical properties, terbium has been widely used, which has inevitably increased the chance of human exposure to terbium-based compounds. It was reported that terbium mainly deposited in bone after introduction into the human body. Although some studies revealed the effects of terbium on bone cell lines, there have been few reports about the potential effect of terbium on adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we investigated the effects of terbium on the adhesion and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and the associated molecular mechanisms. Our data reveal that terbium promoted the osteogenic differentiation in a time-dependent manner and conversely inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the cell-cell or cell-matrix interaction was enhanced by activating adherent-related key factors, which were evaluated by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were also performed to further detect osteogenic and adipogenic biomarkers of MSCs. The regulation of terbium on differentiation of MSCs led to the interaction between the transforming growth factor β/bone morphogenetic protein and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) signaling pathways, resulting in upregulation of the osteogenic master transcription factors, such as Runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein 2, collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin, and downregulation of the adipogenic master transcription factors, such as PPARγ2. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate the mechanisms of bone metabolism by terbium and may be helpful for more rational application of terbium-based compounds in the future. PMID:24585101

  20. LUTEOLIN PROTECTS AGAINST VASCULAR INFLAMMATION IN MICE AND TNF-ALPHA-INDUCED MONOCYTE ADHESION TO ENDOTHELIAL CELLS VIA SUPPRESSING IΚBα/NF-κB SIGNALING PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenquan; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Liu, Dongmin; Shah, Halley; Li, Jason Z.; Chitrakar, Rojin; Si, Hongwei; McCormick, John; Zhu, Hong; Zhen, Wei; Li, Yunbo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavanoid, present in many medicinal plants as well as in some commonly consumed fruits and vegetables has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of luteolin at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that luteolin as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells, a key event in triggering vascular inflammation. Luteolin potently suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, key mediators involved in enhancing endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, luteolin inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation, expression of IκB kinase ß (IKKß), and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that luteolin can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 0% or 0.6% luteolin for three weeks and luteolin supplementation greatly suppressed TNF-α-induced increases in circulating levels of MCP-1/JE, CXCL1/KC, and sICAM-1 in C57BL/6 mice. Consistently, dietary intake of luteolin significantly reduced TNF-α-stimulated adhesion of monocytes to aortic endothelial cells ex vivo. Histology shows that luteolin treatment prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies further show that luteolin treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, luteolin protects against TNF-α-induced vascular inflammation, in both in

  1. Spironolactone promotes autophagy via inhibiting PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway and reduce adhesive capacity damage in podocytes under mechanical stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Lu, Zhenyu; Xu, Zhongwei; Ji, Junya; Zheng, Zhenfeng; Lin, Shan; Yan, Tiekun

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stress which would cause deleterious adhesive effects on podocytes is considered a major contributor to the early progress of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Our previous study has shown that spironolactone could ameliorate podocytic adhesive capacity in diabetic rats. Autophagy has been reported to have a protective role against renal injury. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms by which spironolactone reduced adhesive capacity damage in podocytes under mechanical stress, focusing on the involvement of autophagy. Human conditional immortalized podocytes exposed to mechanical stress were treated with spironolactone, LY294002 or rapamycin for 48 h. The accumulation of LC3 puncta was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Podocyte expression of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), integrin β1, LC3, Atg5, p85-PI3K, p-Akt, p-mTOR were detected by Western blotting. Podocyte adhesion to collagen type IV was also performed with spectrophotometry. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the normal level of autophagy was reduced in podocytes under mechanical stress. Decreased integrin β1, LC3, Atg5 and abnormal activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were also detected in podocytes under mechanical stress. Spironolactone up-regulated integrin β1, LC3, Atg5 expression, down-regulated p85-PI3K, p-Akt, p-mTOR expression and reduced podocytic adhesive capacity damage. Our data demonstrated that spironolactone inhibited mechanical-stress-induced podocytic adhesive capacity damage through blocking PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and restoring autophagy activity. PMID:27129295

  2. Spironolactone promotes autophagy via inhibiting PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway and reduce adhesive capacity damage in podocytes under mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lu, Zhenyu; Xu, Zhongwei; Ji, Junya; Zheng, Zhenfeng; Lin, Shan; Yan, Tiekun

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stress which would cause deleterious adhesive effects on podocytes is considered a major contributor to the early progress of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Our previous study has shown that spironolactone could ameliorate podocytic adhesive capacity in diabetic rats. Autophagy has been reported to have a protective role against renal injury. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms by which spironolactone reduced adhesive capacity damage in podocytes under mechanical stress, focusing on the involvement of autophagy. Human conditional immortalized podocytes exposed to mechanical stress were treated with spironolactone, LY294002 or rapamycin for 48 h. The accumulation of LC3 puncta was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Podocyte expression of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), integrin β1, LC3, Atg5, p85-PI3K, p-Akt, p-mTOR were detected by Western blotting. Podocyte adhesion to collagen type IV was also performed with spectrophotometry. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the normal level of autophagy was reduced in podocytes under mechanical stress. Decreased integrin β1, LC3, Atg5 and abnormal activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were also detected in podocytes under mechanical stress. Spironolactone up-regulated integrin β1, LC3, Atg5 expression, down-regulated p85-PI3K, p-Akt, p-mTOR expression and reduced podocytic adhesive capacity damage. Our data demonstrated that spironolactone inhibited mechanical-stress-induced podocytic adhesive capacity damage through blocking PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and restoring autophagy activity. PMID:27129295

  3. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  4. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  5. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  6. The Fog signaling pathway: insights into signaling in morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alyssa J; Rogers, Stephen L

    2014-10-01

    Epithelia form the building blocks of many tissue and organ types. Epithelial cells often form a contiguous 2-dimensional sheet that is held together by strong adhesions. The mechanical properties conferred by these adhesions allow the cells to undergo dramatic three-dimensional morphogenetic movements while maintaining cell-cell contacts during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development. The Drosophila Folded gastrulation pathway triggers epithelial cell shape changes that drive gastrulation and tissue folding and is one of the most extensively studied examples of epithelial morphogenesis. This pathway has yielded key insights into the signaling mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in epithelial remodeling. In this review, we discuss principles of morphogenesis and signaling that have been discovered through genetic and cell biological examination of this pathway. We also consider various regulatory mechanisms and the system׳s relevance to mammalian development. We propose future directions that will continue to broaden our knowledge of morphogenesis across taxa. PMID:25127992

  7. The Fog signaling pathway: Insights into signaling in morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Alyssa J.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelia form the building blocks of many tissue and organ types. Epithelial cells often form a contiguous 2-dimensional sheet that is held together by strong adhesions. The mechanical properties conferred by these adhesions allow the cells to undergo dramatic three-dimensional morphogenetic movements while maintaining cell–cell contacts during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development. The Drosophila Folded gastrulation pathway triggers epithelial cell shape changes that drive gastrulation and tissue folding and is one of the most extensively studied examples of epithelial morphogenesis. This pathway has yielded key insights into the signaling mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in epithelial remodeling. In this review, we discuss principles of morphogenesis and signaling that have been discovered through genetic and cell biological examination of this pathway. We also consider various regulatory mechanisms and the system's relevance to mammalian development. We propose future directions that will continue to broaden our knowledge of morphogenesis across taxa. PMID:25127992

  8. Adhesion molecule-mediated hippo pathway modulates hemangioendothelioma cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Madri, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    Hemangioendotheliomas are categorized as intermediate-grade vascular tumors that are commonly localized in the lungs and livers. The regulation of this tumor cell's proliferative and apoptotic mechanisms is ill defined. We recently documented an important role for Hippo pathway signaling via endothelial cell adhesion molecules in brain microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. We found that endothelial cells lacking cell adhesion molecules escaped from contact inhibition and exhibited abnormal proliferation and apoptosis. Here we report on the roles of adherens junction molecule modulation of survivin and the Hippo pathway in the proliferation and apoptosis of a murine hemangioendothelioma (EOMA) cell. We demonstrated reduced adherens junction molecule (CD31 and VE-cadherin) expression, increased survivin and Ajuba expression, and a reduction in Hippo pathway signaling resulting in increased proliferation and decreased activation of effector caspase 3 in postconfluent EOMA cell cultures. Furthermore, we confirmed that YM155, an antisurvivin drug that interferes with Sp1-survivin promoter interactions, and survivin small interference RNA (siRNA) transfection elicited induction of VE-cadherin, decreased Ajuba expression, increased Hippo pathway and caspase activation and apoptosis, and decreased cell proliferation. These findings support the importance of the Hippo pathway in hemangioendothelioma cell proliferation and survival and YM155 as a potential therapeutic agent in this category of vascular tumors. PMID:25266662

  9. Glossogyne tenuifolia Extract Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via Blocking the NF-kB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Lee, Thung-Lip; Wei, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Wu, Chau-Chung; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of atherosclerosis, where the pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and the recruitment of monocytes are the crucial events leading to its pathogenesis. Glossogyne tenuifolia ethanol extract (GTE) is shown to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. We evaluated the effects of GTE and its major components, luteolin (lut), luteolin-7-glucoside (lut-7-g), and oleanolic acid (OA) on TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that GTE, lut, and lut-7-g attenuated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, and inhibited the adhesion of monocytes to TNF-α-activated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced mRNA expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was also suppressed, revealing their inhibitory effects at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, GTE, lut, and lut-7-g blocked the TNF-α-induced degradation of nuclear factor-kB inhibitor (IkB), an indicator of the activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). In summary, GTE and its bioactive components were effective in preventing the adhesion of monocytes to cytokine-activated endothelium by the inhibition of expression of adhesion molecules, which in turn is mediated through blocking the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-kB. The current results reveal the therapeutic potential of GTE in atherosclerosis. PMID:26393541

  10. Systematic Pathway Enrichment Analysis of a Genome-Wide Association Study on Breast Cancer Survival Reveals an Influence of Genes Involved in Cell Adhesion and Calcium Signaling on the Patients’ Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Woltmann, Andrea; Chen, Bowang; Lascorz, Jesús; Johansson, Robert; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E.; Hamann, Ute; Manjer, Jonas; Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Hemminki, Kari; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) may help to understand the effects of genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. However, they give only a focused view, which cannot capture the tremendous complexity of this disease. Therefore, we investigated data from a previously conducted GWAS on BC survival for enriched pathways by different enrichment analysis tools using the two main annotation databases Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). The goal was to identify the functional categories (GO terms and KEGG pathways) that are consistently overrepresented in a statistically significant way in the list of genes generated from the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. The SNPs with allelic p-value cut-offs 0.005 and 0.01 were annotated to the genes by excluding or including a 20 kb up-and down-stream sequence of the genes and analyzed by six different tools. We identified eleven consistently enriched categories, the most significant ones relating to cell adhesion and calcium ion binding. Moreover, we investigated the similarity between our GWAS and the enrichment analyses of twelve published gene expression signatures for breast cancer prognosis. Five of them were commonly used and commercially available, five were based on different aspects of metastasis formation and two were developed from meta-analyses of published prognostic signatures. This comparison revealed similarities between our GWAS data and the general and the specific brain metastasis gene signatures as well as the Oncotype DX signature. As metastasis formation is a strong indicator of a patient’s prognosis, this result reflects the survival aspect of the conducted GWAS and supports cell adhesion and calcium signaling as important pathways in cancer progression. PMID:24886783

  11. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  12. Signaling on the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    McPherson, P S; Kay, B K; Hussain, N K

    2001-06-01

    Ligand binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors initiates signal transduction events and induces receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. While receptor-mediated endocytosis has been traditionally considered an effective mechanism to attenuate ligand-activated responses, more recent studies demonstrate that signaling continues on the endocytic pathway. In fact, certain signaling events, such as the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, appear to require endocytosis. Protein components of signal transduction cascades can assemble at clathrin coated pits and remain associated with endocytic vesicles following their dynamin-dependent release from the plasma membrane. Thus, endocytic vesicles can function as a signaling compartment distinct from the plasma membrane. These observations demonstrate that endocytosis plays an important role in the activation and propagation of signaling pathways. PMID:11389765

  13. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D’Mello, Stacey A. N.; Finlay, Graeme J.; Baguley, Bruce C.; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E.

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  14. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Stacey A N; Finlay, Graeme J; Baguley, Bruce C; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  15. Signaling Pathways in Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells of hematopoietic origin that are responsible for the degradation of old bone matrix. Osteoclast differentiation and activity are controlled by two essential cytokines, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). M-CSF and RANKL bind to their respective receptors c-Fms and RANK to stimulate osteoclast differentiation through regulation of delicate signaling systems. Here, we summarize the critical or essential signaling pathways for osteoclast differentiation including M-CSF-c-Fms signaling, RANKL-RANK signaling, and costimulatory signaling for RANK. PMID:26865996

  16. Inhibition of tumor vasculogenic mimicry and prolongation of host survival in highly aggressive gallbladder cancers by norcantharidin via blocking the ephrin type a receptor 2/focal adhesion kinase/paxillin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Zhong; Ge, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Jing-Tao; Liu, Zhong-Yan; Fan, Yue-Zu

    2014-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a newly-defined tumor microcirculation pattern in highly aggressive malignant tumors. We recently reported tumor growth and VM formation of gallbladder cancers through the contribution of the ephrin type a receptor 2 (EphA2)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Paxillin signaling pathways. In this study, we further investigated the anti-VM activity of norcantharidin (NCTD) as a VM inhibitor for gallbladder cancers and the underlying mechanisms. In vivo and in vitro experiments to determine the effects of NCTD on tumor growth, host survival, VM formation of GBC-SD nude mouse xenografts, and vasculogenic-like networks, malignant phenotypes i.e., proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration of GBC-SD cells. Expression of VM signaling-related markers EphA2, FAK and Paxillin in vivo and in vitro were examined by immunofluorescence, western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The results showed that after treatment with NCTD, GBC-SD cells were unable to form VM structures when injecting into nude mouse, growth of the xenograft was inhibited and these observations were confirmed by facts that VM formation by three-dimensional (3-D) matrix, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, migration of GBC-SD cells were affected; and survival time of the xenograft mice was prolonged. Furthermore, expression of EphA2, FAK and Paxillin proteins/mRNAs of the xenografts was downregulated. Thus, we concluded that NCTD has potential anti-VM activity against human gallbladder cancers; one of the underlying mechanisms may be via blocking the EphA2/FAK/Paxillin signaling pathway. PMID:24811250

  17. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937

  18. Signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kawanami, Daiji; Matoba, Keiichiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, specific treatment for DN has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, it is critically important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying DN to develop cause-related therapeutic strategy. To date, various factors such as hemodynamic changes and metabolic pathways have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of DN. Excessive glucose influx activates cellular signaling pathways, including the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, advanced glycation end-products (AGE), polyol pathway, hexosamine pathway and oxidative stress. These factors interact with one another, thereby facilitating inflammatory processes, leading to the development of glomerulosclerosis under diabetic conditions. In addition to metabolic pathways, Rho-kinase, an effector of small-GTPase binding protein Rho, has been implicated as an important factor in the pathogenesis of DN. A number of studies have demonstrated that Rho-kinase plays key roles in the development of DN by inducing endothelial dysfunction, mesangial excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production, podocyte abnormality, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In this review article, we describe our current understanding of the signaling pathways in DN. PMID:27094540

  19. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  20. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  1. Signaling pathways mediating alcohol effects.

    PubMed

    Ron, Dorit; Messing, Robert O

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol's effects on intracellular signaling pathways contribute to acute effects of ethanol as well as to neuroadaptive responses to repeated ethanol exposure. In this chapter we review recent discoveries that demonstrate how ethanol alters signaling pathways involving several receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine and serine-threonine kinases, with consequences for regulation of cell surface receptor function, gene expression, protein translation, neuronal excitability and animal behavior. We also describe recent work that demonstrates a key role for ethanol in regulating the function of scaffolding proteins that organize signaling complexes into functional units. Finally, we review recent exciting studies demonstrating ethanol modulation of DNA and histone modification and the expression of microRNAs, indicating epigenetic mechanisms by which ethanol regulates neuronal gene expression and addictive behaviors. PMID:21877259

  2. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  3. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  4. Signalling pathways in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Anna; Pawałowska, Monika; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process, during which the activity of signalling pathways responsible for cell cycle regulation and division is disrupted which leads to inhibition of apoptosis and enhanced proliferation. Improper activation of Wnt/β-catenin and PI3K. Akt pathways play essential role in endometrial cancers (EC), mainly type I. Mutations in APC, axin or CTNBB1 may lead to β-catenin overactivation leading to excessive gene expression. PTEN inactivation, mutations in the PIK3CA or Akt result in increased transmission in the PI3K/Akt pathway, apoptosis inhibition, intensive cell division, mTOR excitation. In non-endometrioid cancers, key mutations include suppressor gene TP53 responsible for repairing damaged DNA or apoptosis initiation. Irregularities in gene P16, encoding a protein forming the p16-cyclinD/CDK-pRb have also been described. Understanding the complex relations between specific proteins taking part in signal transduction of the abovementioned pathways is key to research on drugs used in targeted therapy. PMID:25520571

  5. Activation of GPR4 by Acidosis Increases Endothelial Cell Adhesion through the cAMP/Epac Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Witte, Owen N.; Yang, Li V.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium-leukocyte interaction is critical for inflammatory responses. Whereas the tissue microenvironments are often acidic at inflammatory sites, the mechanisms by which cells respond to acidosis are not well understood. Using molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that activation of GPR4, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, by isocapnic acidosis increases the adhesiveness of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that express GPR4 endogenously. Acidosis in combination with GPR4 overexpression further augments HUVEC adhesion with U937 monocytes. In contrast, overexpression of a G protein signaling-defective DRY motif mutant (R115A) of GPR4 does not elicit any increase of HUVEC adhesion, indicating the requirement of G protein signaling. Downregulation of GPR4 expression by RNA interference reduces the acidosis-induced HUVEC adhesion. To delineate downstream pathways, we show that inhibition of adenylate cyclase by inhibitors, 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) or SQ 22536, attenuates acidosis/GPR4-induced HUVEC adhesion. Consistently, treatment with a cAMP analog or a Gi signaling inhibitor increases HUVEC adhesiveness, suggesting a role of the Gs/cAMP signaling in this process. We further show that the cAMP downstream effector Epac is important for acidosis/GPR4-induced cell adhesion. Moreover, activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases the expression of vascular adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, which are functionally involved in acidosis/GPR4-mediated HUVEC adhesion. Similarly, hypercapnic acidosis can also activate GPR4 to stimulate HUVEC adhesion molecule expression and adhesiveness. These results suggest that acidosis/GPR4 signaling regulates endothelial cell adhesion mainly through the Gs/cAMP/Epac pathway and may play a role in the inflammatory response of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:22110680

  6. Inhibition on Apoptosis Induced by Elevated Hydrostatic Pressure in Retinal Ganglion Cell-5 via Laminin Upregulating β1-integrin/Focal Adhesion Kinase/Protein Kinase B Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yan-Ming; Sun, Ming-Ming; Guo, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Ya-Chen; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by degeneration of neurons due to loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). High intraocular pressure (HIOP), the main risk factor, causes the optic nerve damage. However, the precise mechanism of HIOP-induced RGC death is not yet completely understood. This study was conducted to determine apoptosis of RGC-5 cells induced by elevated hydrostatic pressures, explore whether laminin is associated with apoptosis under pressure, whether laminin can protect RGCs from apoptosis and affirm the mechanism that regulates the process of RGCs survival. Methods: RGC-5 cells were exposed to 0, 20, 40, and 60 mmHg in a pressurized incubator for 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. The effect of elevated hydrostatic pressure on RGC-5 cells was measured by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and Western blotting of cleaved caspase-3 protein. Location and expression of laminin were detected by immunofluorescence. The expression of β1-integrin, phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and protein kinase B (PKB, or AKT) were investigated with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis. Results: Elevated hydrostatic pressure induced apoptosis in cultured RGC-5 cells. Pressure with 40 mmHg for 24 h induced a maximum apoptosis. Laminin was declined in RGC-5 cells after exposing to 40 mmHg for 24 h. After pretreating with laminin, RGC-5 cells survived from elevated pressure. Furthermore, β1-integrin and phosphorylation of FAK and AKT were increased compared to 40 mmHg group. Conclusions: The data show apoptosis tendency of RGC-5 cells with elevated hydrostatic pressure. Laminin can protect RGC-5 cells against high pressure via β1-integrin/FAK/AKT signaling pathway. These results suggest that the decreased laminin of RGC-5 cells might be responsible for apoptosis induced by elevated hydrostatic pressure

  7. Neuropilin-2 regulates α6β1 integrin in the formation of focal adhesions and signaling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Pursell, Bryan; Standley, Clive; Fogarty, Kevin; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-01-15

    The neuropilins (NRPs) contribute to the function of cancer cells in their capacity as VEGF receptors. Given that NRP2 is induced in breast cancer and correlates with aggressive disease, we examined the role of NRP2 in regulating the interaction of breast cancer cells with the ECM. Using epithelial cells from breast tumors, we defined NRP2(high) and NRP2(low) populations that differed in integrin expression and adhesion to laminin. Specifically, the NRP2(high) population adhered more avidly to laminin and expressed high levels of the α6β1 integrin than the NRP2(low) population. The NRP2(high) population formed numerous focal adhesions on laminin that were not seen in the NRP2(low) population. These results were substantiated using breast carcinoma cell lines that express NRP2 and α6β1 integrin. Depletion experiments revealed that adhesive strength on laminin but not collagen is dependent on NRP2, and that VEGF is needed for adhesion on laminin. A specific interaction between NRP2 and α6β1 integrin was detected by co-immunoprecipitation. NRP2 is necessary for focal adhesion formation on laminin and for the association of α6β1 integrin with the cytoskeleton. NRP2 also facilitates α6β1-integrin-mediated activation of FAK and Src. Unexpectedly, we discovered that NRP2 is located in focal adhesions on laminin. The mechanism by which NRP2 regulates the interaction of α6β1 integrin with laminin to form focal adhesions involves PKC activation. Together, our data reveal a new VEGF-NRP2 signaling pathway that activates the α6β1 integrin and enables it to form focal adhesions and signal. This pathway is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:22302985

  8. Signalling pathways: jack of all cascades.

    PubMed

    Cahill, M A; Janknecht, R; Nordheim, A

    1996-01-01

    The transcription factors that bind the c-fos promoter element SRE are targeted by multiple, independent signalling cascades; the identities of these signalling pathways and their modes of activation are being elucidated. PMID:8805215

  9. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  10. Integrative analyses reveal signaling pathways underlying familial breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Stephen R; Hoffman, Laura M; Conner, Thomas; Shrestha, Gajendra; Cohen, Adam L; Marks, Jeffrey R; Neumayer, Leigh A; Agarwal, Cori A; Beckerle, Mary C; Andrulis, Irene L; Spira, Avrum E; Moos, Philip J; Buys, Saundra S; Johnson, William Evan; Bild, Andrea H

    2016-03-01

    The signaling events that drive familial breast cancer (FBC) risk remain poorly understood. While the majority of genomic studies have focused on genetic risk variants, known risk variants account for at most 30% of FBC cases. Considering that multiple genes may influence FBC risk, we hypothesized that a pathway-based strategy examining different data types from multiple tissues could elucidate the biological basis for FBC. In this study, we performed integrated analyses of gene expression and exome-sequencing data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and showed that cell adhesion pathways are significantly and consistently dysregulated in women who develop FBC. The dysregulation of cell adhesion pathways in high-risk women was also identified by pathway-based profiling applied to normal breast tissue data from two independent cohorts. The results of our genomic analyses were validated in normal primary mammary epithelial cells from high-risk and control women, using cell-based functional assays, drug-response assays, fluorescence microscopy, and Western blotting assays. Both genomic and cell-based experiments indicate that cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion processes seem to be disrupted in non-malignant cells of women at high risk for FBC and suggest a potential role for these processes in FBC development. PMID:26969729

  11. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  12. Involvement of the flagellar assembly pathway in Vibrio alginolyticus adhesion under environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Kong, Wendi; Ma, Ying; Xu, Xiaojin; Lin, Mao; Zheng, Jiang; Yan, Qingpi

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus. This factor may be affected by environmental conditions; however, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In our previous research, adhesion deficient strains were obtained by culturing V. alginolyticus under stresses including Cu, Pb, Hg, and low pH. With RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we found that all of these stress treatments significantly affected the flagellar assembly pathway, which may play an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion. Therefore, we hypothesized that the environmental stresses of the flagellar assembly pathway may be one way in which environmental conditions affect adhesion. To verify our hypothesis, a bioinformatics analysis, QPCR, RNAi, in vitro adhesion assay and motility assay were performed. Our results indicated that (1) the flagellar assembly pathway was sensitive to environmental stresses, (2) the flagellar assembly pathway played an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion, and (3) motility is not the only way in which the flagellar assembly pathway affects adhesion. PMID:26322276

  13. Fluorescence Fluctuation Approaches to the Study of Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesions are large, multimolecular complexes through which cells sense and respond to their environment. They also mediate migration by serving as traction points and signaling centers and allow the cell to modify the surroucnding tissue. Due to their fundamental role in cell behavior, adhesions are germane to nearly all major human health pathologies. However, adhesions are extremely complex and dynamic structures that include over 100 known interacting proteins and operate over multiple space (nm–µm) and time (ms–min) regimes. Fluorescence fluctuation techniques are well suited for studying adhesions. These methods are sensitive over a large spatiotemporal range and provide a wealth of information including molecular transport dynamics, interactions, and stoichiometry from a single time series. Earlier chapters in this volume have provided the theoretical background, instrumentation, and analysis algorithms for these techniques. In this chapter, we discuss their implementation in living cells to study adhesions in migrating cells. Although each technique and application has its own unique instrumentation and analysis requirements, we provide general guidelines for sample preparation, selection of imaging instrumentation, and optimization of data acquisition and analysis parameters. Finally, we review several recent studies that implement these techniques in the study of adhesions. PMID:23280111

  14. WNT/PCP signaling pathway and human cancer (review).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    WNT/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway controls tissue polarity and cell movement through the activation of RHOA, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nemo-like kinase (NLK) signaling cascades. PCP is induced in Drosophila by the asymmetrical localization of Frizzled-Dishevelled-Diego-Starry night (Flamingo) complex and Van Gogh (Strabismus)-Prickle complex. Here, WNT/PCP signaling pathway implicated in human carcinogenesis is reviewed. Human WNT5A, WNT5B, and WNT11 are representative non-canonical WNTs transducing PCP signals through FZD3 or FZD6 receptors, and ROR1, ROR2 or PTK7 co-receptors. Human VANGL1, VANGL2 (Van Gogh homologs), CELSR1, CELSR2, CELSR3 (Starry night homologs), DVL1, DVL2, DVL3 (Dishevelled homologs), PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2 (Prickle homologs), and ANKRD6 (Diego homolog) are core PCP signaling molecules. MAGI3 assembles FZD, VANGL, PTEN, and adhesion molecules. Dishevelled-dependent WNT/PCP signals are transduced to the RHOA signaling cascade through Formin homology proteins DAAM1 and DAAM2, and to the JNK signaling cascade through MAPKKKs and MAPKK4/7. Dishevelled-independent WNT/ PCP signals are transduced to the NLK signaling cascade through MAP3K7 (TAK1). ANKRD6, NKD1 and NKD2 induce class switch from the WNT/GSK3beta signaling pathway to the WNT/PCP signaling pathway. WNT5A is up-regulated in various types of human cancer, such as gastric cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma. FZD3/FZD6 receptor and ROR2 co-receptor transduce WNT5A signal in gastric cancer. Aberrant activation of WNT/PCP signaling pathway in human cancer leads to more malignant phenotypes, such as abnormal tissue polarity, invasion, and metastasis. cDNA-PCR, microarray or ELISA reflecting aberrant activation of WNT/PCP signaling pathway could be developed as novel cancer prognostics. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number polymorphism (CNP) of WNT/PCP signaling molecules mentioned above are suitable for use in screening of cancer predisposition, especially

  15. Rho-signaling pathways in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Hrkal, Zbynēk

    2008-12-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a hematological malignancy that is characteristic by as expansion of myeloid cells and their premature release into the circulation. The molecular cause of CML is the fusion oncoprotein Bcr-Abl whose constitutive tyrosine-kinase (TK) activity maintains enhanced signaling through multiple signal transduction pathways and confers proliferative and survival advantage to CML cells. These effects can be largely suppressed by TK inhibitor Imatinib mesylate, currently the leading drug in CML treatment. However, Bcr-Abl contains also additional functional domains, in particular a DBL homology (DH) domain with guanine-exchange function (GEF) which can activate small GTPases of Rho family and a Src-homology3 (SH3) domain which recruits other proteins with GEF activity. Bcr-Abl affects among others the RhoA/ROCK/LIM/cofilin pathway that regulates the actin cytoskeleton assembly and thereby the cellular adhesion and migration. This review deals in detail with the known points of interference between Bcr-Abl and Rho kinase pathways and with the effects of Imatinib mesylate on Rho signaling and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The potential protein targets related to Bcr-Abl non-kinase activity are discussed. PMID:19075636

  16. [Hedgehog signaling pathway and human disorders].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and cancer formation. This pathway in mammals consists of multiple molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog, PTCH, SMO, and GLI. Mutations of these components result in various human malformations or tumors, i.e., holoprosencephaly, Gorlin syndrome, Greig encephalopolysyndactyly, Pallister-Hall syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, basal cell carcinomas, and medulloblastomas. Recently, small molecules that inhibit this signaling pathway were developed, and clinically applied to cancer therapy. Thus, understanding of these molecular relationships may facilitate the development of new therapies and treatments for diseases caused by hedgehog signaling disorders. PMID:19618878

  17. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  18. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M; Plotnikov, Sergey V; Wrana, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1-Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  19. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an “outside-in” mechanism. PMID:24366944

  20. Function and Regulation in MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Raymond E.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Signaling pathways that activate different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) elicit many of the responses that are evoked in cells by changes in certain environmental conditions and upon exposure to a variety of hormonal and other stimuli. These pathways were first elucidated in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). Studies of MAPK pathways in this organism continue to be especially informative in revealing the molecular mechanisms by which MAPK cascades operate, propagate signals, modulate cellular processes, and are controlled by regulatory factors both internal to and external to the pathways. Here we highlight recent advances and new insights about MAPK-based signaling that have been made through studies in yeast, which provide lessons directly applicable to, and that enhance our understanding of, MAPK-mediated signaling in mammalian cells. PMID:17604854

  1. Modularized TGFbeta-Smad Signaling Pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, M.; Carra, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathway is a prominent regulatory signaling pathway controlling various important cellular processes. It can be induced by several factors, including ionizing radiation. It is regulated by Smads in a negative feedback loop through promoting increases in the regulatory Smads in the cell nucleus, and subsequent expression of inhibitory Smad, Smad7 to form a ubiquitin ligase with Smurf targeting active TGF receptors for degradation. In this work, we proposed a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced Smad-regulated TGF signaling pathway. By modularization, we are able to analyze each module (subsystem) and recover the nonlinear dynamics of the entire network system. Meanwhile the excitability, a common feature observed in the biological systems, along the TGF signaling pathway is discussed by mathematical analysis and numerical simulation.

  2. Premetazoan origin of the Hippo signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Zheng, Yonggang; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Pan, Duojia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Non-aggregative multicellularity requires strict control of cell number. The Hippo signaling pathway coordinates cell proliferation and apoptosis and is a central regulator of organ size in animals. Recent studies have shown the presence of key members of the Hippo pathway in non-bilaterian animals, but failed to identify this pathway outside Metazoa. Through comparative analyses of recently sequenced holozoan genomes, we show that Hippo pathway components, such as the kinases Hippo and Warts, the co-activator Yorkie and the transcription factor Scalloped, were already present in the unicellular ancestors of animals. Remarkably, functional analysis of Hippo components of the amoeboid holozoan Capsaspora owczarzaki, performed in Drosophila, demonstrate that the growth-regulatory activity of the Hippo pathway is conserved in this unicellular lineage. Our findings show that the Hippo pathway evolved well before the origin of Metazoa and highlight the importance of Hippo signaling as a key developmental mechanism pre-dating the origin of Metazoa. PMID:22832104

  3. Optogenetic control of intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cells employ a plethora of signaling pathways to make their life-and-death decisions. Extensive genetic, biochemical, and physiological studies have led to the accumulation of knowledge about signaling components and their interactions within signaling networks. These conventional approaches, though useful, lack the ability to control the spatial and temporal aspects of signaling processes. The recently emerged optogenetic tools open up exciting opportunities by enabling signaling regulation with superior temporal and spatial resolution, easy delivery, rapid reversibility, fewer off-target side effects, and the ability to dissect complex signaling networks. Here we review recent achievements in using light to control intracellular signaling pathways, and discuss future prospects for the field, including integration of new genetic approaches into optogenetics. PMID:25529484

  4. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Fagone, Paolo; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Polesel, Jerry; Talamini, Renato; Bäsecke, Jörg; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Laidler, Piotr; D'Assoro, Antonio B.; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Umezawa, Kazuo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Demidenko, Zoya N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being discovered which may allow the creation of alternative therapies to overcome resistance. This review will discuss some of the highlights over the past few years on the roles of key signaling pathways in various diseases, the targeting of signal transduction pathways and the genetic mechanisms governing sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:23455493

  5. New Insights into Reelin-Mediated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gum Hwa; D’Arcangelo, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Reelin, a multifunctional extracellular protein that is important for mammalian brain development and function, is secreted by different cell types in the prenatal or postnatal brain. The spatiotemporal regulation of Reelin expression and distribution during development relates to its multifaceted function in the brain. Prenatally Reelin controls neuronal radial migration and proper positioning in cortical layers, whereas postnatally Reelin promotes neuronal maturation, synaptic formation and plasticity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the distinct biological functions of Reelin during and after brain development involve unique and overlapping signaling pathways that are activated following Reelin binding to its cell surface receptors. Distinct Reelin ligand isoforms, such as the full-length protein or fragments generated by proteolytic cleavage differentially affect the activity of downstream signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the signaling transduction pathways activated by Reelin that regulate different aspects of brain development and function. A core signaling machinery, including ApoER2/VLDLR receptors, Src/Fyn kinases, and the adaptor protein Dab1, participates in all known aspects of Reelin biology. However, distinct downstream mechanisms, such as the Crk/Rap1 pathway and cell adhesion molecules, play crucial roles in the control of neuronal migration, whereas the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway appears to be more important for dendrite and spine development. Finally, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and an unidentified receptor contribute to the activation of the MEK/Erk1/2 pathway leading to the upregulation of genes involved in synaptic plasticity and learning. This knowledge may provide new insight into neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with Reelin dysfunction. PMID:27242434

  6. The Hedgehog signalling pathway in bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Andre, Philipp; Ye, Ling; Yang, Ying-Zi

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway plays many important roles in development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The critical function of Hh signalling in bone formation has been identified in the past two decades. Here, we review the evolutionarily conserved Hh signalling mechanisms with an emphasis on the functions of the Hh signalling pathway in bone development, homeostasis and diseases. In the early stages of embryonic limb development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) acts as a major morphogen in patterning the limb buds. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has an essential function in endochondral ossification and induces osteoblast differentiation in the perichondrium. Hh signalling is also involved intramembrane ossification. Interactions between Hh and Wnt signalling regulate cartilage development, endochondral bone formation and synovial joint formation. Hh also plays an important role in bone homeostasis, and reducing Hh signalling protects against age-related bone loss. Disruption of Hh signalling regulation leads to multiple bone diseases, such as progressive osseous heteroplasia. Therefore, understanding the signalling mechanisms and functions of Hh signalling in bone development, homeostasis and diseases will provide important insights into bone disease prevention, diagnoses and therapeutics. PMID:26023726

  7. Modulation of FAK and Src adhesion signaling occurs independently of adhesion complex composition.

    PubMed

    Horton, Edward R; Humphries, Jonathan D; Stutchbury, Ben; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Ballestrem, Christoph; Barry, Simon T; Humphries, Martin J

    2016-02-01

    Integrin adhesion complexes (IACs) form mechanochemical connections between the extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton and mediate phenotypic responses via posttranslational modifications. Here, we investigate the modularity and robustness of the IAC network to pharmacological perturbation of the key IAC signaling components focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. FAK inhibition using AZ13256675 blocked FAK(Y397) phosphorylation but did not alter IAC composition, as reported by mass spectrometry. IAC composition was also insensitive to Src inhibition using AZD0530 alone or in combination with FAK inhibition. In contrast, kinase inhibition substantially reduced phosphorylation within IACs, cell migration and proliferation. Furthermore using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that FAK inhibition increased the exchange rate of a phosphotyrosine (pY) reporter (dSH2) at IACs. These data demonstrate that kinase-dependent signal propagation through IACs is independent of gross changes in IAC composition. Together, these findings demonstrate a general separation between the composition of IACs and their ability to relay pY-dependent signals. PMID:26833789

  8. GPCR signaling along the endocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Irannejad, Roshanak; von Zastrow, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) internalize after agonist-induced activation. While endocytosis has long been associated with homeostatic attenuation of cellular responsiveness, accumulating evidence from study of a wide range of eukaryotes reveals that the endocytic pathway also contributes to generating receptor-initiated signals themselves. Here we review recent progress in this area, discussing primarily but not exclusively GPCR signaling in mammalian cells. PMID:24680436

  9. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  10. Mechanical Regulation of Signaling Pathways in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William R.; Rubin, Clinton T.; Rubin, Janet

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of cell types depend on mechanically induced signals to enable appropriate physiological responses. The skeleton is particularly dependent on mechanical information to guide the resident cell population towards adaptation, maintenance and repair. Research at the organ, tissue, cell and molecular levels has improved our understanding of how the skeleton can recognize the functional environment, and how these challenges are translated into cellular information that can site-specifically alter phenotype. This review first considers those cells within the skeleton that are responsive to mechanical signals, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and osteoprogenitors. This is discussed in light of a range of experimental approaches that can vary parameters such as strain, fluid shear stress, and pressure. The identity of mechanoreceptor candidates is approached, with consideration of integrins, pericellular tethers, focal adhesions, ion channels, cadherins, connexins, and the plasma membrane including caveolar and non-caveolar lipid rafts and their influence on integral signaling protein interactions. Several mechanically regulated intracellular signaling cascades are detailed including activation of kinases (Akt, MAPK, FAK), β-catenin, GTPases, and calcium signaling events. While the interaction of bone cells with their mechanical environment is complex, an understanding of mechanical regulation of bone signaling is crucial to understanding bone physiology, the etiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, and to the development of interventions to improve bone strength. PMID:22575727

  11. Combined Sub-Optimal Doses of Rosuvastatin and Bexarotene Impair Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Mononuclear Cell Adhesion Through Inhibition of Nox5 Signaling Pathways and Increased RXR/PPARα and RXR/PPARγ Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Paula; Martinez de Marañón, Aranzazu; Collado, Aida; Gonzalez-Navarro, Herminia; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Peiró, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Mononuclear cell (MC) infiltration into the arterial subendothelium is a key event in atherogenesis. Rosuvastatin (Rosu) and bexarotene (Bex) exert anti-inflammatory activity, but serious dose-related adverse effects have emerged. The need for safer and effective strategies to prevent and treat atherosclerosis led us to test the effect of combined use of both drugs on angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced arterial MC recruitment. Results: Vehicle, Rosu (10–30 nM), Bex (0.3–1 μM), or a combination of both were administered to human umbilical arterial endothelial cells (HUAECs) 20 h before stimulation with 1 μM Ang-II (4 h). Surprisingly, a combination of Rosu (10 nM)+Bex (0.3 μM), which did not influence Ang-II-induced MC recruitment when either stimulus was studied alone, significantly reduced this response. This effect was accompanied by diminished Ang-II-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and CX3CL1 endothelial expression and CXCL1, CXCL8, CCL2, and CCL5 production. Preincubation of HUAECs with Rosu+Bex inhibited Nox5 expression and Nox5-induced RhoA activation stimulated by Ang-II through increased RXRα, PPARα, and PPARγ expression in addition to RXRα/PPARα and RXRα/PPARγ interactions. In vivo, combined but not single administration of Rosu (1.25 mg/kg/day) and Bex (10 mg/kg/day) significantly diminished Ang-II-induced arteriolar leukocyte adhesion in the cremasteric microcirculation of C57BL/6 mice and atherosclerotic lesion formation in apoE−/− mice subjected to an atherogenic diet. Innovation and Conclusion: Combined administration of Bex+Rosu at suboptimal doses may constitute a new alternative and effective therapy in the control of the vascular inflammation associated to cardiometabolic disorders, since they synergize in their anti-inflammatory actions and may counteract their associated adverse effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 901–920. PMID:25602514

  12. GA signalling and cross-talk with other signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lor, Vai S; Olszewski, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones that regulate growth and development. DELLA proteins repress GA responses. GA binding to its receptor triggers a series of events that culminate in the destruction of DELLA proteins by the 26S proteasome, which removes the repression of GA signalling. DELLA proteins are transcription co-activators that induce the expression of genes which encode products that inhibit GA responses. In addition to repressing GA responses, DELLA proteins influence the activity of other signalling pathways and serve as a central hub from which other pathways influence GA signalling. In this role, DELLA proteins bind to and inhibit proteins, including transcription factors that act in the signalling pathways of other hormones and light. The binding of these proteins to DELLA proteins also inhibits DELLA activity. GA signalling is subject to homoeostatic regulation through GA-induced repression of GA biosynthesis gene expression, and increased production of the GA receptor and enzymes that catabolize bioactive GAs. This review also discusses the nature of mutant DELLA alleles that are used to produce high-yielding 'Green Revolution' cereal varieties, and highlights important gaps in our knowledge of GA signalling. PMID:26374886

  13. Research Resources for Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR) signaling pathways impact cellular function in a broad variety of tissues in both normal physiology and disease states. The complex tissue-specific biology of these pathways is an enduring impediment to the development of clinical NR small-molecule modulators that combine therapeutically desirable effects in specific target tissues with suppression of off-target effects in other tissues. Supporting the important primary research in this area is a variety of web-based resources that assist researchers in gaining an appreciation of the molecular determinants of the pharmacology of a NR pathway in a given tissue. In this study, selected representative examples of these tools are reviewed, along with discussions on how current and future generations of tools might optimally adapt to the future of NR signaling research. PMID:27216565

  14. SEPT4 is regulated by the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbin

    2012-04-01

    Notch receptor-mediated signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that regulates diverse developmental processes and its dysregulation has been implicated in a variety of developmental disorders and cancers. Notch functions in these processes by activating expression of its target genes. Septin 4 (SEPT4) is a polymerizing GTP-binding protein that serves as scaffold for diverse molecules and is involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. After activation of the Notch signal, the expression of SEPT4 is up-regulated and cell proliferation is inhibited. When the Notch signal is inhibited by the CSL (CBF1/Su(H)/Lag-1)-binding-domain-negative Mastermind-like protein 1, the expression of SEPT4 is down-regulated, proliferation and colony formation of cells are promoted, but cell adhesion ability is decreased. Nevertheless, the SEPT4 expression is not affected after knock-down of CSL. Meanwhile, if SEPT4 activity is inhibited through RNA interference, the protein level and activity of NOTCH1 remains unchanged, but cell proliferation is dysregulated. This indicates that SEPT4 is a Notch target gene. This relationship between Notch signaling pathway and SEPT4 offers a potential basis for further study of developmental control and carcinogenesis. PMID:21938432

  15. Targeting Apoptosis Signaling Pathways for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Treatment approaches for cancer, for example chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or immunotherapy, primarily act by inducing cell death in cancer cells. Consequently, the inability to trigger cell death pathways or alternatively, evasion of cancer cells to the induction of cell death pathways can result in resistance of cancers to current treatment protocols. Therefore, in order to overcome treatment resistance a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate cell death and survival pathways in cancers and in response to cancer therapy is necessary to develop molecular-targeted therapies. This strategy should lead to more effective and individualized treatment strategies that selectively target deregulated signaling pathways in a tumor type- and patient-specific manner. PMID:22655234

  16. Targeting RTK Signaling Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Regad, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    The RAS/MAP kinase and the RAS/PI3K/AKT pathways play a key role in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and survival. The induction of these pathways depends on Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) that are activated upon ligand binding. In cancer, constitutive and aberrant activations of components of those pathways result in increased proliferation, survival and metastasis. For instance, mutations affecting RTKs, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K and AKT are common in perpetuating the malignancy of several types of cancers and from different tissue origins. Therefore, these signaling pathways became prime targets for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide an overview about the most frequently encountered mutations, the pathogenesis that results from such mutations and the known therapeutic strategies developed to counteract their aberrant functions. PMID:26404379

  17. Targeting Signaling Transduction Pathways in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbosh, Phillip H; McConkey, David J; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Systemic therapy for urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder has largely revolved around cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. However, several recent clinical trials have explored the roles of targeted therapies which specifically inhibit signal transduction pathways. Simultaneously, a rationale for such therapies has come to the forefront of management of this disease because an overabundance of signaling pathways are genetically deranged as a result of point mutation or copy number alteration (CNA) as identified by several recent next generation sequencing (NGS) studies. Importantly, these derangements are found in all stages of disease, and therefore targeted therapies hold promise as a next step in the evolution of the medical management of both localized and metastatic UCC. We review the rationale for and progress in studying inhibition of signal transduction as a means of treatment of UCC. PMID:26472299

  18. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  19. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  20. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery.

  1. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  2. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Wee; Gardiner, Bruce S; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Layton, Meredith J; Smith, David W; Burgess, Antony W

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated with the parameters

  3. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  4. Introduction of p130cas signaling complex formation upon integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a role for Src family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Vuori, K; Hirai, H; Aizawa, S; Ruoslahti, E

    1996-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion triggers intracellular signaling cascades, including tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins. Among these are the focal adhesion proteins p130cas (Cas) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here we identify the kinase(s) mediating integrin-induced Cas phosphorylation and characterize protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphorylated Cas. We found that expression of a constitutively active FAK in fibroblasts results in a consecutive tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. This effect required the autophosphorylation site of FAK, which is a binding site for Src family kinases. Integrin-mediated phosphorylation of Cas was not, however, compromised in fibroblasts lacking FAK. In contrast, adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas was reduced in cells lacking Src, whereas enhanced phosphorylation of Cas was observed Csk- cells, in which Src kinases are activated. These results suggest that Src kinases are responsible for the integrin-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. FAK seems not to be necessary for phosphorylation of Cas, but when autophosphorylated, FAK may recruit Src family kinases to phosphorylate Cas. Cas was found to form complexes with Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing signaling molecules, such as the SH2/SH3 adapter protein Crk, following integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors C3G and Sos were found in the Cas-Crk complex upon integrin ligand binding. These observations suggest that Cas serves as a docking protein and may transduce signals to downstream signaling pathways following integrin-mediated cell adhesion. PMID:8649368

  5. Obesity-Induced Hypertension: Brain Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Fang, Taolin; Aberdein, Nicola; de Lara Rodriguez, Cecilia E P; Hall, John E

    2016-07-01

    Obesity greatly increases the risk for cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal diseases and is one of the most significant and preventable causes of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of central nervous system (CNS) signaling pathways that contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension. We discuss the role of excess adiposity and activation of the brain leptin-melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity. In addition, we highlight other potential brain mechanisms by which increased weight gain modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions. Unraveling the CNS mechanisms responsible for increased sympathetic activation and hypertension and how circulating hormones activate brain signaling pathways to control BP offer potentially important therapeutic targets for obesity and hypertension. PMID:27262997

  6. Mutant p53 promotes ovarian cancer cell adhesion to mesothelial cells via integrin β4 and Akt signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Jin Kim, Tae; Ho Lee, Jae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations in the TP53 gene resulting in the accumulation of mutant proteins are extremely common in advanced ovarian cancer, which is characterised by peritoneal metastasis. Attachment of cancer cells to the peritoneal mesothelium is regarded as an initial, key step for the metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of a p53 mutant in the mesothelial adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. We found that OVCAR-3 cells with the R248 TP53 mutation (p53R248) were more adhesive to mesothelial Met5A cells than were A2780 cells expressing wild-type p53. In addition, ectopic expression of p53R248 in p53-null SKOV-3 cells significantly increased adhesion to Met5A cells. Knockdown of mutant p53 significantly compromised p53R248-induced cell adhesion to Met5A cells. Microarray analysis revealed that several adhesion-related genes, including integrin β4, were markedly up-regulated, and certain signalling pathways, including PI3K/Akt, were activated in p53R248 transfectants of SKOV-3 cells. Inhibition of integrin β4 and Akt signalling using blocking antibody and the inhibitor LY294002, respectively, significantly attenuated p53R248-mediated ovarian cancer-mesothelial adhesion. These data suggest that the p53R248 mutant endows ovarian cancer cells with increased adhesiveness and that integrin β4 and Akt signalling are associated with the mutation-enhanced ovarian cancer-mesothelial cell adhesion. PMID:26223322

  7. Artemisinin inhibits monocyte adhesion to HUVECs through the NF-κB and MAPK pathways in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUE; CAO, JIATIAN; FAN, YUQI; XIE, YUSHUI; XU, ZUOJUN; YIN, ZHAOFANG; GAO, LIN; WANG, CHANGQIAN

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) plays a crucial role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are two important molecules involved in the adhesion of monocytes to HUVECs. Previous studies have suggested that artemisinin, apart from an anti-malarial agent, also has other effects. In the present study, we found that artemisinin significantly decreased the adhesion of monocytes to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed the mRNA and protein level of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. In addition, the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors (SB203580 and U0126) respectively reduced the adhesion of monocytes to TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs, and suppressed ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in TNF-α stimulated HUVECs. Moreover, artemisinin impeded the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Furthermore, Bay 11-7082 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of levels extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Taken together, the findings of our study indicated that artemisinin blocked monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated to HUVECs by downregulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. Artemisinin may thus have potential for use in the protection against the early development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27122190

  8. Artemisinin inhibits monocyte adhesion to HUVECs through the NF-κB and MAPK pathways in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Cao, Jiatian; Fan, Yuqi; Xie, Yushui; Xu, Zuojun; Yin, Zhaofang; Gao, Lin; Wang, Changqian

    2016-06-01

    The adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) plays a crucial role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are two important molecules involved in the adhesion of monocytes to HUVECs. Previous studies have suggested that artemisinin, apart from an anti-malarial agent, also has other effects. In the present study, we found that artemisinin significantly decreased the adhesion of monocytes to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed the mRNA and protein level of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. In addition, the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors (SB203580 and U0126) respectively reduced the adhesion of monocytes to TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs, and suppressed ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in TNF-α stimulated HUVECs. Moreover, artemisinin impeded the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Furthermore, Bay 11-7082 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of levels extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Taken together, the findings of our study indicated that artemisinin blocked monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated to HUVECs by downregulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. Artemisinin may thus have potential for use in the protection against the early development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27122190

  9. Integrins mediate adhesion of medulloblastoma cells to tenascin and activate pathways associated with survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Paul; Partridge, Darren; Staniszewska, Izabela; Wang, Jin Y; Grabacka, Maja; So, Kelvin; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Reiss, Krzysztof; Khalili, Kamel; Croul, Sidney E

    2008-11-01

    Medulloblastoma spreads by leptomeningeal dissemination rather than by infiltration that characterizes other CNS tumors, eg, gliomas. This study represents an initial attempt to identify both the molecules that mediate medulloblastoma adhesion to leptomeninges and the pathways that are key to survival and proliferation of tumor following adhesion. As a first step in molecule identification, we produced adhesion of D283 medulloblastoma cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of H4 glioma cells in vitro. Within this context, D283 cells preferentially expressed the alpha9 and beta1 integrin subunits; antibody and disintegrin blockade of alpha9 and beta1 binding eliminated the adhesion. The H4 ECM was enriched in tenascin, a binding partner for the alpha9beta1 integrin heterodimer. Purified tenascin-C supported D283 cell adhesion. The adhesion was blocked by antibodies to alpha9 and beta1 integrin. In vivo data were similar; immunohistochemistry of primary human medulloblastomas with leptomeningeal extension demonstrated increased expression of alpha9 and beta1 integrins as well as tenascin at the interface of brain and leptomeningeal tumor. These data suggest that tumor-cell expressions of alpha9 and beta1 integrins in combination with extracellular tenascin are necessary for medulloblastoma adhesion to the leptomeninges. As a first step in the identification of pathways that mediate survival and proliferation of tumor following adhesion, we demonstrated that adhesion to H4 ECM was associated with survival and proliferation of D283 cells as well as activation of the MAPK pathway in a growth factor deficient environment. Antibody blockade of alpha9 and beta1 integrin binding that eliminated adhesion also eliminated the in vitro survival benefit. These data suggest that adhesion of medulloblastoma to the meninges is necessary for the survival and proliferation of these tumor cells at the secondary site. PMID:18794852

  10. Curcumin inhibits development and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum: Implications for YakA signaling and GST enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Garige, Mamatha; Walters, Eric

    2015-11-13

    The molecular basis for nutraceutical properties of the polyphenol curcumin (Curcuma longa, Turmeric) is complex, affecting multiple factors that regulate cell signaling and homeostasis. Here, we report the effect of curcumin on cellular and developmental mechanisms in the eukaryotic model, Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium proliferation was inhibited in the presence of curcumin, which also suppressed the prestarvation marker, discoidin I, members of the yakA-mediated developmental signaling pathway, and expression of the extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins (DdCAD and csA). This resulted in delayed chemotaxis, adhesion, and development of the organism. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on developmental genes, curcumin induced gstA gene expression, overall GST activity, and generated production of reactive oxygen species. These studies expand our knowledge of developmental and biochemical signaling influenced by curcumin, and lends greater consideration of GST enzyme function in eukaryotic cell signaling, development, and differentiation. PMID:26449461

  11. Nongenomic Signaling Pathways of Estrogen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail Y.

    2010-01-01

    Xenoestrogens can affect the healthy functioning of a variety of tissues by acting as potent estrogens via nongenomic signaling pathways or by interfering with those actions of multiple physiological estrogens. Collectively, our and other studies have compared a wide range of estrogenic compounds, including some closely structurally related subgroups. The estrogens that have been studied include environmental contaminants of different subclasses, dietary estrogens, and several prominent physiological metabolites. By comparing the nongenomic signaling and functional responses to these compounds, we have begun to address the structural requirements for their actions through membrane estrogen receptors in the pituitary, in comparison to other tissues, and to gain insights into their typical non-monotonic dose-response behavior. Their multiple inputs into cellular signaling begin processes that eventually integrate at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase activities to coordinately regulate broad cellular destinies, such as proliferation, apoptosis, or differentiation. PMID:19955490

  12. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran ecdysone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wendy A.; Lamattina, Anthony; Collins, McKensie

    2014-01-01

    Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori), the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the regulation of insect ecdysone secretion, and in the impact of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin in the control of ecdysone secretion and molting. PMID:24550835

  13. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Finally, the antioxidant activity of polyphenols reflected in the activation of Nrf2 pathway and the consequent upregulation of detoxification enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 as well as the contribution of these effects to the neurotrophic activity have also been discussed. In conclusion, a better understanding of the neurotrophic effects of polyphenols and

  14. Subpathway Analysis based on Signaling-Pathway Impact Analysis of Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianbin; Shen, Liangzhong; Shang, Xuequn; Liu, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Pathway analysis is a common approach to gain insight from biological experiments. Signaling-pathway impact analysis (SPIA) is one such method and combines both the classical enrichment analysis and the actual perturbation on a given pathway. Because this method focuses on a single pathway, its resolution generally is not very high because the differentially expressed genes may be enriched in a local region of the pathway. In the present work, to identify cancer-related pathways, we incorporated a recent subpathway analysis method into the SPIA method to form the “sub-SPIA method.” The original subpathway analysis uses the k-clique structure to define a subpathway. However, it is not sufficiently flexible to capture subpathways with complex structure and usually results in many overlapping subpathways. We therefore propose using the minimal-spanning-tree structure to find a subpathway. We apply this approach to colorectal cancer and lung cancer datasets, and our results show that sub-SPIA can identify many significant pathways associated with each specific cancer that other methods miss. Based on the entire pathway network in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, we find that the pathways identified by sub-SPIA not only have the largest average degree, but also are more closely connected than those identified by other methods. This result suggests that the abnormality signal propagating through them might be responsible for the specific cancer or disease. PMID:26207919

  15. The immune signaling pathways of Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Wang, Yang; Chen, Yun-Ru; Bryant, Bart; Clem, Rollie J.; Schwartz, Lawrence M.; Blissard, Gary; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways and their coordination are critically important for proper functioning of animal immune systems. Our knowledge of the constituents of the intracellular signaling network in insects mainly comes from genetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster. To facilitate future studies of similar systems in the tobacco hornworm and other lepidopteran insects, we have identified and examined the homologous genes in the genome of Manduca sexta. Based on 1:1 orthologous relationships in most cases, we hypothesize that the Toll, Imd, MAPK-JNK-p38 and JAK-STAT pathways are intact and operative in this species, as are most of the regulatory mechanisms. Similarly, cellular processes such as autophagy, apoptosis and RNA interference probably function in similar ways, because their mediators and modulators are mostly conserved in this lepidopteran species. We have annotated a total of 186 genes encoding 199 proteins, studied their domain structures and evolution, and examined their mRNA levels in tissues at different life stages. Such information provides a genomic perspective of the intricate signaling system in a non-drosophiline insect. PMID:25858029

  16. The immune signaling pathways of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Wang, Yang; Chen, Yun-Ru; Bryant, Bart; Clem, Rollie J; Schwartz, Lawrence M; Blissard, Gary; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Signal transduction pathways and their coordination are critically important for proper functioning of animal immune systems. Our knowledge of the constituents of the intracellular signaling network in insects mainly comes from genetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster. To facilitate future studies of similar systems in the tobacco hornworm and other lepidopteran insects, we have identified and examined the homologous genes in the genome of Manduca sexta. Based on 1:1 orthologous relationships in most cases, we hypothesize that the Toll, Imd, MAPK-JNK-p38 and JAK-STAT pathways are intact and operative in this species, as are most of the regulatory mechanisms. Similarly, cellular processes such as autophagy, apoptosis and RNA interference probably function in similar ways, because their mediators and modulators are mostly conserved in this lepidopteran species. We have annotated a total of 186 genes encoding 199 proteins, studied their domain structures and evolution, and examined their mRNA levels in tissues at different life stages. Such information provides a genomic perspective of the intricate signaling system in a non-drosophiline insect. PMID:25858029

  17. Parameter estimate of signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Arisi, Ivan; Cattaneo, Antonino; Rosato, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Background The "inverse" problem is related to the determination of unknown causes on the bases of the observation of their effects. This is the opposite of the corresponding "direct" problem, which relates to the prediction of the effects generated by a complete description of some agencies. The solution of an inverse problem entails the construction of a mathematical model and takes the moves from a number of experimental data. In this respect, inverse problems are often ill-conditioned as the amount of experimental conditions available are often insufficient to unambiguously solve the mathematical model. Several approaches to solving inverse problems are possible, both computational and experimental, some of which are mentioned in this article. In this work, we will describe in details the attempt to solve an inverse problem which arose in the study of an intracellular signaling pathway. Results Using the Genetic Algorithm to find the sub-optimal solution to the optimization problem, we have estimated a set of unknown parameters describing a kinetic model of a signaling pathway in the neuronal cell. The model is composed of mass action ordinary differential equations, where the kinetic parameters describe protein-protein interactions, protein synthesis and degradation. The algorithm has been implemented on a parallel platform. Several potential solutions of the problem have been computed, each solution being a set of model parameters. A sub-set of parameters has been selected on the basis on their small coefficient of variation across the ensemble of solutions. Conclusion Despite the lack of sufficiently reliable and homogeneous experimental data, the genetic algorithm approach has allowed to estimate the approximate value of a number of model parameters in a kinetic model of a signaling pathway: these parameters have been assessed to be relevant for the reproduction of the available experimental data. PMID:17118160

  18. Cryptotanshinone inhibits oxidized LDL-induced adhesion molecule expression via ROS dependent NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Wu, Chuanhong; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-05-01

    Adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin, play important roles in the initial stage of atherosclerosis. Cryptotanshinone (CPT), a natural compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, exhibits anti-atherosclerotic activity although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, the protective effect of CPT against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced adhesion molecule expression was investigated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Ox-LDL significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression at the mRNA and protein levels but reduced eNOS phosphorylation and NO generation, which were reversed by CPT pretreatment. Sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, and BAY117082, a NF-κB inhibitor, inhibited ox-LDL-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression. Ox-LDL-induced ROS production was significantly inhibited by CPT and NAC. Furthermore, ox-LDL activated the NF-κB signaling pathway by inducing phosphorylation of IKKβ and IκBα, promoting the interaction of IKKβ and IκBα, and increasing p65 nuclear translocation, which were significantly inhibited by CPT. In addition, CPT, NAC, and BAY117082 inhibited ox-LDL-induced membrane expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and endothelial-monocyte adhesion and restored eNOS phosphorylation and NO generation. Results suggested that CPT inhibited ox-LDL-induced adhesion molecule expression by decreasing ROS and inhibiting the NF-κB pathways, which provides new insight into the anti-atherosclerotic mechanism of CPT. PMID:26647279

  19. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  20. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  1. Omentin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xia; Li, Xiaonan; Liu, Fuli; Tan, Hui; Shang, Deya

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin reduces expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-{alpha} in HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced ERK and NF-{kappa}B activation in HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin supreeses TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 via ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway. -- Abstract: In the present study, we investigated whether omentin affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data showed that omentin decreased TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HUVECs. In addition, omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Further, we found that omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-activated signal pathway of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) by preventing NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein (I{kappa}B{alpha}) degradation and NF-{kappa}B/DNA binding activity. Omentin pretreatment significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced ERK activity and ERK phosphorylation in HUVECs. Pretreatment with PD98059 suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Omentin, NF-kB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) and ERK inhibitor (PD98059) reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-{alpha}. These results suggest that omentin may inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via blocking ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway.

  2. The TAK1-TRAF6 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Landström, Marene

    2010-05-01

    Cellular responses to pathogens, growth factors, cytokines, extra- or intra-cellular stress, is a prerequisite for the cell to adapt to novel and potentially dangerous situations. If the changes in the extra- or intra-cellular milieu causes DNA-damage or revoke a signalling pathway utilized during morphogenesis, the epithelial cells might be forced to undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) in the benefit for the whole organism or transform to a mesenchymal cell type (epithelial to mesenchymal transition; EMT), in respond to a specific stimuli. An overview is presented over the current knowledge for the key components in signal transduction in homeostasis, inflammation and cancer. A handful of transcription factors are crucial for the determination of the specific cellular responses, where the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is an important factor as discussed in this review. PMID:20060931

  3. MAPKs in development: insights from Dictyostelium signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in the development of eukaryotic organisms through the regulation of signal transduction pathways stimulated by external signals. MAPK signaling pathways have been associated with the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and chemotaxis, indicating MAPKs contribute to a diverse set of developmental processes. In most eukaryotes, the diversity of external signals is likely to far exceed the diversity of MAPKs, suggesting that multiple signaling pathways might share MAPKs. Do different signaling pathways converge before MAPK function or can MAPKs maintain signaling specificity through interactions with specific proteins? The genetic and biochemical analysis of MAPK pathways in simple eukaryotes such as Dictyostelium offers opportunities to investigate functional specificity of MAPKs in G protein-mediated signal transduction pathways. This review considers the regulation and specificity of MAPK function in pathways that control Dictyostelium growth and development. PMID:21666837

  4. Cell signaling pathways elicited by asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, B T; Faux, S; Janssen, Y; Jimenez, L A; Timblin, C; Zanella, C; Goldberg, J; Walsh, E; Barchowsky, A; Driscoll, K

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that minerals can trigger alterations in gene expression by initiating signaling events upstream of gene transactivation. These cascades may be initiated at the cell surface after interaction of minerals with the plasma membrane either through receptorlike mechanisms or integrins. Alternatively, signaling pathways may be stimulated by active oxygen species generated both during phagocytosis of minerals and by redox reactions on the mineral surface. At least two signaling cascades linked to activation of transcription factors, i.e., DNA-binding proteins involved in modulating gene expression and DNA replication, are stimulated after exposure of lung cells to asbestos fibers in vitro. These include nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade important in regulation of the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Both NF kappa B and AP-1 bind to specific DNA sequences within the regulatory or promoter regions of genes that are critical to cell proliferation and inflammation. Unraveling the cell signaling cascades initiated by mineral dusts and pharmacologic inhibition of these events may be important for the control and treatment of mineral-associated occupational diseases. Images Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B PMID:9400710

  5. Semaphorin signals in cell adhesion and cell migration: functional role and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Andrea; Fazzari, Pietro; Tamagnone, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Cell migration is pivotal in embryo development and in the adult. During development a wide range of progenitor cells travel over long distances before undergoing terminal differentiation. Moreover, the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and of the cardiovascular system involves remodelling compact cell layers and sprouting of new tubular branches. In the adult, cell migration is essential for leucocytes involved in immune response. Furthermore, invasive and metastatic cancer cells have the distinctive ability to overcome normal tissue boundaries, travel in and out of blood vessels, and settle down in heterologous tissues. Cell migration normally follows strict guidance cues, either attractive, or inhibitory and repulsive. Semaphorins are a wide family of signals guiding cell migration during development and in the adult. Recent findings have established that semaphorin receptors, the plexins, govern cell migration by regulating integrin-based cell substrate adhesion and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, via specific monomeric GTPases. Plexins furthermore recruit tyrosine kinases in receptor complexes, which allows switching between multiple signaling pathways and functional outcomes. In this article, we will review the functional role of semaphorins in cell migration and the implicated molecular mechanisms controlling cell adhesion. PMID:17607949

  6. Separating the adhesive and signaling functions of the Fat and Dachsous protocadherins.

    PubMed

    Matakatsu, Hitoshi; Blair, Seth S

    2006-06-01

    The protocadherins Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) are required for several processes in the development of Drosophila, including controlling growth of imaginal discs, planar cell polarity (PCP) and the proximodistal patterning of appendages. Ft and Ds bind in a preferentially heterophilic fashion, and Ds is expressed in distinct patterns along the axes of polarity. It has thus been suggested that Ft and Ds serve not as adhesion molecules, but as receptor and ligand in a poorly understood signaling pathway. To test this hypothesis, we performed a structure-function analysis of Ft and Ds, separating their adhesive and signaling functions. We found that the extracellular domain of Ft is not required for its activity in growth, PCP and proximodistal patterning. Thus, ligand binding is not necessary for Ft activity. By contrast, the extracellular domain of Ds is necessary and sufficient to mediate its effects on PCP, consistent with the model that Ds acts as a ligand during PCP. However, we also provide evidence that Ds can regulate growth independently of Ft, and that the intracellular domain of Ds can affect proximodistal patterning, both suggestive of functions independent of binding Ft. Finally, we show that ft mutants or a dominant-negative Ft construct can affect disc growth without changes in the expression of wingless and Wingless target genes. PMID:16687445

  7. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: 1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and 2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  8. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lichan; Bei, Yihua; Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-08-28

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: (1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and (2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  9. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  10. PSFC: a Pathway Signal Flow Calculator App for Cytoscape

    PubMed Central

    Nersisyan, Lilit; Johnson, Graham; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Pico, Alexander; Arakelyan, Arsen

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are sequences of biochemical reactions that propagate an input signal, such as a hormone binding to a cell-surface receptor, into the cell to trigger a reactive process. Assessment of pathway activities is crucial for determining which pathways play roles in disease versus normal conditions. To date various pathway flow/perturbation assessment tools are available, however they are constrained to specific algorithms and specific data types. There are no accepted standards for evaluation of pathway activities or simulation of flow propagation events in pathways, and the results of different software are difficult to compare. Here we present Pathway Signal Flow Calculator (PSFC), a Cytoscape app for calculation of a pathway signal flow based on the pathway topology and node input data. The app provides a rich framework for customization of different signal flow algorithms to allow users to apply various approaches within a single computational framework. PMID:26834984

  11. SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN MELANOSOME BIOGENESIS AND PATHOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are the specialized intracellular organelles of pigment cells devoted to the synthesis, storage and transport of melanin pigments, which are responsible for most visible pigmentation in mammals and other vertebrates. As a direct consequence, any genetic mutation resulting in alteration of melanosomal function, either because affecting pigment cell survival, migration and differentiation, or because interfering with melanosome biogenesis, transport and transfer to keratinocytes, is immediately translated into color variations of skin, fur, hair or eyes. Thus, over one hundred genes and proteins have been identified as pigmentary determinants in mammals, providing us with a deep understanding of this biological system, which functions by using mechanisms and processes that have parallels in other tissues and organs. In particular, many genes implicated in melanosome biogenesis have been characterized, so that melanosomes represent an incredible source of information and a model for organelles belonging to the secretory pathway. Furthermore, the function of melanosomes can be associated with common physiological phenotypes, such as variation of pigmentation among individuals, and with rare pathological conditions, such as albinism, characterized by severe visual defects. Among the most relevant mechanisms operating in melanosome biogenesis are the signal transduction pathways mediated by two peculiar G protein-coupled receptors: the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), involved in the fair skin/red hair phenotype and skin cancer; and OA1 (GPR143), whose loss-of-function results in X-linked ocular albinism. This review will focus on the most recent novelties regarding the functioning of these two receptors, by highlighting emerging signaling mechanisms and general implications for cell biology and pathology. PMID:20381640

  12. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  13. Regulation of Sertoli-Germ Cell Adhesion and Sperm Release by FSH and Nonclassical Testosterone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shupe, John; Cheng, Jing; Puri, Pawan; Kostereva, Nataliya

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and FSH act in synergy to produce the factors required to maximize the production of spermatozoa and male fertility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these hormones support spermatogenesis are not well established. Recently, we identified a nonclassical mechanism of testosterone signaling in cultured rat Sertoli cells. We found that testosterone binding to the androgen receptor recruits and activates Src tyrosine kinase. Src then causes the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, which results in the phosphorylation and activation of the ERK MAPK and the cAMP response element-binding protein transcription factor. In this report, we find that FSH inhibits testosterone-mediated activation of ERK and the MAPK pathway in Sertoli cells via the protein kinase A-mediated inhibition of Raf kinase. In addition, FSH, as well as inhibitors of Src and ERK kinase activity, reduced germ cell attachment to Sertoli cells in culture. Using pathway-specific androgen receptor mutants we found that the nonclassical pathway is required for testosterone-mediated increases in germ cell attachment to Sertoli cells. Studies of seminiferous tubule explants determined that Src kinase, but not ERK kinase, activity is required for the release of sperm from seminiferous tubule explants. These findings suggest the nonclassical testosterone-signaling pathway acts via Src and ERK kinases to facilitate the adhesion of immature germ cells to Sertoli cells and through Src to permit the release of mature spermatozoa. In contrast, FSH acts to limit testosterone-mediated ERK kinase activity and germ cell attachment. PMID:21177760

  14. [Sphingolipid-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Tardy, Claudine; Bonhoure, Elisabeth; Levade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Various sphingolipids are being viewed as bioactive molecules and/or second messengers. Among them, ceramide (or N-acylsphingosine) and sphingosine generally behave as pro-apoptotic mediators. Indeed, ceramide mediates the death signal initiated by numerous stress agents which either stimulate its de novo synthesis or activate sphingomyelinases that release ceramide from sphingomyelin. For instance, the early generation of ceramide promoted by TNF is mediated by a neutral sphingomyelinase the activity of which is regulated by the FAN adaptor protein, thereby controlling caspase activation and the cell death programme. In addition, the activity of this neutral sphingomyelinase is negatively modulated by caveolin, a major constituent of some membrane microdomains. The enzyme sphingosine kinase also plays a crucial role in apoptosis signalling by regulating the intracellular levels of two sphingolipids having opposite effects, namely the pro-apoptotic sphingosine and the anti-apoptotic sphingosine 1-phosphate molecule. Ceramide and sphingosine metabolism therefore appears as a pivotal regulatory pathway in the determination of cell fate. PMID:14708343

  15. Inter-cellular adhesion disruption and the RAS/RAF and beta-catenin signalling in lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play an essential role in creating tight intercellular association and their loss has been correlated with poor prognosis in human cancer. Mutational activation of protein kinases and loss of cell adhesion occur together in human lung adenocarcinoma but how these two pathways interconnect is only poorly understood. Mouse models of human lung adenocarcinoma with oncogene expression targeted to subtypes of lung epithelial cells led to formation of adenomas or adenocarcinomas that lacked metastatic potential. Conditional genetic abrogation of epithelial tumour cell adhesion in mice with benign lung tumours induced by oncogenic RAF kinase has been demonstrated to induce intratumourous vascularization (angiogenic switch), progression to invasive adenocarcinoma and micrometastasis. Importantly, breaking cell adhesion in benign oncogene-driven lung tumour cells activated β-catenin signalling and induced the expression of several genes that are normally expressed in intestine rather than the lung. I will discuss potential routes to nuclear β-catenin signalling in cancer and how nuclear β-catenin may epigenetically alter the plasticity of tumour cells during malignant progression. PMID:18492263

  16. Cell-cell signaling and adhesion in phagocytosis and early development of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Bracco, E; Pergolizzi, B; Peracino, B; Ponte, E; Balbo, A; Mai, A; Ceccarelli, A; Bozzaro, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell-cell signaling and adhesion regulate transition from the unicellular to the multicellular stage of development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Essential gene networks involved in these processes have been identified and their interplay dissected. Heterotrimeric G protein-linked signal transduction plays a key role in regulating expression of genes mediating chemotaxis or cell adhesion, as well as coordinating actin-based cell motility during phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Two classes of cell adhesion molecules, one cadherin-like and the second belonging to the IgG superfamily, contribute to the strength of adhesion in Dictyostelium aggregates. The developmental role of genes involved in motility and adhesion, and their degree of redundancy, have been re-assessed by using novel developmental assay conditions which are closer to development in nature. PMID:11061438

  17. The TCA Pathway is an Important Player in the Regulatory Network Governing Vibrio alginolyticus Adhesion Under Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lixing; Huang, Li; Yan, Qingpi; Qin, Yingxue; Ma, Ying; Lin, Mao; Xu, Xiaojin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is a critical step in the initial stage of Vibrio alginolyticus infection; therefore, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms governing the adhesion of V. alginolyticus and determine if environmental factors have any effect. A greater understanding of this process may assist in developing preventive measures for reducing infection. In our previous research, we presented the first RNA-seq data from V. alginolyticus cultured under stress conditions that resulted in reduced adhesion. Based on the RNA-seq data, we found that the Tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA pathway) might be closely related to adhesion. Environmental interactions with the TCA pathway might alter adhesion. To validate this, bioinformatics analysis, quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR), RNAi, and in vitro adhesion assays were performed, while V. alginolyticus was treated with various stresses including temperature, pH, salinity, and starvation. The expression of genes involved in the TCA pathway was confirmed by qPCR, which reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Silencing of these genes was capable of reducing the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus. Adhesion of V. alginolyticus is influenced substantially by environmental factors and the TCA pathway is sensitive to some environmental stresses, especially changes in pH and starvation. Our results indicated that (1) the TCA pathway plays a key role in V. alginolyticus adhesion: (2) the TCA pathway is sensitive to environmental stresses. PMID:26870007

  18. Membrane cholesterol plays an important role in enteropathogen adhesion and the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Duan, Qiangde; Li, Yinchau; Yang, Yang; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich ordered microdomains distributed in the plasma membrane that participates in mammalian signal transduction pathways. To determine the role of lipid rafts in mediating interactions between enteropathogens and intestinal epithelial cells, membrane cholesterol was depleted from Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells using methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Cholesterol depletion significantly reduced Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis adhesion and invasion into intestinal epithelial cells. Complementation with exogenous cholesterol restored bacterial adhesion to basal levels. We also evaluated the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Toll-like receptor 5 signaling by bacterial flagellin. Depleting membrane cholesterol reduced the ability of purified recombinant E. coli flagellin to activate TLR5 signaling in intestinal cells. These data suggest that both membrane cholesterol and lipid rafts play important roles in enteropathogen adhesion and contribute to the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling. PMID:25935453

  19. Canonical WNT signaling pathway and human AREG.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    AREG (Amphiregulin), BTC (beta-cellulin), EGF, EPGN (Epigen), EREG (Epiregulin), HBEGF, NRG1, NRG2, NRG3, NRG4 and TGFA (TGFalpha) constitute EGF family ligands for ERBB family receptors. Cetuximab (Erbitux), Pertuzumab (Omnitarg) and Trastuzumab (Herceptin) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to EGF family ligands, while Gefitinib (Iressa), Erlotinib (Tarceva) and Lapatinib (GW572016) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to ERBB family receptors. AREG and TGFA are biomarkers for Gefitinib non-responders. The TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human EGF family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because three TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human AREG gene, comparative genomics analyses on AREG orthologs were further performed. The EPGN-EREG-AREG-BTC cluster at human chromosome 4q13.3 was linked to the PPBP-CXCL segmental duplicons. AREG was the paralog of HBEGF at human chromosome 5q31.2. Chimpanzee AREG gene, consisting of six exons, was located within NW_105918.1 genome sequence. Chimpanzee AREG was a type I transmembrane protein showing 98.0% and 71.4% total amino-acid identity with human AREG and mouse Areg, respectively. Three TCF/LEF-binding sites within human AREG promoter were conserved in chimpanzee AREG promoter, but not in rodent Areg promoters. Primate AREG promoters were significantly divergent from rodent Areg promoters. AREG mRNA was expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as colorectal cancer, liver cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, esophageal cancer and myeloma. Because human AREG was characterized as potent target gene of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway, WNT signaling activation could lead to Gefitinib resistance through AREG upregulation. AREG is a target of systems medicine in the field of oncology. PMID:16685431

  20. Notch -- a goldilocks signaling pathway in disease and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Braune, Eike-Benjamin; Lendahl, Urban

    2016-03-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a fundamental signaling mechanism operating in most, if not all, multicellular organisms and in most cell types in the body. Like other "ivy league" pathways such as Wnt, PI3K, Sonic Hedgehog, Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs), and JAK/STAT signaling, the Notch pathway is a linear signaling mechanism, i.e., an extracellular ligand activates a receptor, which ultimately leads to transcriptional alterations in the cell nucleus, but Notch signaling is a strict cell-cell communication mechanism and lacks built-in amplification steps in the signaling pathway. Dysregulated Notch signaling, either by direct mutations in the pathway or by altered signaling output, is increasingly linked to disease, and Notch can act as an oncogene or tumor suppressor depending on the cellular context. This underscores that appropriate level of Notch signaling is important for differentiation and tissue homeostasis, a notion supported also by genetic data indicating that Notch signaling is very gene dosage-sensitive. Thus, too much or too little signaling can lead to disease and Notch can therefore be considered a Goldilocks signaling pathway. Given the emerging role of dysregulated Notch signaling in disease, there is increasing interest in developing therapeutic approaches to modulate Notch signaling. In this review we discuss recent findings on how signal transduction is tuned in the Notch pathway and how Notch signaling is dysregulated in disease. We also discuss different strategies to modulate Notch signaling for clinical use, for example by novel antibody-based tools and by taking advantage of the cross-talk between Notch and other signaling mechanisms. PMID:27115169

  1. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Chou, Joshua; de Vega, Susana; Mizuniwa, Chihiro; Sekimoto, Kaori; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Teneurin-4 (Ten-4), a transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the central nervous system; however, its cellular and molecular function in neuronal differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in neurite outgrowth. Ten-4 expression was induced during neurite outgrowth of the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2a. Ten-4 protein was localized at the neurite growth cones. Knockdown of Ten-4 expression in Neuro-2a cells decreased the formation of the filopodia-like protrusions and the length of individual neurites. Conversely, overexpression of Ten-4 promoted filopodia-like protrusion formation. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of Ten-4 reduced and elevated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-family small GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1, key molecules for the membranous protrusion formation downstream of FAK, respectively. Inhibition of the activation of FAK and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a downstream regulator of FAK and Cdc42, blocked protrusion formation by Ten-4 overexpression. Further, Ten-4 colocalized with phosphorylated FAK in the filopodia-like protrusion regions. Together, our findings show that Ten-4 is a novel positive regulator of cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through the FAK signaling pathway.—Suzuki, N., Numakawa, T., Chou, J., de Vega, S., Mizuniwa, C., Sekimoto, K., Adachi, N., Kunugi, H., Arikawa-Hirasawa, E., Yamada, Y., Akazawa, C. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling. PMID:24344332

  2. The nuclear factor-kappaB-interleukin-6 signalling pathway mediating vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R

    2010-05-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common pathophysiological response to diverse cardiovascular disease processes, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and aortic aneurysms/dissection. Inflammation is an ordered process initiated by vascular injury that produces enhanced leucocyte adherence, chemotaxis, and finally activation in situ. This process is coordinated by local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines whose expression is the result of vascular injury-induced signal transduction networks. A wide variety of mediators of the vascular injury response have been identified; these factors include vasoactive peptides (angiotensin II, Ang II), CD40 ligands, oxidized cholesterol, and advanced glycation end-products. Downstream, the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor performs an important signal integration step, responding to mediators of vascular injury in a stimulus-dependent and cell type-specific manner. The ultimate consequence of NF-kappaB signalling is the activation of inflammatory genes including adhesion molecules and chemotaxins. However, clinically, the hallmark of vascular NF-kappaB activation is the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), whose local role in vascular inflammation is relatively unknown. The recent elucidation for the role of the IL-6 signalling pathway in Ang II-induced vascular inflammation as one that controls monocyte activation as well as its diverse signalling mechanism will be reviewed. These new discoveries further our understanding for the important role of the NF-kappaB-IL-6 signalling pathway in the process of vascular inflammation. PMID:20202975

  3. Detection of Bidirectional Signaling During Integrin Activation and Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Stuart M.; Dixit, Neha; Simon, Scott I.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil arrest and migration on inflamed endothelium is dependent upon a conformational shift in CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1) from a low to high affinity and clustered state which determines the strength and lifetime of bond formation with intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). Cytoskeletal adaptor proteins kindlin-3 and talin-1 anchor clustered LFA-1 to the cytoskeleton and support the transition from neutrophil rolling to arrest. We employ microfluidic flow channels and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to evaluate the spatiotemporal regulation of LFA-1 affinity and bond formation that facilitate the transition from neutrophil rolling to arrest. Methodology is presented to correlate the relationship between integrin conformation, bond formation with ICAM-1, and cytoskeletal engagement and adhesion strengthening necessary to achieve a migratory phenotype. PMID:24504956

  4. Surface wettability of plasma SiOx:H nanocoating-induced endothelial cells' migration and the associated FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Guixue; Huang, Xianliang; Zhang, Qin; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Chaojun; Yu, Qingsong; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2012-02-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration are essential processes in re-endothelialization of implanted biomaterials. There is no clear relationship and mechanism between EC adhesion and migration behaviour on surfaces with varying wettabilities. As model substrates, plasma SiO(x):H nanocoatings with well-controlled surface wettability (with water contact angles in the range of 98.5 ± 2.3° to 26.3 ± 4.0°) were used in this study to investigate the effects of surface wettability on cell adhesion/migration and associated protein expressions in FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways. It was found that EC adhesion/migration showed opposite behaviour on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces promoted EC migration but were anti-adhesions). The number of adherent ECs showed a maximum on hydrophilic surfaces, while cells adhered to hydrophobic surfaces exhibited a tendency for cell migration. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor targeting the Y-397 site of FAK could significantly inhibit cell adhesion/migration, suggesting that EC adhesion and migration on surfaces with different wettabilities involve (p)FAK and its downstream signalling pathways. Western blot results suggested that the FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways were correlative to EC migration on hydrophobic plasma SiO(x):H surfaces, but uncertain to hydrophilic surfaces. This work demonstrated that surface wettability could induce cellular behaviours that were associated with different cellular signalling events. PMID:21715399

  5. Reelin promotes the adhesion and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells via integrin β1 signaling and STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Meng; Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Hui; Qin, Xiaodan; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Jie; Sun, Xiuyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is essential for neuron migration and positioning. The expression of reelin in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its association with cell adhesion and survival were investigated. Overexpression, siRNA knockdown, and the addition of recombinant protein of reelin were used to examine the function of reelin in MM cells. Clinically, high expression of reelin was negatively associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Functionally, reelin promoted the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin via activation of α5β1 integrin. The resulting phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) led to the activation of Src/Syk/STAT3 and Akt, crucial signaling molecules involved in enhancing cell adhesion and protecting cells from drug-induced cell apoptosis. These findings indicate reelin's important role in the activation of integrin-β1 and STAT3/Akt pathways in multiple myeloma and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting reelin/integrin/FAK axis. PMID:26848618

  6. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  7. Signaling Pathways in Thyroid Cancer and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Bao, Wuyuntu; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of endocrine system, and has now become the fastest increasing cancer among all the malignancies. The development, progression, invasion, and metastasis are closely associated with multiple signaling pathways and the functions of related molecules, such as Src, Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, NF-κB, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), Wnt-β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. Each of the signaling pathways could exert its function singly or through network with other pathways. These pathways could cooperate, promote, antagonize, or interact with each other to form a complex network for the regulation. Dysfunction of this network could increase the development, progression, invasion, and metastasis of thyroid cancer. Inoperable thyroid cancer still has a poor prognosis. However, signaling pathway-related targeted therapies offer the hope of longer quality of meaningful life for this small group of patients. Signaling pathway-related targets provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. In the present work, the advances in these signaling pathways and targeted treatments of thyroid cancer were reviewed. PMID:26985248

  8. Targeting the PI3K signaling pathway in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwok-Kin; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2009-01-01

    The PI3K pathway is activated in a variety of different human cancers, and inhibitors of this pathway are under active development as anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the data supporting the use of PI3K pathway inhibitors in genetically and clinically defined cancers. This review focuses on their efficacy as single-agents and in combination with other targeted therapies, specifically those targeting the MEK-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:20006486

  9. Cross talk between signaling pathways in pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Barbara N; Brooks, David M

    2002-08-01

    Plant defense in response to microbial attack is regulated through a complex network of signaling pathways that involve three signaling molecules: salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene. The SA and JA signaling pathways are mutually antagonistic. This regulatory cross talk may have evolved to allow plants to fine-tune the induction of their defenses in response to different plant pathogens. PMID:12179966

  10. Death and dessert: Nutrient signalling pathways and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition can delay ageing and extend healthy life in diverse organisms from yeast to primates. This effect can be recapitulated by genetic or pharmacological dampening of the signal through nutrient signalling pathways, making them a promising target for intervention into human ageing and age-related diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between nutrient signalling pathways and ageing, focusing on the findings emerged in the last few years. PMID:21835601

  11. Information processing in multi-step signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Ambhi; Hamidzadeh, Archer; Zhang, Jin; Levchenko, Andre

    Information processing in complex signaling networks is limited by a high degree of variability in the abundance and activity of biochemical reactions (biological noise) operating in living cells. In this context, it is particularly surprising that many signaling pathways found in eukaryotic cells are composed of long chains of biochemical reactions, which are expected to be subject to accumulating noise and delayed signal processing. Here, we challenge the notion that signaling pathways are insulated chains, and rather view them as parts of extensively branched networks, which can benefit from a low degree of interference between signaling components. We further establish conditions under which this pathway organization would limit noise accumulation, and provide evidence for this type of signal processing in an experimental model of a calcium-activated MAPK cascade. These results address the long-standing problem of diverse organization and structure of signaling networks in live cells.

  12. Evolutionary conservation of plant gibberellin signalling pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Filip; Fierro, Ana C; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Background: Gibberellins (GA) are plant hormones that can regulate germination, elongation growth, and sex determination. They ubiquitously occur in seed plants. The discovery of gibberellin receptors, together with advances in understanding the function of key components of GA signalling in Arabidopsis and rice, reveal a fairly short GA signal transduction route. The pathway essentially consists of GID1 gibberellin receptors that interact with F-box proteins, which in turn regulate degradation of downstream DELLA proteins, suppressors of GA-controlled responses. Results: Arabidopsis sequences of the gibberellin signalling compounds were used to screen databases from a variety of plants, including protists, for homologues, providing indications for the degree of conservation of the pathway. The pathway as such appears completely absent in protists, the moss Physcomitrella patens shares only a limited homology with the Arabidopsis proteins, thus lacking essential characteristics of the classical GA signalling pathway, while the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii contains a possible ortholog for each component. The occurrence of classical GA responses can as yet not be linked with the presence of homologues of the signalling pathway. Alignments and display in neighbour joining trees of the GA signalling components confirm the close relationship of gymnosperms, monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants, as suggested from previous studies. Conclusion: Homologues of the GA-signalling pathway were mainly found in vascular plants. The GA signalling system may have its evolutionary molecular onset in Physcomitrella patens, where GAs at higher concentrations affect gravitropism and elongation growth. PMID:18047669

  13. Organizational Metrics of Interchromatin Speckle Factor Domains: Integrative Classifier for Stem Cell Adhesion & Lineage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Sebastián L.; Dhaliwal, Anandika; Arvind, Varun; Patel, Parth J.; Beijer, Nick R. M.; de Boer, Jan; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell fates on biomaterials are influenced by the complex confluence of microenvironmental cues emanating from soluble growth factors, cell-to-cell contacts, and biomaterial properties. Cell-microenvironment interactions influence the cell fate by initiating a series of outside-in signaling events that traverse from the focal adhesions to the nucleus via the cytoskeleton and modulate the sub-nuclear protein organization and gene expression. Here, we report a novel imaging-based framework that highlights the spatial organization of sub-nuclear proteins, specifically the splicing factor SC-35 in the nucleoplasm, as an integrative marker to distinguish between minute differences of stem cell lineage pathways in response to stimulatory soluble factors, surface topologies, and microscale topographies. This framework involves the high resolution image acquisition of SC-35 domains and imaging-based feature extraction to obtain quantitative nuclear metrics in tandem with machine learning approaches to generate a predictive cell state classification model. The acquired SC-35 metrics led to > 90% correct classification of emergent human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) phenotypes in populations of hMSCs exposed for merely 3 days to basal, adipogenic, or osteogenic soluble cues, as well as varying levels of dexamethasone-induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Early osteogenic cellular responses across a series of surface patterns, fibrous scaffolds, and micropillars were also detected and classified using this imaging-based methodology. Complex cell states resulting from inhibition of RhoGTPase, β-catenin, and FAK could be classified with > 90% sensitivity on the basis of differences in the SC-35 organizational metrics. This indicates that SC-35 organization is sensitively impacted by adhesion-related signaling molecules that regulate osteogenic differentiation. Our results show that diverse microenvironment cues affect different attributes of the SC-35

  14. Retrograde Fluxes of Focal Adhesion Proteins in Response to Cell Migration and Mechanical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei-hui

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mechanical signals mediated by the extracellular matrix play an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes; yet, how cells respond to mechanical stimuli remains elusive. Using live cell fluorescence imaging, we found that actin filaments, in association with a number of focal adhesion proteins, including zyxin and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, undergo retrograde fluxes at focal adhesions in the lamella region. This flux is inversely related to cell migration, such that it is amplified in fibroblasts immobilized on micropatterned islands. In addition, the flux is regulated by mechanical signals, including stretching forces applied to flexible substrates and substrate stiffness. Conditions favoring the flux share the common feature of causing large retrograde displacements of the interior actin cytoskeleton relative to the substrate anchorage site, which may function as a switch translating mechanical input into chemical signals, such as tyrosine phosphorylation. In turn, the stimulation of actin flux at focal adhesions may function as part of a feedback mechanism, regulating structural assembly and force production in relation to cell migration and mechanical load. The retrograde transport of associated focal adhesion proteins may play additional roles in delivering signals from focal adhesions to the interior of the cell. PMID:17804814

  15. E-cadherin mediates contact inhibition of proliferation through Hippo signaling-pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gyun; Koh, Eunjin; Chen, Xiao; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Contact inhibition of cell growth is essential for embryonic development and maintenance of tissue architecture in adult organisms, and the growth of tumors is characterized by a loss of contact inhibition of proliferation. The recently identified Hippo signaling pathway has been implicated in contact inhibition of proliferation as well as organ size control. The modulation of the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP) by the highly conserved kinase cascade of the Hippo signaling pathway has been intensively studied. However, cell-surface receptors regulating the Hippo signaling pathway in mammals are not well understood. In this study, we show that Hippo signaling pathway components are required for E-cadherin–dependent contact inhibition of proliferation. Knockdown of the Hippo signaling components or overexpression of YAP inhibits the decrease in cell proliferation caused by E-cadherin homophilic binding at the cell surface, independent of other cell–cell interactions. We also demonstrate that the E-cadherin/catenin complex functions as an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway in mammalian cells. Expression of E-cadherin in MDA-MB-231 cells restores the density-dependent regulation of YAP nuclear exclusion. Knockdown of β-catenin in densely cultured MCF10A cells, which mainly depletes E-cadherin–bound β-catenin, induces a decrease in the phosphorylation of S127 residue of YAP and its nuclear accumulation. Moreover, E-cadherin homophilic binding independent of other cell interactions is sufficient to control the subcellular localization of YAP. Therefore, Our results indicate that, in addition to its role in cell–cell adhesion, E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contact directly regulates the Hippo signaling pathway to control cell proliferation. PMID:21730131

  16. Molecular recognition between glyconectins as an adhesion self-assembly pathway to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Guerardel, Yann; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Demarty, Maurice; Ripoll, Camille; Karamanos, Yannis; Maes, Emmanuel; Popescu, Octavian; Strecker, Gerard

    2004-04-01

    primordial glyconectin to glyconectin recognition may be a new paradigm in the self-assembly and non-self discrimination pathway of cellular adhesion leading to multicellularity. PMID:14701844

  17. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival. PMID:11529497

  18. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  19. UV signaling pathways within the skin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongxiang; Weng, Qing Yu; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of UVR on the skin include tanning, carcinogenesis, immunomodulation, and synthesis of vitamin D, among others. Melanocortin 1 receptor polymorphisms correlate with skin pigmentation, UV sensitivity, and skin cancer risk. This article reviews pathways through which UVR induces cutaneous stress and the pigmentation response. Modulators of the UV tanning pathway include sunscreen agents, MC1R activators, adenylate cyclase activators, phosphodiesterase 4D3 inhibitors, T oligos, and MITF regulators such as histone deacetylase (HDAC)-inhibitors. UVR, as one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens, represents both a challenge and enormous opportunity in skin cancer prevention. PMID:24759085

  20. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Bi, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26861272

  1. Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takumi; Kawai, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play crucial roles in the innate immune system by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns derived from various microbes. TLRs signal through the recruitment of specific adaptor molecules, leading to activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRFs, which dictate the outcome of innate immune responses. During the past decade, the precise mechanisms underlying TLR signaling have been clarified by various approaches involving genetic, biochemical, structural, cell biological, and bioinformatics studies. TLR signaling appears to be divergent and to play important roles in many aspects of the innate immune responses to given pathogens. In this review, we describe recent progress in our understanding of TLR signaling regulation and its contributions to host defense. PMID:25309543

  2. UNDERSTANDING PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY: MAKING SENSE OF CHANGING SIGNALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title:
    Understanding Pathways of Toxicity: Making sense of changing signals
    Authors & affiliations:
    Sid Hunter, Maria Blanton, Edward Karoly, Ellen Rogers, Leonard Mole, Phillip Hartig, James Andrews. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Ef...

  3. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Robert S.

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  4. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre, Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed. PMID:20471976

  5. Linear effects models of signaling pathways from combinatorial perturbation data

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Ewa; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Perturbations constitute the central means to study signaling pathways. Interrupting components of the pathway and analyzing observed effects of those interruptions can give insight into unknown connections within the signaling pathway itself, as well as the link from the pathway to the effects. Different pathway components may have different individual contributions to the measured perturbation effects, such as gene expression changes. Those effects will be observed in combination when the pathway components are perturbed. Extant approaches focus either on the reconstruction of pathway structure or on resolving how the pathway components control the downstream effects. Results: Here, we propose a linear effects model, which can be applied to solve both these problems from combinatorial perturbation data. We use simulated data to demonstrate the accuracy of learning the pathway structure as well as estimation of the individual contributions of pathway components to the perturbation effects. The practical utility of our approach is illustrated by an application to perturbations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Availability and Implementation: lem is available as a R package at http://www.mimuw.edu.pl/∼szczurek/lem. Contact: szczurek@mimuw.edu.pl; niko.beerenwinkel@bsse.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307630

  6. CD47 signaling pathways controlling cellular differentiation and responses to stress

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D.

    2016-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed integral membrane protein that serves as the counter-receptor for the inhibitory phagocyte receptor signal-regulatory protein-α (SIRPα) and as a signaling receptor for the secreted matricellular protein thrombospondin-1. Recent studies employing mice and somatic cells lacking CD47 have revealed important pathophysiological functions of CD47 in cardiovascular homeostasis, immune regulation, resistance of cells and tissues to stress, and chronic diseases of aging including cancer. With the emergence of experimental therapeutics targeting CD47, a more thorough understanding of CD47 signal transduction is essential. CD47 lacks a substantial cytoplasmic signaling domain, but several cytoplasmic binding partners have been identified, and lateral interactions of CD47 with other membrane receptors play important roles in mediating signaling resulting from the binding of thrombospondin-1. This review addresses recent advances in identifying the lateral binding partners, signal transduction pathways, and downstream transcription networks regulated through CD47 in specific cell lineages. Major pathways regulated by CD47 signaling include calcium homeostasis, cyclic nucleotide signaling, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis and signaling, and stem cell transcription factors. These pathways and other undefined proximal mediators of CD47 signaling regulate cell death and protective autophagy responses, mitochondrial biogenesis, cell adhesion and motility, and stem cell self-renewal. Although thrombospondin-1 is the best characterized agonist of CD47, the potential roles of other members of the thrombospondin family, SIRPα and SIRPγ binding, and homotypic CD47 interactions as agonists or antagonists of signaling through CD47 should also be considered. PMID:25708195

  7. Temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Michael E; Laub, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory features, including the bifunctionality of histidine kinases as well as positive and negative feedback loops. Two-component signaling pathways are also dynamic on evolutionary time-scales, expanding dramatically in many species through gene duplication and divergence. Here, we review recent work probing the temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling systems. PMID:25589045

  8. Temporal and Evolutionary Dynamics of Two-Component Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Michael E.; Laub, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory features, including the bifunctionality of histidine kinases as well as positive and negative feedback loops. Two-component signaling pathways are also dynamic on evolutionary time-scales, expanding dramatically in many species through gene duplication and divergence. Here, we review recent work probing the temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling systems. PMID:25589045

  9. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  10. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH.

    PubMed

    Verdelho Machado, Mariana; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual's response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27258259

  11. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH

    PubMed Central

    Verdelho Machado, Mariana; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual’s response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27258259

  12. Molecular pathways mediating mechanical signaling in bone

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Janet; Rubin, Clinton; Jacobs, Christopher Rae

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue has the capacity to adapt to its functional environment such that its morphology is “optimized” for the mechanical demand. The adaptive nature of the skeleton poses an interesting set of biological questions (e.g., how does bone sense mechanical signals, what cells are the sensing system, what are the mechanical signals that drive the system, what receptors are responsible for transducing the mechanical signal, what are the molecular responses to the mechanical stimuli). Studies of the characteristics of the mechanical environment at the cellular level, the forces that bone cells recognize, and the integrated cellular responses are providing new information at an accelerating speed. This review first considers the mechanical factors that are generated by loading in the skeleton, including strain, stress and pressure. Mechanosensitive cells placed to recognize these forces in the skeleton, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and cells of the vasculature are reviewed. The identity of the mechanoreceptor(s) is approached, with consideration of ion channels, integrins, connexins, the lipid membrane including caveolar and noncaveolar lipid rafts and the possibility that altering cell shape at the membrane or cytoskeleton alters integral signaling protein associations. The distal intracellular signaling systems on-line after the mechanoreceptor is activated are reviewed, including those emanating from G-proteins (e.g., intracellular calcium shifts), MAPKs, and nitric oxide. The ability to harness mechanical signals to improve bone health through devices and exercise is broached. Increased appreciation of the importance of the mechanical environment in regulating and determining the structural efficacy of the skeleton makes this an exciting time for further exploration of this area. PMID:16361069

  13. Piperazic acid derivatives inhibit Gli1 in Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatra, Harleen; Kundu, Jayanta; Khan, Pragya Paramita; Duttagupta, Indranil; Pattanayak, Sankha; Sinha, Surajit

    2016-09-15

    Piperazic acid, a non-proteinogenic amino acid, found in complex secondary metabolites and peptide natural substances, has shown down regulation of Gli1 expression in Hedgehog signaling pathway in cell based assays. Further structure activity relationship study indicated that amide derivatives of piperazic acid are more potent than piperazic acid itself, with little to no toxicity. However, other cellular components involved in the pathway were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the inhibitory property of piperazic acid in this pathway. Hence, this molecule could serve as a useful tool for studying Hedgehog signaling. PMID:27528433

  14. Sonic Hedgehog Signalling Pathway and Ameloblastoma - A Review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pallavi; Panda, Abikshyeet; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath; Kumar, Harish; Mohiddin, Gouse

    2015-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but aggressive odontogenic neoplasm arising from odontogenic epithelium. Many theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of ameloblatoma. Numerous signalling pathways have been implicated to be associated in the development and progression of this neoplasm. Studies have found association of various signalling molecules of Sonic Hedgehog Pathway, namely SHH, PTCH1, SMO, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3, with ameloblastoma. Knowledge about this pathway will help us to understand the nature and behaviour of this neoplasm. This will open the door towards new treatment modalities. PMID:26674664

  15. Sonic Hedgehog Signalling Pathway and Ameloblastoma – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pallavi; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath; Kumar, Harish; Mohiddin, Gouse

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but aggressive odontogenic neoplasm arising from odontogenic epithelium. Many theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of ameloblatoma. Numerous signalling pathways have been implicated to be associated in the development and progression of this neoplasm. Studies have found association of various signalling molecules of Sonic Hedgehog Pathway, namely SHH, PTCH1, SMO, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3, with ameloblastoma. Knowledge about this pathway will help us to understand the nature and behaviour of this neoplasm. This will open the door towards new treatment modalities. PMID:26674664

  16. Proinflammatory signal transduction pathway induced by Shigella flexneri porins in caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Grimaldi; Giovanna, Donnarumma; Brunella, Perfetto; De Anna, Filippis; Alessandro, Melito; Antonietta, Tufano Maria

    2009-01-01

    The recognition of bacterial components on the intestinal epithelial cells occurs through the toll-like receptors and is followed by the induction of an effective innate immune response. We analyzed receptor expression and signaling pathways involved in activation of human colon adenocarcinoma cells after stimulation with porins and LPS of Shigella flexneri. We also analyzed the expression and production of some cytokines, of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, of antimicrobial peptides human β-defensins, and of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase. Our data demonstrate that TLR2 is involved in porin recognition, whereas TLR4 with MD2, is required for LPS recognition. PMID:24031417

  17. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  18. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  19. Frontier of Epilepsy Research - mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Studies of epilepsy have mainly focused on the membrane proteins that control neuronal excitability. Recently, attention has been shifting to intracellular proteins and their interactions, signaling cascades and feedback regulation as they relate to epilepsy. The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signal transduction pathway, especially, has been suggested to play an important role in this regard. These pathways are involved in major physiological processes as well as in numerous pathological conditions. Here, involvement of the mTOR pathway in epilepsy will be reviewed by presenting; an overview of the pathway, a brief description of key signaling molecules, a summary of independent reports and possible implications of abnormalities of those molecules in epilepsy, a discussion of the lack of experimental data, and questions raised for the understanding its epileptogenic mechanism. PMID:21467839

  20. Oscillatory Dynamics of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a central signaling pathway in development and disease and is regulated by multiple negative and positive feedback loops. Recent studies have shown negative feedback from ERK to upstream regulators can give rise to biochemical oscillations with a periodicity of between 15-30 minutes. Feedback due to the stimulated transcription of negative regulators of the ERK pathway can also give rise to transcriptional oscillations with a periodicity of 1-2h. The biological significance of these oscillations is not clear, but recent evidence suggests that transcriptional oscillations participate in developmental processes, such as somite formation. Biochemical oscillations are more enigmatic, but could provide a mechanism for encoding different types of inputs into a common signaling pathway.

  1. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Elisabeth; Taucher, Valentin; Pichler, Martin; Petru, Edgar; Lax, Sigurd; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Response to platinum-based chemotherapy is poor in some patients and, thus, current research is focusing on new therapy options. The various histological types of OC are characterized by distinctive molecular genetic alterations that are relevant for ovarian tumorigenesis. The understanding of these molecular pathways is essential for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Purpose We want to give an overview on the molecular genetic changes of the histopathological types of OC and their role as putative therapeutic targets. In Depth Review of Existing Data In 2012, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor, bevacizumab, was approved for OC treatment. Bevacizumab has shown promising results as single agent and in combination with conventional chemotherapy, but its target is not distinctive when analyzed before treatment. At present, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and components of the EGFR pathway are in the focus of clinical research. Interestingly, some phytochemical substances show good synergistic effects when used in combination with chemotherapy. Conclusion Ongoing studies of targeted agents in conjunction with chemotherapy will show whether there are alternative options to bevacizumab available for OC patients. Novel targets which can be assessed before therapy to predict efficacy are needed. The assessment of therapeutic targets is continuously improved by molecular pathological analyses on tumor tissue. A careful selection of patients for personalized treatment will help to reduce putative side effects and toxicity. PMID:23644885

  2. TSLP signaling pathway map: a platform for analysis of TSLP-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Sharma, Jyoti; Raju, Rajesh; Palapetta, Shyam Mohan; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Huang, Tai-Chung; Yoda, Akinori; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; van Bodegom, Diederik; Weinstock, David M.; Ziegler, Steven F.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a four-helix bundle cytokine that plays a critical role in the regulation of immune responses and in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. TSLP signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of an interleukin-7 receptor α chain and a unique TSLP receptor (TSLPR) [also known as cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2)]. Cellular targets of TSLP include dendritic cells, B cells, mast cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The TSLP/TSLPR axis can activate multiple signaling transduction pathways including the JAK/STAT pathway and the PI-3 kinase pathway. Aberrant TSLP/TSLPR signaling has been associated with a variety of human diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, eosinophilic eosophagitis and, most recently, acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A centralized resource of the TSLP signaling pathway cataloging signaling events is not yet available. In this study, we present a literature-annotated resource of reactions in the TSLP signaling pathway. This pathway map is publicly available through NetPath (http://www.netpath.org/), an open access signal transduction pathway resource developed previously by our group. This map includes 236 molecules and 252 reactions that are involved in TSLP/TSLPR signaling pathway. We expect that the TSLP signaling pathway map will provide a rich resource to study the biology of this important cytokine as well as to identify novel therapeutic targets for diseases associated with dysregulated TSLP/TSLPR signaling. Database URL: http://www.netpath.org/pathways?path_id=NetPath_24 PMID:24573880

  3. TSLP signaling pathway map: a platform for analysis of TSLP-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Sharma, Jyoti; Raju, Rajesh; Palapetta, Shyam Mohan; Prasad, T S Keshava; Huang, Tai-Chung; Yoda, Akinori; Tyner, Jeffrey W; van Bodegom, Diederik; Weinstock, David M; Ziegler, Steven F; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a four-helix bundle cytokine that plays a critical role in the regulation of immune responses and in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. TSLP signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of an interleukin-7 receptor α chain and a unique TSLP receptor (TSLPR) [also known as cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2)]. Cellular targets of TSLP include dendritic cells, B cells, mast cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The TSLP/TSLPR axis can activate multiple signaling transduction pathways including the JAK/STAT pathway and the PI-3 kinase pathway. Aberrant TSLP/TSLPR signaling has been associated with a variety of human diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, eosinophilic eosophagitis and, most recently, acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A centralized resource of the TSLP signaling pathway cataloging signaling events is not yet available. In this study, we present a literature-annotated resource of reactions in the TSLP signaling pathway. This pathway map is publicly available through NetPath (http://www.netpath.org/), an open access signal transduction pathway resource developed previously by our group. This map includes 236 molecules and 252 reactions that are involved in TSLP/TSLPR signaling pathway. We expect that the TSLP signaling pathway map will provide a rich resource to study the biology of this important cytokine as well as to identify novel therapeutic targets for diseases associated with dysregulated TSLP/TSLPR signaling. Database URL: http://www.netpath.org/pathways?path_id=NetPath_24. PMID:24573880

  4. Fanconi Anemia: A Signal Transduction and DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a fascinating, rare genetic disorder marked by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Research in recent years has led to the elucidation of FA as a DNA repair disorder and involved multiple pathways as well as having wide applicability to common cancers, including breast, ovarian, and head and neck. This review will describe the clinical aspects of FA as well as the current state of its molecular pathophysiology. In particular, work from the Kupfer laboratory will be described that demonstrates how the FA pathway interacts with multiple DNA repair pathways, including the mismatch repair system and signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response. PMID:24348213

  5. Predicting resistance by selection of signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rosell, Rafael; Molina, Miguel Angel; Viteri, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in 17% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with notable response to single agent therapy but with low complete remission rate and, eventually, disease progression. Priming BIM, a pro-apoptotic signaling BH3-only protein, induces sensitivity to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant cell lines. Synthetic lethal approaches and preemptive therapies based on the initial expression of BIM may significantly improve the treatment outcome. EGFR mutations result in transient pro-death imbalance of survival and apoptotic signaling in response to EGFR inhibition. SHP2 is essential to the balance between ERK and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT) activity, while mTOR can be an additional marker for patients with high BIM expression. Furthermore, stromal hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) confers EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance and induces interreceptor crosstalk with integrin-b4, Eph2, CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1), AXL and JAK1. Only by understanding better, and in more depth, complex cancer molecular biology will we have the information that will help us to design strategies to augment efficacy of EGFR TKIs and offer our patients the best, most correct therapeutic option. PMID:25806289

  6. The interaction between uPAR and vitronectin triggers ligand-independent adhesion signalling by integrins

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Schulte, Carsten; Buttiglione, Valentina; De Lorenzi, Valentina; Piontini, Andrea; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Madsen, Chris D; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a non-integrin vitronectin (VN) cell adhesion receptor linked to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid anchor. Through structure–function analyses of uPAR, VN and integrins, we document that uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to VN triggers a novel type of integrin signalling that is independent of integrin–matrix engagement. The signalling is fully active on VN mutants deficient in integrin binding site and is also efficiently transduced by integrins deficient in ligand binding. Although integrin ligation is dispensable, signalling is crucially dependent upon an active conformation of the integrin and its association with intracellular adaptors such as talin. This non-canonical integrin signalling is not restricted to uPAR as it poses no structural constraints to the receptor mediating cell attachment. In contrast to canonical integrin signalling, where integrins form direct mechanical links between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, the molecular mechanism enabling the crosstalk between non-integrin adhesion receptors and integrins is dependent upon membrane tension. This suggests that for this type of signalling, the membrane represents a critical component of the molecular clutch. PMID:25168639

  7. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment. PMID:27060495

  8. SOCS Regulation of the JAK/STAT Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Croker, Ben A.; Kiu, Hiu; Nicholson, Sandra E.

    2008-01-01

    The Suppressor Of Cytokine Signalling (SOCS) proteins were, as their name suggests, first described as inhibitors of cytokine signalling. While their actions clearly now extend to other intracellular pathways, they remain key negative regulators of cytokine and growth factor signalling. In this review we focus on the mechanics of SOCS action and the complexities of the mouse models that have underpinned our current understanding of SOCS biology. PMID:18708154

  9. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells. PMID:27452906

  10. ERβ induces the differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by both Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Xinhua; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Hu, Xiongke; Chen, Yong; Zeng, Kefeng; Zhang, Hongqi

    2015-07-01

    Although 17β-estradial (E2) is known to stimulate bone formation, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have implicated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a major signaling cascade in bone biology. The interactions between Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways have been reported in many tissues. In this study, E2 significantly increased the expression of β-catenin by inducing phosphorylations of GSK3β at serine 9. ERβ siRNAs were transfected into MC3T3-E1 cells and revealed that ERβ involved E2-induced osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The osteoblast differentiation genes (BGP, ALP and OPN) and proliferation related gene (cyclin D1) expression were significantly induced by E2-mediated ERβ. Furthermore immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 induced the accumulation of β-catenin protein in the nucleus which leads to interaction with T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that E2 promotes osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation by inducing proliferation-related and differentiation-related gene expression via ERβ/GSK-3β-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of E2 in osteoblastogenesis. - Highlights: • 17β-estradial (E2) promotes GSK3-β phosphorylation. • E2 activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway interacts with estrogen signaling pathways. • E2-mediated ER induced osteoblast differentiation and proliferation related genes expression.

  11. Hypoxia signaling pathways in cancer metabolism: the importance of co-selecting interconnected physiological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Both tumor hypoxia and dysregulated metabolism are classical features of cancer. Recent analyses have revealed complex interconnections between oncogenic activation, hypoxia signaling systems and metabolic pathways that are dysregulated in cancer. These studies have demonstrated that rather than responding simply to error signals arising from energy depletion or tumor hypoxia, metabolic and hypoxia signaling pathways are also directly connected to oncogenic signaling mechanisms at many points. This review will summarize current understanding of the role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in these networks. It will also discuss the role of these interconnected pathways in generating the cancer phenotype; in particular, the implications of switching massive pathways that are physiologically 'hard-wired’ to oncogenic mechanisms driving cancer. PMID:24491179

  12. PI3K/Akt pathway restricts epithelial adhesion of Dr+ Escherichia coli by down-regulating the expression of Decay Accelerating Factor (DAF)

    PubMed Central

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Goluszko, Pawel; Liebenthal, Daniel; Nowicki, Bogdan J.; Nowicki, Stella; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    The urogenital microbial infection in pregnancy is an important cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains which express Dr fimbriae (Dr+) are associated with unique gestational virulence and they utilize cell surface decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) as one of the cellular receptor before invading the epithelial cells. Previous studies in our laboratory established that nitric oxide reduces the rate of E. coli invasion by delocalizing the DAF protein from cell surface lipid rafts and down-regulating its expression. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/ protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) cell signal pathway plays an important role in host-microbe interaction because many bacteria including E. coli activate this pathway in order to establish infection. In the present study we showed that the PI3K/Akt pathway negatively regulates the expression of DAF on the epithelial cell surface and thus inhibits the adhesion of Dr+ E. coli to epithelial cells. Initially, using two human cell lines Ishikawa and HeLa which differ in constitutive activity of PI3K/Akt we showed that DAF levels were associated with the PI3K/Akt pathway. We then showed that the DAF gene expression was up-regulated and the Dr+ E. coli adhesion increased after the suppression of PI3K/Akt pathway in Ishikawa cells using inhibitor LY-294002, and a plasmid which allowed the expression of PI3K/Akt regulatory protein PTEN. The down-regulation of PTEN protein using PTEN-specific siRNA activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, down-regulated the DAF and decreased the adhesion of Dr+ E. coli. We conclude that the PI3K/Akt pathway regulated the DAF expression in a nitric oxide independent manner. PMID:24599886

  13. Interaction of TGFβ and BMP Signaling Pathways during Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Bettina; Yang, Tao; Chen, Yuqing; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Zabel, Bernhard; Lee, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    TGFβ and BMP signaling pathways exhibit antagonistic activities during the development of many tissues. Although the crosstalk between BMP and TGFβ signaling pathways is well established in bone development, the relationship between these two pathways is less well defined during cartilage development and postnatal homeostasis. We generated hypomorphic mouse models of cartilage-specific loss of BMP and TGFβ signaling to assess the interaction of these pathways in postnatal growth plate homeostasis. We further used the chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line to test effects of BMP and TGFβ signaling on each other's downstream targets. We found that conditional deletion of Smad1 in chondrocytes resulted in a shortening of the growth plate. The addition of Smad5 haploinsufficiency led to a more severe phenotype with shorter prehypertrophic and hypertrophic zones and decreased chondrocyte proliferation. The opposite growth plate phenotype was observed in a transgenic mouse model of decreased chondrocytic TGFβ signaling that was generated by expressing a dominant negative form of the TGFβ receptor I (ΔTβRI) in cartilage. Histological analysis demonstrated elongated growth plates with enhanced Ihh expression, as well as an increased proliferation rate with altered production of extracellular matrix components. In contrast, in chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, TGFβ was able to enhance BMP signaling, while BMP2 significantly reduces levels of TGF signaling. In summary, our data demonstrate that during endochondral ossification, BMP and TGFβ signaling can have antagonistic effects on chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in vivo. We also found evidence of direct interaction between the two signaling pathways in a cell model of chondrogenesis in vitro. PMID:21297990

  14. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. PMID:19455134

  15. A multi-pathway hypothesis for human visual fear signaling

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, David N.; Ingvar, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed for five visual fear signaling pathways in humans, based on an analysis of anatomical connectivity from primate studies and human functional connectvity and tractography from brain imaging studies. Earlier work has identified possible subcortical and cortical fear pathways known as the “low road” and “high road,” which arrive at the amygdala independently. In addition to a subcortical pathway, we propose four cortical signaling pathways in humans along the visual ventral stream. All four of these traverse through the LGN to the visual cortex (VC) and branching off at the inferior temporal area, with one projection directly to the amygdala; another traversing the orbitofrontal cortex; and two others passing through the parietal and then prefrontal cortex, one excitatory pathway via the ventral-medial area and one regulatory pathway via the ventral-lateral area. These pathways have progressively longer propagation latencies and may have progressively evolved with brain development to take advantage of higher-level processing. Using the anatomical path lengths and latency estimates for each of these five pathways, predictions are made for the relative processing times at selective ROIs and arrival at the amygdala, based on the presentation of a fear-relevant visual stimulus. Partial verification of the temporal dynamics of this hypothesis might be accomplished using experimental MEG analysis. Possible experimental protocols are suggested. PMID:26379513

  16. Mechanical switching and coupling between two dissociation pathways in a P-selectin adhesion bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Evan; Leung, Andrew; Heinrich, Volkmar; Zhu, Cheng

    2004-08-01

    Many biomolecular bonds exhibit a mechanical strength that increases in proportion to the logarithm of the rate of force application. Consistent with exponential decrease in bond lifetime under rising force, this kinetically limited failure reflects dissociation along a single thermodynamic pathway impeded by a sharp free energy barrier. Using a sensitive force probe to test the leukocyte adhesion bond P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1)-P-selectin, we observed a linear increase of bond strength with each 10-fold increase in the rate of force application from 300 to 30,000 pN/sec, implying a single pathway for failure. However, the strength and lifetime of PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds dropped anomalously when loaded below 300 pN/sec, demonstrating unexpectedly faster dissociation and a possible second pathway for failure. Remarkably, if first loaded by a "jump" in force to 20-30 pN, the bonds became strong when subjected to a force ramp as slow as 30 pN/sec and exhibited the same single-pathway kinetics under all force rates. Applied in this way, a new "jump/ramp" mode of force spectroscopy was used to show that the PSGL-1-P-selectin bond behaves as a mechanochemical switch where force history selects between two dissociation pathways with markedly different properties. Furthermore, replacing PSGL-1 by variants of its 19-aa N terminus and by the crucial tetrasaccharide sialyl LewisX produces dramatic changes in the failure kinetics, suggesting a structural basis for the two pathways. The two-pathway switch seems to provide a mechanism for the "catch bond" response observed recently with PSGL-1-P-selectin bonds subjected to small-constant forces.

  17. Sulfatase 1 and sulfatase 2 in hepatocellular carcinoma: associated signaling pathways, tumor phenotypes, and survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju Dong; Sun, Zhifu; Hu, Chunling; Lai, Jinping; Dove, Rebecca; Nakamura, Ikuo; Lee, Ju-Seog; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Kang, Koo Jeong; Chu, In-Sun; Roberts, Lewis R

    2011-02-01

    The heparin-degrading endosulfatases sulfatase 1 (SULF1) and sulfatase 2 (SULF2) have opposing effects in hepatocarcinogenesis despite structural similarity. Using mRNA expression arrays, we analyzed the correlations of SULF expression with signaling networks in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and the associations of SULF expression with tumor phenotype and patient survival. Data from two mRNA microarray analyses of 139 and 36 HCCs and adjacent tissues were used as training and validation sets. Partek and Metacore software were used to identify SULF correlated genes and their associated signaling pathways. Associations between SULF expression, the hepatoblast subtype of HCC, and survival were examined. Both SULF1 and 2 had strong positive correlations with periostin, IQGAP1, TGFB1, and vimentin and inverse correlations with HNF4A and IQGAP2. Genes correlated with both SULFs were highly associated with the cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, blood coagulation, TGFB, and Wnt/β-catenin and epithelial mesenchymal transition signaling pathways. Genes uniquely correlated with SULF2 were more associated with neoplastic processes than genes uniquely correlated with SULF1. High SULF expression was associated with the hepatoblast subtype of HCC. There was a bimodal effect of SULF1 expression on prognosis, with patients in the lowest or highest tertile having a worse prognosis than those in the middle tertile. SULFs have complex effects on HCC signaling and patient survival. There are functionally similar associations with cell adhesion, ECM remodeling, TGFB, and WNT pathways, but also unique associations of SULF1 and SULF2. The roles and targeting of the SULFs in cancer require further investigation. PMID:21104785

  18. Integrin-Dependent Activation of the JNK Signaling Pathway by Mechanical Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kanger, Johannes S.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Martin-Blanco, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical force is known to modulate the activity of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascade. However, the effect of mechanical stresses on JNK signaling activation has previously only been analyzed by in vitro detection methods. It still remains unknown how living cells activate the JNK signaling cascade in response to mechanical stress and what its functions are in stretched cells. We assessed in real-time the activity of the JNK pathway in Drosophila cells by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), using an intramolecular phosphorylation-dependent dJun-FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) biosensor. We found that quantitative FRET-FLIM analysis and confocal microscopy revealed sustained dJun-FRET biosensor activation and stable morphology changes in response to mechanical stretch for Drosophila S2R+ cells. Further, these cells plated on different substrates showed distinct levels of JNK activity that associate with differences in cell morphology, integrin expression and focal adhesion organization. These data imply that alterations in the cytoskeleton and matrix attachments may act as regulators of JNK signaling, and that JNK activity might feed back to modulate the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion. We found that this dynamic system is highly plastic; at rest, integrins at focal adhesions and talin are key factors suppressing JNK activity, while multidirectional static stretch leads to integrin-dependent, and probably talin-independent, Jun sensor activation. Further, our data suggest that JNK activity has to coordinate with other signaling elements for the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell shape remodeling associated with stretch. PMID:22180774

  19. Modeling of cell signaling pathways in macrophages by semantic networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Michael; Bellenson, Joel L; Shankey, Conor; Cherkasov, Artem

    2004-01-01

    Background Substantial amounts of data on cell signaling, metabolic, gene regulatory and other biological pathways have been accumulated in literature and electronic databases. Conventionally, this information is stored in the form of pathway diagrams and can be characterized as highly "compartmental" (i.e. individual pathways are not connected into more general networks). Current approaches for representing pathways are limited in their capacity to model molecular interactions in their spatial and temporal context. Moreover, the critical knowledge of cause-effect relationships among signaling events is not reflected by most conventional approaches for manipulating pathways. Results We have applied a semantic network (SN) approach to develop and implement a model for cell signaling pathways. The semantic model has mapped biological concepts to a set of semantic agents and relationships, and characterized cell signaling events and their participants in the hierarchical and spatial context. In particular, the available information on the behaviors and interactions of the PI3K enzyme family has been integrated into the SN environment and a cell signaling network in human macrophages has been constructed. A SN-application has been developed to manipulate the locations and the states of molecules and to observe their actions under different biological scenarios. The approach allowed qualitative simulation of cell signaling events involving PI3Ks and identified pathways of molecular interactions that led to known cellular responses as well as other potential responses during bacterial invasions in macrophages. Conclusions We concluded from our results that the semantic network is an effective method to model cell signaling pathways. The semantic model allows proper representation and integration of information on biological structures and their interactions at different levels. The reconstruction of the cell signaling network in the macrophage allowed detailed

  20. Cancer stem cells and signaling pathways in radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lei; Graham, Peter; Hao, Jingli; Ni, Jie; Deng, Junli; Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David; Gillatt, David; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the most important strategies in cancer treatment. Radioresistance (the failure to RT) results in locoregional recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms leading to cancer radioresistance to overcome this problem and increase patients' survival. Currently, the majority of the radioresistance-associated researches have focused on preclinical studies. Although the exact mechanisms of cancer radioresistance have not been fully uncovered, accumulating evidence supports that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and different signaling pathways play important roles in regulating radiation response and radioresistance. Therefore, targeting CSCs or signaling pathway proteins may hold promise for developing novel combination modalities and overcoming radioresistance. The present review focuses on the key evidence of CSC markers and several important signaling pathways in cancer radioresistance and explores innovative approaches for future radiation treatment. PMID:26716904

  1. Dissecting Major Signaling Pathways throughout the Development of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Henrique B.; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Nolasco, Eduardo L.; de Victo, Nathalia C.; Atique, Rodrigo; Jank, Carina C.; Anschau, Valesca; Zerbini, Luiz F.; Correa, Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies found in males. The development of PCa involves several mutations in prostate epithelial cells, usually linked to developmental changes, such as enhanced resistance to apoptotic death, constitutive proliferation, and, in some cases, to differentiation into an androgen deprivation-resistant phenotype, leading to the appearance of castration-resistant PCa (CRPCa), which leads to a poor prognosis in patients. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the main deregulations into signaling pathways that will lead to the development of PCa and/or CRPCa. Key mutations in some pathway molecules are often linked to a higher prevalence of PCa, by directly affecting the respective cascade and, in some cases, by deregulating a cross-talk node or junction along the pathways. We also discuss the possible environmental and nonenvironmental inducers for these mutations, as well as the potential therapeutic strategies targeting these signaling pathways. A better understanding of how some risk factors induce deregulation of these signaling pathways, as well as how these deregulated pathways affect the development of PCa and CRPCa, will further help in the development of new treatments and prevention strategies for this disease. PMID:23738079

  2. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  3. The Hippo Signaling Pathway in Development and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Duojia

    2011-01-01

    First discovered in Drosophila, the Hippo signaling pathway is a conserved regulator of organ size. Central to this pathway is a kinase cascade leading from the tumor suppressor Hippo (Mst1 and Mst2 in mammals) to the oncoprotein Yki (YAP and TAZ in mammals), a transcriptional coactivator of target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival. Here, I review recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanism and physiological function of Hippo signaling in Drosophila and mammals. These studies suggest that the core Hippo kinase cascade integrates multiple upstream inputs, enabling dynamic regulation of tissue homeostasis in animal development and physiology. PMID:20951342

  4. The Notch signaling pathway as a mediator of tumor survival

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Sharon R.

    2013-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved and responsible for cell fate determination in the developing embryo and mature tissue. At the molecular level, ligand binding activates Notch signaling by liberating the Notch intracellular domain, which then translocates into the nucleus and activates gene transcription. Despite the elegant simplicity of this pathway, which lacks secondary messengers or a signaling cascade, Notch regulates gene expression in a highly context- and cell-type-dependent manner. Notch signaling is frequently dysregulated, most commonly by overactivation, across many cancers and confers a survival advantage on tumors, leading to poorer outcomes for patients. Recent studies demonstrate how Notch signaling increases tumor cell proliferation and provide evidence that active Notch signaling maintains the cancer stem-cell pool, induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition and promotes chemoresistance. These studies imply that pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling may refine control of cancer therapy and improve patient survival. Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) are drugs that inhibit Notch signaling and may be successful in controlling cancer cell growth in conjunction with standard chemotherapy, but substantial side effects have hampered their widespread use. Recent efforts have been aimed at the development of antibodies against specific Notch receptors and ligands with the hope of limiting side effects while providing the same therapeutic benefit as GSIs. Together, studies characterizing Notch signaling and modulation have offered hope that refined methods targeting Notch may become powerful tools in anticancer therapeutics. PMID:23585460

  5. Uniform curation protocol of metazoan signaling pathways to predict novel signaling components.

    PubMed

    Pálfy, Máté; Farkas, Illés J; Vellai, Tibor; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    A relatively large number of signaling databases available today have strongly contributed to our understanding of signaling pathway properties. However, pathway comparisons both within and across databases are currently severely hampered by the large variety of data sources and the different levels of detail of their information content (on proteins and interactions). In this chapter, we present a protocol for a uniform curation method of signaling pathways, which intends to overcome this insufficiency. This uniformly curated database called SignaLink ( http://signalink.org ) allows us to systematically transfer pathway annotations between different species, based on orthology, and thereby to predict novel signaling pathway components. Thus, this method enables the compilation of a comprehensive signaling map of a given species and identification of new potential drug targets in humans. We strongly believe that the strict curation protocol we have established to compile a signaling pathway database can also be applied for the compilation of other (e.g., metabolic) databases. Similarly, the detailed guide to the orthology-based prediction of novel signaling components across species may also be utilized for predicting components of other biological processes. PMID:23715991

  6. Reducing canonical Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway confers protection against mutant Huntingtin toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pascale; Besson, Marie-Thérèse; Devaux, Jérôme; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2012-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by movement disorders, cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. HD is caused by expanded CAG tract within the coding region of Huntingtin protein. Despite major insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to HD, no effective cure is yet available. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) has been reported to alter the stability and levels of β-Catenin, a key molecule in cell adhesion and signal transduction in Wingless (Wg)/Wnt pathway. However it remains to establish whether manipulation of Wg/Wnt signaling can impact HD pathology. We here investigated the phenotypic interactions between mHtt and Wg/Wnt signaling by using the power of Drosophila genetics. We provide compelling evidence that reducing Armadillo/β-Catenin levels confers protection and that this beneficial effect is correlated with the inactivation of the canonical Wg/Wnt signaling pathway. Knockdowns of Wnt ligands or of the downstream transcription factor Pangolin/TCF both ameliorate the survival of HD flies. Similarly, overexpression of one Armadillo/β-Catenin destruction complex component (Axin, APC2 or Shaggy/GSK-3β) increases the lifespan of HD flies. Loss of functional Armadillo/β-Catenin not only abolishes neuronal intrinsic but also glia-induced alterations in HD flies. Our findings highlight that restoring canonical Wg/Wnt signaling may be of therapeutic value. PMID:22531500

  7. A network map of Interleukin-10 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Verma, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Sharma, Kusum; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Advani, Jayshree; Gowda, Harsha; Tripathy, Srikanth Prasad; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gandotra, Sheetal; Prasad, T S Keshava; Shankar, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with important immunoregulatory functions. It is primarily secreted by antigen-presenting cells such as activated T-cells, monocytes, B-cells and macrophages. In biologically functional form, it exists as a homodimer that binds to tetrameric heterodimer IL-10 receptor and induces downstream signaling. IL-10 is associated with survival, proliferation and anti-apoptotic activities of various cancers such as Burkitt lymphoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma and non-small scell lung cancer. In addition, it plays a central role in survival and persistence of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Trypanosoma cruzi inside the host. The signaling mechanisms of IL-10 cytokine are not well explored and a well annotated pathway map has been lacking. To this end, we developed a pathway resource by manually annotating the IL-10 induced signaling molecules derived from literature. The reactions were categorized under molecular associations, activation/inhibition, catalysis, transport and gene regulation. In all, 37 molecules and 76 reactions were annotated. The IL-10 signaling pathway can be freely accessed through NetPath, a resource of signal transduction pathways previously developed by our group. PMID:26253919

  8. Redefining Signaling Pathways with an Expanding Single-Cell Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Suzanne; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2016-06-01

    Genetically identical cells respond heterogeneously to uniform environmental stimuli. Consequently, investigating the signaling networks that control these cell responses using 'average' bulk cell measurements can obscure underlying mechanisms and misses information emerging from cell-to-cell variability. Here we review recent technological advances including live-cell fluorescence imaging-based approaches and microfluidic devices that enable measurements of signaling networks, dynamics, and responses in single cells. We discuss how these single-cell tools have uncovered novel mechanistic insights for canonical signaling pathways that control cell proliferation (ERK), DNA-damage responses (p53), and innate immune and stress responses (NF-κB). Future improvements in throughput and multiplexing, analytical pipelines, and in vivo applicability will all significantly expand the biological information gained from single-cell measurements of signaling pathways. PMID:26968612

  9. Phylogenetic diversity of stress signalling pathways in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Elissavet; Agrafioti, Ino; Stumpf, Michael; Quinn, Janet; Stansfield, Ian; Brown, Alistair JP

    2009-01-01

    Background Microbes must sense environmental stresses, transduce these signals and mount protective responses to survive in hostile environments. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that fungal stress signalling pathways have evolved rapidly in a niche-specific fashion that is independent of phylogeny. To test this hypothesis we have compared the conservation of stress signalling molecules in diverse fungal species with their stress resistance. These fungi, which include ascomycetes, basidiomycetes and microsporidia, occupy highly divergent niches from saline environments to plant or mammalian hosts. Results The fungi displayed significant variation in their resistance to osmotic (NaCl and sorbitol), oxidative (H2O2 and menadione) and cell wall stresses (Calcofluor White and Congo Red). There was no strict correlation between fungal phylogeny and stress resistance. Rather, the human pathogens tended to be more resistant to all three types of stress, an exception being the sensitivity of Candida albicans to the cell wall stress, Calcofluor White. In contrast, the plant pathogens were relatively sensitive to oxidative stress. The degree of conservation of osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways amongst the eighteen fungal species was examined. Putative orthologues of functionally defined signalling components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by performing reciprocal BLASTP searches, and the percent amino acid identities of these orthologues recorded. This revealed that in general, central components of the osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways are relatively well conserved, whereas the sensors lying upstream and transcriptional regulators lying downstream of these modules have diverged significantly. There was no obvious correlation between the degree of conservation of stress signalling pathways and the resistance of a particular fungus to the corresponding stress. Conclusion Our data are consistent with

  10. Wnt pathway in Dupuytren disease: connecting profibrotic signals.

    PubMed

    van Beuge, Marike M; Ten Dam, Evert-Jan P M; Werker, Paul M N; Bank, Ruud A

    2015-12-01

    A role of Wnt signaling in Dupuytren disease, a fibroproliferative disease of the hand and fingers, has not been fully elucidated. We examined a large set of Wnt pathway components and signaling targets and found significant dysregulation of 41 Wnt-related genes in tissue from the Dupuytren nodules compared with patient-matched control tissue. A large proportion of genes coding for Wnt proteins themselves was downregulated. However, both canonical Wnt targets and components of the noncanonical signaling pathway were upregulated. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that protein expression of Wnt1-inducible secreted protein 1 (WISP1), a known Wnt target, was increased in nodules compared with control tissue, but knockdown of WISP1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in the Dupuytren myofibroblasts did not confirm a functional role. The protein expression of noncanonical pathway components Wnt5A and VANGL2 as well as noncanonical coreceptors Ror2 and Ryk was increased in nodules. On the contrary, the strongest downregulated genes in this study were 4 antagonists of Wnt signaling (DKK1, FRZB, SFRP1, and WIF1). Downregulation of these genes in the Dupuytren tissue was mimicked in vitro by treating normal fibroblasts with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), suggesting cross talk between different profibrotic pathways. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of these antagonists in normal fibroblasts led to increased nuclear translocation of Wnt target β-catenin in response to TGF-β1 treatment. In conclusion, we have shown extensive dysregulation of Wnt signaling in affected tissue from Dupuytren disease patients. Components of both the canonical and the noncanonical pathways are upregulated, whereas endogenous antagonists are downregulated, possibly via interaction with other profibrotic pathways. PMID:26470681

  11. Neuregulin-1 Regulates Cell Adhesion via an ErbB2/Phosphoinositide-3 Kinase/Akt-Dependent Pathway: Potential Implications for Schizophrenia and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanakry, Christopher G.; Li, Zhen; Nakai, Yoko; Sei, Yoshitatsu; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01

    Background Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is a putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene involved extensively in central nervous system development as well as cancer invasion and metastasis. Using a B lymphoblast cell model, we previously demonstrated impairment in NRG1α-mediated migration in cells derived from patients with schizophrenia as well as effects of risk alleles in NRG1 and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), a second gene implicated both in schizophrenia susceptibility and in cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we examine cell adhesion, an essential component process of cell motility, using an integrin-mediated cell adhesion assay based on an interaction between ICAM-1 and the CD11a/CD18 integrin heterodimer expressed on lymphoblasts. In our assay, NRG1α induces lymphoblasts to assume varying levels of adhesion characterized by time-dependent fluctuations in the firmness of attachment. The maximum range of variation in adhesion over sixty minutes correlates strongly with NRG1α-induced migration (r2 = 0.61). NRG1α-induced adhesion variation is blocked by erbB2, PI3K, and Akt inhibitors, but not by PLC, ROCK, MLCK, or MEK inhibitors, implicating the erbB2/PI3K/Akt1 signaling pathway in NRG1-stimulated, integrin-mediated cell adhesion. In cell lines from 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 normal controls, cells from patients show a significant deficiency in the range of NRG1α-induced adhesion (p = 0.0002). In contrast, the response of patient-derived cells to phorbol myristate acetate is unimpaired. The COMT Val108/158Met genotype demonstrates a strong trend towards predicting the range of the NRG1α-induced adhesion response with risk homozygotes having decreased variation in cell adhesion even in normal subjects (p = 0.063). Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that a mechanism of the NRG1 genetic association with schizophrenia may involve the molecular biology of cell adhesion. PMID:18159252

  12. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya; Li, Ming-Yang; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  13. Network Features and Pathway Analyses of a Signal Transduction Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Yanashima, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Matsubara, Yoshiya; Weatheritt, Robert; Oka, Kotaro; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Tomita, Masaru; Ishizaki, Shun

    2008-01-01

    The scale-free and small-world network models reflect the functional units of networks. However, when we investigated the network properties of a signaling pathway using these models, no significant differences were found between the original undirected graphs and the graphs in which inactive proteins were eliminated from the gene expression data. We analyzed signaling networks by focusing on those pathways that best reflected cellular function. Therefore, our analysis of pathways started from the ligands and progressed to transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins. We employed the Python module to assess the target network. This involved comparing the original and restricted signaling cascades as a directed graph using microarray gene expression profiles of late onset Alzheimer's disease. The most commonly used method of shortest-path analysis neglects to consider the influences of alternative pathways that can affect the activation of transcription factors or cytoskeletal proteins. We therefore introduced included k-shortest paths and k-cycles in our network analysis using the Python modules, which allowed us to attain a reasonable computational time and identify k-shortest paths. This technique reflected results found in vivo and identified pathways not found when shortest path or degree analysis was applied. Our module enabled us to comprehensively analyse the characteristics of biomolecular networks and also enabled analysis of the effects of diseases considering the feedback loop and feedforward loop control structures as an alternative path. PMID:19543432

  14. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  15. Hedgehog signaling pathway in small bovine ovarian follicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hedgehog signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and turnover in a variety of mammalian embryonic and adult tissues including bovine ovarian granulosa and theca cells. Binding of hedgehog to the patch receptor derepresses smoothened resulting in t...

  16. Convergent, RIC-8-Dependent Gα Signaling Pathways in the Caenorhabditis elegans Synaptic Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Nicole K.; Schade, Michael A.; Miller, Kenneth G.

    2005-01-01

    We used gain-of-function and null synaptic signaling network mutants to investigate the relationship of the Gαq and Gαs pathways to synaptic vesicle priming and to each other. Genetic epistasis studies using Gαq gain-of-function and null mutations, along with a mutation that blocks synaptic vesicle priming and the synaptic vesicle priming stimulator phorbol ester, suggest that the Gαq pathway generates the core, obligatory signals for synaptic vesicle priming. In contrast, the Gαs pathway is not required for the core priming function, because steady-state levels of neurotransmitter release are not significantly altered in animals lacking a neuronal Gαs pathway, even though these animals are strongly paralyzed as a result of functional (nondevelopmental) defects. However, our genetic analysis indicates that these two functionally distinct pathways converge and that they do so downstream of DAG production. Further linking the two pathways, our epistasis analysis of a ric-8 null mutant suggests that RIC-8 (a receptor-independent Gα guanine nucleotide exchange factor) is required to maintain both the Gαq vesicle priming pathway and the neuronal Gαs pathway in a functional state. We propose that the neuronal Gαs pathway transduces critical positional information onto the core Gαq pathway to stabilize the priming of selected synapses that are optimal for locomotion. PMID:15489511

  17. Integration of Shh and Wnt Signaling Pathways Regulating Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigang; Wan, Liping; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Kun

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the spatial and temporal programmed expression of Shh and Wnt members during key stages of definitive hematopoiesis and the possible mechanism of Shh and Wnt signaling pathways regulating the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Spatial and temporal programmed gene expression of Shh and Wnt signaling during hematopoiesis corresponded with c-kit(+)lin(-) HPCs proliferation. C-kit(+)Lin(-) populations derived from aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) of Balb/c mice at E10.5 with increased expression of Shh and Wnt3a demonstrated a greater potential for proliferation. Additionally, supplementation with soluble Shh N-terminal peptide promoted the proliferation of c-kit(+)Lin(-) populations by activating the Wnt signaling pathway, an effect which was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. A specific inhibitor of wnt signaling was capable of inhibiting Shh-induced proliferation in a similar manner to shh inhibitor. Our results provide valuable information on Shh and Wnt signaling involved in hematopoiesis and highlight the importance of interaction of Shh and Wnt signaling in regulating HPCs proliferation. PMID:26378473

  18. Pentoxifylline inhibits liver fibrosis via hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hua, Juan; Guo, Chun-Xia; Wang, Wei-Xian; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Dong-Liang; Wei, Ping; Lu, Yin-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Infection of schistosomiasis japonica may eventually lead to liver fibrosis, and no effective antifibrotic therapies are available but liver transplantation. Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway has been involved in the process and is a promising target for treating liver fibrosis. This study aimed to explore the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) on liver fibrosis induced by schistosoma japonicum infection by inhibiting the HH signaling pathway. Phorbol12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) was used to induce human acute mononuclear leukemia cells THP-1 to differentiate into macrophages. The THP-1-derived macrophages were stimulated by soluble egg antigen (SEA), and the culture supernatants were collected for detection of activation of macrophages. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) was used to detect the cytotoxicity of the culture supernatant and PTX on the LX-2 cells. The LX-2 cells were administered with activated culture supernatant from macrophages and(or) PTX to detect the transforming growth factor-β gene expression. The mRNA expression of shh and gli-1, key parts in HH signaling pathway, was detected. The mRNA expression of shh and gli-1 was increased in LX-2 cells treated with activated macrophages-derived culture supernatant, suggesting HH signaling pathway may play a key role in the activation process of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The expression of these genes decreased in LX-2 cells co-cultured with both activated macrophages-derived culture supernatant and PTX, indicating PTX could suppress the activation process of HSCs. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that PTX prevents liver fibrogenesis in vitro by the suppression of HH signaling pathway. PMID:27376806

  19. Current perspectives of the signaling pathways directing neural crest induction.

    PubMed

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-11-01

    The neural crest is a migratory population of embryonic cells with a tremendous potential to differentiate and contribute to nearly every organ system in the adult body. Over the past two decades, an incredible amount of research has given us a reasonable understanding of how these cells are generated. Neural crest induction involves the combinatorial input of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors, and is thought to occur in two phases from gastrulation to neurulation. In the first phase, FGF and Wnt signaling induce NC progenitors at the border of the neural plate, activating the expression of members of the Msx, Pax, and Zic families, among others. In the second phase, BMP, Wnt, and Notch signaling maintain these progenitors and bring about the expression of definitive NC markers including Snail2, FoxD3, and Sox9/10. In recent years, additional signaling molecules and modulators of these pathways have been uncovered, creating an increasingly complex regulatory network. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of the major signaling pathways that participate in neural crest induction, with a focus on recent developments and current perspectives. We provide a simplified model of early neural crest development and stress similarities and differences between four major model organisms: Xenopus, chick, zebrafish, and mouse. PMID:22547091

  20. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2004-01-01

    The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:15219238

  1. Asymptotic Analysis of the Wnt/β Signaling Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, D. T.; Goussis, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a signal transduction pathway made of proteins, which plays an important role in oncogenesis. Ethan Lee and and co-workers introduced in 2003 a detailed mathematical model of this pathway, incorporating the kinetics of protein-protein interactions, protein synthesis/degradation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The fast/slow dynamics of Lee's system are examined here, by employing the Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) algorithm. CSP reproduces the results of the classical singular perturbation analysis in an algorithmic fashion, producing an approximation of (i) the low dimensional Slow Invariant Manifold (SIM), where the solution evolves and (ii) the reduced model that governs the flow there. The temporal variation of the dimensions of the SIM will be presented and the components of the pathway that are responsible (i) for the generation of the SIM and (ii) for driving the system on it will be identified.

  2. F-actin bundles direct the initiation and orientation of lamellipodia through adhesion-based signaling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Heath E.; King, Samantha J.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Rotty, Jeremy D.; Bear, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts are weakly polarized and reorient directionality by a lamellipodial branching mechanism that is stabilized by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. However, the mechanisms by which new lamellipodia are initiated and directed are unknown. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor cytoskeletal and signaling dynamics in migrating cells, we show that peripheral F-actin bundles/filopodia containing fascin-1 serve as templates for formation and orientation of lamellipodia. Accordingly, modulation of fascin-1 expression tunes cell shape, quantified as the number of morphological extensions. Ratiometric imaging reveals that F-actin bundles/filopodia play both structural and signaling roles, as they prime the activation of PI3K signaling mediated by integrins and focal adhesion kinase. Depletion of fascin-1 ablated fibroblast haptotaxis on fibronectin but not platelet-derived growth factor chemotaxis. Based on these findings, we conceptualize haptotactic sensing as an exploration, with F-actin bundles directing and lamellipodia propagating the process and with signaling mediated by adhesions playing the role of integrator. PMID:25666809

  3. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  4. Stress Signaling Pathways for the Pathogenicity of Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Sensing, responding, and adapting to the surrounding environment are crucial for all living organisms to survive, proliferate, and differentiate in their biological niches. This ability is also essential for Cryptococcus neoformans and its sibling species Cryptococcus gattii, as these pathogens have saprobic and parasitic life cycles in natural and animal host environments. The ability of Cryptococcus to cause fatal meningoencephalitis is highly related to its capability to remodel and optimize its metabolic and physiological status according to external cues. These cues act through multiple stress signaling pathways through a panoply of signaling components, including receptors/sensors, small GTPases, secondary messengers, kinases, transcription factors, and other miscellaneous adaptors or regulators. In this minireview, we summarize and highlight the importance of several stress signaling pathways that influence the pathogenicity of Cryptococcus and discuss future challenges in these areas. PMID:24078305

  5. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  6. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova-St Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  7. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK Signalling Influence Osteoblast Adhesion, Differentiation and Mineralization on Titanium Topographies

    PubMed Central

    Prowse, Paul D. H.; Elliott, Christopher G.; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23505566

  8. Chemical modulation of glycerolipid signaling and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Brown, H. Alex

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago, glycerolipids captured the attention of biochemical researchers as novel cellular signaling entities. We now recognize that these biomolecules occupy signaling nodes critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, glycerolipid-metabolizing enzymes present attractive targets for new therapies. A number of fields—ranging from neuroscience and cancer to diabetes and obesity—have elucidated the signaling properties of glycerolipids. The biochemical literature teems with newly emerging small molecule inhibitors capable of manipulating glycerolipid metabolism and signaling. This ever-expanding pool of chemical modulators appears daunting to those interested in exploiting glycerolipid-signaling pathways in their model system of choice. This review distills the current body of literature surrounding glycerolipid metabolism into a more approachable format, facilitating the application of small molecule inhibitors to novel systems. PMID:24440821

  9. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-08-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and adhesion molecules including soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 and soluble E-selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcriptional activity, Inhibitor of NF-κB alpha (IκBα) degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers' delicate organization, as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced vascular adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti

  10. Mechanically Induced Focal Adhesion Assembly Amplifies Anti-Adipogenic Pathways in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Guilluy, Christophe; Xie, Zhihui; Case, Natasha; Styner, Maya; Thomas, Jacob; Oguz, Ipek; Rubin, Clinton; Burridge, Keith; Rubin, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The fate of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is determined through integration of chemical, spatial, and physical signals. The suppression of MSC adipogenesis by mechanical stimuli, which requires Akt-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) with β-catenin activation, can be enhanced by repetitive dosing within a single day. Here, we demonstrate that reapplication of cyclic strain within a 24-hour period leads to amplification of both Akt activation and its subsequent inhibition of GSK3β, such that total cycle number can be reduced while still inhibiting adipogenesis. Amplification of Akt signaling is facilitated by a dynamic restructuring of the cell in response to mechanical signals, as evidenced by a transient increase in focal adhesion (FA) number and increased RhoA activity. Preventing FA assembly or development of tension blocks activation of Akt by mechanical signals, but not by insulin. This indicates that the FA infrastructure is essential to the physical, but not necessarily the chemical, sensitivity, and responsiveness of the cell. Exploiting the transient nature of cytoskeletal remodeling may represent a process to enhance cell responsiveness to mechanical input and ultimately define the fate of MSCs with a minimal input. PMID:21898699

  11. The Aspergillus fumigatus cell wall integrity signaling pathway: drug target, compensatory pathways, and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Valiante, Vito; Macheleidt, Juliane; Föge, Martin; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen, causing severe infections with invasive growth in immunocompromised patients. The fungal cell wall (CW) prevents the cell from lysing and protects the fungus against environmental stress conditions. Because it is absent in humans and because of its essentiality, the fungal CW is a promising target for antifungal drugs. Nowadays, compounds acting on the CW, i.e., echinocandin derivatives, are used to treat A. fumigatus infections. However, studies demonstrating the clinical effectiveness of echinocandins in comparison with antifungals currently recommended for first-line treatment of invasive aspergillosis are still lacking. Therefore, it is important to elucidate CW biosynthesis pathways and their signal transduction cascades, which potentially compensate the inhibition caused by CW- perturbing compounds. Like in other fungi, the central core of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway in A. fumigatus is composed of three mitogen activated protein kinases. Deletion of these genes resulted in severely enhanced sensitivity of the mutants against CW-disturbing compounds and in drastic alterations of the fungal morphology. Additionally, several cross-talk interactions between the CWI pathways and other signaling pathways are emerging, raising the question about their role in the CW compensatory mechanisms. In this review we focused on recent advances in understanding the CWI signaling pathway in A. fumigatus and its role during drug stress response and virulence. PMID:25932027

  12. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. PMID:25556853

  13. Targeting signaling pathways with small molecules to treat autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Bozena; Swiatek-Machado, Karolina

    2008-01-01

    Chronic activation of immune responses, mediated by inflammatory mediators and involving different effector cells of the innate and acquired immune system characterizes autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis and septic shock syndrome. MAPKs are crucial intracellular mediators of inflammation. MAPK inhibitors are attractive anti-inflammatory drugs, because they are capable of reducing the synthesis of inflammation mediators at multiple levels and are effective in blocking proinflammatory cytokine signaling. Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway converts cytokine signals into genomic responses regulating proliferation and differentiation of the immune cells. JAK inhibitors are a new class of immunomodulatory agents with immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory and antiallergic properties. This review discusses the rationale behind current strategies of targeting MAPK and JAK/STAT signaling pathways, and the overall effects of signal transduction inhibitors in animal models of inflammatory disorders. Signal transduction inhibitors are small molecules that can be administered orally, and initial results of clinical trials have shown clinical benefits in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:20477590

  14. The mTOR Signalling Pathway in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pópulo, Helena; Lopes, José Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2012-01-01

    The conserved serine/threonine kinase mTOR (the mammalian target of rapamycin), a downstream effector of the PI3K/AKT pathway, forms two distinct multiprotein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 is sensitive to rapamycin, activates S6K1 and 4EBP1, which are involved in mRNA translation. It is activated by diverse stimuli, such as growth factors, nutrients, energy and stress signals, and essential signalling pathways, such as PI3K, MAPK and AMPK, in order to control cell growth, proliferation and survival. mTORC2 is considered resistant to rapamycin and is generally insensitive to nutrients and energy signals. It activates PKC-α and AKT and regulates the actin cytoskeleton. Deregulation of multiple elements of the mTOR pathway (PI3K amplification/mutation, PTEN loss of function, AKT overexpression, and S6K1, 4EBP1 and eIF4E overexpression) has been reported in many types of cancers, particularly in melanoma, where alterations in major components of the mTOR pathway were reported to have significant effects on tumour progression. Therefore, mTOR is an appealing therapeutic target and mTOR inhibitors, including the rapamycin analogues deforolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, are submitted to clinical trials for treating multiple cancers, alone or in combination with inhibitors of other pathways. Importantly, temsirolimus and everolimus were recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma, PNET and giant cell astrocytoma. Small molecules that inhibit mTOR kinase activity and dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitors are also being developed. In this review, we aim to survey relevant research, the molecular mechanisms of signalling, including upstream activation and downstream effectors, and the role of mTOR in cancer, mainly in melanoma. PMID:22408430

  15. Integrins modulate the Egfr signaling pathway to regulate tendon cell differentiation in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Martin-Bermudo, M D

    2000-06-01

    Changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern the differentiation of many cell types during embryogenesis. Integrins are cell matrix receptors that play a major role in cell-ECM adhesion and in transmitting signals from the ECM inside the cell to regulate gene expression. In this paper, it is shown that the PS integrins are required at the muscle attachment sites of the Drosophila embryo to regulate tendon cell differentiation. The analysis of the requirements of the individual alpha subunits, alphaPS1 and alphaPS2, demonstrates that both PS1 and PS2 integrins are involved in this process. In the absence of PS integrin function, the expression of tendon cell-specific genes such as stripe and beta1 tubulin is not maintained. In addition, embryos lacking the PS integrins also exhibit reduced levels of activated MAPK. This reduction is probably due to a downregulation of the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (Egfr) pathway, since an activated form of the Egfr can rescue the phenotype of embryos mutant for the PS integrins. Furthermore, the levels of the Egfr ligand Vein at the muscle attachment sites are reduced in PS mutant embryos. Altogether, these results lead to a model in which integrin-mediated adhesion plays a role in regulating tendon cell differentiation by modulating the activity of the Egfr pathway at the level of its ligand Vein. PMID:10821759

  16. Wnt-/-β-catenin pathway signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been adequately clarified, which negatively impacts the development of targeted therapy protocols for this overwhelming neoplasia. The aberrant activation of signaling in the HCC is primarily due to the deregulated expression of the components of the Wnt-/-β-catenin. This leads to the activation of β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent target genes that control cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell motility. The deregulation of the Wnt pathway is an early event in hepatocarcinogenesis. An aggressive phenotype was associated with HCC, since this pathway is implicated in the proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of cancer cells, regarding the cell’s own survival. The disruption of the signaling cascade Wnt-/-β-catenin has shown anticancer properties in HCC’s clinical evaluations of therapeutic molecules targeted for blocking the Wnt signaling pathway for the treatment of HCC, and it represents a promising perspective. The key to bringing this strategy in to clinical practice is to identify new molecules that would be effective only in tumor cells with aberrant signaling β-catenin. PMID:26609340

  17. Wnt-/-β-catenin pathway signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini

    2015-11-18

    The molecular basis of the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been adequately clarified, which negatively impacts the development of targeted therapy protocols for this overwhelming neoplasia. The aberrant activation of signaling in the HCC is primarily due to the deregulated expression of the components of the Wnt-/-β-catenin. This leads to the activation of β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent target genes that control cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell motility. The deregulation of the Wnt pathway is an early event in hepatocarcinogenesis. An aggressive phenotype was associated with HCC, since this pathway is implicated in the proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of cancer cells, regarding the cell's own survival. The disruption of the signaling cascade Wnt-/-β-catenin has shown anticancer properties in HCC's clinical evaluations of therapeutic molecules targeted for blocking the Wnt signaling pathway for the treatment of HCC, and it represents a promising perspective. The key to bringing this strategy in to clinical practice is to identify new molecules that would be effective only in tumor cells with aberrant signaling β-catenin. PMID:26609340

  18. Fibronectin-Tissue Transglutaminase Matrix Rescues RGD-impaired Cell Adhesion through Syndecan-4 and β1 Integrin Co-signaling*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Telci, Dilek; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Xiaoling; Verderio, Elisabetta A. M.; Humphries, Martin J.; Baccarini, Manuela; Basaga, Huveyda; Griffin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Heterotropic association of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) with extracellular matrix-associated fibronectin (FN) can restore the adhesion of fibroblasts when the integrin-mediated direct binding to FN is impaired using RGD-containing peptide. We demonstrate that the compensatory effect of the TG-FN complex in the presence of RGD-containing peptides is mediated by TG2 binding to the heparan sulfate chains of the syndecan-4 cell surface receptor. This binding mediates activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) and its subsequent interaction with β1 integrin since disruption of PKCα binding to β1 integrins with a cell-permeant competitive peptide inhibits cell adhesion and the associated actin stress fiber formation. Cell signaling by this process leads to the activation of focal adhesion kinase and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Fibroblasts deficient in Raf-1 do not respond fully to the TG-FN complex unless either the full-length kinase competent Raf-1 or the kinase-inactive domain of Raf-1 is reintroduced, indicating the involvement of the Raf-1 protein in the signaling mechanism. We propose a model for a novel RGD-independent cell adhesion process that could be important during tissue injury and/or remodeling whereby TG-FN binding to syndecan-4 activates PKCα leading to its association with β1 integrin, reinforcement of actin-stress fiber organization, and MAPK pathway activation. PMID:18499669

  19. Hyperactive RAS/PI3-K/MAPK Signaling Cascade in Migration and Adhesion of Nf1 Haploinsufficient Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; He, Yongzheng; Sharma, Richa; Xing, Wen; Estwick, Selina A; Wu, Xiaohua; Rhodes, Steven D; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene, which affect approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Patients with NF1 suffer from a range of malignant and nonmalignant manifestations such as plexiform neurofibromas and skeletal abnormalities. We previously demonstrated that Nf1 haploinsufficiency in mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) results in impaired osteoblastic differentiation, which may be associated with the skeletal manifestations in NF1 patients. Here we sought to further ascertain the role of Nf1 in modulating the migration and adhesion of MSPCs of the Nf1 haploinsufficient (Nf1(+/-)) mice. Nf1(+/-) MSPCs demonstrated increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, increased migration, and increased actin polymerization as compared to wild-type (WT) MSPCs. Additionally, Nf1(+/-) MSPCs were noted to have significantly enhanced cell adhesion to fibronectin with selective affinity for CH271 with an overexpression of its complimentary receptor, CD49e. Nf1(+/-) MSPCs also showed hyperactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways when compared to WT MSPCs, which were both significantly reduced in the presence of their pharmacologic inhibitors, LY294002 and PD0325901, respectively. Collectively, our study suggests that both PI3-K and MAPK signaling pathways play a significant role in enhanced migration and adhesion of Nf1 haploinsufficient MSPCs. PMID:26039236

  20. The Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway regulates renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Wan-Young; Hur, Jeongmi; Kim, Hanbyul; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, Arum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Park, Sang Hee; Chung, Chaeuk; Kim, Jin; Min, Soohong; Myung, Seung-Jae; Lim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is the final pathway of various renal injuries that result in chronic kidney disease. The mammalian Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell death, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in disease development in patients with TIF and in a mouse model of TIF. Mice with tubular epithelial cell (TEC)-specific deletions of Sav1 (Salvador homolog 1) exhibited aggravated renal TIF, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypic changes, apoptosis, and proliferation after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Moreover, Sav1 depletion in TECs increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and activated β-catenin expression after UUO, which likely accounts for the abovementioned enhanced TEC fibrotic phenotype. In addition, TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), a major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, was significantly activated in Sav1-knockout mice in vivo. An in vitro study showed that TAZ directly regulates TGF-β and TGF-β receptor II expression. Collectively, our data indicate that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of TIF and that regulating this pathway may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing TIF. PMID:27550469

  1. The Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway regulates renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Wan-Young; Hur, Jeongmi; Kim, Hanbyul; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, Arum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Park, Sang Hee; Chung, Chaeuk; Kim, Jin; Min, Soohong; Myung, Seung-Jae; Lim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is the final pathway of various renal injuries that result in chronic kidney disease. The mammalian Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell death, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in disease development in patients with TIF and in a mouse model of TIF. Mice with tubular epithelial cell (TEC)-specific deletions of Sav1 (Salvador homolog 1) exhibited aggravated renal TIF, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypic changes, apoptosis, and proliferation after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Moreover, Sav1 depletion in TECs increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and activated β-catenin expression after UUO, which likely accounts for the abovementioned enhanced TEC fibrotic phenotype. In addition, TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), a major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, was significantly activated in Sav1-knockout mice in vivo. An in vitro study showed that TAZ directly regulates TGF-β and TGF-β receptor II expression. Collectively, our data indicate that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of TIF and that regulating this pathway may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing TIF. PMID:27550469

  2. The neural adhesion molecule TAG-1 modulates responses of sensory axons to diffusible guidance signals.

    PubMed

    Law, Chris O; Kirby, Rebecca J; Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Furley, Andrew J W

    2008-08-01

    When the axons of primary sensory neurons project into the embryonic mammalian spinal cord, they bifurcate and extend rostrocaudally before sending collaterals to specific laminae according to neuronal subclass. The specificity of this innervation has been suggested to be the result both of differential sensitivity to chemorepellants expressed in the ventral spinal cord and of the function of Ig-like neural cell adhesion molecules in the dorsal horn. The relationship between these mechanisms has not been addressed. Focussing on the pathfinding of TrkA+ NGF-dependent axons, we demonstrate for the first time that their axons project prematurely into the dorsal horn of both L1 and TAG-1 knockout mice. We show that axons lacking TAG-1, similar to those lacking L1, are insensitive to wild-type ventral spinal cord (VSC)-derived chemorepellants, indicating that adhesion molecule function is required in the axons, and that this loss of response is explained in part by loss of response to Sema3A. We present evidence that TAG-1 affects sensitivity to Sema3A by binding to L1 and modulating the endocytosis of the L1/neuropilin 1 Sema3A receptor complex. However, TAG-1 appears to affect sensitivity to other VSC-derived chemorepellants via an L1-independent mechanism. We suggest that this dependence of chemorepellant sensitivity on the functions of combinations of adhesion molecules is important to ensure that axons project via specific pathways before extending to their final targets. PMID:18550718

  3. Concordant Signaling Pathways Produced by Pesticide Exposure in Mice Correspond to Pathways Identified in Human Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gollamudi, Seema; Johri, Ashu; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Yang, Lichuan; Elemento, Olivier; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which the etiology of 90 percent of the patients is unknown. Pesticide exposure is a major risk factor for PD, and paraquat (PQ), pyridaben (PY) and maneb (MN) are amongst the most widely used pesticides. We studied mRNA expression using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) in the ventral midbrain (VMB) and striatum (STR) of PQ, PY and paraquat+maneb (MNPQ) treated mice, followed by pathway analysis. We found concordance of signaling pathways between the three pesticide models in both the VMB and STR as well as concordance in these two brain areas. The concordant signaling pathways with relevance to PD pathogenesis were e.g. axonal guidance signaling, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as pathways not previously linked to PD, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, human embryonic stem cell pluripotency and role of macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in rheumatoid arthritis. Human PD pathways previously identified by expression analysis, concordant with VMB pathways identified in our study were axonal guidance signaling, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, IL-6 signaling, ephrin receptor signaling, TGF-β signaling, PPAR signaling and G-protein coupled receptor signaling. Human PD pathways concordant with the STR pathways in our study were Wnt/β-catenin signaling, axonal guidance signaling and G-protein coupled receptor signaling. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (Ppard) and G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) were common genes in VMB and STR identified by network analysis. In conclusion, the pesticides PQ, PY and MNPQ elicit common signaling pathways in the VMB and STR in mice, which are concordant with known signaling pathways identified in human PD, suggesting that these pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic PD. The analysis of these networks and pathways may therefore lead to improved understanding of disease pathogenesis, and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22563483

  4. Parameter sensitivity analysis of IL-6 signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y; Jayaraman, A; Hahn, J

    2007-11-01

    Signal transduction pathways generally consist of a large number of individual components and have an even greater number of parameters describing their reaction kinetics. Although the structure of some signalling pathways can be found in the literature, many of the parameters are not well known and they would need to be re-estimated from experimental data for each specific case. However it is not feasible to estimate hundreds of parameters because of the cost of the experiments associated with generating data. Parameter sensitivity analysis can address this situation as it investigates how the system behaviour is changed by variations of parameters and the analysis identifies which parameters play a key role in signal transduction. Only these important parameters need then be re-estimated using data from further experiments. This article presents a detailed parameter sensitivity analysis of the JAK/STAT and MAPK signal transduction pathway that is used for signalling by the cytokine IL-6. As no parameter sensitivity analysis technique is known to work best for all situations, a comparison of the results returned by four techniques is presented: differential analysis, the Morris method, a sampling-based approach and the Fourier amplitude sensitivity test. The recruitment of the transcription factor STAT3 to the dimer of the phosphorylated receptor complex is determined as the most important step by the sensitivity analysis. Additionally, the desphosphorylation of the nuclear STAT3 dimer by PP2 as well as feedback inhibition by SOCS3 are found to play an important role for signal transduction. PMID:18203580

  5. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway. PMID:26620835

  6. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Signaling During Disease: Regulation by Reactive Oxygen Species and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Michelle E.; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The endothelium is immunoregulatory in that inhibiting the function of vascular adhesion molecules blocks leukocyte recruitment and thus tissue inflammation. The function of endothelial cells during leukocyte recruitment is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants. In inflammatory sites and lymph nodes, the endothelium is stimulated to express adhesion molecules that mediate leukocyte binding. Upon leukocyte binding, these adhesion molecules activate endothelial cell signal transduction that then alters endothelial cell shape for the opening of passageways through which leukocytes can migrate. If the stimulation of this opening is blocked, inflammation is blocked. In this review, we focus on the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Expression of VCAM-1 is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory diseases by several mediators, including ROS. Then, VCAM-1 on the endothelium functions as both a scaffold for leukocyte migration and a trigger of endothelial signaling through NADPH oxidase-generated ROS. These ROS induce signals for the opening of intercellular passageways through which leukocytes migrate. In several inflammatory diseases, inflammation is blocked by inhibition of leukocyte binding to VCAM-1 or by inhibition of VCAM-1 signal transduction. VCAM-1 signal transduction and VCAM-1-dependent inflammation are blocked by antioxidants. Thus, VCAM-1 signaling is a target for intervention by pharmacological agents and by antioxidants during inflammatory diseases. This review discusses ROS and antioxidant functions during activation of VCAM-1 expression and VCAM-1 signaling in inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1607–1638. PMID:21050132

  7. Ninjurin1 suppresses metastatic property of lung cancer cells through inhibition of interleukin 6 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeong-Su; Kang, Ju-Hee; Woo, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hwan Mook; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2016-07-15

    Nerve injury-induced protein 1 (Ninjurin1, Ninj1) is a cell surface molecule that can mediate homophilic adhesion and promote neurite outgrowth from cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Interestingly, Ninj1 overexpressed in human cancer; however, its role in metastasis is not clear. This study showed that inhibition of Ninj1 promotes lung cancer metastasis through interleukin 6 (IL-6)/STAT3 signaling. Ninj1 levels were relatively low in highly motile lung cancer cells. While inhibition of Ninj1 enhanced cell migration in lung cancer cells, overexpression of Ninj1 significantly suppressed it. We found that inhibition of Ninj1 significantly increased expression and secretion of IL-6 in A549 cells. We also found that inhibition of IL-6 decreased intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression. In addition, inhibition of Ninj1 significantly increased cell motility and invasiveness of lung cancer cells. In an in vivo model, we found that Ninj1 suppression did not affect tumor growth but induced significant increase in incidence of lung metastasis, and sizes and number of tumor nodules. Taken together, our data clearly demonstrate that Ninj1 suppresses migration, invasion and metastasis of lung cancer via inhibition of the IL-6 signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26815582

  8. Signaling pathways implicated in hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Diana; Krstic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Vlaski, Marija; Petakov, Marijana; Jovcic, Gordana; Stojanovic, Nevenka; Milenkovic, Pavle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the signal transduction pathways associated with the clonal development of myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells. The contribution of particular signaling molecules of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and PI-3 kinase signaling to the growth of murine bone marrow colony forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and erythroid (burst forming unit-erythroid [BFU-E] and colony forming unit-erythroid [CFU-E]) progenitors was examined in studies performed in the presence or absence of specific signal transduction inhibitors. The results clearly pointed to different signal transducing intermediates that are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation depending on the cell lineage, as well as on the progenitors' maturity. Lineage-specific differences were obtained when chemical inhibitors specific for receptor- or nonreceptor-PTKs, as well as for the main groups of distinctly regulated MAPK cascades, were used because all of these compounds suppressed the growth of erythroid progenitors, with no major effects on myeloid progenitors. At the same time, differential involvement of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK transduction pathway was observed in the proliferation and/or differentiation of early, BFU-E, and late, CFU-E, erythroid progenitor cells. The results also demonstrated that phosphatydylinositol (PI)-3 kinase and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcriptional factor were required for maintenance of both myeloid and erythroid progenitor cell function. Overall, the data obtained indicated that committed hematopoietic progenitors express a certain level of constitutive signaling activity that participates in the regulation of normal steady-state hematopoiesis and point to the importance of evaluating the impact of signal transduction inhibitors on normal bone marrow when used as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:17202596

  9. In Vivo Detection of Intracellular Signaling Pathways in Developing Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2000-01-01

    Information regarding the intracellular signaling processes that occur during the development of T cells has largely been obtained with the use of transgenic mouse models, which although providing invaluable information are time consuming and costly. To this end, we have developed a novel system that facilitates the In Vivo analysis of signal transduction pathways during T-lymphocyte development. This approach uses reporter-plasmids for the detection of intracellular signals mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase or cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Reporter-plasmids are transfected into thymocytes in fetal thymic organ culture by accelerated DNA/particle bombardment (gene gun), and the activation of a signaling pathway is determined in the form of a standard luciferase assay. Importantly, this powerful technique preserves the structural integrity of the thymus, and will provide an invaluable tool to study how thymocytes respond to normal environmental stimuli encountered during differentiation within the thymic milieu. Thus, this method allows for the monitoring of signals that occur in a biological time frame, such as during differentiation, and within the natural environment of differentiating cells. PMID:11293810

  10. Molecular Pathways: Interleukin-15 Signaling in Health and in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anjali; Sullivan, Laura; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the development, survival, proliferation and activation of multiple lymphocyte lineages utilizing a variety of signaling pathways. IL-15 utilizes three distinct receptor chains in at least two different combinations to signal and exert its effects on the immune system. The binding of IL-15 to its receptor complex activates an ‘immune-enhancing’ signaling cascade in natural killer cells and subsets of T cells, as well as the induction of a number of proto-oncogenes. Additional studies have explored the role of IL-15 in the development and progression of cancer, notably leukemia of large granular lymphocytes, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma. This review provides an overview of the molecular events in the IL-15 signaling pathway and the aberrancies in its regulation that are associated with chronic inflammation and cancer. We briefly explore the potential therapeutic opportunities that have arisen as a result of these studies to further the treatment of cancer. These involve both targeting the disruption of IL-15 signaling as well as IL-15-mediated enhancement of innate and antigen specific immunity. PMID:24737791

  11. Calcineurin Signaling Regulates Neural Induction Through Antagonizing the BMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ahryon; Deng, Suhua; Chen, Lei; Miller, Erik; Wernig, Marius; Graef, Isabella A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Development of the nervous system begins with neural induction, which is controlled by complex signaling networks functioning in concert with one another. Fine-tuning of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway is essential for neural induction in the developing embryo. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cells integrate the signaling pathways that contribute to neural induction have remained unclear. We find that neural induction is dependent on the Ca2+-activated phosphatase calcineurin (CaN). FGF-regulated Ca2+ entry activates CaN, which directly and specifically dephosphorylates BMP-regulated Smad1/5 proteins. Genetic and biochemical analyses revealed that CaN adjusts the strength and transcriptional output of BMP signaling and that a reduction of CaN activity leads to an increase of Smad1/5-regulated transcription. As a result, FGF-activated CaN signaling opposes BMP signaling during gastrulation, thereby promoting neural induction and the development of anterior structures. PMID:24698271

  12. Signal transduction pathways involved in mechanotransduction in bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liedert, Astrid . E-mail: astrid.liedert@uni-ulm.de; Kaspar, Daniela; Blakytny, Robert; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2006-10-13

    Several in vivo and in vitro studies with different loading regimens showed that mechanical stimuli have an influence on proliferation and differentiation of bone cells. Prerequisite for this influence is the transduction of mechanical signals into the cell, a phenomenon that is termed mechanotransduction, which is essential for the maintenance of skeletal homeostasis in adults. Mechanoreceptors, such as the integrins, cadherins, and stretch-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, together with various signal transduction pathways, are involved in the mechanotransduction process that ultimately regulates gene expression in the nucleus. Mechanotransduction itself is considered to be regulated by hormones, the extracellular matrix of the osteoblastic cells and the mode of the mechanical stimulus.

  13. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTÍN, MIGUEL; MARTINEZ-GLEZ, VICTOR; PEÑA-GRANERO, CAROLINA; ISLA, ALBERTO; LASSALETTA, LUIS; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; MELÉNDEZ, BÁRBARA; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; REY, JUAN A.

    2013-01-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  14. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martín, Miguel; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Peña-Granero, Carolina; Isla, Alberto; Lassaletta, Luis; DE Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Meléndez, Bárbara; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2013-07-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  15. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  16. PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fresno Vara, Juan Angel; Casado, Enrique; de Castro, Javier; Cejas, Paloma; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; González-Barón, Manuel

    2004-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinases, PI3Ks, constitute a lipid kinase family characterized by their ability to phosphorylate inositol ring 3'-OH group in inositol phospholipids to generate the second messenger phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI-3,4,5-P(3)). RPTK activation results in PI(3,4,5)P(3) and PI(3,4)P(2) production by PI3K at the inner side of the plasma membrane. Akt interacts with these phospholipids, causing its translocation to the inner membrane, where it is phosphorylated and activated by PDK1 and PDK2. Activated Akt modulates the function of numerous substrates involved in the regulation of cell survival, cell cycle progression and cellular growth. In recent years, it has been shown that PI3K/Akt signalling pathway components are frequently altered in human cancers. Cancer treatment by chemotherapy and gamma-irradiation kills target cells primarily by the induction of apoptosis. However, the development of resistance to therapy is an important clinical problem. Failure to activate the apoptotic programme represents an important mode of drug resistance in tumor cells. Survival signals induced by several receptors are mediated mainly by PI3K/Akt, hence this pathway may decisively contribute to the resistant phenotype. Many of the signalling pathways involved in cellular transformation have been elucidated and efforts are underway to develop treatment strategies that target these specific signalling molecules or their downstream effectors. The PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in many of the mechanisms targeted by these new drugs, thus a better understanding of this crossroad can help to fully exploit the potential benefits of these new agents. PMID:15023437

  17. Nutrient shortage triggers the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway via the GCN2-ATF4 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chaveroux, Cédric; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Barbet, Virginie; Belfeki, Sofiane; Barthelaix, Audrey; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Lebecque, Serge; Renno, Toufic; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Manié, Serge N.

    2016-01-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is a nutrient-sensing metabolic pathway that produces the activated amino sugar UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, a critical substrate for protein glycosylation. Despite its biological significance, little is known about the regulation of HBP flux during nutrient limitation. Here, we report that amino acid or glucose shortage increase GFAT1 production, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 is a transcriptional target of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) induced by the GCN2-eIF2α signalling pathway. The increased production of GFAT1 stimulates HBP flux and results in an increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ATF4 provides a link between nutritional stress and the HBP for the regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation-dependent cellular signalling. PMID:27255611

  18. Nutrient shortage triggers the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway via the GCN2-ATF4 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chaveroux, Cédric; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Barbet, Virginie; Belfeki, Sofiane; Barthelaix, Audrey; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Lebecque, Serge; Renno, Toufic; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Manié, Serge N

    2016-01-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is a nutrient-sensing metabolic pathway that produces the activated amino sugar UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, a critical substrate for protein glycosylation. Despite its biological significance, little is known about the regulation of HBP flux during nutrient limitation. Here, we report that amino acid or glucose shortage increase GFAT1 production, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 is a transcriptional target of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) induced by the GCN2-eIF2α signalling pathway. The increased production of GFAT1 stimulates HBP flux and results in an increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ATF4 provides a link between nutritional stress and the HBP for the regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation-dependent cellular signalling. PMID:27255611

  19. Effects of adhesive thickness on the Lamb wave pitch-catch signal using bonded piezoelectric wafer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. M.; Huang, H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of adhesive layer on Lamb wave ultrasound pitch-catch signals that are excited and sensed by piezoelectric wafer transducers bonded on a slender structure. Analytical models were established to simulate the longitudinal and flexural vibrations of the structures separately and parametric studies of the bonding layer properties, i.e. the shear transfer parameter, adhesive thickness, and shear modulus, were performed. The parametric studies indicate that there exists an optimal adhesive layer thickness that generates maximum ultrasound pitch-catch signal for both wave modes. This prediction was subsequently validated by measurements. In addition, an improved match between the measured and simulated pitch-catch signals was achieved by adjusting the adhesive layer parameters.

  20. Anti-metastatic treatment in colorectal cancer: targeting signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Clara; Sack, Ulrike; Schmid, Felicitas; Juneja, Manisha; Stein, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the Western world. Tumor progression towards metastasis affects a large number of patients with colorectal cancer and seriously affects their clinical outcome. Therefore, considerable effort has been made towards the development of therapeutic strategies that can decrease or prevent colorectal cancer metastasis. Standard treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with chemotherapy has been improved in the last 10 years by the addition of new targeted agents. The currently used antibodies bevacizumab, cetuximab and panitumumab target the VEGF and EGFR signaling pathways, which are crucial for tumor progression and metastasis. These antibodies have shown relevant efficacy in both first- and second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Additionally, other signaling pathways, including the Wnt and HGF/Met pathways, have a well-established role in colorectal cancer progression and metastasis and constitute, therefore, promising targets for new therapeutic approaches. Several new drugs targeting these pathways, including different antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, are currently being developed and tested in clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the new developments in this field, focusing on the inhibitors that show more promising results for use in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:22973955

  1. The sphingolipid salvage pathway in ceramide metabolism and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2008-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cells, many of which function as bioactive signaling molecules. Of these, ceramide is a central metabolite and plays key roles in a variety of cellular responses, including regulation of cell growth, viability, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramide is composed of the long-chain sphingoid base, sphingosine, in N-linkage to a variety of acyl groups. Sphingosine serves as the product of sphingolipid catabolism, and it is mostly salvaged through re-acylation, resulting in the generation of ceramide or its derivatives. This recycling of sphingosine is termed the “salvage pathway”, and recent evidence points to important roles for this pathway in ceramide metabolism and function. A number of enzymes are involved in the salvage pathway, and these include sphingomyelinases, cerebrosidases, ceramidases, and ceramide synthases. Recent studies suggest that the salvage pathway is not only subject to regulation, but it also modulates the formation of ceramide and subsequent ceramide-dependent cellular signals. This review focuses on the salvage pathway in ceramide metabolism, its regulation, its experimental analysis, and emerging biological functions. PMID:18191382

  2. Targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway in cancer: beyond Smoothened

    PubMed Central

    Gonnissen, Annelies; Isebaert, Sofie; Haustermans, Karin

    2015-01-01

    An essential role for Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in human cancer has been established beyond doubt. At present, targeting Hh signaling has mainly been investigated with SMO inhibitors. Unfortunately, resistance against currently used SMO inhibitors has already been observed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients. Therefore, the use of Hh inhibitors targeting the signaling cascade more downstream of SMO could represent a more promising strategy. Furthermore, besides the classical canonical way of Hh signaling activation, non-canonical activation of the GLI transcription factors by multiple important signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K, TGFβ) has also been described, pinpointing the importance of targeting the transcription factors GLI1/2. The most promising agent in this context is probably the GLI1/2 inhibitor GANT61 which has been investigated preclinically in numerous tumor types in the last few years. In this review, the emerging role of Hh signaling in cancer is critically evaluated focusing on the potential of targeting Hh signaling more downstream of SMO, i.e. at the level of the GLI transcription factors. Furthermore, the working mechanism and therapeutic potential of the most extensively studied GLI inhibitor in human cancer, i.e. GANT61, is discussed in detail. In conclusion, GANT61 appears to be highly effective against human cancer cells and in xenograft mouse models, targeting almost all of the classical hallmarks of cancer and could hence represent a promising treatment option for human cancer. PMID:26053182

  3. Color signals through dorsal and ventral visual pathways

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Explanations for color phenomena are often sought in the retina, LGN and V1, yet it is becoming increasingly clear that a complete account will take us further along the visual-processing pathway. Working out which areas are involved is not trivial. Responses to S-cone activation are often assumed to indicate that an area or neuron is involved in color perception. However, work tracing S-cone signals into extrastriate cortex has challenged this assumption: S-cone responses have been found in brain regions, such as MT, not thought to play a major role in color perception. Here we review the processing of S-cone signals across cortex and present original data on S-cone responses measured with fMRI in alert macaque, focusing on one area in which S-cone signals seem likely to contribute to color (V4/posterior inferior temporal cortex), and on one area in which S signals are unlikely to play a role in color (MT). We advance a hypothesis that the S-cone signals in color-computing areas are required to achieve a balanced neural representation of perceptual color space, while the S-cone signals in non-color-areas provide a cue to illumination (not luminance) and confer sensitivity to the chromatic contrast generated by natural daylight (shadows, illuminated by ambient sky, surrounded by direct sunlight). This sensitivity would facilitate the extraction of shape-from-shadow signals to benefit global scene analysis and motion perception. PMID:24103417

  4. Quantitative relationship among integrin-ligand binding, adhesion, and signaling via focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Asthagiri, A R; Nelson, C M; Horwitz, A F; Lauffenburger, D A

    1999-09-17

    ERK2. These measures of FAK and ERK2 activity were found to correlate with short term cell-substratum adhesivity, indicating that signaling via FAK and ERK2 is proportional to the number of integrin-fibronectin bonds. PMID:10480927

  5. From genotypes to phenotypes: classification of the tumour profiles for different variants of the cadherin adhesion pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Drasdo, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    The E-cadherin adhesive profile expressed by a tumour is a characterization of the intracellular and intercellular protein interactions that control cell-cell adhesion. Within the intracellular proteins that determine the tumour adhesive profile, Src and PI3 are two essentials to initiate the formation of the E-cadherin adhesion complex. On the other hand, Src has also the capability of disrupting the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex and down-regulating cell-cell adhesion. In this paper, using a multi-scale mathematical model, we study the role of each of these proteins in the adhesive profile and invasive properties of the tumour. To do this, we create three versions of an intracellular model that explains the interplay between the proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, Src and PI3; and we couple them to the strength of the cell-cell adhesion forces within an individual-cell-based model. The simulation results show how the tumour profile and its aggressive potential may change depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the protein pathways, and how these pathways may influence the early stages of cancer invasion. Our major findings may be summarized as follows. (1) Intermediate levels of Src synthesis rates generate the least invasive tumour phenotype. (2) Conclusions drawn from findings obtained from the intracellular molecular dynamics (here cadherin-catenin binding complexes) to the multi-cellular invasive potential of a tumour may be misleading or erroneous. The conclusions should be validated in a multi-cellular context on timescales relevant for population growth. (3) Monoclonal populations of more cohesive cells with otherwise equal properties tend to grow slower. (4) Less cohesive cells tend to outcompete more cohesive cells. (5) Less cohesive cells have a larger probability of invasion as migration forces can more easily outbalance cohesive forces.

  6. Multiplicity and plasticity of natural killer cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Sabrina; Mingueneau, Michael; Fuseri, Nicolas; Malissen, Bernard; Raulet, David H.; Malissen, Marie; Vivier, Eric; Tomasello, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express an array of activating receptors that associate with DAP12 (KARAP), CD3ζ, and/or FcRγ ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif)–bearing signaling subunits. In T and mast cells, ITAM-dependent signals are integrated by critical scaffolding elements such as LAT (linker for activation of T cells) and NTAL (non–T-cell activation linker). Using mice that are deficient for ITAM-bearing molecules, LAT or NTAL, we show that NK cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ secretion are initiated by ITAM-dependent and -independent as well as LAT/NTAL-dependent and -independent pathways. The role of these various signaling circuits depends on the target cell as well as on the activation status of the NK cell. The multiplicity and the plasticity of the pathways that initiate NK cell effector functions contrast with the situation in T cells and B cells and provide an explanation for the resiliency of NK cell effector functions to various pharmacologic inhibitors and genetic mutations in signaling molecules. PMID:16291591

  7. [Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway and regulation of inner ear development].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xin-Huan; Cao, Xin

    2013-09-01

    During inner ear development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is involved in the ventral otic identity, cell fate determination of statoacoustic ganglion neurons and hair cell development. Shh protein, secreted from floor plate, antagonizes Wnt protein from roof plate, which refines and maintains dorsoventral axial patterning in the ear. Shh, served as a mitogen during neurogenesis, directly promotes the development of spiral ganglion neuron. After Shh signaling pathway is activated, Ngn1 is freed from Tbx1 repression. As a result, Shh indirectly upregulates the expression of Ngn1, thus regulating neurogenic patterning of inner ear. In addition, Shh regulates the differentiation of hair cells by influencing cell cycle of the progenitor cells located in the cochlea. The basal-to-apical wave of Shh decline ensures the normal devel- opment pattern of hair cells. It is confirmed by a quantity of researches conducted in both animals and patients with hereditary hearing impairment that abnormal Shh signaling results in aberrant transcription of target genes, disturbance of the proper development of inner ear, and human hearing impairment. In humans, diseases accompanied by hearing disorders caused by abnormal Shh signaling include Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and medulloblastoma, etc. This review would provide a theoretical basis for further study of molecular mechanisms and clinical use of inner ear development. PMID:24400478

  8. Purmorphamine induces osteogenesis by activation of the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Walker, John; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Sheng; Schultz, Peter G

    2004-09-01

    Previously, a small molecule, purmorphamine, was identified that selectively induces osteogenesis in multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells. In order to gain insights into the mechanism of action of purmorphamine, high-density oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile gene expression in multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells treated with either purmorphamine or bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4). In contrast to BMP-4 treatment, purmorphamine activates the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, resulting in the up- and downregulation of its downstream target genes, including Gli1 and Patched. Moreover, the known Hh signaling antagonists, cyclopamine and forskolin, completely block the osteogenesis and Glimediated transcription induced by purmorphamine. These results demonstrate that purmorphamine is a small molecule agonist of Hedgehog signaling, and it may ultimately be useful in the treatment of bone-related disease and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:15380183

  9. Focal adhesions are foci for tyrosine-based signal transduction via GIV/Girdin and G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Lo, I-Chung; Kabir, Firooz; Midde, Krishna K.; Wang, Honghui; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    GIV/Girdin is a multimodular signal transducer and a bona fide metastasis-related protein. As a guanidine exchange factor (GEF), GIV modulates signals initiated by growth factors (chemical signals) by activating the G protein Gαi. Here we report that mechanical signals triggered by the extracellular matrix (ECM) also converge on GIV-GEF via β1 integrins and that focal adhesions (FAs) serve as the major hubs for mechanochemical signaling via GIV. GIV interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ligand-activated β1 integrins. Phosphorylation of GIV by FAK enhances PI3K-Akt signaling, the integrity of FAs, increases cell–ECM adhesion, and triggers ECM-induced cell motility. Activation of Gαi by GIV-GEF further potentiates FAK-GIV-PI3K-Akt signaling at the FAs. Spatially restricted signaling via tyrosine phosphorylated GIV at the FAs is enhanced during cancer metastasis. Thus GIV-GEF serves as a unifying platform for integration and amplification of adhesion (mechanical) and growth factor (chemical) signals during cancer progression. PMID:26446841

  10. HIV-1 gp120 induces cytokine expression, leukocyte adhesion, and transmigration across the blood-brain barrier: modulatory effects of STAT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Akhter, Sidra; Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2009-03-01

    How neuroinflammatory activities affect signaling pathways leading to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury during HIV/AIDS are currently unknown. Our previous work demonstrated that HIV-1 exposure activates pro-inflammatory genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and showed that these genes are linked to the janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway. Here, we report that HIV-1 gp120 protein activated STAT1 and induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion in HBMEC. IL-6, IL-8, and gp120 increased monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, prevented gp120-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Inhibitors of STAT1, mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) (PD98059), and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (LY294002), blocked gp120-induced STAT1 activation and significantly diminished IL-8-, IL-6-, and gp120-induced monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an important role in gp120-induced inflammation and BBB dysfunction associated with viral infection. Results also suggest crosstalk between STAT1, MEK, and PI3K pathways in gp120-induced BBB dysfunction. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to decrease neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction in HIV/AIDS. PMID:19103208

  11. Pentagone internalises glypicans to fine-tune multiple signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Mark; Vuilleumier, Robin; Springhorn, Alexander; Gawlik, Jennifer; Pyrowolakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Tight regulation of signalling activity is crucial for proper tissue patterning and growth. Here we investigate the function of Pentagone (Pent), a secreted protein that acts in a regulatory feedback during establishment and maintenance of BMP/Dpp morphogen signalling during Drosophila wing development. We show that Pent internalises the Dpp co-receptors, the glypicans Dally and Dally-like protein (Dlp), and propose that this internalisation is important in the establishment of a long range Dpp gradient. Pent-induced endocytosis and degradation of glypicans requires dynamin- and Rab5, but not clathrin or active BMP signalling. Thus, Pent modifies the ability of cells to trap and transduce BMP by fine-tuning the levels of the BMP reception system at the plasma membrane. In addition, and in accordance with the role of glypicans in multiple signalling pathways, we establish a requirement of Pent for Wg signalling. Our data propose a novel mechanism by which morphogen signalling is regulated. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13301.001 PMID:27269283

  12. Signaling Pathways Involved in Lunar Dust Induced Cytotoxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Zalesak, Selina; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans. One of the particular interests in the study is to evaluate dust-induced changes of the expression of fibrosis-related genes, and to identify specific signaling pathways involved in lunar dust-induced toxicity. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.1, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from the blood or lung tissue after being lavaged, using the Qigen RNeasy kit. The Rat Fibrosis RT2 Profile PCR Array was used to profile the expression of 84 genes relevant to fibrosis. The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using IPA pathway analysis tool to determine the signaling pathways with significant changes.

  13. Targeting the HGF/MET signalling pathway in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Fabiola; Rabe, Daniel C.; Bottaro, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Under normal conditions, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced activation of its cell surface receptor, the Met tyrosine kinase (TK), is tightly regulated by paracrine ligand delivery, ligand activation at the target cell surface, and ligand activated receptor internalization and degradation. Despite these controls, HGF/Met signaling contributes to oncogenesis and tumor progression in several cancers and promotes aggressive cellular invasiveness that is strongly linked to tumor metastasis. Area covered The prevalence of HGF/Met pathway activation in human malignancies has driven rapid growth in cancer drug development programs. The authors review Met structure and function, the basic properties of HGF/Met pathway antagonists now in preclinical and clinical development, as well as the latest clinical trial results. Expert opinion Clinical trials with HGF/Met pathway antagonists show that as a class these agents are well tolerated. Although widespread efficacy was not seen in several completed phase 2 studies, promising results have been reported in lung, gastric, prostate and papillary renal cancer patients treated with these agents. The main challenges facing the effective use of HGF/Met-targeted antagonists for cancer treatment are optimal patient selection, diagnostic and pharmacodynamic biomarker development, and the identification and testing of optimal therapy combinations. The wealth of basic information, analytical reagents and model systems available concerning HGF/Met oncogenic signaling will continue to be invaluable in meeting these challenges and moving expeditiously toward more effective disease control. PMID:22530990

  14. Signal transduction in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitor histidine-rich glycoprotein targets focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chunsik; Dixelius, Johan; Thulin, Asa; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Claesson-Welsh, Lena; Olsson, Anna-Karin . E-mail: Anna-Karin.Olsson@genpat.uu.se

    2006-08-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) is an abundant heparin-binding plasma protein. We have shown that a fragment released from the central histidine/proline-rich (His/Pro-rich) domain of HRGP blocks endothelial cell migration in vitro and vascularization and growth of murine fibrosarcoma in vivo. The minimal active HRGP domain exerting the anti-angiogenic effect was recently narrowed down to a 35 amino acid peptide, HRGP330, derived from the His/Pro-rich domain of HRGP. By use of a signal transduction antibody array representing 400 different signal transduction molecules, we now show that HRGP and the synthetic peptide HRGP330 specifically induce tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and its downstream substrate paxillin in endothelial cells. HRGP/HRGP330 treatment of endothelial cells induced disruption of actin stress fibers, a process reversed by treatment of cells with the FAK inhibitor geldanamycin. In addition, VEGF-mediated endothelial cell tubular morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was inhibited by HRGP and HRGP330. In contrast, VEGF-induced proliferation was not affected by HRGP or HRGP330, demonstrating the central role of cell migration during tube formation. In conclusion, our data show that HRGP targets focal adhesions in endothelial cells, thereby disrupting the cytoskeletal organization and the ability of endothelial cells to assemble into vessel structures.

  15. Muscle redox signalling pathways in exercise. Role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Mason, Shaun A; Morrison, Dale; McConell, Glenn K; Wadley, Glenn D

    2016-09-01

    Recent research highlights the importance of redox signalling pathway activation by contraction-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in normal exercise-related cellular and molecular adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this review, we discuss some potentially important redox signalling pathways in skeletal muscle that are involved in acute and chronic responses to contraction and exercise. Specifically, we discuss redox signalling implicated in skeletal muscle contraction force, mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant enzyme induction, glucose uptake and muscle hypertrophy. Furthermore, we review evidence investigating the impact of major exogenous antioxidants on these acute and chronic responses to exercise. Redox signalling pathways involved in adaptive responses in skeletal muscle to exercise are not clearly elucidated at present, and further research is required to better define important signalling pathways involved. Evidence of beneficial or detrimental effects of specific antioxidant compounds on exercise adaptations in muscle is similarly limited, particularly in human subjects. Future research is required to not only investigate effects of specific antioxidant compounds on skeletal muscle exercise adaptations, but also to better establish mechanisms of action of specific antioxidants in vivo. Although we feel it remains somewhat premature to make clear recommendations in relation to application of specific antioxidant compounds in different exercise settings, a bulk of evidence suggests that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is ergogenic through its effects on maintenance of muscle force production during sustained fatiguing events. Nevertheless, a current lack of evidence from studies using performance tests representative of athletic competition and a potential for adverse effects with high doses (>70mg/kg body mass) warrants caution in its use for performance enhancement. In addition, evidence implicates high dose vitamin C (1g/day) and E

  16. Notch Signaling Mediates the Age-Associated Decrease in Adhesion of Germline Stem Cells to the Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Wan, Chih-Ling; Cho, Yueh; Tung, Shu-Yun; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs), and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention) is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion. PMID:25521289

  17. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development. PMID:26757815

  18. Key gravity-sensitive signaling pathways drive T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Boonyaratanakornkit, J B; Cogoli, A; Li, C-F; Schopper, T; Pippia, P; Galleri, G; Meloni, M A; Hughes-Fulford, M

    2005-12-01

    Returning astronauts have experienced altered immune function and increased vulnerability to infection during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab. Lack of immune response in microgravity occurs at the cellular level. We analyzed differential gene expression to find gravity-dependent genes and pathways. We found inhibited induction of 91 genes in the simulated freefall environment of the random positioning machine. Altered induction of 10 genes regulated by key signaling pathways was verified using real-time RT-PCR. We discovered that impaired induction of early genes regulated primarily by transcription factors NF-kappaB, CREB, ELK, AP-1, and STAT after crosslinking the T-cell receptor contributes to T-cell dysfunction in altered gravity environments. We have previously shown that PKA and PKC are key early regulators in T-cell activation. Since the majority of the genes were regulated by NF-kappaB, CREB, and AP-1, we studied the pathways that regulated these transcription factors. We found that the PKA pathway was down-regulated in vg. In contrast, PI3-K, PKC, and its upstream regulator pLAT were not significantly down-regulated by vectorless gravity. Since NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB are all regulated by PKA and are transcription factors predicted by microarray analysis to be involved in the altered gene expression in vectorless gravity, the data suggest that PKA is a key player in the loss of T-cell activation in altered gravity. PMID:16210397

  19. Wnt signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J

    2014-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin alterations are prominent in human malignancies. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), β-catenin and APC mutations are uncommon, but Wnt signaling is important in NSCLC cell lines, and Wnt inhibition reduces proliferation. Overexpression of Wnt-1, -2, -3, and -5a and of Wnt-pathway components Frizzled-8, Dishevelled, Porcupine, and TCF-4 is common in resected NSCLC and is associated with poor prognosis. Conversely, noncanonical Wnt-7a suppresses NSCLC development and is often downregulated. Although β-catenin is often expressed in NSCLCs, it was paradoxically associated with improved prognosis in some series, possibly because of E-cadherin interactions. Downregulation of Wnt inhibitors (eg, by hypermethylation) is common in NSCLC tumor cell lines and resected samples; may be associated with high stage, dedifferentiation, and poor prognosis; and has been reported for AXIN, sFRPs 1-5, WIF-1, Dkk-1, Dkk-3, HDPR1, RUNX3, APC, CDX2, DACT2, TMEM88, Chibby, NKD1, EMX2, ING4, and miR-487b. AXIN is also destabilized by tankyrases, and GSK3β may be inactivated through phosphorylation by EGFR. Preclinically, restoration of Wnt inhibitor function is associated with reduced Wnt signaling, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Wnt signaling may also augment resistance to cisplatin, docetaxel, and radiotherapy, and Wnt inhibitors may restore sensitivity. Overall, available data indicate that Wnt signaling substantially impacts NSCLC tumorigenesis, prognosis, and resistance to therapy, with loss of Wnt signaling inhibitors by promoter hypermethylation or other mechanisms appearing to be particularly important. Wnt pathway antagonists warrant exploration clinically in NSCLC. Agents blocking selected specific β-catenin interactions and approaches to increase expression of downregulated Wnt inhibitors may be of particular interest. PMID:24309006

  20. Light-Mediated Remote Control of Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Priestman, Melanie A.; Lawrence, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cell signaling networks display an extraordinary range of temporal and spatial plasticity. Our programmatic approach focuses on the construction of intracellular probes, including sensors, inhibitors, and functionally unique proteins that can be temporally and spatially controlled by the investigator even after they have entered the cell. We have designed and evaluated protein kinase sensors that furnish a fluorescent readout upon phosphorylation. In addition, since the sensors are inert (i.e. cannot be phosphorylated) until activated by light, they can be carried through the various stages of any given cell-based behavior without being consumed. Using this strategy, we have shown that PKCβ is essential for nuclear envelope breakdown and thus the transition from prophase to metaphase in actively dividing cells. Photoactivatable proteins furnish the means to initiate cellular signaling pathways with a high degree of spatial and temporal control. We have used this approach to demonstrate that cofilin serves as a component of the steering apparatus of the cell. Finally, inhibitors are commonly used to assess the participation of specific enzymes in signaling pathways that control cellular behavior. We have constructed a photo-deactivatable inhibitor, an inhibitory species that can be switched off with light. In the absence of light, the target enzyme is inactive due to the presence of the potent inhibitory molecule. Upon photolysis, the inhibitory molecule is destroyed and enzymatic activity is released. PMID:19765679

  1. Distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Fleck, David; Mundt, Nadine; Bruentgens, Felicitas; Geilenkirchen, Petra; Machado, Patricia A; Veitinger, Thomas; Veitinger, Sophie; Lipartowski, Susanne M; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Oldiges, Marco; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogenesis ranks among the most complex, yet least understood, developmental processes. The physiological principles that control male germ cell development in mammals are notoriously difficult to unravel, given the intricate anatomy and complex endo- and paracrinology of the testis. Accordingly, we lack a conceptual understanding of the basic signaling mechanisms within the testis, which control the seminiferous epithelial cycle and thus govern spermatogenesis. Here, we address paracrine signal transduction in undifferentiated male germ cells from an electrophysiological perspective. We identify distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia, both in vitro and in situ. ATP-a dynamic, widespread, and evolutionary conserved mediator of cell to cell communication in various developmental contexts-activates at least two different spermatogonial purinoceptor isoforms. Both receptors operate within nonoverlapping stimulus concentration ranges, display distinct response kinetics and, in the juvenile seminiferous cord, are uniquely expressed in spermatogonia. We further find that spermatogonia express Ca(2+)-activated large-conductance K(+) channels that appear to function as a safeguard against prolonged ATP-dependent depolarization. Quantitative purine measurements additionally suggest testicular ATP-induced ATP release, a mechanism that could increase the paracrine radius of initially localized signaling events. Moreover, we establish a novel seminiferous tubule slice preparation that allows targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified testicular cell types in an intact epithelial environment. This unique approach not only confirms our in vitro findings, but also supports the notion of purinergic signaling during the early stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:27574293

  2. Parallel quorum sensing signaling pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah A; Hawver, Lisa A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial signaling process for monitoring population density and complexity. Communication among bacterial cells via QS relies on the production, secretion, and detection of small molecules called autoinducers. Many bacteria have evolved their QS systems with different network architectures to incorporate information from multiple signals. In the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, at least four parallel signaling pathways converge to control the activity of a single regulator to modulate its QS response. By integrating multiple signal inputs, it is believed that Vibrio species can survey intra-species, intra-genus, and inter-species populations and program their gene expression accordingly. Our recent studies suggest that this "many-to-one" circuitry is also important for maintaining the integrity of the input-output relationship of the system and minimizes premature commitment to QS due to signal perturbation. Here we discuss the implications of this specific parallel network setup for V. cholerae intercellular communication and how this system arrangement affects our approach to manipulate the QS response of this clinically important pathogen. PMID:26545759

  3. The Gq signalling pathway inhibits brown and beige adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Klepac, Katarina; Kilić, Ana; Gnad, Thorsten; Brown, Loren M.; Herrmann, Beate; Wilderman, Andrea; Balkow, Aileen; Glöde, Anja; Simon, Katharina; Lidell, Martin E.; Betz, Matthias J.; Enerbäck, Sven; Wess, Jürgen; Freichel, Marc; Blüher, Matthias; König, Gabi; Kostenis, Evi; Insel, Paul A.; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates nutritional energy as heat via the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) and BAT activity correlates with leanness in human adults. Here we profile G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in brown adipocytes to identify druggable regulators of BAT. Twenty-one per cent of the GPCRs link to the Gq family, and inhibition of Gq signalling enhances differentiation of human and murine brown adipocytes. In contrast, activation of Gq signalling abrogates brown adipogenesis. We further identify the endothelin/Ednra pathway as an autocrine activator of Gq signalling in brown adipocytes. Expression of a constitutively active Gq protein in mice reduces UCP1 expression in BAT, whole-body energy expenditure and the number of brown-like/beige cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Furthermore, expression of Gq in human WAT inversely correlates with UCP1 expression. Thus, our data indicate that Gq signalling regulates brown/beige adipocytes and inhibition of Gq signalling may be a novel therapeutic approach to combat obesity. PMID:26955961

  4. The Lophotrochozoan TGF-β signalling cassette - diversification and conservation in a key signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Nathan J; Namigai, Erica K O; Dearden, Peter K; Hui, Jerome H L; Grande, Cristina; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β signalling plays a key role in the patterning of metazoan body plans and growth. It is widely regarded as a 'module' capable of co-option into novel functions. The TGF-β pathway arose in the Metazoan lineage, and while it is generally regarded as well conserved across evolutionary time, its components have been largely studied in the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. The recent discovery of the Nodal molecule in molluscs has underlined the necessity of untangling this signalling network in lophotrochozoans in order to truly comprehend the evolution, conservation and diversification of this key pathway. Three novel genome resources, the mollusc Patella vulgata, annelid Pomatoceros lamarcki and rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, along with other publicly available data, were searched for the presence of TGF-β pathway genes. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses, along with some consideration of conserved domain structure, was used to confirm gene identity. Analysis revealed conservation of key components within the canonical pathway, allied with extensive diversification of TGF-β ligands and partial loss of genes encoding pathway inhibitors in some lophotrochozoan lineages. We fully describe the TGF-β signalling cassette of a range of lophotrochozoans, allowing firm inference to be drawn as to the ancestral state of this pathway in this Superphylum. The TGF-β signalling cascade's reputation as being highly conserved across the Metazoa is reinforced. Diversification within the activin-like complement, as well as potential wide loss of regulatory steps in some Phyla, hint at specific evolutionary implications for aspects of this cascade's functionality in this Superphylum. PMID:25690968

  5. Defects in Cytoskeletal Signaling Pathways, Arrhythmia, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sakima; Curran, Jerry; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Ankyrin polypeptides are cellular adapter proteins that tether integral membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton in a host of human organs. Initially identified as integral components of the cytoskeleton in erythrocytes, a recent explosion in ankyrin research has demonstrated that these proteins play prominent roles in cytoskeletal signaling pathways and membrane protein trafficking/regulation in a variety of excitable and non-excitable cells including heart and brain. Importantly, ankyrin research has translated from bench to bedside with the discovery of human gene variants associated with ventricular arrhythmias that alter ankyrin–based pathways. Ankyrin polypeptides have also been found to play an instrumental role in various forms of sinus node disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). Mouse models of ankyrin-deficiency have played fundamental roles in the translation of ankyrin-based research to new clinical understanding of human sinus node disease, AF, and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:22586405

  6. Crosstalk between pathways enhances the controllability of signalling networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingjie; Jin, Suoqin; Zou, Xiufen

    2016-02-01

    The control of complex networks is one of the most challenging problems in the fields of biology and engineering. In this study, the authors explored the controllability and control energy of several signalling networks, which consisted of many interconnected pathways, including networks with a bow-tie architecture. On the basis of the theory of structure controllability, they revealed that biological mechanisms, such as cross-pathway interactions, compartmentalisation and so on make the networks easier to fully control. Furthermore, using numerical simulations for two realistic examples, they demonstrated that the control energy of normal networks with crosstalk is lower than in networks without crosstalk. These results indicate that the biological networks are optimally designed to achieve their normal functions from the viewpoint of the control theory. The authors' work provides a comprehensive understanding of the impact of network structures and properties on controllability. PMID:26816393

  7. Assembling the Puzzle: Pathways of Oxytocin Signaling in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Grinevich, Valery; Knobloch-Bollmann, H Sophie; Eliava, Marina; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice

    2016-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide, which can be seen to be one of the molecules of the decade due to its profound prosocial effects in nonvertebrate and vertebrate species, including humans. Although OT can be detected in various physiological fluids (blood, saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid) and brain tissue, it is unclear whether peripheral and central OT releases match and synergize. Moreover, the pathways of OT delivery to brain regions involved in specific behaviors are far from clear. Here, we discuss the evolutionarily and ontogenetically determined pathways of OT delivery and OT signaling, which orchestrate activity of the mesolimbic social decision-making network. Furthermore, we speculate that both the alteration in OT delivery and OT receptor expression may cause behavioral abnormalities in patients afflicted with psychosocial diseases. PMID:26001309

  8. Biology and significance of the JAK/STAT signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kiu, Hiu; Nicholson, Sandra E

    2013-01-01

    Since its discovery two decades ago, the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway by numerous cytokines and growth factors has resulted in it becoming one of the most well studied intracellular signalling networks. The field has progressed from the identification of the individual components, to high-resolution crystal structures of both JAK and STAT, and an understanding of the complexities of the molecular activation and deactivation cycle which results in a diverse, yet highly specific and regulated pattern of transcriptional responses. While there is still more to learn, we now appreciate how disruption and de-regulation of this pathway can result in clinical disease and look forward to adoption of the next generation of JAK inhibitors in routine clinical treatment. PMID:22339650

  9. Integrated analysis of breast cancer cell lines reveals unique signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, Laura M.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Talcott, Carolyn L.; Laderoute, Keith R.; Knapp, Merrill; Guan, Yinghui; Hu, Zhi; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Weber, Barbara L.; Laquerre, Sylvie; Jackson, Jeffrey R.; Wooster, Richard F.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2009-03-31

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease resulting from the accumulation of genetic defects that negatively impact control of cell division, motility, adhesion and apoptosis. Deregulation in signaling along the EGFR-MAPK pathway is common in breast cancer, though the manner in which deregulation occurs varies between both individuals and cancer subtypes. We were interested in identifying subnetworks within the EGFR-MAPK pathway that are similarly deregulated across subsets of breast cancers. To that end, we mapped genomic, transcriptional and proteomic profiles for 30 breast cancer cell lines onto a curated Pathway Logic symbolic systems model of EGFR-MEK signaling. This model was comprised of 539 molecular states and 396 rules governing signaling between active states. We analyzed these models and identified several subtype specific subnetworks, including one that suggested PAK1 is particularly important in regulating the MAPK cascade when it is over-expressed. We hypothesized that PAK1 overexpressing cell lines would have increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. We tested this experimentally by measuring quantitative responses of 20 breast cancer cell lines to three MEK inhibitors. We found that PAK1 over-expressing luminal breast cancer cell lines are significantly more sensitive to MEK inhibition as compared to those that express PAK1 at low levels. This indicates that PAK1 over-expression may be a useful clinical marker to identify patient populations that may be sensitive to MEK inhibitors. All together, our results support the utility of symbolic system biology models for identification of therapeutic approaches that will be effective against breast cancer subsets.

  10. Biphasic Role of Calcium in Mouse Sperm Capacitation Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alvau, Antonio; Escoffier, Jessica; Krapf, Dario; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Salicioni, Ana M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilizing ability in the female tract in a process known as capacitation. At the molecular level, capacitation is associated with up-regulation of a cAMP-dependent pathway, changes in intracellular pH, intracellular Ca2+ and an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. How these signaling systems interact during capacitation is not well understood. Results presented in this study indicate that Ca2+ ions have a biphasic role in the regulation of cAMP-dependent signaling. Media without added Ca2+ salts (nominal zero Ca2+) still contain micromolar concentrations of this ion. Sperm incubated in this medium did not undergo PKA activation or the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting that these phosphorylation pathways require Ca2+. However, chelation of the extracellular Ca2+ traces by EGTA induced both cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. The EGTA effect in nominal zero Ca2+ media was mimicked by two calmodulin antagonists, W7 and calmidazolium, and by the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A. These results suggest that Ca2+ ions regulate sperm cAMP and tyrosine phosphorylation pathways in a biphasic manner and that some of its effects are mediated by calmodulin. Interestingly, contrary to wild type mouse sperm, sperm from CatSper1 KO mice underwent PKA activation and an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation upon incubation in nominal zero Ca2+ media. Therefore, sperm lacking Catsper Ca2+ channels behave as wild-type sperm incubated in the presence of EGTA. This latter result suggests that Catsper transports the Ca2+ involved in the regulation of cAMP-dependent and tyrosine phosphorylation pathways required for sperm capacitation. PMID:25597298

  11. [Low-dose radiation effects and intracellular signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-10-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that exposure to low-dose radiation, especially doses less than 0.1 Gy, induces observable effects on mammalian cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Recently, it has been shown that low-dose radiation stimulates growth factor receptor, which results in a sequential activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In addition to the activation of the membrane-bound pathways, it is becoming evident that nuclear pathways are also activated by low-dose radiation. Ionizing radiation has detrimental effects on chromatin structure, since radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks result in discontinuity of nucleosomes. Recently, it has been shown that ATM protein, the product of the ATM gene mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, recognizes alteration in the chromatin structure, and it is activated through intermolecular autophosphorylation at serine 1981. Using antibodies against phosphorylated ATM, we found that the activated and phosphorylated ATM protein is detected as discrete foci in the nucleus between doses of 10 mGy and 1 Gy. Interestingly, the size of the foci induced by low-dose radiation was equivalent to the foci induced by high-dose radiation. These results indicate that the initial signal is amplified through foci growth, and cells evolve a system by which they can respond to a small number of DNA double-strand breaks. From these results, it can be concluded that low-dose radiation is sensed both in the membrane and in the nucleus, and activation of multiple signal transduction pathways could be involved in manifestations of low-dose effects. PMID:17016017

  12. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  13. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Sapharikas, Elene; Lokajczyk, Anna; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic beads from peripheral blood of healthy donors were treated with fucoidan. Fucoidan induced a 1.5-fold increase in monocyte adhesion to gelatin (p < 0.05) and a five-fold increase in chemotaxis in Boyden chambers (p < 0.05). Fucoidan also enhanced migration 2.5-fold in a transmigration assay (p < 0.05). MMP9 activity in monocyte supernatants was significantly enhanced by fucoidan (p < 0.05). Finally, Western blot analysis of fucoidan-treated monocytes showed upregulation of ERK/p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK/p38 phosphorylation abrogated fucoidan enhancement of migration (p < 0.01). Fucoidan displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte adhesion and migration. These effects involve the ERK and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. Fucoidan could improve critical limb ischemia by promoting monocyte recruitment. PMID:26133555

  14. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sapharikas, Elene; Lokajczyk, Anna; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic beads from peripheral blood of healthy donors were treated with fucoidan. Fucoidan induced a 1.5-fold increase in monocyte adhesion to gelatin (p < 0.05) and a five-fold increase in chemotaxis in Boyden chambers (p < 0.05). Fucoidan also enhanced migration 2.5-fold in a transmigration assay (p < 0.05). MMP9 activity in monocyte supernatants was significantly enhanced by fucoidan (p < 0.05). Finally, Western blot analysis of fucoidan-treated monocytes showed upregulation of ERK/p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK/p38 phosphorylation abrogated fucoidan enhancement of migration (p < 0.01). Fucoidan displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte adhesion and migration. These effects involve the ERK and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. Fucoidan could improve critical limb ischemia by promoting monocyte recruitment. PMID:26133555

  15. Modulation of adhesion-dependent cAMP signaling by echistatin and alendronate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, J. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We measured intracellular cAMP levels in cells during attachment and spreading on different extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Increases in cAMP were observed within minutes when cells attached to fibronectin, vitronectin, and a synthetic RGD-containing fibronectin peptide (Petite 2000), but not when they adhered to another integrin alpha nu beta 3 ligand, echistatin. Because echistatin also inhibits bone resorption, we measured the effects of adding another osteoporosis inhibitor, alendronate, in this system. Alendronate inhibited the cAMP increase induced by ligands that primarily utilize integrin alpha nu beta 3 (vitronectin, Peptite 2000), but not by fibronectin which can also use integrin alpha 5 beta 1. These results show that cell adhesion to ECM can increase intracellular cAPM levels and raise the possibility that inhibitors of osteoporosis may act, in part, by preventing activation of this pathway by integrins.

  16. Signaling pathways mediating chemotaxis in the social amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Willard, Stacey S; Devreotes, Peter N

    2006-09-01

    Chemotaxis, or cell migration guided by chemical cues, is critical for a multitude of biological processes in a diverse array of organisms. Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae rely on chemotaxis to find food and to survive starvation conditions, and we have taken advantage of this system to study the molecular regulation of this vital cell behavior. Previous work has identified phosphoinositide signaling as one mechanism which may contribute to directional sensing and actin polymerization during chemotaxis; a mechanism which is conserved in mammalian neutrophils. In this review, we will discuss recent data on genes and pathways governing directional sensing and actin polymerization, with a particular emphasis on contributions from our laboratory. PMID:16962888

  17. Multiparticle collision dynamics for diffusion-influenced signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehl, R.; Rohlf, K.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient yet accurate simulation method for modeling diffusion-influenced reaction networks is presented. The method extends existing reactive multiparticle collision dynamics by incorporating species-dependent diffusion coefficients, and developing theoretical expressions for the reactant-dependent diffusion control. This off-lattice particle-based mesoscopic simulation tool is particularly suited for problems in which detailed descriptions of particle trajectories and local reactions are required. Numerical simulations of an intracellular signaling pathway for bacterial chemotaxis are carried out to validate our approach, and to demonstrate its efficiency.

  18. To build a synapse: signaling pathways in neuromuscular junction assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Synapses, as fundamental units of the neural circuitry, enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse type that forms between motoneurons and skeletal muscle fibers and that exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization. Aided by genetic techniques and suitable animal models, studies in the past decade have brought significant progress in identifying NMJ components and assembly mechanisms. This review highlights recent advances in the study of NMJ development, focusing on signaling pathways that are activated by diffusible cues, which shed light on synaptogenesis in the brain and contribute to a better understanding of muscular dystrophy. PMID:20215342

  19. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  20. Pericytes of the neurovascular unit: key functions and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Ayyadurai, Shiva; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-05-26

    Pericytes are vascular mural cells embedded in the basement membrane of blood microvessels. They extend their processes along capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles and post-capillary venules. CNS pericytes are uniquely positioned in the neurovascular unit between endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons. They integrate, coordinate and process signals from their neighboring cells to generate diverse functional responses that are critical for CNS functions in health and disease, including regulation of the blood-brain barrier permeability, angiogenesis, clearance of toxic metabolites, capillary hemodynamic responses, neuroinflammation and stem cell activity. Here we examine the key signaling pathways between pericytes and their neighboring endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons that control neurovascular functions. We also review the role of pericytes in CNS disorders including rare monogenic diseases and complex neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and brain tumors. Finally, we discuss directions for future studies. PMID:27227366

  1. Loss of Modifier of Cell Adhesion Reveals a Pathway Leading to Axonal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Peto, Charles A.; Shelton, G. Diane; Mizisin, Andrew; Sawchenko, Paul E.; Schubert, David

    2009-01-01

    Axonal dysfunction is the major phenotypic change in many neurodegenerative diseases, but the processes underlying this impairment are not clear. Modifier of cell adhesion (MOCA) is a presenilin binding protein that functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. The loss of MOCA in mice leads to axonal degeneration and causes sensorimotor impairments by decreasing cofilin phosphorylation and altering its upstream signaling partners LIM kinase and p21-activated kinase, an enzyme directly downstream of Rac1. The dystrophic axons found in MOCA-deficient mice are associated with abnormal aggregates of neurofilament protein, the disorganization of the axonal cytoskeleton, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, MOCA deficiency causes an alteration in the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of cofilin-containing rod-like structures. The dystrophic axons show functional abnormalities, including impaired axonal transport. These findings demonstrate that MOCA is required for maintaining the functional integrity of axons and define a model for the steps leading to axonal degeneration. PMID:19129390

  2. Hypergravity Stimulates Osteoblast Proliferation Via Matrix-Integrin-Signaling Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, W.; Parra, M.; Roden, C.; DaCosta, M.; Wing, A.; Damsky, C.; Holton, E.; Searby, N.; Globus, R.; Almeida, E.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive characterizations of the physiologic consequences of microgravity and gravity indicate that lack of weight-bearing may cause tissue atrophy through cellular and subcellular level mechanisms. We hypothesize that gravity is needed for the efficient transduction of cell growth and survival signals from the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in mechanosensitive tissues. Recent work from our laboratory and from others shows that an increase of gravity increases bone cell growth and survival. We found that 50-g hypergravity stimulation increased osteoblast proliferation for cells grown on Collagen Type I and Fibronectin, but not on Laminin or uncoated plastic. This may be a tissue-specific response, because 50-g hypergravity stimulation caused no increase in proliferation for primary rat fibroblasts. These results combined with RT-PCR for all possible integrins indicate that beta1 integrin subunit may be involved. The osteoblast proliferation response on Collagen Type I was greater at 25-g than at 10-g or 50-g; 24-h duration of hypergravity was necessary to see an increase in proliferation. Survival was enhanced during hypergravity stimulation by the presence of matrix. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that cell cycle may be altered; BrdU incorporation in proliferating cells showed an increase in the number of actively dividing cells from about 60% at 1-g to over 90% at 25-g. To further investigate the molecular components involved, we applied fluorescence labeling of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules to cells after 2 to 30 minutes of hypergravity stimulation. While structural components did not appear to be altered, phosphorylation increased, indicating that signaling pathways may be activated. These data indicate that gravity mechanostimulation of osteoblast proliferation involves specific matrix-integrin signaling pathways which are sensitive to duration and g-level.

  3. Elucidation of functional consequences of signalling pathway interactions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A great deal of data has accumulated on signalling pathways. These large datasets are thought to contain much implicit information on their molecular structure, interaction and activity information, which provides a picture of intricate molecular networks believed to underlie biological functions. While tremendous advances have been made in trying to understand these systems, how information is transmitted within them is still poorly understood. This ever growing amount of data demands we adopt powerful computational techniques that will play a pivotal role in the conversion of mined data to knowledge, and in elucidating the topological and functional properties of protein - protein interactions. Results A computational framework is presented which allows for the description of embedded networks, and identification of common shared components thought to assist in the transmission of information within the systems studied. By employing the graph theories of network biology - such as degree distribution, clustering coefficient, vertex betweenness and shortest path measures - topological features of protein-protein interactions for published datasets of the p53, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and G1/S phase of the cell cycle systems were ascertained. Highly ranked nodes which in some cases were identified as connecting proteins most likely responsible for propagation of transduction signals across the networks were determined. The functional consequences of these nodes in the context of their network environment were also determined. These findings highlight the usefulness of the framework in identifying possible combination or links as targets for therapeutic responses; and put forward the idea of using retrieved knowledge on the shared components in constructing better organised and structured models of signalling networks. Conclusion It is hoped that through the data mined reconstructed signal transduction networks, well developed models of the

  4. Signalling pathways mediating inflammatory responses in brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Gorina, R; Chamorro, A

    2006-12-01

    Stroke causes neuronal necrosis and generates inflammation. Pro-inflammatory molecules intervene in this process by triggering glial cell activation and leucocyte infiltration to the injured tissue. Cytokines are major mediators of the inflammatory response. Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released in the ischaemic brain. Anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10, promote cell survival, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha), can induce cell death. However, deleterious effects of certain cytokines can turn to beneficial actions, depending on particular features such as the concentration, time point and the very intricate network of intracellular signals that become activated and interact. A key player in the intracellular response to cytokines is the JAK (Janus kinase)/STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that induces alterations in the pattern of gene transcription. These changes are associated either with cell death or survival depending, among other things, on the specific proteins involved. STAT1 activation is related to cell death, whereas STAT3 activation is often associated with survival. Yet, it is clear that STAT activation must be tightly controlled, and for this reason the function of JAK/STAT modulators, such as SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) and PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT), and phosphatases is most relevant. Besides local effects in the ischaemic brain, cytokines are released to the circulation and affect the immune system. Unbalanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory plasma cytokine concentrations favouring an 'anti-inflammatory' state can decrease the immune response. Robust evidence now supports that stroke can induce an immunodepression syndrome, increasing the risk of infection. The contribution of individual cytokines and their intracellular signalling pathways to this response needs to be further investigated

  5. Loss of MLCK leads to disruption of cell-cell adhesion and invasive behavior of breast epithelial cells via increased expression of EGFR and ERK/JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Helfman, D M

    2016-08-25

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression is downregulated in breast cancer, including invasive ductal carcinoma compared with ductal breast carcinoma in situ and metastatic breast tumors. However, little is known about how loss of MLCK expression contributes to tumor progression. MLCK is a component of the actin cytoskeleton and its known role is the phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of myosin II. To gain insights into the role of MLCK in breast cancer, we perturbed its function using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or pharmacological inhibition in untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). Loss of MLCK by siRNAs led to increased cell migration and invasion, disruption of cell-cell adhesions and enhanced formation of focal adhesions at the leading edge of migratory cells. In addition, downregulation of MLCK cooperated with HER2 in MCF10A cells to promote cell migration and invasion and low levels of MLCK is associated with a poor prognosis in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Associated with these altered migratory behaviors were increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways in MLCK downregulated MCF10A cells. By contrast, inhibition of the kinase function of MLCK using pharmacological agents inhibited cell migration and invasion, and did not affect cellular adhesions. Our results show that loss of MLCK contributes to the migratory properties of epithelial cells resulting from changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, and increased epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings suggest that decreased expression of MLCK may have a critical role during tumor progression by facilitating the metastatic potential of tumor cells. PMID:26876209

  6. Signal transduction pathways mediated by PECAM-1: new roles for an old molecule in platelet and vascular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 [CD31])-deficient mice have revealed that this molecule plays an important role in controlling the activation and survival of cells on which it is expressed. In this review, we focus on the complex cytoplasmic domain of PECAM-1 and describe what is presently known about its structure, posttranslational modifications, and binding partners. In addition, we summarize findings that implicate PECAM-1 as an inhibitor of cellular activation via protein tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling pathways, an activator of integrins, and a suppressor of cell death via pathways that depend on damage to the mitochondria. The challenge of future research will be to bridge our understanding of the functional and biochemical properties of PECAM-1 by establishing mechanistic links between signals transduced by the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain and discrete cellular responses. PMID:12689916

  7. From uncertainty to reward: BOLD characteristics differentiate signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Reward value and uncertainty are represented by dopamine neurons in monkeys by distinct phasic and tonic firing rates. Knowledge about the underlying differential dopaminergic pathways is crucial for a better understanding of dopamine-related processes. Using functional magnetic resonance blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging we analyzed brain activation in 15 healthy, male subjects performing a gambling task, upon expectation of potential monetary rewards at different reward values and levels of uncertainty. Results Consistent with previous studies, ventral striatal activation was related to both reward magnitudes and values. Activation in medial and lateral orbitofrontal brain areas was best predicted by reward uncertainty. Moreover, late BOLD responses relative to trial onset were due to expectation of different reward values and likely to represent phasic dopaminergic signaling. Early BOLD responses were due to different levels of reward uncertainty and likely to represent tonic dopaminergic signals. Conclusions We conclude that differential dopaminergic signaling as revealed in animal studies is not only represented locally by involvement of distinct brain regions but also by distinct BOLD signal characteristics. PMID:20028546

  8. Aspirin Promotes Oligodendroglial Differentiation Through Inhibition of Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nanxin; Chen, Dong; Wu, Xiyan; Chen, Xianjun; Zhang, Xuesi; Niu, Jianqin; Shen, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin, one of the most commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, has been recently reported to display multiple effects in the central nervous system (CNS), including neuroprotection and upregulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression in astrocytes. Although it was most recently reported that aspirin could promote the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) after white matter lesion, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To dissect the effects of aspirin on oligodendroglial development and explore possible mechanisms, we here demonstrated the following: (i) in vitro treatment of aspirin on OPC cultures significantly increased the number of differentiated oligodendrocytes (OLs) but had no effect on the number of proliferative OPCs, indicating that aspirin can promote OPC differentiation but not proliferation; (ii) in vivo treatment of aspirin on neonatal (P3) rats for 4 days led to a nearly twofold increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), devoid of change in OPC proliferaion, in the corpus callosum (CC); (iii) finally, aspirin treatment increased the phosphorylation level of β-catenin and counteracted Wnt signaling pathway synergist QS11-induced suppression on OPC differentiation. Together, our data show that aspirin can directly target oligodendroglial lineage cells and promote their differentiation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings suggest that aspirin may be a novel candidate for the treatment of demyelinating diseases. PMID:26059811

  9. Signaling pathway cross talk in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest energy failure and accumulative intracellular waste play a causal role in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in particular. AD is characterized by extracellular amyloid deposits, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, cholinergic deficits, synaptic loss, inflammation and extensive oxidative stress. These pathobiological changes are accompanied by significant behavioral, motor, and cognitive impairment leading to accelerated mortality. Currently, the potential role of several metabolic pathways associated with AD, including Wnt signaling, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1, silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α (PGC-1α) have widened, with recent discoveries that they are able to modulate several pathological events in AD. These include reduction of amyloid-β aggregation and inflammation, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, and increased availability of neuronal energy. This review aims to highlight the involvement of these new set of signaling pathways, which we have collectively termed “anti-ageing pathways”, for their potentiality in multi-target therapies against AD where cellular metabolic processes are severely impaired. PMID:24679124

  10. Liver Stem Cells and Molecular Signaling Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kitisin, Krit; Pishvaian, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers. Surgical intervention is the only curative option, with only a small fraction of patients being eligible. Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy have not been effective in treating this disease, thus leaving patients with an extremely poor prognosis. In viral, alcoholic, and other chronic hepatitis, it has been shown that there is an activation of the progenitor/stem cell population, which has been found to reside in the canals of Hering. In fact, the degree of inflammation and the disease stage have been correlated with the degree of activation. Dysregulation of key regulatory signaling pathways such as transforming growth factor-beta/transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TGF-β/TBR), insulin-like growth factor/IGF-1 receptor (IGF/IGF-1R), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/MET), Wnt/β-catenin/FZD, and transforming growth factor-α/epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α/EGFR) in this progenitor/stem cell population could give rise to HCC. Further understanding of these key signaling pathways and the molecular and genetic alterations associated with HCC could provide major advances in new therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. PMID:19360142

  11. Early signalling pathways in rice roots under vanadate stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Wen; Lin, Chung-Yi; Chang, Ching-Chun; Lee, Ruey-Hua; Tsai, Tsung-Mu; Chen, Po-Yu; Chi, Wen-Chang; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2009-05-01

    Vanadate is beneficial to plant growth at low concentration. However, plant exposure to high concentrations of vanadate has been shown to arrest cell growth and lead to cell death. We are interested in understanding the signalling pathways of rice roots in response to vanadate stress. In this study, we demonstrated that vanadate induced rice root cell death and suppressed root growth. In addition, we found that vanadate induced ROS accumulation, increased lipid peroxidation and elicited a remarkable increase of MAPKs and CDPKs activities in rice roots. In contrast, pre-treatment of rice roots with ROS scavenger (sodium benzoate), serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor (endothall), and CDPK antagonist (W7), reduced the vanadate-induced MAPKs activation. Furthermore, the expression of a MAPK gene (OsMPK3) and four tyrosine phosphatase genes (OsDSP3, OsDSP5, OsDSP6, and OsDSP10) were regulated by vanadate in rice roots. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that ROS, protein phosphatase, and CDPK may function in the vanadate-triggered MAPK signalling pathway cause cell death and retarded growth in rice roots. PMID:19250836

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 in Wnt signaling pathway and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Muñoz, Nydia; Robles-Flores, Martha

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) was first discovered in 1980 as one of the key enzymes of glycogen metabolism. Since then, GSK-3 has been revealed as one of the master regulators of a diverse range of signaling pathways, including those activated by Wnts, participating in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, suggesting that its activity is tightly regulated. Numerous studies have pointed to an association of GSK-3 dysregulation with the onset and progression of human diseases, including diabetes mellitus, obesity, inflammation, neurological illnesses, and cancer. Therefore, GSK-3 is recognized as an attractive therapeutic target in multiple disorders. However, the great number of substrates that are phosphorylated by GSK-3 has raised the question of whether this limits its feasibility as a therapeutic target because of the potential disruption of many cellular processes and also by the fear that inhibition of GSK-3 may stimulate or aid in malignant transformation, as GSK-3 can phosphorylate pro-oncogenic factors. This mini review focuses on the role played by GSK-3 in Wnt signaling pathway and cancer using as model colon cancer. PMID:26600003

  13. Text mining for metabolic pathways, signaling cascades, and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Robert; Krallinger, Martin; Andres, Eduardo; Tamames, Javier; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-05-10

    The complexity of the information stored in databases and publications on metabolic and signaling pathways, the high throughput of experimental data, and the growing number of publications make it imperative to provide systems to help the researcher navigate through these interrelated information resources. Text-mining methods have started to play a key role in the creation and maintenance of links between the information stored in biological databases and its original sources in the literature. These links will be extremely useful for database updating and curation, especially if a number of technical problems can be solved satisfactorily, including the identification of protein and gene names (entities in general) and the characterization of their types of interactions. The first generation of openly accessible text-mining systems, such as iHOP (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins), provides additional functions to facilitate the reconstruction of protein interaction networks, combine database and text information, and support the scientist in the formulation of novel hypotheses. The next challenge is the generation of comprehensive information regarding the general function of signaling pathways and protein interaction networks. PMID:15886388

  14. A divergent canonical WNT-signaling pathway regulates microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Krylova, Olga; Smalley, Matthew J.; Dale, Trevor C.; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2004-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) is associated with axonal microtubules and regulates microtubule stability through the inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In the canonical WNT pathway, the negative regulator Axin forms a complex with β-catenin and GSK-3β, resulting in β-catenin degradation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by DVL increases β-catenin stability and TCF transcriptional activation. Here, we show that Axin associates with microtubules and unexpectedly stabilizes microtubules through DVL. In turn, DVL stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting GSK-3β through a transcription- and β-catenin–independent pathway. More importantly, axonal microtubules are stabilized after DVL localizes to axons. Increased microtubule stability is correlated with a decrease in GSK-3β–mediated phosphorylation of MAP-1B. We propose a model in which Axin, through DVL, stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting a pool of GSK-3β, resulting in local changes in the phosphorylation of cellular targets. Our data indicate a bifurcation in the so-called canonical WNT-signaling pathway to regulate microtubule stability. PMID:14734535

  15. Promotion of Dental Pulp Cell Migration and Pulp Repair by a Bioceramic Putty Involving FGFR-mediated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhu, L X; Cheng, X; Lin, Y; Yan, P; Peng, B

    2015-06-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate is the currently recommended material of choice for clinical pulp repair despite several disadvantages, including handling inconvenience. Little is known about the signaling mechanisms involved in bioceramic-mediated dental pulp repair-particularly, dental pulp cell (DPC) migration. This study evaluated the effects of iRoot BP Plus, a novel ready-to-use nanoparticulate bioceramic putty, on DPC migration in vitro and pulp repair in vivo, focusing on possible involvement of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-related signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways. Treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts enhanced horizontal and vertical migration of DPCs, which was comparable with the effects induced by mineral trioxide aggregate extracts. The DPCs exposed to iRoot BP Plus extracts demonstrated no evident apoptosis. Importantly, treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts resulted in rapid activation of FGFR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Akt signaling in DPCs. Confocal immunofluorescence staining revealed that iRoot BP Plus stimulated focal adhesion formation and stress fiber assembly in DPCs, in addition to upregulating the expression of focal adhesion molecules, including p-focal adhesion kinase, p-paxillin, and vinculin. Moreover, activation of FGFR, ERK, JNK, and Akt were found to mediate the upregulated expression of focal adhesion molecules, stress fiber assembly, and enhanced DPC migration induced by iRoot BP Plus. Consistent with the in vitro results, we observed induction of homogeneous dentin bridge formation and expression of p-focal adhesion kinase, p-FGFR, p-ERK 1/2, p-JNK, and p-Akt near injury sites by iRoot BP Plus in an in vivo pulp repair model. These data demonstrate that iRoot BP Plus can promote DPC migration and pulp repair involving the FGFR-mediated ERK 1/2, JNK, and Akt pathways. These findings provide

  16. MUC16 contributes to the metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through focal adhesion mediated signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Seema; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Gupta, Suprit; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Smith, Lynette M.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2016-01-01

    MUC16, a heavily glycosylated type-I transmembrane mucin is overexpressed in several cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Previously, we have shown that MUC16 is significantly overexpressed in human PDAC tissues. However, the functional consequences and its role in PDAC is poorly understood. Here, we show that MUC16 knockdown decreases PDAC cell proliferation, colony formation and migration in vitro. Also, MUC16 knockdown decreases the tumor formation and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Mechanistically, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses confirms MUC16 interaction with galectin-3 and mesothelin in PDAC cells. Adhesion assay displayed decreased cell attachment of MUC16 knockdown cells with recombinant galectin-1 and galectin-3 protein. Further, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MUC16 knockout cells show decreased tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (T and Tn) in PDAC cells. Importantly, carbohydrate antigens were decreased in the region that corresponds to MUC16 and suggests for the decreased MUC16-galectin interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation also revealed a novel interaction between MUC16 and FAK in PDAC cells. Interestingly, we observed decreased expression of mesenchymal and increased expression of epithelial markers in MUC16-silenced cells. Additionally, MUC16 loss showed a decreased FAK-mediated Akt and ERK/MAPK activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that MUC16-focal adhesion signaling may play a critical role in facilitating PDAC growth and metastasis. PMID:27382435

  17. Romidepsin targets multiple survival signaling pathways in malignant T cells.

    PubMed

    Valdez, B C; Brammer, J E; Li, Y; Murray, D; Liu, Y; Hosing, C; Nieto, Y; Champlin, R E; Andersson, B S

    2015-01-01

    Romidepsin is a cyclic molecule that inhibits histone deacetylases. It is Food and Drug Administration-approved for treatment of cutaneous and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, but its precise mechanism of action against malignant T cells is unknown. To better understand the biological effects of romidepsin in these cells, we exposed PEER and SUPT1 T-cell lines, and a primary sample from T-cell lymphoma patient (Patient J) to romidepsin. We then examined the consequences in some key oncogenic signaling pathways. Romidepsin displayed IC50 values of 10.8, 7.9 and 7.0 nm in PEER, SUPT1 and Patient J cells, respectively. Strong inhibition of histone deacetylases and demethylases, increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, which may contribute to the observed DNA-damage response and apoptosis. The stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway and unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum were activated, whereas the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) and β-catenin pro-survival pathways were inhibited. The decreased level of β-catenin correlated with the upregulation of its inhibitor SFRP1 through romidepsin-mediated hypomethylation of its gene promoter. Our results provide new insights into how romidepsin invokes malignant T-cell killing, show evidence of its associated DNA hypomethylating activity and offer a rationale for the development of romidepsin-containing combination therapies. PMID:26473529

  18. Romidepsin targets multiple survival signaling pathways in malignant T cells

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, B C; Brammer, J E; Li, Y; Murray, D; Liu, Y; Hosing, C; Nieto, Y; Champlin, R E; Andersson, B S

    2015-01-01

    Romidepsin is a cyclic molecule that inhibits histone deacetylases. It is Food and Drug Administration-approved for treatment of cutaneous and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, but its precise mechanism of action against malignant T cells is unknown. To better understand the biological effects of romidepsin in these cells, we exposed PEER and SUPT1 T-cell lines, and a primary sample from T-cell lymphoma patient (Patient J) to romidepsin. We then examined the consequences in some key oncogenic signaling pathways. Romidepsin displayed IC50 values of 10.8, 7.9 and 7.0 nm in PEER, SUPT1 and Patient J cells, respectively. Strong inhibition of histone deacetylases and demethylases, increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, which may contribute to the observed DNA-damage response and apoptosis. The stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway and unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum were activated, whereas the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) and β-catenin pro-survival pathways were inhibited. The decreased level of β-catenin correlated with the upregulation of its inhibitor SFRP1 through romidepsin-mediated hypomethylation of its gene promoter. Our results provide new insights into how romidepsin invokes malignant T-cell killing, show evidence of its associated DNA hypomethylating activity and offer a rationale for the development of romidepsin-containing combination therapies. PMID:26473529

  19. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A.S.; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally-occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), adhesion molecule sVCAM-1 and sE-Selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane may be, at least in part, associated with interfering with the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24880493

  20. Control of density-dependent, cell state-specific signal transduction by the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1, and its influence on cell cycle regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffrahn, Inka; Singer, Bernhard B.; Sigmundsson, Kristmundur; Lucka, Lothar; Oebrink, Bjoern . E-mail: bjorn.obrink@cmb.ki.se

    2005-07-15

    Growth factor receptors, extracellular matrix receptors, and cell-cell adhesion molecules co-operate in regulating the activities of intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1 co-regulates growth-factor-induced DNA synthesis in NBT-II epithelial cells in a cell-density-dependent manner. CEACAM1 exerted its effects by regulating the activity of the Erk 1/2 MAP kinase pathway and the expression levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Interestingly, both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were observed. Confluent cells continuously exposed to fetal calf serum showed little Erk activity and DNA synthesis compared with sparse cells. Under these conditions, anti-CEACAM1 antibodies strongly stimulated Erk activation, decreased p27 expression, and induced DNA synthesis. In serum-starved confluent cells, re-addition of 10% fetal calf serum activated the Erk pathway, decreased p27 expression, and stimulated DNA synthesis to the same levels as in sparse cells. Under these conditions anti-CEACAM1 antibodies de-activated Erk, restored the level of p27, and inhibited DNA synthesis. These data indicate that CEACAM1 mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in cells that are constantly exposed to growth factors, but co-activates growth-factor-induced proliferation in cells that have been starved for growth factors; exposure to extracellular CEACAM1 ligands reverts these responses.

  1. Myostatin and the skeletal muscle atrophy and hypertrophy signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J; Vernus, B; Chelh, I; Cassar-Malek, I; Gabillard, J C; Hadj Sassi, A; Seiliez, I; Picard, B; Bonnieu, A

    2014-11-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and is conserved in many species, from rodents to humans. Myostatin inactivation can induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy, while its overexpression or systemic administration causes muscle atrophy. As it represents a potential target for stimulating muscle growth and/or preventing muscle wasting, myostatin regulation and functions in the control of muscle mass have been extensively studied. A wealth of data strongly suggests that alterations in skeletal muscle mass are associated with dysregulation in myostatin expression. Moreover, myostatin plays a central role in integrating/mediating anabolic and catabolic responses. Myostatin negatively regulates the activity of the Akt pathway, which promotes protein synthesis, and increases the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to induce atrophy. Several new studies have brought new information on how myostatin may affect both ribosomal biogenesis and translation efficiency of specific mRNA subclasses. In addition, although myostatin has been identified as a modulator of the major catabolic pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome and the autophagy-lysosome systems, the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The goal of this review is to highlight outstanding questions about myostatin-mediated regulation of the anabolic and catabolic signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. Particular emphasis has been placed on (1) the cross-regulation between myostatin, the growth-promoting pathways and the proteolytic systems; (2) how myostatin inhibition leads to muscle hypertrophy; and (3) the regulation of translation by myostatin. PMID:25080109

  2. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  3. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  4. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  5. In vitro maturation of oocytes alters gene expression and signaling pathways in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Salhab, Mohamad; Dhorne-Pollet, Sophie; Auclair, Sylvain; Guyader-Joly, Catherine; Brisard, Daphné; Dalbies-Tran, Rozenn; Dupont, Joelle; Ponsart, Claire; Mermillod, Pascal; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2013-02-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) of immature oocytes is widely used in assisted reproduction technologies in cattle, and is increasingly used to treat human infertility. The development competence of IVM oocytes, however, is lower than preovulatory, in vivo-matured oocytes. During maturation, cumulus cells (CC) are metabolically coupled with an oocyte and support the acquisition of its developmental potential. Our objective was to identify genes and pathways that were affected by IVM in bovine CC. Microarray transcriptomic analysis of CC enclosing in vitro- or in vivo-mature oocytes revealed 472 differentially expressed genes, including 28% related to apoptosis, correlating with twofold higher cell death after IVM than in vivo, as detected by TUNEL. Genes overexpressed after IVM were significantly enriched in functions involved in cell movement, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix function, and TGF-beta signaling, whereas under-expressed genes were enriched in regulating gene expression, energy metabolism, stress response, and MAP kinases pathway functions. Differential expression of 15 genes, including PAG11 (increased) and TXNIP (decreased), which were never detected in CC before, was validated by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, protein quantification confirmed the lower abundance of glutathione S-transferase A1 and prostaglandin G/H synthase 2, and the higher abundance of hyaluronan synthase 2 and SMAD4, a member of TGF-beta pathway, in CC after IVM. Phosphorylation levels of SMAD2, MAPK3/1, and MAPK14, but not MAPK8, were higher after IVM that in vivo. In conclusion, IVM provokes the hyper-activation of TGF-beta and MAPK signaling components, modifies gene expression, leads to increased apoptosis in CC, and thus affects oocyte quality. PMID:23280668

  6. Perturbation in T cell signal transduction pathway in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Yamauchi, K.; Taga, M.; Odle, J.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.

    T lymphocytes are regulatory and effector components of the immune system. It has been documented that T cell function is down regulated in microgravity of space flight and also in microgravity analogs. Lymphocyte signal transduction and the function of its effector elements are essential for proper functioning of T cells in any environment. We have shown that T cell mediated responses are down regulated in the microgravity analogs; in vivo antiorthostatic suspension mouse model as well as the in vitro culture system of Bioreactor (BIO). One of the postulated mechanisms for this effect is perturbation in signal transduction mechanisms via disruption of cytoskeleton due to the tensile force acting on cell membranes. Using BIO cultured mouse splenocytes we analyzed T cell signaling molecules associated with T cell receptor (TcR) and essential in signal transduction and cellular function. ZAP-70, a protein tyrosine kinase, is unaltered in 1g, however, is decreased 50% in the BIO at 96 hrs. SLP-76 levels drop more than 50% early in Bio samples at 24 and 48 hrs. LAT was unchanged. Once activated, ZAP-70 interacts with and phosphorylates Vav, SLP-76 and LAT proteins resulting in one of the complexs, namely SLP- 76/Vav, which putatively plays a regulatory role in TcR signal transduction pathway, perhaps via the actin cytoskeleton. Thus the decrease in SLP -76 at earlier time point could lead to ineffective recruitment and activation of cytoskeleton. Further studies are underway to delineate the mechanisms of T cell down regulation in microgravity. (Supported by NASA NCC8-168 grant, ADK)

  7. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Signaling Pathways That Facilitate Lytic Gammaherpesvirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, James A.; Chavan, Shweta S.; Sifford, Jeffrey M.; MacLeod, Veronica; Voth, Daniel E.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Forrest, J. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Lytic gammaherpesvirus (GHV) replication facilitates the establishment of lifelong latent infection, which places the infected host at risk for numerous cancers. As obligate intracellular parasites, GHVs must control and usurp cellular signaling pathways in order to successfully replicate, disseminate to stable latency reservoirs in the host, and prevent immune-mediated clearance. To facilitate a systems-level understanding of phosphorylation-dependent signaling events directed by GHVs during lytic replication, we utilized label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to interrogate the lytic replication cycle of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV68). Compared to controls, MHV68 infection regulated by 2-fold or greater ca. 86% of identified phosphopeptides – a regulatory scale not previously observed in phosphoproteomic evaluations of discrete signal-inducing stimuli. Network analyses demonstrated that the infection-associated induction or repression of specific cellular proteins globally altered the flow of information through the host phosphoprotein network, yielding major changes to functional protein clusters and ontologically associated proteins. A series of orthogonal bioinformatics analyses revealed that MAPK and CDK-related signaling events were overrepresented in the infection-associated phosphoproteome and identified 155 host proteins, such as the transcription factor c-Jun, as putative downstream targets. Importantly, functional tests of bioinformatics-based predictions confirmed ERK1/2 and CDK1/2 as kinases that facilitate MHV68 replication and also demonstrated the importance of c-Jun. Finally, a transposon-mutant virus screen identified the MHV68 cyclin D ortholog as a viral protein that contributes to the prominent MAPK/CDK signature of the infection-associated phosphoproteome. Together, these analyses enhance an understanding of how GHVs reorganize and usurp intracellular signaling networks to facilitate infection and replication. PMID:24068923

  8. The Epstein-Barr virus encoded LMP1 oncoprotein modulates cell adhesion via regulation of activin A/TGFβ and β1 integrin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Mhairi A.; Dawson, Christopher W.; Laverick, Louise; Davis, Alexandra M.; Dudman, Joe P. R.; Raveenthiraraj, Sathuwarman; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Yap, Lee-Fah; Young, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of global cancer incidence is causally linked to an infectious agent. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) accounts for around 1% of all virus-associated cancers and is associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), the major oncoprotein encoded by EBV, behaves as a constitutively active tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor activating a variety of signalling pathways, including the three classic MAPKs (ERK-MAPK, p38 MAPK and JNK/SAPK). The present study identifies novel signalling properties for this integral membrane protein via the induction and secretion of activin A and TGFβ1, which are both required for LMP1’s ability to induce the expression of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin. However, it is evident that LMP1 is unable to activate the classic Smad-dependent TGFβ signalling pathway, but rather elicits its effects through the non-Smad arm of TGFβ signalling. In addition, there is a requirement for JNK/SAPK signalling in LMP1-mediated fibronectin induction. LMP1 also induces the expression and activation of the major fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin, an effect that is accompanied by increased focal adhesion formation and turnover. Taken together, these findings support the putative role for LMP1 in the pathogenesis of NPC by contributing to the metastatic potential of epithelial cells. PMID:26782058

  9. Peroxiredoxins in Regulation of MAPK Signalling Pathways; Sensors and Barriers to Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Heather R.; Veal, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are highly conserved and abundant peroxidases. Although the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of peroxiredoxin (Prx) is important to maintain low levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide, Prx have also been shown to promote hydrogen peroxide-mediated signalling. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways mediate cellular responses to a variety of stimuli, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we review the evidence that Prx can act as both sensors and barriers to the activation of MAPK and discuss the underlying mechanisms involved, focusing in particular on the relationship with thioredoxin. PMID:26813660

  10. Peroxiredoxins in Regulation of MAPK Signalling Pathways; Sensors and Barriers to Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Heather R; Veal, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are highly conserved and abundant peroxidases. Although the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of peroxiredoxin (Prx) is important to maintain low levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide, Prx have also been shown to promote hydrogen peroxide-mediated signalling. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways mediate cellular responses to a variety of stimuli, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we review the evidence that Prx can act as both sensors and barriers to the activation of MAPK and discuss the underlying mechanisms involved, focusing in particular on the relationship with thioredoxin. PMID:26813660

  11. β1 Integrin-Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Signaling Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell (RGC) Survival

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Corredor, Raul G.; Obeso, Betty Albo; Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F.; Wang, Ying; Ponmattam, Jamie; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Ivanov, Dmitry; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Fini, Mary Elizabeth; Bajenaru, Michaela Livia

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity in the central nervous system (CNS) is essential for neuronal homeostasis. Signals from the ECM are transmitted to neurons through integrins, a family of cell surface receptors that mediate cell attachment to ECM. We have previously established a causal link between the activation of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), degradation of laminin in the ECM of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), and RGC death in a mouse model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). Here we investigated the role of laminin-integrin signaling in RGC survival in vitro, and after ischemia in vivo. In purified primary rat RGCs, stimulation of the β1 integrin receptor with laminin, or agonist antibodies enhanced RGC survival in correlation with activation of β1 integrin’s major downstream regulator, focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Furthermore, β1 integrin binding and FAK activation were required for RGCs’ survival response to laminin. Finally, in vivo after RIRI, we observed an up-regulation of MMP-9, proteolytic degradation of laminin, decreased RGC expression of β1 integrin, FAK and Akt dephosphorylation, and reduced expression of the pro-survival molecule bcl-xL in the period preceding RGC apoptosis. RGC death was prevented, in the context of laminin degradation, by maintaining β1 integrin activation with agonist antibodies. Thus, disruption of homeostatic RGC-laminin interaction and signaling leads to cell death after retinal ischemia, and maintaining integrin activation may be a therapeutic approach to neuroprotection. PMID:23118988

  12. Targeting the EGFR signaling pathway in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Haridas, Dhanya; Jain, Maneesh; Ganti, AparK.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cancer is a devastating disease; however, several therapeutic advances have recently been made, wherein EGFR and its family members have emerged as useful biomarkers and therapeutic targets. EGFR, a transmembrane glycoprotein is a member of the ERBB receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily. EGFR binds to its cognate ligand EGF, which further induces tyrosine phosphorylation and receptor dimerization with other family members leading to enhanced uncontrolled proliferation. Several anti-EGFR therapies such as monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed, which has enabled clinicians to identify and treat specific patient cohorts. Areas covered In this review, the basic mechanism of EGFR activation and the role of EGFR signaling in cancer progression, has been covered. Furthermore, current developments made towards targeting the EGFR signaling pathway for the treatment of epithelial cancers and a summary of the various anti-EGFR therapeutic agents that are currently in use, has also been made. Expert opinion EGFR signaling is a part of a complex network that has been the target of effective cancer therapies. However, further understanding of the system is required to develop an effective anticancer regiment. A combination therapy comprising of an anti-EGFR and a chemotherapeutic/chemopreventive agent will exhibit a multi-pronged approach that can be developed into a highly attractive and specific molecular oriented remedy. PMID:22239438

  13. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders. PMID:26293414

  14. Dual TORK/DNA-PK inhibition blocks critical signaling pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Rachel; Ter Burg, Johanna; Garrick, Brett; van Bochove, Gregor G W; Brown, Jennifer R; Fernandes, Stacey M; Rodríguez, María Solé; Michot, Jean-Marie; Hallek, Michael; Eichhorst, Barbara; Reinhardt, Hans Christian; Bendell, Johanna; Derks, Ingrid A M; van Kampen, Roel J W; Hege, Kristen; Kersten, Marie José; Trowe, Torsten; Filvaroff, Ellen H; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P

    2016-07-28

    Inhibition of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) provides significant clinical benefit to patients, mainly by blocking adhesion of CLL cells in the lymph node microenvironment. The currently applied inhibitors ibrutinib and idelalisib have limited capacity however to induce cell death as monotherapy and are unlikely to eradicate the disease. Acquired resistance to therapy in CLL is often caused by mutations in the response network being targeted, both for DNA damage or BCR signaling pathways. Thus, drugs with dual targeting capacity could offer improved therapeutic value. Here, the potency of CC-115, a novel inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin kinase (TORK) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), was evaluated in primary CLL cells in vitro and in CLL patients. Combined TORK and DNA-PK inhibition in vitro resulted in caspase-dependent cell killing irrespective of p53, ATM, NOTCH1, or SF3B1 status. Proliferation induced by CD40(+) interleukin-21 stimulation was completely blocked by CC-115, and CD40-mediated resistance to fludarabine and venetoclax could be reverted by CC-115. BCR-mediated signaling was inhibited by CC-115 and also in CLL samples obtained from patients with acquired resistance to idelalisib treatment. Clinical efficacy of CC-115 was demonstrated in 8 patients with relapsed/refractory CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma harboring ATM deletions/mutations; all but 1 patient had a decrease in lymphadenopathy, resulting in 1 IWCLL partial response (PR) and 3 PRs with lymphocytosis. In conclusion, these preclinical results, along with early promising clinical activity, suggest that CC-115 may be developed further for treatment of CLL. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01353625. PMID:27235137

  15. Boolean approach to signalling pathway modelling in HGF-induced keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit; Nascimento, Juliana M.; Kowar, Silke; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Cell migration is a complex process that is controlled through the time-sequential feedback regulation of protein signalling and gene regulation. Based on prior knowledge and own experimental data, we developed a large-scale dynamic network describing the onset and maintenance of hepatocyte growth factor-induced migration of primary human keratinocytes. We applied Boolean logic to capture the qualitative behaviour as well as short-and long-term dynamics of the complex signalling network involved in this process, comprising protein signalling, gene regulation and autocrine feedback. Results: A Boolean model has been compiled from time-resolved transcriptome data and literature mining, incorporating the main pathways involved in migration from initial stimulation to phenotype progress. Steady-state analysis under different inhibition and stimulation conditions of known key molecules reproduces existing data and predicts novel interactions based on our own experiments. Model simulations highlight for the first time the necessity of a temporal sequence of initial, transient MET receptor (met proto-oncogene, hepatocyte growth factor receptor) and subsequent, continuous epidermal growth factor/integrin signalling to trigger and sustain migration by autocrine signalling that is integrated through the Focal adhesion kinase protein. We predicted in silico and verified in vitro that long-term cell migration is stopped if any of the two feedback loops are inhibited. Availability: The network file for analysis with the R BoolNet library is available in the Supplementary Information. Contact: melanie.boerries@frias.uni-freiburg.de or hauke.busch@frias.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22962472

  16. Modeling TGF-β signaling pathway in epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laise, Pasquale; Fanelli, Duccio; Lió, Pietro; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2012-03-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) consists in a morphological change in epithelial cells characterized by the loss of the cell adhesion and the acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype. This process plays a crucial role in the embryonic development and in regulating the tissue homeostasis in the adult, but it proves also fundamental for the development of cancer metastasis. Experimental evidences have shown that the EMT depends on the TGF-β signaling pathway, which in turn regulates the transcriptional cellular activity. In this work, a dynamical model of the TGF-β pathway is proposed and calibrated versus existing experimental data on lung cancer A549 cells. The analysis combines Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and standard Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) techniques to interpolate the gene expression data via an iterative adjustments of the parameters involved. The kinetic of the Smad proteins phosphorylation, as predicted within the model is found in excellent agreement with available experiments, an observation that confirms the adequacy of the proposed mathematical picture.

  17. The role of the Janus kinase family/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway in fibrotic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Futoshi; Meldrum, Kirstan K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, a number of cytokines and growth factors including transforming growth factor β1, tumor necrosis factor α, and angiotensin II have been shown to play a crucial role in renal fibrosis. The Janus kinase family (JAK) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) constitute one of the primary signaling pathways that regulate cytokine expression, and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway has increasingly been implicated in the pathophysiology of renal disease. This review examines the role of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in fibrotic renal disease. The JAK/STAT signaling pathway is activated in a variety of renal diseases and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. Experimental evidence suggests that inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, in particular JAK2 and STAT3, may suppress renal fibrosis and protect renal function. However, it is incompletely understood which cells activate the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and which JAK/STAT signaling pathway is activated in each renal disease. Research regarding JAK/STAT signaling and its contribution to renal disease is still ongoing in humans. Future studies are required to elucidate the potential role of JAK/STAT signaling inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in the attenuation of renal fibrosis. PMID:22883438

  18. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  19. Angiotensin II activates different calcium signaling pathways in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Dolgacheva, Lyudmila P; Turovskaya, Maria V; Dynnik, Vladimir V; Zinchenko, Valery P; Goncharov, Nikolay V; Davletov, Bazbek; Turovsky, Egor A

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important mammalian neurohormone involved in reninangiotensin system. Ang II is produced both constitutively and locally by RAS systems, including white fat adipocytes. The influence of Ang II on adipocytes is complex, affecting different systems of signal transduction from early Са(2+) responses to cell proliferation and differentiation, triglyceride accumulation, expression of adipokine-encoding genes and adipokine secretion. It is known that white fat adipocytes express all RAS components and Ang II receptors (АТ1 and АТ2). The current work was carried out with the primary white adipocytes culture, and Са(2+) signaling pathways activated by Ang II were investigated using fluorescent microscopy. Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses of differentiated adipocytes to Ang II were registered in cells with both small and multiple lipid inclusions. Using inhibitory analysis and selective antagonists, we now show that Ang II initiates periodic Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses by activating АТ1 and АТ2 receptors and involving branched signaling cascades: 1) Ang II → Gq → PLC → IP3 → IP3Rs → Ca(2+) 2) Gβγ → PI3Kγ → PKB 3) PKB → eNOS → NO → PKG 4) CD38 → cADPR → RyRs → Ca(2+) In these cascades, AT1 receptors play the leading role. The results of the present work open a perspective of using Ang II for correction of signal resistance of adipocytes often observed during obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26850364

  20. Signaling pathways relevant to cognition-enhancing drug targets.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Gaudreau, Pierrette; Quirion, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    Aging is generally associated with a certain cognitive decline. However, individual differences exist. While age-related memory deficits can be observed in humans and rodents in the absence of pathological conditions, some individuals maintain intact cognitive functions up to an advanced age. The mechanisms underlying learning and memory processes involve the recruitment of multiple signaling pathways and gene expression, leading to adaptative neuronal plasticity and long-lasting changes in brain circuitry. This chapter summarizes the current understanding of how these signaling cascades could be modulated by cognition-enhancing agents favoring memory formation and successful aging. It focuses on data obtained in rodents, particularly in the rat as it is the most common animal model studied in this field. First, we will discuss the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and its receptors, downstream signaling effectors [e.g., calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)], associated immediate early gene (e.g., Homer 1a, Arc and Zif268), and growth factors [insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)] in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Second, the impact of the cholinergic system and related modulators on memory will be briefly reviewed. Finally, since dynorphin neuropeptides have recently been associated with memory impairments in aging, it is proposed as an attractive target to develop novel cognition-enhancing agents. PMID:25977080

  1. Current Views of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    On microbial invasion, the host immediately evokes innate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play crucial roles in innate responses that lead not only to the clearance of pathogens but also to the efficient establishment of acquired immunity by directly detecting molecules from microbes. In terms of intracellular TLR-mediated signaling pathways, cytoplasmic adaptor molecules containing Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domains play important roles in inflammatory immune responses through the production of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and type I interferon, and upregulation of costimulatory molecules. In this paper, we will describe our current understanding of the relationship between TLRs and their ligands derived from pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Moreover, we will review the historical and current literature to describe the mechanisms behind TLR-mediated activation of innate immune responses. PMID:21197425

  2. Interferons, Signal Transduction Pathways, and the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nallar, Shreeram C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS. PMID:25084173

  3. Roles of BMP Signaling Pathway in Lip and Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and cleft palate only (CP) are severe disruptions affecting orofacial structures. Patients with orofacial clefts require complex interdisciplinary care, which includes nursing, plastic surgery, maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, speech therapy, audiology, psychological and genetic counseling, orthodontics and dental treatment, among others. Overall, treatment of clefts of the lip and palate entails a significant economic burden for families and society. Therefore, prevention is the ultimate objective and this will be facilitated by a complete understanding of the etiology of this condition. Here we review the current concepts regarding the genetic and environmental factors contributing to orofacial clefts and emphasize on the roles of BMP signaling pathway components in the normal and aberrant development of the lip and palate. PMID:22759670

  4. Signaling pathways in the epithelial origins of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hardie, William D; Hagood, James S; Dave, Vrushank; Perl, Anne-Karina T; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Glasser, Stephan

    2010-07-15

    Pulmonary fibrosis complicates a number of disease processes and leads to substantial morbidity and mortality. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is perhaps the most pernicious and enigmatic form of the greater problem of lung fibrogenesis with a median survival of three years from diagnosis in affected patients. In this review, we will focus on the pathology of IPF as a model of pulmonary fibrotic processes, review possible cellular mechanisms, review current treatment approaches and review two transgenic mouse models of lung fibrosis to provide insight into processes that cause lung fibrosis. We will also summarize the potential utility of signaling pathway inhibitors as a future treatment in pulmonary fibrosis. Finally, we will present data demonstrating a minimal contribution of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the development of fibrotic lesions in the transforming growth factor-alpha transgenic model of lung fibrosis. PMID:20676040

  5. Cell signalling pathways underlying induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kate; Joy, Shona; McKay, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, somatic cells reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by forced expression of defined factors, represent a uniquely valuable resource for research and regenerative medicine. However, this methodology remains inefficient due to incomplete mechanistic understanding of the reprogramming process. In recent years, various groups have endeavoured to interrogate the cell signalling that governs the reprogramming process, including LIF/STAT3, BMP, PI3K, FGF2, Wnt, TGFβ and MAPK pathways, with the aim of increasing our understanding and identifying new mechanisms of improving safety, reproducibility and efficiency. This has led to a unified model of reprogramming that consists of 3 stages: initiation, maturation and stabilisation. Initiation of reprogramming occurs in almost all cells that receive the reprogramming transgenes; most commonly Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and cMyc, and involves a phenotypic mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The initiation stage is also characterised by increased proliferation and a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The maturation stage is considered the major bottleneck within the process, resulting in very few “stabilisation competent” cells progressing to the final stabilisation phase. To reach this stage in both mouse and human cells, pre-iPS cells must activate endogenous expression of the core circuitry of pluripotency, comprising Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, and thus reach a state of transgene independence. By the stabilisation stage, iPS cells generally use the same signalling networks that govern pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. These pathways differ between mouse and human cells although recent work has demonstrated that this is context dependent. As iPS cell generation technologies move forward, tools are being developed to interrogate the process in more detail, thus allowing a greater understanding of this intriguing biological phenomenon. PMID:25426259

  6. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  7. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models.

    PubMed

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  8. Kavain Involvement in LPS-Induced Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoren; Amar, Salomon

    2016-10-01

    Kavain, a compound extracted from the Kava plant, Piper methysticum, is found to be involved in TNF-α expression in human and mouse cells via regulation of transcriptional factors such as NF-kB and LITAF. LITAF is known to activate the transcription of more than 20 cytokines that are involved in a variety of cellular processes and is associated with many inflammatory diseases, including angiogenesis, cancer, arthritis, and more. The modulation of LITAF is expected to positively affect cytokine-mediated diseases. Thus, intensive efforts have been deployed in search of LITAF inhibitors. In this work, we found that, in vitro, Kavain reduced LPS- induced TNF-α secretion in mouse macrophages, mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMM), and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (HPBMC). We also found that Kavain treatment in RAW264.7 cells deactivated MyD88 and Akt, inhibited LITAF, and reduced the production of TNF-α, IL-27, and MIG in response to LPS. Similarly, it had a significant in vivo anti-inflammatory effect on wild-type (WT) mice that developed Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis (CAIA). Overall, MyD88 was found to be an important mediator of the LPS-induced inflammatory response that can be distinguished from the NF-κB pathway. We also found that MyD88 is involved in the pathway linking LPS/LITAF to TNF-α. Therefore, given that Kavain modulates LPS-induced signaling pathways leading to cytokine expression, therapeutic interventions involving Kavain in inflammatory diseases are warranted. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2272-2280, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917453

  9. Targeting cancer by binding iron: Dissecting cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Goldie Y.L.; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Vera; Merlot, Angelica M.; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    Newer and more potent therapies are urgently needed to effectively treat advanced cancers that have developed resistance and metastasized. One such strategy is to target cancer cell iron metabolism, which is altered compared to normal cells and may facilitate their rapid proliferation. This is supported by studies reporting the anti-neoplastic activities of the clinically available iron chelators, desferrioxamine and deferasirox. More recently, ligands of the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone (DpT) class have demonstrated potent and selective anti-proliferative activity across multiple cancer-types in vivo, fueling studies aimed at dissecting their molecular mechanisms of action. In the past five years alone, significant advances have been made in understanding how chelators not only modulate cellular iron metabolism, but also multiple signaling pathways implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. Herein, we discuss recent research on the targeting of iron in cancer cells, with a focus on the novel and potent DpT ligands. Several key studies have revealed that iron chelation can target the AKT, ERK, JNK, p38, STAT3, TGF-β, Wnt and autophagic pathways to subsequently inhibit cellular proliferation, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. These developments emphasize that these novel therapies could be utilized clinically to effectively target cancer. PMID:26125440

  10. Modulation of signal transduction pathways by natural compounds in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Alok; Fofaria, Neel M; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is generally regarded as the result of abnormal growth of cells. According to World Health Organization, cancer is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Mother nature provides a large source of bioactive compounds with excellent therapeutic efficacy. Numerous phytochemicals from nature have been investigated for anticancer properties. In this review article, we discuss several natural compounds, which have shown anti-cancer activity. Natural compounds induce cell cycle arrest, activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, generate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), and down-regulate activated signaling pathways, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation, progression and metastasis of cancer. Several preclinical studies have suggested that natural compounds can also increase the sensitivity of resistant cancers to available chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, combining FDA approved anti-cancer drugs with natural compounds results in improved efficacy. On the basis of these exciting outcomes of natural compounds against several cancer types, several agents have already advanced to clinical trials. In conclusion, preclinical results and clinical outcomes against cancer suggest promising anticancer efficacy of agents from natural sources. PMID:26481373

  11. Caytaxin Deficiency Disrupts Signaling Pathways in Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Gong, Suzhen; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as a site of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and calcium-transporting plasma membrane ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex. PMID:17092653

  12. mTOR signaling pathway genes in focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Baulac, S

    2016-01-01

    Focal epilepsies, where seizures initiate in spatially limited networks, are the most frequent epilepsy type, accounting for two-thirds of patients. Focal epilepsies have long been thought to be acquired disorders; several focal epilepsy syndromes are now proven to be (genetically heterogeneous) monogenic disorders. While earlier genetic studies have demonstrated a strong contribution of ion channel and neurotransmitter receptor genes, or synaptic secreted protein genes, later work has revealed a new class of genes encoding components of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction pathway. The mTOR pathway controls a myriad of biological processes among which cell growth and protein synthesis in response to several extracellular and intracellular. Recently, germline mutations have been found in genes encoding the components of the GATOR1 complex (DEPDC5, NPRL2, NPRL3), a repressor of mTORC1. These mutations are increasingly recognized as causing a wide and yet evolving spectrum of focal epilepsy syndromes, with and without cortical structural abnormalities (usually focal cortical dysplasia). Brain somatic mutations in the gene encoding mTOR (MTOR) have recently been linked to focal cortical dysplasia and other associated brain pathologies including hemimegalencephaly. This chapter reviews the genetics and neurobiology of DEPDC5, NPRL2, and NPRL3, and summarizes the clinical and molecular spectrum of GATOR1-related epilepsies. PMID:27323939

  13. Multi-Inhibitory Effects of A2A Adenosine Receptor Signaling on Neutrophil Adhesion Under Flow.

    PubMed

    Yago, Tadayuki; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Liu, Zhenghui; Wang, Ying; Thompson, Linda F; McEver, Rodger P

    2015-10-15

    A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) signaling negatively regulates inflammatory responses in many disease models, but the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. We used the selective A2AAR agonist, ATL313, to examine how A2AAR signaling affects human and murine neutrophil adhesion under flow. Treating neutrophils with ATL313 inhibited selectin-induced, β2 integrin-dependent slow rolling and chemokine-induced, β2 integrin-dependent arrest on ICAM-1. ATL313 inhibited selectin-induced β2 integrin extension, which supports slow rolling, and chemokine-induced hybrid domain "swing-out," which supports arrest. Furthermore, ATL313 inhibited integrin outside-in signaling as revealed by reduced neutrophil superoxide production and spreading on immobilized anti-β2 integrin Ab. ATL313 suppressed selectin-triggered activation of Src family kinases (SFKs) and p38 MAPK, chemokine-triggered activation of Ras-related protein 1, and β2 integrin-triggered activation of SFKs and Vav cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. ATL313 activated protein kinase A and its substrate C-terminal Src kinase, an inhibitor of SFKs. Treating neutrophils with a protein kinase A inhibitor blocked the actions of ATL313. In vivo, ATL313-treated neutrophils rolled faster and arrested much less frequently in postcapillary venules of the murine cremaster muscle after TNF-α challenge. Furthermore, ATL313 markedly suppressed neutrophil migration into the peritoneum challenged with thioglycollate. ATL313 did not affect A2AAR-deficient neutrophils, confirming its specificity. Our findings provide new insights into the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of A2AAR signaling and the potential utility of A2AAR agonists in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26355151

  14. Benzo[a]pyrene induces intercellular adhesion molecule-1 through a caveolae and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterling, Elizabeth; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2008-10-15

    Toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have linked benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure with cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of action leading to these diseases have not been fully understood. One key step in the development of atherosclerosis is vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by increased adhesiveness. To determine if B[a]P could lead to increased endothelial adhesiveness, the effects of B[a]P on human endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was investigated. B[a]P was able to increase ICAM-1 protein only after pretreatment with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF). Knockdown of AhR by siRNA or treatment with AhR antagonist {alpha}-naphthoflavone ({alpha}-NF) eliminated the induction of ICAM-1 from B[a]P, confirming the necessity of AhR in this process. Likewise, B[a]P only increased monocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium when cells were pretreated with {beta}-NF. Experiments were done to define a signaling mechanism. B[a]P increased phosphorylation of MEK and p38-MAPK, and inhibitors to these proteins blunted the ICAM-1 induction. B[a]P was also able to increase AP-1 DNA binding and phosphorylation of cJun. Phosphorylation of cJun was disrupted by MEK and p38-MAPK inhibitors linking the signaling cascade. Finally, the importance of membrane microdomains, caveolae, was demonstrated by knockdown of the structural protein caveolin-1. Disruption of caveolae eliminated the B[a]P-induced ICAM-1 expression. These data suggest a possible pro-inflammatory mechanism of action of B[a]P involving caveolae, leading to increased vascular endothelial adhesiveness, and this inflammation may be a critical step in the development of B[a]P-induced atherosclerosis.

  15. MicroRNAs: New Regulators of Toll-Like Receptor Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobing; Jing, Zhizhong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a critical family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are responsible for the innate immune responses via signalling pathways to provide effective host defence against pathogen infections. However, TLR-signalling pathways are also likely to stringently regulate tissue maintenance and homeostasis by elaborate modulatory mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators and as an essential part of the networks involved in regulating TLR-signalling pathways. In this review, we highlight our understanding of the regulation of miRNA expression profiles by TLR-signalling pathways and the regulation of TLR-signalling pathways by miRNAs. We focus on the roles of miRNAs in regulating TLR-signalling pathways by targeting multiple molecules, including TLRs themselves, their associated signalling proteins and regulatory molecules, and transcription factors and functional cytokines induced by them, at multiple levels. PMID:24772440

  16. Role of α7 nicotinic receptor in the immune system and intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zdanowski, Robert; Ujazdowska, Dominika; Lewicka, Aneta; Lewicki, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine has been well known as one of the most exemplary neurotransmitters. In humans, this versatile molecule and its synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, have been found in various non-neural tissues such as the epithelium, endothelium, mesothelium muscle, blood cells and immune cells. The non-neuronal acetylcholine is accompanied by the expression of acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic/muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Increasing evidence of the non-neuronal acetylcholine system found throughout the last few years has indicated this neurotransmitter as one of the major cellular signaling molecules (associated e.g. with kinases and transcription factors activity). This system is responsible for maintenance and optimization of the cellular function, such as proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration, intercellular contact and apoptosis. Additionally, it controls proper activity of immune cells and affects differentiation, antigen presentation or cytokine production (both pro- and anti-inflammatory). The present article reviews recent findings about the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the field of immune system and intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:26648784

  17. Denbinobin suppresses breast cancer metastasis through the inhibition of Src-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Peng, Chieh-Yu; Pai, Hui-Chen; Teng, Che-Ming; Chen, Chien-Chih; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2011-08-01

    Denbinobin (5-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxy- 1,4-phenanthraquinone), a biologically active chemical isolated from Ephemerantha lonchophylla, has been demonstrated to display anti-cancer activity. Breast cancer is the leading cause of female mortality, and the high mortality is mainly attributable to metastasis. Src kinase activity is elevated in many human cancers, including breast cancer, and is often associated with aggressive disease. In the present study, we examined the anti-metastatic effects of denbinobin through decreasing Src kinase activity in human and mouse breast cancer cells. Denbinobin caused significant block of Src kinase activity in both human and mouse breast cancer cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of the signaling molecules focal adhesion kinase, Crk-associated substrate and paxillin downstream of Src was also inhibited by denbinobin. Furthermore, denbinobin inhibited the in vitro migration, invasion and in vivo metastasis of breast cancers in a mouse metastatic model. The denbinobin-treated group showed a significant reduction in tumor metastasis, orthrotopic tumor volume, and spleen enlargement compared to the control group. In addition, transfection of breast cancer cells with a plasmid coding for a constitutively active Src prevented the denbinobin-mediated phosphorylation of Src and downstream molecules and cell migration. Our findings provide evidences that denbinobin inhibits Src-mediated signaling pathways involved in controlling breast cancer migration and metastasis, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential in breast cancer treatment. PMID:21062671

  18. The Spectrin cytoskeleton regulates the Hippo signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Georgina C; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Khanal, Ichha; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The Spectrin cytoskeleton is known to be polarised in epithelial cells, yet its role remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the Spectrin cytoskeleton controls Hippo signalling. In the developing Drosophila wing and eye, loss of apical Spectrins (alpha/beta-heavy dimers) produces tissue overgrowth and mis-regulation of Hippo target genes, similar to loss of Crumbs (Crb) or the FERM-domain protein Expanded (Ex). Apical beta-heavy Spectrin binds to Ex and co-localises with it at the apical membrane to antagonise Yki activity. Interestingly, in both the ovarian follicular epithelium and intestinal epithelium of Drosophila, apical Spectrins and Crb are dispensable for repression of Yki, while basolateral Spectrins (alpha/beta dimers) are essential. Finally, the Spectrin cytoskeleton is required to regulate the localisation of the Hippo pathway effector YAP in response to cell density human epithelial cells. Our findings identify both apical and basolateral Spectrins as regulators of Hippo signalling and suggest Spectrins as potential mechanosensors. PMID:25712476

  19. Chronic itch development in sensory neurons requires BRAF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong-Qiu; Huo, Fu-Quan; Jeffry, Joseph; Hampton, Lori; Demehri, Shadmehr; Kim, Seungil; Liu, Xian-Yu; Barry, Devin M.; Wan, Li; Liu, Zhong-Chun; Li, Hui; Turkoz, Ahu; Ma, Kaijie; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Kopan, Raphael; Battey, James F.; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Chronic itch, or pruritus, is associated with a wide range of skin abnormalities. The mechanisms responsible for chronic itch induction and persistence remain unclear. We developed a mouse model in which a constitutively active form of the serine/threonine kinase BRAF was expressed in neurons gated by the sodium channel Nav1.8 (BRAFNav1.8 mice). We found that constitutive BRAF pathway activation in BRAFNav1.8 mice results in ectopic and enhanced expression of a cohort of itch-sensing genes, including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and MAS-related GPCR member A3 (MRGPRA3), in nociceptors expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). BRAFNav1.8 mice showed de novo neuronal responsiveness to pruritogens, enhanced pruriceptor excitability, and heightened evoked and spontaneous scratching behavior. GRP receptor expression was increased in the spinal cord, indicating augmented coding capacity for itch subsequent to amplified pruriceptive inputs. Enhanced GRP expression and sustained ERK phosphorylation were observed in sensory neurons of mice with allergic contact dermatitis– or dry skin–elicited itch; however, spinal ERK activation was not required for maintaining central sensitization of itch. Inhibition of either BRAF or GRP signaling attenuated itch sensation in chronic itch mouse models. These data uncover RAF/MEK/ERK signaling as a key regulator that confers a subset of nociceptors with pruriceptive properties to initiate and maintain long-lasting itch sensation. PMID:24216512

  20. Targeting the VEGF and PDGF signaling pathway in glioblastoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Alisa Madalina; Alexandru, Oana; Brindusa, Corina; Purcaru, Stefana Oana; Tache, Daniela Elise; Tataranu, Ligia Gabriela; Taisescu, Citto; Dricu, Anica

    2015-01-01

    Growth factor receptors dysfunction has previously been correlated with glioma cell proliferation, ability to evade apoptosis, neo-angiogenesis and resistance to therapy. Antineoplastic molecules targeting growth factor receptors are in clinical handling, however the efficacy of these compounds has often been limited by the signaling redundancy. Here, we analyzed the effect of AG1433 (a PDGFR inhibitor), SU1498 (a VEGFR inhibitor) and BEZ235 (a PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways inhibitor) on glioblastoma cells in vitro. For this study, we used a low passage glioblastoma cell line (GB9B). Assessment of cell number over 72 h showed that the growth rate was 0.3024 and the doubling time of GB9B was 2.29 days. Similar cytotoxic effects were observed by using AG1433 and SU1498 treatment, while dual PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibition by BEZ235 was more efficient in killing glioblastoma cells than individual PDGFR or VEGFR targeting. In SU1498 treated cells, caspase 3 activity was detected 3 hours after the treatment, while activation of caspase 8 and 9 was detected 48 hours later. AG1433 treatment induced caspase 3, 8 and 9, 3 hours after the treatment. BEZ235 treatment resulted in early caspase 3 and 8 activation, 3 hours after the treatment and an activation of caspase 9, 8 hours later. PMID:26339347

  1. Signaling pathways activated by a protease allergen in basophils

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Yu, Shuang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a significant burden in industrialized countries, but why and how the immune system responds to allergens remain largely unknown. Because many clinically significant allergens have proteolytic activity, and many helminths express proteases that are necessary for their life cycles, host mechanisms likely have evolved to detect the proteolytic activity of helminth proteases, which may be incidentally activated by protease allergens. A cysteine protease, papain, is a prototypic protease allergen that can directly activate basophils and mast cells, leading to the production of cytokines, including IL-4, characteristic of the type 2 immune response. The mechanism of papain’s immunogenic activity remains unknown. Here we have characterized the cellular response activated by papain in basophils. We find that papain-induced IL-4 production requires calcium flux and activation of PI3K and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Interestingly, papain-induced IL-4 production was dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) adaptor protein Fc receptor γ-chain, even though the canonical ITAM signaling was not activated by papain. Collectively, these data characterize the downstream signaling pathway activated by a protease allergen in basophils. PMID:25369937

  2. Advances in mechanisms and signaling pathways of carbon nanotube toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Ma, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed into new materials with a variety of industrial and commercial applications. In contrast, the physicochemical properties of CNT at the nanoscale render them the potency to generate toxic effects. Indeed, the potential health impacts of CNT have drawn a great deal of attention in recent years, owing to their identified toxicological and pathological consequences including cytotoxicity, inflammation, fibrosis, genotoxicity, tumorigenesis, and immunotoxicity. Understanding the mechanisms by which CNT induce toxicity and pathology is thus urgently needed for accurate risk assessment of CNT exposure in humans, and for safe and responsible development and commercialization of nanotechnology. Here, we summarize and discuss recent advances in this area with a focus on the molecular interactions between CNT and mammalian systems, and the signaling pathways important for the development of CNT toxicity such as the NF-κB, NLRP3 inflammasome, TGF-β1, MAPK, and p53 signaling cascades. With the current mechanistic evidence summarized in this review, we expect to provide new insights into CNT toxicology at the molecular level and offer new clues to the prevention of health effects resulting from CNT exposure. Moreover, we disclose questions and issues that remain in this rapidly advancing field of nanotoxicology, which would facilitate ascertaining future research directions. PMID:25676622

  3. Upregulation of BMSCs Osteogenesis by Positively-Charged Tertiary Amines on Polymeric Implants via Charge/iNOS Signaling Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Na; Shi, Haigang; Liu, Jun; Shi, Lianxin; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Huaiyu; Ji, Junhui; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-03-01

    Positively-charged surfaces on implants have a similar potential to upregulate osteogenesis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) as electromagnetic therapy approved for bone regeneration. Generally, their osteogenesis functions are generally considered to stem from the charge-induced adhesion of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins without exploring the underlying surface charge/cell signaling molecule pathways. Herein, a positively-charged surface with controllable tertiary amines is produced on a polymer implant by plasma surface modification. In addition to inhibiting the TNF-α expression, the positively-charged surface with tertiary amines exhibits excellent cytocompatibility as well as remarkably upregulated osteogenesis-related gene/protein expressions and calcification of the contacted BMSCs. Stimulated by the charged surface, these BMSCs display high iNOS expressions among the three NOS isoforms. Meanwhile, downregulation of the iNOS by L-Can or siRNA inhibit osteogenic differentiation in the BMSCs. These findings suggest that a positively-charged surface with tertiary amines induces osteogenesis of BMSCs via the surface charge/iNOS signaling pathway in addition to elevated ECM protein adhesion. Therefore, creating a positively-charged surface with tertiary amines is a promising approach to promote osseointegration with bone tissues.

  4. Upregulation of BMSCs Osteogenesis by Positively-Charged Tertiary Amines on Polymeric Implants via Charge/iNOS Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Na; Shi, Haigang; Liu, Jun; Shi, Lianxin; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Huaiyu; Ji, Junhui; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Positively-charged surfaces on implants have a similar potential to upregulate osteogenesis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) as electromagnetic therapy approved for bone regeneration. Generally, their osteogenesis functions are generally considered to stem from the charge-induced adhesion of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins without exploring the underlying surface charge/cell signaling molecule pathways. Herein, a positively-charged surface with controllable tertiary amines is produced on a polymer implant by plasma surface modification. In addition to inhibiting the TNF-α expression, the positively-charged surface with tertiary amines exhibits excellent cytocompatibility as well as remarkably upregulated osteogenesis-related gene/protein expressions and calcification of the contacted BMSCs. Stimulated by the charged surface, these BMSCs display high iNOS expressions among the three NOS isoforms. Meanwhile, downregulation of the iNOS by L-Can or siRNA inhibit osteogenic differentiation in the BMSCs. These findings suggest that a positively-charged surface with tertiary amines induces osteogenesis of BMSCs via the surface charge/iNOS signaling pathway in addition to elevated ECM protein adhesion. Therefore, creating a positively-charged surface with tertiary amines is a promising approach to promote osseointegration with bone tissues. PMID:25791957

  5. Redox signaling in colonial hydroids: many pathways for peroxide.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Neil W; Bivins, Matthew J; Cherry, Kimberly S; Fletcher, Robert E; Geddes, Gabrielle C

    2005-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial redox signaling predict that the colonial hydroids Eirene viridula and Podocoryna carnea should respond to manipulations of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both species encrust surfaces with feeding polyps connected by networks of stolons; P. carnea is more 'sheet-like' with closely spaced polyps and short stolons, while E. viridula is more 'runner-like' with widely spaced polyps and long stolons. Treatment with the chemical antioxidant vitamin C diminishes ROS in mitochondrion-rich epitheliomuscular cells (EMCs) and produces phenotypic effects (sheet-like growth) similar to uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. In peripheral stolon tips, treatment with vitamin C triggers a dramatic increase of ROS that is followed by tissue death and stolon regression. The enzymatic anti-oxidant catalase is probably not taken up by the colony but, rather, converts hydrogen peroxide in the medium to water and oxygen. Exogenous catalase does not affect ROS in mitochondrion-rich EMCs, but does increase the amounts of ROS emitted from peripheral stolons, resulting in rapid, runner-like growth. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide increases ROS levels in stolon tips and results in somewhat faster colony growth. Finally, untreated colonies of E. viridula exhibit higher levels of ROS in stolon tips than untreated colonies of P. carnea. ROS may participate in a number of putative signaling pathways: (1) high levels of ROS may trigger cell and tissue death in peripheral stolon tips; (2) more moderate levels of ROS in stolon tips may trigger outward growth, inhibit branching and, possibly, mediate the redox signaling of mitochondrion-rich EMCs; and (3) ROS may have an extra-colony function, perhaps in suppressing the growth of bacteria. PMID:15634856

  6. Signalling pathway impact analysis based on the strength of interaction between genes.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhenshen; Li, Xianbin; Zan, Xiangzhen; Shen, Liangzhong; Ma, Runnian; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Signalling pathway analysis is a popular approach that is used to identify significant cancer-related pathways based on differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from biological experiments. The main advantage of signalling pathway analysis lies in the fact that it assesses both the number of DEGs and the propagation of signal perturbation in signalling pathways. However, this method simplifies the interactions between genes by categorising them only as activation (+1) and suppression (-1), which does not encompass the range of interactions in real pathways, where interaction strength between genes may vary. In this study, the authors used newly developed signalling pathway impact analysis (SPIA) methods, SPIA based on Pearson correlation coefficient (PSPIA), and mutual information (MSPIA), to measure the interaction strength between pairs of genes. In analyses of a colorectal cancer dataset, a lung cancer dataset, and a pancreatic cancer dataset, PSPIA and MSPIA identified more candidate cancer-related pathways than were identified by SPIA. Generally, MSPIA performed better than PSPIA. PMID:27444024

  7. FGF signaling inhibitor, SPRY4, is evolutionarily conserved target of WNT signaling pathway in progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-03-01

    WNT, FGF and Hedgehog signaling pathways network together during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. FGF16, FGF18, and FGF20 genes are targets of WNT-mediated TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-BCL9/BCL9L-PYGO transcriptional complex. SPROUTY (SPRY) and SPRED family genes encode inhibitors for receptor tyrosine kinase signaling cascades, such as those of FGF receptor family members and EGF receptor family members. Here, transcriptional regulation of SPRY1, SPRY2, SPRY3, SPRY4, SPRED1, SPRED2, and SPRED3 genes by WNT/beta-catenin signaling cascade was investigated by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (humint). Because double TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human SPRY4 gene, comparative genomics analyses on SPRY4 orthologs were further performed. SPRY4-FGF1 locus at human chromosome 5q31.3 and FGF2-NUDT6-SPATA5-SPRY1 locus at human chromosome 4q27-q28.1 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Chimpanzee SPRY4 gene was identified within NW_107083.1 genome sequence. Human, chimpanzee, rat and mouse SPRY4 orthologs, consisting of three exons, were well conserved. SPRY4 gene was identified as the evolutionarily conserved target of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway based on the conservation of double TCF/LEF-binding sites within 5'-promoter region of mammalian SPRY4 orthologs. Human SPRY4 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, brain, pancreatic islet, colon cancer, head and neck tumor, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer. WNT signaling activation in progenitor cells leads to the growth regulation of progenitor cells themselves through SPRY4 induction, and also to the growth stimulation of proliferating cells through FGF secretion. Epigenetic silencing and loss-of-function mutations of SPRY4 gene in progenitor cells could lead to carcinogenesis. SPRY4 is the pharmacogenomics target in the fields of oncology and regenerative medicine. PMID:16465403

  8. Anosmin-1 contributes to brain tumor malignancy through integrin signal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Catherine T; Kim, Haseong; Lee, Ji-Young; Williams, David M; Palethorpe, David; Fellows, Greg; Wright, Alan J; Laing, Ken; Bridges, Leslie R; Howe, Franklyn A; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Anosmin-1, encoded by the KAL1 gene, is an extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated protein which plays essential roles in the establishment of olfactory and GNRH neurons during early brain development. Loss-of-function mutations of KAL1 results in Kallmann syndrome with delayed puberty and anosmia. There is, however, little comprehension of its role in the developed brain. As reactivation of developmental signal pathways often takes part in tumorigenesis, we investigated if anosmin-1-mediated cellular mechanisms associated with brain tumors. Our meta-analysis of gene expression profiles of patients' samples and public microarray datasets indicated that KAL1 mRNA was significantly upregulated in high-grade primary brain tumors compared with the normal brain and low-grade tumors. The tumor-promoting capacity of anosmin-1 was demonstrated in the glioblastoma cell lines, where anosmin-1 enhanced cell motility and proliferation. Notably, anosmin-1 formed a part of active β1 integrin complex, inducing downstream signaling pathways. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of anosmin-1 attenuated motility and growth of tumor cells and induced apoptosis. Anosmin-1 may also enhance the invasion of tumor cells within the ECM by modulating cell adhesion and activating extracellular proteases. In a mouse xenograft model, anosmin-1-expressing tumors grew faster, indicating the role of anosmin-1 in tumor microenvironment in vivo. Combined, these data suggest that anosmin-1 can facilitate tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and survival. Therefore, although the normal function of anosmin-1 is required in the proper development of GNRH neurons, overexpression of anosmin-1 in the developed brain may be an underlying mechanism for some brain tumors. PMID:24189182

  9. Tie2 Signaling Enhances Mast Cell Progenitor Adhesion to Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) through α4β1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Emiko; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Nagai, Kei; Hiroyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Yukio; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Shibuya, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation contributes considerably to immune responses, such as host protection and allergy. Cell surface immunoreceptors expressed on MCs play an important role in MC activation. Although various immunoreceptors on MCs have been identified, the regulatory mechanism of MC activation is not fully understood. To understand the regulatory mechanisms of MC activation, we used gene expression analyses of human and mouse MCs to identify a novel immunoreceptor expressed on MCs. We found that Tek, which encodes Tie2, was preferentially expressed in the MCs of both humans and mice. However, Tie2 was not detected on the cell surface of the mouse MCs of the peritoneal cavity, ear skin, or colon lamina propria. In contrast, it was expressed on mouse bone marrow–derived MCs and bone marrow MC progenitors (BM-MCps). Stimulation of Tie2 by its ligand angiopoietin-1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 in MEDMC-BRC6, a mouse embryonic stem cell-derived mast cell line, and enhanced MEDMC-BRC6 and mouse BM-MCp adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) through α4β1 integrin. These results suggest that Tie2 signaling induces α4β1 integrin activation on BM-MCps for adhesion to VCAM-1. PMID:26659448

  10. A capacitive, biocompatible and adhesive electrode for long-term and cap-free monitoring of EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Hun; Byeon, Hang Jin; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, Kwang Suk; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring broadens EEG applications to various areas, but it requires cap-free recording of EEG signals. Our objective here is to develop a capacitive, small-sized, adhesive and biocompatible electrode for the cap-free and long-term EEG monitoring. Approach. We have developed an electrode made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and adhesive PDMS for EEG monitoring. This electrode can be attached to a hairy scalp and be completely hidden by the hair. We tested its electrical and mechanical (adhesive) properties by measuring voltage gain to frequency and adhesive force using 30 repeat cycles of the attachment and detachment test. Electrode performance on EEG was evaluated by alpha rhythm detection and measuring steady state visually evoked potential and N100 auditory evoked potential. Main results. We observed the successful recording of alpha rhythm and evoked signals to diverse stimuli with high signal quality. The biocompatibility of the electrode was verified and a survey found that the electrode was comfortable and convenient to wear. Significance. These results indicate that the proposed EEG electrode is suitable and convenient for long term EEG monitoring.

  11. Epigenetic alterations of the Wnt signaling pathway in cancer: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Serman, Ljiljana; Martic, Tamara Nikuseva; Serman, Alan; Vranic, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation in both normal and neoplastic development. One of the key signaling pathways whose components are altered through the epigenetic mechanisms is the Wnt signaling pathway. In this review, we briefly discuss the key concepts of epigenetics and focus on the recent advances in the Wnt signaling pathway research and its potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:25428669

  12. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR56 plays a role in cell transformation and tumorigenesis involving the cell adhesion pathway.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ning; Sundaram, Roshni; Liu, Guohong; Chionis, John; Fan, Wufang; Rogers, Cheryl; Awad, Tarif; Grifman, Mirta; Yu, Dehua; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2007-06-01

    GPR56 is an orphan G protein - coupled receptor, mutations of which have recently been associated with bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria, a rare neurologic disease that has implications in brain development. However, no phenotype beyond central nervous system has yet been described for the GPR56-null mutations despite abundant GPR56 expression in many non - central nervous system adult tissues. In the present study, we show that higher GPR56 expression is correlated with the cellular transformation phenotypes of several cancer tissues compared with their normal counterparts, implying a potential oncogenic function. RNA interference-mediated GPR56 silencing results in apoptosis induction and reduced anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells via increased anoikis, whereas cDNA overexpression resulted in increased foci formation in mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cell line. When GPR56 silencing was induced in vivo in several xenograft tumor models, significant tumor responses (including regression) were observed, suggesting the potential of targeting GPR56 in the development of tumor therapies. The expression profiling of GPR56-silenced A2058 melanoma cell line revealed several genes whose expression was affected by GPR56 silencing, particularly those in the integrin-mediated signaling and cell adhesion pathways. The potential role of GPR56 in cancer cell adhesion was further confirmed by the observation that GPR56 silencing also reduced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, which is consistent with the observed increase in anoikis and reduction in anchorage-independent growth phenotypes. The oncogenic potential and apparent absence of physiologic defects in adult human tissues lacking GPR56, as well as the targetable nature of G protein - coupled receptor by small molecule or antibody, make GPR56 an attractive drug target for the development of cancer therapies. PMID:17575113

  13. [Recent studies on PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in hematopoietic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Chi; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2013-02-01

    PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway plays an essential role in the growth, proliferation and survival of various type of cells and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway leads to exhaustion of HSC, while the inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway results in blocking of B cell differentiation. This article reviews the latest advances on the role of key components involved in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, including PI3K, AKT, mTOR, FoxO and GSK-3 in HSC. PMID:23484729

  14. Restraint of inflammatory signaling by interdependent strata of negative regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Peter J.; Smale, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and related pathways by microbial products drives inflammatory responses, host defense pathways and adaptive immunity. The cost of excessive inflammation is cell and tissue damage, an underlying cause of many acute and chronic diseases. Coincident with activation of TLR signaling, a plethora of anti-inflammatory pathways and mechanisms begin to modulate inflammation until tissue repair is complete. Whereas most studies have focused on the signaling components immediately downstream of the TLRs, this review summarizes the different levels of anti-inflammatory pathways that have evolved to abate TLR signaling and how they are integrated to prevent cell and tissue destruction. PMID:22990889

  15. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Eui-Suk; Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering. PMID:26382272

  16. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering. PMID:26382272

  17. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Darlington, Yolanda F; Ochsner, Scott A; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R; Watkins, Christopher M; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H; Wise, Michael W; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N; McKenna, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse 'omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy "Web 2.0" technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA's Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  18. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Darlington, Yolanda F.; Ochsner, Scott A.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Watkins, Christopher M.; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H.; Wise, Michael W.; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N.; McKenna, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse ‘omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy “Web 2.0” technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA’s Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  19. L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE SIGNALING IS INHIBITED BY ETHANOL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Littner, Yoav; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is an immense public health problem. In vitro studies support the hypothesis that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity. L1 is critical for the development of the central nervous system. It functions through signal transduction leading to phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of tyrosines on its cytoplasmic domain. The function of L1 is also dependent on trafficking through lipid rafts. Our hypothesis is that L1 is a target for ethanol neurotoxicity in vivo. Our objective is to demonstrate changes in L1 phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and lipid raft association in vivo. Methods Rat pups on postnatal day 6 are administered 4.5, 5.25 and 6 g/kg of ethanol divided into 2 doses 2 hours apart, then sacrificed. Cerebella are rapidly frozen for assay. Blood is analyzed for blood ethanol concentration. L1 tyrosine phosphorylation is determined by immunoprecipitation and dephosphorylation of tyrosine 1176 determined by immunoblot. Lipid rafts are isolated by sucrose density gradient and the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts is determined. Results Ethanol at all doses reduced the relative amount of Y1176 dephosphorylation as well as the relative amount of L1 phosphorylated on other tyrosines. The proportion of L1 present in lipid rafts is significantly increased in pups who received 6 g/kg ethanol compared to intubated controls. Conclusions L1 is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity in vivo. PMID:23050935

  20. The adhesion molecule NCAM promotes ovarian cancer progression via FGFR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zecchini, Silvia; Bombardelli, Lorenzo; Decio, Alessandra; Bianchi, Marco; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Sanguineti, Fabio; Aletti, Giovanni; Maddaluno, Luigi; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Casadio, Chiara; Viale, Giuseppe; Colombo, Nicoletta; Giavazzi, Raffaella; Cavallaro, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is an aggressive neoplasm, which mainly disseminates to organs of the peritoneal cavity, an event mediated by molecular mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we investigated the expression and functional role of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a cell surface glycoprotein involved in brain development and plasticity, in EOC. NCAM is absent from normal ovarian epithelium but becomes highly expressed in a subset of human EOC, in which NCAM expression is associated with high tumour grade, suggesting a causal role in cancer aggressiveness. We demonstrate that NCAM stimulates EOC cell migration and invasion in vitro and promotes metastatic dissemination in mice. This pro-malignant function of NCAM is mediated by its interaction with fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Indeed, not only FGFR signalling is required for NCAM-induced EOC cell motility, but targeting the NCAM/FGFR interplay with a monoclonal antibody abolishes the metastatic dissemination of EOC in mice. Our results point to NCAM-mediated stimulation of FGFR as a novel mechanism underlying EOC malignancy and indicate that this interplay may represent a valuable therapeutic target. PMID:21739604

  1. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet; Ariestanti, Donna M.; Aust, Gabriela; Bae, Byoung-il; Bista, Bigyan R.; Bridges, James P.; Duman, Joseph G.; Engel, Felix B.; Giera, Stefanie; Goffinet, André M.; Hall, Randy A.; Hamann, Jörg; Hartmann, Nicole; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Rong; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Prömel, Simone; Ressl, Susanne; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Sigoillot, Séverine M.; Song, Helen; Talbot, William S.; Tall, Gregory G.; White, James P.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix—a structural feature of all GPCRs—the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region. In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis–inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site (GPS) motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF are associated non-covalently as a heterodimer at the plasma membrane. While the biological function of the GAIN domain–mediated autocleavage is not fully understood, mounting evidence suggests that the NTF and CTF possess distinct biological activities in addition to their function as a receptor unit. We discuss recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs. PMID:25424900

  2. Neuroplasticity Signaling Pathways Linked to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Darrick T.; Coyle, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that afflicts nearly 1% of the world's population. One of the cardinal pathological features of schizophrenia is perturbation in synaptic connectivity. Although the etiology of schizophrenia is unknown, it appears to be a developmental disorder involving the interaction of a potentially large number of risk genes, with no one gene producing a strong effect except rare, highly penetrant copy number variants. The purpose of this review is to detail how putative schizophrenia risk genes (DISC-1, neuregulin/ErbB4, dysbindin, Akt1, BDNF, and NMDA receptor) are involved in regulating neuroplasticity and how alterations in their expression may contribute to the disconnectivity observed in schizophrenia. Moreover, this review highlights how many of these risk genes converge to regulate common neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways. Future studies aimed at elucidating the functions of these risk genes will provide new insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and will likely lead to the nomination of novel therapeutic targets for restoring proper synaptic connectivity in the brain in schizophrenia and related disorders. PMID:20951727

  3. Progesterone in pregnancy; receptor-ligand interaction and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Halasz, Melinda; Palkovics, Tamas

    2009-12-01

    Progesterone is indispensable in creating a suitable endometrial environment for implantation, and also for the maintenance of pregnancy. Successful pregnancy depends on an appropriate maternal immune response to the fetus. Along with its endocrine effects, progesterone also acts as an "immunosteroid", by contributing to the establishment of a pregnancy protective immune milieu. Progesterone plays a role in uterine homing of NK cells and upregulates HLA-G gene expression, the ligand for NK inhibitory and activating receptors. At high concentrations, progesterone is a potent inducer of Th2-type cytokines as well as of LIF and M-CSF production by T cells. A protein called progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), by inducing a Th2-dominant cytokine production mediates the immunological effects of progesterone. PIBF binds to a novel type of the IL-4 receptor and signals via the Jak/STAT pathway, to induce a number of genes, that not only affect the immune response, but might also play a role in trophoblast invasiveness. PMID:19880194

  4. Generation and application of signaling pathway reporter lines in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Moro, Enrico; Vettori, Andrea; Porazzi, Patrizia; Schiavone, Marco; Rampazzo, Elena; Casari, Alessandro; Ek, Olivier; Facchinello, Nicola; Astone, Matteo; Zancan, Ilaria; Milanetto, Martina; Tiso, Natascia; Argenton, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    In the last years, we have seen the emergence of different tools that have changed the face of biology from a simple modeling level to a more systematic science. The transparent zebrafish embryo is one of the living models in which, after germline transformation with reporter protein-coding genes, specific fluorescent cell populations can be followed at single-cell resolution. The genetically modified embryos, larvae and adults, resulting from the transformation, are individuals in which time lapse analysis, digital imaging quantification, FACS sorting and next-generation sequencing can be performed in specific times and tissues. These multifaceted genetic and cellular approaches have permitted to dissect molecular interactions at the subcellular, intercellular, tissue and whole-animal level, thus allowing integration of cellular and developmental genetics with molecular imaging in the resulting frame of modern biology. In this review, we describe a new step in the zebrafish road to system biology, based on the use of transgenic biosensor animals expressing fluorescent proteins under the control of signaling pathway-responsive cis-elements. In particular, we provide here the rationale and details of this powerful tool, trying to focus on its huge potentialities in basic and applied research, while also discussing limits and potential technological evolutions of this approach. PMID:23674148

  5. ent-Steroids: Novel Tools for Studies of Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Douglas F.

    2008-01-01

    Membrane receptors are often modulated by steroids and it is necessary to distinguish the effects of steroids at these receptors from effects occurring at nuclear receptors. Additionally, it may also be mechanistically important to distinguish between direct effects caused by binding of steroids to membrane receptors and indirect effects on membrane receptor function caused by steroid perturbation of the membrane containing the receptor. In this regard, ent-steroids, the mirror images of naturally occurring steroids, are novel tools for distinguishing between these various actions of steroids. The review provides a background for understanding the different actions that can be expected of steroids and ent-steroids in biological systems, references for the preparation of ent-steroids, a short discussion about relevant forms of stereoisomerism and the requirements that need to be fulfilled for the interaction between two molecules to be enantioselective. The review then summarizes results of biophysical, biochemical and pharmacological studies published since 1992 in which ent-steroids have been used to investigate the actions of steroids in membranes and/or receptor-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:19103212

  6. The cell-adhesion and signaling molecule PECAM-1 is a molecular mediator of resistance to genotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Goel, Reema; Paddock, Cathy; Gao, Cunji; Newman, Debra K; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Newman, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptotic pathways have been implicated in the emergence of cancers resistant to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Identification of novel signaling molecules that influence cell survival has the potential to facilitate the development of new cancer therapies. The cell adhesion and signaling molecule, PECAM-1, is expressed in many hematopoietic and endothelial cell malignancies, and has previously been shown to suppress mitochondrial-dependent, Bax-mediated apoptosis. The ability of PECAM-1 to influence tumor cell survival following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, however, is not known. Here we show that, when overexpressed in HEK293 and REN mesothelioma cells, PECAM-1 confers resistance to apoptosis induced by the DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide. Surprisingly, PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection was found to be largely independent of its ability to form a signaling complex with the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, as virtually no tyrosine phosphorylation of, or SHP-2 association with, PECAM-1 could be detected after etoposide treatment. Furthermore, PECAM-1 retained its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cells with SHP-2 levels significantly reduced using SHP-2-specific siRNA, and in cells in which Erk1/2--a downstream effector of SHP-2--had been inhibited. Finally, to determine whether endogenous PECAM-1 confers resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lymphoid malignancies and endothelial cells, we used a lentiviral vector to stably express PECAM-1-specific siRNA in the Jurkat leukemia cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). siRNA-expressing Jurkat cells with a 70% reduction of PECAM-1 expression were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. HUVECs with PECAM-1 expression reduced 75% were also markedly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Taken together, these data demonstrate that endogenous PECAM-1 expression on lymphoid

  7. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyu; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1) to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery. PMID:27043642

  8. [Cellular signal transduction pathways in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure].

    PubMed

    Lewartowski, Bohdan; Mackiewicz, Urszula

    2006-10-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure are characterized by significant changes of expression and function of many proteins. These changes are responsible for arrhythmias and haemodynamic disturbances. They are initiated by increased cardiac load, detected by cellular mechanoreceptors, and by activation of sarcolemmal chemoreceptors in myocytes and fibroblasts. In the present paper the authors describe the structure and function of molecular cellular pathways for transmission of the information generated by receptors to the nucleus, where it modifies the expression of genes coding for cellular proteins. The authors describe in detail: structure and function of Z-discs and integrins working as mechanoreceptors, calcineurin/NFAT pathways, MAP kinases pathways, pathway activated by AT1 receptors: protein kinase C pathways, AKT/mTHOR kinase pathway and EGRF/ERK1,2 pathway. Functional relationships between pathways mentioned and the results of studies analysing their role in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure are also presented. PMID:20527382

  9. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway contributes to the sequential progression of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Senthil Murugan, Ramalingam; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathway mediated via interactions between β-catenin and members of the TCF/LEF-1 family of transcription factors plays a central role in the regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, adhesion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and invasion. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway with overexpression of Wnt and Fz, mutations of APC, β-catenin, and axin 1, and cytoplasmic accumulation of β-catenin have been frequently reported in a broad spectrum of human malignancies including oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). However, changes in the components of the Wnt signaling pathway have not been documented during 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis, a paradigm for oral oncogenesis and chemointervention. In this study, we evaluated the role of β-catenin accumulation and Wnt ligands, Wnt signaling members (Fz, Dvl, APC, GSK-3β, axin, and WIF) and the downstream targets of Wnt (cyclin D1, MMP-2, and MMP-9) during the sequential progression of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Our data reveal a correlation between β-catenin accumulation and activation of Wnt signaling, and its downstream effector molecules during the sequential development of HBP carcinomas from hyperplasia to invasive carcinoma through dysplasia. Our data also support a pivotal role for β-catenin in the malignant transition of the HBP. Aberrant Wnt signaling may be a hallmark of progression to malignancy during DMBA-induced HBP carcinogenesis and could be a potential preventive and therapeutic target for suppression of OSCC. PMID:21924667

  10. State of the Art in Silico Tools for the Study of Signaling Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Villaamil, Vanessa Medina; Gallego, Guadalupe Aparicio; Cainzos, Isabel Santamarina; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel; Antón Aparicio, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    In the last several years, researchers have exhibited an intense interest in the evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways that have crucial roles during embryonic development. Interestingly, the malfunctioning of these signaling pathways leads to several human diseases, including cancer. The chemical and biophysical events that occur during cellular signaling, as well as the number of interactions within a signaling pathway, make these systems complex to study. In silico resources are tools used to aid the understanding of cellular signaling pathways. Systems approaches have provided a deeper knowledge of diverse biochemical processes, including individual metabolic pathways, signaling networks and genome-scale metabolic networks. In the future, these tools will be enormously valuable, if they continue to be developed in parallel with growing biological knowledge. In this study, an overview of the bioinformatics resources that are currently available for the analysis of biological networks is provided. PMID:22837650

  11. Caffeine suppresses the progression of human glioblastoma via cathepsin B and MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Ding, You-Ming; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chen, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma has aggressive proliferative and invasive properties. We investigated the effect of caffeine on the invasion and the anti-cancer effect in human glioblastomas. Caffeine reduced the invasion in U-87MG, GBM8401 and LN229 cells. Caffeine decreased mRNA, protein expression, and activity of cathepsin B. Besides, mRNA and protein expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) was upregulated by caffeine treatment, whereas matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was downregulated. The expression of Ki67, p-p38, phospforylated extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK), and membranous integrin β1 and β3 was decreased by caffeine. The Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632, blocked the caffeine-mediated reduction of cathepsin B, phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and p-ERK, and invasion. Moreover, caffeine decreased the tumor size, cathepsin B and Ki67 expression in animal model. Caffeine reduced the invasion of glioma cells through ROCK-cathepsin B/FAK/ERK signaling pathway and tumor growth in orthotopic xenograft animal model, supporting the anti-cancer potential in glioma therapy. PMID:27260469

  12. Butyrate modulates bacterial adherence on LS174T human colorectal cells by stimulating mucin secretion and MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Park, Jeong Hyeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Fermentation of dietary fiber results in production of various short chain fatty acids in the colon. In particular, butyrate is reported to regulate the physical and functional integrity of the normal colonic mucosa by altering mucin gene expression or the number of goblet cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether butyrate modulates mucin secretion in LS174T human colorectal cells, thereby influencing the adhesion of probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and subsequently inhibiting pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli. In addition, possible signaling pathways involved in mucin gene regulation induced by butyrate treatment were also investigated. MATERIALS/METHODS Mucin protein content assay and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining were performed in LS174T cells treated with butyrate at various concentrations. Effects of butyrate on the ability of probiotics to adhere to LS174T cells and their competition with E. coli strains were examined. Real time polymerase chain reaction for mucin gene expression and Taqman array 96-well fast plate-based pathway analysis were performed on butyrate-treated LS174T cells. RESULTS Treatment with butyrate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mucin protein contents in LS174T cells with peak effects at 6 or 9 mM, which was further confirmed by PAS staining. Increase in mucin protein contents resulted in elevated adherence of probiotics, which subsequently reduced the adherent ability of E. coli. Treatment with butyrate also increased transcriptional levels of MUC3, MUC4, and MUC12, which was accompanied by higher gene expressions of signaling kinases and transcription factors involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS Based on our results, butyrate is an effective regulator of modulation of mucin protein production at the transcriptional and translational levels, resulting in changes in the adherence of gut microflora. Butyrate

  13. Pulsed ultrasound promotes melanoblast migration through upregulation of macrophage colony-stimulating factor/focal adhesion kinase autocrine signaling and paracrine mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yu-Ting; Deng, Jhu-Yun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Repigmentation of vitiliginous lesions relies on the proliferation and migration of melanoblasts from hair follicles to the epidermis. Pulsed ultrasound has been demonstrated to have stimulatory effects on cell proliferation and migration and has been applied clinically to enhance tissue repair. To clarify the biologic effects and signaling mechanisms of pulsed ultrasound on melanoblast proliferation and migration, two melanoblast cell lines, the undifferentiated NCCmelb4 cells and the differentiated NCCmelan5 cells, were examined. We demonstrated that pulsed ultrasound increased cell migration in a dose-dependent manner without altering cell proliferation. Pulsed ultrasound enhanced autocrine secretion of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), which subsequently activated the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway to promote melanoblast migration. Furthermore, conditioned medium from mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH 3T3 and primary human keratinocytes treated with pulsed ultrasound could stimulate melanoblast migration through a paracrine effect. Our results provide a novel mechanism to promote migration of melanoblasts by pulsed ultrasound stimulation. PMID:23725022

  14. Pathway connectivity and signaling coordination in the yeast stress-activated signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Berry, David B; Nemec, Corey M; MacGilvray, Matthew E; Hose, James; Merrill, Anna E; Lee, M Violet; Will, Jessica L; Coon, Joshua J; Ansari, Aseem Z; Craven, Mark; Gasch, Audrey P

    2014-01-01

    Stressed cells coordinate a multi-faceted response spanning many levels of physiology. Yet knowledge of the complete stress-activated regulatory network as well as design principles for signal integration remains incomplete. We developed an experimental and computational approach to integrate available protein interaction data with gene fitness contributions, mutant transcriptome profiles, and phospho-proteome changes in cells responding to salt stress, to infer the salt-responsive signaling network in yeast. The inferred subnetwork presented many novel predictions by implicating new regulators, uncovering unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways, and pointing to previously unknown ‘hubs’ of signal integration. We exploited these predictions to show that Cdc14 phosphatase is a central hub in the network and that modification of RNA polymerase II coordinates induction of stress-defense genes with reduction of growth-related transcripts. We find that the orthologous human network is enriched for cancer-causing genes, underscoring the importance of the subnetwork's predictions in understanding stress biology. PMID:25411400

  15. Wnt and the Wnt signaling pathway in bone development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Yi-Ping; Paulson, Christie; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Xiaoling; Wu, Mengrui; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling affects both bone modeling, which occurs during development, and bone remodeling, which is a lifelong process involving tissue renewal. Wnt signals are especially known to affect the differentiation of osteoblasts. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of Wnt signaling, which is divided into two major branches: the canonical pathway and the noncanonical pathway. The canonical pathway is also called the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. There are two major noncanonical pathways: the Wnt-planar cell polarity pathway (Wnt-PCP pathway) and the Wnt-calcium pathway (Wnt-Ca2+ pathway). This review also discusses how Wnt ligands, receptors, intracellular effectors, transcription factors, and antagonists affect both the bone modeling and bone remodeling processes. We also review the role of Wnt ligands, receptors, intracellular effectors, transcription factors, and antagonists in bone as demonstrated in mouse models. Disrupted Wnt signaling is linked to several bone diseases, including osteoporosis, van Buchem disease, and sclerosteosis. Studying the mechanism of Wnt signaling and its interactions with other signaling pathways in bone will provide potential therapeutic targets to treat these bone diseases. PMID:24389191

  16. Wrangling Phosphoproteomic Data to Elucidate Cancer Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Mark L.; Lee, Wan-Jui; van der Maaten, Laurens; Shannon, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of biological data sets is essential for generating hypotheses that guide research, yet modern methods of global analysis challenge our ability to discern meaningful patterns and then convey results in a way that can be easily appreciated. Proteomic data is especially challenging because mass spectrometry detectors often miss peptides in complex samples, resulting in sparsely populated data sets. Using the R programming language and techniques from the field of pattern recognition, we have devised methods to resolve and evaluate clusters of proteins related by their pattern of expression in different samples in proteomic data sets. We examined tyrosine phosphoproteomic data from lung cancer samples. We calculated dissimilarities between the proteins based on Pearson or Spearman correlations and on Euclidean distances, whilst dealing with large amounts of missing data. The dissimilarities were then used as feature vectors in clustering and visualization algorithms. The quality of the clusterings and visualizations were evaluated internally based on the primary data and externally based on gene ontology and protein interaction networks. The results show that t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) followed by minimum spanning tree methods groups sparse proteomic data into meaningful clusters more effectively than other methods such as k-means and classical multidimensional scaling. Furthermore, our results show that using a combination of Spearman correlation and Euclidean distance as a dissimilarity representation increases the resolution of clusters. Our analyses show that many clusters contain one or more tyrosine kinases and include known effectors as well as proteins with no known interactions. Visualizing these clusters as networks elucidated previously unknown tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathways that drive cancer. Our approach can be applied to other data types, and can be easily adopted because open source software

  17. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, Zuzanna; Buszman, Ewa; Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones). Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells. PMID:27356601

  18. Mast Cell Chemotaxis – Chemoattractants and Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Halova, Ivana; Draberova, Lubica; Draber, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Migration of mast cells is essential for their recruitment within target tissues where they play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. These processes rely on the ability of mast cells to recognize appropriate chemotactic stimuli and react to them by a chemotactic response. Another level of intercellular communication is attained by production of chemoattractants by activated mast cells, which results in accumulation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cells at the sites of inflammation. Mast cells express numerous surface receptors for various ligands with properties of potent chemoattractants. They include the stem cell factor (SCF) recognized by c-Kit, antigen, which binds to immunoglobulin E (IgE) anchored to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), highly cytokinergic (HC) IgE recognized by FcεRI, lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which binds to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Other large groups of chemoattractants are eicosanoids [prostaglandin E2 and D2, leukotriene (LT) B4, LTD4, and LTC4, and others] and chemokines (CC, CXC, C, and CX3C), which also bind to various GPCRs. Further noteworthy chemoattractants are isoforms of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1–3, which are sensitively recognized by TGF-β serine/threonine type I and II β receptors, adenosine, C1q, C3a, and C5a components of the complement, 5-hydroxytryptamine, neuroendocrine peptide catestatin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and others. Here we discuss the major types of chemoattractants recognized by mast cells, their target receptors, as well as signaling pathways they utilize. We also briefly deal with methods used for studies of mast cell chemotaxis and with ways of how these studies profited from the results obtained in other cellular systems. PMID:22654878

  19. Hedgehog signaling pathway function conserved in Tribolium segmentation.

    PubMed

    Farzana, Laila; Brown, Susan J

    2008-04-01

    In Drosophila, maintenance of parasegmental boundaries and formation of segmental grooves depend on interactions between segment polarity genes. Wingless and Engrailed appear to have similar roles in both short and long germ segmentation, but relatively little is known about the extent to which Hedgehog signaling is conserved. In a companion study to the Tribolium genome project, we analyzed the expression and function of hedgehog, smoothened, patched, and cubitus interruptus orthologs during segmentation in Tribolium. Their expression was largely conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium. Parental RNAi analysis of positive regulators of the pathway (Tc-hh, Tc-smo, or Tc-ci) resulted in small spherical cuticles with little or no evidence of segmental grooves. Segmental Engrailed expression in these embryos was initiated but not maintained. Wingless-independent Engrailed expression in the CNS was maintained and became highly compacted during germ band retraction, providing evidence that derivatives from every segment were present in these small spherical embryos. On the other hand, RNAi analysis of a negative regulator (Tc-ptc) resulted in embryos with ectopic segmental grooves visible during germband elongation but not discernible in the first instar larval cuticles. These transient grooves formed adjacent to Engrailed expressing cells that encircled wider than normal wg domains in the Tc-ptc RNAi embryos. These results suggest that the en-wg-hh gene circuit is functionally conserved in the maintenance of segmental boundaries during germ band retraction and groove formation in Tribolium and that the segment polarity genes form a robust genetic regulatory module in the segmentation of this short germ insect. PMID:18392879

  20. Rac1 promotes chondrogenesis by regulating STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoin; Sonn, Jong Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The small GTPase protein Rac1 is involved in a wide range of biological processes including cell differentiation. Previously, Rac1 was shown to promote chondrogenesis in micromass cultures of limb mesenchyme. However, the pathways mediating Rac1's role in chondrogenesis are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms by which Rac1 regulates chondrogenic differentiation. Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was increased as chondrogenesis proceeded in micromass cultures of chick wing bud mesenchyme. Inhibition of Rac1 with NSC23766, janus kinase 2 (JAK2) with AG490, or STAT3 with stattic inhibited chondrogenesis and reduced phosphorylation of STAT3. Conversely, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 (Rac L61) increased phosphorylation of STAT3. Rac L61 expression resulted in increased expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), and treatment with IL-6 increased phosphorylation of STAT3. NSC23766, AG490, and stattic prohibited cell aggregation, whereas expression of Rac L61 increased cell aggregation, which was reduced by stattic treatment. Our studies indicate that Rac1 induces STAT3 activation through expression and action of IL-6. Overexpression of Rac L61 increased expression of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4). BMP4 promoted chondrogenesis, which was inhibited by K02288, an activin receptor-like kinase-2 inhibitor, and increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Overexpression of Rac L61 also increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was reduced by K02288. These results suggest that Rac1 activates STAT3 by expression of IL-6, which in turn increases expression and activity of BMP4, leading to the promotion of chondrogenesis. PMID:27306109

  1. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia; Wang, Xudong

    2014-03-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI.

  2. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and m

  3. Inhibition of integrin β1 decreases the malignancy of ovarian cancer cells and potentiates anticancer therapy via the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LEI; ZOU, WEN

    2015-01-01

    Integrin β1 (ITGB1) is frequently upregulated in ovarian cancer, and promotes ovarian tumorigenesis and cancer progression. However, the effects of ITGB1 inhibition on ovarian cancer progression and anticancer therapy remain to be elucidated. The results of the present study indicated that ITGB1 was upregulated in HO-8910 and HO-8910PM ovarian cancer cell lines, and knockdown of ITGB1 using short hairpin RNA markedly increased tumor cell apoptosis, decreased tumor cell adhesion and migration, and reduced tumor cell invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. Furthermore, the results of the present study provided evidence regarding the role of ITGB1 inhibition in bevacizumab anticancer therapy. The activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is involved in integrin-mediated cell migration and adhesion. In the present study, the expression levels of FAK were markedly upregulated in ovarian cancer. The adherence and migratory potentials of ovarian cancer cells were significantly reduced when the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway was inhibited by fludarabine. The results of the present study demonstrated that ITGB1 inhibition effectively reduced tumorigenesis and disease exacerbation, and contributed to bevacizumab anticancer therapy via the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway, suggesting that inhibition of ITGB1 is a potential novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26497667

  4. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    cells (HAECs) in vitro under conditions that mimic the shear stress in the bloodstream. For both heavy ions and x-rays, these adhesiveness changes are independent of adhesion molecule expression levels, but are chemokine dependent. Here we identify the specific endothelial chemokine responsible for this radiation-induced adhesiveness. X-irradiation increased IL-8 secretion almost 5-fold, while having little or no effect on expression of 15 other chemokines. Adhesiveness was then assayed under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Radiation significantly increased endothelial adhesiveness. The radiation-induced adhesiveness was specifically blocked by anti-IL-8 antibody, with no effect on baseline, radiation-independent adhesion. Addition of recombinant human IL-8 to un-irradiated HAECs was sufficient to increase adhesion to the same level as x-rays. Therefore, radiation-induced IL-8 signaling is both necessary and sufficient for radiation effects on aortic endothelial adhesiveness. This IL-8 induced adhesiveness may explain, at least in part, the mechanism by which radiation accelerates development of atherosclerosis. A better understanding of this mechanism can provide the basis for future countermeasure development.

  5. Cross-regulation of signaling pathways: An example of nuclear hormone receptors and the canonical Wnt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Beildeck, Marcy E.; Gelmann, Edward P.; Byers, Stephen W.

    2010-07-01

    Predicting the potential physiological outcome(s) of any given molecular pathway is complex because of cross-talk with other pathways. This is particularly evident in the case of the nuclear hormone receptor and canonical Wnt pathways, which regulate cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metastatic potential in numerous tissues. These pathways are known to intersect at many levels: in the intracellular space, at the membrane, in the cytoplasm, and within the nucleus. The outcomes of these interactions are important in the control of stem cell differentiation and maintenance, feedback loops, and regulating oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the importance of considering pathway cross-talk when predicting functional outcomes of signaling, using nuclear hormone receptor/canonical Wnt pathway cross-talk as an example.

  6. Role of Extracellular Matrix Renal Tubulo-interstitial Nephritis Antigen (TINag) in Cell Survival Utilizing Integrin αvβ3/Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK)/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Protein Kinase B-Serine/Threonine Kinase (AKT) Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Kondeti, Vinay K.; Lin, Sun; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Raparia, Kirtee; Kanwar, Yashpal S.

    2011-01-01

    Tubulo-interstitial nephritis antigen (TINag) is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in tubular basement membranes. Combined mutations in TINag and nephrocystin-1 genes lead to nephronophthisis with reduced cell survival. Because certain extracellular matrix proteins are known to modulate cell survival, studies were initiated in Lewis rats lacking TINag to assess if they are more susceptible to cisplatin-induced injury. Cisplatin induced a higher degree of tubular cell damage and apoptosis in regions where TINag is expressed in a parental Wistar strain. This was accompanied by an accentuated increase in serum creatinine and Kim-1 RNA and renal expression of Bax, p53, and its nuclear accumulation, mtDNA fragmentation, and a decrease of Bcl-2. Cisplatin induced fulminant apoptosis of HK-2 cells with increased caspase3/7 activity, mtDNA fragmentation, and a reduced cell survival. These effects were partially reversed in cells maintained on TINag substratum. Far Western/solid phase assays established TINag binding with integrin αvβ3 comparable with vitronectin. Transfection of cells with αv-siRNA accentuated cisplatin-induced apoptosis, aberrant translocation of cytochrome c and Bax, and reduced cell survival. The αv-siRNA decreased expression of integrin-recruited focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and p-FAK, while increasing the expression of p53 and p-p53. Similarly, p-AKT was reduced although ILK was unaffected. Inhibition of PI3K had similar adverse cellular effects. These effects were ameliorated in cells on TINag substratum. In vivo, a higher degree of decrease in the expression of p-FAK and pAKT was observed in Lewis rats following cisplatin treatment. These in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate an essential role of TINag in cellular survival to maintain proper tubular homeostasis utilizing integrin αvβ3 and downstream effectors. PMID:21795690

  7. The octadecanoic pathway: signal molecules for the regulation of secondary pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Blechert, S; Brodschelm, W; Hölder, S; Kammerer, L; Kutchan, T M; Mueller, M J; Xia, Z Q; Zenk, M H

    1995-01-01

    Plant defense against microbial pathogens and herbivores relies heavily on the induction of defense proteins and low molecular weight antibiotics. The signals between perception of the aggression, gene activation, and the subsequent biosynthesis of secondary compounds are assumed to be pentacylic oxylipin derivatives. The rapid, but transient, synthesis of cis-jasmonic acid was demonstrated after insect attack on a food plant and by microbial elicitor addition to plant suspension cultures. This effect is highly specific and not caused by a number of environmental stresses such as light, heavy metals, or cold or heat shock. Elicitation of Eschscholtzia cell cultures also led to a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium prior to jasmonate formation. Inhibition of this alkalinization process by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine also inhibited jasmonate formation. The induction of specific enzymes in the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid pathway leading to the antimicrobial sanguinarine was induced to a qualitatively and quantitatively similar extent by fungal elicitor, methyl jasmonate, and its linolenic acid-derived precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid. It is herein proposed that a second oxylipid cascade may exist in plants starting from linoleic acid via 15,16-dihydro-12-oxophytodienoic acid to 9,10-dihydrojasmonate. Experiments with synthetic trihomojasmonate demonstrated that beta-oxidation is not a prerequisite for biological activity and that 12-oxophytodienoic acid and derivatives are most likely fully active as signal transducers. Octadecanoic acid-derived compounds are essential elements in modulating the synthesis of antibiotic compounds and are thus integral to plant defense. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 9 PMID:7753776

  8. Kinases and kinase signaling pathways: potential therapeutic targets in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Jing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2012-08-01

    Complex molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are gradually being elucidated. Accumulating genetic evidence implicates dysfunction of kinase activities and phosphorylation pathways in the pathogenesis of PD. Causative and risk gene products associated with PD include protein kinases (such as PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK) and proteins related phosphorylation signaling pathways (such as SNCA, DJ-1). PINK1, LRRK2 and several PD gene products have been associated with mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and protein kinase B (AKT) kinase signaling pathways. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and p38, signaling pathways downstream of MAP, are particularly important in PD. JNK and p38 play an integral role in neuronal death. Targeting JNK or p38 signaling may offer an effective therapy for PD. Inhibitors of the ERK signaling pathway, which plays an important role in the development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), have been shown to attenuate this condition in animal models. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence gathered over the last decade on the role of PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK and their related phosphorylation signaling pathways (JNK, ERK, p38 and PI3K/AKT) in PD. It is speculated that improvement or modulation of these signaling pathways will reveal potential therapeutic targets for attenuation of the cardinal symptoms and motor complications in patients with PD in the future. PMID:22709943

  9. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl− efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca2+ from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner. PMID:27065801

  10. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl(-) efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca(2+) from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner. PMID:27065801

  11. Inhibitory machinery for the TGF-β family signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Susumu; Itoh, Fumiko

    2011-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family signaling regulates cell growth and differentiation of many different cell types and is widely involved in the regulation of homeostasis during both embryogenesis and adult life. Therefore, aberrant TGF-β family signal transduction is linked to congenital disorders, tumorigenicity, and fibrosis, which can be life-threatening. A specific receptor-ligand complex initiates transduction of TGF-β family signaling to the nucleus via intracellular signal molecules, mainly Smads, whereby a number of bioactivities such as wound healing, immunomodulation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis are controlled. To avoid an excess of TGF-β family signaling in cells, the duration and intensity of the TGF-β family signal appear to be subject to elaborate regulation. In this paper, we describe recent advances in the understanding of how TGF-β family signals are perturbed and terminated to maintain homeostasis in cells. PMID:21913798

  12. Control of Integrin αIIbβ3 Outside-In Signaling and Platelet Adhesion by Sensing the Physical Properties of Fibrin(ogen) Substrates†

    PubMed Central

    Podolnikova, Nataly P.; Yermolenko, Ivan S.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Lishko, Valeryi K.; Magonov, Sergei; Bowen, Benjamin; Enderlein, Joerg; Podolnikov, Andriy V.; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of substrates are known to control cell adhesion via integrin-mediated signaling. Fibrin and fibrinogen, the principal components of hemostatic and pathological thrombi, may represent biologically relevant substrates whose variable physical properties control adhesion of leukocytes and platelets. In our previous work, we have shown that binding of fibrinogen to the surface of fibrin clot prevents cell adhesion by creating an antiadhesive fibrinogen layer. Furthermore, fibrinogen immobilized on various surfaces at high density supports weak cell adhesion whereas at low density it is highly adhesive. To explore the mechanism underlying differential cell adhesion, we examined the structural and physical properties of surfaces prepared by deposition of various concentrations of fibrinogen using atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. Fibrinogen deposition at high density resulted in an aggregated multilayered material characterized by low adhesion forces. In contrast, immobilization of fibrinogen at low density produced a single layer in which molecules were directly attached to the solid surface, resulting in higher adhesion forces. Consistent with their distinct physical properties, low- but not high-density fibrinogen induced strong αIIbβ3-mediated outside-in signaling in platelets, resulting in their spreading. Moreover, while intact fibrin gels induced strong signaling in platelets, deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of fibrin resulted in diminished cell signaling. The data suggest that deposition of a multilayered fibrinogen matrix prevents stable cell adhesion by modifying the physical properties of surfaces, which results in reduced force generation and insufficient signaling. The mechanism whereby circulating fibrinogen alters adhesive properties of fibrin clots may have important implications for control of thrombus formation and thrombogenicity of biomaterials. PMID:19929007

  13. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  14. LKB1 kinase-dependent and -independent defects disrupt polarity and adhesion signaling to drive collagen remodeling during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Lee, Byoungkoo; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine/threonine kinase and a commonly mutated gene in lung adenocarcinoma. The majority of LKB1 mutations are truncations that disrupt its kinase activity and remove its C-terminal domain (CTD). Because LKB1 inactivation drives cancer metastasis in mice and leads to aberrant cell invasion in vitro, we sought to determine how compromised LKB1 function affects lung cancer cell polarity and invasion. Using three-dimensional models, we show that LKB1 kinase activity is essential for focal adhesion kinase–mediated cell adhesion and subsequent collagen remodeling but not cell polarity. Instead, cell polarity is overseen by the kinase-independent function of its CTD and more specifically its farnesylation. This occurs through a mesenchymal-amoeboid morphological switch that signals through the Rho-GTPase RhoA. These data suggest that a combination of kinase-dependent and -independent defects by LKB1 inactivation creates a uniquely invasive cell with aberrant polarity and adhesion signaling that drives invasion into the microenvironment. PMID:26864623

  15. Hippo signaling regulates Drosophila intestine stem cell proliferation through multiple pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fangfang; Wang, Bing; Yue, Tao; Yun, Eun-Young; Ip, Y. Tony; Jiang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the Drosophila adult midgut are essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis and replenishing lost cells in response to tissue damage. Here we demonstrate that the Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway, an evolutionarily conserved pathway implicated in organ size control and tumorigenesis, plays an essential role in regulating ISC proliferation. Loss of Hpo signaling in either midgut precursor cells or epithelial cells stimulates ISC proliferation. We provide evidence that loss of Hpo signaling in epithelial cells increases the production of cytokines of the Upd family and multiple EGFR ligands that activate JAK-STAT and EGFR signaling pathways in ISCs to stimulate their proliferation, thus revealing a unique non–cell-autonomous role of Hpo signaling in blocking ISC proliferation. Finally, we show that the Hpo pathway mediator Yorkie (Yki) is also required in precursor cells for injury-induced ISC proliferation in response to tissue-damaging reagent DSS. PMID:21078993

  16. NF-kappaB Signaling Pathways in Neurological Inflammation: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ruey-Horng; Wang, Chen-Yu; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB (nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) transcription factor family is a pleiotropic regulator of many cellular signaling pathways, providing a mechanism for the cells in response to a wide variety of stimuli linking to inflammation. The stimulated cells will be regulated by not only the canonical but also non-canonical NF-κB pathways. To initiate both of these pathways, IκB-degradation triggers NF-κB release and the nuclear translocated-heterodimer (or homodimer) can associate with the κB sites of promoter to regulate the gene transcriptions. NF-κB ubiquitously expresses in neurons and the constitutive NF-κB activation is associated with processing of neuronal information. NF-κB can regulate the transcription of genes such as chemokines, cytokines, proinflammatory enzymes, adhesion molecules, proinflammatory transcription factors, and other factors to modulate the neuronal survival. In neuronal insult, NF-κB constitutively active in neuron cell bodies can protect neurons against different injuries and regulate the neuronal inflammatory reactions. Besides neurons, NF-κB transcription factors are abundant in glial cells and cerebral blood vessels and the diverse functions of NF-κB also regulate the inflammatory reaction around the neuronal environment. NF-κB transcription factors are abundant in the brain and exhibit diverse functions. Several central nerve system (CNS) diseases are linked to NF-κB activated by inflammatory mediators. The RelA and c-Rel expression produce opposite effects on neuronal survival. Importantly, c-Rel expression in CNS plays a critical role in anti-apoptosis and reduces the age-related behaviors. Moreover, the different subunits of NF-κB dimer formation can modulate the neuroninflammation, neuronal protection, or neurotoxicity. The diverse functions of NF-κB depend on the subunits of the NF-κB dimer-formation which enable us to develop a therapeutic approach to neuroinflammation based on a

  17. The Canonical Notch Signaling Pathway: Unfolding the Activation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kopan, Raphael; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.

    2009-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates many aspects of metazoan development and tissue renewal. Accordingly, misregulation or loss of Notch signaling underlies multiple human disorders, from developmental syndromes to adult onset diseases and cancer. Notch receptor activation is irreversible as it involves proteolysis-mediated release of the Notch intracellular domain, translocation to the nucleus, and association with a DNA-bound protein. Even though each Notch molecule signals only once without amplification by secondary messenger cascades, Notch signaling is remarkably robust in most tissues. In this review, we highlight the recent studies that reveal new molecular details involved in regulating ligand-mediated activation, receptor proteolysis and target selection. PMID:19379690

  18. Self-Adhesive and Capacitive Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrode to Record Electroencephalograph Signals From the Hairy Scalp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Hun; Park, Cheolsoo; Hwang, Ji-Young; Hong, Joung Sook; Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)/adhesive polydimethylsiloxane (aPDMS) composite-based dry electroencephalograph (EEG) electrode for capacitive measuring of EEG signals. As research related to brain-computer interface applications has advanced, the presence of hairs on a patient's scalp has continued to present an obstacle to recorder EEG signals using dry electrodes. The CNT/aPDMS electrode developed here is elastic, highly conductive, self-adhesive, and capable of making conformal contact with and attaching to a hairy scalp. Onto the conductive disk, hundreds of conductive pillars coated with Parylene C insulation layer were fabricated. A CNT/aPDMS layer was attached on the disk to transmit biosignals to the pillar. The top of disk was designed to be solderable, which enables the electrode to connect with a variety of commercial EEG acquisition systems. The mechanical and electrical characteristics of the electrode were tested, and the performances of the electrodes were evaluated by recording EEGs, including alpha rhythms, auditory-evoked potentials, and steady-state visually-evoked potentials. The results revealed that the electrode provided a high signal-to-noise ratio with good tolerance for motion. Almost no leakage current was observed. Although preamplifiers with ultrahigh input impedance have been essential for previous capacitive electrodes, the EEGs were recorded here by directly connecting a commercially available EEG acquisition system to the electrode to yield high-quality signals comparable to those obtained using conventional wet electrodes. PMID:26390442

  19. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1. PMID:27015742

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Intracellular Signaling Pathway Kinetics Predicts Targets for Stem Cell Fate Control

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Davey, Ryan E; Bhola, Patrick; Yin, Ting; Zandstra, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    Directing stem cell fate requires knowledge of how signaling networks integrate temporally and spatially segregated stimuli. We developed and validated a computational model of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3) pathway kinetics, a signaling network involved in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal. Our analysis identified novel pathway responses; for example, overexpression of the receptor glycoprotein-130 results in reduced pathway activation and increased ESC differentiation. We used a systematic in silico screen to identify novel targets and protein interactions involved in Stat3 activation. Our analysis demonstrates that signaling activation and desensitization (the inability to respond to ligand restimulation) is regulated by balancing the activation state of a distributed set of parameters including nuclear export of Stat3, nuclear phosphatase activity, inhibition by suppressor of cytokine signaling, and receptor trafficking. This knowledge was used to devise a temporally modulated ligand delivery strategy that maximizes signaling activation and leads to enhanced ESC self-renewal. PMID:17616983

  1. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed

    Fetting, Jennifer L; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-10-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90 degrees rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echinoid (Fred) act throughout ommatidial rotation to modulate the degree of ommatidial precursor movement. We propose that differential levels of Ed and Fred between stationary and rotating cells at the initiation of rotation create a permissive environment for cell movement, and that uniform levels in these two populations later contribute to stopping the movement. Based on genetic data, we propose that ed and fred impart a second, independent, ;brake-like' contribution to this process via Egfr signaling. Ed and Fred are localized in largely distinct and dynamic patterns throughout rotation. However, ed and fred are required in only a subset of cells - photoreceptors R1, R7 and R6 - for normal rotation, cells that have only recently been linked to a role in planar cell polarity (PCP). This work also provides the first demonstration of a requirement for cone cells in the ommatidial rotation aspect of PCP. ed and fred also genetically interact with the PCP genes, but affect only the degree-of-rotation aspect of the PCP phenotype. Significantly, we demonstrate that at least one PCP protein, Stbm, is required in R7 to control the degree of ommatidial rotation. PMID:19736327

  2. Focal adhesion kinase is required for IGF-I-mediated growth of skeletal muscle cells via a TSC2/mTOR/S6K1-associated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Hannah; Kazi, Abid A.; Lang, Charles H.; Timmons, James A.; Pierre, Philippe; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Smith, Kenneth; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an attachment complex protein associated with the regulation of muscle mass through as-of-yet unclear mechanisms. We tested whether FAK is functionally important for muscle hypertrophy, with the hypothesis that FAK knockdown (FAK-KD) would impede cell growth associated with a trophic stimulus. C2C12 skeletal muscle cells harboring FAK-targeted (FAK-KD) or scrambled (SCR) shRNA were created using lentiviral transfection techniques. Both FAK-KD and SCR myotubes were incubated for 24 h with IGF-I (10 ng/ml), and additional SCR cells (±IGF-1) were incubated with a FAK kinase inhibitor before assay of cell growth. Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and putative FAK signaling mechanisms (immunoblotting and coimmunoprecipitation) were assessed. IGF-I-induced increases in myotube width (+41 ± 7% vs. non-IGF-I-treated) and total protein (+44 ± 6%) were, after 24 h, attenuated in FAK-KD cells, whereas MPS was suppressed in FAK-KD vs. SCR after 4 h. These blunted responses were associated with attenuated IGF-I-induced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and markedly suppressed phosphorylation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and critical downstream mTOR signaling (ribosomal S6 kinase, eIF4F assembly) in FAK shRNA cells (all P < 0.05 vs. IGF-I-treated SCR cells). However, binding of FAK to TSC2 or its phosphatase Shp-2 was not affected by IGF-I or cell phenotype. Finally, FAK-KD-mediated suppression of cell growth was recapitulated by direct inhibition of FAK kinase activity in SCR cells. We conclude that FAK is required for IGF-I-induced muscle hypertrophy, signaling through a TSC2/mTOR/S6K1-dependent pathway via means requiring the kinase activity of FAK but not altered FAK-TSC2 or FAK-Shp-2 binding. PMID:23695213

  3. Compartmentalized signaling by GPI-anchored ephrin-A5 requires the Fyn tyrosine kinase to regulate cellular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Alice; Gale, Nicholas W.; Murray, Elizabeth W.; Klinghoffer, Richard A.; Soriano, Philippe; Feuerstein, Claude; Robbins, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their corresponding surface-bound ligands, the ephrins, provide cues to the migration of cells and growth cones during embryonic development. Here we show that ephrin-A5, which is attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchor, induces compartmentalized signaling within a caveolae-like membrane microdomain when bound to the extracellular domain of its cognate Eph receptor. The physiological response induced by this signaling event is concomitant with a change in the cellular architecture and adhesion of the ephrin-A5-expressing cells and requires the activity of the Fyn protein tyrosine kinase. This study stresses the relevance of bidirectional signaling involving the ephrins and Eph receptors during brain development. PMID:10601038

  4. Novel Axl-driven signaling pathway and molecular signature characterize high-grade ovarian cancer patients with poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Katia; Pinciroli, Patrizia; Sensi, Marialuisa; Alciato, Federica; Bisaro, Brigitte; Lozneanu, Ludmila; Raspagliesi, Francesco; Centritto, Floriana; Cabodi, Sara; Defilippi, Paola; Avanzi, Gian Carlo; Canevari, Silvana; Tomassetti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    High-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (HGEOC) is a clinically diverse and molecularly heterogeneous disease comprising subtypes with distinct biological features and outcomes. The receptor tyrosine kinases, expressed by EOC cells, and their ligands, present in the microenvironment, activate signaling pathways, which promote EOC cells dissemination. Herein, we established a molecular link between the presence of Gas6 ligand in the ascites of HGEOCs, the expression and activation of its receptor Axl in ovarian cancer cell lines and biopsies, and the progression of these tumors. We demonstrated that Gas6/Axl signalling converges on the integrin β3 pathway in the presence of the adaptor protein p130Cas, thus inducing tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix and invasion. Accordingly, Axl and p130Cas were significantly co-expressed in HGEOC samples. Clinically, we identified an Axl-associated signature of 62 genes able to portray the HGEOCs with the shortest overall survival. These data biologically characterize a group of HGEOCs and could help guide a more effective therapeutic approach to be taken for these patients. PMID:26356564

  5. Antroquinonol Targets FAK-Signaling Pathway Suppressed Cell Migration, Invasion, and Tumor Growth of C6 Glioma.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a pivotal role in multiple cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation. This study attempts to determine the effect of synthesized antroquinonol on the modulation of FAK signaling pathways and explore their underlying mechanisms. Antroquinonol significantly inhibits cell viability with an MTT assay in both N18 neuroblastoma and C6 glioma cell lines, which exhibits sub G1 phase cell cycle, and further induction of apoptosis is confirmed by a TUNEL assay. Antroquinonol decreases anti-apoptotic proteins, whereas it increases p53 and pro-apoptotic proteins. Alterations of cell morphology are observed after treatment by atomic force microscopy. Molecular docking results reveal that antroquinonol has an H-bond with the Arg 86 residue of FAK. The protein levels of Src, pSrc, FAK, pFAK, Rac1, and cdc42 are decreased after antroquinonol treatment. Additionally, antroquinonol also regulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins. Furthermore, antroquinonol suppresses the C6 glioma growth in xenograft studies. Together, these results suggest that antroquinonol is a potential anti-tumorigenesis and anti-metastasis inhibitor of FAK. PMID:26517117

  6. Prognostic microRNAs modulate the RHO adhesion pathway: A potential therapeutic target in undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Philip; Hui, Angela; Su, Jie; Yue, Shijun; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Gokgoz, Nalan; Xu, Wei; Bruce, Jeff; Williams, Justin; Catton, Charles; Wunder, Jay S.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Gladdy, Rebecca; Dickson, Brendan; O'Sullivan, Brian; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    A common and aggressive subtype of soft-tissue sarcoma, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) was examined to determine the role of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in modulating distant metastasis. Following histopathologic review, 110 fresh frozen clinically annotated UPS samples were divided into two independent cohorts for Training (42 patients), and Validation (68 patients) analyses. Global miRNA profiling on the Training Set and functional analysis in vitro suggested that miRNA-138 and its downstream RHO-ROCK cell adhesion pathway was a convergent target of miRNAs associated with the development of metastasis. A six-miRNA signature set prognostic of distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was developed from Training Set miRNA expression values. Using the six-miRNA signature, patients were successfully categorized into high- and low-risk groups for DMFS in an independent Validation Set, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.25 (p = 0.048). After adjusting for other known prognostic variables such as age, gender, tumor grade, size, depth, and treatment with radiotherapy, the six-miRNA signature retained prognostic value with a HR of 3.46 (p < 0.001). A prognostic miRNA biomarker for clinical validation was thus identified along with a functional pathway that modulates UPS metastatic phenotype. PMID:25970788

  7. Prognostic microRNAs modulate the RHO adhesion pathway: A potential therapeutic target in undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Wong, Philip; Hui, Angela; Su, Jie; Yue, Shijun; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Gokgoz, Nalan; Xu, Wei; Bruce, Jeff; Williams, Justin; Catton, Charles; Wunder, Jay S; Andrulis, Irene L; Gladdy, Rebecca; Dickson, Brendan; O'Sullivan, Brian; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-11-17

    A common and aggressive subtype of soft-tissue sarcoma, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) was examined to determine the role of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in modulating distant metastasis. Following histopathologic review, 110 fresh frozen clinically annotated UPS samples were divided into two independent cohorts for Training (42 patients), and Validation (68 patients) analyses. Global miRNA profiling on the Training Set and functional analysis in vitro suggested that miRNA-138 and its downstream RHO-ROCK cell adhesion pathway was a convergent target of miRNAs associated with the development of metastasis. A six-miRNA signature set prognostic of distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was developed from Training Set miRNA expression values. Using the six-miRNA signature, patients were successfully categorized into high- and low-risk groups for DMFS in an independent Validation Set, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.25 (p = 0.048). After adjusting for other known prognostic variables such as age, gender, tumor grade, size, depth, and treatment with radiotherapy, the six-miRNA signature retained prognostic value with a HR of 3.46 (p < 0.001). A prognostic miRNA biomarker for clinical validation was thus identified along with a functional pathway that modulates UPS metastatic phenotype. PMID:25970788

  8. Slit2‑Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E‑cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2‑Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2‑Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2‑Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti‑human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2‑Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E‑cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E‑cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2‑Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E‑cadherin. PMID:27431199

  9. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation preferentially via GPVI signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tang, Xiaorong; Yi, Wenxiu; Li, Qiang; Ren, Lijie; Liu, Xiaohui; Chu, Chunjun; Ozaki, Yukio; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA), an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001) and CRP (P<0.01), a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent. PMID:24386454

  10. Hyaluronan-Mediated Leukocyte Adhesion and Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis Are Attenuated in the Absence of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sudip K.; de la Motte, Carol A.; Kessler, Sean P.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Hill, David R.; Strong, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the intestinal mucosa whose etiology is unclear but is likely to be multifactorial. We have shown previously that an increased amount of hyaluronan (HA) is present both in the inflamed mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in isolated human cells after polyI:C treatment. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 protein plays an important role in many signaling pathways that are associated with inflammation. We therefore investigated the role of STAT1 in adhesive interactions that occur between leukocytes and polyI:C-induced mucosal smooth muscle cells (M-SMCs). Activation of STAT1 was observed after the polyI:C treatment of M-SMCs. Specific phosphorylation of tyrosine and serine residues of STAT1 was observed in polyI:C-treated, but not untreated, M-SMC cultures. To evaluate further the role of STAT1, a corresponding STAT-1-null mouse was used. PolyI:C-induced, HA-mediated leukocyte adhesion to colon SMCs from STAT1-null mice was significantly decreased compared with that from wild-type control mice. In vivo, using the dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of colon inflammation, both tissue damage and HA deposition were attenuated in STAT1-null mice compared with that in wild-type control mice. Additionally, the inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI), a proteoglycan essential for facilitating leukocyte binding to the HA matrix, was reduced in STAT1-null mice. Together, these results demonstrate that STAT1 plays an important role in HA-mediated inflammatory processes. PMID:18818378

  11. Control of Proliferation and Cancer Growth by the Hippo Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ehmer, Ursula; Sage, Julien

    2016-02-01

    The control of cell division is essential for normal development and the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Abnormal cell proliferation is associated with multiple pathological states, including cancer. Although the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway was initially thought to control organ size and growth, increasing evidence indicates that this pathway also plays a major role in the control of proliferation independent of organ size control. In particular, accumulating evidence indicates that the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway functionally interacts with multiple other cellular pathways and serves as a central node in the regulation of cell division, especially in cancer cells. Here, recent observations are highlighted that connect Hippo/YAP signaling to transcription, the basic cell-cycle machinery, and the control of cell division. Furthermore, the oncogenic and tumor-suppressive attributes of YAP/TAZ are reviewed, which emphasizes the relevance of the Hippo pathway in cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(2); 127-40. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26432795

  12. NGL-2 Regulates Pathway-Specific Neurite Growth and Lamination, Synapse Formation, and Signal Transmission in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Kelly L.; Johnson, Robert E.; Schottler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Parallel processing is an organizing principle of many neural circuits. In the retina, parallel neuronal pathways process signals from rod and cone photoreceptors and support vision over a wide range of light levels. Toward this end, rods and cones form triad synapses with dendrites of distinct bipolar cell types, and the axons or dendrites, respectively, of horizontal cells (HCs). The molecular cues that promote the formation of specific neuronal pathways remain largely unknown. Here, we discover that developing and mature HCs express the leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing protein netrin-G ligand 2 (NGL-2). NGL-2 localizes selectively to the tips of HC axons, which form reciprocal connections with rods. In mice with null mutations in Ngl-2 (Ngl-2−/−), many branches of HC axons fail to stratify in the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and invade the outer nuclear layer. In addition, HC axons expand lateral territories and increase coverage of the OPL, but establish fewer synapses with rods. NGL-2 can form transsynaptic adhesion complexes with netrin-G2, which we show to be expressed by photoreceptors. In Ngl-2−/− mice, we find specific defects in the assembly of presynaptic ribbons in rods, indicating that reverse signaling of complexes involving NGL-2 regulates presynaptic maturation. The development of HC dendrites and triad synapses of cone photoreceptors proceeds normally in the absence of NGL-2 and in vivo electrophysiology reveals selective defects in rod-mediated signal transmission in Ngl-2−/− mice. Thus, our results identify NGL-2 as a central component of pathway-specific development in the outer retina. PMID:23864682

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound promotes chondrogenic progenitor cell migration via focal adhesion kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kee W; Ding, Lei; Seol, Dongrim; Lim, Tae-Hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2014-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been studied frequently for its beneficial effects on the repair of injured articular cartilage. We hypothesized that these effects are due to stimulation of chondrogenic progenitor cell (CPC) migration toward injured areas of cartilage through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. CPC chemotaxis in bluntly injured osteochondral explants was examined by confocal microscopy, and migratory activity of cultured CPCs was measured in transwell and monolayer scratch assays. FAK activation by LIPUS was analyzed in cultured CPCs by Western blot. LIPUS effects were compared with the effects of two known chemotactic factors: N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. LIPUS significantly enhanced CPC migration on explants and in cell culture assays. Phosphorylation of FAK at the kinase domain (Tyr 576/577) was maximized by 5 min of exposure to LIPUS at a dose of 27.5 mW/cm(2) and frequency of 3.5 MHz. Treatment with fMLF, but not HMBG1, enhanced FAK activation to a degree similar to that of LIPUS, but neither fMLF nor HMGB1 enhanced the LIPUS effect. LIPUS-induced CPC migration was blocked by suppressing FAK phosphorylation with a Src family kinase inhibitor that blocks FAK phosphorylation. Our results imply that LIPUS might be used to promote cartilage healing by inducing the migration of CPCs to injured sites, which could delay or prevent the onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:24612644

  14. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  15. Differential Expression of Adhesion-Related Proteins and MAPK Pathways Lead to Suitable Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; López-Díaz, Annia; Barrera, Lourdes; Camacho-Morales, Alberto; Hernandez-Aguilar, Felipe; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Calderón-Pérez, Jaime; García-Álvarez, Jorge; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Piña-Barba, Cristina; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Lara-Arias, Jorge; Rivera-Bolaños, Nancy; López-Camarillo, César; Moncada-Saucedo, Nidia; Galván-De los Santos, Alejandra; Meza-Urzúa, Fátima; Villarreal-Gómez, Luis; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth

    2015-11-01

    Cellular adhesion enables communication between cells and their environment. Adhesion can be achieved throughout focal adhesions and its components influence osteoblast differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Because cell adhesion and osteoblast differentiation are closely related, this article aimed to analyze the expression profiles of adhesion-related proteins during osteoblastic differentiation of two hMSCs subpopulations (CD105(+) and CD105(-)) and propose a strategy for assembling bone grafts based on its adhesion ability. In vitro experiments of osteogenic differentiation in CD105(-) cells showed superior adhesion efficiency and 2-fold increase of α-actinin expression compared with CD105(+) cells at the maturation stage. Interestingly, levels of activated β1-integrin increased in CD105(-) cells during the process. Additionally, the CD105(-) subpopulation showed 3-fold increase of phosphorylated FAK(Y397) compared to CD105(+) cells. Results also indicate that ERK1/2 was activated during CD105(-) bone differentiation and participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 in CD105(+) differentiation through a focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-independent pathway. In vivo trial demonstrated that grafts containing CD105(-) showed osteocytes embedded in a mineralized matrix, promoted adequate graft integration, increased host vascular infiltration, and efficient intramembranous repairing. In contrast, grafts containing CD105(+) showed deficient endochondral ossification and fibrocartilaginous tissue. Based on the expression of α-actinin, FAKy,(397) and ERK1/2 activation, we define maturation stage as critical for bone graft assembling. By in vitro assays, CD105(-) subpopulation showed superior adhesion efficiency compared to CD105(+) cells. Considering in vitro and in vivo assays, this study suggests that integration of a scaffold with CD105(-) subpopulation at the maturation stage represents an attractive strategy for clinical use in

  16. CLE peptides and their signaling pathways in plant development.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yasuka L; Ishida, Takashi; Sawa, Shinichiro

    2016-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is crucial for the coherent functioning of multicellular organisms, and they have evolved intricate molecular mechanisms to achieve such communication. Small, secreted peptide hormones participate in cell-to-cell communication to regulate various physiological processes. One such family of plant peptide hormones is the CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related (CLE) family, whose members play crucial roles in the differentiation of shoot and root meristems. Recent biochemical and genetic studies have characterized various CLE signaling modules, which include CLE peptides, transmembrane receptors, and downstream intracellular signaling components. CLE signaling systems are conserved across the plant kingdom but have divergent modes of action in various developmental processes in different species. Moreover, several CLE peptides play roles in symbiosis, parasitism, and responses to abiotic cues. Here we review recent studies that have provided new insights into the mechanisms of CLE signaling. PMID:27229733

  17. Mapping toll-like receptor signaling pathway genes of Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) with FISH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bosong; Zhao, Liang; Liao, Huan; Cheng, Jie; Lian, Shanshan; Li, Xuan; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the innate immune system. Studies on TLR signaling pathway genes in Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) have mainly focused on sequence analysis and expression profiling, no research has been carried out on their localization. The chromosomal position of TLR signaling pathway genes can be valuable for assemblying scallop genome and analysizing gene regulatory networks. In the present study, five key TLR signaling pathway genes ( CfTLR, CfMyd88, CfTRAF6, CfNFκB, and CfIκB) containing bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) were isolated and physically mapped through fluorescence in situ hybridization on five non-homologous chromosome pairs, showing a similar distribution to another five model species. The isolation and mapping of these key immune genes of C. farreri will aid to the research on innate immunity, assignment of interested genes to chromosomes, and integration of physical, linkage and cytogenetic maps of this species.

  18. Role of the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway in Nicotine Dependence and Co-morbid Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Miranda L; Loukola, Anu; Kaprio, Jaakko; Turner, Jill R

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is currently the leading cause of preventable death in the United States and is responsible for over four million deaths annually worldwide. Therefore, there is a vast clinical unmet need with regards to therapeutics targeting smoking cessation. This is even more apparent when examining smokers co-morbid with psychiatric illness, as rates of smoking in this population are ~4× higher than in the general population. Examining common genetic and molecular signaling pathways impinging upon both smoking behavior and psychiatric illness will lead to a better understanding of co-morbid disorders and potential development of novel therapeutics. Studies have implicated the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric illnesses. Additionally, recent studies have also shown an association between the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway and smoking behaviors. This review outlines basic mechanisms of the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway and how it may be exploited for precision medicine approaches in treating nicotine dependence and mental illness. PMID:26472527

  19. Differential Modulation of Nods Signaling Pathways by Fatty Acids in Human Colonic Epithelial HCT116 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing proteins (Nods) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognizing conserved moieties of bacterial peptidoglycan through their leucine-rich repeats (LRR) domain. The agonists for Nods activate proinflammtory signaling pathways incl...

  20. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  1. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury. PMID:26842916

  2. MicroRNAs Regulating Signaling Pathways: Potential Biomarkers in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yisha; Huang, Jing; Guo, Muyao; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem fibrotic and autoimmune disease. Both genetic and epigenetic elements mediate SSc pathophysiology. This review summarizes the role of one epigenetic element, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), involved in different signaling pathways of SSc pathogenesis. The expression of key components in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway has been found to be regulated by miRNAs both upstream and downstream of TGF-β. We are specifically interested in the pathway components upstream of TGF-β, while miRNAs in other signaling pathways have not been extensively studied. The emerging role of miRNAs in vasculopathy of SSc suggests a promising new direction for future investigation. Elucidation of the regulatory role of miRNAs in the expression of signaling factors may facilitate the discovery of novel biomarkers in SSc and improve the understanding and treatment of this disease. PMID:26365208

  3. ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling increase endothelial cell surface PECAM-1 adhesivity and neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T; Chen, Zhenlong; Brovkovych, Viktor M; Vogel, Stephen M; Muller, William A; Skidgel, Randal A; Malik, Asrar B; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-08-30

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) extravasation requires selectin-mediated tethering, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent firm adhesion, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1)-mediated transendothelial migration. An important unanswered question is whether ICAM-1-activated signaling contributes to PMN transmigration mediated by PECAM-1. We tested this concept and the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Src activated by PMN ligation of ICAM-1 in mediating PECAM-1-dependent PMN transmigration. We observed that lung PMN infiltration in vivo induced in carrageenan-injected WT mice was significantly reduced in ICAM-1(-/-) and eNOS(-/-) mice. Crosslinking WT mouse ICAM-1 expressed in human endothelial cells (ECs), but not the phospho-defective Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant, induced SHP-2-dependent Src Tyr530 dephosphorylation that resulted in Src activation. ICAM-1 activation also stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser473) and eNOS (p-Ser1177), thereby increasing NO production. PMN migration across EC monolayers was abolished in cells expressing the Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant or by pretreatment with either the Src inhibitor PP2 or eNOS inhibitor L-NAME. Importantly, phospho-ICAM-1 induction of Src signaling induced PECAM-1 Tyr686 phosphorylation and increased EC surface anti-PECAM-1 mAb-binding activity. These results collectively show that ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling sequentially induce PECAM-1-mediated PMN transendothelial migration. Both Src and eNOS inhibition may be important therapeutic targets to prevent or limit vascular inflammation. PMID:22806890

  4. Redox and zinc signalling pathways converging on protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Zinc ions, though redox-inert, have either pro-antioxidant or pro-oxidant functions at critical junctures in redox metabolism and redox signalling. They are released from cells and in cells, e.g. from metallothionein, a protein that transduces redox signals into zinc signals (1). The released zinc ions inhibit enzymes such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), key regulatory enzymes of cellular phosphorylation signalling. The Ki(Zn) value for inhibition of receptor PTPB is 21pM (2). The binding is about as tight as the binding of zinc to zinc metalloenzymes and suggests tonic zinc inhibition. PTP1-B (PTPN1), an enzyme regulating the insulin and leptin receptors and involved in cancer and diabetes pathobiochemistry, has a Ki(Zn) value of about 5nM (3). Zinc ions bind to the enzyme in the closed conformation when additional metal-binding ligands are brought into the vicinity of the active site. In contrast, redox reactions target cysteines in the active sites of PTPs in the open conformation. This work provides a molecular basis how hydrogen peroxide and free zinc ions generated by growth factor signalling stimulate phosphorylation signalling differentially. (Supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council UK, grant BB/K001442/1.). PMID:26461422

  5. Surface Chemical Gradient Affects the Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells via ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xujie; Shi, Shengjun; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; He, Wei; Huang, Qianli; Zhang, Ranran; Yang, Xing; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2015-08-26

    To understand the role of surface chemistry on cell behavior and the associated molecular mechanisms, we developed and utilized a surface chemical gradient of amine functional groups by carefully adjusting the gas composition of 1,7-octadiene (OD) and allylamine (AA) of the plasma phase above a moving substrate. The chemical gradient surface used in the present work shows an increasing N/C ratio and wettability from the OD side toward the AA side with no change in surface topography. Under standard culture conditions (with serum), human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) adhesion and spreading area increased toward the AA side of the gradient. However, there were no differences in cell behavior in the absence of serum. These results, supported by the trends in proteins adsorption on the gradient surface, demonstrated that surface chemistry affects the response of hASCs through cell-adhesive serum proteins, rather than interacting directly with the cells. The expression of p-ERK and the osteogenic differentiation increased toward the AA side of the gradient, while adipogenic differentiation decreased in the same direction; however, when the activation of ERK1/2 was blocked by PD98059, the levels of osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation on different regions of the chemical gradient were the same. This indicates that ERK1/2 may be an important downstream signaling pathway of surface chemistry directed stem cell fate. PMID:26237746

  6. Relationships between Signaling Pathway Usage and Sensitivity to a Pathway Inhibitor: Examination of Trametinib Responses in Cultured Breast Cancer Lines

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Euphemia Y.; Kim, Ji Eun; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Rewcastle, Gordon W.; Finlay, Graeme J.; Baguley, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling pathways involving mTOR, PI3K and ERK have dominated recent studies of breast cancer biology, and inhibitors of these pathways have formed a focus of numerous clinical trials. We have chosen trametinib, a drug targeting MEK in the ERK pathway, to address two questions. Firstly, does inhibition of a signaling pathway, as measured by protein phosphorylation, predict the antiproliferative activity of trametinib? Secondly, do inhibitors of the mTOR and PI3K pathways synergize with trametinib in their effects on cell proliferation? A panel of 30 human breast cancer cell lines was chosen to include lines that could be classified according to whether they were ER and PR positive, HER2 over-expressing, and “triple negative”. Everolimus (targeting mTOR), NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458 (both targeting PI3K/mTOR) were chosen for combination experiments. Inhibition of cell proliferation was measured by IC50 values and pathway utilization was measured by phosphorylation of signaling kinases. Overall, no correlation was found between trametinib IC50 values and inhibition of ERK signaling. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed at trametinib concentrations not affecting proliferation, and sensitivity of cell proliferation to trametinib was found in cell lines with low ERK phosphorylation. Evidence was found for synergy between trametinib and either everolimus, NVP-BEZ235 or GSK2126458, but this was cell line specific. The results have implications for the clinical application of PI3K/mTOR and MEK inhibitors. PMID:25170609

  7. Adhesion of ZAP-70+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to stromal cells is enhanced by cytokines and blocked by inhibitors of the PI3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Sandrine T; Johnston, James B; Gibson, Spencer B; Marshall, Aaron J

    2014-01-01

    CLL cell survival and proliferation is enhanced through direct contact with supporting cells present in lymphoid tissues. PI3Ks are critical signal transduction enzymes controlling B cell survival and activation. PI3K inhibitors have entered clinical trials and show promising therapeutic activity; however, it is unclear whether PI3K inhibitor drugs differentially affect ZAP-70 positive versus negative CLL cells or target specific microenvironmental interactions. Here we provide evidence that CD40L+IL-4, IL-8 or IL-6 enhance adhesion to stromal cells, with IL-6 showing a selective effect on ZAP-70 positive cells. Stimulatory effects of IL-8 or IL-6 are fully reversed by PI3K inhibition, while the effects of CD40L+IL-4 are partially reversed. While CD40L+IL-4 is the only stimulation increasing CLL cell survival for all patient groups, IL-6 protects ZAP-70 positive cells from cell death induced by PI3K inhibition. Altogether, our results indicate that targeting the PI3K pathway can reverse protective CLL-microenvironment interactions in both ZAP-70 positive and negative CLL despite their differences in cytokine responsiveness. PMID:23981382

  8. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin–focal adhesion kinase signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin–focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer. PMID:27041993

  9. Reactive astrocytes promote adhesive interactions between brain endothelium and endothelial progenitor cells via HMGB1 and beta-2 integrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Pham, Loc-Duyen D.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may contribute to neurovascular repair after stroke and neurodegeneration. A key step in this process should involve adhesive interactions between EPCs and the targeted cerebral endothelium. Here, we tested the hypothesis that reactive astrocytes may play a critical role in enhancing adhesive interactions and transmigration of EPCs across cerebral endothelial cells. Transiently seeding EPCs onto a monolayer of RBE.4 rat brain endothelial cells resulted in a time-dependent adherence between the two cell types. Blocking β2 integrins on EPCs or blocking the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) on endothelial cells significantly decreased EPC-endothelial adherence. Next, we tested whether reactive astrocytes can enhance this process by growing EPCs, brain endothelial cells and astrocytes together in a transwell co-culture system. The presence of reactive astrocytes in the lower chamber significantly promoted adherence between EPCs and endothelial cells in the upper chamber. This process involved the release of soluble HMGB1 from reactive astrocytes that then upregulated endothelial expression of RAGE via Egr1 signaling. Directly adding HMGB1 to the transwell system also promoted EPC-endothelial adhesion and accelerated EPC transmigration into the lower chamber. These initial findings provide proof-of-concept that reactive astrocytes promote crosstalk between cerebral endothelium and EPCs. Further investigation of this phenomenon may lead to a better understanding of cell-cell interactions required for neurovascular recovery after stroke. PMID:24480450

  10. Inferring the functional effect of gene expression changes in signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sebastián-León, Patricia; Carbonell, José; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Signaling pathways constitute a valuable source of information that allows interpreting the way in which alterations in gene activities affect to particular cell functionalities. There are web tools available that allow viewing and editing pathways, as well as representing experimental data on them. However, few methods aimed to identify the signaling circuits, within a pathway, associated to the biological problem studied exist and none of them provide a convenient graphical web interface. We present PATHiWAYS, a web-based signaling pathway visualization system that infers changes in signaling that affect cell functionality from the measurements of gene expression values in typical expression microarray case-control experiments. A simple probabilistic model of the pathway is used to estimate the probabilities for signal transmission from any receptor to any final effector molecule (taking into account the pathway topology) using for this the individual probabilities of gene product presence/absence inferred from gene expression values. Significant changes in these probabilities allow linking different cell functionalities triggered by the pathway to the biological problem studied. PATHiWAYS is available at: http://pathiways.babelomics.org/. PMID:23748960

  11. Origin and evolution of the Notch signalling pathway: an overview from eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gazave, Eve; Lapébie, Pascal; Richards, Gemma S; Brunet, Frédéric; Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Degnan, Bernard M; Borchiellini, Carole; Vervoort, Michel; Renard, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the 20 or so signal transduction pathways that orchestrate cell-cell interactions in metazoans, seven are involved during development. One of these is the Notch signalling pathway which regulates cellular identity, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis via the developmental processes of lateral inhibition and boundary induction. In light of this essential role played in metazoan development, we surveyed a wide range of eukaryotic genomes to determine the origin and evolution of the components and auxiliary factors that compose and modulate this pathway. Results We searched for 22 components of the Notch pathway in 35 different species that represent 8 major clades of eukaryotes, performed phylogenetic analyses and compared the domain compositions of the two fundamental molecules: the receptor Notch and its ligands Delta/Jagged. We confirm that a Notch pathway, with true receptors and ligands is specific to the Metazoa. This study also sheds light on the deep ancestry of a number of genes involved in this pathway, while other members are revealed to have a more recent origin. The origin of several components can be accounted for by the shuffling of pre-existing protein domains, or via lateral gene transfer. In addition, certain domains have appeared de novo more recently, and can be considered metazoan synapomorphies. Conclusion The Notch signalling pathway emerged in Metazoa via a diversity of molecular mechanisms, incorporating both novel and ancient protein domains during eukaryote evolution. Thus, a functional Notch signalling pathway was probably present in Urmetazoa. PMID:19825158

  12. Teaching the Toolkit: A Laboratory Series to Demonstrate the Evolutionary Conservation of Metazoan Cell Signaling Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeClair, Elizabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    A major finding of comparative genomics and developmental genetics is that metazoans share certain conserved, embryonically deployed signaling pathways that instruct cells as to their ultimate fate. Because the DNA encoding these pathways predates the evolutionary split of most animal groups, it should in principle be possible to clone…

  13. A Par-1-Par-3-Centrosome Cell Polarity Pathway and Its Tuning for Isotropic Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; McKinley, R F Andrew; McGill, Melanie A; Angers, Stephane; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-10-19

    To form regulated barriers between body compartments, epithelial cells polarize into apical and basolateral domains and assemble adherens junctions (AJs). Despite close links with polarity networks that generate single polarized domains, AJs distribute isotropically around the cell circumference for adhesion with all neighboring cells [1-3]. How AJs avoid the influence of polarity networks to maintain their isotropy has been unclear. In established epithelia, trans cadherin interactions could maintain AJ isotropy [4], but AJs are dynamic during epithelial development and remodeling [5, 6], and thus specific mechanisms may control their isotropy. In Drosophila, aPKC prevents hyper-polarization of junctions as epithelia develop from cellularization to gastrulation [7]. Here, we show that aPKC does so by inhibiting a positive feedback loop between Bazooka (Baz)/Par-3, a junctional organizer [5, 8-10], and centrosomes. Without aPKC, Baz and centrosomes lose their isotropic distributions and recruit each other to single plasma membrane (PM) domains. Surprisingly, our loss- and gain-of-function analyses show that the Baz-centrosome positive feedback loop is driven by Par-1, a kinase known to phosphorylate Baz and inhibit its basolateral localization [8, 11, 12]. We find that Par-1 promotes the positive feedback loop through both centrosome microtubule effects and Baz phosphorylation. Normally, aPKC attenuates the circuit by expelling Par-1 from the apical domain at gastrulation. The combination of local activation and global inhibition is a common polarization strategy [13-16]. Par-1 seems to couple both effects for a potent Baz polarization mechanism that is regulated for the isotropy of Baz and AJs around the cell circumference. PMID:26455305

  14. LOW-INTENSITY PULSED ULTRASOUND PROMOTES CHONDROGENIC PROGENITOR CELL MIGRATION VIA FOCAL ADHESION KINASE PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee W.; Ding, Lei; Seol, Dongrim; Lim, Tae-hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been frequently studied for its beneficial effects on the repair of injured articular cartilage. Here, we hypothesized that these effects are due to stimulation of chondrogenic progenitor cell (CPC) migration toward injured areas in cartilage through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. CPC chemotaxis in bluntly impacted osteochondral explants was examined by confocal microscopy and migratory activity of cultured CPCs was measured in trans-well and monolayer scratch assays. FAK activation by LIPUS was analyzed in cultured CPCs by western blot. LIPUS effects were compared with the effects of two known chemotactic factors; formylated-methionine peptides (fMLF), and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. LIPUS significantly enhanced CPC migration on explants and in cell culture assays. Phosphorylation of FAK at the kinase domain (Tyr 576/577) was maximized by 5 minute exposure to LIPUS at a dose of 27.5 mW/cm2 and at a frequency of 3.5 MHz. Treatment with fMLF, but not HMBG1 enhanced FAK activation to a degree similar to LIPUS, but neither fMLF nor HMGB1 enhanced the LIPUS effect. LIPUS-induced CPC migration was blocked by suppressing FAK phosphorylation with a Src family kinases (SFKs) inhibitor that blocks FAK phosphorylation. Our results imply that LIPUS might be utilized to promote cartilage healing by inducing the migration of CPCs to injured sites, which could delay or prevent the onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). PMID:24612644

  15. Dietary influence on MAPK-signaling pathways and risk of colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Associations between genes in the DUSP, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK-signaling pathways and dietary factors associated with growth factors, inflammation, and oxidative stress and risk of colon and rectal cancer were evaluated. Data include colon cases (n=1555) and controls (n=1956) and rectal cases (n=754) and controls (n=959). Statistically significant interactions were observed for the MAPK-signaling pathways after adjustment for multiple comparisons. DUSP genes interacted with carbohydrates, mutagen index, calories, calcium, vitamin D, lycopene, dietary fats, folic acid, and selenium. MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK1 and RAF1 within the ERK1/2 MAPK-signaling pathway interacted with dietary fats and cruciferous vegetables. Within the JNK MAPK-signaling pathway, interactions between MAP3K7 and protein, vitamin C, iron, folic acid, carbohydrates, and cruciferous vegetables; MAP3K10 and folic acid; MAP3K9 and lutein/zeaxanthin; MAPK8 and calcium; MAP3K3 and calcium and lutein; MAP3K1 and cruciferous vegetables. Interaction within the p38-signaling pathway included: MAPK14 with calories, carbohydrates saturated fat, selenium, vitamin C; MAP3K2 and carbohydrates, and folic acid. These data suggest that dietary factors involved in inflammation and oxidative stress interact with MAPK-signaling genes to alter risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23859041

  16. The Hexosamine Signaling Pathway: O-GlcNAc cycling in feast or famine

    PubMed Central

    Hanover, John A.; Krause, Michael W.; Love, Dona C.

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes of O-GlcNAc cycling couple the nutrient-dependent synthesis of UDP-GlcNAc to O-GlcNAc modification of Ser/Thr residues of key nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. This series of reactions culminating in O-GlcNAcylation of targets has been termed the Hexosamine Signaling Pathway (HSP). The evolutionarily ancient enzymes of O-GlcNAc cycling have co-evolved with other signaling effecter molecules; they are recruited to their targets by many of the same mechanisms used to organize canonic kinase-dependent signaling pathways. This co-recruitment of the enzymes of O-GlcNAc cycling drives a binary switch impacting pathways of anabolism and growth (nutrient uptake) and catabolic pathways (nutrient sparing and salvage). The Hexosamine Signaling Pathway (HSP) has thus emerged as a versatile cellular regulator modulating numerous cellular signaling cascades influencing growth, metabolism, cellular stress, circadian rhythm, and host-pathogen interactions. In mammals, the nutrient-sensing HSP has been harnessed to regulate such cell-specific functions as neutrophil migration, and activation of B-cells and T-cells. This review summarizes the diverse approaches being used to examine O-GlcNAc cycling. It will emphasize the impact O-GlcNAcylation has upon signaling pathways that may be become deregulated in diseases of the immune system, diabetes mellitus, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19647043

  17. The two-pathway model for the catch-slip transition in biological adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Forero, Manu; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Thomas, Wendy E

    2005-09-01

    Some recently studied biological noncovalent bonds have shown increased lifetime when stretched by mechanical force. In each case these counterintuitive "catch-bonds" have transitioned into ordinary "slip-bonds" that become increasingly shorter lived as the tensile force on the bond is further increased. We describe analytically how these results are supported by a physical model whereby the ligand escapes the receptor binding site via two alternative routes, a catch-pathway that is opposed by the applied force and a slip-pathway that is promoted by force. The model predicts under what conditions and at what critical force the catch-to-slip transition would be observed, as well as the degree to which the bond lifetime is enhanced at the critical force. The model is applied to four experimentally studied systems taken from the literature, involving the binding of P- and L-selectins to sialyl Lewis(X) oligosaccharide-containing ligands. Good quantitative fit to the experimental data is obtained, both for experiments with a constant force and for experiments where the force increases linearly with time. PMID:15951391

  18. The Two-Pathway Model for the Catch-Slip Transition in Biological Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Forero, Manu; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2005-01-01

    Some recently studied biological noncovalent bonds have shown increased lifetime when stretched by mechanical force. In each case these counterintuitive “catch-bonds” have transitioned into ordinary “slip-bonds” that become increasingly shorter lived as the tensile force on the bond is further increased. We describe analytically how these results are supported by a physical model whereby the ligand escapes the receptor binding site via two alternative routes, a catch-pathway that is opposed by the applied force and a slip-pathway that is promoted by force. The model predicts under what conditions and at what critical force the catch-to-slip transition would be observed, as well as the degree to which the bond lifetime is enhanced at the critical force. The model is applied to four experimentally studied systems taken from the literature, involving the binding of P- and L-selectins to sialyl LewisX oligosaccharide-containing ligands. Good quantitative fit to the experimental data is obtained, both for experiments with a constant force and for experiments where the force increases linearly with time. PMID:15951391

  19. Evolution and Design Governing Signal Precision and Amplification in a Bacterial Chemosensory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Leon; Baronian, Grégory; Molle, Virginie; Mauriello, Emilia M. F.; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the principles underlying the plasticity of signal transduction networks is fundamental to decipher the functioning of living cells. In Myxococcus xanthus, a particular chemosensory system (Frz) coordinates the activity of two separate motility systems (the A- and S-motility systems), promoting multicellular development. This unusual structure asks how signal is transduced in a branched signal transduction pathway. Using combined evolution-guided and single cell approaches, we successfully uncoupled the regulations and showed that the A-motility regulation system branched-off an existing signaling system that initially only controlled S-motility. Pathway branching emerged in part following a gene duplication event and changes in the circuit structure increasing the signaling efficiency. In the evolved pathway, the Frz histidine kinase generates a steep biphasic response to increasing external stimulations, which is essential for signal partitioning to the motility systems. We further show that this behavior results from the action of two accessory response regulator proteins that act independently to filter and amplify signals from the upstream kinase. Thus, signal amplification loops may underlie the emergence of new connectivity in signal transduction pathways. PMID:26291327

  20. No-dependent signaling pathways in unloaded skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana L.; Lomonosova, Yulia N.

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of the current review is the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signaling mechanism in unloaded skeletal. Review of the published data describing muscles during physical activity and inactivity demonstrates that NO is an essential trigger of signaling processes, which leads to structural and metabolic changes of the muscle fibers. The experiments with modulation of NO-synthase (NOS) activity during muscle unloading demonstrate the ability of an activated enzyme to stabilize degradation processes and prevent development of muscle atrophy. Various forms of muscle mechanical activity, i.e., plantar afferent stimulation, resistive exercise and passive chronic stretch increase the content of neural NOS (nNOS) and thus may facilitate an increase in NO production. Recent studies demonstrate that NO-synthase participates in the regulation of protein and energy metabolism in skeletal muscle by fine-tuning and stabilizing complex signaling systems which regulate protein synthesis and degradation in the fibers of inactive muscle. PMID:26582991

  1. Responses of the Insulin Signaling Pathways in the Brown Adipose Tissue of Rats following Cold Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wahl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The insulin signaling pathway is critical for the control of blood glucose levels. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has also been implicated as important in glucose homeostasis. The effect of short-term cold exposure on this pathway in BAT has not been explored. We evaluated the effect of 4 hours of cold exposure on the insulin pathway in the BAT of rats. Whole genomic microarray chips were used to examine the transcripts of the pathway in BAT of rats exposed to 4°C and 22°C for 4 hours. The 4 most significantly altered pathways following 4 hours of cold exposure were the insulin signaling pathway, protein kinase A, PI3K/AKT and ERK/MAPK signaling. The insulin signaling pathway was the most affected. In the documented 142 genes of the insulin pathway, 42 transcripts (29.6%) responded significantly to this cold exposure with the least false discovery rate (Benjamini-Hochberg Multiple Testing: −log10 (p-value)  = 7.18). Twenty-seven genes (64%) were up-regulated, including the insulin receptor (Insr), insulin substrates 1 and 2 (Irs1 and Irs2). Fifteen transcripts (36%) were down-regulated. Multiple transcripts of the primary target and secondary effector targets for the insulin signaling were also up-regulated, including those for carbohydrate metabolism. Using western blotting, we demonstrated that the cold induced higher Irs2, Irs1, and Akt-p protein levels in the BAT than in the BAT of controls maintained at room temperature, and higher Akt-p protein level in the muscle. Conclusion: this study demonstrated that 4 hours of cold exposure stimulated the insulin signaling pathway in the BAT and muscle of overnight fasted rats. This raises the possibility that acute cold stimulation may have potential to improve glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity. PMID:24915042

  2. Merlin, a “Magic” Linker Between the Extracellular Cues and Intracellular Signaling Pathways that Regulate Cell Motility, Proliferation, and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Stamenkovic, Ivan; Yu, Qin

    2010-01-01

    Genetic alterations of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene lead to the development of schwannomas, meningiomas, and ependymomas. Mutations of NF2 gene were also found in thyroid cancer, mesothelioma, and melanoma, suggesting that it functions as a tumor suppressor in a wide spectrum of cells. The product of NF2 gene is merlin (moesinezrin-radixin-like protein), a member of the Band 4.1 superfamily proteins. Merlin shares significant sequence homology with the ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) family proteins and serves as a linker between transmembrane proteins and the actin-cytoskeleton. Merlin is a multifunctional protein and involved in integrating and regulating the extracellular cues and intracellular signaling pathways that control cell fate, shape, proliferation, survival, and motility. Recent studies showed that merlin regulates the cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions and functions of the cell surface adhesion/extracellular matrix receptors including CD44 and that merlin and CD44 antagonize each other's function and work upstream of the mammalian Hippo signaling pathway. Furthermore, merlin plays important roles in stabilizing the contact inhibition of proliferation and in regulating activities of several receptor tyrosine kinases. Accumulating data also suggested an emerging role of merlin as a negative regulator of growth and progression of several non-NF2 associated cancer types. Together, these recent advances have improved our basic understanding about merlin function, its regulation, and the major signaling pathways regulated by merlin and provided the foundation for future translation of these findings into the clinic for patients bearing the cancers in which merlin function and/or its downstream signaling pathways are impaired or altered. PMID:20491622

  3. Curcumin and Emodin Down-Regulate TGF-β Signaling Pathway in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Pooja Chandrakant; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the major cause of cancer related deaths in women, especially in developing countries and Human Papilloma Virus infection in conjunction with multiple deregulated signaling pathways leads to cervical carcinogenesis. TGF-β signaling in later stages of cancer is known to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition promoting tumor growth. Phytochemicals, curcumin and emodin, are effective as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compounds against several cancers including cervical cancer. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of curcumin and emodin on TGF-β signaling pathway and its functional relevance to growth, migration and invasion in two cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. Since TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways are known to cross talk having common downstream targets, we analyzed the effect of TGF-β on β-catenin (an important player in Wnt/β-catenin signaling) and also studied whether curcumin and emodin modulate them. We observed that curcumin and emodin effectively down regulate TGF-β signaling pathway by decreasing the expression of TGF-β Receptor II, P-Smad3 and Smad4, and also counterbalance the tumorigenic effects of TGF-β by inhibiting the TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. Expression of downstream effectors of TGF-β signaling pathway, cyclinD1, p21 and Pin1, was inhibited along with the down regulation of key mesenchymal markers (Snail and Slug) upon curcumin and emodin treatment. Curcumin and emodin were also found to synergistically inhibit cell population and migration in SiHa and HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that TGF-β activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HeLa cells, and curcumin and emodin down regulate the pathway by inhibiting β-catenin. Taken together our data provide a mechanistic basis for the use of curcumin and emodin in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:25786122

  4. Folding and signaling share the same pathway in a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter D.

    2002-03-01

    The photoreceptor photoactive yellow protein (PYP) was used as a model system to study receptor activation and protein folding. Refolding was studied by stopped-flow absorbance spectroscopy for PYP with either a trans or a cis chromophore. Chromophore trans to cis isomerization, the mechanism of light detection by PYP, greatly affects the protein folding process. When the cis chromophore is present, the unfolded state refolding proceeds through the putative signaling state of PYP as an on-pathway intermediate. In addition, moderate denaturant concentrations result in the specific unfolding of the signaling state of PYP. Thus, the signaling state is common to the pathways of folding and signaling. This provides a novel avenue for the study of protein folding. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to establish whether a folding intermediate is on-pathway or off-pathway. The results also reveal transient partial unfolding as a molecular mechanism for signaling. The signaling intermediate of PYP exhibits properties characteristic of a molten globule, providing a challenge for the current paradigm for the relay of signals along a signal transduction chain by highly specific interactions between fully folded proteins.

  5. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Jennifer C; Welsh, Natalie J; Braga, Vania M M

    2015-09-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  6. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, Jennifer C.; Welsh, Natalie J.; Braga, Vania M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  7. Phosphoproteomic analyses reveal novel cross-modulation mechanisms between two signaling pathways in yeast.

    PubMed

    Vaga, Stefania; Bernardo-Faura, Marti; Cokelaer, Thomas; Maiolica, Alessio; Barnes, Christopher A; Gillet, Ludovic C; Hegemann, Björn; van Drogen, Frank; Sharifian, Hoda; Klipp, Edda; Peter, Matthias; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental stimuli via specialized signaling pathways. Concurrent stimuli trigger multiple pathways that integrate information, predominantly via protein phosphorylation. Budding yeast responds to NaCl and pheromone via two mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, the high osmolarity, and the mating pathways, respectively. To investigate signal integration between these pathways, we quantified the time-resolved phosphorylation site dynamics after pathway co-stimulation. Using shotgun mass spectrometry, we quantified 2,536 phosphopeptides across 36 conditions. Our data indicate that NaCl and pheromone affect phosphorylation events within both pathways, which thus affect each other at more levels than anticipated, allowing for information exchange and signal integration. We observed a pheromone-induced down-regulation of Hog1 phosphorylation due to Gpd1, Ste20, Ptp2, Pbs2, and Ptc1. Distinct Ste20 and Pbs2 phosphosites responded differently to the two stimuli, suggesting these proteins as key mediators of the information exchange. A set of logic models was then used to assess the role of measured phosphopeptides in the crosstalk. Our results show that the integration of the response to different stimuli requires complex interconnections between signaling pathways. PMID:25492886

  8. Phosphoproteomic analyses reveal novel cross-modulation mechanisms between two signaling pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vaga, Stefania; Bernardo-Faura, Marti; Cokelaer, Thomas; Maiolica, Alessio; Barnes, Christopher A; Gillet, Ludovic C; Hegemann, Björn; van Drogen, Frank; Sharifian, Hoda; Klipp, Edda; Peter, Matthias; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental stimuli via specialized signaling pathways. Concurrent stimuli trigger multiple pathways that integrate information, predominantly via protein phosphorylation. Budding yeast responds to NaCl and pheromone via two mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, the high osmolarity, and the mating pathways, respectively. To investigate signal integration between these pathways, we quantified the time-resolved phosphorylation site dynamics after pathway co-stimulation. Using shotgun mass spectrometry, we quantified 2,536 phosphopeptides across 36 conditions. Our data indicate that NaCl and pheromone affect phosphorylation events within both pathways, which thus affect each other at more levels than anticipated, allowing for information exchange and signal integration. We observed a pheromone-induced down-regulation of Hog1 phosphorylation due to Gpd1, Ste20, Ptp2, Pbs2, and Ptc1. Distinct Ste20 and Pbs2 phosphosites responded differently to the two stimuli, suggesting these proteins as key mediators of the information exchange. A set of logic models was then used to assess the role of measured phosphopeptides in the crosstalk. Our results show that the integration of the response to different stimuli requires complex interconnections between signaling pathways. PMID:25492886

  9. Drug-induced alterations in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway: implications for reinforcement and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Haifeng; Li, Yanqin; Wang, Xi; Lu, Lin

    2008-02-01

    Drug addiction, characterized by high rates of relapse, is recognized as a kind of neuroadaptive disorder. Since the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is critical to neuroplasticity in the adult brain, understanding the role this pathway plays is important for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying drug addiction and relapse. Here, we review previous literatures that focus on the effects of exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), nicotine, morphine, and alcohol on ERK signaling in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system; these alterations of ERK signaling have been thought to contribute to the drug's rewarding effects and to the long-term maladaptation induced by drug abuse. We then discuss the possible upstreams of the ERK signaling pathway activated by exposure of drugs of abuse and the environmental cues previously paired with drugs. Finally, we argue that since ERK activation is a key molecular process in reinstatement of conditioned place preference and drug self-administration, the pharmacological manipulation of the ERK pathway is a potential treatment strategy for drug addiction. PMID:18041576

  10. Identification of Potential Drug Targets in Cancer Signaling Pathways using Stochastic Logical Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Peican; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Uludağ, Hasan; Han, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of vulnerable components in a signaling pathway can contribute to development of drug therapy addressing aberrations in that pathway. Here, an original signaling pathway is derived from the published literature on breast cancer models. New stochastic logical models are then developed to analyze the vulnerability of the components in multiple signalling sub-pathways involved in this signaling cascade. The computational results are consistent with the experimental results, where the selected proteins were silenced using specific siRNAs and the viability of the cells were analyzed 72 hours after silencing. The genes elF4E and NFkB are found to have nearly no effect on the relative cell viability and the genes JAK2, Stat3, S6K, JUN, FOS, Myc, and Mcl1 are effective candidates to influence the relative cell growth. The vulnerabilities of some targets such as Myc and S6K are found to vary significantly depending on the weights of the sub-pathways; this will be indicative of the chosen target to require customization for therapy. When these targets are utilized, the response of breast cancers from different patients will be highly variable because of the known heterogeneities in signaling pathways among the patients. The targets whose vulnerabilities are invariably high might be more universally acceptable targets. PMID:26988076

  11. Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms. PMID:23226239

  12. Conserved features and evolutionary shifts of the EDA signaling pathway involved in vertebrate skin appendage development.

    PubMed

    Pantalacci, Sophie; Chaumot, Arnaud; Benoît, Gérard; Sadier, Alexa; Delsuc, Frédéric; Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Laudet, Vincent

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that evolutionary changes in conserved developmental signaling pathways play an important role in morphological evolution. However, few in silico studies were interested in tracking such changes in a signaling pathway. The Ectodysplasin (EDA) pathway provides an opportunity to fill this gap because it is involved in vertebrate skin appendage development such as scales, teeth, hair, and feathers that take an obvious part in the adaptation of species to their environment. We benefited from the large amount of genomic data now available to explore the evolution of the upstream genes of the EDA pathway. In mammals, these genes are eda (encoding 2 ligands, EDA-A1 and EDA-A2), edar (EDA-A1 receptor), edaradd (EDA receptor [EDAR] adapter), xedar (EDA-A2 receptor), and troy (a XEDAR-related receptor). We show that the evolution of EDA pathway genes combines both strongly conserved features and evolutionary shifts. These shifts are found at different signaling levels (from the ligand to intracellular signaling) and at different taxonomic levels (class, suborder, and genera). Although conserved features likely participate to the similarities found in the early development of vertebrate skin appendages, these shifts might account for innovations and specializations. Moreover, our study demonstrates that we can now benefit from the large number of sequenced vertebrate genomes to explore the evolution of specific signaling pathways and thereby to open new perspectives for developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:18304980

  13. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  14. Chemical regulation of signaling pathways to programmed necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Hyun; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Young Sik

    2014-06-01

    Necroptosis is an active and well-orchestrated necrosis, distinctive from apoptosis in microscopic structure, and biochemical and molecular features. Unlike apoptosis-undergoing cells, which are removed by macrophage or neighboring cells, necrotic cell death releases danger signals and provokes inflammation, and further a severe damage to neighbor tissue. A regulated necrosis, termed as necroptosis or programmed necrosis, is emerging as a new paradigm of cell death that can be activated when apoptotic machinery is genetically or pathogenically defective. It plays biological significances in pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory diseases as well as in a beneficial innate immune defense mechanism. This review highlights the identification of hits against necroptosis, and comprehensive approaches to discovery of small molecules that regulate necroptotic cell death. Also, the signaling molecular mechanism of necroptosis and future clinical uses of necroptosis inhibitor will be described in brief. PMID:24715577

  15. Targeting the PDGF signaling pathway in tumor treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms and PDGF receptors have important functions in the regulation of growth and survival of certain cell types during embryonal development and e.g. tissue repair in the adult. Overactivity of PDGF receptor signaling, by overexpression or mutational events, may drive tumor cell growth. In addition, pericytes of the vasculature and fibroblasts and myofibroblasts of the stroma of solid tumors express PDGF receptors, and PDGF stimulation of such cells promotes tumorigenesis. Inhibition of PDGF receptor signaling has proven to useful for the treatment of patients with certain rare tumors. Whether treatment with PDGF/PDGF receptor antagonists will be beneficial for more common malignancies is the subject for ongoing studies. PMID:24359404

  16. Focus on the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in bone development and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Thouverey, Cyril; Caverzasio, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a wide range of extracellular signals. As a consequence, it can generate many different biological effects that depend on the stimulus and on the activated cell type. Therefore, this pathway has been found to regulate many aspects of tissue development and homeostasis. Recent work with the aid of genetically modified mice has highlighted the physiological functions of this pathway in skeletogenesis and postnatal bone maintenance. In this review, emphasis is given to the roles of the p38 MAPK pathway in chondrocyte, osteoblast and osteoclast biology. In particular, we describe the molecular mechanisms of p38 MAPK activation and downstream targets. The requirement of this pathway in physiological bone development and homeostasis is demonstrated by the ability of p38 MAPK to regulate master transcription factors controlling geneses and functions of chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:26131361

  17. Phytohormones Signaling Pathways and ROS Involvement in Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Oracz, Krystyna; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are major determinants of the regulation of development and stress responses in plants. During life cycle of these organisms, signaling networks of plant growth regulators and ROS interact in order to render an appropriate developmental and environmental response. In plant’s photosynthetic (e.g., leaves) and non-photosynthetic (e.g., seeds) tissues, enhanced and suboptimal ROS production is usually associated with stress, which in extreme cases can be lethal to cells, a whole organ or even an organism. However, controlled production of ROS is appreciated for cellular signaling. Despite the current progress that has been made in plant biology and increasing number of findings that have revealed roles of ROS and hormonal signaling in germination, some questions still arise, e.g., what are the downstream protein targets modified by ROS enabling stimulus-specific