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Sample records for adhesion strength increased

  1. On the increasing of adhesive strength of nanotube layers on beta titanium alloys for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Filip, Vladimir; Joska, Ludek

    2015-11-01

    The nanostructuring of titanium and its alloys surfaces is used inter alia for increasing the medical implants osseointegration. Many papers about this topic were published. However, in most cases there were no informations about nanostructures adhesion to the surface, which is crucial from the application point of view. The aim of this study was to prepare nanostructures on titanium beta alloy and optimized its adhesion to the alloy surface. Nanotubes were formed by anodic polarization in electrolyte containing fluoride ions. The composition of the nanotubes was described by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Nanostructures adhesion was tested by pull-of method. The nanotubes on the Ti-36Nb-6Ta beta alloy surface were prepared by anodization. The nanostructures properties were modified by electrochemical process parameters. The adhesion of the nanotubes prepared in this work was satisfactory for implantological applications.

  2. Adhesive strength of autologous fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Hirozane, K; Kamiya, A

    2000-03-01

    To establish an easy and rapid method for measuring the adhesive strength of fibrin glue and to clarify the factor(s) most affecting the strength, a study was made on the effect of the concentration of plasma components on the strength of cryoprecipitate (Cryo) prepared from a subject's own autologous plasma to be used as fibrin glue. The adhesive strength of the Cryo was measured with various supporting materials instead of animal skin using a tester of tension and compression. The results were as follows: (1) the strength of Cryo applied to ground flat glass (4 cm2) was significantly greater than that applied to clear glass, clear plastic, or smooth and flat wood chips; (2) the adhesive strength of Cryo depended on the concentration of thrombin with the optimal concentration being 50 units/ml; (3) the concentration of CaCl2 did not affect the adhesive strength of Cryo; (4) the adhesive reaction was dependent on the temperature and the adhesive strength more quickly reached a steady state at 37 degrees C than at lower temperature; (5) the adhesive strength was correlated well with the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. These results indicate that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be easily and quickly evaluated using a tester and ground glass with thrombin at 50 units/ml, and that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be predicted from the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. PMID:10726885

  3. Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded section beams under torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tomioka, Noboru; Kakiage, Masashi; Niisawa, Junetsu; Kitagawa, Hideo

    1995-11-01

    Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded box beams was investigated. From results of the fatigue tests, it was seen that the fatigue strength of bonded beams was higher than that of spot welded beams. Fatigue strength of bonded beams was independent of plate thickness and partition. The flexural rigidity of the box beams in the plane of partition can increase without decrease of torsional rigidity and torsional fatigue strength, if the partition is jointed by adhesive bonding instead of spot welding. Since the fatigue strength and rigidity of adhesive bonded joints can be higher than the spot welded joints in the weight saving structures, it is expected that the structural adhesive joints will be employed more in the automobile body structure. For assuring the introduction of this joint more into the automobile body structures, it is necessary that the fatigue tests on the model members of the actual members used in the automobile body structure are conducted, in addition to those of the simple joints such as tension shear and T-type tension, and the property of the fatigue strength on the adhesive bonded members is known. But, the authors now have little data on fatigue tests of the adhesive bonded members. In the present research to be reported, the fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams under torsion, which are typical members in automobile body structure, were carried out and the effects of the presence of longitudinal partition and plate thickness on fatigue strength were investigated. Comparing the results of fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams with those on spot welded box beams, the property of fatigue strength on these adhesive bonded box beams was cleared.

  4. Adhesion Strength Study of EVA Encapsulants on Glass Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Glick, S. H.

    2003-05-01

    An extensive peel-test study was conducted to investigate the various factors that may affect the adhesion strength of photovoltaic module encapsulants, primarily ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), on glass substrates of various laminates based on a common configuration of glass/encapsulant/backfoil. The results show that"pure" or"absolute" adhesion strength of EVA-to-glass was very difficult to obtain because of tensile deformation of the soft, semi-elastic EVA layer upon pulling. A mechanically"strong enough" backing foil on the EVA was critical to achieving the"apparent" adhesion strength. Peel test method with a 90-degree-pull yielded similar results to a 180-degree-pull. The 90-degree-pull method better revealed the four stages of delamination failure of the EVA/backfoil layers. The adhesion strength is affected by a number of factors, which include EVA type, formulation, backfoil type and manufacturing source, glass type, and surface priming treatment on the glass surface or on the backfoil. Effects of the glass-cleaning method and surface texture are not obvious. Direct priming treatments used in the work did not improve, or even worsened, the adhesion. Aging of EVA by storage over~5 years reduced notably the adhesion strength. Lower adhesion strengths were observed for the blank (unformulated) EVA and non-EVA copolymers, such as poly(ethylene-co-methacrylate) (PEMA) or poly(ethylene-co-butylacrylate) (PEBA). Their adhesion strengths increased if the copolymers were cross-linked. Transparent fluoropolymer superstrates such as TefzelTM and DureflexTM films used for thin-film PV modules showed low adhesion strengths to the EVA at a level of~2 N/mm.

  5. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities. PMID:25105533

  6. Passively stuck: death does not affect gecko adhesion strength.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William J; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Many geckos use adhesive toe pads on the bottom of their digits to attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. Although gecko adhesion has been studied for hundreds of years, gaps exist in our understanding at the whole-animal level. It remains unclear whether the strength and maintenance of adhesion are determined by the animal or are passively intrinsic to the system. Here we show, for the first time, that strong adhesion is produced passively at the whole-animal level. Experiments on both live and recently euthanized tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) revealed that death does not affect the dynamic adhesive force or motion of a gecko foot when pulled along a vertical surface. Using a novel device that applied repeatable and steady-increasing pulling forces to the foot in shear, we found that the adhesive force was similarly high and variable when the animal was alive (mean ± s.d. = 5.4 ± 1.7 N) and within 30 min after death (5.4 ± 2.1 N). However, kinematic analyses showed that live geckos are able to control the degree of toe pad engagement and can rapidly stop strong adhesion by hyperextending the toes. This study offers the first assessment of whole-animal adhesive force under extremely controlled conditions. Our findings reveal that dead geckos maintain the ability to adhere with the same force as living animals, disproving that strong adhesion requires active control. PMID:25472940

  7. The variation of ice adhesion strength with substrate surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. F.; Lee, H. P.; Lim, S. P.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a relationship exists between the mean surface roughness Ra of an aluminium sample and the interfacial bonding strength σ between it and ice that has been frozen onto its surface. A method of forced vibration of a cantilevered composite beam at 10.0 Hz was used to study the interfacial fracture of the metal-ice interface. Low-cost strain gauges instead of piezoelectric PVDF sensors used in other reported studies were used for the adhesion strength measurements. It was found that increasing surface roughness would lead to a higher interfacial bonding strength, although there was no clearly defined mathematical relationship between Ra and σ. For smooth beams, the adhesion strength was found to be between 0.142 and 0.267 MPa, which was in good agreement with the range of values reported in other studies.

  8. Adhesion strength of sputtered TiAlN-coated WC insert tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Razali, M. Mohd.; Nizam, A. R. Md.

    2013-09-01

    The adhesion strength of TiAlN coating that deposited by using DC magnetron sputtering on WC insert tool are studied. TiAlN coating are deposited on Tungsten Carbide (WC) insert tool by varying negatively substrate bias from 79 to 221 volt and nitrogen flow rate from 30 to 72 sccm. The adhesion strength are obtained by using Rockwell indentation test method with a Brale diamond at applied load of 60,100 and 150 kgf. The lateral diameter of indentation is plotted on three different applied loads and the adhesion strength of TiAlN coating was obtained from the curved slopes at 100 and 150 kgf. The lower curve slop indicated better adhesion strength. The results shows that the adhesion strength of sputterred TiAlN coating tend to increase as the negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate are increased.

  9. Adhesion strength of sputtered TiAlN-coated WC insert tool

    SciTech Connect

    Budi, Esmar; Razali, M. Mohd.; Nizam, A. R. Md.

    2013-09-09

    The adhesion strength of TiAlN coating that deposited by using DC magnetron sputtering on WC insert tool are studied. TiAlN coating are deposited on Tungsten Carbide (WC) insert tool by varying negatively substrate bias from 79 to 221 volt and nitrogen flow rate from 30 to 72 sccm. The adhesion strength are obtained by using Rockwell indentation test method with a Brale diamond at applied load of 60,100 and 150 kgf. The lateral diameter of indentation is plotted on three different applied loads and the adhesion strength of TiAlN coating was obtained from the curved slopes at 100 and 150 kgf. The lower curve slop indicated better adhesion strength. The results shows that the adhesion strength of sputterred TiAlN coating tend to increase as the negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate are increased.

  10. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent. PMID:22414513

  11. Adhesion strength study between plasma treated polyester fibres and a rubber matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krump, H.; Šimor, M.; Hudec, I.; Jaššo, M.; Luyt, A. S.

    2005-02-01

    In this work, the adhesion strength between poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibres and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) was studied. The effects of atmospheric plasma treatment, used to increase adhesion strength between PET fibres and the rubber matrix, were investigated and compared. It was confirmed that lubricants on the fibres caused a decrease in adhesion strength between the plasma treated reinforcing PET fibres and the SBR rubber matrix. These lubricants can be removed by acetone. When washed and treated in plasma, a substantial improvement in adhesion strength was observed. No ageing in air before combination with the rubber matrix was observed. This confirmed that the plasma streamers caused the creation of a new, relatively stable chemical species on the polymer surface. It suggests that the surface modification of PET fibres by plasma treatment at atmospheric gas pressure is a suitable and technologically applicable method for the improvement of adhesion strength of polyester reinforcing materials to rubber.

  12. Geckolike high shear strength by carbon nanotube fiber adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Y.; Nakayama, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube adhesives can adhere strongly to surfaces as a gecko does. The number of carbon nanotube layers is an important determinant of the contact area for adhesion. Balancing the catalyst ratio and buffer layer used for chemical vapor deposition processing controls the number of carbon nanotube layers and their distribution. The features of carbon nanotubes determine the shear strength of adhesion. Carbon nanotubes with a broad distribution of layers exhibit enhanced shear strength with equivalent adhesive capability to that of a natural Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko)

  13. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  14. Effects of ultrasonic agitation on adhesion strength of micro electroforming Ni layer on Cu substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Xu, Zheng; Shao, Ligeng

    2016-03-01

    Micro electroforming is an important technology, which is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in MEMS. The micro metal devices have the problem of poor adhesion strength, which has dramatically influenced the dimensional accuracy of the devices and seriously limited the development of the micro electroforming technology. In order to improve the adhesion strength, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process in this paper. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under ultrasonic and ultrasonic-free conditions. The effects of the ultrasonic agitation on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization and alternating current (a.c.) impedance methods. The real surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry method. The compressive stress and the crystallite size of the electroforming layer were measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The adhesion strength of the electroforming layer was measured by scratch test. The experimental results show that the imposition of the ultrasonic agitation decreases the polarization overpotential and increases the charge transfer process at the electrode-electrolyte interface during the electroforming process. The ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size and the real surface area, and reduces the compressive stress. Then the adhesion strength is improved about 47% by the ultrasonic agitation in average. In addition, mechanisms of the ultrasonic agitation improving the adhesion strength are originally explored in this paper. The mechanisms are that the ultrasonic agitation increases the crystallite size, which reduces the compressive stress. The lower the compressive stress is, the larger the adhesion strength is. Furthermore, the ultrasonic agitation increases the real surface area, enhances the mechanical interlocking strength and consequently increases the adhesion

  15. The effect of different adhesive system applications on push-out bond strengths of glass fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Deniz Arısu, Hacer; Üçtaşlı, Mine Betül; Okay, Tufan Can

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Over the past years, the adhesion of fiber posts luted with simplified adhesive systems has been a matter of great interest. The aim of this study was to assess the post retentive potential of a self-adhesive resin cement using different adhesive systems to compare the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS The post spaces of 56 mandibular premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups and further divided into 2 subgroups according to testing time (n=7). The fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and one of the following adhesive systems: no adhesive, a total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond), a two-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil SE Bond) and a one-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil S3 Bond). Each root was cut horizontally, and 1.5 mm thick six root segments were prepared. Push-out tests were performed after one week or three months (0.5 mm/min). Statistical analysis were performed with three-way ANOVA (α=.05). RESULTS Cervical root segments showed higher bond strength values than middle segments. Adhesive application increased the bond strength. For one week group, the total-etch adhesive resin Single Bond showed higher bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem applied without adhesive resin at middle region. For 3 months group, the two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond showed the highest bond strength for both regions. Regarding the time considered, Clearfil SE Bond 3 months group showed higher bond strength values than one week group. CONCLUSION Using the adhesive resins in combination with the self-adhesive resin cement improves the bond strengths. The bond strength values of two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond improved as time passes. PMID:24049572

  16. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  17. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  18. Experimental and computational analysis of a novel flow channel to assess the adhesion strength of sessile marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Dimartino, Simone; Mather, Anton V; Alestra, Tommaso; Nawada, Suhas; Haber, Meir

    2015-02-01

    Bioadhesives produced by marine macroalgae represent a potential source of inspiration for the development of water-resistant adhesives. Assessing their adhesion strength, however, remains difficult owing to low volumes of adhesive material produced, low solubility and rapid curing time. These difficulties can be circumvented by testing the adhesion strength of macroalgae propagules attached to a substrate. In this paper, we present a simple, novel flow channel used to test the adhesion strength of the germlings of the fucalean alga Hormosira banksii to four substrates of biomedical relevance (PMMA, agar, gelatin and gelatin + lipid). The adhesion strength of H. banksii germlings was found to increase in a time-dependent manner, with minimal adhesion success after a settlement period of 6 h and maximum adhesion strength achieved 24 h after initial settlement. Adhesion success increased most dramatically between 6 and 12 h settlement time, while no additional increase in adhesion strength was recorded for settlement times over 24 h. No significant difference in adhesion strength to the various substrates was observed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to estimate the influence of fluid velocity and germling density on drag force acting on the settled organisms. CFD modelling showed that, on average, the drag force decreased with increasing germling number, suggesting that germlings would benefit from gregarious settlement behaviour. Collectively, our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms allowing benthic marine organisms to thrive in hydrodynamically stressful environments and provide useful insights for further investigations. PMID:25657838

  19. Experimental and computational analysis of a novel flow channel to assess the adhesion strength of sessile marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Dimartino, Simone; Mather, Anton V.; Alestra, Tommaso; Nawada, Suhas; Haber, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives produced by marine macroalgae represent a potential source of inspiration for the development of water-resistant adhesives. Assessing their adhesion strength, however, remains difficult owing to low volumes of adhesive material produced, low solubility and rapid curing time. These difficulties can be circumvented by testing the adhesion strength of macroalgae propagules attached to a substrate. In this paper, we present a simple, novel flow channel used to test the adhesion strength of the germlings of the fucalean alga Hormosira banksii to four substrates of biomedical relevance (PMMA, agar, gelatin and gelatin + lipid). The adhesion strength of H. banksii germlings was found to increase in a time-dependent manner, with minimal adhesion success after a settlement period of 6 h and maximum adhesion strength achieved 24 h after initial settlement. Adhesion success increased most dramatically between 6 and 12 h settlement time, while no additional increase in adhesion strength was recorded for settlement times over 24 h. No significant difference in adhesion strength to the various substrates was observed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to estimate the influence of fluid velocity and germling density on drag force acting on the settled organisms. CFD modelling showed that, on average, the drag force decreased with increasing germling number, suggesting that germlings would benefit from gregarious settlement behaviour. Collectively, our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms allowing benthic marine organisms to thrive in hydrodynamically stressful environments and provide useful insights for further investigations. PMID:25657838

  20. Effect of particle state on the adhesive strength of HVOF sprayed metallic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Yu-Yue

    2002-12-01

    NiCrBSi and Ni-50Cr coatings were deposited using the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process under different spray parameters with two powders of different sizes to clarify the influence of the melting state of spray particles on the adhesive strength of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coating was estimated according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C633-79. The melting state of the spray droplet was examined from the coating microstructure. It was found that the melting state of spray particles had a significant effect on the adhesive strength of HVOF sprayed Ni-based coatings. The significant melting of the spray particle did not contribute to the increase in the adhesion of HVOF metallic coatings. On the other hand, the deposition of a partially melted large particle contributed to the substantial improvement of adhesive strength of the HVOF coating. The subsequent coating presented a dense microstructure and yielded an adhesive strength of more than 76 MPa, which was double that of the coating deposited with completely molten particles. It can be suggested that the good melting of the spray particle is mainly related to the mechanical interlocking effect, which reaches the limited and approximately defined adhesive strength up to 40 50 MPa.

  1. Cell adhesion strength from cortical tension - an integration of concepts.

    PubMed

    Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2015-10-15

    Morphogenetic mechanisms such as cell movement or tissue separation depend on cell attachment and detachment processes, which involve adhesion receptors as well as the cortical cytoskeleton. The interplay between the two components is of stunning complexity. Most strikingly, the binding energy of adhesion molecules is usually too small for substantial cell-cell attachment, pointing to a main deficit in our present understanding of adhesion. In this Opinion article, I integrate recent findings and conceptual advances in the field into a coherent framework for cell adhesion. I argue that active cortical tension is best viewed as an integral part of adhesion, and propose on this basis a non-arbitrary measure of adhesion strength - the tissue surface tension of cell aggregates. This concept of adhesion integrates heterogeneous molecular inputs into a single mechanical property and simplifies the analysis of attachment-detachment processes. It draws attention to the enormous variation of adhesion strengths among tissues, whose origin and function is little understood. PMID:26471994

  2. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  3. Strength of adhesive-bonded hybrid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschke, L.; Prinz, R.; Schnell, H.

    1979-01-01

    Structures prepared from materials with different thermal and mechanical properties by means of fiber-strengthened binders can fail in a number of ways. The present lecture is focused on failures through debonding at the metal or at the fiber-reinforced plastic. A method for calculating the stress distribution in adhesive layers as a function of the load is outlined, and its usefulness in providing insight into the behavior of bonds in hybrid structures is noted. Means of eliminating the unfavorable effects of temperature, humidity, creep and relaxation on the bonds in the manufacture of hybrid structures are examined, along with test methods developed for such structures.

  4. Studies of fiber-matrix adhesion on compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Nairn, John A.; Boll, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated on the effect of the matrix polymer and the fiber matrix bond strength of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites. The work includes tests with micro-composites, single ply composites, laminates, and multi-axial loaded cylinders. The results obtained thus far indicate that weak fiber-matrix adhesion dramatically reduces 0 degree compression strength. Evidence is also presented that the flaws in the carbon fiber that govern compression strength differ from those that determine fiber tensile strength. Examination of post-failure damage in the single ply tests indicates kink banding at the crack tip.

  5. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  6. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  7. The effect of pretreatment on adhesive strength of Cu-plated liquid crystal polymer (LCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Meisheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Ding, Dongyan; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Copper metallization on LCP was carried out by means of electroless plating followed by electroplating and the effect of pretreatment on the adhesive strength of the Cu-plated LCP was investigated in detail. Compared with the other etching agents used here, potassium permanganate was found to be the most effective and the optimum etching time is 20 min. With potassium permanganate as the etching agent, the adhesive strength could reach 12.08 MPa, which is much higher than the reported maximum adhesive strength (lower than 8.0 MPa). XPS spectra of LCP film indicated that hydrophilic groups were introduced into the LCP surface by etching, creating a nanometer-scale surface roughness and improving the wettability between copper and LCP. SEM and AFM observations revealed that the distinctly increased adhesive strength could be attributed to the improved wetting and the mechanical interlocking effect. The failure mode of Cu-plated LCP film was found to be dependent on the etching time. When the etching time was short, the failure mode of Cu-plated LCP film was mainly adhesive. As the etching time increased, cohesive failure gradually occurred, causing an adhesive/cohesive mixed failure mode.

  8. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  9. Improvement of adhesion strength and scratch resistance of fluorocarbon thin films by cryogenic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Wang, Jun; Shen, Jinpeng; Li, Rui; Yang, Guangcheng; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Fluorocarbon thin films have been widely applied as protective coatings due to unique physical and chemical properties, but the scratch resistance and adhesion strength between the films and substrates are rather poor. Coating technologies for stronger scratch resistance and adhesion strength are definitely needed and have great significance in coatings applications of fluorocarbon thin films. In this work, the scratch resistance and adhesion strength between silicon substrates and fluorocarbon thin films deposited by radio frequency (R.F.) magnetron sputtering were improved via a remarkably simple, flexible and nondestructive cryogenic treatment method. The effect of the cryogenic treatment on the microstructure, hardness, adhesion strength and scratch resistance of fluorocarbon thin films were investigated. XPS results indicated that the content of fluorine decreased slightly and the amount of cross-linked units increased after cryogenic treatment. Furthermore, the hardness of fluorocarbon thin films slightly improved. Nano-scratch test revealed that fluorocarbon thin films after this treatment had excellent scratch resistance and good adhesion strength.

  10. Evaluation of bond strength of different adhesive systems: Shear and Microtensile Bond Strength Test

    PubMed Central

    GALLUSI, G.; GALEANO, P.; LIBONATI, A.; GIUCA, M.R.; CAMPANELLA, V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. Aim of this work is the in vitro bond strength evaluation of three bonding agents comparing the results of two kinds of test, Microtensile Bond Strength Test and a Shear Bond Strength Test. Bond strength tests have been used to test both direct and indirect restorative techniques to investigate if methods could give different results. Methods 72 human third molars have been collected and stored in physiological solution. Three kinds of test were conducted: 1- SB, 2- “Slice” preparation μTBS1, 3- “Stick” preparation μTBS2. We tested three different adhesive systems (Groups 1-2-3 n=24), two restorative techniques (subgroup A–B n=12). The tested adhesives were: Optibond FL (OFL) (Group 1), Optibond Solo Plus (OSP) (Group 2), Optibond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OSSE) (Group 3). For all tests was used a universal load machine Instron Machine. Results. Best values were found for Optibond FL with mean values of 45–50 MPa. Optibond Solo Plus resulted in values very similar and in some cases almost identical to FL. Optibond Solo Self Etch showed poorer adhesion in both direct and indirect restorative techniques. The parametric and non parametric statistical variance analysis pointed out the absence of significant differences between OFL and OSP, and demonstrated a significant difference for OSSE adhesive. Significance. The results confirm that a total etch two-step adhesive is the best compromise between easiness and effectiveness. PMID:23285371

  11. Resistivity and adhesive strength of thin film metallizations on single crystal quartz.

    PubMed

    Vianco, P T; Sifford, C H; Romero, J A

    1997-01-01

    Resistivity and adhesive strength were measured for the thin films 450 A Cr-1800 A Au, 450 A Cr-1000 A Mo-1800 A Au, 450 A Cr-1000 A Ni-1800 A Au, 450 A Mo-1800 A Au, 1800 A Au, and 2000 A Al on z-and AT-oriented single crystal quartz substrates in the as-deposited condition as well as after thermal annealing at 380 degrees C and 450 degrees C for 30 min in air or vacuum. The Cr-Au films exhibited significant resistivity increases after thermal annealing which were caused by the interdiffusion of Cr and Au. Barrier layers of Mo or Ni limited such increases after heat treatment. The Mo-Au, Au, and Al films exhibited resistivity decreases following thermal annealing. The mean adhesive strengths of the Cr-Au, Cr-Mo-Au, and Cr-Ni-Au films were excellent in the as-deposited and annealed conditions, ranging from 41 MPa to 70 MPa. The Mo-Au and Au films maintained relatively poor adhesion under all circumstances. Heat treatment improved the poor adhesive strength of the as-deposited Al films to values exceeding 63 MPa. Resistivity and adhesive strengths did not differ significantly between the z- and AT-oriented substrates. PMID:18244122

  12. Influence of superconductor film composition on adhesion strength of coated conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Khatri, Narayan; Liu, Yuhao; Delgado, Louis; Galstyan, Eduard; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2015-11-20

    The effect of high temperature superconductor (HTS) film composition on the adhesion strength of rare- earth barium copper oxide coated conductors (CCs) has been studied. It has been found that the mechanical integrity of the superconductor layer is very susceptible to the defects especially those along the ab plane, probably due to the weak interfaces between the defects and the matrix. Gd and Y in the standard composition were substituted with Sm and the number of in-plane defects was drastically reduced. Consequently, a four-fold increase in adhesion or peeling strength in Sm-based CCs was achieved compared to the standard GdYBCO samples.

  13. Effect of Molecular Flexibility upon Ice Adhesion Shear Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Knuth, Taylor; Hadley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft surfaces effects aircraft performance by increasing weight and drag leading to loss of lift. Current active alleviation strategies involve pneumatic boots, heated surfaces, and usage of glycol based de-icing fluids. Mitigation or reduction of in-flight icing by means of a passive approach may enable retention of aircraft capabilities, i.e., no reduction in lift, while reducing the aircraft weight and mechanical complexity. Under a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute Seedling activity, the effect of end group functionality and chain length upon ice adhesion shear strength (IASS) was evaluated with the results indicating that chemical functionality and chain length (i.e. molecular flexibility) affected IASS. Based on experimental and modeling results, diamine monomers incorporating molecular flexibility as either a side chain or in between diamine functionalities were prepared, incorporated into epoxy resins that were subsequently used to fabricate coatings on aluminum substrates, and tested in a simulated icing environment. The IASS was found to be lower when molecular flexibility was incorporated in the polymer chain as opposed to a side chain.

  14. Enhancing the adhesion strength of micro electroforming layer by ultrasonic agitation method and the application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Tao, Yousheng; Li, Qingfeng; Luo, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Micro electroforming is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in Micro Electro Mechanism System (MEMS). However, there is the problem of poor adhesion strength between micro electroforming layer and substrate. This dramatically influences the dimensional accuracy of the device. To solve this problem, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation on the adhesion strength, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under different ultrasonic power (0W, 100W, 150W, 200W, 250W) and different ultrasonic frequencies (0kHz, 40kHz, 80kHz, 120kHz, 200kHz). The effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization method and alternating current (a.c.) impedance method. The adhesion strength between the electroforming layer and the substrate was measured by scratch test. The compressive stress of the electroforming layer was measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The crystallite size of the electroforming layer was measured by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method. The internal contact surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic agitation can decrease the polarization overpotential and increase the charge transfer process. Generally, the internal contact surface area is increased and the compressive stress is reduced. And then the adhesion strength is enhanced. Due to the different depolarization effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency, the effects on strengthening the adhesion strength are different. When the ultrasonic agitation is 200W and 40kHz, the effect on strengthening the adhesion strength is the best. In order to prove the effect which the ultrasonic agitation can improve the adhesion strength of the micro devices, micro pillar arrays were fabricated under

  15. Adhesive strength and curing rate of marine mussel protein extracts on porcine small intestinal submucosa*

    PubMed Central

    Ninan, Lal; Stroshine, R L; Wilker, J.J.; Shi, Riyi

    2008-01-01

    An adhesive protein extracted from marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) was used to bond strips of connective tissue for the purpose of evaluating the use of curing agents to improve adhesive curing. Specifically, mussel adhesive protein solution (MAPS, 0.5 mM dihydroxyphenylalanine) was applied, with or without the curing agents, to the ends of two overlapping strips of porcine small intestinal submucosa. The bond strength of this lap joint was determined after curing for 1 h at room temperature (25°C). The strength of joints formed using only MAPS or with only the ethyl, butyl or octyl cyanoacrylate adhesives were determined. Although joints bonded using ethyl cyanoacrylate were strongest, those using MAPS were stronger than those using butyl and octyl cyanoacrylates. The addition of 25 mM solutions of the transition metal ions V5+, Fe3+ and Cr6+, which are all oxidants, increased the bond strength of the MAPS joints. The V5+ gave the strongest bonds and the Fe3+ the second strongest. In subsequent tests with V5+ and Fe3+ solutions, the bond strength increased with V5+ concentration, but it did not increase with Fe3+ concentration. Addition of 250 mM V5+ gave a very strong bond. PMID:17434815

  16. Effect of thermal cycling on the bond strength of self-adhesive cements to fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco; Osorio, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the push-out bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to epoxy resin-based fiber posts after challenging by thermocycling. Thirty-six single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were drilled to receive RelyX Fiber posts #1. Three self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Breeze) were used for luting fiber posts. The bonded specimens were either stored for 1 month in a moist field (37°C) or submitted to thermocycling (5,000 times) prior to push-out test. The maximum force required to dislodge the post via an apical-coronal direction was recorded (megapascal). The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). The factors "luting cement" and "thermocycling" significantly influenced bond strengths. The initial push-out values of RelyX Unicem and Breeze were higher than those of G-Cem. After thermocycling, the bond strength of G-Cem increased and no differences were found between groups. RelyX Unicem and Breeze bond strengths were not affected by the thermal challenge. Thermal cycling and cement type differently influence the bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements. Self-adhesive cements can represent an option for luting fiber posts into root canal. PMID:21670983

  17. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coating with 110 µm Al2O3 particles which modified with silica; and, Group 3, tribochemical treatment - silica coating + silanization. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours before testing shear bond strength. Results Silica coating and tribochemical treatment significantly increased the bond strength of the MA, UN, BR, BI, SE and CL to zirconia compared to #600 polishing. For both #600 polished and silica coating treatments, MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement CL had the highest bond strengths to zirconia. Conclusion Applying silica coating and tribochemical treatment improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to zirconia, especially for CL. PMID:20690416

  18. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  19. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups). Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray), with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups), or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) (Three-step/Methacrylate group) (n = 6). The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm), and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min) to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05). However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. PMID:25671209

  20. Copper-Filled Electrically Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Ngee; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the effects of diethyl carbitol (diluent) and tertiary amines on the electrical, mechanical, and rheological properties of the Cu-filled polyurethane-based electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) were investigated. Significant difference could be observed in the electrical resistivity and shear strength of ECA prepared with different amount of diethyl carbitol. Reduced electrical resistivity was found in ECAs prepared with addition of tertiary amines, but no obvious change was observed in the shear strength of the ECA joint. Rheological property of the ECA paste was investigated in order to understand the correlation of the viscosity of ECA paste and electrical resistivity and shear strength of ECA joint. Results revealed that decrease in viscosity of the ECA paste reduced electrical resistivity and enhanced shear strength of ECA joint. A Cu-filled polyurethane-based ECA with considerably low electrical resistivity at the magnitude order range of 10-3 Ω cm, and significantly high shear strength (above 17 MPa) could be achieved.

  1. Increased erythrocyte adhesion to VCAM-1 during pulsatile flow: Application of a microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennell; Lancelot, Moira; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hines, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microvascular occlusion mediated by adhesive interactions of sickle erythrocytes (SSRBCs) to the endothelium. Most in vitro flow adhesion assays measure SSRBC adhesion during continuous flow, although in vivo SSRBC adhesive interactions occur during pulsatile flow. Using a well-plate microfluidic flow adhesion system, we demonstrate that isolated SSRBCs adhere to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) at greater levels during pulsatile versus continuous flow. A significant increase in adhesive interactions was observed between all pulse frequencies 1 Hz to 2 Hz (60–120 beats/min) when compared to non-pulsatile flow. Adhesion of isolated SSRBCs and whole blood during pulsatile flow was unaffected by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and exposure of SSRBCs to pulsatile flow did not affect the intrinsic adhesive properties of SSRBCs. The cell type responsible for increased adhesion of whole blood varied from patient to patient. We conclude that low flow periods of the pulse cycle allow more adhesive interactions between sickle erythrocytes and VCAM-1, and sickle erythrocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood may better reflect physiologic cellular interactions. The microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay used in this study may have applications for clinical assessment of sickle erythrocyte adhesion during pulsatile flow. PMID:24898561

  2. Proanthocyanidins Alter Adhesive/Dentin Bonding Strengths when Included in a Bonding System

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, Benjamin; Yao, Xiaomei; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of proanthocyanidins (PA) incorporation into a bonding system on dentin/adhesive bond stability following long-term storage in buffer and collagenase. Methods Human dentin surfaces were bonded with no PA (0-PA), PA incorporated in the primer (PA-primer), or PA incorporated in the adhesive (PA-adhesive), and composite build-ups were created. Following sectioning into beams, bonded specimens were stored in buffer or collagenase for 0, 1, 4, 26, or 52 weeks before being tested for microtensile bond strength (μTBS). ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc were performed. Fractured surfaces were viewed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Both bonding system and storage time but not storage medium significantly affected μTBS. Initially, 0-PA and PA-primer were superior to PA-adhesive, and after 1 week both PA groups were inferior to 0-PA. However, after 4 weeks PA-adhesive had significantly increased and 0-PA significantly decreased such that all three groups were equal. Thereafter, both PA-primer/adhesive groups trended with an increase (the 0-PA group remaing consistent) such that at 52 weeks PA-primer samples were significantly stronger (p < 0.001) or nearly so (p = 0.08) when compared to 0-PA samples. SEM revealed that initial fractures tended to occur at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer for 0-PA and PA-primer groups but at the top of the hybrid layer/in the adhesive for PA-adhesive. After 4 weeks, however, all groups fractured similarly at the middle/bottom of the hybrid layer. Clinical Significance PA incorporation into a bonding system significantly alters interfacial bonding strengths, and its incorporation may stabilize the interface and protect degradation over time under clinical conditions. PMID:23243975

  3. Comparison of bond strength of three adhesives: composite resin, hybrid GIC, and glass-filled GIC.

    PubMed

    Rix, D; Foley, T F; Mamandras, A

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare 3 orthodontic adhesives in the areas of shear-peel bond strength, location of adhesive failure, and extent of enamel cracking before bonding and after debonding of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives included a composite resin control (Transbond XT; 3M/Unitek, St Paul, Minn), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America Corp, Alsip, Ill), and a polyacid-modified composite resin under dry and saliva-contaminated conditions (Assure; Reliance Orthodontic Products Inc, Itasca, Ill). Metal brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of 160 (4 groups of 40) human premolars. The bonded teeth were stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 30 days and thermocycled for 24 hours before debonding with a Universal Instron (Instron Corp, Canton, Mass) testing machine. The extent of cracking in the buccal surfaces was evaluated under 16x magnification before bonding and after debonding. Although the bond strength of the composite resin control (20.19 MPa) was significantly greater (P <.05) than that of the adhesives in the other groups, clinically acceptable shear-peel bond strengths were found for all adhesives (Fuji Ortho LC = 13.57 MPa, Assure-dry = 10.74 MPa, Assure-wet = 10.99 MPa). The bond strength for the Assure adhesive was not significantly affected by saliva contamination. The sample of extracted premolars used in this study displayed a greater frequency of buccal surface enamel cracking (46.7%) than that reported in the literature for in vivo premolars (7.8%-10.2%), which was possibly due to the extraction process. The frequency of enamel cracking in a subset of this sample (n = 34) increased from 46.4% at prebonding to 62.4% at postdebonding as a result of the forces of debonding. PMID:11174538

  4. The role of adhesion strength in human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblastic differentiation on biodegradable polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizan, Sylva Jana

    in focal adhesion number. Differentiation studies demonstrated that both constitutively active RhoA and mutants of FAK increase osteoblastic activity, while both dominant negative RhoA cells and hMSC treated with Y27632 exhibited a decrease in osteoblastic markers. Manipulating FAK or RhoA in hMSC resulted in greater modulations in osteogenesis on PLGA previously demonstrating maximal T50. This suggests that hMSC differentiation on polymers exhibiting high adhesion strength depends on FAK and RhoA signaling.

  5. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  6. [Adhesive strengths of cast crowns with various types of cements].

    PubMed

    Utz, K H; Grüner, M; Büscher, M

    1990-12-01

    In an in vitro study the adhesive strength of sand-blasted castings (gold alloy) was tested on human teeth prepared and finished in different ways. For cementation we used two glass ionomer and one phosphate cement. On the surfaces treated with carbide finishing instruments the force required for separating the crown from the tooth was about 1.9 N/mm2 for Ketac-cem, about 2 N/mm2 for Fuji Ionomer, and about 1.8 N/mm2 for Harvard (a zinc oxide phosphate cement). Compared with this, the values obtained for dentin surfaces pretreated with fine diamonds (red ring) were 1.5 N/mm2 for Ketac-cem, 1.6 N/mm2 for Fuji Ionomer, and 1.9 N/mm2 for Harvard. The measured differences between the various types of cement were statistically not significant. PMID:2135267

  7. Application of tung oil to improve adhesion strength and water resistance of cottonseed meal and protein adhesives on maple veneer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed meal-based products show promise in serving as environment-friendly wood adhesives. However, their practical utilization is currently limited due to low durability and water resistant properties. In this research, we tested the improvement of adhesion strength and water resistance of cott...

  8. Adhesion strength measurements of excimer-laser-treated PTFE surfaces using liquid photoreagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Bela; Smausz, Tomi; Kresz, Norbert; Ignacz, Ferenc

    2003-04-01

    The most known feature of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is its adhesion behavior: it is hydrophobic and oleophobic at the same time. This can cause serious problems and obstacles during the surface treatment and fixing of PTFE objects. During our experiments Teflon films were irradiated by an ArF excimer laser beam in presence of liquid photoreagents containing amine groups (aminoethanol, 1,2-diaminoethane, triethylene-tetramine). In consequence of the treatment the adhesion of the modified surfaces significantly increased, the samples could be glued and moistened. The adhesion strength of the glued surfaces was measured in the function of the applied laser fluence. The adhesion strength increased drastically between 0 - 1 mJ/cm2 and showed saturation above 1 mJ/cm2 at approximately 5 - 9 MPa values depending on the applied photoreagents. On the basis of our experiments it was found that the treatment with triethylene-tetramine was the most effective. The surface chemical modifications of the treated Teflon samples can be due to the incorporation of amine groups into the surface layer.

  9. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Anish

    decrease of bond shear strength in single lap shear test samples. Through-transmission ultrasonics (TTU) Acoustography at 3.8 MHz showed promising results on the detectability of bondline defects in adhesively bonded CFRP-Al lap shear test samples. A correlation between Acoustography ultrasonic attenuation and average bond shear strength in CFRP-Al lap shear panels demonstrated that differential attenuation increased with the reduction of the bond shear strength. Similarly, optical DIC tests were conducted to identify and quantify kissing bond defects in CFRP-Al single lap shear joints. DIC results demonstrated changes in the normal strain (epsilonyy) contour map of the contaminated specimens at relatively lower load levels (15% ~ 30% of failure loads). Kissing bond regions were characterized by negative strains, and these were attributed to high compressive bending strains and the localized disbonding taking placed at the bondline interface as a result of the load application. It was also observed that contaminated samples suffered from more compressive strains (epsilonyy) compared to the baseline sample along the loading direction and they suffered from less compressive strains (epsilonxx) compared to the baseline sample perpendicular to the loading direction. This demonstrated the adverse effect of the kissing bond on the adhesive joint integrity. This was a very significant finding for the reason that hybrid ultrasonic DIC is being developed as a faster, more efficient, and more reliable NDE technique for determining bond quality and predicting bond shear strength in adhesively bonded structures.

  10. Effect of Pulsed Waterjet Surface Preparation on the Adhesion Strength of Cold Gas Dynamic Sprayed Aluminum Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, T.; MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Jodoin, B.

    2015-08-01

    It has been observed that the method of substrate surface preparation can have a profound effect on the adhesion strength of cold-sprayed metallic coatings. In this investigation, pure aluminum powder was sprayed onto aluminum alloy substrates using cold spray. The substrates used in this work had undergone a variety of surface preparations to impart varying degrees of surface roughness. The pulsed waterjet technique was used to increase the substrates' surface roughness beyond what can be achieved using traditional grit blasting procedures. Surfaces prepared using pulsed waterjet resulted in substantial increases in the pure aluminum coating adhesion strength. This increase may be the result of increased mechanical anchoring sites available as well as their favorable geometries. It is hypothesized that compressive residual stress may also contribute to increased adhesion strength.

  11. Evaluation of a sugar based edible adhesive utilizing a tensile strength tester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and utilized to formulate a recently patented adhesive based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as reduced strength due to improper heating time, and an optimal curing temperature of 60oC was ac...

  12. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Three Self-etching Adhesives: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yadala, Chandrashekhar; Gaddam, Rajkumar; Arya, Siddarth; Baburamreddy, K V; Raju, V Ramakrishnam; Varma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine and compare the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with Adper Promt self-etching adhesive (3M ESPE), Xeno III self-etching adhesive (DENSPLY), Transbond plus self-etching adhesive (3M) with that of conversional bonding procedure, and to calculate the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Materials and Methods: Totally, 60 maxillary premolar teeth were collected, and divided into Group I (Blue): Transbond™ XT primer, Group II (Purple): Adper™ Prompt™ self-etching adhesive, Group III (Orange): Xeno III® self-etching adhesive, Group IV (Pink): Tranbond™ Plus self-etching adhesive. Results: The results of the study showed there was no statistical significance in the shear bond strength according to an analysis of variance (P = 0.207) of the four groups. The mean shear bond strength of Groups I, II, III, IV were 14.56 ± 2.97 Megapascals (MPa), 12.62 ± 2.48 MPa, 13.27 ± 3.16, and 12.64 ± 2.56, respectively. Chi-square comparison for the ARI indicated that there was a significant difference (P = 0.003) between the groups. Conclusion: All the four self-etching adhesives showed clinically acceptable mean shear bond strength. The ARI score showed a self-etching adhesive the debonding occurred more within the adhesive interface leaving less composite adhesive on the tooth surface making it easy to clean up. PMID:26229371

  13. Effects of two adhesion boosters on the shear bond strength of new and rebonded orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Chung, C H; Fadem, B W; Levitt, H L; Mante, F K

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 adhesion boosters, Enhance LC (Reliance, Itasca, Ill) and All-Bond 2 (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill), on the shear bond strength of new and rebonded (previously debonded) brackets. Sixty new and 60 sandblasted rebonded brackets were bonded to 120 extracted human premolars with composite resin and divided equally into 6 groups based on the 2 adhesion boosters used: (1) new brackets/no booster (2) rebonded brackets/no booster (3) new brackets/Enhance (4) rebonded brackets/Enhance (5) new brackets/All-Bond (6) rebonded brackets/All-Bond. Shear bond strength of each sample was tested with an Instron machine (Instron Corp, Canton, Mass). Results show that the new brackets/All-Bond group yielded the highest strength (20.8 +/- 7.5 MPa), followed by the new brackets/Enhance group (18.6 +/- 6.5 MPa), rebond brackets/All-Bond group (17.3 +/- 7.2 MPa), new brackets/no booster group (16.8 +/- 6.3 MPa), rebonded brackets/no booster group (14.2 +/- 7.2 MPa), and rebonded brackets/Enhance group (13.6 +/- 6.7 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found among the 3 groups utilizing new brackets. For groups of rebonded brackets/no booster and rebonded brackets/Enhance, bond strength was significantly lower than groups of 3 new brackets and rebonded brackets/All-Bond. Rebonded brackets/All-Bond group had comparable bond strength to all 3 new brackets groups. It was concluded that in the process of replacing a failed bracket, (1) when new brackets are used, neither All-Bond 2 or Enhance LC improves bond strength significantly, (2) without the use of any adhesion booster, sandblasted rebonded brackets yield significantly less bond strength than new brackets, (3) Enhance LC fails to increase bond strength of sandblasted rebonded brackets, (4) All-Bond 2 significantly increases bond strength of sandblasted rebonded brackets, (5) sandblasted rebonded brackets with All-Bond 2 yield comparable bond strength to new brackets

  14. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  15. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  16. Influence of adhesive systems on microtensile bond strength of resin-based endodontic sealers to the root dentin

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Juan B.; González-Rodríguez, María P.; González-López, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength to root dentin of AH Plus™ and EndoREZ® with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and Optibond Solo™ Plus adhesive systems. Study Design: The coronal and middle thirds of six single rooted bovine teeth was split longitudinally in a mesio-distal direction. The two halves were joined with AH Plus or EndoREZ, with and without the use of Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and Optibond Solo™ Plus adhesive systems. Build-ups were vertically sectioned into quadrangular (≈1mmx1mm) compound bars and subjected to tensile tests at a constant crosshead speed (1 mm/min) until debonding. Results: Optibond® Solo Plus™ in combination with AH Plus™ and EndoREZ® showed the highest mean microtensile bond strength values, in both coronal and middle thirds. The lowest results were seen in the groups where no dentine adhesive was applied, and in those where the self-etching adhesive Clearfil Liner Bond 2V was used. Conclusion: The microtensile bond strength to root dentin of AH Plus™ and EndoREZ may be increased with the use of a total-etch adhesive. Key words:Adhesive systems, AH Plus, EndoREZ, microtensile bond strength, root dentin. PMID:25136417

  17. The effect of Zircaloy-4 substrate surface condition on the adhesion strength and corrosion of SiC coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Olayyan, Y.; Fuchs, G. E.; Baney, R.; Tulenko, J.

    2005-11-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings of silicon carbide were deposited on various Zircaloy-4 substrates having different surface preparations to increase the corrosion resistance. The effects of several different surface treatments of the Zircaloy-4 substrate, such as surface roughness, the presence of interlayer, and pickling, on the adhesion and corrosion resistance of the SiC coatings have been evaluated using a scratch test method, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The scratch test was found to be a good tool for qualitative measurement of adhesion strength of thin coating films. Higher adhesion strengths were obtained for a moderate level of substrate roughness and the corrosion resistance of these films was closely related with the adhesion of the film on the substrate, as measured by impedance.

  18. Adhesive strength of medical polymer on anodic oxide nanostructures fabricated on biomedical β-type titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Junko; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Mohri, Tomoyoshi; Hanawa, Takao

    2014-03-01

    Anodic oxide nanostructures (nanopores and nanotubes) were fabricated on a biomedical β-type titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ), by anodization in order to improve the adhesive strength of a medical polymer, segmented polyurethane (SPU), to TNTZ. TNTZ was anodized in 1.0M H3PO4 solution with 0.5 mass% NaF using a direct-current power supply at a voltage of 20V. A nanoporous structure is formed on TNTZ in the first stage of anodization, and the formation of a nanotube structure occurs subsequently beneath the nanoporous structure. The nanostructures formed on TNTZ by anodization for less than 3,600s exhibit higher adhesive strengths than those formed at longer anodization times. The adhesive strength of the SPU coating on the nanoporous structure formed on top of TNTZ by anodization for 1,200s improves by 144% compared to that of the SPU coating on as-polished TNTZ with a mirror surface. The adhesive strength of the SPU coating on the nanotube structure formed on TNTZ by anodization for 3,600s increases by 50%. These improvements in the adhesive strength of SPU are the result of an anchor effect introduced by the nanostructures formed by anodization. Fracture occurs at the interface of the nanoporous structure and the SPU coating layer. In contrast, in the case that SPU coating has been performed on the nanotube structure, fracture occurs inside the nanotubes. PMID:24433910

  19. Bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive to dentin surfaces treated with saliva, blood, and different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Nimet; Cebe, Fatma; Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cetin, Ali Riza; Cobanoglu, Nevin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive to dentin surfaces after treatment with 4 different hemostatic agents in the presence of saliva and blood. After testing, no significant differences were found between the mean bond strength of Clearfil SE (CSE) Bond resin adhesive to normal dentin and those of CSE to dentin treated with the hemostatic agents ViscoStat Clear, Astringedent, or Astringedent X (P > 0.05). However, the mean bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin treated with Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) was significantly greater than those of the other groups (P < 0.05). Thus, while 3 of the tested hemostatic agents did not have significant effects on the bond strength of composite resin to dentin, ABS increased the bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin. PMID:26147164

  20. Bond strength of pressure sensitive adhesives for CFRP aluminium-alloy hybrid beams under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, C.

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses the impact absorbing capabilities of CFRP aluminium-alloy hybrid beams bonded with double-coated pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. Two sorts of double-coated adhesive tapes (VHB and SBT, 3M) were used in experiments. The strength and absorbed energy of the beams under impact loading were measured using an instrumented Charpy tester. Using the beams having the different adhesive tapes and the CFRP of different length, the variations of the strength and the absorbed energy were investigated. The beams bonded with VHB showed sufficient strength and absorbed energy. SBT showed also great capability of absorbing impact energy.

  1. Thermal Processing Effects on the Adhesive Strength of PS304 High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effects of post deposition heat treatments on the cohesive and adhesive strength properties of PS304, a plasma sprayed nickel-chrome based, high temperature solid lubricant coating deposited on stainless steel, are studied. Plasma spray deposited coating samples were exposed in air at temperatures from 432 to 650 C for up to 500 hr to promote residual stress relief, enhance particle to particle bonding and increase coating to substrate bond strength. Coating pull-off strength was measured using a commercial adhesion tester that utilizes 13 mm diameter aluminum pull studs attached to the coating surface with epoxy. Pull off force was automatically recorded and converted to coating pull off strength. As deposited coating samples were also tested as a baseline. The as-deposited (untreated) samples either delaminated at the coating-substrate interface or failed internally (cohesive failure) at about 17 MPa. Samples heat treated at temperatures above 540 C for 100 hr or at 600 C or above for more than 24 hr exhibited strengths above 31 MPa, nearly a two fold increase. Coating failure occurred inside the body of the coating (cohesive failure) for nearly all of the heat-treated samples and only occasionally at the coating substrate interface (adhesive failure). Metallographic analyses of heat-treated coatings indicate that the Nickel-Chromium binder in the PS304 appears to have segregated into two phases, a high nickel matrix phase and a high chromium precipitated phase. Analysis of the precipitates indicates the presence of silicon, a constituent of a flow enhancing additive in the commercial NiCr powder. The exact nature and structure of the precipitate phase is not known. This microstructural change is believed to be partially responsible for the coating strength increase. Diffusion bonding between particles may also be playing a role. Increasing the heat treatment temperature, exposure time or both accelerate the heat treatment process. Preliminary

  2. Preliminary evaluation of adhesion strength measurement devices for ceramic/titanium matrix composite bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlchuck, Bobby; Zeller, Mary V.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesive bond between ceramic cement and a titanium matrix composite substrate to be used in the National Aerospace Plane program is evaluated. Two commercially available adhesion testers, the Sebastian Adherence Tester and the CSEM REVETEST Scratch Tester, are evaluated to determine their suitability for quantitatively measuring adhesion strength. Various thicknesses of cements are applied to several substrates, and bond strengths are determined with both testers. The Sabastian Adherence Tester has provided limited data due to an interference from the sample mounting procedure, and has been shown to be incapable of distinguishing adhesion strength from tensile and shear properties of the cement itself. The data from the scratch tester has been found to be difficult to interpret due to the porosity and hardness of the cement. Recommendations are proposed for a more reliable adhesion test method.

  3. The Influence of Casing-Sand Adhesion on Cementing Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Guan, Zhichuan; Xu, Minglei; Shi, Yucai; Liao, Hualin; Sun, Jia

    2015-01-01

    In the petroleum industry, one of the most serious problems encountered during cementing is the failure at the bonding interface. Many measures including casing-sand adhesion have been developed to improve cementing bond strength. However, due to the lack of detailed study of the technique, many questions remain. The primary goal of this study is to investigate the influence of casing-sand adhesion on cementing bond strength, and to optimize parameters. An orthogonal experiment and a supplementary experiment were conducted. The results indicated that casing-sand adhesion can improve the cementing bond strength. The priority orders of key factors are: sand grain size, sand coverage, adhesive curing temperature and adhesive curing time. The optimal parameters recommended for application are: 1.6mm~1.9mm sand grain size, 60%~70% sand coverage, 30°C curing temperature and 60 hours curing time. PMID:26115343

  4. Influence of oxygen inhibition on the surface free-energy and dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kensaku; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Kotaku, Mayumi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Tsubota, Keishi; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2011-10-01

    We compared the surface free-energies and dentin bond strengths of single-step self-etch adhesives with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The labial dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The adhesives were applied to the ground dentin, light-irradiated, and the oxygen-inhibited layer was either retained or removed with ethanol. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The dentin bond strengths of specimens with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer were measured. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component was relatively constant at 35.5-39.8 mJ m(-2) . The value of the , Lewis acid component increased slightly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas that of the , Lewis base component decreased significantly. The bond strengths of the self-etch adhesives were significantly lower in specimens without an oxygen-inhibited layer (13.2-13.6 MPa) than in those with an oxygen-inhibited layer (17.5-18.4 MPa). These results indicate that the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer in single-step self-etch adhesives with advanced photoinitiators promotes higher dentin bond strength. PMID:21896057

  5. Comparative evaluation of bond strength of three contemporary self-etch adhesives: An ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Singh, Vijay; Chaudhry, Suruchi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of 2-hydroxymethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and the type of solvent on the tensile bond strength of the following three self-etch adhesives: Adper easy one (HEMA-rich adhesive) which contained ethanol, G-Bond (HEMA-free adhesive) which contained acetone, and Xeno V (HEMA-free adhesive) which contained butanol as a solvent. Material and Methods: Intact mandibular molars were mounted in self-cured resin and the occlusal surfaces were ground with # 600 SiC paper. Adhesives were applied on the prepared dentinal surfaces and the resin composite was condensed in the split brass mold (5 × 3 mm) placed over the adhesive surface. The specimens were stored in normal saline and placed in incubator at 37°C. After 24 hours, the specimens were tested in tensile mode at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was done using One way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results: The mean bond strengths of Adper easy one, G-Bond, and Xeno V were 12.41 MPa, 10.09 MPa, and 8.67 MPa, respectively. Conclusions: Comparison of contemporary adhesives in this ex vivo study revealed that the ethanol-based HEMA-rich self-etch adhesive is better than HEMA-free self-etch adhesive that contained acetone and butanol as the solvents, when compared in terms of bond strength. PMID:21957383

  6. Adhesive strength of paint-on resins to crown and bridge composites.

    PubMed

    Kanie, Takahito; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2004-12-01

    This paper examined the adhesive strength of paint-on resin to crown and bridge composites after soaking in water and thermal-cycling. Three shades of paint-on resin were coated on three kinds of crown and bridge composite under four surface treatment conditions (a combination of sandblaster and pretreatment liquid). These specimens were soaked in water at 37 degrees C for 1 day, 1 month, and 1 year, and at 4 degrees C and 60 degrees C alternatively for 1-minute periods for 10,000 cycles by thermal-cycling machine. The adhesive strengths were obtained by shear test. There were no significant differences among the adhesive strengths of three shades of paint-on resin to three composites after storage (p > 0.05). The adhesive strengths to composites with sandblasting showed higher values than those without it (p < 0.01). PMID:15693161

  7. Role of Powder Granulometry and Substrate Topography in Adhesion Strength of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, R.; Cormier, J.; Costil, S.

    2016-06-01

    APS coating is deposited with different treated surfaces to understand the effects of surface topography and particle sizes on adhesion bond strength. Grit blasting and laser surface texturing have been used to create a controlled roughness and controlled surface topography, respectively. Coating adhesion is mainly controlled by a mechanical interlocking mechanism. Fully melted Ni-Al powder fills the respected target surface with high-speed radial flow. Pores around central flattening splat are usually seen due to splash effects. Laser surface texturing has been used to study near interface coating depending on the target shape and in-contact area. Pull-off test results have revealed predominant correlation with powder, surface topography, and adhesion bond strength. Adhesion bond strength is linked to the in-contact area. So, coating adhesion might be optimized with powder granulometry. Pores near the interface would be localized zones for crack initiations and propagations. A mixed-mode failure has been reported for sharp interface (interface and inter-splats cracks) due to crack kicking out phenomena. Coating toughness near the interface is a key issue to maximize adhesion bond strength. Volume particles and topography parameters have been proposed to enhance adhesion bond strength for thermal spray process for small and large in-contact area.

  8. Role of Powder Granulometry and Substrate Topography in Adhesion Strength of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, R.; Cormier, J.; Costil, S.

    2016-05-01

    APS coating is deposited with different treated surfaces to understand the effects of surface topography and particle sizes on adhesion bond strength. Grit blasting and laser surface texturing have been used to create a controlled roughness and controlled surface topography, respectively. Coating adhesion is mainly controlled by a mechanical interlocking mechanism. Fully melted Ni-Al powder fills the respected target surface with high-speed radial flow. Pores around central flattening splat are usually seen due to splash effects. Laser surface texturing has been used to study near interface coating depending on the target shape and in-contact area. Pull-off test results have revealed predominant correlation with powder, surface topography, and adhesion bond strength. Adhesion bond strength is linked to the in-contact area. So, coating adhesion might be optimized with powder granulometry. Pores near the interface would be localized zones for crack initiations and propagations. A mixed-mode failure has been reported for sharp interface (interface and inter-splats cracks) due to crack kicking out phenomena. Coating toughness near the interface is a key issue to maximize adhesion bond strength. Volume particles and topography parameters have been proposed to enhance adhesion bond strength for thermal spray process for small and large in-contact area.

  9. Pinning effect of reactive elements on adhesion energy and adhesive strength of incoherent Al2O3/NiAl interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhang, R F; Legut, D; Li, D Q; Zhang, S H; Fu, Z H; Guo, H B

    2016-08-17

    The profound effects of reactive elements (REs) on the adhesion energy and adhesive strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have attracted increasing attention because RE-doping has played a significant role in improving the thermal cycling lifetime of TBCs. However, the fundamental mechanism is, so far, not well understood due to the experimental difficulty and theoretical complexity in interface modelling. For this purpose, in the present study we have performed comprehensive density functional theory calculations and information targeted experiments to underline the origin of the surprising enhancement of interface adhesion, stability and mechanical strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface by different RE doping levels. Our results suggest that the interface failure firstly appears within the NiAl layer adjacent to the Al-terminated oxide under mechanical loading, while the formation of O-RE-Ni bond pairs at the interface can effectively hinder the interface de-cohesion, providing a higher mechanical strength. By comparing several typical REs, it is observed that Hf can emerge not only with the highest interface adhesion energy, but also the highest mechanical strength; in agreement with our experimental results. By continuously increasing the dopant concentration, the strengthening effect may increase correspondingly, but is limited by the solute solubility. These results shed light into the effect of REs on the stability and strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface, providing theoretical guidance for interface design via a combinational analysis of bond topology and electronic structure. PMID:27480916

  10. Quantification of the Existence Ratio of Non-Adhesion Grain Boundaries and Factors Governing the Strength of Coke Containing Low-Quality Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Yoshiaki; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Uchida, Ataru; Saito, Yasuhiro; Shoji, Masakazu; Aoki, Hideyuki; Nomura, Seiji; Kubota, Yukihiro; Hayashizaki, Hideyuki; Miyashita, Shigeto

    “Non-adhesion grain boundaries” are formed when low-quality coal grains do not adhere to other grains in the carbonization process because of the low dilation of coke. To better understand the effects of non-adhesion grain boundaries on coke strength, the relationship between the existence ratio of non-adhesion grain boundaries and coke strength was investigated quantitatively. The existence ratio of non-adhesion grain boundaries were measured quantitatively by observing the fracture cross-section of coke using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coke strength was measured with a diametral-compression test and an I-shape drum index test. As a result, non-adhesion grain boundaries increased with an increase in the blending ratio of low-quality coal. In particular, non-adhesion grain boundaries increased rapidly when the blending ratio of low-quality coal was over 50%. When the ratio was less than 50%, low-quality coals adhered to other caking coal. However, not many low-quality coals adhered to other caking coals when the ratio was over 50%. The tensile strength of coke was not affected by the porosity of coke. However, the tensile strength and the drum index were affected by the existence ratio of non-adhesion grain boundaries. Tensile strength decreased rapidly even for a few non-adhesion grain boundaries because significant defects caused a fracture in the diametral-compression test. However, the I-shape drum index decreased linearly with the existence ratio of the non-adhesion grain boundaries because many fractures occurred during 600 rotations in the drum. The strength of coke containing low-quality coal is governed by the existence ratio of non-adhesion grain boundaries rather than mean values such as the porosity of coke.

  11. Evaluation of a sugar-based edible adhesive using a tensile strength tester.

    PubMed

    Doll, Kenneth M; Erhan, Sevim Z

    2011-04-01

    A method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and used to reformulate a recently patented adhesive which is based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as an optimal curing temperature of 60°C. The addition of maltodextrin and soy protein at optimized levels was shown to nearly double the bonding strength of the adhesive, from 0.46 ± 0.076 to 0.74 ± 0.26 kN, under our test conditions. Also discussed is the potential for this method to be automated using commercially available equipment. PMID:21609697

  12. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Cécile; Villat, Cyril; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm(2) sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  13. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  14. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Cécile; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  15. Fabrication and characterization of thermoplastic elastomer dry adhesives with high strength and low contamination.

    PubMed

    Bin Khaled, Walid; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-05-14

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyurethane elastomers have commonly been used to manufacture mushroom shaped gecko-inspired dry adhesives with high normal adhesion strength. However, the thermosetting nature of these two materials severely limits the commercial viability of their manufacturing due to long curing times and high material costs. In this work, we introduce poly(styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene) (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomers as an alternative for the manufacture of mushroom shaped dry adhesives with both directional and nondirectional performance. These materials are attractive for their potential to be less contaminating via oligomer transfer than thermoset elastomers, as well as being more suited to mass manufacturing. Low material transfer properties are attractive for adhesives that could potentially be used in cleanroom environments for microscale assembly and handling in which device contamination is a serious concern. We characterized a thermoplastic elastomer in terms of oligomer transfer using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the SEBS transfers negligible amounts of its own oligomers, during contact with a gold-coated silicon surface, which may be representative of the metallic bond pads found in micro-electro-mechanical systems devices. We also demonstrate the fabrication of mushroom shaped isotropic and anisotropic adhesive fibers with two different SEBS elastomer grades using thermocompression molding and characterize the adhesives in terms of their shear-enhanced normal adhesion strength. The overall adhesion of one of the thermoplastic elastomer adhesives was found to be stronger or comparable to their polyurethane counterparts with identical dimensions. PMID:24712514

  16. Effect of surface treatment on adhesion strength between magnetron sputtered copper thin films and alumina substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ju Dy; Lee, Pui Mun; Rhee, Daniel Min Woo; Leong, Kam Chew; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    A number of surface pre-treatments have been studied for their effectiveness on the adhesion strength between magnetron sputtered copper (Cu) thin film and polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3) substrate. The treatments include organic solvent cleaning, acid washing, heat treatment, plasma cleaning, and they were organized into different sequences in order to evaluate their individual contribution to the film adhesion. Adhesion strength was measured mechanically using a pull test. By proper pre-treatment, the adhesive strength of at least 34 MPa can be achieved with direct sputtering of Cu thin film onto the Al2O3 substrate. With the help of XPS, SEM, XRD, TGA and contact angle measurement, the effect of the different substrate surface treatment techniques has been elucidated.

  17. Effects of model coal tar components on adhesion strength of polyurethane coating on steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, N.; Fujino, K.

    2005-04-15

    In order to study the effects of coal tar components on the adhesion strength of a heavy duty anticorrosive coating formed with tar-urethane resin oil on a steel plate, polyurethane coatings that were compounded with 15 kinds of polycyclic aromatic compounds as model coal tar components were prepared. In the model coal tar, components, naphthalene, quinoline, 2-naphthol, and phenanthrene showed good compatibility with polyurethane. To test their heavy duty anticorrosive properties, tensile adhesion strength of the cured coatings prepared with the compatible model coal tar components was measured, and the change in tensile adhesion strength as a function of time during salt-water spray treatment was measured. We found that the systems compounded with naphthalene, 2-naphthol, and phenanthrene showed good properties in an ordinary state for adhesion strength. However, only the system with 2-naphthol was found to have good properties in the change of tensile adhesion strength as a function or time during salt-water spray treatment. The curing time of the system with 2-naphthol was slower than that or the others, i.e., we found an inverse proportion between curing speed and adhesion durability. We also measured the dynamic viscoelasticity of cured coatings.

  18. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted for by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.

  19. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted formore » by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.« less

  20. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery.

  1. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives: pH influence

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values to enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 200 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values were tested both on enamel and on dentin: Adper™ Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive (pH = 0.8-1), Futurabond NR (pH=2), G-aenial Bond (pH = 1.5), Clearfil S3 Bond (pH = 2.7). After adhesive systems application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the bonded surface. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until the sample rupture. The shear bond strength values (MPa) of the different groups were compared with analysis of variance after that Kolmogorov and Smirnov tests were applied to assess normality of distributions. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In enamel shear bond strength, the highest shear bond strength values were reported with Futurabond NR (P < 0.01); however, no significant differences were found with Clearfil S3 Bond. The others adhesive systems showed lower shear bond strength values with significant differences between them (P < 0.05). When comparing the dentin shear bond strength, the lowest shear bond strength values were reported with Clearfil S3 Bond (P < 0.05), while there were no significant differences among the other three products (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The pH values of adhesive systems did not influence significantly their shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. PMID:26005459

  2. [Relationship between hardness, abrasion and bending strength of UV-polymerizable adhesives].

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, K J; Vahl, J

    1978-04-01

    These experiments were undertaken to explore the influence of hardening on bending and bending strength of photopolymerisable adhesives. It was shown that light sources at present in use only influence the bending strength to a small degree but enable 40% variation in bending. The use of more intensive light sources not yet in commercial use led to further improvements. PMID:274282

  3. Determination of interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and substrate for metallic SOFC interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Liu, W. N.; Stephens, E.; Khaleel, M. A.

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  4. The effect of saliva decontamination procedures on dentin bond strength after universal adhesive curing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayang; Hong, Sungok; Choi, Yoorina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of multiple decontamination procedures for salivary contamination after curing of a universal adhesive on dentin bond strength according to its etch modes. Materials and Methods Forty-two extracted bovine incisors were trimmed by exposing the labial dentin surfaces and embedded in cylindrical molds. A universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal, Bisco) was used. The teeth were randomly divided into groups according to etch mode and decontamination procedure. The adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions for a given etch mode. With the exception of the control groups, the cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva for 20 sec. In the self-etch group, the teeth were divided into three groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive. In the etch-and-rinse group, the teeth were divided into four groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive. A composite resin (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE) was used for filling and was cured on the treated surfaces. Shear bond strength was measured, and failure modes were evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variation and Tukey's HSD test. Results The etch-and-rinse subgroup that was decontaminated by rinse, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive showed a significantly higher bond strength. Conclusions When salivary contamination occurs after curing of the universal adhesive, additional etching improves the bond strength to dentin. PMID:26587416

  5. Statistical Investigation of the Effect of Process Parameters on the Shear Strength of Metal Adhesive Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, Goribidanur Rangappa; Krishna, Munishamaih; Narasimhamurthy, Hebbale Narayanrao; Keshavamurthy, Yalanabhalli Channegowda

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the work was to optimize sheet metal joining parameters such as adhesive material, adhesive thickness, adhesive overlap length and surface roughness for single lap joint of aluminium sheet shear strength using robust design. An orthogonal array, main effect plot, signal-to-noise ratio and analysis of variance were employed to investigate the shear strength of the joints. The statistical result shows vinyl ester is best candidate among other two polymers viz. epoxy and polyester due to its low viscosity value compared to other two polymers. The experiment results shows that the adhesive thickness 0.6 mm, overlap length 50 mm and surface roughness 2.12 µm for obtained maximum shear strength of Al sheet joints. The ANOVA result shows one of the most significant factors is overlap length which affect joint strength in addition to adhesive thickness, adhesive material, and surface roughness. A confirmation test was carried out as the optimal combination of parameters will not match with the any of the experiments in the orthogonal array.

  6. The bond strength of elastomer tray adhesives to thermoplastic and acrylic resin tray materials.

    PubMed

    Hogans, W R; Agar, J R

    1992-04-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of selected impression materials (Permlastic, Express, and Hydrosil) to a thermoplastic custom tray material as a function of drying time of the adhesive after application to a tray material. In addition, bond strengths of a polysulfide impression material to an acrylic resin tray material and to a thermoplastic tray material made directly against wax were evaluated. Bond strengths were obtained directly from values of applied load at failure and important conclusions were drawn. PMID:1507140

  7. Correlation Between Thermal Interface Conductance and Mechanical Adhesion Strength in Cu-Coated Glassy Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzl, J.; Kijamnajsuk, P.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of defective areas in the interface on the correlation between the thermal interface conductance and the mechanical adhesion strength was investigated on as-prepared and heat-treated samples of copper-coated carbon flat specimens with different bonding layers between the copper film and the substrate. The thermal interface conductance was determined by frequency-domain photothermal radiometry. The mechanical adhesion strength of the film coating was deduced from pull-off experiments. The imperfect interfaces were modeled by two different values for the thermal interface conductance, G1 and G2, which co-exist at different areas on the interface and are weighted according to their areas, A1 and A2. The model parameters were determined by adjusting the frequency dependence of the normalized phases and phase differences of the PTR signals from as-prepared and heat-treated samples. The total thermal conductance of the interface was found to exhibit a correlation with the adhesion strength for most of the heat-treated samples whereas, among the as-prepared samples, considerable deviations from such a trend exist. The observations are explained by the impact of supplementary stress on the adhesion strength measurements which are due to the strain developed during the preparation process at the interface. The interfacial stress and strain are mostly released during thermal annealing. A semi-empirical formula was developed that describes the impact of the defective areas on the adhesion strength using the experimentally determined thermal model parameters.

  8. Shear adhesion strength of thermoplastic gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive exceeds material limits.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2011-09-20

    Natural gecko array wearless dynamic friction has recently been reported for 30,000 cycles on a smooth substrate. Following these findings, stiff polymer gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives have been proposed for high-cycle applications such as robot feet. Here we examine the behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) microfiber arrays during repeated cycles of engagement on a glass surface, with a normal preload of less than 40 kPa. We find that fiber arrays maintained 54% of the original shear stress of 300 kPa after 10,000 cycles, despite showing a marked plastic deformation of fiber tips. This deformation could be due to shear-induced plastic creep of the fiber tips from high adhesion forces, adhesive wear, or thermal effects. We hypothesize that a fundamental material limit has been reached for these fiber arrays and that future gecko synthetic adhesive designs must take into account the high adhesive forces generated to avoid damage. Although the synthetic material and natural gecko arrays have a similar elastic modulus, the synthetic material does not show the same wear-free dynamic friction as the gecko. PMID:21848321

  9. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel of primary teeth molars. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 180 extracted primary molars. They were randomly divided into 6 groups and each group was divided into 2 subgroups (treated with CPP-ACP and untreated). In subgroups with CPP-ACP, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP paste 1 h/d for 5 days. Types of adhesives that were evaluated in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, AdheSE One F, single Bond 2, SE Bond, and Adper Prompt L-Pop. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine and mode of failure was evaluated under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by T test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and Fisher exact test using SPSS18. P < 0.05 was considered as significance level. Results: Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to enamel of primary teeth treated and untreated with CPP-ACP showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mode of failure in all groups regardless of CPP-ACP administration was mainly adhesive type. Our results indicated that CPP-ACP did not affect shear bond strength of studied adhesives to primary teeth enamel. Conclusions: To have a successful and durable composite restoration, having a high strength bonding is essential. Considering the wide use of CPP-ACP in preventing tooth decay and the role of adhesive shear bond strength (SBS) in success of composite restoration, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP on the SBS of adhesives to primary teeth

  10. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  11. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  12. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  13. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing (TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  14. Cytocompatibility studies of a biomimetic copolymer with simplified structure and high-strength adhesion.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M Jane; Meredith, Heather J; Jenkins, Courtney L; Wilker, Jonathan J; Liu, Julie C

    2016-04-01

    The development of adhesives suitable for biomedical applications has been challenging given that these materials must exhibit sufficient adhesion strengths and biocompatibility. Biomimetic materials inspired by mussel adhesive proteins appear to contain many of the necessary characteristics for biomedical adhesives. In particular, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] has been shown to be a high strength adhesive material with bonding comparable to or even greater than several commercial glues. Herein, a thorough study on the cytocompatibility of this copolymer provides insights on the suitability of a mussel-mimicking adhesive for applications development. The cytotoxicity of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] was evaluated through assessment of the viability, proliferation rate, and morphology of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts when cultured with copolymer extracts or directly in contact with the adhesive. After 1 and 3 days of culture, both the copolymer alone and copolymer cross-linked with periodate exhibited minimal effects on cell viability. Likewise, cells cultured on the copolymer displayed proliferation rates and morphologies similar to cells on the poly-L-lysine control. These results indicate that poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] is highly cytocompatible and therefore a promising material for use where biological contact is important. PMID:26714824

  15. Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength.

    PubMed

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2016-09-01

    Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces were small, but strongly exceeded them when shear forces were large, resulting in an approximately linear increase of adhesion with friction. Adhesion sharply increased at peel angles less than ca 30°, allowing a rapid switch between attachment and detachment. The departure from classic peeling theory coincided with the appearance of pad sliding, which dramatically increased the peel force via a combination of two mechanisms. First, partial sliding pre-stretched the pads, so that they were effectively stiffer upon detachment and peeled increasingly like inextensible tape. Second, pad sliding reduces the thickness of the fluid layer in the contact zone, thereby increasing the stress levels required for peeling. In combination, these effects can explain the coupling between adhesion and friction that is fundamental to adhesion control across all climbing animals. Our results highlight that control of adhesion is not solely achieved by direction-dependence and morphological anisotropy, suggesting promising new routes for the development of controllable bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27605165

  16. Haemostatic agents on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Akansha; Sekhar, Anand; Ginjupalli, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin surface contaminated with haemostatic agents can interfere with the bonding of self-adhesive resin cement. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various haemostatic agents such as Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate and Tannic acid on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting agent. Material and Methods The buccal surfaces of extracted premolars were flattened to expose the dentine. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. In Group I Aluminium Chloride was applied on the flattened dentinal surface, in Group II Ferric Sulphate was applied to exposed dentin surface, in Group III tannic acid was applied on to the dentinal surface, and the control group, i.e. Group IV was rinsed with saline. After the surface treatment, all the teeth were air dried. Then a predetermined dimension of RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the pretreated dentin surfaces. The samples were then stored under 370C in distilled water for 24 hours under 100 % humidity. Following this each sample was tested for shear bond strength with an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Results There was significant difference in the shear bond strength of control and tannic acid contaminated group (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant differences between the shear bond strength between control and aluminium chloride and ferric sulphate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The usage of haemostatic agent can negatively affect the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X) on to the dentin surface. As per the study Tannic acid significantly weakened the bond between the self-adhesive resin and dentin. Key words:Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, self-adhesive resin cement, shear bond strength, Tannic acid. PMID:26330930

  17. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words

  18. Shear bond strength of orthodontic color-change adhesives with different light-curing times

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Ghassemi, Amirreza; Manafi, Safa; Delavarian, Mohadeseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing time on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two orthodontic color-change adhesives (CCAs). Materials and Methods: A total of 72 extracted premolars were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 12 teeth each. Subsequent to primer application, a metal bracket was bonded to the buccal surface using an orthodontic adhesive. Two CCAs (Greengloo and Transbond Plus) were tested and one conventional light-cured adhesive (Resilience) served as control. For each adhesive, the specimens were light-cured for two different times of 20 and 40 s. All the specimens underwent mechanical testing using a universal testing machine to measure the SBS. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the remnant adhesive material on the tooth surface. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software. The significance level for all statistical tests was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: The SBSs of the tested groups were in the range of 14.05-31.25 MPa. Greengloo adhesive showed the highest SBS values when light-cured for 40 s, and Transbond Plus adhesive showed the lowest values when light-cured for 20 s. ARI scores of Transbond Plus adhesive were significantly higher than those of controls, while other differences in ARI values were not significant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of his study, decreasing the light-curing time from 40 to 20 s decreased the SBS of the tested adhesives; however, this decline in SBS was statistically significant only in Transbond Plus adhesive PMID:26005468

  19. Bond strength and bioactivity of Zn-doped dental adhesives promoted by load cycling.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if mechanical loading influences bioactivity and bond strength at the resin-dentin interface after bonding with Zn-doped etch-and-rinse adhesives. Dentin surfaces were subjected to demineralization by 37% phosphoric acid (PA) or 0.5 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Single bond (SB) adhesive—3M ESPE—SB+ZnO particles 20 wt% and SB+ZnCl2 2 wt% were applied on treated dentin to create the groups PA+SB, SB+ZnO, SB+ZnCl2, EDTA+SB, EDTA+ZnO, and EDTA+ZnCl2. Bonded interfaces were stored in simulated body fluid for 24 h and tested or submitted to mechanical loading. Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) was assessed. Debonded dentin surfaces were studied by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Remineralization of the bonded interfaces was assessed by atomic force microscope imaging/nanoindentation, Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, and Masson's trichrome staining. Load cycling (LC) produced reduction in MTBS in all PA+SB, and no change was encountered in EDTA+SB specimens, regardless of zinc doping. LC increased the mineralization and crystallographic maturity at the interface; a higher effect was noticed when using ZnO. Trichrome staining reflected a narrow demineralized dentin matrix after loading of dentin surfaces that were treated with SB-doped adhesives. This correlates with an increase in mineral platforms or plate-like multilayered crystals in PA or EDTA-treated dentin surfaces, respectively. PMID:25499741

  20. Effect of Fluoride and Simplified Adhesive Systems on the Bond Strength of Primary Molars and Incisors.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Noleto, Lawanne Ellen Carvalho; Gomes, Isabella Azevedo; Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate in vitro the influence of simplified adhesive systems (etch-and-rinse and self-etching) and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) on the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins on primary molars and incisors. Forty primary molars and forty incisors vestibular enamel was treated with either the self-etching Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray) or etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2, 3M/ESPE) adhesive system. Each group was subdivided based on the prior treatment of the enamel with or without the topical application of 1.23% APF. Thereafter, matrices were positioned and filled with composite resin and light cured. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h, the specimens were submitted to μ-SBS in a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05) showed that the prior application of 1.23% APF led to a significant reduction in bond strength. The type of adhesive exerted no significant influence bond strength. In the inter-group analysis, however, significantly bond strength reduction was found for the incisors when CSE was employed with APF. Adhesive failure was the most common type of fracture. The bond strength was affected by the prior application of 1.23% APF and type of tooth. PMID:26312974

  1. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Fatemeh-Maleknejad; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (µSBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% (E0), 5% (E5), 10% (E10), 15% (E15), 20% (E20) (by weight) 10-MDP monomer and Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) as a control. After 24 hours, microshear bond strength was tested. The degree of conversion was also measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interfacial ultrastructure was observed under a scanning electron microscope in all the groups. Results A higher microshear bond strength was observed with adhesives containing 10% and 15% 10-MDP in comparison to study groups (P<.05). Clearfil S3 Bond and 10% MDP had a significantly greater degree of conversion than other groups (P<.05). Conclusions The amount of functional monomer in 1-SEAs influences both the bonding performance and degree of conversion; 10% 10-MDP showed the best combination of bond strength and degree of conversion. Key words:Self-etch adhesives, 10-MDP, bond strength, degree of conversion. PMID:26155340

  2. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  3. Shear bond strength of rebonded brackets after removal of adhesives with Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Katsuyuki; Endo, Toshiya; Shinkai, Koichi; Katoh, Yoshiroh

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to examine the bond strength of rebonded orthodontic brackets after adhesive residuals on the surface of the bracket bases were removed by Er,Cr:YSGG lasers. Seventy-six brackets bonded to premolars with a self-etching primer adhesive system were equally divided into four groups after the first debonding with the bracket bases (Group 1) untreated, and treated by (Group 2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser, (Group 3) sandblaster, and (Group 4) Er,Cr:YSGG laser/sandblaster. The treated brackets were rebonded to the new premolars in the same manner as the first-stage experiment. The shear bond strengths were measured, with the bonding/debonding procedures repeated once after the first debonding, and the bracket/adhesive failure modes were evaluated after each debonding. The treated bracket base surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean rebond strengths were significantly lower in group 1 than in other groups, and there were no significant differences between the other groups. The mean initial bond strength was significantly higher than the mean rebond strength in group 1 but there was no significant difference between the two in the other three groups. Failures at the bracket-adhesive interface occurred frequently at second debonding in group 1. Under the SEM, residual adhesive was removed from the bracket bases by Er,Cr:YSGG laser, while adhesive remnant was seen underneath the meshwork of the bracket bases and microroughness appeared on the meshwork after sandblasting. Er,Cr:YSGG laser certainly could serve the purpose of promoting the use of recycled orthodontic brackets. PMID:21553071

  4. Microtensile and tensile bond strength of single-bottle adhesives: a new test method.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, A I

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile and microtensile bond strength of five single-bottle adhesives to dentine, extracted human molar teeth were used. For each tooth dentine was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. The tested adhesive materials were: Scotchbond 1, Syntac SC, One-Step, Prime & Bond 2.1 and Clearfil SE Bond. The adhesive was applied to either 1 mm(2) of dentine or a circular area with a diameter of 3.9 mm. Composite resin Clearfil AP-X was placed to the adhesives using a Teflon split mould 3.9 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height. Tensile and microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Under tensile mode, the bond strengths were 16.7 +/- 3.5, 15.2 +/- 2.5, 11.5 +/- 3.2, 13.7 +/- 2.6, 20.9 +/- 4.2 MPa for each material. Under microtensile mode, the bond strengths were 52.5 +/- 9.5, 55.3 +/- 8.3, 40.5 +/- 5.2, 37.5 +/- 8.7, 60 +/- 6.21 MPa. Fracture pattern of bonded specimens showed 66% cohesive dentine failure in samples tested for tensile bond strength. For the microtensile test, failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between adhesive and dentine (94%). PMID:15089946

  5. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäder, Edith; Liu, Jian-Wen; Hiller, Janett; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhandarov, Serge; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test. In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis. The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this, shear sliding along

  6. Effect of refrigeration on bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Spohr, Ana Maria; de Oliveira, Wildomar José; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Borges, Luis Henrique

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength to dentin of three self-etching adhesive systems at refrigerated and room temperatures. Seventy-eight bovine incisors were embedded in self-cured acrylic resin, abraded on a water-cooled lathe and polished with 400- and 600-grit sandpapers to obtain standard dentin surfaces. The specimens were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=13). Clearfil SE Bond, AdheSE and One-Up Bond F adhesive systems at refrigerated (4 degrees C) and room temperatures (23 degrees C) were applied to dentin according to the manufacturers' instructions. A truncated composite resin (Herculite XRV) cone was bonded to dentin surface. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and submitted to tensile bond strength testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Means in MPa were analyzed statistically by Student's t-test at 5% significance level. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found between the adhesive systems applied at refrigerated and room temperatures. In conclusion, no adverse effects on tensile bond strength were observed when self-etching adhesive systems were used after being taken directly from the refrigerated storage. PMID:17262122

  7. The Effect of CFRP Surface Treatment on the Splat Morphology and Coating Adhesion Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Amirthan; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Metallization of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites aggrandized their application to aircraft, automobile, and wind power industries. Recently, the metallization of CFRP surface using thermal spray technique, especially the cold spray, a solid state deposition technique, is a topic of research. However, a direct cold spray deposition on the CFRP substrate often imposes severe erosion on the surface owing to the high-impact energy of the sprayed particles. This urges the requirement of an interlayer on the CFRP surface. In the present study, the effect of surface treatment on the interlayer adhesion strength is evaluated. The CFRP samples were initially treated mechanically, chemically, and thermally and then an interlayer was developed by atmospheric plasma spray system. The quality of the coating is highly dependent on the splat taxonomy; therefore the present work also devoted to study the splat formation behavior using the splat-collection experiments, where the molten Cu particles impinged on the treated CFRP substrates. These results were correlated with the coating adhesion strength. The coating adhesion strength was measured by pull-out test. The results showed that the surface treatment, particularly the chemical treatment, was fairly successful in improving the adhesion strength.

  8. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  9. Modifying Matrix Materials to Increase Wetting and Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Katie

    2011-01-01

    In an alternative approach to increasing the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fiber and matrix components of organic-fiber/polymer matrix composite materials, the matrix resins are modified. Heretofore, it has been common practice to modify the fibers rather than the matrices: The fibers are modified by chemical and/or physical surface treatments prior to combining the fibers with matrix resins - an approach that entails considerable expense and usually results in degradation (typically, weakening) of fibers. The alternative approach of modifying the matrix resins does not entail degradation of fibers, and affords opportunities for improving the mechanical properties of the fiber composites. The alternative approach is more cost-effective, not only because it eliminates expensive fiber-surface treatments but also because it does not entail changes in procedures for manufacturing conventional composite-material structures. The alternative approach is best described by citing an example of its application to a composite of ultra-high-molecular- weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers in an epoxy matrix. The epoxy matrix was modified to a chemically reactive, polarized epoxy nano-matrix to increase the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fibers and the matrix. The modification was effected by incorporating a small proportion (0.3 weight percent) of reactive graphitic nanofibers produced from functionalized nanofibers into the epoxy matrix resin prior to combining the resin with the UHMWPE fibers. The resulting increase in fiber/matrix adhesion manifested itself in several test results, notably including an increase of 25 percent in the maximum fiber pullout force and an increase of 60-65 percent in fiber pullout energy. In addition, it was conjectured that the functionalized nanofibers became involved in the cross linking reaction of the epoxy resin, with resultant enhancement of the mechanical properties and lower viscosity of the matrix.

  10. Effects of blood contamination on microtensile bond strength to dentin of three self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok Woo; Cho, Byeong Hoon; Lim, Ran Yeob; Kyung, Seung Hyun; Park, Dong Sung; Oh, Tae Seok; Yoo, Hyun Mi

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of blood contamination and decontamination methods during different steps of bonding procedures on the microtensile bond strength of two-step self-etch adhesives to dentin. Sixty extracted human molars were ground flat to expose occlusal dentin. The 60 molars were randomly assigned to three groups, each treated with a different two-step self-etch adhesive: Clearfil SE Bond, AdheSE and Tyrian SPE. In turn, these groups were subdivided into five subgroups (n = 20), each treated using different experimental conditions as follows: control group-no contamination; contamination group 1-CG1: primer application/ contamination/primer re-application; contamination group 2-CG2: primer application/contamination/wash/dry/primer re-application; contamination group 3-CG3: primer application/adhesive application/light curing/contamination/ adhesive re-application/light curing; contamina- tion group 4-CG4: primer application/adhesive application/light curing/contamination/wash/ dry/adhesive re-application/light curing. Composite buildup was performed using Z250. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the bonded specimens were trimmed to an hourglass shape and serially sectioned into slabs with 0.6 mm2 cross-sectional areas. Microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) were assessed for each specimen using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc LSD test. SEM evaluations of the fracture modes were also performed. The contaminated specimens showed lower bond strengths than specimens in the control group (p < 0.05), with the exception of CG1 in the Clearfil SE group and CG2 and CG3 in the Tyrian SPE group. Among the three self-etch adhesives, the Tyrian SPE group exhibited a significantly lower average MTBS compared to the Clearfil SE Bond and AdheSE (p < 0.05) groups. Based on the results of the current study, it was found that blood contamination reduced the MTBS of all three self

  11. Cross-sectional nanoindentation (CSN) studies on the effect of thickness on adhesion strength of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshanghias, A.; Khatibi, G.; Pelzer, R.; Steinbrenner, J.; Bernardi, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the cross-sectional nanoindentation (CSN) technique has been employed to investigate the adhesion behavior of Titanium-Tungsten (TiW) thin films in various thicknesses on silicon substrate. Furthermore, the nanoindentation-induced blister (NIB) technique has been implemented on the same samples to evaluate the adhesion energy of the films with a different approach. The adhesion energy release rate of these thin films, derived by these two techniques, revealed a good agreement. Accordingly, the results show that as the thickness of the TiW layer increases, the adhesion toughness of the film decreases. It was suggested that three factors might be responsible for the superior adhesion strength of thin films with lower thicknesses: higher surface energy due to the smaller mean grain size; higher constraint from the substrate, which causes inferior fracture toughness of the coating and facilitates crack deflection from interface to surface; and, energy dissipation due to decohesion. The thickness dependency of the transition between delamination and decohesion mechanism in thin films has also been discussed and modelled.

  12. Ab Initio Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Dopants and Impurities on Interface Adhesion, Diffusion and Grain Boundary Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozfidan, Asli Isil

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the effects of additives, reactive elements and impurities, on the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings. The thesis consists of a number of studies on interface adhesion, impurity diffusion, grain boundary sliding and cleavage processes and their impact on the mechanical behaviour of grain boundaries. The effects of additives and impurity on interface adhesion were elaborated by using total energy calculations, electron localization and density of states, and by looking into the atomic separations. The results of these calculations allow the assessment of atomic level contributions to changes in the adhesive trend. Formation of new bonds across the interface is determined to improve the adhesion in reactive element(RE)-doped structures. Breaking of the cross interface bonds and sulfur(S)-oxygen(O) repulsion is found responsible for the decreased adhesion after S segregation. Interstitial and vacancy mediated S diffusion and the effects of Hf and Pt on the diffusion rate of S in bulk NiAl are studied. Hf is shown to reduce the diffusion rate, and the preferred diffusion mechanism of S and the influence of Pt are revealed to be temperature dependent. Finally, the effects of reactive elements on alumina grain boundary strength are studied. Reactive elements are shown to improve both the sliding and cleavage resistance, and the analysis of atomic separations suggest an increased ductility after the addition of quadrivalent Hf and Zr to the alumina grain boundaries.

  13. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to systematically review the literature for the effect of digluconate chlorhexidine (CHX) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine. The search strategies were computer search of the database and review of reference lists of the related articles. Search words/terms were as follows: (digluconate chlorhexidine*) AND (dentin* OR adhesive system* OR bond strength*). Results: Bond strength reduction after CHX treatments varied among the studies, ranging 0-84.9%. In most of the studies, pretreatment CHX exhibited lower bond strength reduction than the control experimental groups. Researchers who previously investigated the effect of CHX on the bond strength of dental adhesive systems on dentin have reported contrary results, which may be attributed to different experimental methods, different designs of the experiments, and different materials investigated. Conclusions: Further investigations, in particular clinical studies, would be necessary to clarify the effect of CHX on the longevity of dentin bonds. PMID:26957786

  14. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bronzato, Juliana Delatorre; Cecchin, Doglas; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone) on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control); G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl); G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05). Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05). G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently. PMID:26957789

  15. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Methods Micro-tensile (MT, n=15) and single plane shear (SP, n=8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-BOND (GB) were used according to manufacturers’ instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1-mm diameter and stored in water at 37° C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher’s PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at 100X. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HCl/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at 1000X, 2500X, and 5000X in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8h. Specimens were sectioned (90-nm thick) and observed under TEM. Results Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, p= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher’s PLSD intervals (p<0.05) for bond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were ~0.5 µm for PB, GB and S3 and ~5 µm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within interfaces for all adhesive systems. Clinical significance Simplification of application procedures appears to induce loss of adhesion capabilities. In this

  16. Dentin bond strengths of three adhesive/composite core systems using different curing units.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Meu; Nikaido, Toru; Okada, Ayako; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2008-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strengths of three adhesive/composite core materials to bovine dentin using three different curing units. Bovine dentin surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC paper. Bonding area was demarcated with a vinyl tape (4-mm-diameter hole). Three adhesive/composite core systems--S6054 (experimental), UniFil Core, and Clearfil DC Core Automix--were used with three curing units--Curing Light XL3000 (quartz-tungsten-halogen), Hyper Lightel (high-power quartz-tungsten-halogen), and LEDemetronl (blue light-emitting diode)--according to manufacturers' instructions. After 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C, tensile bond strengths were measured at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (p < 0.05). Highest tensile bond strength was obtained using Clearfil DC Core Automix with Hyper Lightel. PMID:18540391

  17. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    PubMed Central

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Results The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Conclusions Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution. PMID:26082572

  18. The bond strength of different tray adhesives on vinyl polysiloxane to two tray materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ashwini, B L; Manjunath, S; Mathew, K Xavier

    2014-03-01

    There has been no established chemical bonding between custom tray resin and the elastomeric impression materials without the use of manufacturer's recommended specific tray adhesive. The present study was aimed to compare the bond strength of the manufacturer recommended tray adhesives with the universal tray adhesives using the medium body consistency vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) material and custom tray made of autopolymerising resin and visible light cure (VLC) resin. A total 90 cubicle specimens of autopolymerising resin and 90 specimens of VLC resin were tested for its tensile bond strength. Effectiveness of universal tray adhesive was compared with manufactured tray adhesive. Each of these specimens was then subjected to tensile load in hounsefield universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 5 mm/min and the results were compared and evaluated using one way analysis of variance and post hoc Tuckey's test. Analysis of bond strength revealed that the universal tray adhesive showed better strength and was statiscally significant when compared to the manufacture supplied tray adhesive. Comparison between both the groups, VLC resin showed better bond strength as compared to autopolymerizing resin. Universal tray adhesive had better tensile bond strength than the manufacturers recommended tray adhesive with the medium body viscosity VPS impression material for both autopolymerising and VLC tray resin. PMID:24604995

  19. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems to Er:YAG-laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Brulat, Nathalie; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Leforestier, Eric; Fiorucci, Gilbert; Nammour, Samir; Bertrand, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin bonded to Er:YAG laser or bur-prepared dentin surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems. The occlusal surfaces of 120 human third molars were ground flat to expose dentin. The dentin was prepared using either a carbide bur or an Er:YAG laser at 350 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (fluence, 44.5 J/cm(2)). Three different self-etching adhesive systems were applied: iBond, Xeno III and Clearfil SE Bond. Rods of composite resin were bonded to dentin surfaces and shear bond tests were carried out. Both dentin surfaces after debonding and resin rods were observed using a scanning electron microscope. When the Xeno III was used, no difference was observed on shear bond strength values when bur and Er:YAG laser were compared. When using iBond and Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values measured on Er:YAG-laser-prepared surfaces were lower than those observed on bur-prepared surfaces. The absence of smear layer formation during the preparation of the dentin by the Er:YAG laser did not improve the adhesion values of self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:18034284

  20. Evaluation of metal bond strength to dentin and enamel using different adhesives and surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Mine; Gungor, Mehmet Ali; Cal, Ebru; Darcan, Alev; Erdem, Adalet

    2007-01-01

    Because adherence of base metal alloys is important for the long-term clinical success of adhesive fixed partial dentures, it has been necessary to improve adhesion to metal substrate by using different surface treatments. This study used different surface conditioning methods and two different luting resins to evaluate the shear bond strength of base metal alloys to dentin and enamel. Sixty noncarious freshly extracted human teeth were mounted in a plastic holder filled with autopolymerized acrylic resin. After the roots were removed and 30 flat enamel and 30 flat dentin surfaces were exposed, the specimens were divided randomly into two main luting cement groups. Sixty nickel chromium (NiCr) metal specimens were fabricated and subjected to three different surface conditioning procedures: sandblasting with 50 microm aluminum oxide, tribochemical silica coating, and a combination of the two. Scanning electron mircoscopy (SEM) evaluations revealed mainly cohesive failures. Self-cure adhesive resulted in higher bond strengths to dental substrates. Higher bond strengths were achieved through a combination of sandblasting and tribochemical silica coating; however, further clinical research is required. A surface treatment that combines sandblasting with tribochemical silica coating can achieve a more effective bond for adhesive restorations with metal substrates. PMID:17511361

  1. Effect of additional etching and ethanol-wet bonding on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joonghee; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the effects of additional acid etching on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives with different compositions and pH. The effect of ethanol wetting on etched dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives was also evaluated. Materials and Methods Forty-two human permanent molars were classified into 21 groups according to the adhesive types (Clearfil SE Bond [SE, control]; G-aenial Bond [GB]; Xeno V [XV]; Beauti Bond [BB]; Adper Easy Bond [AE]; Single Bond Universal [SU]; All Bond Universal [AU]), and the dentin conditioning methods. Composite resins were placed on the dentin surfaces, and the teeth were sectioned. The microtensile bond strength was measured, and the failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined. The data were analyzed statistically using two-way ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test. Results In GB, XV and SE (pH ≤ 2), the bond strength was decreased significantly when the dentin was etched (p < 0.05). In BB, AE and SU (pH 2.4 - 2.7), additional etching did not affect the bond strength (p > 0.05). In AU (pH = 3.2), additional etching increased the bond strength significantly (p < 0.05). When adhesives were applied to the acid etched dentin with ethanol-wet bonding, the bond strength was significantly higher than that of the no ethanol-wet bonding groups, and the incidence of cohesive failure was increased. Conclusions The effect of additional acid etching on the dentin bond strength was influenced by the pH of one-step self-etch adhesives. Ethanol wetting on etched dentin could create a stronger bonding performance of one-step self-etch adhesives for acid etched dentin. PMID:25671215

  2. Effect of Saliva on the Tensile Bond Strength of Different Generation Adhesive Systems: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Saha, Sonali; Dhinsa, Kavita; Garg, Aarti

    2015-01-01

    Background Newer development of bonding agents have gained a better understanding of factors affecting adhesion of interface between composite and dentin surface to improve longevity of restorations. Objective The present study evaluated the influence of salivary contamination on the tensile bond strength of different generation adhesive systems (two-step etch-and-rinse, two-step self-etch and one-step self-etch) during different bonding stages to dentin where isolation is not maintained. Materials and Methods Superficial dentin surfaces of 90 extracted human molars were randomly divided into three study Groups (Group A: Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system; Group B: Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Group C: One-step self-etch adhesive system) according to the different generation of adhesives used. According to treatment conditions in different bonding steps, each Group was further divided into three Subgroups containing ten teeth in each. After adhesive application, resin composite blocks were built on dentin and light cured subsequently. The teeth were then stored in water for 24 hours before sending for testing of tensile bond strength by Universal Testing Machine. The collected data were then statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results One-step self-etch adhesive system revealed maximum mean tensile bond strength followed in descending order by Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system both in uncontaminated and saliva contaminated conditions respectively. Conclusion Unlike One-step self-etch adhesive system, saliva contamination could reduce tensile bond strength of the two-step self-etch and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesives contaminated with saliva. PMID:26393214

  3. Comparison of the flexural strength of two dual cure adhesive resin cements under oral simulated conditions: an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, P; Nair, A; Regish, K M; Viswambaran, M; Kumar, M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the flexural strength of the newly developed self-adhesive dual cure resin cement and compare it with conventional resin cement under oral simulated conditions. A conventional resin cement (Calibra) and self adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) were selected and 40 specimens of each cement were fabricated for the study. Half of these specimens were polymerized directly whereas the other half were polymerized through 2 mm of porcelain disc. Specimens were tested after 24hrs and after 30 days immersion in artificial saliva. A three point bending test was performed using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Overall RelyX U100 showed higher mean flexural strength compared to Calibra (141.55 MPa, 119.46MPa, respectively). When the specimens of both the cements were light cured through 2 mm porcelain disc, their flexural strength decreased significantly. The mean flexural strength of both self adhesive and conventional dual cure adhesive resin cements was increased significantly after storage in artificial saliva for 30 days at 37 degreeC. Among the two dual cure resin cements, the self adhesive dual cure cement (RelyX U100) showed increased overall mean flexural strength as compared to conventional resin cement (Calibra) under all the curing and storage protocols. PMID:23888528

  4. Influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Miho; Rikuta, Akitomo; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    The influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives was investigated. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of test liquids placed on composites that had been immersed in different concentrations of methyl mercaptan (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 M). To determine the repair bond strength, self-etch adhesives were applied to the aged composite, and then newly added composites were condensed. Ten samples of each specimen were subjected to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm min(-1). Samples were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Although the dispersion force of the composites remained relatively constant, their polar force increased slightly as the concentration of methyl mercaptan increased. The hydrogen-bonding forces were significantly higher after immersion in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan, leading to higher surface-free energies. However, the repair bond strengths for the repair restorations prepared from composites immersed in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan were significantly lower than for those immersed in 0.01 and 0.10 M methyl mercaptan. Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that the repair bond strengths of both the aged and newly added composites were affected by immersion in methyl mercaptan solutions. PMID:25545663

  5. Influence of adhesive system and bevel preparation on fracture strength of teeth restored with composite resin.

    PubMed

    Coelho-de-Souza, Fábio Herrmann; Rocha, Analice da Cunha; Rubini, Alessandro; Klein-Júnior, Celso Afonso; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of teeth with different cavosurface margin cavity preparations and restored with composite resin and different adhesive systems. Eighty premolars were randomly divided in 8 groups, as follow: G1- sound teeth; G2- MOD preparation (no restoration); G3- Adper Single Bond without bevel preparation (butt joint); G4- Adper Single Bond with bevel preparation; G5- Adper Single Bond with chamfer preparation; G6- Clearfil SE Bond without bevel (butt joint); G7- Clearfil SE Bond with bevel preparation; G8- Clearfil SE Bond with chamfer preparation. The adhesive systems were applied according to manufacturers' instructions. Composite resin (Filtek Z250) was incrementally placed in all cavities. After 24 h, the specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (fracture strength) and Fisher's exact test (fracture pattern). The confidence level was set at 95% for all tests. Prepared and non-restored teeth showed the worst performance and G4 exhibited the highest fracture strength among all groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, all restorative treatments were able to recover the fracture strength of non-restored teeth to levels similar to those of sound teeth. Using a total-etch adhesive system with bevel preparation significantly improved the resistance to fracture. PMID:20976383

  6. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  7. Bond Strength of a Bisphenol-A-Free Fissure Sealant With and Without Adhesive Layer under Conditions of Saliva Contamination.

    PubMed

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Sabbatini, Iliana Ferraz; Almeida, Cintia Guimarães de; Galo, Rodrigo; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Dental sealants are important for prevention of carious lesions, if they have good shear strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two sealants to saliva-contaminated and non-contaminated enamel with and without an intermediate adhesive layer underneath the sealant. Ninety flat enamel surfaces from human third molars were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=15): F (control): Fluroshield(tm) sealant; EWB (control): Embrace(tm) WetBond(tm); SB/F: Single Bond adhesive system + F; SB/EWB, s-SB/F and s-SB/EWB. In the s-SB/F and s-SB/EWB groups, the acid-etched enamel was contaminated with 0.01 mL of fresh human saliva for 20 s. Sealant cylinders were bonded to enamel surface with and without an intermediate adhesive system layer. The shear tests were performed using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). F presented higher mean SBS than EWB in all experimental conditions. The lowest SBS mean was obtained for EWB on contaminated enamel (p<0.05). In conclusion, an adhesive system layer should be used prior to sealant placement, in both dry and saliva-contaminated enamel. F had the best performance in all experimental conditions. EWB sealant showed very low results, but an adhesive layer underneath the sealant increased its SBS even after salivary contamination. PMID:27224565

  8. Mechanism for interfacial adhesion strength of an ion beam mixed Cu/polyimide with a thin buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, G. S.; Chae, K. H.; Whang, C. N.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zatsepin, D. A.; Winarski, R. P.; Ederer, D. L.; Moewes, A.; Lee, Y. P.

    1999-01-01

    A Cu (400 Å)/Al (50 Å)/polyimide system showed larger adhesion strength than that of Cu (400 Å)/polyimide after N2+ ion beam mixing. X-ray emission spectroscopy was performed to elucidate the mechanism of adhesion enhancement of the ion beam mixed Cu (400 Å)/polyimide with a thin Al buffer layer. Cu L2,3 x-ray emission spectra showed the formation of a CuAl2O4 layer which is strongly correlated with the large adhesion strength of a Cu/Al/polyimide. A decrease in adhesion strength at an ion dose higher than 5×1015cm-2 was also explained by the formation of an amorphous carbon. This was understood by investigating C Kα x-ray emission spectra. The overall spectroscopic results were in accordance with the behavior of quantitative adhesion strength.

  9. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  10. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  11. A scaffold-enhanced light-activated surgical adhesive technique: surface selection for enhanced tensile strength in wound repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    An ex vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of the irregularity of the scaffold surface on the tensile strength of repairs formed using our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA). Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The scaffolds were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The tensile strength of repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung, using the smooth and irregular surfaces of the above scaffold-enhanced materials were measured and the time-to-failure was recorded. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were consistently higher than those formed using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. The largest difference was observed on repairs formed on the aorta and small intestine, where the repairs were, on average, 50% stronger using the irregular versus the smooth scaffold surfaces. In addition, the time-to-failure of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were between 50% and 100% longer than that achieved using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. It has previously been shown that distributing or dispersing the adhesive forces over the increased surface area of the scaffold, either smooth or irregular, produces stronger repairs than albumin solder alone. The increase in the absolute strength and longevity of repairs seen in this new study when the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds are used is thought to be due to the distribution of forces between the many independent micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surfaces.

  12. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Tomoko; Uno, Shigeru; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Yamada, Toshimoto; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM) and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, P < 0.05). The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found. PMID:22606202

  13. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to GIC using three different adhesives.

    PubMed

    Gopikrishna, V; Abarajithan, M; Krithikadatta, J; Kandaswamy, D

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the bonding ability of composite to glass ionomer cement (GIC) using three different bonding systems. One hundred samples of composites bonded to GIC were prepared and divided into five groups. In Group A, the composite was bonded to GIC after the initial setting of the GIC being employed as a total-etch adhesive. In Group B, the self-etch primer was employed to bond composite to GIC before the initial setting of the GIC. In Group C, the self-etch primer was employed to bond composite to the GIC after the initial setting of the GIC. In Group D, the GIC-based adhesive was employed to bond composite to the GIC before the initial setting of the GIC. In Group E, the GIC-based adhesive was employed to bond composite to the GIC after the initial setting of the GIC. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were tabulated and the statistical analysis was performed with one-way ANOVA; the Tukey's test showed that the bond strength of composite to GIC was significantly higher for the self-etch primer group employed on unset GIC and the GIC-based adhesive group employed on the set GIC for bonding composite to GIC. PMID:19678453

  14. Effect of Chlorhexidine on Dentin Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Systems after Storage in Different Media.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Enio Marcos; Glir, Daniel Hatschbach; Gill, Allana Walesca Martins Castanho; Giovanini, Allan Fernando; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) application during the bonding protocol on microshear bond strength of two adhesive systems, after storage in different media. Seventy-two human molars had their crowns cut in half and embedded in PVC cylinders with acrylic resin. The specimens were randomly divided into experimental groups (n=12) according to the adhesive system (Ambar and Single Bond 2), use of CHX in the bonding protocol, and time interval (24 h and 15 days) in the storage media (distilled water, mineral oil and 1% sodium hypochlorite - NaOCl). Adhesive systems were applied in accordance to manufacturers' recommendations, with or without the use of CHX, and resin composite (Z350 XT) cylinders were placed on the hybridized dentin. After photoactivation, the specimens were stored in distilled water, mineral oil and 1% NaOCl for 24 h and 15 days. Microshear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically by 4-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%). Use of CHX in the bonding protocol did not cause loss of bond strength in any of the evaluated situations, irrespective of time and storage medium. The storage medium had no influence on bond strength values after 15 days when the bond protocol without CHX application was used. However, the use of CHX in the protocol influenced negatively the bond strength values for Single Bond 2 after 15 days storage in distilled water and 1% NaOCl. PMID:26963210

  15. [Comparative in vitro evaluation of modern glass ionomer cements for adhesion strength and fluoride release].

    PubMed

    Zhitkov, M Yu; Rusanov, F S; Poyurovskaya, I Ya

    2016-01-01

    The study proved similar adhesion strength and fluoride release level in aqueous extracts of glass ionomer cements Cemion (VladMiVa, Russia), Glassin Rest (Omega-Dent, Russia), Cemfil 10 (StomaDent, Russia) and Fuji VIII (GC Corporation, Japan). Despite of close concentrations of fluoride in glasses, the rate of fluoride release in water from calcium and calcium-barium glasses is much higher than that of strontium glasses. PMID:27239999

  16. Dentin bond strength of a fluoride-releasing adhesive system submitted to pH-cycling.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Platt, Jeffrey A; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of a fluoride-containing adhesive system submitted to a pH-cycling and storage time regimen for primary outcomes. As secondary outcomes the fluoride released amount was evaluated. Twelve dentin surfaces from sound third molar were divided into 2 groups according to adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Protect (PB) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE). Sticks obtained (1.0 mm2) from teeth were randomly divided into 3 subgroups according to storage regimen model: immediate (24h); 5-month deionized water (W); and pH-cycling model (C). All sticks were tested for µTBS in a universal testing machine. Fluoride concentration was obtained from 1-4 days and 30-day in W and 1-4 days in demineralization (DE)/remineralization (RE) solutions from C, using a fluoride-specific electrode. µTBS and fluoride released data were, respectively, submitted to ANOVA in a split plot design and Tukey, and Friedman' tests (a=0.05). There was no significant interaction between adhesive system and storage regimen for µTBS. W showed the lowest µTBS values. There was no significant difference between 24 h and C models for µTBS. There was no significant difference between adhesive systems. Failure mode was predominantly cohesive within composite for the 24 h and W, for the C group it was mixed for SE and cohesive within composite for PB adhesive system. Fluoride concentrations in the DE/RE solutions were less than 0.03125 ppm and not detected in W. In conclusion, the fluoride-containing adhesive system performed similarly to the regular one. Hydrolytic degradation is the main problem with both adhesive systems, regardless of fluoride contents. PMID:25590191

  17. Adhesive bond strengths to enamel and dentin using recommended and extended treatment times.

    PubMed

    Kimmes, Nicole S; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of different enamel and dentin conditioning times on the shear bond strength of a resin composite using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were determined following treatment of flat ground human enamel and dentin surfaces (4000 grit) with 11 adhesive systems: 1) AdheSE One Viva Pen-(ASE), 2) Adper Prompt L-Pop-(PLP), 3) Adper Single Bond Plus-(SBP), 4) Clearfil SE Bond-(CSE), 5) Clearfil S3 Bond-(CS3), 6) OptiBond All-In-One-(OBA), 7) OptiBond Solo Plus-(OBS), 8) Peak SE-(PSE), 9) Xeno IV-(X4), 10) Xeno V-(X5) and 11) XP Bond-(XPB) using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Composite (Z100) to enamel and dentin bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's LSD post hoc test. The highest shear bond strengths (MPa) to enamel were achieved by the three etch-and-rinse systems at both the recommended treatment time (SBP-40.5 +/- 6.1; XPB-38.7 +/- 3.7; OBS- 35.2 +/- 6.2) and the extended treatment time (SBP-44.5 +/- 8.1; XPB-40.9 +/- 5.7; OBS-35.0 +/- 4.5). Extending the enamel treatment time did not produce a significant change (p > 0.05) in bond strength for the 11 adhesive systems tested. OBS generated the highest (46.2 +/- 7.9) bond strengths to dentin at the recommended treatment time. At the extended treatment time X4 (42.2 +/- 11.7), PSE (42.1 +/- 9.7) and OBS (41.4 +/- 8.0) produced the highest bond strengths to dentin. The bond strength change between recommend and extended treatment times was significant (p < 0.05) for PSE, but the other 10 systems did not exhibit any significant change. PMID:20166418

  18. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Júnior, Lindomar Corrêa; de Souza Almeida, Mauro; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Honório, Heitor Marques; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; De Souza, Grace Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse). Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10) and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05). Results: According to the results, Kruskal–Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001). The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05). Group PSM8 (P90 + SM) showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP), PSB2 (P90 + SB), and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE). Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin. PMID:26752846

  19. Surface Physicochemistry and Ionic Strength Affects eDNA’s Role in Bacterial Adhesion to Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Modrzyński, Jakub J.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent eDNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired adhesion of cells to glass surfaces, but the adhesive properties of S. xylosus were regained within 30 minutes if DNase was not continuously present, implying a continuous release of eDNA in the culture. Removal of eDNA lowered the adhesion of S. xylosus to all surfaces chemistries tested, but not at all ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength. The adhesive properties of eDNA in mediating initial adhesion of S. xylosus is thus highly versatile, but also dependent on the physicochemical properties of the surface and ionic strength of the surrounding medium. PMID:25122477

  20. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement. PMID:26296729

  1. An Ultrasonic Technique to Determine the Residual Strength of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach, J. D.; Tang, Z.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, ultrasonic techniques to nondestructively evaluate adhesive bond degradation have been studied. The key to the present approach is the introduction of an external factor which pulls the adhesive bond in the nonlinear range, simultaneously with the application of an ultrasonic technique. With the aid of an external static tensile loading, a superimposed longitudinal wave has.been used to obtain the slopes of the stress-strain curve of an adhesive bond at a series of load levels. The critical load, at which a reduction of the slope is detected by the superimposed longitudinal wave, is an indication of the onset of nonlinear behavior of the adhesive bond, and therefore of bond degradation. This approach has been applied to the detection of adhesive bond degradation induced by cyclic fatigue loading. Analogously to the longitudinal wave case, a superimposed shear wave has been used to obtain the effective shear modulus of adhesive layers at different shear load levels. The onset of the nonlinear behavior of an adhesive bond under shear loading has been detected by the use of a superimposed shear wave. Experiments show that a longitudinal wave can also detect the nonlinear behavior when an adhesive bond is subjected to shear loading. An optimal combination of ultrasonic testing and mechanical loading methods for the detection of degradation related nonlinear behavior of adhesive bonds has been discussed. For the purpose of a practical application, an ultrasonic technique that uses a temperature increase as an alternative to static loading has also been investigated. A general strain-temperature correspondence principle that relates a mechanical strain to a temperature has been presented. Explicit strain-temperature correspondence relations for both the tension and shear cases have been derived. An important parameter which quantifies the relation between the wave velocity and temperature has been defined. This parameter, which is indicative of adhesive

  2. A study on the compatibility between one-bottle dentin adhesives and composite resins using micro-shear bond strength

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to determine whether the combined use of one-bottle self-etch adhesives and composite resins from same manufacturers have better bond strengths than combinations of adhesive and resins from different manufacturers. Materials and Methods 25 experimental micro-shear bond test groups were made from combinations of five dentin adhesives and five composite resins with extracted human molars stored in saline for 24 hr. Testing was performed using the wire-loop method and a universal testing machine. Bond strength data was statistically analyzed using two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test. Results Two way ANOVA revealed significant differences for the factors of dentin adhesives and composite resins, and significant interaction effect (p < 0.001). All combinations with Xeno V (Dentsply De Trey) and Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray Dental) adhesives showed no significant differences in micro-shear bond strength, but other adhesives showed significant differences depending on the composite resin (p < 0.05). Contrary to the other adhesives, Xeno V and BondForce (Tokuyama Dental) had higher bond strengths with the same manufacturer's composite resin than other manufacturer's composite resin. Conclusions Not all combinations of adhesive and composite resin by same manufacturers failed to show significantly higher bond strengths than mixed manufacturer combinations. PMID:25671210

  3. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P < 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences for CSEB subgroups with hydrated and dehydrated dentin samples between the three different curing modes (P > 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study. PMID:27041894

  4. A novel method for improving the adhesion strength of the electrodeposited Ni films in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Rui; Jiang, Wei Qiao; Zhu, Jun; Feng, Jian Zhi; Ding, Gui Fu; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion performance of MEMS materials is increasingly important with the widely use of miniaturized devices. This paper proposed a novel method for improving adhesion performance between electrodeposited Ni multi-layers. The new method is to treat the Ni substrate in nickel chloride plating solution by pulse reverse current technique before electrodeposition. The dense oxide film of Ni substrate can be removed effectively by this electrochemical method, meanwhile, the proper roughness of Ni substrate is in favor of epitaxial growth during electrodeposition. Moreover, the Ni film is electrodeposited by the new method with low stress and coarse crystal grain. Consequently, the adhesion performance of Ni films is improved dramatically. The experimental results show that the adhesion performance of Ni film electrodeposited by the new method is about 3 times that of by traditional method.

  5. Innovative use of adhesive interface characteristics to nondestructively quantify the strength of bonded joints.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2010-05-01

    Advances in structural adhesives have permitted engineers to contemplate the use of bonded joints in areas that have long been dominated by mechanical fasteners and welds. Although strength, modulus, and toughness have been improved in modern adhesives, the typical concerns with using these polymers still exist. These include concerns over long-term durability and an inability to quantify bond strength (i.e., identify weak bonds) in adhesive joints. Bond deterioration in aging structures and bond strength in original construction are now critical issues that require more than simple flaw detection. Whether the structure involves metallic or composite materials, it is necessary to extend inspections beyond the detection of disbond flaws to include an assessment of the strength of the bond. Use of advanced nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods to measure the mechanical properties of a bonded joint and associated correlations with post-inspection failure tests have provided some clues regarding the key parameters involved in assessing bond strength. Recent advances in ultrasonic- and thermographic-based inspection methods have shown promise for measuring such properties. Specialized noise reduction and signal enhancement schemes have allowed thermographic interrogations to image the subtle differences between bond lines of various strengths. Similarly, specialized ultrasonic (UT) inspection techniques, including laser UT, guided waves, UT spectroscopy, and resonance methods, can be coupled with unique signal analysis algorithms to accurately characterize the properties of weak interfacial bonds. The generation of sufficient energy input levels to derive bond strength variations, the production of sufficient technique sensitivity to measure such minor response variations, and the difficulty in manufacturing repeatable weak bond specimens are all issues that exacerbate these investigations. The key to evaluating the bond strength lies in the ability to exploit the

  6. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    PubMed Central

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P < 0.05); no significance was found between ADSE and XE (P > 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P < 0.05). The bonding interface of SB showed the most intense silver uptake. SE and ADSE showed more favorable hybridization quality than that observed for ADP and XE. Conclusions: The bond strength and hybridization quality were affected by the interaction form of the adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  7. Significant influence of particle surface oxidation on deposition efficiency, interface microstructure and adhesive strength of cold-sprayed copper coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Ya; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liao, Hanlin

    2010-06-01

    The critical velocity for particle deposition in cold spraying is a key parameter, which depends not only on the material type, but also the particle temperature and oxidation condition. The dependency of deposition efficiency of cold spray Cu particles on the particle temperature and surface oxidation was examined. The effect of particle surface oxide scales on the interfacial microstructure and adhesive strength of the cold-sprayed Cu coatings was investigated. The results show that the deposition efficiency significantly increases with increasing the gas temperature but decreases with augmenting the oxygen content of the starting powder. The oxide inclusions at the interfaces between the deposited particles inhibit the effective bonding of fresh metals and remarkably lower the bond strength of the deposited Cu coatings on steel.

  8. Adhesive strength of bioactive oxide layers fabricated on TNTZ alloy by three different alkali-solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Takematsu, E; Cho, K; Hieda, J; Nakai, M; Katsumata, K; Okada, K; Niinomi, M; Matsushita, N

    2016-08-01

    Bioactive oxide layers were fabricated on Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ) by three different alkali solution treatments: hydrothermal (H), electrochemical (E), and hydrothermal-electrochemical (HE). The adhesive strength of the oxide layer to the TNTZ substrate was measured to determine whether this process achieves sufficient adhesive strength for implant materials. Samples subjected to the HE process, in which a current of 15mA/cm(2) was applied at 90°C for 1h (HE90-1h), exhibited a comparatively higher adhesive strength of approximately 18MPa while still maintaining a sufficiently high bioactivity. Based on these results, an oxide layer fabricated on TNTZ by HE90-1h is considered appropriate for practical biomaterial application, though thicker oxide layers with many cracks can lead to a reduced adhesive strength. PMID:26866453

  9. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed only between Provy (164.44 ± 31.23) and Temp Bond NE (88.48 ± 21.83) after cementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar. PMID:26963209

  10. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p < 0.05) than those of the bleached interfaces (FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength. PMID:23184165

  11. Shear bond strength and SEM morphology evaluation of different dental adhesives to enamel prepared with ER:YAG laser

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Patrícia T.; Ferreira, João C.; Oliveira, Sofia A.; Azevedo, Álvaro F.; Dias, Walter R.; Melo, Paulo R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early observations of enamel surfaces prepared by erbium lasers motivated clinicians to use laser as an alternative to chemical etching. Aims: Evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) values of different dental adhesives on Erbium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser prepared enamel and to evaluate possible etching patterns correlations between dental adhesives and SBS values. Subjects and Methods: One hundred bovine incisors were randomly assigned to SBS tests on enamel (n = 15) and to enamel morphology analysis (n = 5) after Er:YAG laser preparation as follows: Group I – 37% phosphoric acid (PA)+ ExciTE®; Group II – ExciTE®; Group III – AdheSE® self-etching; Group IV – FuturaBond® no-rinse. NR; Group V – Xeno® V. Teeth were treated with the adhesive systems and subjected to thermal cycling. SBS were performed in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (P < 0.05). For the morphology evaluation, specimens were immersed in Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the etching pattern analyzed under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Results: Mean bond strengths were Group I – 47.17 ± 1.61 MPa (type I etching pattern); Group II – 32.56 ± 1.64 MPa, Group III – 29.10 ± 1.34 MPa, Group IV – 23.32 ± 1.53 MPa (type III etching pattern); Group V – 24.43 MPa ± 1.55 (type II etching pattern). Conclusions: Different adhesive systems yielded significantly different SBSs. Acid etching significantly increased the adhesion in laser treated enamel. No differences in SBS values were obtained between AdheSE® and ExciTE® without condition with PA. FuturaBond® NR and Xeno® V showed similar SBS, which was lower in comparison to the others adhesives. No correlation between enamel surface morphology and SBS values was observed, except when PA was used. PMID:23853447

  12. Increase in Strength of Partially Stabilized Zirconia After Shot Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Koji; Iwanaka, Kae; Osada, Toshio; Koike, Hitonobu

    2015-09-01

    The effects of shot peening (SP) on the strength of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) were studied. The compressive residual stress, apparent fracture toughness ( K C), and bending strength values of specimens subjected to SP were investigated. Results of x-ray diffraction analyses showed that SP introduced large compressive residual stress in specimens. As a result, the K C and bending strength values of specimens having semi-elliptical pre-cracks on their surfaces increased significantly. Shot-peened specimens having surface pre-cracks with lengths less than 140 µm exhibited strength comparable to that of smooth specimens and fractured outside the pre-crack zone, indicating that the pre-cracks were rendered harmless by SP. Thus, the introduction of a compressive residual stress by SP is an effective technique for increasing the strength of PSZ.

  13. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    PubMed

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p < 0.001). GC (22.4 MPa) and CSA (18.4 MPa) revealed the highest bond strengths in group SB. Bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia were increased by air-particle abrasion. Cements containing adhesive monomers (MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions. PMID:19415350

  14. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  15. Effect of bromelain enzyme for dentin deproteinization on bond strength of adhesive system

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Kirti; Basavanna, Revaplar Siddaveerappa; Shivanna, Vasundhara

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the deproteinizing effect of bromelain enzyme and compare it with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on shear bond strength before application of the adhesive system. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 extracted human premolars were divided into three groups, each one consisted of 10 teeth. The occlusal surface was wet ground to expose superficial dentin. In Group 1, teeth were etched; in Group 2, teeth were etched and deproteinized with bromelain enzyme; in Group 3, teeth were etched and deproteinized with 5% NaOCl. Upon completion of the adhesive procedures, resin composite was inserted into the plastic tube and light-polymerized. All specimens were stored at 37°C in water for 24 h, and the specimens were transferred to the universal testing machine, and then subjected to shear bond strength analysis at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test at a significance level of 0.05. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 12.0.1 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: The bond strength results were significantly influenced by the application of bromelain enzyme. Statistically significant differences were not demonstrated in control group and NaOCl-treated group. The highest bond strength was seen in bromelain enzyme-treated group. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it was concluded that removal of unsupported collagen fiber with bromelain enzyme after acid etching results in improved bond strength. PMID:26430297

  16. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT ADHESIVE SYSTEMS ON THE PULL-OUT BOND STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER POSTS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Andrade, Andréa Mello; Machuca, Melissa Fernanda Garcia; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; da Silva, Ricardo Virgolino C.; Veronezi, Maria Cecília

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost – Angelus-Brazil) cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC – 3M/ESPE) associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP) Plus – 3M/ESPE), using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10): G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE) + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost – Angelus) + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin – Angelus) + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf) and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 ± 7.123; G2- 37.752 ±13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; α=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the groups. Adhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1). The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength. PMID:19089224

  17. Effects of solvent volatilization time on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin using conventional or deproteinization bonding techniques

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Júnior, José Aginaldo; Carregosa Santana, Márcia Luciana; de Figueiredo, Fabricio Eneas Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study determined the effect of the air-stream application time and the bonding technique on the dentin bond strength of adhesives with different solvents. Furthermore, the content and volatilization rate of the solvents contained in the adhesives were also evaluated. Materials and Methods Three adhesive systems with different solvents (Stae, SDI, acetone; XP Bond, Dentsply De Trey, butanol; Ambar, FGM, ethanol) were evaluated. The concentrations and evaporation rates of each adhesive were measured using an analytical balance. After acid-etching and rinsing, medium occlusal dentin surfaces of human molars were kept moist (conventional) or were treated with 10% sodium hypochlorite for deproteinization. After applying adhesives over the dentin, slight air-stream was applied for 10, 30 or 60 sec. Composite cylinders were built up and submitted to shear testing. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results Stae showed the highest solvent content and Ambar the lowest. Acetone presented the highest evaporation rate, followed by butanol. Shear bond strengths were significantly affected only by the factors of 'adhesive' and 'bonding technique' (p < 0.05), while the factor 'duration of air-stream' was not significant. Deproteinization of dentin increased the bond strength (p < 0.05). Stae showed the lowest bond strength values (p < 0.05), while no significant difference was observed between XP Bond and Ambar. Conclusions Despite the differences in content and evaporation rate of the solvents, the duration of air-stream application did not affect the bond strength to dentin irrespective of the bonding technique. PMID:26295023

  18. Adhesive strength of total knee endoprostheses to bone cement - analysis of metallic and ceramic femoral components under worst-case conditions.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Dammer, Rebecca; Zietz, Carmen; Finze, Susanne; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the adhesive strength of femoral components to the bone cement is a relevant parameter for predicting implant safety. In the present experimental study, three types of cemented femoral components (metallic, ceramic and silica/silane-layered ceramic) of the bicondylar Multigen Plus knee system, implanted on composite femora were analysed. A pull-off test with the femoral components was performed after different load and several cementing conditions (four groups and n=3 components of each metallic, ceramic and silica/silane-layered ceramic in each group). Pull-off forces were comparable for the metallic and the silica/silane-layered ceramic femoral components (mean 4769 N and 4298 N) under standard test condition, whereas uncoated ceramic femoral components showed reduced pull-off forces (mean 2322 N). Loading under worst-case conditions led to decreased adhesive strength by loosening of the interface implant and bone cement using uncoated metallic and ceramic femoral components, respectively. Silica/silane-coated ceramic components were stably fixed even under worst-case conditions. Loading under high flexion angles can induce interfacial tensile stress, which could promote early implant loosening. In conclusion, a silica/silane-coating layer on the femoral component increased their adhesive strength to bone cement. Thicker cement mantles (>2 mm) reduce adhesive strength of the femoral component and can increase the risk of cement break-off. PMID:25781660

  19. Enhancement of adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite films on Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr by surface morphology control.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Junko; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Gozawa, Tatsuya; Katsui, Hirokazu; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) films were deposited on a β-type titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ), by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in order to improve its hard-tissue compatibility. The surface morphologies of TNTZ substrates were changed by acid treatments and mechanical polishing prior to the HAp film deposition. The adhesive strength of the HAp films formed on TNTZ substrates treated with an HF solution increased to twice that of the HAp film deposited on a TNTZ substrate with a mirror-like finish. Complex microstructures with deeply etched grain boundaries, formed on the TNTZ substrates after immersion in the HF solution, were responsible for the increase in the adhesive strength of the HAp film caused by an interlocking effect. The HAp films on TNTZ substrates treated with a H(2)SO(4) solution exhibited lower adhesive strength than HAp films on TNTZ substrates treated with HF solution, regardless of the surface roughness of the substrates. Additionally, acid treatments using HNO(3) and H(2)O(2) solutions did not change the surface morphologies of the TNTZ substrates. The complex microstructures with deeply etched grain boundaries and nanosized asperities formed on the TNTZ substrates are important factors in the improvement of the adhesive strengths of HAp films deposited on TNTZ substrates. PMID:23274485

  20. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  1. The effect of antimicrobial agents on bond strength of orthodontic adhesives: a meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Altmann, A S P; Collares, F M; Leitune, V C B; Samuel, S M W

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial orthodontic adhesives aim to reduce white spot lesions' incidence in orthodontic patients, but they should not jeopardizing its properties. Systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the question whether the association of antimicrobial agents with orthodontic adhesives compromises its mechanical properties and whether there is a superior antimicrobial agent. PubMed and Scopus databases. In vitro studies comparing shear bond strength of conventional photo-activated orthodontic adhesives to antimicrobial photo-activated orthodontic adhesives were considered eligible. Search terms included the following: orthodontics, orthodontic, antimicrobial, antibacterial, bactericidal, adhesive, resin, resin composite, bonding agent, bonding system, and bond strength. The searches yielded 494 citations, which turned into 467 after duplicates were discarded. Titles and abstracts were read and 13 publications were selected for full-text reading. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. The global analysis showed no statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups. In the subgroup analysis, only the chlorhexidine subgroup showed a statistically significant difference, where the control groups had higher bond strength than the experimental groups. Many studies on in vitro orthodontic bond strength fail to report test conditions that could affect their outcomes. The pooled in vitro data suggest that adding an antimicrobial agent to an orthodontic adhesive system does not influence bond strength to enamel. It is not possible to state which antimicrobial agent is better to be associated. PMID:26257400

  2. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  3. Tamarindus indica pectin blend film composition for coating tablets with enhanced adhesive force strength.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Rajneet; Singh, Kuldeep; Sapra, Bharti; Tiwary, A K; Rana, Vikas

    2014-02-15

    Tablet coating is the most useful method to improve tablet texture, odour and mask taste. Thus, the present investigation was aimed at developing an industrially acceptable aqueous tablet coating material. The physico-chemical, electrical and SEM investigations ensures that blending of Tamarindus indica (Linn.) pectin (TP) with chitosan gives water resistant film texture. Therefore, CH-TP (60:40) spray coated tablets were prepared. The evaluation of CH-TP coated tablets showed enhanced adhesive force strength (between tablet surface to coat) and negligible cohesive force strength (between two tablets) both evaluated using texture analyzer. The comparison of CH-TP coated tablets with Eudragit coated tablets further supported superiority of the former material. Thus, the findings pointed towards the potential of CH-TP for use as a tablet coating material in food as well as pharmaceutical industry. PMID:24507255

  4. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  5. Influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser treatment on microtensile bond strength of adhesives to enamel.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; De Munck, Jan; Coutinho, Eduardo; Ermis, R Banu; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; de Carvalho, Rubens Corte Real; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2008-01-01

    The current trend towards minimum-intervention dentistry has introduced laser technology as an alternative technique for cavity preparation. This study assessed the null hypothesis that enamel prepared either by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or conventional diamond bur is equally receptive to adhesive procedures. The buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 sound human molars were prepared with Er,Cr:YSGG laser or a medium-grit diamond bur. One etch&rinse (OptiBond FL) and three self-etch adhesives (Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond) were applied on laser-irradiated and bur-cut enamel, followed by the application of a 5-6 mm build-up of Z100. The micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) was determined after 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C. Prepared enamel surfaces and failure patterns were evaluated using a stereomicroscope and a field-emission-gun scanning electron microscope (Feg-SEM). The pTBS to laser-irradiated enamel was significantly lower than to bur-cut enamel (p<0.05), with the exception of Clearfil S3 Bond, which bonded equally effectively to both substrates. The latter presented the highest microTBS on laser-irradiated enamel, though it was not statistically different from the microTBS of OptiBond FL. SEM analysis revealed significant morphological alterations of the laser-irradiated enamel surface, such as areas of melted and recrystalized hydroxyapatite and deep extensive micro-cracks. In conclusion, the bonding effectiveness of adhesives to laser-irradiated enamel depends not only on the structural substrate alterations induced by the laser, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed. PMID:18666504

  6. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  7. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved. PMID:22087741

  8. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  10. Promotion of adhesive penetration and resin bond strength to dentin using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas (NT-APPs) have been shown to improve the bond strength of resin composites to demineralized dentin surfaces. Based on a wet-bonding philosophy, it is believed that a rewetting procedure is necessary after treatment with NT-APP because of its air-drying effect. This study investigated the effect of 'plasma-drying' on the bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin by comparison with the wet-bonding technique. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were acid-etched and divided into four groups according to the adhesion procedure: wet bonding, plasma-drying, plasma-drying/rewetting, and dry bonding. In plasma treatment groups, the demineralized dentin surfaces were treated with a plasma plume generated using a pencil-type low-power plasma torch. After the adhesion procedures, resin composite/dentin-bonded specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond-strength test. The hybrid layer formation was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The plasma-drying group presented significantly higher bond strength than the wet-bonding and dry-bonding groups. Micro-Raman spectral analysis indicated that plasma-drying improved the penetration and polymerization efficacy of the adhesive. Plasma-drying could be a promising method to control the moisture of demineralized dentin surfaces and improve the penetration of adhesive and the mechanical property of the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:26714586

  11. Plasticizers Increase Adhesion of the Deteriogenic Fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to Polyvinyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jeremy S.; Van der Mei, Henny C.; Nixon, Marianne; Eastwood, Ian M.; Greenhalgh, Malcolm; Read, Simon J.; Robson, Geoffrey D.; Handley, Pauline S.

    1999-01-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing the plasticizers dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and dioctyl adipate (DOA). A quantitative adhesion assay using image analysis identified fundamental differences in the mechanism of adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to these substrata. Adhesion to pPVC was greater than that to uPVC by a maximum of 280% after a 4-h incubation with 108 blastospores ml−1. That plasticizers enhance adhesion to PVC was confirmed by incorporating a dispersion of both DOA and DOP into the blastospore suspension. Adhesion to uPVC was increased by up to 308% in the presence of the dispersed plasticizers. Hydrophobic interactions were found to dominate adhesion to uPVC because (i) a strong positive correlation was observed between substratum hydrophobicity (measured by using a dynamic contact angle analyzer) and adhesion to a range of unplasticized polymers including uPVC, and (ii) neither the pH nor the electrolyte concentration of the suspension buffer, both of which influence electrostatic interactions, affected adhesion to uPVC. In contrast, adhesion to pPVC is principally controlled by electrostatic interactions. Enhanced adhesion to pPVC occurred despite a relative reduction of 13° in the water contact angle of pPVC compared to that of uPVC. Furthermore, adhesion to pPVC was strongly dependent on both the pH and electrolyte concentration of the suspension medium, reaching maximum levels at pH 8 and with an electrolyte concentration of 10 mM NaCl. Plasticization with DOP and DOA therefore increases adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to pPVC through an interaction mediated by electrostatic forces. PMID:10427051

  12. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Lee, Yoon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n = 10). They were treated as follows: untreated (control), Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P < 0.05). Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:26539485

  13. Effect of acid etching on bond strength of nanoionomer as an orthodontic bonding adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A new Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement known as nanoionomer containing nanofillers of fluoroaluminosilicate glass and nanofiller 'clusters' has been introduced. An in-vitro study aimed at evaluating shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of nanoionomer under etching/unetched condition for use as an orthodontic bonding agent. Material and Methods: A total of 75 extracted premolars were used, which were divided into three equal groups of 25 each: 1-Conventional adhesive (Enlight Light Cure, SDS, Ormco, CA, USA) was used after and etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by Ortho Solo application 2-nanoionomer (Ketac™ N100, 3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used after etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s 3-nanoionomer was used without etching. The SBS testing was performed using a digital universal testing machine (UTM-G-410B, Shanta Engineering). Evaluation of ARI was done using scanning electron microscopy. The SBS were compared using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test for intergroup comparisons and ARI scores were compared with Chi-square test. Results: ANOVA (SBS, F = 104.75) and Chi-square (ARI, Chi-square = 30.71) tests revealed significant differences between groups (P < 0.01). The mean (SD) SBS achieved with conventional light cure adhesive was significantly higher (P < 0.05) (10.59 ± 2.03 Mpa, 95% CI, 9.74-11.41) than the nanoionomer groups (unetched 4.13 ± 0.88 Mpa, 95% CI, 3.79-4.47 and etched 9.32 ± 1.87 Mpa, 95% CI, 8.58-10.06). However, nanoionomer with etching, registered SBS in the clinically acceptable range of 5.9–7.8 MPa, as suggested by Reynolds (1975). The nanoionomer groups gave significantly lower ARI values than the conventional adhesive group. Conclusion: Based on this in-vitro study, nanoionomer with etching can be successfully used as an orthodontic bonding agent leaving less adhesive remnant on enamel surface, making cleaning easier. However, in-vivo studies are needed to confirm the validity

  14. Analysis of bonding stress with high strength adhesive between the reflector and the mounts in space camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Yongming; Li, Yingcai; Qu, Youshan; Ding, Jiaoteng

    2010-05-01

    The bond stress is analyzed when the optics were attached to their mounts with high strength adhesive in space camera. The model was founded that a circular planar reflector supported by one, three, six or twelve adhesive points, which evenly distributed on different circles. The surface deformation of reflector is mainly caused by the shrinkage after solidity. The functional relation was deduced between the bonding force of the reflector and the characteristic dimension of the adhesive spot using piecewise function, and then analyzing the RMS error of no gravity assuming that the adhesive spot is fixed connect to the reflector using Nastran. The analytical RMS error was the aberration which added by solidification of adhesive. The calculation result is in good agreement with the experiment results. This analyzing method will be useful for the microstress clamping of high performance reflector system for application in space optical systems.

  15. Effect of blood contamination with 1-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, H M; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of blood contamination and decontamination methods on the microtensile bond strength of 1-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin contaminated after adhesive application and light curing. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop) and 1 resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) were used. Third molars that had been stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the 3 adhesive systems. The adhesive systems were used under 3 conditions: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood and reapplication of adhesive (Contamination 1) and contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood, then washing, drying and reapplication of the adhesive (Contamination 2). Following light curing of the adhesive, the resin composite was placed in 3 increments up to a 5-mm-thick layer on the bonded surface. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The microtensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p=0.05). After debonding, 5 specimens were selected from each group and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. For all adhesives, contamination groups showed lower bond strength than the control (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference among the control groups (p>0.05). For Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop, contamination group #2 showed the lowest bond strength among the groups (p<0.05). For One Up Bond F, contamination group #2 showed higher bond strength than contamination group #1 but showed no statistical significance between them (p>0.05). PMID

  16. Mixed-mode interfacial adhesive strength of a thin film on an anisotropic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitey, Rajesh; Geubelle, Philippe H.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2009-01-01

    The mixed-mode interfacial adhesion strength between a gold (Au) thin film and an anisotropic passivated silicon (Si) substrate is measured using laser-induced stress wave loading. Test specimens are prepared by bonding a fused silica (FS) prism to the back side of a <1 0 0> Si substrate with a thin silicon nitride (Si xN y) passivation layer deposited on the top surface. A high-amplitude stress wave is developed by pulsed laser ablation of a sacrificial absorbing layer on one of the lateral surfaces of the FS prism. Due to the negative non-linear elastic properties of the FS, the compressive stress wave evolves into a decompression shock with fast fall time. Careful selection of the incident angle between the pulse and the FS/Si interface generates a mode-converted shear wave in refraction, subjecting the Si xN y/Au thin film interface to dynamic mixed-mode loading, sufficient to cause interfacial fracture. A detailed analysis of the anisotropic wave propagation combined with interferometric measurements of surface displacements enables calculation of the interfacial stresses developed under mixed-mode loading. The mixed-mode interfacial strength is compared to the interfacial strength measured under purely tensile loading.

  17. The effects of two soft drinks on bond strength, bracket microleakage, and adhesive remnant on intact and sealed enamel.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Raúl; Vicente, Ascensión; Ortiz, Antonio J; Bravo, Luis A

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and Schweppes Limón on bond strength, adhesive remnant, and microleakage beneath brackets. One hundred and twenty upper central incisor brackets were bonded to bovine incisors and divided into three groups: (1) Control, (2) Coca-Cola, and (3) Schweppes Limón. The teeth were submerged in the drinks three times a day for 15 minutes over a 15 day period. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured with a universal testing machine, and adhesive remnant evaluated using image analysis equipment. Microleakage at the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces was determined using methylene blue. One hundred and eight teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of the drinks on intact and sealed enamel. SBS and adhesive remnant data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.05) and microleakage using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests applying Bonferroni correction (P < 0.017). No significant differences were found in SBS and adhesive remnant between the groups (P > 0.05). Microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface for groups 2 and 3 was significantly greater than for group 1 (P < 0.017). At the adhesive-bracket interface, microleakage was significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (P < 0.017) while microleakage in group 3 did not differ significantly from either group 1 or 2 (P < 0.017). The drinks produced enamel erosion, loss of adhesive and microleakage. Coca-Cola and Schweppes Limón did not affect the SBS of brackets or the adhesive remnant. PMID:20631082

  18. Influence of different pre-etching times on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Scheidel, Donal D; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence on dentin bonding of phosphoric acid pre-etching times before the application of self-etch adhesives. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives [Prime & Bond Elect (EL) and Scotchbond Universal (SU)], a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive [G-aenial Bond (GB)], and a two-step self-etch adhesive [OptiBond XTR (OX)] were used. The SBS and SFS values were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching times of 3, 10, or 15 s before application of the adhesives, and for a control without pre-etching. For groups with 3 s of pre-etching, SU and EL showed higher SBS values than control groups. No significant difference was observed for GB among the 3 s, 10 s, and control groups, but the 15 s pre-etching group showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values than the control group. No significant difference was found for OX among the pre-etching groups. Reducing phosphoric acid pre-etching time can minimize the adverse effect on dentin bonding durability for the conventional self-etch adhesives. Furthermore, a short phosphoric acid pre-etching time enhances the dentin bonding performance of universal adhesives. PMID:26918658

  19. Surface modification of cotton fabrics by gas plasmas for color strength and adhesion by inkjet ink printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pransilp, Porntapin; Pruettiphap, Meshaya; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan; Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Kiatkamjornwong, Suda

    2016-02-01

    Surface properties of cotton fabric were modified by three types of gas plasma pretreatment, namely, oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), to improve ink absorption of water-based pigmented inkjet inks and color reproduction of the treated surfaces. Effects of gas plasma exposure parameters of power, exposure time and gas pressure on surface physical and chemical properties of the treated fabrics were investigated. XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was used to identify changes in functional groups on the fabric surface while AFM (atomic force microscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) were used to reveal surface topography of the fabric. Color spectroscopic technique was used to investigate changes in color strength caused by different absorptions of the printed fabrics. The O2 plasma treatments produced new functional groups, sbnd Osbnd Csbnd O/Cdbnd O and Osbnd Cdbnd O while N2 plasma treatments produced additionally new functional groups, Csbnd N and Odbnd Csbnd NH, onto the fabric surface which increased hydrophilic properties and surface energy of the fabric. For cotton fabric treated with SF6 plasma, the fluorine functionalization was additionally found on the surface. Color strength values (K/S) increased when compared with those of the untreated fabrics. SF6 plasma-treated fabrics were hydrophobic and caused less ink absorption. Fabric surface roughness caused by plasma etching increased fabric surface areas, captured more ink, and enhanced a larger ink color gamut and ink adhesion. Cotton fabrics exhibited higher ink adhesion and wider color gamut after the O2 plasma treatment comparing with those after N2 plasma treatment.

  20. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  1. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  2. Influence of different primer application times on bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems to unground enamel.

    PubMed

    Britta, Liana Cláudia; Martins, Marcelo; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of increasing the application time of acid primer on the bond strength of one- and two-step self-etching systems to unground enamel. Thirty-two human third molars were used in this study. Additionally, four self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), AdheSE (Ivoclar-Vivadent), Futurabond NR (Voco) and One Up Bond F Plus (J Morita) were used in two conditions according to each manufacturer's recommendations and using double the application time of the primer recommended by the manufacturers. The teeth were randomly separated into groups and sectioned in their central region in the buccal-lingual direction perpendicular to their long axes, using a double-faced diamond disk. A 6-mm high block was then made with Rok (SDI) resin composite on the mesial and distal faces of each tooth. The samples were then serially sectioned from the resin composite in the occlusal-gingival and buccal-lingual directions at a distance of 1 mm between cuts using a high concentration diamond disk adapted to a precision cutter. The microtensile test was performed in a universal test machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The fractured specimens were analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy to determine failure modes. The data obtained were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey Kramer tests. There was no statistically significant difference among the adhesive systems and primer application times. Failure modes varied among the groups and were influenced by the increase in acid primer application time. PMID:19192836

  3. Using scratch testing to measure the adhesion strength of calcium phosphate coatings applied to poly(carbonate urethane) substrates.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Dunstan; Johnson, Scott; Snell, Robert; Best, Serena

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive coatings are applied to components of modern orthopædic implants to improve the host tissue response to the implants. Such coatings cannot be applied to polymeric implants by high-temperature techniques, because the use of high temperatures may critically degrade the polymer substrate. Regardless of the coating technique that is used, the coating must be sufficiently well adhered to the underlying substrate to provide any practical benefit. This paper investigates the use of scratch testing to measure the adhesion strength of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings that were applied to a poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU) substrate by an aqueous process at temperatures of 19, 28, 37, and 50 °C. This work represents the first time that scratch testing analysis has been used to study CaP coatings deposited by an aqueous, low-temperature process on to a polymer substrate. Scratch testing was shown to be a useful technique for obtaining comparative, rather than absolute, values of adhesion strength for hard coatings formed on a compliant substrate. Generally, the coating temperature was not found to influence the CaP-PCU adhesion strength. Although CaP coatings formed at 19 °C exhibited considerably lower adhesion strengths than CaP coatings formed at 28, 37, and 50 °C, this finding was attributable to the inconsistency of CaP coatings formed on the PCU substrates at 19 °C. The coating-substrate adhesion strength was measured for CaP coatings of four different coating ages (0, 1, 2, and 3 years). CaP coatings that were aged for 0, 1, or 2 years exhibited similar coating-substrate adhesion strengths to each other. In contrast, CaP coatings that were aged for 3 years demonstrated considerably lower coating-substrate adhesion strengths. The observed reduction in adhesion strength with age was thought to be attributable to suspected "drying out" of the CaP coatings. PMID:22301182

  4. Effects of Two Soft Drinks on Shear Bond Strength and Adhesive Remnant Index of Orthodontic Metal Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Materials and Methods: Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Conclusion: Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25584049

  5. Effect of adhesive primers on bonding strength of heat cure denture base resin to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Sung; Yang, Hong-So; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM The poor chemical bonding of a denture base resin to cast titanium framework often introduces adhesive failure and increases microleakage. PURPOSE This study evaluated the shear bond strengths of a heat cure denture base resin to commercially pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and a cobalt-chromium alloy using two adhesive primers. MATERIAL AND METHODS Disks of commercially pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and a cobalt-chromium alloy were cast. Specimens without the primer were also prepared and used as the controls. The shear bond strengths were measured on a screw-driven universal testing machine. RESULTS The primers significantly (P < .05) improved the shear bond strengths of the heat cure resin to all metals. However, the specimens primed with the Alloy primer® (MDP monomer) showed higher bond strength than those primed with the MR bond® (MAC-10 monomer) on titanium. Only adhesive failure was observed at the metal-resin interface in the non-primed specimens, while the primed specimens showed mixed failure of adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSIONS The use of appropriate adhesive metal primers makes it possible not only to eliminate the need for surface preparation of the metal framework before applying the heat cure resins, but also reduce the need for retentive devices on the metal substructure. In particular, the Alloy primer®, which contains the phosphoric acid monomer, MDP, might be clinically more acceptable for bonding a heat cure resin to titanium than a MR bond®, which contains the carboxylic acid monomer, MAC-10. PMID:21165254

  6. Increasing Lean Mass and Strength: A Comparison of High Frequency Strength Training to Lower Frequency Strength Training

    PubMed Central

    THOMAS, MICHAEL H.; BURNS, STEVE P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect strength training frequency has on improvements in lean mass and strength. Participants were 7 women and 12 men, age (χ̄= 34.64 years ± 6.91 years), with strength training experience, training age (χ̄= 51.16 months ± 39.02 months). Participants were assigned to one of two groups to equal baseline group demographics. High frequency training group (HFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist, 3 times per week, exercising with 3 sets per muscle group per session (3 total body workouts). Low frequency training group (LFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist one time per week, completing all 9 sets during that one workout. LFT consisted of a routine split over three days: 1) pectoralis, deltoids, and triceps; 2) upper back and biceps; 3) quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and abdominals. Following eight weeks of training, HFT increased lean mass by 1.06 kg ± 1.78 kg, (1.9%), and LFT increased lean mass by .99 kg ± 1.31 kg, (2.0%). HFT strength improvements on the chest press was 9.07 kg ± 6.33 kg, (11%), and hack squat 20.16 kg ± 11.59 kg, (21%). LFT strength improvements on chest press was 5.80kg ± 4.26 kg, (7.0%), and hack squat 21.83 kg ± 11.17 kg, (24 %). No mean differences between groups were significant. These results suggest that HFT and LFT of equal set totals result in similar improvements in lean mass and strength, following 8 weeks of strength training. PMID:27182422

  7. Effect of the pre-treatment and the aggregate content on the adhesion strength of repair mortars on Miocene porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2016-04-01

    The adhesion between porous limestone and newly prepared repair mortars are crucial in the preservation of historic stone structures. Besides mechanical compatibility other matches such as chemical composition and porosity are also essential, but the current research focuses on the adhesion strength of repair mortars that are used in the restoration of Hungarian porous limestone. 8 mortars (4 commercial and 4 specially prepared) were selected for the tests. Mortars with different amount of aggregate were prepared and caste to stone surface. The stone substrate was highly porous Miocene limestone. The strength was tested by standardized pull-out tests which method is commonly used for concrete testing. The limestone surfaces were either used in their natural conditions or were pre-treated (pre-wetting). The strength of the stone/mortar bond was tested. The failure mechanism was documented and various failure modes were identified. Strength test results suggest that especially pre-treatment influences strongly the pull-out strength at mortar/stone interface. Increasing aggregate content also reduces pull out strength of tested repair mortars, but at various rates depending on the mortar type. The financial support of OTKA post-doctoral grant to BSZK (reference number is: PD 112-955) and National Research, Development and Innovation (NKFI) Fund to ÁT (ref. no. K 116532) are appreciated.

  8. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

  9. Preparation and properties of a starch-based wood adhesive with high bonding strength and water resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhua; Ding, Longlong; Gu, Jiyou; Tan, Haiyan; Zhu, Libin

    2015-01-22

    A Highly efficient method was developed for preparing starch-based wood adhesives with high performance, using H2O2, a silane coupling agent and an olefin monomer as an oxidant, cross-linking agent and comonomer, respectively. The effects of various parameters on the shear adhesive strength were investigated in the dry state (DS) and wet state (WS). The results indicated that the bonding strength of starch-based wood adhesives could reach 7.88 MPa in dry state and 4.09 MPa in wet state. The oxidation could reduce the content of the hydroxyl transforming into carboxyl and aldehyde groups, and the graft copolymerization enhanced the thermal stability, which improved the bonding strength and water resistance. The starch-based adhesive and the fractures in the bonded joints were analyzed via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The improved properties were attributed to the modified of microstructure of the graft-copolymerized starch-based adhesive. PMID:25439864

  10. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. RESULTS For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. CONCLUSION Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin. PMID:26330979

  11. Effect of saliva contamination on the microshear bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, H M; Oh, T S; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination and decontamination methods on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt) and one resin composite (Filtek Z-250) were used. Third molars stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to contamination methods: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva before light curing (A) and contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva after light curing (B). Each contamination group was further subdivided into three subgroups according to the decontamination method: A1-Saliva was removed by a gentle air blast and the adhesive was light-cured; A2-Saliva was rinsed for 10 seconds, gently air-dried and the was adhesive light-cured; A3-Saliva was rinsed and dried as in A2, then the adhesive was re-applied to the dentin surface and light-cured; B1-Saliva was removed with a gentle air blast; B2-Saliva was rinsed and dried; B3-Saliva was rinsed, dried and the adhesive was re-applied and light cured. Tygon tubes filled with resin composite were placed on each surface and light cured. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Microshear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p<0.05). After debonding, five specimens were selected and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. The A2 subgroup resulted in the lowest bond strength. For One Up Bond F and Adper Prompt, there was no significant difference between subgroup A1 and the control, and subgroup A3 and the control (p>0.05). Bond

  12. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives. PMID:27217558

  13. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  14. Foam concrete of increased strength with the thermomodified peat additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Kopanitsa, N. O.; Sarkisov, Ju S.; Kasatkina, A. V.; Prischepa, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research of foam concrete with thermomodified peat additives. The aim of the research was to study the effect of modifying additives on cement stone and foam concrete properties. Peat additives are prepared by heat treatment of peat at 600 °C. Two approaches of obtaining additives are examined: in condition of open air access (TMT-600) and in condition of limited air access (TMT-600-k). Compressive strength of a cement stone with modifiers found to be increased by 28.9 - 65.2%. Introducing peat modifiers into foam concrete mix leads to increase of compressive strength by 44-57% at 28- day age and heat conductivity of foam concrete decreases by 0.089 W/(m·°C).

  15. An in vitro comparison of adhesive techniques and rotary instrumentation on shear bond strength of nanocomposite with simulated pulpal pressure

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Jayshree; Sravanthi, Y

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite to tooth using different adhesive techniques and rotary instruments under simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molars were randomly divided into two groups of 30 samples each (group I and II), according to the adhesive technique followed (i.e. total etch and self etch groups). Each group was further divided into two sub-groups (Sub-groups A and B) of 15 samples each according to the cutting instrument (diamond abrasive or carbide burs) used. Class II cavities were made with diamond abrasive or carbide burs, and restored with nano-composite under positive intra-pulpal pressure. Shear bond strength of the specimens were recorded simultaneously. Results: After statistical evaluation using two-way ANOVA and t-test, the mean shear bond strength values of the groups are as follows: Group IA- 4.69 MPa, Group IB-6.15 MPa, Group IIA-4.3 MPa, and Group IIB-6.24 MPa. It was seen that group IIB showed highest bond strength followed by group IB. Group II A showed the least bond strength. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, diamond abrasive gave better bond strength than carbide bur with both the adhesive techniques. PMID:22025823

  16. Increasing the Strength of Aluminum-alloy Columns by Prestressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M; Hartman, E C

    1937-01-01

    A series of tests was made in which the column strength of 17ST tubing was increased as much as 50 percent by prestressing the tubing to 40,000 pounds per square inch in compression under conditions of support that prevented column failure at this stress. This prestressing achieves it's beneficial effects entirely by improving the compressive properties of the material, principally the proportional limit.

  17. Study of the time effect on the strength of cell-cell adhesion force by a novel nano-picker

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} A nano-picker is developed for single cell adhesion force measurement. {yields} The adhesion of picker-cell has no influence to the cell-cell measurement result. {yields} Cell-cell adhesion force has a rise at the first few minutes and then becomes constant. -- Abstract: Cell's adhesion is important to cell's interaction and activates. In this paper, a novel method for cell-cell adhesion force measurement was proposed by using a nano-picker. The effect of the contact time on the cell-cell adhesion force was studied. The nano-picker was fabricated from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever by nano fabrication technique. The cell-cell adhesion force was measured based on the deflection of the nano-picker beam. The result suggests that the adhesion force between cells increased with the increasing of contact time at the first few minutes. After that, the force became constant. This measurement methodology was based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. It can realize both the observation and manipulation of a single cell at nanoscale. The quantitative and precise cell-cell adhesion force result can be obtained by this method. It would help us to understand the single cell interaction with time and would benefit the research in medical and biological fields potentially.

  18. Effect of desensitizing agents on the microtensile bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Cortiano, Fernanda M; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; de Souza, Evelise M

    2016-06-01

    Desensitizers can be used to control postoperative sensitivity in adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents on the bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to dentin. Forty-two human molars were sectioned to obtain 3-mm-thick dentin discs. The discs were divided into three groups (n = 14 in each) - no-treatment control group (CT), and oxalic acid [BisBlock (BB)] and calcium phosphate [Desensibilize Nano-P (NP)] desensitizers - before the application of two adhesive systems [Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) and One-Step Plus (OSP)]. A nanoparticle composite resin was used to create a 3-mm-thick build-up. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h before a microtensile bond-strength test was performed. The failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope at 100 × magnification. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the interface for scanning electron microscopy analyses. The CT-SB group exhibited the highest bond strength, differing significantly from BB-SB and BB-OSP groups. Mixed failures were prevalent for all groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a continuous hybrid layer and resin tags in all groups. Dentin bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems was reduced by an oxalic acid desensitizer but was not affected by a calcium phosphate-containing desensitizer. PMID:27038226

  19. Effect of pretreating technologies on the adhesive strength and anticorrosion property of Zn coated NdFeB specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Xu, Guangqing; Liu, Jiaqin; Yi, Xiaofei; Wu, Yucheng; Chen, JingWu

    2016-02-01

    Zinc coated NdFeB specimens were prepared with different pretreating technologies, such as polishing, pickling (50 s), sandblasting and combined technology of sandblasting and pickling (5 s). Morphologies of the NdFeB substrates pretreated with different technologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer and an atomic force microscope. The tensile test was performed to measure the adhesive strength between Zn coating and NdFeB substrate. The self-corrosion behavior of the NdFeB specimen was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization curve. The anticorrosion properties of Zn coated NdFeB specimens were characterized by neutral salt spray tests. The pretreating technologies possess obvious impact on the adhesive strength and anticorrosion property of Zn coated NdFeB specimens. Combined pretreating technology of sandblasting and pickling (5 s) achieves the highest adhesive strength (25.56 MPa) and excellent anticorrosion property (average corrosion current density of 21 μA/cm2) in the four pretreating technologies. The impacting mechanisms of the pretreating technology on the adhesive strength and anticorrosion properties are deeply discussed.

  20. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  1. Impact of adhesive application to wet and dry dentin on long-term resin-dentin bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra; Pellizzaro, Arlete; Dal-Bianco, Karen; Gones, Osnara Mongruel; Patzlaff, Rafael; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the effects of moisture and rubbing action on the immediate and one-year microtensile bond strength (BS) of an ethanol/water-based adhesive system (Single Bond [SB]) and an acetone-based system (One Step [OS]) to dentin. A flat superficial dentin surface on 60 human molars was exposed by wet abrasion. Two coats of the adhesives were applied on either a dry (D) or rewetted surface (W) with no (NRA), slight (SRA) or vigorous rubbing action (VRA). After light curing (600 mW/cm2/10 seconds), composite buildups were constructed incrementally and the specimens were stored in water (37 degrees C/24 hours). They were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/minute. The sticks from each tooth were then divided, stored in water at 37 degrees C and tested immediately and after 12 months (12 M) at 0.5 mm/minute. The bond strength values of sticks from the same hemitooth were averaged for statistical purposes. The prematurely debonded specimens were included in the hemi-tooth mean. The data from each adhesive was analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests (alpha = 0.05). In the dry groups, high bond strength values were obtained under VRA. When the dentin was kept moist, both SRA and VRA provided high resin-dentin bond strength values. Reductions in bond strength values after one year of water storage were not observed for the SB adhesive or were less pronounced for the OS adhesive when it was vigorously rubbed onto the dentin surface. PMID:17695611

  2. Nanostructural hierarchy increases the strength of aluminium alloys.

    PubMed

    Liddicoat, Peter V; Liao, Xiao-Zhou; Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian; Murashkin, Maxim Y; Lavernia, Enrique J; Valiev, Ruslan Z; Ringer, Simon P

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the strength of metallic alloys while maintaining formability is an interesting challenge for enabling new generations of lightweight structures and technologies. In this paper, we engineer aluminium alloys to contain a hierarchy of nanostructures and possess mechanical properties that expand known performance boundaries-an aerospace-grade 7075 alloy exhibits a yield strength and uniform elongation approaching 1 GPa and 5%, respectively. The nanostructural architecture was observed using novel high-resolution microscopy techniques and comprises a solid solution, free of precipitation, featuring (i) a high density of dislocations, (ii) subnanometre intragranular solute clusters, (iii) two geometries of nanometre-scale intergranular solute structures and (iv) grain sizes tens of nanometres in diameter. Our results demonstrate that this novel architecture offers a design pathway towards a new generation of super-strong materials with new regimes of property-performance space. PMID:20842199

  3. Pull-out mechanical measurement of tissue-substrate adhesive strength: endothelial cell monolayer sheet formed on a thermoresponsive gelatin layer.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Keiichi; Shoda, Kaori; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2002-01-01

    Although adhesive strength of a single cell on substrates has been reported, the adhesive strength at the tissue-substrate interface has not been reported. However, the tissue-substrate adhesive strength must provide important criteria for performance of implant devices. This article deals with the tissue-substrate adhesive strength for fully endothelialized tissue, which was formed on commercial tissue culture dishes with or without a coating layer of thermoresponsive gelatin (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted gelatin, which dissolves in water at room temperature but is precipitated at 37 degrees C). To determine tissue-substrate adhesive strength, a pull-out technique using a glue-coated cover glass was used. The adhesive strength of monolayered tissue on a noncoated dish was approximately 560 Pa or 230 nN/cell at 37 degrees C. For dishes coated with thermoresponsive gelatin, the adhesive strengths were 1050 Pa or 584 nN/cell at 37 degrees C, and 26 Pa or 14 nN/cell at room temperature. For noncoated dishes, delamination occurred mostly at the interface between the extracellular matrix (ECM) secreted by the cells and the dish surface; and for coated dishes, it took place fully at the interface between ECM and the dish surface. This technique enables determination of the adhesive strength between a full monolayered tissue and a substrate. PMID:12003077

  4. The bond strength of adhesive resins to AH plus contaminated dentin cleaned by various gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Demirbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kansad; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2015-01-01

    The optimal bonding of adhesives to dentin requires the sealer to be completely removed from dentinal walls. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different cleaning procedures using gutta-percha solvents on bond strength of adhesive resins to AH Plus contaminated dentin (APCD). The pulp chamber dentin surfaces were contaminated with AH Plus and cleaned with five different techniques (dry cotton, chloroform, orange oil, eucalyptol, and ethanol). Then, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), and Tetric N Bond (TNB) (Ivoclar Vivadent) were applied and filled with a composite resin. The serial sticks (1 × 1 mm) were obtained and tested for microtensile bond strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for analysis of debonded surfaces. Ethanol exhibited the highest bond strength to APCD followed by dry cotton. There was no statistically significant difference between ethanol and dry cotton (p > 0.05). Eucalyptol showed the lowest bond strength to APCD and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in comparison with other groups. APCD reduced the bond strength of all adhesive resins. Dry cotton, ethanol, and chloroform were the most suitable techniques when used with CSE together, whereas ethanol was best with TNB. PMID:25678408

  5. Arsenic Exposure Increases Monocyte Adhesion to the Vascular Endothelium, a Pro-Atherogenic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Maryse; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemarié, Catherine A; Bolt, Alicia M; Flores Molina, Manuel; Krohn, Regina M; Smits, Judit E; Lehoux, Stéphanie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure increases atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unknown. Monocytes, macrophages and platelets play an important role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Circulating monocytes and macrophages bind to the activated vascular endothelium and migrate into the sub-endothelium, where they become lipid-laden foam cells. This process can be facilitated by platelets, which favour monocyte recruitment to the lesion. Thus, we assessed the effects of low-to-moderate arsenic exposure on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, platelet activation and platelet-monocyte interactions. We observed that arsenic induces human monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro. These findings were confirmed ex vivo using a murine organ culture system at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. We found that both cell types need to be exposed to arsenic to maximize monocyte adhesion to the endothelium. This adhesion process is specific to monocyte/endothelium interactions. Hence, no effect of arsenic on platelet activation or platelet/leukocyte interaction was observed. We found that arsenic increases adhesion of mononuclear cells via increased CD29 binding to VCAM-1, an adhesion molecule found on activated endothelial cells. Similar results were observed in vivo, where arsenic-exposed mice exhibit increased VCAM-1 expression on endothelial cells and increased CD29 on circulating monocytes. Interestingly, expression of adhesion molecules and increased binding can be inhibited by antioxidants in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data suggest that arsenic might enhance atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, a process that is inhibited by antioxidants. PMID:26332580

  6. Effect of desensitizing agents on the microtensile bond strength of a two-step self-etch adhesive to dentin.

    PubMed

    Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Dalkihç, Evrim; Üçtaşli, Mine Betül

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of cervical hypersensitivity treatments (neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet [Nd:YAG] laser and conventional techniques) on the microtensile bond strengths of adhesives to treated dentin. The buccal cervical enamel of 42 freshly extracted human mandibular third molars was ground flat to expose the cervical dentin. The dentin surfaces were polished with a series of silicon carbide papers, and the smear was removed with an ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid solution. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups as follows: group 1, Vivasens; group 2, BisBlock; group 3, fluoride gel; group 4, Nd:YAG laser; group 5, Clearfil SE + Nd:YAG laser; and group 6, no treatment (control). The specimens were then restored with a two-step self-etch adhesive, with the exception of group 5. Five specimens from each group were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin. The adhesive interface of two specimens from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface to produce beams (adhesive area 1 mm(2)). The beams were then attached to a microtensile tester and stressed to failure at 1 mm/min. The data were compared using one-way analysis of variance at a significance level of 0.05. The microtensile bond strengths of the control group were significantly higher than those found for group 1, group 2, group 3, and group 4 (p< 0.05). No significant difference was found between group 5 and the control group. Most of the premature failures were seen in group 2 (80%), and the fewest premature failures were seen in group 5 (13.3%). The SEM findings verified the microtensile test findings. In conclusion, desensitizing treatment procedures (with the exception of Clearfil SE + Nd:YAG laser) reduced the microtensile bond strength of a two-step self-etch adhesive to dentin. PMID:21777097

  7. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Daina, Paola; Tamagnone, Alessandra; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP) with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh) were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT) and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit) systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs), Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs. PMID:23984339

  8. Evaluation of Self-Etching Adhesive and Er:YAG Laser Conditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J.; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura E.; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia; Olea-Mejía, Oscar F.; Alcántara-Galena, María del Carmen Z.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength, the adhesive remnant index scores, and etch surface of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with self-etching primer and Er:YAG laser conditioning. One hundred and twenty bovine incisors were randomly divided into four groups. In Group I (Control), the teeth were conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In Group II the teeth were conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (5 sec); III and IV were irradiated with the Er:YAG 150 mJ (11.0 J/cm2), 150 mJ (19.1 J/cm2), respectively, at 7–12 Hz with water spray. After surface preparation, upper central incisor stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change Adhesive. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours and shear bond strengths were measured, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined. The conditioned surface was observed under a scanning electron microscope. One-way ANOVA and chi-square test were used. Group I showed the significantly highest values of bond strength with a mean value of 8.2 megapascals (MPa). The lesser amount of adhesive remnant was found in Group III. The results of this study suggest that Er:YAG laser irradiation could not be an option for enamel conditioning. PMID:24228014

  9. Micro-tensile bond strength of two adhesives to Erbium:YAG-lased vs. bur-cut enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Yudhira, Rafaël; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the hypotheses that laser irradiation is equally effective for bonding as traditional acid-etch procedures, and that tooth substrate prepared either by Erbium:YAG laser or diamond bur is equally receptive to adhesive procedures. Buccal/oral enamel and mid-coronal dentin were laser-irradiated using an Erbium:YAG laser. A total-etch adhesive (OptiBond FL) applied with and without prior acid-etching and a self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond) were employed to bond the composite. The micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) was determined after 24 h of storage in water. Failure patterns were analysed using a stereo-microscope, and samples were processed for Field-emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (Fe-SEM) evaluation. Unbonded, lased enamel and dentin surfaces were evaluated using Fe-SEM as well. The total-etch adhesive bonded significantly less effectively to lased than to bur-cut enamel/dentin. Laser 'conditioning' was clearly less effective than acid-etching. Moreover, acid etching lased enamel and dentin significantly improved the microTBS of OptiBond FL. The self-etch adhesive performed equally to lased as to bur-cut enamel, but significantly less effectively to lased than to bur-cut dentin. It is concluded that cavities prepared by laser appear less receptive to adhesive procedures than conventional bur-cut cavities. PMID:12206595

  10. Strength analysis and design of adhesive joints between circular elements made of metal and reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekh, B. L.; Marchuk, M. V.; Kogut, I. S.

    1992-06-01

    The stress-strain state of an adhesive joint between cylindrical components made of a metal (steel) and a cross-reinforced filament-wound composite (glass/polymer or basalt/polymer) was investigated under static axial loading using newly proposed experimental techniques and a refined mathematical model. Analytical expressions are obtained for contact stresses in the adhesive joint. The maximum permissible load and the ultimate shear strength of the joint are determined. The experimental results are found to be in satisfactory agreement with model predictions.

  11. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Nouri, Hossein; Koohpeima, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was created by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit) under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond) and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond) were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350) was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter) on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa) was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany) at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive system at 25 ˚C and 40 ˚C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ˚C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001). Conclusion Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond. PMID:25759852

  12. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  13. The effects of tooth preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to contaminated dentin.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of a self-adhesive luting cement after using four different techniques to remove surface contamination on dentin. Extracted human molars were flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for full crown preparation. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at room temperature with 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups, and excess provisional cement was removed with (1) a hand instrument (excavator), (2) prophy with a mixture of flour pumice and water (3) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 microm at 40 psi and (4) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 50 microm at 40 psi. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated and residual materials were detected using SEM and EDS analysis of randomly selected specimens. The ceramics were treated with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized to the prepared dentin prior to cementing with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE). The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Particle abrasion treatment of dentin with an aluminous oxide particle provided the highest values of bond strength, while hand instrument excavation was the lowest (p < 0.05). Aluminous oxide particle size did not significantly influence the bond strength at 40 psi. The use of low pressure and small particle abrasion treated dentin as a mechanical cleansing protocol prior to definitive cementation increased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin-luting cement to dentin following eugenol-containing temporary cement. PMID:18833862

  14. Peptidoglycan increases firm adhesion of monocytes under flow conditions and primes monocyte chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nijhuis, Manon M Oude; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Sluis, Nienke I; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; Laman, Jon D; Ulfman, Laurien H

    2007-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain ligand peptidoglycan (PG) has been shown to be present in macrophage-rich regions within atherosclerotic lesions, and stimulation of TLR2 promotes atherosclerotic plaque and intima formation in in vivo mouse models. We determined the effect of a PG preparation and Pam(3)Cys-SK(4), a synthetic TLR2 activator, on (1) adhesion molecule expression by flow cytometry; (2) monocyte adhesion under flow conditions, and (3) monocyte migration. The total adhesion (rolling and firm adhesion) of the PG-preparation-stimulated monocytes to L cells, constitutively expressing ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and E-selectin, was decreased. This was most likely due to the L-selectin shedding, since monocyte incubation with a blocking L-selectin antibody resulted in a comparable number of adherent monocytes as PG-stimulated cells. The PG preparation induced an increased percentage of firmly adherent, polarized cells and a beta(2)-integrin-dependent binding to ICAM-1-coated beads. Interestingly, the PG preparation induced a priming of the monocytes for increased migration towards the chemoattractant C5a which was TLR2 and beta(2)-integrin dependent. Pam(3)Cys-SK(4) gave comparable results to the PG preparation in all assays tested. This study demonstrates that PG activation of monocytes results in an increase in adhesive and migratory capacities of these cells. This might be a mechanism by which PG promotes atherosclerotic disease in vivo. PMID:17337907

  15. Influence of light intensity on surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Kie; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of light intensity on the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step selfetch adhesives. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). Surface-free energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. Dentin bond strengths of the specimens were also measured. Polymerization with a higher light intensity resulted in a lower surface-free energy of the cured adhesives. The greatest bond strength was achieved when a light intensity of 400 mW/cm(2) or greater was used. Our data suggest that the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives are affected by light intensity of the curing unit. PMID:26438984

  16. Resin-dentin bond strength of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Silvia Terra; Cubas, Gloria Beatriz de Azevedo; Flores, Josiane Barcelos; Montemezzo, Murieli Leonor; Pinto, Marcia Bueno; Piva, Evandro

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resin-dentin bond degradation of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage, 100 bovine incisors were randomly separated into 10 groups and their superficial coronal dentin was exposed. According to manufacturers' instructions, dentin surfaces were bonded with one of seven two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives or one of three three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives. Composite buildups were constructed incrementally. Restored teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks (0.5 mm²). The specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond strength test after storage in distilled water (at 37°C) for one year. Data (MPa) were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey's tests at α = 0.05. Of the adhesives tested, One Step, All Bond 2, and Optibond FL attained the highest bond strength to dentin after one year in water storage, while Magic Bond DE and Master Bond presented a high number of premature debonded flaws. PMID:21062710

  17. The shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nimish; Chaman, Chandrakar; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Singh, Udai Pratap; Sharma, Apoorv

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems- self-adhering flowable composite, etch and rinse adhesive system and self etch adhesive system. Methodology: MTA specimens (n = 60) were prepared using cylindrical acrylic blocks, having a central cavity with 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. MTA was mixed and placed in the prepared cavity, and was covered with a moist cotton pellet and temporary filling material. The specimens were divided into 3 groups which were further divided into 2 sub-groups (45 Minutes and 24 hours). After the application of bonding agents composite resin was placed over the MTA surface. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength and readings were statically analyzed. Result: After 24 hrs the mean value of etch and rinse group was significantly higher than self etch and the self adhering composite groups. Among the 45 minutes groups there were no significant difference. Conclusion: In single visit after 45 minutes self adhering flowable can be used successfully as a final restorative material in place of conventional flowable composite without using any alternative adhesive system over MTA. PMID:27099417

  18. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D.'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID-Er:YAG, 50 μs, 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6 J/cm2), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID-erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39 B), SID (12.77±5.09 A), ED (5.12±1.72 D), and EID (7.62±3.39 C). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  19. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  20. Adhesive strength of atherosclerotic plaque in a mouse model depends on local collagen content and elastin fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Johnson, John A; Fulp, Abigail; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2013-02-22

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is a major cause of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. The adhesive strength of the bond between a plaque and the vascular wall, measured as local energy release rate, G, is used for quantitative plaque stability estimation. We tested the hypothesis that adhesive strength varies with plaque composition. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP12) deficiency was previously reported to alter lesion composition. To estimate G values, peeling experiments are performed on aortic plaques from apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE KO) and apoE MMP12 double knockout (DKO) male mice after 8 months on high-fat diet. For plaques in apoE KO and apoE MMP12 DKO mice, experimental values for G differ significantly (p<0.002) between genotypes, averaging 19.2J/m(2) and 12.1J/m(2), respectively. Histology confirms that plaques delaminate along their interface with the underlying internal elastic lamina (IEL) in both genotypes. Quantitative image analysis of stained tissue sections demonstrates a significant positive correlation (p<0.05) between local collagen content of lesions and G values in both genotypes, indicating that adhesive strength of plaques depends on local collagen content. Surprisingly, macrophage content of aortic plaques is neither significantly correlated with G values nor significantly different between genotypes. The IEL underlying plaques in apoE KO mice is significantly more fragmented (number of breaks and length of breaks) than in apoE MMP12 DKO mice, suggesting that elastin fragmentation also influences adhesion strength of plaques. Overall, our results suggest that plaques adhere more strongly to the underlying IEL in apoE KO mice than in apoE MMP12 DKO mice. PMID:23261250

  1. Adhesion strength and nucleation thermodynamics of four metals (Al, Cu, Ti, Zr) on AlN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuan; Ke, Genshui; Xie, Yan; Chen, Yigang; Shi, Siqi; Guo, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    Devices based on AlN generally require adherent and strong interfaces between AlN and other materials, whereas most metals are known to be nonwetting to AlN and form relatively weak interfaces with AlN. In this study, we selected four representative metals (Al, Cu, Ti, and Zr) to study the adhesion strength of the AlN/metal interfaces. Mathematical models were constructed between the adhesion strength and enthalpy of formation of Al-metal solid solutions, the surface energies of the metals, and the lattice mismatch between the metals and AlN, based on thermodynamic parameters calculated using density functional theory. It appears that the adhesion strength is mainly determined by the lattice mismatch, and is in no linear correlation with either the Al-metal solution's formation enthalpies or the metals' surface energies. We also investigated the nucleation thermodynamics of the four metals on AlN substrates. It was found that Ti forms the strongest interface with AlN, and has the largest driving force for nucleation on AlN substrates among the four metals.

  2. Shear Strength at 75 F to 500 F of Fourteen Adhesives Used to Bond a Glass-fabric-reinforced Phenolic Resin Laminate to Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John R

    1956-01-01

    Fourteen adhesives used to bond a glass-fabric-reinforced phenolic resin laminate to steel were tested in order to determine their shear strengths at temperatures from 75 F to 500 F. Fabrication methods were varied to evaluate the effect of placing cloth between the facing surfaces to maintain a uniform bond-line thickness. One glass-fabric supported phenolic adhesive was found to have a shear strength of 3,400 psi at 300 F and over 1,000 psi at 500 F. Strength and fabrication data are tabulated for all adhesives tested.

  3. Iron ion irradiation increases promotes adhesion of monocytic cells to arterial vascular endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz

    Radiation causes inflammation, and chronic, low-level vascular inflammation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Consistent with this, exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Part of the inflammatory response to radiation is a change in the adhesiveness of the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, triggering inappropriate accumulation of leukocytes, leading to later, damaging effects of inflammation. Although some studies have been done on the effects of gamma irradiation on vascular endothelium, the response of endothelium to heavy ion radiation likely to be encountered in prolonged space flight has not been determined. We investigated how irradiation of aortic endothelial cells with iron ions affects adhesiveness of cultured aortic endothelial cells for monocytic cells and the consequences of this for development of atherosclerosis. Aortic endothelial cells were irradiated with 600 MeV iron ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and adhesion-related changes were measured. Cells remained viable for at least 72 hours, and were even able to repair acute damage to cell junctions. We found that iron ion irradiation altered expression levels of specific endothelial cell adhesion molecules. Further, these changes had functional consequences. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay to measure adhesion of monocytic cells to endothelial cells under physiological shear stress, we found that adhesivity of vascular endothelium was enhanced in as little as 24 hours after irradiation. Further, the radiation dose dependence was not monotonic, suggesting that it was not simply the result of endothelial cell damage. We also irradiated aortic arches and carotid arteries of Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice. Histologic analysis of these mice will be conducted to determine whether effects of radiation on endothelial adhesiveness result in consequences for development of atherosclerosis. (Supported by NSBRI

  4. Circulating but not immobilized N-deglycosylated von Willebrand factor increases platelet adhesion under flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, M. A.; Huck, V.; Niemeyer, V.; Desch, A.; Angerer, J. I.; McKinnon, T. A. J.; Wixforth, A.; Schneider, S. W.; Schneider, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The role of von Willebrand factor (VWF) as a shear stress activated platelet adhesive has been related to a coiled-elongated shape conformation. The forces dominating this transition have been suggested to be controlled by the proteins polymeric architecture. However, the fact that 20% of VWF molecular weight originates from glycan moieties has so far been neglected in these calculations. In this study, we present a systematic experimental investigation on the role of N-glycosylation for VWF mediated platelet adhesion under flow. A microfluidic flow chamber with a stenotic compartment that allows one to mimic various physiological flow conditions was designed for the efficient analysis of the adhesion spectrum. Surprisingly, we found an increase in platelet adhesion with elevated shear rate, both qualitatively and quantitatively fully conserved when N-deglycosylated VWF (N-deg-VWF) instead of VWF was immobilized in the microfluidic channel. This has been demonstrated consistently over four orders of magnitude in shear rate. In contrast, when N-deg-VWF was added to the supernatant, an increase in adhesion rate by a factor of two was detected compared to the addition of wild-type VWF. It appears that once immobilized, the role of glycans is at least modified if not—as found here for the case of adhesion—negated. These findings strengthen the physical impact of the circulating polymer on shear dependent platelet adhesion events. At present, there is no theoretical explanation for an increase in platelet adhesion to VWF in the absence of its N-glycans. However, our data indicate that the effective solubility of the protein and hence its shape or conformation may be altered by the degree of glycosylation and is therefore a good candidate for modifying the forces required to uncoil this biopolymer. PMID:24404057

  5. Covering of fiber-reinforced composite bars by adhesive materials, is it necessary to improve the bond strength of lingual retainers?

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Farzin; Kerayechian, Navid; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Shafaee, Hooman; Heravi, Parya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers when bonding them to teeth with and without covering the FRC bars using two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Hundred and twenty extracted human maxillary premolars were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 15). FRC bars (4 mm length, Everstick Ortho®, Stick Tech, Oy, Turku, Finland) were bonded to the proximal (distal) surfaces of the teeth using two different adhesives (Tetric Flow [TF, Ivoclar Vivadent, Switzerland] and resin-modified glass ionomer cement [RMGIC, ODP, Vista, CA, USA]) with and without covering with the same adhesive. Specimens were exposed to thermocycling (625 cycles per day [5–55°C, intervals: 30 s] for 8 days). The SBS test was then performed using the universal testing machine (Zwick, GMBH, Ulm, Germany). After debonding, the remaining adhesive on the teeth was recorded by the adhesive remnant index (0–3). Results: The lowest mean SBS (standard deviation) was found in the TF group without covering with adhesive (12.6 [2.11] MPa), and the highest bond strength was in the TF group with covering with adhesive (16.01 [1.09] MPa). Overall, the uncovered RMGIC (15.65 [3.57] MPa) provided a higher SBS compared to the uncovered TF. Covering of FRC with TF led to a significant increase in SBS (P = 0.001), but this was not true for RMGIC (P = 0.807). Thermal cycling did not significantly change the SBS values (P = 0.537). Overall, eight groups were statistically different (ANOVA test, F = 3.32, P = 0.034), but no significant differences in bond failure locations were found between the groups (Fisher's exact tests, P = 0.92). Conclusions: The present findings showed no significant differences between SBS of FRC bars with and without covering by RMGIC. However, when using TF, there was a significant difference in SBS measurements between covering and noncovering groups. Therefore, the use of RMGIC without

  6. Noteworthy impacts of polyurethane-urea ionomers as the efficient polar coatings on adhesion strength of plasma treated polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashmejahanbin, Mohammad. R.; Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi; Salimi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In present research, polypropylene (PP) was selected as a model nonpolar substrate for chemical modification using plasma. In the first step, the PP samples were treated using oxygen and argon atmospheres, individually. The prepared samples were analyzed using both FTIR and AFM techniques. The output of these techniques revealed that the carbonyl, carboxylic acid and its derivatives have been formed on the surface of PP. Afterward, a series of aqueous polyurethane-urea dispersions were synthesized as the novel polar coating for modified nonpolar polymers and characterized by different techniques including FTIR, DSC, TGA, mechanical properties and contact angle. Finally, the plasma treated samples were coated by prepared polyurethane ionomer. The results of pull-off analysis confirmed the significant role of the polyurethane as an extremely polar coating to create hydrogen bonding with functional groups on the surface of treated PP. The adhesion strength of polypropylenes increased from 0.04 MPa to 0.61 MPa for neat and oxygen-based plasma treated samples, respectively.

  7. Increased osteoblast adhesion on nanograined hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate containing calcium titanate.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Celaletdin; Liu, Huinan; Halloran, John W; Webster, Thomas J

    2007-03-15

    Depending on the coating method utilized and subsequent heat treatments (such as through the use of plasma-spray deposition), inter-diffusion of atomic species across titanium (Ti) and hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings may result. These events may lead to structural and compositional changes that consequently cause unanticipated HA phase transformations which may clearly influence the performance of an orthopedic implant. Thus, the objective of the present in vitro study was to compare the cytocompatibility properties of chemistries that may form at the Ti:HA interface, specifically HA, tricalcium phosphate (TCP), HA doped with Ti, and those containing calcium titanate (CaTiO(3)). In doing so, results of this study showed that osteoblast (bone-forming cells) adhesion increased with greater CaTiO(3) substitutions in either HA or TCP. Specifically, osteoblast adhesion on HA and TCP composites with CaTiO(3) was almost 4.5 times higher than that over pure HA. Material characterization studies revealed that enhanced osteoblast adhesion on these compacts may be due to increasing shrinkage in the unit lattice parameters and decreasing grain size. Although all CaTiO(3) composites exhibited excellent osteoblast adhesion results, Ca(9)HPO(4)(PO(4))(5)OH phase transformation into TCP/CaTiO(3) increased osteoblast adhesion the most; because of these reasons, these materials should be further studied for orthopedic applications. PMID:17120201

  8. Study of the time effect on the strength of cell-cell adhesion force by a novel nano-picker.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    Cell's adhesion is important to cell's interaction and activates. In this paper, a novel method for cell-cell adhesion force measurement was proposed by using a nano-picker. The effect of the contact time on the cell-cell adhesion force was studied. The nano-picker was fabricated from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever by nano fabrication technique. The cell-cell adhesion force was measured based on the deflection of the nano-picker beam. The result suggests that the adhesion force between cells increased with the increasing of contact time at the first few minutes. After that, the force became constant. This measurement methodology was based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. It can realize both the observation and manipulation of a single cell at nanoscale. The quantitative and precise cell-cell adhesion force result can be obtained by this method. It would help us to understand the single cell interaction with time and would benefit the research in medical and biological fields potentially. PMID:21510921

  9. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciana Artioli; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Tanaka, Auro; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10) and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP) were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3). Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0) than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1) (p < 0.05) and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7). The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6); seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7), and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9), showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05). Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. PMID:25337932

  10. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Michael B.; Orner, Caitlin A.; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A.; Hammert, Warren C.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Loiselle, Alayna E.

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  11. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A; Hammert, Warren C; O'Keefe, Regis J; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  12. Increased Mesenchymal Stem Cell Response and Decreased Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion on Titania Nanotubes without Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Lai, Yingzhen; Wu, Dong; Huang, Wenxiu; Huang, Sijia; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants with enhanced biocompatibility and antibacterial property are highly desirable and characterized by improved success rates. In this study, titania nanotubes (TNTs) with various tube diameters were fabricated on Ti surfaces through electrochemical anodization at 10, 30, and 60 V (denoted as NT10, NT30, and NT60, resp.). Ti was also investigated and used as a control. NT10 with a diameter of 30 nm could promote the adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) without noticeable differentiation. NT30 with a diameter of 100 nm could support the adhesion and proliferation of BMSCs and induce osteogenesis. NT60 with a diameter of 200 nm demonstrated the best ability to promote cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation; however, it clearly impaired cell adhesion and proliferation. As the tube diameter increased, bacterial adhesion on the TNTs decreased and reached the lowest value on NT60. Therefore, NT30 without pharmaceuticals could be used to increase mesenchymal stem cell response and decrease Staphylococcus aureus adhesion and thus should be further studied for improving the efficacy of Ti-based orthopedic implants. PMID:26640782

  13. Coating Properties which Increase the Vacuum Flashover Strength of Insulators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiker, Gary Robert

    The surface flashover strengths in vacuum for several common insulators, including Lexan, Lucite, polyethylene, Macor, quartz, alumina, and an alumina-filled epoxy, have been increased using a vacuum spark discharge treatment. Analysis of the treated surfaces using Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) show them to be coated with a thin hydrocarbon/metal oxide layer. The formation of this high-flashover coating is strongly dependent on the amount of water vapor in the chamber during treatment. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient (SEEC) show that the treated surfaces produce many more secondary electrons at energies of a few keV than do untreated samples. In current theories of electrical breakdown, an avalanche of monoenergetic secondary electrons along the dielectric surface from the cathode to the anode is believed to cause gas desorption and initiate a surface flashover. A new theory is proposed in which the monoenergetic nature of this secondary electron avalanche is destroyed due to electron -gas molecule collisions before the onset of breakdown. This phenomenon, coupled with the larger number of secondaries produced at high energies, could lead to a modified charge distribution on the surface of the treated insulators, which delays the breakdown process.

  14. Adhesion strength between thermoplastics and its polyurethane coating made by using the technology combination of injection molding and reaction injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloß, P.; Böhme, A.; Müller, J.; Krajewsky, P.; Michaelis, J.

    2014-05-01

    A complete equipment for injection molding (IM) of a thermoplastic (TP) carrier and reaction injection molding (RIM) of polyurethane (PUR) coatings including IM and RIM machines, a color module for PUR, and a robot was built up. A modularly composed sliding split mold was constructed and manufactured allowing different parts including thicker (2 mm thickness) soft touch and thin (0.4 mm) lacquer PUR coatings. As TP PC/ABS and PA6 GF15 compounds were used, and aromatic and aliphatic PUR systems as well. From the parts made by IM+RIM, test specimens for peel force measurements were cut. These investigations were performed prior and after ageing under climatic conditions @ 50 % RH and temperature changes between -30 °C and 90 °C. By varying IM processing parameters, we have found that mold and TP temperatures are particularly important for the adhesion strength between TP and PUR. The waiting time between the end of TP cooling and PUR injection has a minor influence on its mean value. However, to short waiting times may result in inhomogeneous adhesion. It was surprising that surface defects of the TP carrier leads also to inhomogeneous adhesion. We have observed that ageing may cause an increase and decrease of adhesions strength depending on the TP+PUR system used. We have found that the results are valid only for the actual TP and PUR combination. A generalization seems to be inappropriate, hence, the actual combination should be investigated to prevent unwanted surprises when the coated TP part is in its application.

  15. Effect of placement agitation and placement time on the shear bond strength of 3 self-etching adhesives.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Lina Maria; Sergent, Robert S; Burgess, John O; Mercante, D E

    2006-01-01

    This study measured the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 self-etching bonding agents to enamel and dentin with and without agitation at 3 different application times. The null hypotheses tested were that agitation and application time have no effect on bond strength. Occlusal surfaces of 180 recently extracted caries-free human molars were wet ground with 600 grit wet-dry silica carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat enamel surface. The teeth were divided into 18 groups of 10 teeth. Three self-etching bonding agents, Clearfil SE BOND (Kuraray America), Xeno III (Dentsply) and AdheSE (Ivoclar-Vivadent) were applied using application times of 10, 20 or 30 seconds with or without agitation, thinned with a gentle stream of air and cured for 10 seconds, according to manufacturers' directions. Z100 (3M ESPE) composite, A2 shade, was placed over the cured adhesive and cured for 40 seconds. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature until testing. The samples were tested in shear to failure with a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed. After enamel shear bond strength testing, the teeth were again ground with 400 and 600-grit wet-dry SiC paper to obtain a flat dentin surface. The protocol used for preparing the enamel bond test samples was repeated, and the teeth were stored until testing in distilled water at room temperature. The samples were again tested in shear at a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed. Values were converted to MPa and data analyzed for intergroup differences using ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. Agitation did not improve enamel SBS for any of the materials tested, but there was a significant difference in enamel SBS among materials: Clearfil SE Bond shear bond strength was greater than Xeno III, which was greater than AdheSE. At 10 seconds application time on dentin, agitation improved the Clearfil SE Bond SBS and, at 20 seconds application time on dentin, agitation significantly improved SBS to dentin for all systems tested. Agitation had no affect

  16. Adhesive strength of bone-implant interfaces and in-vivo degradation of PHB composites for load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Meischel, M; Eichler, J; Martinelli, E; Karr, U; Weigel, J; Schmöller, G; Tschegg, E K; Fischerauer, S; Weinberg, A M; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the response of bone to novel biodegradable polymeric composite implants in the femora of growing rats. Longitudinal observation of bone reaction at the implant site (BV/TV) as well as resorption of the implanted pins were monitored using in vivo micro-focus computed tomography (µCT). After 12, 24 and 36 weeks femora containing the implants were explanted, scanned with high resolution ex vivo µCT, and the surface roughness of the implants was measured to conclude on the ingrowth capability for bone tissue. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to observe changes on the surface of Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during degradation and cell ingrowth. Four different composites with zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) and Herafill(®) were compared. After 36 weeks in vivo, none of the implants did show significant degradation. The PHB composite with ZrO2 and a high percentage (30%) of Herafill® as well as the Mg-alloy WZ21 showed the highest values of bone accumulation (increased BV/TV) around the implant. The lowest value was measured in PHB with 3% ZrO2 containing no Herafill®. Roughness measurements as well as EDX and SEM imaging could not reveal any changes on the PHB composites׳ surfaces. Biomechanical parameters, such as the adhesion strength between bone and implant were determined by measuring the shear strength as well as push-out energy of the bone-implant interface. The results showed that improvement of these mechanical properties of the studied PHBs P3Z, P3Z10H and P3Z30H is necessary in order to obtain appropriate load-bearing material. The moduli of elasticity, tensile strength and strain properties of the PHB composites are close to that of bone and thus promising. Compared to clinically used PLGA, PGA and PLA materials, their additional benefit is an unchanged local pH value during degradation, which makes them well tolerated by cells and immune system. They might be used

  17. Increasing silk fibre strength through heterogeneity of bundled fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Cranford, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Can naturally arising disorder in biological materials be beneficial? Materials scientists are continuously attempting to replicate the exemplary performance of materials such as spider silk, with detailed techniques and assembly procedures. At the same time, a spider does not precisely machine silk—imaging indicates that its fibrils are heterogeneous and irregular in cross section. While past investigations either focused on the building material (e.g. the molecular scale protein sequence and behaviour) or on the ultimate structural component (e.g. silk threads and spider webs), the bundled structure of fibrils that compose spider threads has been frequently overlooked. Herein, I exploit a molecular dynamics-based coarse-grain model to construct a fully three-dimensional fibril bundle, with a length on the order of micrometres. I probe the mechanical behaviour of bundled silk fibrils with variable density of heterogenic protrusions or globules, ranging from ideally homogeneous to a saturated distribution. Subject to stretching, the model indicates that cooperativity is enhanced by contact through low-force deformation and shear ‘locking’ between globules, increasing shear stress transfer by up to 200 per cent. In effect, introduction of a random and disordered structure can serve to improve mechanical performance. Moreover, addition of globules allows a tuning of free volume, and thus the wettability of silk (with implications for supercontraction). These findings support the ability of silk to maintain near-molecular-level strength at the scale of silk threads, and the mechanism could be easily adopted as a strategy for synthetic fibres. PMID:23486175

  18. Influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Taranjeet Kaur; Asrani, Hemant; Banga, Harpreet; Jain, Aditi; Rawlani, Sudhir S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty caries-free human premolars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each and bonding was done using seventh-generation bonding agents Adper Easy One (3M ESPE) and Xeno V (Dentsply). Following the bonding procedure, resin composite was bonded to the surfaces using a plastic mould. The prepared specimen with composite cylinders attached were placed in 37°C distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) with 0 h universal testing machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test. Results: Statistical significant difference between the Groups I, II and III in which Adper Easy One was used and similarly for Groups IV, V, and VI in which Xeno V was used. When an intergroup comparison was made using unpaired t-test Group II and Group V showed the nonsignificant difference. Conclusion: Salivary contamination significantly affects the SBS of both the seventh generation dentin bonding agents. However, 2-hydroxyethyl methacryate based adhesive has higher bond strength. PMID:26752841

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) at subtoxic concentrations increases the adhesivity of human leukemic cells to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Pluskalová, Michaela; Brodská, Barbora; Otevrelová, Petra; Elknerová, Klára; Grebenová, Dana; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2010-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) which is being introduced into clinic for the treatment of hematological diseases. We studied the effect of this compound on six human hematopoietic cell lines (JURL-MK1, K562, CML-T1, Karpas-299, HL-60, and ML-2) as well as on normal human lymphocytes and on leukemic primary cells. SAHA induced dose-dependent and cell type-dependent cell death which displayed apoptotic features (caspase-3 activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation) in most cell types including the normal lymphocytes. At subtoxic concentrations (0.5-1 microM), SAHA increased the cell adhesivity to fibronectin (FN) in all leukemia/lymphoma-derived cell lines but not in normal lymphocytes. This increase was accompanied by an enhanced expression of integrin beta1 and paxillin, an essential constituent of focal adhesion complexes, both at the protein and mRNA level. On the other hand, the inhibition of ROCK protein, an important regulator of cytoskeleton structure, had no consistent effect on SAHA-induced increase in the cell adhesivity. The promotion of cell adhesivity to FN seems to be specific for SAHA as we observed no such effects with other HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A and sodium butyrate). PMID:19911379

  20. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Abed Kahnemooyi, Mehdi; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghiazar, Fatemeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mhammadi Torkani, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A-D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultra-structural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at P<0.05. Results. The interaction between the adhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014), withsignificant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (P<0.01). There were significant differences in shear bond strength in terms of surface preparation techniques irrespective of the adhesive system (P<0.01). Conclusion. The results showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide decreased the shear bond strength values with both adhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems. PMID:25587382

  1. Shear bond strength to dentin and Ni-Cr-Be alloy with the All-Bond universal adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Suh, B I; Cooley, R L

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strength of the All-Bond system to dentin and a nonprecious alloy was evaluated. Eighty human molar teeth (10 per group) were used in the dentin bonding phase of the study. A bond site was prepared in dentin, and both the succinic anhydride modified HEMA and 10 percent phosphoric acid dentin conditioning techniques were evaluated under both wet and dry conditions. Eighty Rexillium III specimens were used in the metal bonding phase of the study. All-Bond primer and opaquer were applied to the metal surface, followed by a visible light-cured composite restorative material. Dentin bond strengths were determined at 24 hours, while metal bond strengths were evaluated both at 24 hours and after thermocycling (2,500 cycles). Separate groups were established for adhesion to both dentin and metal with the composite placed in a plastic matrix or a gelatin capsule. The highest mean shear bond values to dentin were obtained in the groups with the gelatin capsule bonding procedure, where the dentin was treated with 10 percent phosphoric acid and then blotted dry (wet technique) before the bonding procedure (39.99 MPa). These values were higher than the succinic anhydride modified HEMA-treated group with gentle air drying (wet technique-29.56 MPa). There was essentially no difference in mean shear bond strengths to dentin when a succinic anhydride modified HEMA dentin conditioner was used with aggressive (dry technique) or gentle air drying (wet technique) [29.56 versus 29.08 MPa]. High bond strengths to Rexillium III were obtained when the All-Bond adhesive system was used in combination with a dual-care opaquer and a composite restorative material.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1817584

  2. Bond strength of Epiphany™ Sealer combined with different adhesive systems photo-activated with LED and QTH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, A. M. P.; Bandéca, M. C.; Borges, A. H.; Nadalin, M. R.; Thomé, L. H. C.

    2009-08-01

    The Epiphany™ Sealer is a new dual-curing resin-based sealer and has been introduced as an alternative to gutta-percha and traditional root canal sealers. The canal filling is claimed to create a seal with the dentinal tubules within the root canal system producing a ‘monoblock’ effect between the sealer and dentinal tubules. Therefore, considering the possibility to incorporate the others adhesive systems, it is important to study the bond strength of the resulting cement. Forty-eight root mandibular canines were sectioned 8-mm below CEJ. The dentine discs were prepared using a tapered diamond bur and irrigated with 1% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. Previous the application Epiphany™ Sealer, the Epiphany™ Primer, AdheSE, and One Up Bond F were applied to the root canal walls. The LED and QTH (Quartz Tungsten Halogen) were used to photo-activation during 45 s with power density of 400 and 720 mW/cm2, respectively. The specimens were performed on a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until bond failure occurred. The force was recorded and the debonding values were used to calculate Push-out bond strength. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences ( P < 0.05) to Epiphany™ Sealer/Epiphany™ Primer/QTH and EpiphanyTM Sealer/AdheSE/QTH, which had the highest mean values of bond strength. The efficiency of resin-based filling materials are dependent the type of light curing unit used including the power density, the polymerization characteristics of these resin-based filling materials, depending on the primer/adhesive used.

  3. Influence of surface treatment of contaminated lithium disilicate and leucite glass ceramics on surface free energy and bond strength of universal adhesives.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Fumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Nojiri, Kie; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi; Latta, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of surface treatment of contaminated lithium disilicate and leucite glass ceramic restorations on the bonding efficacy of universal adhesives. Lithium disilicate and leucite glass ceramics were contaminated with saliva, and then cleaned using distilled water (SC), or 37% phosphoric acid (TE), or hydrofluoric acid (CE). Specimens without contamination served as controls. The surface free energy was determined by measuring the contact angles formed when the three test liquids were placed on the specimens. Bond strengths of the universal adhesives were also measured. Saliva contamination and surface treatment of ceramic surfaces significantly influenced the surface free energy. The bond strengths of universal adhesives were also affected by surface treatment and the choice of adhesive materials. Our data suggest that saliva contamination of lithum disilicate and leucite glass ceramics significantly impaired the bonding of the universal adhesives, and reduced the surface free energy of the ceramics. PMID:26632235

  4. Influence of thermal and mechanical load cycling on microtensile bond strengths of total and self-etching adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different thermal (TC) and mechanical (MC) cycling protocols on microtensile bond strength (muTBS) to cervical dentin margins of Class II restorations using two total-etch (TE) adhesives and one self-etching (SE) primer. Class II slot cavities were prepared on the mesial surfaces of 168 bovine incisors and were divided into three groups according to the bonding system used: Single Bond, OptiBond Solo Plus and Clearfil SE Bond. All cavities were restored with Filtek Z250 composite. Following restorative procedures, the restored teeth were allocated to seven subgroups (n = 8) according to the thermal/mechanical protocol performed: G1-control (no cycling), G2-100,000 MC, G3-200,000 MC, G4-500,000 MC, G5-100,000 MC+1,000 TC, G6-200,000 MC+1,000 TC, G7-500,000 MC+1,000 TC. TC was performed using 5 +/- 2 degrees C and 55 +/- 2 degrees C baths, with a dwell time of 60 seconds in each bath. MC was achieved with an axial force of 80 N at 2 cycles/second. The restorations were sectioned perpendicular to the cervical bonded interface into two 0.8-1-mm thick slabs. The slabs were trimmed at the interface to obtain a cross-sectional surface area of 0.8-1 mm2. All specimens were then subjected to muTBS (v = 0.5 mm/minute). Fracture mode analysis was performed using SEM. Bond strength mean values (MPa) were analyzed with ANOVA 3-way and Tukey's test (alpha = 5%). Dunnett's test was used to compare tested groups against Control groups of each adhesive system (alpha = 56%). SE primer presented lower mean bond strength values when compared to TE adhesives (p = 0.05). In addition, specimens restored with the SE primer did not resist to the 200,000 and 500,000 MC associated with TC. The application of 100,000 MC did not present a significant decrease in bond strength when compared to the control. Mixed failures were predominant for all groups. The higher the amount of thermal/mechanical cycles, the greater the number of mixed failures and the

  5. Agonist Leukadherin-1 Increases CD11b/CD18-Dependent Adhesion Via Membrane Tethers

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Emrah; Faridi, Mohd. Hafeez; Kumar, Vinay; Deep, Shashank; Moy, Vincent T.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    Integrin CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte migration and immune functions. Leukadherin-1 (LA1) is a small molecule agonist that enhances CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion to its ligand ICAM-1. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the biophysical mechanism by which LA1-activated CD11b/CD18 mediates leukocyte adhesion. Between the two distinct populations of CD11b/CD18:ICAM-1 complex that participate in cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton(CSK)-anchored elastic elements and the membrane tethers, we found that LA1 enhanced binding of CD11b/CD18 on K562 cells to ICAM-1 via the formation of long membrane tethers, whereas Mn2+ additionally increased ICAM-1 binding via CSK-anchored bonds. LA1 activated wild-type and LFA1−/− neutrophils also showed longer detachment distances and time from ICAM-1-coated atomic force microscopy tips, but significantly lower detachment force, as compared to the Mn2+-activated cells, confirming that LA1 primarily increased membrane-tether bonds to enhance CD11b/CD18:ICAM-1 binding, whereas Mn2+ induced additional CSK-anchored bond formation. The results suggest that the two types of agonists differentially activate integrins and couple them to the cellular machinery, providing what we feel are new insights into signal mechanotransduction by such agents. PMID:24314082

  6. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  7. The effect of a diode laser and traditional irrigants on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Cihan; Ozcan, Erhan; Polat, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of a diode laser and traditional irrigants on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five incisors extracted due to periodontal problems were used. All teeth were instrumented using a set of rotary root canal instruments. The post spaces were enlarged for a No.14 (diameter, 1.4 mm) Snowlight (Abrasive technology, OH, USA) glass fiber reinforced composite post with matching drill. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 experimental groups of 11 teeth each. The post spaces were treated with the followings: Group 1: 5 mL 0.9% physiological saline; Group 2: 5 mL 5.25% sodium hypochlorite; Group 3: 5 mL 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), Group 4: 37% orthophosphoric acid and Group 5: Photodynamic diode laser irradiation for 1 minute after application of light-active dye solution. Snowlight posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Each root was sectioned perpendicular to its long axis to create 1 mm thick specimens. The push-out bond strength test method was used to measure bond strength. One tooth from each group was processed for scanning electron microscopic analysis. RESULTS Bond strength values were as follow: Group 1 = 4.15 MPa; Group 2 = 3.00 MPa; Group 3 = 4.45 MPa; Group 4 = 6.96 MPa; and Group 5 = 8.93 MPa. These values were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference test (P<.05). Significantly higher bond strength values were obtained with the diode laser and orthophosphoric acid (P<.05). There were no differences found between the other groups (P>.05). CONCLUSION Orthophosphoric acid and EDTA were more effective methods for removing the smear layer than the diode laser. However, the diode laser and orthophosphoric acid were more effective at the cement dentin interface than the EDTA, Therefore, modifying the smear layer may be more effective when a self-adhesive system is used. PMID:24353886

  8. Heat treatment of pre-hydrolyzed silane increases adhesion of phosphate monomer-based resin cement to glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Cotes, Caroline; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different forms of heat treatment on a pre-hydrolyzed silane to improve the adhesion of phosphate monomer-based (MDP) resin cement to glass ceramic. Resin and feldspathic ceramic blocks (n=48, n=6 for bond test, n=2 for microscopy) were randomly divided into 6 groups and subject to surface treatments: G1: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + MDP resin cement (Panavia F); G2: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G3: Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G4: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G5: Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G6: Silane + Panavia F. Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to categorize the failure types. Data were analyzed statistically using two-way test ANOVA and Tukey's test (=0.05). Heat treatment of the silane containing MDP, with prior etching with HF (G2: 13.15 ± 0.89a; G4: 12.58 ± 1.03a) presented significantly higher bond strength values than the control group (G1: 9.16 ± 0.64b). The groups without prior etching (G3: 10.47 ± 0.70b; G5: 9.47 ± 0.32b) showed statistically similar bond strength values between them and the control group (G1). The silane application without prior etching and heat treatment resulted in the lowest mean bond strength (G6: 8.05 ± 0.37c). SEM analysis showed predominantly adhesive failures and EDS analysis showed common elements of spectra (Si, Na, Al, K, O, C) characterizing the microstructure of the glass-ceramic studied. Heat treatment of the pre-hydrolyzed silane containing MDP in an oven at 100 °C for 2 min or with hot air application at 50 ± 5 ºC for 1 min, was effective in increasing the bond strength values between the ceramic and resin cement containing MDP. PMID:25672383

  9. Endothelial cell Ca2+ increases upon tumor cell contact and modulates cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Pili, R; Corda, S; Passaniti, A; Ziegelstein, R C; Heldman, A W; Capogrossi, M C

    1993-01-01

    The signal transduction mechanisms involved in tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells are still largely undefined. The effect of metastatic murine melanoma cell and human prostate carcinoma cell contact on cytosolic [Ca2+] of bovine artery endothelial cells was examined in indo-1-loaded endothelial cell monolayers. A rapid increase in endothelial cell [Ca2+] occurred on contact with tumor cells, but not on contact with 8-microns inert beads. A similar increase in endothelial cell [Ca2+] was observed with human neutrophils or monocyte-like lymphoma cells, but not with endothelial cells, red blood cells, and melanoma cell-conditioned medium. The increase in endothelial cell [Ca2+] was not inhibited by extracellular Ca2+ removal. In contrast, endothelial cell pretreatment with thapsigargin, which releases endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ into the cytosol and depletes this Ca2+ store site, abolished the cytosolic [Ca2+] rise upon melanoma cell contact. Endothelial cell pretreatment with the membrane-permeant form of the Ca2+ chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxyl)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid blocked the increase in cytosolic [Ca2+]. Under static and dynamic flow conditions (0.46 dyn/cm2) bis-(O-aminophenoxyl)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid pretreatment of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers inhibited melanoma cell adhesion to the endothelial cells. Thus, tumor cell contact with endothelial cells induces a rapid Ca2+ release from endothelial intracellular stores, which has a functional role in enhancing cell-cell adhesion. Images PMID:8254056

  10. Bond strength and SEM observation of CO2 laser irradiated dentin, bonded with simplified-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koshiro, K; Inoue, S; Niimi, K; Koase, K; Sano, H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated, mechanically and morphologically, whether the dentin surface irradiated by CO2 laser could be a possible adherent when bonded with simplified-step adhesives. Buccal enamel and cementum of extracted human premolars were removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were irradiated continuously with CO2 laser at 1.0 W. Before bonding with either a single-bottle adhesive (Single Bond) or a self-etching priming system (Mega Bond), the irradiated dentin surface was treated as follows: no treatment, NaHCO3 powder abrasion and wet-grinding with 600-grit SiC paper. The treated dentin surfaces were bonded to resin composite with either of the two adhesives. Non-irradiated dentin surfaces were also used as control. Resin bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and subjected to microtensile bond test. Additionally, to observe the resin/irradiated dentin interface, resin-bonded specimens were similarly prepared, sectioned into slabs, embedded in epoxy resin, polished with diamond pastes, sputter coated Au-Pd and examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After SEM observation, the specimens were further polished with diamond paste to remove the Au-Pd sputter-coat, immersed in HCL and NaOCl and finally observed by SEM again. In the presence of carbonized dentin, microtensile bond strength drastically decreased but recovered to the control value by removing the carbonized dentin layer visually with SiC paper for both adhesive systems. However, the laser-affected dentin that remained on the bonded interface was easily dissolved with NaOCl and HCl. PMID:15853101

  11. Improvement of the T-peel Strength of Polypropylene Adhesion Joints by Surface Photografting Pre-Treatment with Methyl Methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balart, R.; Sánchez-Nácher, L.; Balart, J.; Fombuena, V.; España, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    Although polypropylene is one of the most used polymers at industrial level due to good balanced properties, it presents some restrictions in applications that require good adhesion properties as well as coating and painting. These restrictions are related to its non polar nature which leads to low wetting properties. So that, in most cases, it is necessary a previous surface pre-treatment in order to improve adhesion properties. These surface treatments could be physical or chemical. Among the wide variety of physical processes, plasma technologies are useful from both technical and environmental points of view. If we take into account economic considerations, chemical processes are interesting due to low cost equipment and procedures. In particular, we have used photografting of methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer on polypropylene substrates with UV radiation and initiators. This process is useful to promote chemical modification of polypropylene surface by grafting MMA monomers into polypropylene polymer chains. Due to polarity of some groups in MMA monomers, it is possible to increase surface wettability thus promoting a remarkable increase in adhesion properties of polypropylene. In this work, changes in wettability of polypropylene surfaces in terms of the exposure time to UV radiation in presence of MMA monomers and initiators has been investigated. Furthermore, chemical changes have been characterized by FTIR analysis and mechanical performance of adhesion joints has been evaluated by T-peel tests.

  12. Push-out bond strength of quartz fibre posts to root canal dentin using total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Navimipour, Elmira J.; Shakerifar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several adhesive systems are available for cementation of fibre posts into the root canal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the push-out bond strengths of quartz fibre posts to root dentin with the use of different total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements. Study Design: Ninety single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and standardized post-spaces were prepared. Fibre posts were cemented with different luting agents: total-etch (Nexus NX3, Duo-Link, and RelyX ARC) and self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, BisCem, and RelyX Unicem). Three post/dentin sections (coronal, middle and apical) were obtained from each specimen, and push-out bond strength test was performed in each section at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed with two-factor and one-way analysis of variance and a post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Cement type, canal region, and their interaction significantly influenced bond strength. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in the apical region of self-adhesive cements. Only Duo-Link and RelyX ARC cements resulted in homogeneous bond strengths. Conclusions: Cementation of quartz fibre posts using self-adhesive cements provided higher push-out bond strengths especially in the apical region, while total-etch cements resulted in more uniform bond strengths in different regions of the root canal. Key words: Push-out bond strength; quartz fibre post; total-etch resin cement; self-adhesive resin cement. PMID:22143695

  13. Chronic psoriatic skin inflammation leads to increased monocyte adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Jackelyn B.; Groft, Sarah G.; Squeri, Michael V.; Debanne, Sara M.; Ward, Nicole L.; McCormick, Thomas S.; Cooper, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis patients exhibit an increased risk of death by cardiovascular disease (CVD) and have elevated levels of circulating intermediate (CD14++CD16+) monocytes. This elevation could represent evidence of monocyte dysfunction in psoriasis patients at risk of CVD, as increases in circulating CD14++CD16+ monocytes are predictive of myocardial infarction and death. An elevation in the CD14++CD16+ cell population has been previously reported in patients with psoriatic disease, which has been confirmed in the cohort of our human psoriasis patients. CD16 expression was induced in CD14++CD16neg classical monocytes following plastic adhesion, which also elicited enhanced β2 but not β1 integrin surface expression, suggesting increased adhesive capacity. Indeed, we found that psoriasis patients have increased monocyte aggregation among circulating PBMCs which is recapitulated in the KC-Tie2 murine model of psoriasis. Visualization of human monocyte aggregates using imaging cytometry revealed that classical CD14++CD16neg monocytes are the predominant cell type participating in these aggregate pairs. Many of these pairs also included CD16+ monocytes, which could account for apparent elevations of intermediate monocytes. Additionally, intermediate monocytes and monocyte aggregates were the predominant cell type to adhere to TNF-α and IL-17A-stimulated dermal endothelium. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) demonstrated that monocyte aggregates have a distinct transcriptional profile from singlet monocytes and monocytes following plastic adhesion, suggesting that circulating monocyte responses to aggregation are not fully accounted for by homotypic adhesion, and that further factors influence their functionality. PMID:26223654

  14. Activation of GPR4 by Acidosis Increases Endothelial Cell Adhesion through the cAMP/Epac Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Witte, Owen N.; Yang, Li V.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium-leukocyte interaction is critical for inflammatory responses. Whereas the tissue microenvironments are often acidic at inflammatory sites, the mechanisms by which cells respond to acidosis are not well understood. Using molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that activation of GPR4, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, by isocapnic acidosis increases the adhesiveness of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that express GPR4 endogenously. Acidosis in combination with GPR4 overexpression further augments HUVEC adhesion with U937 monocytes. In contrast, overexpression of a G protein signaling-defective DRY motif mutant (R115A) of GPR4 does not elicit any increase of HUVEC adhesion, indicating the requirement of G protein signaling. Downregulation of GPR4 expression by RNA interference reduces the acidosis-induced HUVEC adhesion. To delineate downstream pathways, we show that inhibition of adenylate cyclase by inhibitors, 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) or SQ 22536, attenuates acidosis/GPR4-induced HUVEC adhesion. Consistently, treatment with a cAMP analog or a Gi signaling inhibitor increases HUVEC adhesiveness, suggesting a role of the Gs/cAMP signaling in this process. We further show that the cAMP downstream effector Epac is important for acidosis/GPR4-induced cell adhesion. Moreover, activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases the expression of vascular adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, which are functionally involved in acidosis/GPR4-mediated HUVEC adhesion. Similarly, hypercapnic acidosis can also activate GPR4 to stimulate HUVEC adhesion molecule expression and adhesiveness. These results suggest that acidosis/GPR4 signaling regulates endothelial cell adhesion mainly through the Gs/cAMP/Epac pathway and may play a role in the inflammatory response of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:22110680

  15. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P < 0.05). Thermocycling significantly reduced μSBS in SBU (22.49 MPa ± 4.11) (P < 0.05), but not in NC (20.68 MPa ± 4.60) and PC (28.77 MPa ± 3.52) (P > 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  16. Effect of different disinfectant methods on the initial microtensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to dentin.

    PubMed

    Dalkilic, Evrim Eliguzeloglu; Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Kivanc, Bagdagul Helvacioglu; Uctasli, Mine Betul; Omurlu, Huma

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfection methods on the initial microtensile bond strength of a two-step, self-etch adhesive to dentin. Twenty mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane to expose the mid-coronal dentin. All of the teeth were divided into four groups (n = 5 per group): (1) in group OZ, the dentin surfaces were exposed to ozone gas from the Ozonytron X delivery system (OzonyTron X-Bioozonix, Munich, Germany), (2) in group ND, the dentin surfaces were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser (Pulsmaster 600 IQ, American Dental Technologies, U.S.), (3) in group CHX, the dentin surfaces were treated with a 2% chlorhexidine solution, and (4) in the control group, no treatment was applied. In all of the groups, the teeth were restored with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan) and Clearfil Majesty Posterior (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan), according to the manufacturer's instructions. The teeth were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded surface (surface area of approximately 1 mm(2)). Thus, six to seven specimens were obtained from each tooth, and a total of 34 specimens were analyzed in each group. The specimens were attached to the microtensile test machine (Micro Tensile Tester, T-61010 K, Bisco, U.S.). The data was analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test (p < 0.05). Fracture modes of each specimen were determined using a stereomicroscope (SZ-PT Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The lowest bond strength occurred in the OZ group. Significant differences were determined only between group OZ and the other groups (group ND, group CHX, and control group) (p < 0.05). In conclusion, although ozone decreased the microtensile bond strength of the self-etch adhesive system to dentin, the Nd:YAG laser and 2% chlorhexidine did not change the microtensile bond strength so in context of the present study it would appear that the Nd:YAG laser and 2

  17. TNF-α increases endothelial progenitor cell adhesion to the endothelium by increasing bond expression and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Anthony R.; Prisco, Michael R.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a rare population of cells that participate in angiogenesis. To effectively use EPCs for regenerative therapy, the mechanisms by which they participate in tissue repair must be elucidated. This study focused on the process by which activated EPCs bind to a target tissue. It has been demonstrated that EPCs can bind to endothelial cells (ECs) through the tumore necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-regulated vascular cell adhesion molecule 1/very-late antigen 4 (VLA4) interaction. VLA4 can bind in a high or low affinity state, a process that is difficult to experimentally isolate from bond expression upregulation. To separate these processes, a new parallel plate flow chamber was built, a detachment assay was developed, and a mathematical model was created that was designed to analyze the detachment assay results. The mathematical model was developed to predict the relative expression of EPC/EC bonds made for a given bond affinity distribution. EPCs treated with TNF-α/vehicle were allowed to bind to TNF-α/vehicle-treated ECs in vitro. Bound cells were subjected to laminar flow, and the cellular adherence was quantified as a function of shear stress. Experimental data were fit to the mathematical model using changes in bond expression or affinity as the only free parameter. It was found that TNF-α treatment of ECs increased adhesion through bond upregulation, whereas TNF-α treatment of EPCs increased adhesion by increasing bond affinity. These data suggest that injured tissue could potentially increase recruitment of EPCs for tissue regeneration via the secretion of TNF-α. PMID:25539711

  18. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Suryakumari, Nujella B. P.; Reddy, P. Satyanarayana; Surender, L. R.; Kiran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems — (the V generation) at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system — (Adper Single Bond) was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated); Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE) was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III) and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V) if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III) the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength. PMID:22090757

  19. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  20. Human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases cell-to-cell adhesion and surface expression of adhesion-promoting surface glycoproteins on mature granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Arnaout, M A; Wang, E A; Clark, S C; Sieff, C A

    1986-01-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit migration of mature granulocytes and to enhance their antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We found that human recombinant GM-CSF also enhanced granulocyte-granulocyte adhesion and increased by two- to threefold the surface expression of Mo1 and LeuM5 (P150, 95), two members of a family of leukocyte adhesion molecules (Leu-CAM). Increased Mo1 surface expression occurred within 15 min at 37 degrees C and was maximal at the migration inhibitory concentration of 500 pM. One-half maximal rise in the expression of Mo1 on the cell surface occurred at 5 pM. The chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe produced a comparable rise in surface Mo1 with one-half maximal expression occurring at 7 nM. Both GM-CSF and f-Met-Leu-Phe produced optimal granulocyte-granulocyte adhesion at 500 pM and 100 nM, respectively. This adhesion-promoting effect induced by either stimulus was inhibited by a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against Mo1 antigen. These data indicate that GM-CSF promotes cell-to-cell adhesion, presumably through enhanced expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This mechanism may explain, in part, the known effects of GM-CSF on the function of mature granulocytes. Images PMID:3090106

  1. Increased microvascular density and enhanced leukocyte rolling and adhesion in the skin of VEGF transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Detmar, M; Brown, L F; Schön, M P; Elicker, B M; Velasco, P; Richard, L; Fukumura, D; Monsky, W; Claffey, K P; Jain, R K

    1998-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in the pathologic angiogenesis observed in psoriasis and other chronic inflammatory skin diseases that are characterized by enhanced expression of VEGF by epidermal keratinocytes and of VEGF receptors by tortuous microvessels in the upper dermis. To investigate the functional importance of chronic VEGF overexpression in vivo, we used a keratin 14 promoter expression cassette containing the gene for murine VEGF164 to selectively target VEGF expression to basal epidermal keratinocytes in transgenic mice. These mice demonstrated an increased density of tortuous cutaneous blood capillaries with elevated expression levels of the high affinity VEGF receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, most prominently during the neonatal period. In contrast, no abnormalities of lymphatic vessels were detected. In addition, the number of mast cells in the upper dermis was significantly increased in transgenic skin. Intravital fluorescence microscopy revealed highly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in postcapillary skin venules that were both inhibited after injection of blocking antibodies against E- and P-selectin. Combined blocking antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 were without effect, whereas an anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule-1/VLA-4 antibody combination almost completely normalized the enhanced leukocyte adhesion in transgenic mice. This study reveals VEGF as a growth factor specific for blood vessels, but not lymphatic vessels, and demonstrates that chronic orthotopic overexpression of VEGF in the epidermis is sufficient to induce cardinal features of chronic skin inflammation, providing a molecular link between angiogenesis, mast cell accumulation, and leukocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation. PMID:9665379

  2. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Lima, Felipe Coelho; Saboia, Vicente de Paula Aragão; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza; Neves, Aline de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M) to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8) according to the filling material, (1) AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH)/Gutta-Percha cone; (2) Epiphany SE (Pentron)/Resilon cone; (3) RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in bond strength between AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p > 0.05). Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials. PMID:25383347

  3. Luting of ceramic crowns with a self-adhesive cement: Effect of contamination on marginal adaptation and fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    Slavcheva, Slavena; Krejci, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the percentages of continuous margins (%CM) and fracture strength (FS) of crowns made out from blocs of leucite-reinforced ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) and luted with a representative self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem) under four contaminating agents: saliva, water, blood, a haemostatic solution containing aluminium chloride (pH= 0.8) and a control group with no contamination. Study Design: %CM at both tooth-cement (TC) and cement-crown (CC) interfaces were determined before and after a fatigue test consisting of 600’000 chewing loads and 1’500 temperature cycles changing from 5º C to 50º C. Load to fracture was recorded on fatigued specimens. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare %CM and FS between the five groups with a level of confidence of 95%. Results: At the TC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation before loading could be detected between groups. After loading, a significant marginal degradation was observed in the group contaminated with aluminium chloride (52 ± 22 %CM) in respect to the other groups. No significant differences in %CM could be detected between the groups contaminated with saliva, water, blood and the control. At the CC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation were observed between the groups. The FS on loaded specimens was around 1637N, with no significant differences between groups as well. Conclusions: An adverse interaction of the highly acidic haemostatic agent with either dentin or the self-adhesive cement could explain the specimens’ marginal degradation. The self-adhesive cement tested in this study was no sensitive to moisture contamination either with saliva, water or blood. Key words:Marginal adaptation, RelyX Unicem, contamination, all-ceramic crowns. PMID:23722123

  4. Stem cell differentiation increases membrane-actin adhesion regulating cell blebability, migration and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Sliogeryte, Kristina; Thorpe, Stephen D.; Lee, David A.; Botto, Lorenzo; Knight, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells regulates the interaction between the cell membrane and the actin cortex controlling cell behavior. Micropipette aspiration was used to measure the pressure required for membrane-cortex detachment which increased from 0.15 kPa in stem cells to 0.71 kPa following chondrogenic differentiation. This effect was associated with reduced susceptibility to mechanical and osmotic bleb formation, reduced migration and an increase in cell modulus. Theoretical modelling of bleb formation demonstrated that the increased stiffness of differentiated cells was due to the increased membrane-cortex adhesion. Differentiated cells exhibited greater F-actin density and slower actin remodelling. Differentiated cells also expressed greater levels of the membrane-cortex ezrin, radixin, moeisin (ERM) linker proteins which was responsible for the reduced blebability, as confirmed by transfection of stem cells with dominant active ezrin-T567D-GFP. This study demonstrates that stem cells have an inherently weak membrane-cortex adhesion which increases blebability thereby regulating cell migration and stiffness. PMID:25471686

  5. Evaluating the shear bond strength of enamel and dentin with or without etching: A comparative study between dimethacrylate-based and silorane-based adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Nasseh, Atefeh; Rahmanpour, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Background Silorane-based composites and their specific self-etch adhesive were introduced to conquest the polymerization shrinkage of methacrylate-based composites. It has been shown that additional etching of enamel and dentin can improve the bond strength of self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives but this claim is not apparent about silorane-based adhesives. Our objective was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of enamel and dentin between silorane-based adhesive resin and a methacrylate-based resin with or without additional etching. Material and Methods 40 sound human premolars were prepared and divided into two groups: 1- Filtek P60 composite and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive; 2- Filtek P90 composite and Silorane adhesive. Each group divided into two subgroups: with or without additional etching. For additional etching, 37% acid phosphoric was applied before bonding procedure. A cylinder of the composite was bonded to the surface. After 24 hours storage and 500 thermo cycling between 5-55°C, shear bond strength was assessed with the cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Then, bonded surfaces were observed under stereomicroscope to determine the failure mode. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Fischer exact test. Results Shear bond strength of Filtek P60 composite was significantly higher than Filtek P90 composite both in enamel and dentin surfaces (P<0.05). However, additional etching had no significant effect on shear bond strength in enamel or dentin for each of the composites (P>0.05). There was no interaction between composite type and additional etching (P>0.05). Failure pattern was mainly adhesive and no significant correlation was found between failure and composite type or additional etching (P>0.05). Conclusions Shear bond strength of methacrylate-based composite was significantly higher than silorane-based composite both in enamel and dentin surfaces and additional etching had no significant effect on shear bond strength in enamel or dentin for

  6. The interaction of polyphenols with bilayers: conditions for increasing bilayer adhesion.

    PubMed

    Huh, N W; Porter, N A; McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A

    1996-12-01

    Because proteins and other molecules with a high polyphenol content are commonly involved in adhesion processes, we are investigating the interactions between polyphenols and biological materials. A naturally occurring polyphenol that binds a variety of proteins and lipids is tannic acid (TA), which contains five digallic acid residues covalently linked to a central D-glucose. A previous study has shown that TA increases the adhesion between apposing phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers and over a very narrow concentration range collapses the interbilayer fluid space from about 15 A to 5 A. To determine the chemical requirements a polyphenolic molecule must possess to increase bilayer adhesion, we have synthesized several simpler TA analogs that vary in their size, shape, and number of gallic acid and hydroxyl groups. X-ray diffraction, absorbance, binding, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate the interaction of these polyphenolic molecules with egg PC (EPC) and dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) bilayers. Of these synthetic polyphenols, only penta-O-galloyl-alpha-D-glucose (PGG) was able to completely mimic the effects of TA by collapsing the interbilayer fluid space from 15 A to 5 A, decreasing the dipole potential by about 300 mV, increasing the transition enthalpy of DPPC liposomes, and inducing an interdigitated phase in DPPC. Binding studies indicated that the fluid space was reduced to 5 A at an EPC:PGG mole ratio of 5:1. We conclude that these polyphenols collapse the fluid space of PC bilayers because they 1) are amphipathic and partition into the bilayers interfacial region, 2) are long enough to span the interbilayer space, 3) contain several gallic acids distributed so that they can partition simultaneously into apposing bilayers, and 4) have sufficient gallic acid residues to interact with all lipid headgroups and cover the bilayer surface. Under these conditions we conclude that the polyphenols from interbilayer bridges. We

  7. The interaction of polyphenols with bilayers: conditions for increasing bilayer adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Huh, N W; Porter, N A; McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A

    1996-01-01

    Because proteins and other molecules with a high polyphenol content are commonly involved in adhesion processes, we are investigating the interactions between polyphenols and biological materials. A naturally occurring polyphenol that binds a variety of proteins and lipids is tannic acid (TA), which contains five digallic acid residues covalently linked to a central D-glucose. A previous study has shown that TA increases the adhesion between apposing phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers and over a very narrow concentration range collapses the interbilayer fluid space from about 15 A to 5 A. To determine the chemical requirements a polyphenolic molecule must possess to increase bilayer adhesion, we have synthesized several simpler TA analogs that vary in their size, shape, and number of gallic acid and hydroxyl groups. X-ray diffraction, absorbance, binding, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate the interaction of these polyphenolic molecules with egg PC (EPC) and dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) bilayers. Of these synthetic polyphenols, only penta-O-galloyl-alpha-D-glucose (PGG) was able to completely mimic the effects of TA by collapsing the interbilayer fluid space from 15 A to 5 A, decreasing the dipole potential by about 300 mV, increasing the transition enthalpy of DPPC liposomes, and inducing an interdigitated phase in DPPC. Binding studies indicated that the fluid space was reduced to 5 A at an EPC:PGG mole ratio of 5:1. We conclude that these polyphenols collapse the fluid space of PC bilayers because they 1) are amphipathic and partition into the bilayers interfacial region, 2) are long enough to span the interbilayer space, 3) contain several gallic acids distributed so that they can partition simultaneously into apposing bilayers, and 4) have sufficient gallic acid residues to interact with all lipid headgroups and cover the bilayer surface. Under these conditions we conclude that the polyphenols from interbilayer bridges. We

  8. ELMO1 increases expression of extracellular matrix proteins and inhibits cell adhesion to ECMs.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, A; Tanaka, Y; Shinosaki, T; Ikeda, M; Watada, H; Hirose, T; Kawamori, R; Maeda, S

    2006-11-01

    We have previously identified the engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) as a susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. To elucidate the role of ELMO1 in the pathogenesis of chronic renal injury, we examined the expression of Elmo1 in the kidney of a rat model for chronic glomerulonephritis (uninephrectomy plus anti-Thy1.1 antibody [E30] injection). We found that the expression of the Elmo1 was significantly increased in the renal cortex and glomeruli of uninephrectomized rats injected with E30 compared to controls. By in situ hybridization, the expression of Elmo1 was shown to be elevated in the diseased kidney, especially in glomerular epithelial cells. In COS cells, the overexpression of ELMO1 resulted in a substantial increase in fibronectin expression, whereas the depletion of the ELMO1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ELMO1 significantly suppressed the fibronectin expression in ELMO1 overexpressing and control cells. We also found that the expression of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) was significantly increased in ELMO1 overexpressing cells, and the ELMO1-induced increase in fibronectin was partially, but significantly, inhibited by siRNA targeting ILK. Furthermore, we identified that the cell adhesion to ECMs was considerably inhibited in cells overexpressing ELMO1. These results suggest that the ELMO1 contributes to the development and progression of chronic glomerular injury through the dysregulation of ECM metabolism and the reduction in cell adhesive properties to ECMs. PMID:17021600

  9. Proteins implicated in the increase of adhesivity induced by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Grebeňová, D; Röselová, P; Pluskalová, M; Halada, P; Rösel, D; Suttnar, J; Brodská, B; Otevřelová, P; Kuželová, K

    2012-12-21

    We have previously shown that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) treatment increases the adhesivity of leukemic cells to fibronectin at clinically relevant concentrations. Now, we present the results of the proteomic analysis of SAHA effects on leukemic cell lines using 2-DE and ProteomLab PF2D system. Histone acetylation at all studied acetylation sites reached the maximal level after 5 to 10 h of SAHA treatment. No difference in histone acetylation between subtoxic and toxic SAHA doses was observed. SAHA treatment induced cofilin phosphorylation at Ser3, an increase in vimentin and paxillin expression and a decrease in stathmin expression as confirmed by western-blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. The interaction of cofilin with 14-3-3 epsilon was documented using both Duolink system and coimmunoprecipitation. However, this interaction was independent of cofilin Ser3 phosphorylation and the amount of 14-3-3-ε-bound cofilin did not rise following SAHA treatment. SAHA-induced increase in the cell adhesivity was associated with an increase in PAK phosphorylation in CML-T1 cells and was abrogated by simultaneous treatment with IPA-3, a PAK inhibitor. The effects of SAHA on JURL-MK1 cells were similar to those of other histone deacetylase inhibitors, tubastatin A and sodium butyrate. The proteome analysis also revealed several potential non-histone targets of histone deacetylases. PMID:23022583

  10. Cross-linked Bioreducible Layer-by-layer Films for Increased Cell Adhesion and Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Jenifer; Sievers, Torsten K.; Handa, Hitesh; You, Ye-Zi; Oupický, David; Mao, Guangzhao; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking layer-by-layer (LbL) films consisting of bioreducible poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (rPDMAEMA) and DNA is examined with regards to rigidity, biodegradability, cell adhesion, and transfection activity using 1,5-diiodopentane (DIP) cross-linker. DIP chemically reacts with the tertiary amines of rPDMAEMA, altering the chemical composition of these LbL films. The result is a change in surface morphology, film swelling behavior and film rigidity, measured with AFM and ellipsometry. It is found that the apparent Young’s modulus is increased more than four times its original value upon cross-linking. Cross-linking mass is additionally confirmed with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Comprehensive analyses of these experimental values were investigated to calculate the degree of cross-linking using the rubber elasticity theory and the Flory-Rehner theory. Additionally, the Flory-Huggins parameter, χ, was calculated. Good agreement in the two methods yields a cross-linking density of ~0.82 mmol/cm3. The Flory-Huggins parameter increased upon cross-linking from 1.07 to 1.2, indicating increased hydrophobicity of the network and formation of bulk water droplets within the films. In addition, the effects of cross-linking on film disassembly by 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) is found to be insignificant despite the alteration in film rigidity. Mouse fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells are used to study the effect of cross-linking on cell adhesion and cell transfection activity. In vitro transfection activity up to seven days is quantified using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) DNA. Film cross-linking is found to enhance cell adhesion and prolong the duration of cellular transfection. These results contribute to the development of bioreducible polymer coatings for localized gene delivery. PMID:20369813

  11. Surface pH and bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system to intracoronal dentin after application of hydrogen peroxide bleach with sodium perborate.

    PubMed

    Elkhatib, Hanadi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Hiraishi, Noriko; Kitasako, Yuichi; Tagami, Junji; Nomura, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the dentin bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system with dentin surface pH with or without bleaching and observed the morphological changes in bleached dentin treated with a self-etching primer. Dentin disks were prepared from the coronal-labial region of 32 human anterior teeth. The pulpal surfaces of the dentin disks were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. The dentin surfaces on all specimens were bleached with a mixture of 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for one week. The bleaching agent was then rinsed off with water for 5, 15 or 30 seconds. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C. Half of the five-second rinsing specimens were stored in water for an additional week. Dentin surface pH with or without bleaching was examined using a pH-imaging microscope (SCHEM-100). A self-etching primer/adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond) was applied to bleached or unbleached dentin according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24-hour water storage, the bonded specimens were prepared for microtensile testing. Microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin was measured using a universal-testing machine (EZ test, Shimadzu, Japan) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test (alpha=0.05). The pH values of the dentin surfaces of the 5 and 15 second rinsing groups were significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), while the 30-second rinsing and one-week water storage groups had similar surface pH values to the control group (p<0.05). The microTBS of 5, 15 and 30 second rinsing specimens after bleaching were significantly lower than the control specimens (p<0.05). However, after one-week of water storage, the microTBS returned to the control group. The application of a bleaching agent increased the pH value of the dentin surface and decreased the bond strength of the self-etching primer/adhesive system. One

  12. Bond Strength of a Novel One Bottle Multi-mode Adhesive to Human Dentin After Six Months of Storage

    PubMed Central

    Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Somacal, Deise Caren; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Júnior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of Scotchbond Universal to dentin using the etch-and-rinse or the self-etch technique after 24 h and 6 months of storage. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained in 24 third molars. The teeth were divided into four groups: G1 – Scotchbond Universal applied in the etch-and-rinse mode; G2 – Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode; G3 – Scotchbond Multi-Purpose; G4 – Clearfil SE Bond. A block of composite was built on the adhesive area. The tooth/resin sets were cut parallel to the long axis to obtain 40 beams (~0.8 mm2) for each group. Twenty specimens were immediately submitted to the µTBS test, and the remaining 20 were stored in water for 6 months. Failures and the adhesive interface were analyzed by SEM. Results: According to two-way ANOVA, the interaction between adhesive and storage time was significant (p=0.015).The µTBS (MPa) means were the following: 24 h – G1 (39.37±10.82), G2 (31.02±13.76), G3 (35.09±14.03) and G4 (35.84±11.06); 6 months – G1 (36.99±8.78), G2 (40.58±8.07), G3 (32.44±6.07) and G4 (41.75±8.25). Most failures were mixed. Evidence of hybrid layer and numerous resin tags were noted for Scotchbond Universal applied with the etch-and-rinse mode and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose. A thinner hybrid layer and fewer resin tags were noted for Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Clearfil SE Bond. Conclusion: The results indicate that the µTBS for Scotchbond Universal is comparable to the gold-standard adhesives. Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Clearfil SE Bond revealed higher bond stability compared to the etch-and-rinse mode. PMID:27347230

  13. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings. PMID:26618537

  14. Formation mechanism and adhesive strength of a hydroxyapatite/TiO2 composite coating on a titanium surface prepared by micro-arc oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shimin; Li, Baoe; Liang, Chunyong; Wang, Hongshui; Qiao, Zhixia

    2016-01-01

    A hydroxyapatite (HA)/TiO2 composite coating was prepared on a titanium surface by one-step micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The formation mechanism of the composite coating was investigated and the adhesion of the coating to the substrate was also measured. The results showed that flocculent structures could be obtained during the early stages of treatment. As the treatment period extended, increasing amounts of Ca-P precipitate appeared on the surface, and the flocculent morphology transformed into a plate-like morphology. Then the plate-like calcium and phosphate salt self-assembled to form flower-like apatite. The Ca/P atomic ratio gradually decreased, indicating that the amounts of Ca2+ ions which diffused into the coating decreased more rapidly than that of PO43- or HPO42-. The adhesive strength between the apatite and TiO2 coating was improved. This improvement is attributed to the interlocking effect between the apatite and TiO2 layer which formed simultaneously during the early stages of the one-step MAO. This study shows that it is a promising method to prepare bioactive coating on a titanium surface.

  15. The effect of ionic strength on oil adhesion in sandstone – the search for the low salinity mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hilner, E.; Andersson, M. P.; Hassenkam, T.; Matthiesen, J.; Salino, P. A.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Core flood and field tests have demonstrated that decreasing injection water salinity increases oil recovery from sandstone reservoirs. However, the microscopic mechanism behind the effect is still under debate. One hypothesis is that as salinity decreases, expansion of the electrical double layer decreases attraction between organic molecules and pore surfaces. We have developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to explore the relationship between wettability and salinity. We functionalised AFM tips with alkanes and used them to represent tiny nonpolar oil droplets. In repeated measurements, we brought our “oil” close to the surface of sand grains taken from core plugs and we measured the adhesion between the tip and sample. Adhesion was constant in high salinity solutions but below a threshold of 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, adhesion decreased as salinity decreased, rendering the surface less oil wet. The effect was consistent, reproducible and reversible. The threshold for the onset of low salinity response fits remarkably well with observations from core plug experiments and field tests. The results demonstrate that the electric double layer force always contributes at least in part to the low salinity effect, decreasing oil wettability when salinity is low. PMID:25899050

  16. The effect of ionic strength on oil adhesion in sandstone--the search for the low salinity mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hilner, E; Andersson, M P; Hassenkam, T; Matthiesen, J; Salino, P A; Stipp, S L S

    2015-01-01

    Core flood and field tests have demonstrated that decreasing injection water salinity increases oil recovery from sandstone reservoirs. However, the microscopic mechanism behind the effect is still under debate. One hypothesis is that as salinity decreases, expansion of the electrical double layer decreases attraction between organic molecules and pore surfaces. We have developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to explore the relationship between wettability and salinity. We functionalised AFM tips with alkanes and used them to represent tiny nonpolar oil droplets. In repeated measurements, we brought our "oil" close to the surface of sand grains taken from core plugs and we measured the adhesion between the tip and sample. Adhesion was constant in high salinity solutions but below a threshold of 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, adhesion decreased as salinity decreased, rendering the surface less oil wet. The effect was consistent, reproducible and reversible. The threshold for the onset of low salinity response fits remarkably well with observations from core plug experiments and field tests. The results demonstrate that the electric double layer force always contributes at least in part to the low salinity effect, decreasing oil wettability when salinity is low. PMID:25899050

  17. Influence of colloidal silicon dioxide on gel strength, robustness, and adhesive properties of diclofenac gel formulation for topical application.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zheng; Fassihi, Reza

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the extent of stiffness, adhesiveness, and thixotropic character of a three-dimensional gel network of a 1% diclofenac sodium topical gel formulation in the presence and absence of colloidal silicon dioxide (CSD) and assess its ease of application and adhesiveness using both objective and subjective analysis. The 1% diclofenac gel was mixed with different amounts of CSD (e.g., 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5% w/w) and allowed to equilibrate prior to testing. The texture analyzer in combination with a cone-cap assembly was used to objectively investigate the changes in spreadability and adhesiveness of the gel system before and after addition of CSD. Results indicate that an increase in pliability and adhesiveness at levels ≥2 to ≤5% w/w of CSD dispersed in the gel ensues. For subjective analysis, gels with (2% w/w) CSD and in the absence of CSD were uniformly applied to a 20-cm(2) (5 cm × 4 cm) surface area on the forearms of healthy volunteers and vehicle preferences by the volunteers regarding ease of application, durability on the skin, compliance, and feelings concerning its textural properties were assessed. It appears that changes in the gel formulation with the addition of CSD enhance gel viscosity and bonding to the skin. Results further show that changes in physical and rheological characteristics of gel containing 2% w/w CSD did not significantly change subject preferences for the gel preparations. These findings may help formulators to have additional options to develop more robust and cost-effective formulations. PMID:25501873

  18. Effect of biological contamination on dentine bond strength of adhesive resins.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, J H; Botha, F S; van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of saliva (S) and blood (B) contamination on the dentine bond strength of two single-component dentine bonding systems. The occlusal thirds of 120 recently extracted, human molars were removed with a low speed saw and subsequently embedded in Bencor rings by means of self-curing, acrylic resin. The occlusal surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicone carbide paper in a polishing machine to expose superficial dentine and to create a smear layer. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10). All the dentine surfaces were etched with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds rinsed with water, air-dried for 3 seconds, leaving the surfaces visibly moist. For the control groups (C) the etched dentine surfaces were treated with either, Scotchbond 1 (SB1, 3M) or Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply) according to the manufacturer's instructions. In the contaminated groups, the saliva or blood was applied by means of a disposable brush, left undisturbed for 1 minute, and the excess then thinned by air spray. The dentine bonding systems were then applied, also according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z250 and TPH) and Compomer (F2000 and Dyract AP (D-AP)) stubs were packed and cured incrementally to the corresponding pretreated dentine surfaces. All specimens were stored for 24 hours under water at 37 degrees C. The bonds were then stressed to failure with a Zwick testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured samples were examined in a Scanning Electron Microscope. The data were statistically analysed (Student-t test). The mean SBS (MPa) were. SB1 with Z250: C = 19.1 +/- 4.4; S = 17.3 +/- 3.5; B = 2.6 +/- 0.9; SB1 with F2000: C = 11.8 +/- 3.3; S = 9.7 +/- 1.8; B = 4.7 +/- 1.6. PBNT with TPH: C = 9.2 +/- 3.2; S = 6.5 +/- 3.0; B = 4.3 +/- 1.5; PBNT with D-AP: C = 10.2 +/- 3.6; S = 9.3 +/- 2.9 and B = 7.3 +/- 2.5. There was no statistical significant difference in shear bond

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    D, Krishnakanth Reddy; V, Kishore M S; Safeena, Safeena

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine shear bond strength and the effect on the bracket/ adhesive failure mode when an acidic primer and other etchants were used to condition the enamel surface before bonding. Materials & Methods: Group I: Brackets bonded with Ultimate cure-on-light Light-cure composite adhesive system. Group II: Brackets bonded with Ortho-one no-mix. Self-cure composite adhesive system. Group III: Brackets bonded with Light-cure glass ionomer adhesive system. Group IV: Brackets bonded with Transbond plus self etching primer. Results: The results of this study indicated that the shear bond strength when using Transbond plus self etching primer showed the highest bond strength Group- IV(8.69 2.54 MPa) followed by Ultimate cure-on-light Group-I (8.62 1.84 MPa), Ortho-one no-mix (Bisco Inc. USA)Group-II (8.07 1.72 MPa), and least bond strength was seen in G.C. Fuji Ortho L.C. Group-III (6.01 1.6) MPa Conclusion: Use of self etching primer saves chairside time and satisfactory high bond strength was obtained. Care should be taken during debonding of ceramic brackets How to cite this article: Reddy K D, Kishore M S V, Safeena S. Shear Bond Strength of Acidic Primer, Light-Cure Glass Ionomer, Light-Cure and Self Cure Composite Adhesive Systems - An In Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):73-78. PMID:24155606

  20. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  1. GEP-based method to formulate adhesion strength and hardness of Nb PVD coated on Ti-6Al-7Nb aimed at developing mixed oxide nanotubular arrays.

    PubMed

    Rafieerad, A R; Bushroa, A R; Nasiri-Tabrizi, B; Fallahpour, A; Vadivelu, J; Musa, S N; Kaboli, S H A

    2016-08-01

    PVD process as a thin film coating method is highly applicable for both metallic and ceramic materials, which is faced with the necessity of choosing the correct parameters to achieve optimal results. In the present study, a GEP-based model for the first time was proposed as a safe and accurate method to predict the adhesion strength and hardness of the Nb PVD coated aimed at growing the mixed oxide nanotubular arrays on Ti67. Here, the training and testing analysis were executed for both adhesion strength and hardness. The optimum parameter combination for the scratch adhesion strength and micro hardness was determined by the maximum mean S/N ratio, which was 350W, 20 sccm, and a DC bias of 90V. Results showed that the values calculated in the training and testing in GEP model were very close to the actual experiments designed by Taguchi. The as-sputtered Nb coating with highest adhesion strength and microhardness was electrochemically anodized at 20V for 4h. From the FESEM images and EDS results of the annealed sample, a thick layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the sample surface after soaking in SBF for 10 days, which can be connected to the development of a highly ordered nanotube arrays. This novel approach provides an outline for the future design of nanostructured coatings for a wide range of applications. PMID:26874249

  2. Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Src Increases Detachment and Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Xiaojie; Trujillo, Angelica; Kurenova, Elena V.; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that is overexpressed in a number of human tumors including neuroblastoma, and regulates both cellular adhesion and survival. We have studied the effects of FAK inhibition upon neuroblastoma using adenovirus-containing FAK-CD (AdFAK-CD). Utilizing an isogenic MYCN+ / MYCN− neuroblastoma cell line, we found that the MYCN+ cells are more sensitive to FAK inhibition with AdFAK-CD than their MYCN negative counterparts. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of Src is increased in the untreated isogenic MYCN− neuroblastoma cells, and that the decreased sensitivity of the MYCN− neuroblastoma cells to FAK inhibition with AdFAK-CD is abrogated by the addition of the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2. The results of the current study suggest that both FAK and Src play a role in protecting neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis, and that dual inhibition of these kinases may be important when designing therapeutic interventions for this tumor. PMID:19885861

  3. Physical activity compensates for increased mortality risk among older people with poor muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Portegijs, E; Rantanen, T; Sipilä, S; Laukkanen, P; Heikkinen, E

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether habitual physical activity can compensate for the increased mortality risk among older people with poor muscle strength. Mortality was followed up for 10 years after laboratory examination in 558 community dwelling 75- and 80-year-old men and women. Maximal isometric strength of five muscle groups was measured and tertile cut-off points were used to categorize participants. Participants, who reported moderate physical activity for at least 4 h a week, were categorized as physically active and the others as sedentary. High muscle strength and physical activity both protected from mortality, but their effect was not additive. Within each muscle strength tertile, physically active people had a lower mortality risk than sedentary people, the effect being most pronounced among those with lower strength in all muscle groups. A high level of physical activity may thus compensate for the increased mortality associated with low muscle strength. PMID:17166169

  4. Increased tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarns and sheets through chemical modification and electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sandi G; Williams, Tiffany S; Baker, James S; Solá, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A

    2014-05-14

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of CNT forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated into that of sheets and yarns, where the bulk material strength is limited by intertube electrostatic attractions and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess postprocessing of CNT sheets and yarns to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small-molecule functionalization and electron-beam irradiation were evaluated as means to enhance the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the bulk CNT materials. Mechanical testing revealed a 57% increase in tensile strength of CNT sheets upon functionalization compared with unfunctionalized sheets, while an additional 48% increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated. Similarly, small-molecule functionalization increased tensile strength of yarn by up to 25%, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88% beyond that of the baseline yarn. PMID:24720450

  5. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  6. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation alone did not lead to differences in µ-TBS (p > 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  7. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

  8. Plasma source ion implantation to increase the adhesion of subsequently deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Walter, K.C.; Taylor, T.N.

    1997-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) an object is placed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative potential, so as to implant the plasma ions into the surface of the object. Although ion implantation, by itself, can yield desirable surface modification, it is even more useful as a method of creating a functionally graded interface between the substrate material and a subsequently deposited coating, which may be produced by altering operating conditions on the same plasma source. Although this interfacial region is very thin - as little as 20 nm - it can greatly increase the adhesion of the deposited coatings. We present here a description of this process, and compare a simulation of the graded interface with an XPS depth profile of the interfacial region for erbium metal implanted into steel.

  9. Prospects of increasing the strength of aluminum by reinforcing it with stainless steel wire (a review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Ivanova, V. S.; Kopev, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental strength of aluminum reinforced with stainless steel wire is analyzed. Various methods of producing the composite material and it's static and cyclical strengths are considered. The reinforcement of aluminum with stainless steel wire was accomplished from the perspective of increasing the specific strength of aluminum and it's alloys, increasing the strength of the material with respect to high and low temperatures, as well as increasing the cyclical strength. The production of the composite aluminum-stainless steel wire material with approximated or calculated strengthening is possible by any of the considered methods. The selection of the proper production technology depends on precise details and conditions of application of the material.

  10. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  11. Plasma surface oxidation of 316L stainless steel for improving adhesion strength of silicone rubber coating to metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Afrooz; Imani, Mohammad; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Daliri Joupari, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Stainless steel 316L is one of the most widely used materials for fabricating of biomedical devices hence, improving its surface properties is still of great interest and challenging in biomaterial sciences. Plasma oxidation, in comparison to the conventional chemical or mechanical methods, is one of the most efficient methods recently used for surface treatment of biomaterials. Here, stainless steel specimens were surface oxidized by radio-frequency plasma irradiation operating at 34 MHz under pure oxygen atmosphere. Surface chemical composition of the samples was significantly changed after plasma oxidation by appearance of the chromium and iron oxides on the plasma-oxidized surface. A wettable surface, possessing high surface energy (83.19 mN m-1), was observed after plasma oxidation. Upon completion of the surface modification process, silicone rubber was spray coated on the plasma-treated stainless steel surface. Morphology of the silicone rubber coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A uniform coating was formed on the oxidized surface with no delamination at polymer-metal interface. Pull-off tests showed the lowest adhesion strength of coating to substrate (0.12 MPa) for untreated specimens and the highest (0.89 MPa) for plasma-oxidized ones.

  12. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin. PMID:24190486

  13. Effect of film gradient profile on adhesion strength, residual stress and effective hardness of functionally graded diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yoo Jai; Ki, Hyungson

    2014-08-01

    We have studied, for the first time, the effect of continuously-varying film gradient profiles on the adhesion strength, residual stress, and effective film hardness of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on stainless steel substrates. Precisely graded DLC films with five polynomial profiles (linear, quadratic, cubic, square root and cubic root profiles) were investigated and compared with pure DLC films, and it was shown that by optimizing the film gradient profile the residual stress and adhesion characteristics can be significantly improved but the effective film hardness can be negatively affected.

  14. Increase vs. decrease in the strength of granitic rocks subjected to heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, Anita; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    Accidental fire generally causes catastrophic loss in granitic structures or tunnels excavated in granitic rocks. It is necessary to measure strength of materials at various degrees to understand the mechanical behaviour of such stone structures or tunnels. Our laboratory experiments were aimed to detect indirect tensile strength and uniaxial compressive strength of granitic rocks that were subjected to temperatures of up to 600°C. For control measurements ultrasonic pulse velocity was also recorded. The studied rocks included three granites: a Hungarian dark pink granite (Mórágy), an Austrian greyish granite (Mauthausen) and a common pinkish Spanish granite (Rosa Beta). Cylindrical tests specimens of the three granites were subjected to 300°C and 600°C, respectively. Compressive strength test and tensile strength test results were compared to strength values obtained at room temperature. Our test results show that two of the studied granites (Hungarian and the Spanish one) have higher strength at 300°C that at room temperature. To the contrary ultrasonic pulse velocity decreased for all the three granites from room temperature to 300°C. The tensile strength of the granites did not show such a clear trend, however Hungarian granite has a slightly increased tensile strength at 300°C than at room temperature. At 600°C the compressive strength, tensile strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity dropped but not at the same rate. Our experiments showed that a given and limited temperature increase can have a positive effect on strength of granites rather than an adverse effect on a short-term.

  15. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  16. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  17. Effects of dentin moisture on the push-out bond strength of a fiber post luted with different self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoğlu, Emel; Yılmaz, Zeliha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effects of intraradicular moisture on the pushout bond strength of a fibre post luted with several self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Endodontically treated root canals were treated with one of three luting cements: (1) RelyX U100, (2) Clearfil SA, and (3) G-Cem. Roots were then divided into four subgroups according to the moisture condition tested: (I) dry: excess water removed with paper points followed by dehydration with 95% ethanol, (II) normal moisture: canals blot-dried with paper points until appearing dry, (III) moist: canals dried by low vacuum using a Luer adapter, and (IV) wet: canals remained totally flooded. Two 1-mm-thick slices were obtained from each root sample and bond strength was measured using a push-out test setup. The data were analysed using a two-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test with p = 0.05. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that moisture levels had a significant effect on the bond strength of luting cements (p < 0.05), with the exception of G-Cem. RelyX U100 displayed the highest bond strength under moist conditions (III). Clearfil SA had the highest bond strength under normal moisture conditions (II). Statistical ranking of bond strength values was as follows: RelyX U100 > Clearfil SA > G-Cem. Conclusions The degree of residual moisture significantly affected the adhesion of luting cements to radicular dentine. PMID:24303359

  18. The synergy between the insect-inspired claws and adhesive pads increases the attachment ability on various rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Dai, Zhendong; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    To attach reliably on various inclined rough surfaces, many insects have evolved both claws and adhesive pads on their feet. However, the interaction between these organs still remains unclear. Here we designed an artificial attachment device, which mimics the structure and function of claws and adhesive pads, and tested it on stiff spheres of different dimensions. The results show that the attachment forces of claws decrease with an increase of the sphere radius. The forces may become very strong, when the sphere radius is smaller or comparable to the claw radius, because of the frictional self-lock. On the other hand, adhesive pads generate considerable adhesion on large sphere diameter due to large contact areas. The synergy effect between the claws and adhesive pads leads to much stronger attachment forces, if compared to the action of claw or adhesive pads independently (or even to the sum of both). The results carried out by our insect-inspired artificial attachment device clearly demonstrate why biological evolution employed two attachment organs working in concert. The results may greatly inspire the robot design, to obtain reliable attachment forces on various substrates. PMID:27198650

  19. The synergy between the insect-inspired claws and adhesive pads increases the attachment ability on various rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yi; Dai, Zhendong; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-01-01

    To attach reliably on various inclined rough surfaces, many insects have evolved both claws and adhesive pads on their feet. However, the interaction between these organs still remains unclear. Here we designed an artificial attachment device, which mimics the structure and function of claws and adhesive pads, and tested it on stiff spheres of different dimensions. The results show that the attachment forces of claws decrease with an increase of the sphere radius. The forces may become very strong, when the sphere radius is smaller or comparable to the claw radius, because of the frictional self-lock. On the other hand, adhesive pads generate considerable adhesion on large sphere diameter due to large contact areas. The synergy effect between the claws and adhesive pads leads to much stronger attachment forces, if compared to the action of claw or adhesive pads independently (or even to the sum of both). The results carried out by our insect-inspired artificial attachment device clearly demonstrate why biological evolution employed two attachment organs working in concert. The results may greatly inspire the robot design, to obtain reliable attachment forces on various substrates. PMID:27198650

  20. Adhesion of human platelets to albumin is synergistically increased by lysophosphatidic acid and adrenaline in a donor-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Whiss, Per A; Nilsson, Ulrika K

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and adrenaline are weak platelet activators considered important for thrombus formation, and were previously shown to synergistically increase platelet aggregation. Here we investigate synergistic activation by LPA and adrenaline when measuring platelet adhesion. Platelet-rich plasma from healthy blood donors together with adrenaline and/or LPA were added to protein-coated microplates. Platelets were allowed to adhere and the amount of adhesion detected enzymatically. The LPA and adrenaline combination induced a synergistic increase of platelet adhesion to a normally non-adhesive albumin surface. The degree of synergy varied markedly between individuals; these variations could not be explained by age, gender, blood type or different amounts of platelets, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, insulin or glucose in plasma. There was a trend indicating increased synergistic effect for platelets sensitive to adrenaline stimulation. The synergistic effect was blocked by the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and inhibited by the ADP scavenger system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase and antibodies against alphaIIbbeta3. Furthermore, platelets adhering to albumin after adrenaline and LPA treatment expressed P-selectin. In conclusion, LPA and adrenaline act synergistically to increase alphaIIbbeta3-mediated platelet adhesion to albumin, dependent on alpha2-adrenoceptor signalling and platelet secretion. We also confirm that synergistic platelet activation achieved with LPA and adrenaline is highly donor dependent. PMID:16788312

  1. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  2. Adhesive properties of water washed cottonseed meal on poplar, douglas fir, walnut, and white oak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interest in natural product-based wood adhesives has been steadily increasing due to the environmental and sustainable concerns of petroleum-based adhesives. In this work, we reported our research on utilization of water washed cottonseed meal (WCM) as wood adhesives. The adhesive strength and w...

  3. Adhesive properties of water washed cottonseed meal on four types of wood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interest in natural product-based wood adhesives has been steadily increasing due to the environmental and sustainable concerns of petroleum-based adhesives. In this work, we reported our research on the utilization of water washed cottonseed meal (WCM) as wood adhesives. The adhesive strength a...

  4. Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis to Milk Oligosaccharides Increases Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Induces a Substantial Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Devon W.; O’Callaghan, John; Buttó, Ludovica F.; Slattery, Helen; Lane, Jonathan; Clyne, Marguerite; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh; Hickey, Rita M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that milk oligosaccharides may contribute not only to selective growth of bifidobacteria, but also to their specific adhesive ability. Human milk oligosaccharides (3′sialyllactose and 6′sialyllactose) and a commercial prebiotic (Beneo Orafti P95; oligofructose) were assayed for their ability to promote adhesion of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 to HT-29 and Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Treatment with the commercial prebiotic or 3′sialyllactose did not enhance adhesion. However, treatment with 6′sialyllactose resulted in increased adhesion (4.7 fold), while treatment with a mixture of 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose substantially increased adhesion (9.8 fold) to HT-29 intestinal cells. Microarray analyses were subsequently employed to investigate the transcriptional response of B. longum subsp. infantis to the different oligosaccharide treatments. This data correlated strongly with the observed changes in adhesion to HT-29 cells. The combination of 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose resulted in the greatest response at the genetic level (both in diversity and magnitude) followed by 6′sialyllactose, and 3′sialyllactose alone. The microarray data was further validated by means of real-time PCR. The current findings suggest that the increased adherence phenotype of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis resulting from exposure to milk oligosaccharides is multi-faceted, involving transcription factors, chaperone proteins, adhesion-related proteins, and a glycoside hydrolase. This study gives additional insight into the role of milk oligosaccharides within the human intestine and the molecular mechanisms underpinning host-microbe interactions. PMID:23805302

  5. Increased osteoblast adhesion on nanophase metals: Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCrMo.

    PubMed

    Webster, Thomas J; Ejiofor, Jeremiah U

    2004-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated increased functions of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on nanophase compared to conventional ceramics (specifically, alumina, titania, and hydroxyapatite), polymers (such as poly lactic-glycolic acid and polyurethane), carbon nanofibers/nanotubes, and composites thereof. Nanophase materials are unique materials that simulate dimensions of constituent components of bone since they possess particle or grain sizes less than 100 nm. However, to date, interactions of osteoblasts on nanophase compared to conventional metals remain to be elucidated. For this reason, the objective of the present in vitro study was to synthesize, characterize, and evaluate osteoblast adhesion on nanophase metals (specifically, Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCrMo alloys). Such metals in conventional form are widely used in orthopedic applications. Results of this study provided the first evidence of increased osteoblast adhesion on nanophase compared to conventional metals. Interestingly, osteoblast adhesion occurred preferentially at surface particle boundaries for both nanophase and conventional metals. Since more particle boundaries are present on the surface of nanophase compared to conventional metals, this may be an explanation for the measured increased osteoblast adhesion. Lastly, material characterization studies revealed that nanometal surfaces possessed similar chemistry and only altered in degree of nanometer surface roughness when compared to their respective conventional counterparts. Because osteoblast adhesion is a necessary prerequisite for subsequent functions (such as deposition of calcium-containing mineral), the present study suggests that nanophase metals should be further considered for orthopedic implant applications. PMID:15120519

  6. Prolonged Morphine Exposure Induces Increased Firm Adhesion in an in Vitro Model of the Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Strazza, Marianne; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Dampier, Will; Lin, Wei; Feng, Rui; Maubert, Monique E.; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) has been defined as a critically important protective barrier that is involved in providing essential biologic, physiologic, and immunologic separation between the central nervous system (CNS) and the periphery. Insults to the BBB can cause overall barrier damage or deregulation of the careful homeostasis maintained between the periphery and the CNS. These insults can, therefore, yield numerous phenotypes including increased overall permeability, interendothelial gap formation, alterations in cytokine and chemokine secretion, and accelerated cellular passage. The current studies expose the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3, to prolonged morphine exposure and aim to uncover the mechanisms underlying alterations in barrier function in vitro. These studies show alterations in the mRNA and protein levels of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule that correlate with an increased firm adhesion of the CD3+ subpopulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overall, these studies suggest that prolonged morphine exposure may result in increased cell migration into the CNS, which may accelerate pathological processes in many diseases that involve the BBB. PMID:27294916

  7. Prolonged Morphine Exposure Induces Increased Firm Adhesion in an in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Strazza, Marianne; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Dampier, Will; Lin, Wei; Feng, Rui; Maubert, Monique E; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Nonnemacher, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been defined as a critically important protective barrier that is involved in providing essential biologic, physiologic, and immunologic separation between the central nervous system (CNS) and the periphery. Insults to the BBB can cause overall barrier damage or deregulation of the careful homeostasis maintained between the periphery and the CNS. These insults can, therefore, yield numerous phenotypes including increased overall permeability, interendothelial gap formation, alterations in cytokine and chemokine secretion, and accelerated cellular passage. The current studies expose the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3, to prolonged morphine exposure and aim to uncover the mechanisms underlying alterations in barrier function in vitro. These studies show alterations in the mRNA and protein levels of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule that correlate with an increased firm adhesion of the CD3⁺ subpopulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overall, these studies suggest that prolonged morphine exposure may result in increased cell migration into the CNS, which may accelerate pathological processes in many diseases that involve the BBB. PMID:27294916

  8. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  9. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    Epidemiological evidence has established terrestrial radiation exposure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. For example, a major side effect of therapeutic radiation, especially for breast and head-and-neck cancers, is atherosclerosis, which can result in stroke years after treatment. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors were significantly more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their countrymen. Even radiation technologists, prior to 1950 (when regulations governing shielding and occupational exposure were less rigorous) had an increased risk of clinically significant atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that 600 MeV (56) Fe similarly exacerbates plaque formation in the apoE mouse atherosclerosis model at doses 4-7 fold lower than required for x-rays to produce a similar pro-atherogenic effect. This raises concern that exposure to cosmic radiation might pose a similar risk for astronauts. Because so little is known about the mechanism of pro-atherogenic radiation effects, however, the current strategy to minimize risk from terrestrial radiation sources is to limit exposure. For astronauts on deep space missions, exposure to a significant amount of radiation will be unavoidable. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced atherosclerosis will be essential in order to develop countermeasures. Radiation can cause increased adhesiveness of vascular endothelium, leading to inappropriate accumulation of monocytes and other white blood cells, which can initiate a self-perpetuating inflammatory response. This vascular inflammation is an early event in atherosclerosis that can eventually lead to clinically significant cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. We showed earlier that x-rays, (56) Fe, and (28) Si all accelerate development of atherosclerosis in the apoE -/- mouse model. We also demonstrated that both x-rays and heavy ions increase adhesion of monocytic cells to vascular human aortic endothelial

  10. Impact of ionic strength of growth on the physiochemical properties, structure, and adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes polyelectrolyte brushes to a silicon nitride surface in water.

    PubMed

    Gordesli, Fatma Pinar; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2012-12-15

    The adhesion energies between pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes EGDe to a model surface of silicon nitride were quantified using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in water for cells grown in pure media (as the control) and in media of four different ionic strengths of added NaCl (IS of 0.05 M, 0.1 M, 0.3 M and 0.5 M NaCl). The physiochemical properties of L. monocytogenes EGDe surface brushes were shown to have a strong influence on the adhesion of the microbe to the silicon nitride surface. The transitions in the adhesion energies, physiochemical properties, and the structure of bacterial surface polyelectrolyte brushes were observed for the cells grown in the media of 0.1M added NaCl. Our results suggested that the highest long-range electrostatic repulsion which was partially balanced by the Liftshitz-van der Waals attraction for the cells grown at 0.1M was responsible for the highest energy barrier to adhesion for these cells as predicted by the soft-particle analysis of DLVO theory and the lower adhesion measured by AFM. PMID:23010316

  11. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate Treatment on Microtensile Bond Strength to Carious Affected Dentin Using Two Adhesive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Farhadi, Farrokh; Norouzi, Marouf

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to carious affected dentin (CAD) using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and methods. The occlusal surface of 32 human molars with moderate occlusal caries was removed. Infected dentin was removed until reaching CAD and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups based on the Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) adhesive systems. Before composite resin bonding, each group was subdivided into three subgroups of ND, CAD and CPP-ACP-treated CAD (CAD-CPP) based on the dentin substrate. After dissecting samples to l-mm-thick cross-sections (each subgroup: n = 13), μTBS was measured at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and post-hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results. Bond strength of both adhesive systems to ND was significantly higher than that to CAD (P <0.001) and CAD/CPP (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the μTBS of SB to CAD and CAD-CPP (P > 0.05).μTBS of CSE to CAD-CPP was higher than that to CAD; however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Significant differences were found between SB and CSE systems only with CAD substrate (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Regardless of the adhesive system used, surface treatment of CAD with CPP-ACP did not have a significant effect on bond strength. However, bond strength to CAD was higher with SB rather than with CSE. PMID:25346832

  12. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity.

  13. Influence of Air Abrasion and Sonic Technique on Microtensile Bond Strength of One-Step Self-Etch Adhesive on Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Anja, Baraba; Walter, Dukić; Nicoletta, Chieffi; Marco, Ferrari; Pezelj Ribarić, Sonja; Ivana, Miletić

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesive to human dentin surface modified with air abrasion and sonic technique and to assess the morphological characteristics of the pretreated dentin surface. The occlusal enamel was removed to obtain a flat dentin surface for thirty-six human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 12 per group), according to the pretreatment of the dentin: (1) control group, (2) air abrasion group, and (3) sonic preparation group. Microtensile bond strength test was performed on a universal testing machine. Two specimens from each experimental group were subjected to SEM examination. There was no statistically significant difference in bond strength between the three experimental groups (P > 0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength (MPa) values were 35.3 ± 12.8 for control group, 35.8 ± 13.5 for air abrasion group, and 37.7 ± 12.0 for sonic preparation group. The use of air abrasion and sonic preparation with one-step self-etch adhesive does not appear to enhance or impair microtensile bond strength in dentin. PMID:25879053

  14. In-vitro study of the adhesive strengths of brackets on metals, ceramic and composite. Part 1: Bonding to precious metals and amalgam.

    PubMed

    Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Drost, C; Can, S

    1996-04-01

    Adult patients often have fillings, artificial crowns and/or bridges that make fitting of conventional bands difficult or even impossible. In such cases bonding rather than banding would be preferable. The present paper presents the investigation of more than 25 resin/conditioner combinations with respect to their bond strength to different metals as well as to amalgam. For that purpose stainless steel lingual buttons were bonded with the various adhesives and their shear bond strengths and types of bond failure were determined after 24 hours. All specimens were air-abraded with 50 microns Al2O3 for 2 or 4 seconds by means of a Microetcher before bonding. For comparison, buttons were also bonded to bovine enamel after air-abrasion or conventional etching with 37% H3PO4. Results show that, on all metals investigated, several materials yield bond strengths which are similar to or higher than what is achieved with the conventional acid etch technique on enamel. Maximum adhesive strength is not always desirable, however, for bonding brackets. The type of bond failure and the risk of irreversible damage to the bonded material have also to be taken into consideration. Al2O3 abrasion may cause considerable damage to enamel within 4 seconds. Since the bond strength on air-abraded enamel is about the same as on acid etched enamel, conventional etching with H3PO4 is preferable to the sandblasting of enamel. PMID:8647560

  15. The wear properties and adhesion strength of the diamond-like carbon film coated on SUS, Ti and Ni-Ti with plasma pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, K; Masuzawa, T; Hirakuri, K K

    2010-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel (SUS), titanium (Ti) and nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) substrates using a radiofrequency plasma chemical vapour deposition method. Prior to DLC coating, the substrates were exposed to O2 and N2 plasma to enhance the adhesion strength of the DLC film to the substrate. After the plasma pre-treatment, the chemical composition and the wettability of the substrate surface was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurement, respectively. A pull-out test and a ball-on-disc test were carried out to evaluate the adhesion strength and the wear properties of the DLC-coated substrates. The XPS results showed that the N2 and O2 plasma pre-treatment produced nitride and oxide on the substrate surfaces, such as TiO2, TiO, Fe2O3, CrN and TiNO. In the pull-out test, the adhesion strengths of the DLC film to the SUS, Ti and Ni-Ti substrates were improved with the plasma pre-treatment. In the ball-on-disc test, the DLC coated SUS, Ti and Ni-Ti substrates without the plasma pre-treatment showed severe film failure following the test. The DLC coated SUS and Ni-Ti substrates with the N2 plasma pre-treatment showed good wear resistance, compared with that with the O2 plasma pre-treatment. PMID:20448301

  16. Effect of thermal and mechanical loading on marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive with caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Miglani, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of thermal and mechanical loading on marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength in total-etch versus self-etch adhesive systems in caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Forty class II cavities were prepared on extracted proximally carious human mandibular first molars and were divided into two groups: Group I — self-etch adhesive system restorations and Group II — total-etch adhesive system restorations. Group I and II were further divided into sub-groups A (Without thermal and mechanical loading) and B (With thermal and mechanical loading of 5000 cycles, 5 ± 2°C to 55 ± 2°C, dwell time 30 seconds, and 150,000 cycles at 60N). The gingival margin of the proximal box was evaluated at 200X magnification for marginal adaptation in a low vacuum scanning electron microscope. The restorations were sectioned, perpendicular to the bonded surface, into 0.8 mm thick slabs. All the specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using descriptive studies, and the bond strength data was analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results and Conclusions: The total-etch system performed better under thermomechanical loading. PMID:21691507

  17. Effect of different adhesive strategies on microtensile bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing blocks bonded to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Teich, Sorin; Porto, Thiago Soares

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of ceramic and composite computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks bonded to dentin using different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 crowns of sound freshly extracted human molars were sectioned horizontally 3 mm above the cementoenamel junction to produce flat dentin surfaces. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks, size 14, were sectioned into slices of 3 mm thick. Before bonding, CAD/CAM block surfaces were treated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Groups were created based on the adhesive strategy used: Group 1 (GI) - conventional resin cement + total-etch adhesive system, Group 2 (GII) - conventional resin cement + self-etch adhesive system, and Group 3 (GIII) - self-adhesive resin cement with no adhesive. Bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24h at 37΀C, and then sectioned with a slow-speed diamond saw to obtain 1 mm × 1 mm × 6 mm microsticks. Microtensile testing was then conducted using a microtensile tester. μTBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post hoc (Tukey) test at the 5% significance level. Results: Mean values and standard deviations of μTBS (MPa) were 17.68 (±2.71) for GI/ceramic; 17.62 (±3.99) for GI/composite; 13.61 (±6.92) for GII/composite; 12.22 (±4.24) for GII/ceramic; 7.47 (±2.29) for GIII/composite; and 6.48 (±3.10) for GIII/ceramic; ANOVA indicated significant differences among the adhesive modality and block interaction (P < 0.05), and no significant differences among blocks only, except between GI and GII/ceramic. Bond strength of GIII was consistently lower (P < 0.05) than GI and GII groups, regardless the block used. Conclusion: Cementation of CAD/CAM restorations, either composite or ceramic, can be significantly affected by different adhesive strategies used. PMID:27076825

  18. Influence of different Er,Cr:YSGG laser parameters on long-term dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesive.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tahsin; Ayar, Muhammet Kerim; Yesilyurt, Cemal

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of erbium, chromium: yattrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser frequency on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a self-etch adhesive to dentin after 15-month water storage. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser can safely be used on dental hard tissue. However, no study has compared the effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser parameters and aging by water storage on the bonding effectiveness of self-etch adhesives to dentin. Thirty-five bovine teeth were randomly assigned to the following seven groups (n = 5): group I (diamond bur with high-speed handpiece (control)), group II (Er,Cr:YSGG laser 3 W/50 Hz), group III (Er,Cr:YSGG laser 3 W/35 Hz), group IV (Er,Cr:YSGG laser 3 W/20 Hz), group V (Er,Cr:YSGG laser 6 W/50 Hz), group VI (Er,Cr:YSGG laser 6 W/35 Hz), and group VII (Er,Cr:YSGG laser 6 W/20 Hz). Clearfil SE Bond was applied to the prepared dentin, and the composites were placed and cured. Resin-dentin sticks with an approximate cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm(2) were obtained, and bond strength tests were performed at 24 h and 15 months of water storage after bonding. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation resulted in significantly lower bond strengths when compared to bur treating. Fifteen-month water storage reduced bond strength for all groups. There was no significant difference among the effects of different laser frequencies on bond strength. It can be concluded that Er,Cr:YSGG laser used at the tested parameters may alter the dentin bond durability of self-etch adhesive. PMID:26498449

  19. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  20. Effect of collagen cross-linkers on the shear bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system to deep dentin

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasulu, Sakhamuri; Vidhya, Sampath; Sujatha, Manimaran; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin to deep dentin, bonded using a self-etch adhesive, after treatment with two collagen cross-linkers at varying time intervals. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted human incisors were sectioned longitudinally into equal mesial and distal halves (n = 60). The proximal deep dentin was exposed and the specimens were divided based on the surface treatment of dentin prior to bonding as follows: Group I (n = 12, control): No prior dentin surface treatment; group II (n = 24): Dentin surface pretreated with 10% sodium ascorbate; and group III (n = 24): Dentin surface pretreated with 6.5% proanthocyanidin. Groups II and III were further divided into two subgroups based on the pre-treatment time of five and 10 min. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested using universal testing machine and the data were statistically analyzed. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength to deep dentin was observed in teeth treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin compared to control group. No significant difference was observed between 5 min and 10 min pre-treatment times. Conclusion: Dentin surface pre-treatment with both 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin resulted in significant improvement in bond strength of self-etch adhesive to deep dentin. PMID:23716965

  1. PLASMA POLYMER FILMS AS ADHESION PROMOTING PRIMERS FOR ALUMINUM. PART II: STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF LAP JOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films (~800 A in thickness) were deposited onto 6111-T4 aluminum substrates in radio frequency and microwave powered reactors and used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Processing variables such as substrate pre-treatment,...

  2. Effects of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet and neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser hypersensitivity treatment parameters on the bond strength of self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Yazici, E; Gurgan, S; Gutknecht, N; Imazato, S

    2010-07-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) of two self-etch adhesives to coronal and root dentin treated with erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) or neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers for dentin hypersensitivity. The coronal and root dentin surfaces of 60 extracted human cuspids were divided into three groups (n = 20): (1) control (without treatment); (2) treated with Er:YAG; (3) treated with Nd:YAG laser and a one-step (S3) or two-step self-etch adhesive (SE). A nano-composite was applied and SBS tests were performed. The mean SBS values were calculated, failure modes were determined, and data were subjected to statistical analysis (P = 0.05). Control/SE exhibited higher values than did control/S3 and Nd:YAG/S3 on coronal dentin (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the SE and S3 groups in root dentin (P > 0.05). Comparisons of two dentin substrates did not show any difference except control/SE (P < 0.05). The failure modes were mainly adhesive. The SBSs of self-etch adhesives to Er:YAG or Nd:YAG laser-treated surfaces were comparable with control for both coronal and root dentin. PMID:19475475

  3. The procedure of evaluating the practical adhesion strength of new biocompatible nano- and micro-thin films in accordance with international standards.

    PubMed

    Kutilek, Patrik; Miksovsky, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The possibilities of using newly developed nano- and micro-thin films in biomedicine are intensively studied at the present time. Many research institutions are looking for ways to evaluate mechanical properties of these films. One of the most important and frequently studied characteristics is practical adhesion. A very important method for evaluating the practical adhesion strength is scratch test. Often, however, the research teams use a method based on the disunity evaluation of adhesion of biocompatible surface layer. This makes the quantitative comparison of research results impossible. We designed and tested new evaluation method and procedure based on international standards in order to eliminate these problems. This article is aimed at showing the new possibility of using established standards for evaluating adhesion of nano- and micro-thin biocompatible films and at showing the application of the standards to evaluate the often studied DLC biocompatible layers. The thickness of the film was 470 nm. As a substrate a titanium alloy Ti6Al4V was used. PMID:22098333

  4. On the mechanical properties of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adhesives.

    PubMed

    Berchane, N S; Andrews, M J; Kerr, S; Slater, N K H; Jebrail, F F

    2008-04-01

    Biological adhesives, natural and synthetic, are of current active interest. These adhesives offer significant advantages over traditional sealant techniques, in particular, they are easier to use, and can play an integral part in the healing mechanism of tissue. Thus, biological adhesives can play a major role in medical applications if they possess adequate mechanical behavior and stability over time. In this work, we report on the method of preparation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) into a biological adhesive. We present quantitative measurements that show the effect of BSA concentration and cross-linker content on the bonding strength of BSA adhesive to wood. A comparison is then made with synthetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) adhesive, and a commercial cyanoacrylate glue, which was used as a control adhesive. In addition, BSA samples were prepared and characterized for their water content, tensile strength, and elasticity. We show that on dry surface, BSA adhesive exhibits a high bonding strength that is comparable with non-biological commercial cyanoacrylate glues, and synthetic PGMA adhesive. Tensile testing on wet wood showed a slight increase in the bonding strength of BSA adhesive, a considerable decrease in the bonding strength of cyanoacrylate glue, and negligible adhesion of PGMA. Tests performed on BSA samples demonstrate that initial BSA concentration and final water content have a significant effect on the stress-strain behavior of the samples. PMID:18197367

  5. Increased strength and decreased flexibility are related to reduced oxygen cost of walking

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John P.; Bryan, David R.; Zuckerman, Paul A.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Byrne, Nuala M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose was determine effects resistance training/weight loss induced changes in muscular strength and flexibility have on net walking oxygen uptake (netVO2). Sixty-seven premenopausal women lost 12 kg. Before weight loss subjects were assigned to diet (WL) or diet/3 days per week resistance training (WLRT). Resting energy expenditure, oxygen uptake while walking at 4.84 km h−1 on the flat and up 2.5% grade, isometric knee extension strength, and flexibility of the knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured. Strength increased in WLRT (+36 N) but not in WL (−24 N). NetVO2 decreased significantly while flat walking (7.3%) and 2.5% grade walking (5.7%) in WLRT, but not in WL. Delta strength was negatively while delta knee extensor and plantar flexor flexibility were positively related to delta netVO2. Decreases in walking and grade netVO2 were independently and positively related to increased knee extension strength and decreased knee extensor and plantar flexor flexibility. PMID:18758805

  6. Self-cleaning properties, mechanical stability, and adhesion strength of transparent photocatalytic TiO(2)-ZnO coatings on polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Fateh, Razan; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2014-02-26

    Transparent layers containing TiO2 have been intensively studied because of their interesting application potential including photocatalytically active and self-cleaning surfaces. In the present work, transparent TiO2-ZnO thin films on a SiO2 interlayer were successfully deposited on the surface of polycarbonate to provide polymeric sheets with a self-cleaning, superhydrophilic, and photocatalytically active surface layer. To ensure a good adhesion of the SiO2 interlayer, the polycarbonate sheets were first modified by irradiation with UV(C) light. The prepared films were characterized by UV/vis spectrophotometry, SEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and water contact-angle measurements. All prepared films are transparent, have thicknesses in the range between 120 and 250 nm, and possess superhydrophilic properties. Moreover, they exhibit good adhesion qualities as defined quantitatively by cross-cut tests. However, their mechanical strengths, checked by felt-abrasion tests, differ by changing the molar TiO2-ZnO ratio. The photocatalytic activity, expressed as photonic efficiency, of the coated surfaces was estimated from the kinetics of the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and methyl stearate. The combination between superhydrophilic properties and photocatalytic activity was determined by studying the change of water contact angle during the storage of the prepared films in the dark under an ambient atmosphere and under an atmosphere containing either acetone or isopropanol followed by UV(A) irradiation. In addition, self-cleaning properties were examined by determining the changes in the contact angle during the irradiation time after applying oleic acid to the surface. The results show that increasing the molar ratio of ZnO in TiO2 coatings up to 5% yields maximum photonic efficiency values of 0.023%, as assessed by the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the superhydrophilic coating with a molar TiO2-ZnO ratio of 1

  7. Improvements in Spiral-Bevel Gears to Reduce Noise and Increase Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Henry, Zachary S.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced-design spiral-bevel gears were tested in an OH-58D helicopter transmission using the NASA 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Four different gear designs were tested. The four designs tested were the current design of the OH-58D transmission, a higher-strength design the same as the current but with an increased fillet radius to reduce gear tooth bending stress, and two versions of a lower-noise design the same as the high-strength but with modified tooth geometry to reduce transmission error and noise. Noise, vibration, and tooth strain tests were performed and significant gear stress and noise reductions were achieved.

  8. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-08-01

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys.

  9. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys. PMID:27488621

  10. Semantic priming increases word frequency judgments: Evidence for the role of memory strength in frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Woltz, Dan J; Gardner, Michael K

    2015-09-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a systematic, nonlinear relationship between word frequency judgments and values from word frequency norms. This relationship could reflect a perceptual process similar to that found in the psychophysics literature for a variety of sensory phenomena. Alternatively, it could reflect memory strength differences that are expected for words of varying levels of prior exposure. Two experiments tested the memory strength explanation by semantically priming words prior to frequency judgments. Exposure to related word meanings produced a small but measurable increase in target word frequency ratings. Repetition but not semantic priming had a greater impact on low compared to high frequency words. These findings are consistent with a memory strength view of frequency judgments that assumes a distributed network with lexical and semantic levels of representation. PMID:26253593

  11. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys. PMID:27488621

  12. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Total- and Self-etching Adhesive Systems after Application of Chlorhexidine to Dentin Contaminated with a Hemostatic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Farhadpour, Hajar

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Hemostatic agents may influence the bond strength of different bonding agents. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on bond strength values and their combination effect has not been reported yet. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on shear bond strength (SBS) of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Method In this experimental study, the occlusal enamel of each sixty caries-free mandibular molars was removed and their midcoronal dentin was exposed. The specimens were then mounted in auto-polymerizing resin 1mm apical to CEJ. Then, the specimens were divided into 6 groups (n=10) based on contamination with a hemostatic agent (H), application of chlorhexidine (CHX) and the adhesive system used; and then were classified as Group 1: Adper Single Bond (ASB); Group 2: H+ASB; Group 3: H+0.2% CHX+ASB; Group 4: Clearfil SE Bond (CSB); Group 5: H+CSB; Group 6: H+0.2% CHX+CSB. Then, composite resin rods (4×2 mm) were built up on the dentin surfaces and after thermocycling, the SBS (MPa) was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences between bond strength values of group 1 (ASB) and group 2 (H+ASB) (p< 0.001) and group 1 (ASB) and group 3 (H+CHX+ASB) (p< 0.001). Similarly, significant differences were seen between group 4 (CSB) and group 5 (H+CSB) (p< 0.001) and between group 4 (CSB) and group 6 (H+CHX+CSB) (p< 0.001). Conclusion Contamination with hemostatic agent reduced the SBS of both total- and self-etching adhesive systems. In addition, application of chlorhexidine after the removal of hemostatic agent had a negative effect on SBS of total- and self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:26331146

  13. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of all-in-one adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Oskoee, Parnian-Alizadeh; Daneshpuy, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Ascorbic acid and its salts are low-toxicity products, which are routinely used in food industries as antioxidants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 10% sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of two all-in-one adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin. Material and Methods After exposing the dentin on the facial surface of 90 sound human premolars and mounting in an acrylic resin mold, the exposed dentin surfaces were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. Then the samples were randomly divided into 6 groups of 15. Groups 1 and 4 were the controls, in which no surface preparation was carried out. In groups 2 and 5 the dentin surfaces were treated with 5.25% NaOCl alone for 10 minutes and in groups 3 and 6 with 5.25% NaOCl for 10 minutes followed by 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes. Then composite resin cylinders, measuring 2 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height, were bonded on the dentin surfaces in groups 1, 2 and 3 with Clearfil S3 Bond and in groups 4, 5 and 6 with Adper Easy One adhesive systems according to manufacturers’ instructions. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and then thermocycled. Finally, the samples underwent shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a strain rate of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests at α=0.05. Results The differences between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.01), 1 and 5 (P=0.003). 1 and 6 (P=0.03) and 4 and 5 (P=0.03) were statistically significant. Two-by-two comparisons did not reveal any significant difference between other groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Use of 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes restored the decreased bond strength of the adhesive systems to that of the control groups. Key words:Sodium ascorbate, adhesive systems, all-in-one, bond strength, sodium hypochlorite. PMID:26644835

  14. Ice adhesion on lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Srinivas Bengaluru; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-11-01

    Ice accretion is an important problem and passive approaches for reducing ice-adhesion are of great interest in various systems such as aircrafts, power lines, wind turbines, and oil platforms. Here, we study the ice-adhesion properties of lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces. Force measurements show ice adhesion strength on textured surfaces impregnated with thermodynamically stable lubricant films to be higher than that on surfaces with excess lubricant. Systematic ice-adhesion measurements indicate that the ice-adhesion strength is dependent on texture and decreases with increasing texture density. Direct cryogenic SEM imaging of the fractured ice surface and the interface between ice and lubricant-impregnated textured surface reveal stress concentrators and crack initiation sites that can increase with texture density and result in lowering adhesion strength. Thus, lubricant-impregnated surfaces have to be optimized to outperform state-of-the-art icephobic treatments. PMID:24070257

  15. First-principles comparative study on the interlayer adhesion and shear strength of transition-metal dichalcogenides and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levita, Giacomo; Molinari, Elisa; Polcar, Tomas; Righi, Maria Clelia

    2015-08-01

    Due to their layered structure, graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are easily sheared along the basal planes. Despite a growing attention towards their use as solid lubricants, so far no head-to-head comparison has been carried out. By means of ab initio modeling of a bilayer sliding motion, we show that graphene is characterized by a shallower potential energy landscape while more similarities are attained when considering the sliding forces; we propose that the calculated interfacial ideal shear strengths afford the most accurate information on the intrinsic sliding capability of layered materials. We also investigate the effect of an applied uniaxial load: in graphene, this introduces a limited increase in the sliding barrier while in TMDs it has a substantially different impact on the possible polytypes. The polytype presenting a parallel orientation of the layers (R 0 ) bears more similarities to graphene while that with antiparallel orientation (R 180 ) shows deep changes in the potential energy landscape and consequently a sharper increase of its sliding barrier.

  16. Strength of density feedback in census data increases from slow to fast life histories

    PubMed Central

    Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Delean, Steven; Brook, Barry W; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2012-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts an increasing rate of population growth among species arranged along a continuum from slow to fast life histories. We examine the effects of this continuum on density-feedback strength estimated using long-term census data from >700 vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Four life-history traits (Age at first reproduction, Body size, Fertility, Longevity) were related statistically to Gompertz strength of density feedback using generalized linear mixed-effects models and multi-model inference. Life-history traits alone explained 10 to 30% of the variation in strength across species (after controlling for time-series length and phylogenetic nonindependence). Effect sizes were largest for body size in mammals and longevity in birds, and density feedback was consistently stronger for smaller-bodied and shorter-lived species. Overcompensatory density feedback (strength <−1) occurred in 20% of species, predominantly at the fast end of the life-history continuum, implying relatively high population variability. These results support the idea that life history leaves an evolutionary signal in long-term population trends as inferred from census data. Where there is a lack of detailed demographic data, broad life-history information can inform management and conservation decisions about rebound capacity from low numbers, and propensity to fluctuate, of arrays of species in areas planned for development, harvesting, protection, and population recovery. PMID:22957193

  17. Knockdown of Sec6 improves cell-cell adhesion by increasing α-E-catenin in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Iino, Mituyoshi; Goto, Kaoru

    2012-03-23

    The Sec6/8 complex is essential for specific exocytic sites on the plasma membrane and contributes to membrane growth in mammalian cells. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, E-cadherin and nectin-based adhesion complexes recruit the Sec6/8 complex to intercellular contacts. However, in cancer cells, the relationship between the Sec6/8 complex and the cell-cell adhesion proteins remains obscure. We demonstrate that the expression of α-E-catenin is increased by Sec6 siRNAs, and E-cadherin and β-catenin localize mainly at the cell-cell contact region in HSC3 cells, which were transfected with Sec6 siRNA. PMID:22381337

  18. Resolution Improvements in in Vivo1H NMR Spectra with Increased Magnetic Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetter, Rolf; Weisdorf, Sally A.; Rajanayagan, Vasantham; Terpstra, Melissa; Merkle, Hellmut; Truwit, Charles L.; Garwood, Michael; Nyberg, Scott L.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-11-01

    The measurement of cerebral metabolites using highly homologous localization techniques and similar shimming methods was performed in the human brain at 1.5 and 4 T as well as in the dog and rat brain at 9.4 T. In rat brain, improved resolution was achieved by shimming all first- and second-order shim coils using a fully adiabatic FASTMAP sequence. The spectra showed a clear improvement in spectral resolution for all metabolite resonances with increased field strength. Changes in cerebral glutamine content were clearly observed at 4 T compared to 1.5 T in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. At 9.4 T, glutamine H4 at 2.46 ppm was fully resolved from glutamate H4 at 2.37 ppm, as was the potential resonance from γ-amino-butyric acid at 2.30 ppm and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 2.05 ppm. Singlet linewidths were found to be as low as 6 Hz (0.015 ppm) at 9.4 T, indicating a substantial decrease in ppm linewidth with field strength. Furthermore, the methylene peak of creatine was partially resolved from phosphocreatine, indicating a close to 1:1 relationship in gray matter. We conclude that increasing the magnetic field strength increases spectral resolution also for1H NMR, which can lead to more than linear sensitivity gains.

  19. Mechanism of mechanical strength increase of soda-lime glass by aging

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W.T.; Tomozawa, M. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    This paper reports on two models proposed to explain the mechanical strength increase of abraded or indented soda-lime glasses upon aging, namely, crack tip blunting and the release of residual tensile stress near the crack tip. To clarify the mechanism, the time dependence of the strengthening of an abraded soda-lime glass was investigated. Effects of aging media, such as moist air, distilled water, 1N HCl and 1N NaOH solutions, as well as the abrasion flaw depth, were determined. The strength increase rate in water of abraded soda-lime glass was compared with those of borosilicate and high-silica glasses. The effect of stressing during aging was also investigated. It was found that the rate of strength increase was faster with decreasing abrasion flaw depth and with decreasing chemical durability. For a given flaw depth, an acidic solution produced the fastest strengthening. The strengthening rate was found to accelerate because of the coaxing effect of stressing during aging. From these observations, it was concluded that the strengthening rates relate to the diffusion process and chemical reactions, especially the alkali-hydrogen (or hydronium) ion-exchange reaction, near the crack tip.

  20. Evaluation of shear bond strength between self-etching adhesive systems and dentin and analysis of the resin-dentin interface.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Cleonice Silveira; Chain, Marcelo Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength between dentin and four self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (Group 1), Optibond Solo Plus SE (Group 2), Adper Prompt SE (Group 3), and Tyrian SPE (Group 4). A single-bottle adhesive system (Optibond Solo Plus) was used as the control (Group 5). The resin-dentin interface was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The facial and lingual surfaces of 40 human molars were wet-ground flat; the teeth then were assigned randomly to one of five groups. Each adhesive system was applied to the dentin and the respective resin was applied using a Teflon mold. After 24 hours, the specimens were sheared at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Five additional teeth were prepared for SEM. Mean scores (+/-SD) in MP a were highest for Group 1 (33.23 +/- 12.67), followed by Group 2 (32.41 +/- 9.90), Group 5 (30.68 +/- 4.08), Group 4 (21.37 +/- 5.87), and Group 3 (17.50 +/- 4.24). The statistical analysis by Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank-Sum tests revealed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between Groups 1, 2, and 5. Groups 3 and 4 were different from the others and from each other (p < 0.05). The fracture modes were mostly interfacial/adhesive and cohesive in the resin. SEM analysis of the resin-dentin interface showed a homogeneous gap-free hybrid layer for all groups. PMID:20236904

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile – Bond Strength of An Orthodontic Adhesive with and without Fluoride Application, After Acid Etching -An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yugandhar, G; Ramana, I Venkata; Srinivas, K; Yadav, S. Sarjeev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background Fixed appliances hinder the effective control of plaque accumulation and white spot lesions may develop under the ill fitting bands or adjacent to the stainless steel brackets during orthodontic treatment particularly the etching process. Aims and Objectives Comparative study of tensile bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive with and without fluoride application after acid etching to know the effect of fluoride on bond strength. Materials and Methods This study is carried out on 90 non carious human premolar teeth, and divided in 6 groups with each group of 15 specimens. In those Groups I and IV were control group acid etch treatment, Group II and V is 1.23% APF gel (acid etch plus APF gel treatment,) and group III and VI is 8% SnF2 (acid etch plus SnF2 treatment). Samples of Group I, II and III bond strength were tested after 24 h and groups IV, V and VI after one month on microtechtensometer machine. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation was carried out for the 2 specimens for the control group after acid etch and 4 specimens after acid etch with fluoride application for fluoride groups. Results Control and SnF2 treated groups was found to be nearly similar to the control group whereas APF treated group showed less focal holes than the other 2 groups. Conclusion Fluoride application after acid etching without having an adverse effect on bond strength but we can prevent the white spot lesions and caries. PMID:26023648

  2. The Pilates Method increases respiratory muscle strength and performance as well as abdominal muscle thickness.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Mateus Beltrame; da Silva, Antônio Marcos Vargas; Weber, Laura Menezes; Monteiro, Mariane Borba

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the Pilates Method (PM) training program on the thickness of the abdominal wall muscles, respiratory muscle strength and performance, and lung function. This uncontrolled clinical trial involved 16 sedentary women who were assessed before and after eight weeks of PM training. The thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was assessed. The respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressure. The lung function and respiratory muscle performance were assessed by spirometry. An increase was found in MIP (p = 0.001), MEP (p = 0.031), maximum voluntary ventilation (p = 0.020) and the TrA (p < 0.001), IO (p = 0.002) and EO (p < 0.001) thickness after the PM program. No alterations in lung function were found. These findings suggest that the PM program promotes abdominal wall muscle hypertrophy and an increase in respiratory muscle strength and performance, preventing weakness in abdominal muscles and dysfunction in ventilatory mechanics, which could favor the appearance of illnesses. PMID:27210841

  3. Laser Welded versus Resistance Spot Welded Bone Implants: Analysis of the Thermal Increase and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Bonanini, Mauro; Lagori, Giuseppe; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Nammour, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The first aim of this “ex vivo split mouth” study was to compare the thermal elevation during the welding process of titanium bars to titanium implants inserted in pig jaws by a thermal camera and two thermocouples. The second aim was to compare the strength of the joints by a traction test with a dynamometer. Materials and Methods. Six pigs' jaws were used and three implants were placed on each side of them for a total of 36 fixtures. Twelve bars were connected to the abutments (each bar on three implants) by using, on one side, laser welding and, on the other, resistance spot welding. Temperature variations were recorded by thermocouples and by thermal camera while the strength of the welded joint was analyzed by a traction test. Results. For increasing temperature, means were 36.83 and 37.06, standard deviations 1.234 and 1.187, and P value 0.5763 (not significant). For traction test, means were 195.5 and 159.4, standard deviations 2.00 and 2.254, and P value 0.0001 (very significant). Conclusion. Laser welding was demonstrated to be able to connect titanium implant abutments without the risk of thermal increase into the bone and with good results in terms of mechanical strength. PMID:25110731

  4. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  5. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  6. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  7. Increasing self-regulatory strength can reduce the depleting effect of suppressing stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Gailliot, Matthew T; Plant, E Ashby; Butz, David A; Baumeister, Roy F

    2007-02-01

    Three longitudinal studies and one correlational study tested the hypothesis that increasing self-regulatory strength by regular self-regulatory exercise would reduce the intrapsychic costs of suppressing stereotypes. Participants tried to resist using stereotypes while describing or talking to a stimulus person. Participants whose habitual motivation to suppress stereotypes was low exhibited impaired Stroop and anagram performance after the suppression task, presumably because of self-regulatory depletion (i.e., a reduction of self-regulatory strength following prior use). Two weeks of self-regulation exercises (such as using one's nondominant hand or refraining from cursing) eliminated this effect. These findings indicate that self-regulatory exercise can improve resistance to self-regulatory depletion and, consequently, people can suppress stereotypes without suffering subsequent decrements in task performance. PMID:17259587

  8. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  9. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  10. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kachuei, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5) with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence), 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma), and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem). Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A) were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh) in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃), the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05). Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016). The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin. PMID:24790921

  11. Kinesthetic imagery training of forceful muscle contractions increases brain signal and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wan X; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Allexandre, Didier; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of training using internal imagery (IMI; also known as kinesthetic imagery or first person imagery) with that of external imagery (EMI; also known as third-person visual imagery) of strong muscle contractions on voluntary muscle strengthening. Eighteen young, healthy subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups (6 in each group): internal motor imagery (IMI), external motor imagery (EMI), or a no-practice control (CTRL) group. Training lasted for 6 weeks (~15 min/day, 5 days/week). The participants' right arm elbow-flexion strength, muscle electrical activity, and movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) were evaluated before and after training. Only the IMI group showed significant strength gained (10.8%) while the EMI (4.8%) and CTRL (-3.3%) groups did not. Only the IMI group showed a significant elevation in MRCP on scalp locations over both the primary motor (M1) and supplementary motor cortices (EMI group over M1 only) and this increase was significantly greater than that of EMI and CTRL groups. These results suggest that training by IMI of forceful muscle contractions was effective in improving voluntary muscle strength without physical exercise. We suggest that the IMI training likely strengthened brain-to-muscle (BTM) command that may have improved motor unit recruitment and activation, and led to greater muscle output. Training by IMI of forceful muscle contractions may change the activity level of cortical motor control network, which may translate into greater descending command to the target muscle and increase its strength. PMID:24133427

  12. The development of ultrahigh strength low alloy cast steels with increased toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Paul C.

    This work describes the initial work on the development of the next generation of ultrahigh strength low alloy (UHSLA) cast steels. These UHSLA cast steels have both ultrahigh strength levels and good impact toughness. The influence of heat treatment, secondary processing using hot isostatic processing (HIP), and chemical composition on the microstructure and properties of UHSLA cast steels have been evaluated. The extent of microsegregation reduction expected during the heat treatment of UHSLA cast steels has also been estimated by diffusion modeling. This new family of UHSLA cast steels is similar in composition and properties to UHSLA wrought steels. However, the heat treatment and secondary processing of the UHSLA cast steels is used to develop microstructures and properties typically developed through thermomechanical processing and heat treatment for wrought UHSLA steels. Two martensitic UHSLA steels, 4340+ (silicon modified 4340) and ES-1 were investigated for this study. For the 4340+ alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, tempering temperature, and austempering temperature and time. For the ES-1 alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, austenization temperature, cryogenic treatment, and tempering temperature. The effect of high temperature hot isostatic processing (HIP) on the 4340+ and ES- 1 alloys was also investigated. Tensile properties, charpy v-notch impact toughness (CVN), microstructures, and fractographs have all been characterized after heat treatment. The effects of HIP on microporosity reduction in the ES-1 alloy were also investigated. The experiments carried out on the investment cast 4340+ alloy have shown that increasing the homogenization temperature can increase CVN without changing the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) or yield strength (YS) of the cast material. By replacing the homogenization step in the conventional heat treatment process with

  13. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  14. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  15. Anti-myostatin antibody increases muscle mass and strength and improves insulin sensitivity in old mice

    PubMed Central

    Camporez, João-Paulo G.; Petersen, Max C.; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Moreira, Gabriela V.; Jurczak, Michael J.; Friedman, Glenn; Haqq, Christopher M.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia, or skeletal muscle atrophy, is a debilitating comorbidity of many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including normal aging. There are no approved therapies for sarcopenia, but the antihypertrophic myokine myostatin is a potential therapeutic target. Here, we show that treatment of young and old mice with an anti-myostatin antibody (ATA 842) for 4 wk increased muscle mass and muscle strength in both groups. Furthermore, ATA 842 treatment also increased insulin-stimulated whole body glucose metabolism in old mice, which could be attributed to increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake as measured by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Taken together, these studies provide support for pharmacological inhibition of myostatin as a potential therapeutic approach for age-related sarcopenia and metabolic disease. PMID:26858428

  16. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  17. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  18. Influence of preheating the bonding agent of a conventional three-step adhesive system and the light activated resin cement on dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Holanda, Daniel Brandão Vilela; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    Aims: to evaluate the influence of preheating the bonding agent (Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive/3M ESPE) and the light-activated resin cement (RelyX Venner/3M ESPE) on dentin microtensile bond strength. Materials and Methods: The exposed flat dentin surface of 40 human third molars were randomly distributed into four groups for cementation (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) (n = 10): G1-bond and resin cement, both at room temperature (22°C), G2-bond preheated to 58°C and cement at room temperature (22°C), G3-bond at room temperature (22°C) and the cement preheated to 58°C, G4-bond preheated to 58°C and cement preheated to 58°C. Sticks of dentin/block set measuring approximately 1 mm2 were obtained and used for the microtensile bond strength test. All sticks had their failure mode classified. Statistical analysis used: Factorial analysis of variance was applied, 2 × 2 (bond × cement) (P < 0.05). Results: Preheating the bonding agent (P = 0.8411) or the cement (P = 0.7155), yielded no significant difference. The interaction bond × cement was not significant (P = 0.9389). Conclusions: Preheating the bond and/or the light-activated resin cement did not influence dentin bond strength or fracture failure mode. PMID:24347889

  19. Irisin in Blood Increases Transiently after Single Sessions of Intense Endurance Exercise and Heavy Strength Training

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Håvard; Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Vegge, Geir; Hollan, Ivana; Whist, Jon Elling; Strand, Tor; Rønnestad, Bent R.; Ellefsen, Stian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Irisin is a recently identified exercise-induced hormone that increases energy expenditure, at least in rodents. The main purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Irisin increases acutely in blood after singular sessions of intense endurance exercise (END) and heavy strength training (STR). Secondary, we wanted to explore the relationship between body composition and exercise-induced effects on irisin, and the effect of END and STR on muscular expression of the irisin gene FNDC5. Methods Nine moderately trained healthy subjects performed three test days using a randomized and standardized crossover design: one day with 60 minutes of END, one day with 60 minutes of STR, and one day without exercise (CON). Venous blood was sampled over a period of 24h on the exercise days. Results Both END and STR led to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood, peaking immediately after END and one hour after STR, before gradually returning to baseline. Irisin responses to STR, but not END, showed a consistently strong negative correlation with proportions of lean body mass. Neither END nor STR affected expression of FNDC5, measured 4h after training sessions, though both protocols led to pronounced increases in PGC-1α expression, which is involved in transcriptional control of FNDC5. Conclusion The results strongly suggest that single sessions of intense endurance exercise and heavy strength training lead to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood. This was not accompanied by increased FNDC5 expression, measured 4h post-exercise. The results suggest that irisin responses to resistance exercise are higher in individuals with lower proportions of lean body mass. PMID:25781950

  20. ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling increase endothelial cell surface PECAM-1 adhesivity and neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T; Chen, Zhenlong; Brovkovych, Viktor M; Vogel, Stephen M; Muller, William A; Skidgel, Randal A; Malik, Asrar B; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-08-30

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) extravasation requires selectin-mediated tethering, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent firm adhesion, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1)-mediated transendothelial migration. An important unanswered question is whether ICAM-1-activated signaling contributes to PMN transmigration mediated by PECAM-1. We tested this concept and the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Src activated by PMN ligation of ICAM-1 in mediating PECAM-1-dependent PMN transmigration. We observed that lung PMN infiltration in vivo induced in carrageenan-injected WT mice was significantly reduced in ICAM-1(-/-) and eNOS(-/-) mice. Crosslinking WT mouse ICAM-1 expressed in human endothelial cells (ECs), but not the phospho-defective Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant, induced SHP-2-dependent Src Tyr530 dephosphorylation that resulted in Src activation. ICAM-1 activation also stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser473) and eNOS (p-Ser1177), thereby increasing NO production. PMN migration across EC monolayers was abolished in cells expressing the Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant or by pretreatment with either the Src inhibitor PP2 or eNOS inhibitor L-NAME. Importantly, phospho-ICAM-1 induction of Src signaling induced PECAM-1 Tyr686 phosphorylation and increased EC surface anti-PECAM-1 mAb-binding activity. These results collectively show that ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling sequentially induce PECAM-1-mediated PMN transendothelial migration. Both Src and eNOS inhibition may be important therapeutic targets to prevent or limit vascular inflammation. PMID:22806890

  1. Effect of the Simulated Disinfection by Microwave Energy on the Impact Strength of the Tooth/Acrylic Resin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Consani, Rafael L.X.; Mesquita, Marcelo F.; Zampieri, Marinaldo H.; Mendes, Wilson B.; Consani, Simonides

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of simulated microwave disinfection on the tooth/acrylic resin impact strength. Acrylic molar teeth with a wax stick attached to the ridge lap were included in brass flasks. Specimens were made with Classico thermopolymerized acrylic resin, according to the groups: 1 and 5 - tooth with no treatment (control); 2 and 6 – tooth bur abrasion; 3 and 7 – tooth bur retention; and 4 and 8 – tooth monomer etch. Eighty specimens (n=10) were polymerized in bath cycle at 74ºC for 9 hours and deflasked after flask cooling. Specimen from groups 2, 4, 6 and 8 was submitted to simulated microwave disinfection in a microwave oven at 650W for 3 minutes. Impact strength test was performed with an Otto Wolpert-Werke machine (Charpy system) with an impact load of 40 kpcm. Fracture load value was transformed into impact strength as a function of the bond area (kfg/cm2). Collected data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=.05) and results indicate that the simulated microwave disinfection decreased the impact strength in all treatments. PMID:19088877

  2. Increased intra-cortical porosity reduces bone stiffness and strength in pediatric patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Vardakastani, V; Saletti, D; Skalli, W; Marry, P; Allain, J M; Adam, C

    2014-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disease occurring in one out of every 20,000 births. Although it is known that Type I collagen mutation in OI leads to increased bone fragility, the mechanism of this increased susceptibility to fracture is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the microstructure of cortical bone fragments from patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) using polarized light microscopy, and to correlate microstructural observations with the results of previously performed mechanical compression tests on bone from the same source. Specimens of cortical bone were harvested from the lower limbs of three (3) OI patients at the time of surgery, and were divided into two groups. Group 1 had been subjected to previous micro-mechanical compression testing, while Group 2 had not been subjected to any prior testing. Polarized light microscopy revealed disorganized bone collagen architecture as has been previously observed, as well as a large increase in the areal porosity of the bone compared to typical values for healthy cortical bone, with large (several hundred micron sized), asymmetrical pores. Importantly, the areal porosity of the OI bone samples in Group 1 appears to correlate strongly with their previously measured apparent Young's modulus and compressive strength. Taken together with prior nanoindentation studies on OI bone tissue, the results of this study suggest that increased intra-cortical porosity is responsible for the reduction in macroscopic mechanical properties of OI cortical bone, and therefore that in vivo imaging modalities with resolutions of ~100 μm or less could potentially be used to non-invasively assess bone strength in OI patients. Although the number of subjects in this study is small, these results highlight the importance of further studies in OI bone by groups with access to human OI tissue in order to clarify the relationship between increased porosity and reduced macroscopic mechanical integrity. PMID

  3. Weight loss may be a better approach for managing musculoskeletal conditions than increasing muscle mass and strength

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bokun; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; So, Rina; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Suzuki, Shun; Kim, Taeho; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-01-01

    To prevent or remedy musculoskeletal conditions, the relationship between obesity and the characteristics of muscle mass and strength need to be clarified. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 259 Japanese males aged 30–64 years were classified into 4 groups according to the Japanese obesity criteria. Body composition was evaluated, and handgrip strength and knee extensor strength were measured for the upper and lower extremities, respectively. Physical performance was evaluated with a jump test. [Results] Obesity was positively correlated with skeletal muscle mass index, percentage of whole-body fat, and leg muscle strength and negatively correlated with the percentage of muscle mass index, body weight-normalized handgrip strength, and knee extensor strength, and the jump test results. [Conclusion] Weight loss may be a better approach than increasing muscle mass and strength to improve musculoskeletal conditions in obese adult males. PMID:26834353

  4. The Effects of Prophylactic Ozone Pretreatment of Enamel on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Total or Self-Etch Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Guzey, Asli; Arhun, Neslihan; Cetinsahin, Alev; Unver, Bahtiyar

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study is to determine (1) shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded with self-etch and total-etch adhesive after ozone treatment (2) bond failure interface using a modified Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Methods: 52 premolars were randomly assigned into four groups (n=13) and received the following treatments: Group 1: 30 s Ozone (Biozonix, Ozonytron, Vehos Medikal, Ankara, Turkey) application + Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer (SEP) (3M) + Transbond XT (3M), Group 2: Transbond Plus SEP + Transbond XT, Group 3: 30 s Ozone application + 37% orthophosphoric acid + Transbond XT Primer (3M) + Transbond XT, Group 4: 37% orthophosphoric acid + Transbond XT Primer + Transbond XT. All samples were stored in deionised water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear debonding test was performed by applying a vertical force to the base of the bracket at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Results: The mean SBS results were Group 1: 10.48 MPa; Group 2: 8.89 MPa; Group 3: 9.41 MPa; Group 4: 9.82 MPa. One-Way Variance Test revealed that the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P=0.267). Debonded brackets were examined by an optical microscope at X16 magnification to determine the bond failure interface using a modified ARI. The results were (mean) Group 1: 2.38; Group 2: 1.31; Group 3: 3.00; Group 4: 1.92. Multiple comparisons showed that Groups 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4 were statistically different (P=0.014, P<.001 and P=0.025). Conclusions: Ozone treatment prior to bracket bonding does not affect the shear bond strength. PMID:20922155

  5. Ischemic preconditioning increases muscle perfusion, oxygen uptake, and force in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Paradis-Deschênes, Pénélope; Joanisse, Denis R; Billaut, François

    2016-09-01

    Muscle ischemia and reperfusion induced by ischemic preconditioning (IPC) can improve performance in various activities. However, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of IPC on muscle hemodynamics and oxygen (O2) uptake during repeated maximal contractions. In a cross-over, randomized, single-blind study, 10 strength-trained men performed 5 sets of 5 maximal voluntary knee extensions of the right leg on an isokinetic dynamometer, preceded by either IPC of the right lower limb (3×5-min compression/5-min reperfusion cycles at 200 mm Hg) or sham (20 mm Hg). Changes in deoxyhemoglobin, expressed as a percentage of arterial occlusion, and total hemoglobin ([THb]) concentrations of the vastus lateralis muscle were monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy. Differences between IPC and sham were analyzed using Cohen's effect size (ES) ± 90% confidence limits, and magnitude-based inferences. Compared with sham, IPC likely increased muscle blood volume at rest (↑[THb], 46.5%; ES, 0.56; 90% confidence limits for ES, -0.21, 1.32). During exercise, peak force was almost certainly higher (11.8%; ES, 0.37; 0.27, 0.47), average force was very likely higher (12.6%; ES, 0.47; 0.29, 0.66), and average muscle O2 uptake was possibly increased (15.8%; ES, 0.36; -0.07, 0.79) after IPC. In the recovery periods between contractions, IPC also increased blood volume after sets 1 (23.6%; ES, 0.30; -0.05, 0.65) and 5 (25.1%; ES, 0.32; 0.09, 0.55). Three cycles of IPC immediately increased muscle perfusion and O2 uptake, conducive to higher repeated force capacity in strength-trained athletes. This maneuver therefore appears relevant to enhancing exercise training stimulus. PMID:27574913

  6. Influence of chlorhexidine and/or ethanol treatment on bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin: an in vitro and in situ study.

    PubMed

    Simões, D M S; Basting, R T; Amaral, F L B; Turssi, C P; França, F M G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a chlorhexidine and/or ethanol application on the bond strength of an etch-and-rinse, hydrophobic adhesive system either under in vitro aging or in situ cariogenic challenge. The dentin surface of 36 human third molars were flattened and allocated into four groups to be treated with chlorhexidine, ethanol, or chlorhexidine + ethanol or left unexposed to any solution (control) (n=9). Then, a resin composite restoration was made on the dentin surface and longitudinal sticks were obtained. Sticks from each tooth were assigned to three test conditions: stored in water in vitro for 24 hours, stored in water in vitro for 6 months, or worn in situ for 14 days. During in situ wear time, a high-cariogenic challenge condition was simulated. Specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength (μTBS). Multivariate analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed that chlorhexidine, ethanol, or chlorhexidine + ethanol did not affect the μTBS. The in vitro μTBS values were significantly lower for the specimens stored for 6 months than for those stored for 24 hours. Intermediate μTBS values were shown by the specimens worn in situ. Thus, use of chlorhexidine and/or ethanol was incapable of containing the degradation at the bond interface in the in vitro model. The in situ model was capable of reducing bond strength similarly to the in vitro/6 months model. Despite this, the in situ bond strength was still similar to that of the in vitro/24-hour model. PMID:23675741

  7. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products. PMID:26892897

  8. PDGFB-based stem cell gene therapy increases bone strength in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Baylink, David J.; Brier-Jones, Justin; Neises, Amanda; Kiroyan, Jason B.; Rundle, Charles H.; Lau, Kin-Hing William; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in the past two decades in the management of osteoporosis. However, none of the current medications can eliminate the risk of fracture and rejuvenate the skeleton. To this end, we recently reported that transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) or Sca1+ cells engineered to overexpress FGF2 results in a significant increase in lamellar bone matrix formation at the endosteum; but this increase was attended by the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism and severe osteomalacia. Here we switch the therapeutic gene to PDGFB, another potent mitogen for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but potentially safer than FGF2. We found that modest overexpression of PDGFB using a relatively weak phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter completely avoided osteomalacia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and simultaneously increased trabecular bone formation and trabecular connectivity, and decreased cortical porosity. These effects led to a 45% increase in the bone strength. Transplantation of PGK-PDGFB–transduced Sca1+ cells increased MSC proliferation, raising the possibility that PDGF-BB enhances expansion of MSC in the vicinity of the hematopoietic niche where the osteogenic milieu propels the differentiation of MSCs toward an osteogenic destination. Our therapy should have potential clinical applications for patients undergoing HSC transplantation, who are at high risk for osteoporosis and bone fractures after total body irradiation preconditioning. It could eventually have wider application once the therapy can be applied without the preconditioning. PMID:26150503

  9. PDGFB-based stem cell gene therapy increases bone strength in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanqiu; Baylink, David J; Brier-Jones, Justin; Neises, Amanda; Kiroyan, Jason B; Rundle, Charles H; Lau, Kin-Hing William; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2015-07-21

    Substantial advances have been made in the past two decades in the management of osteoporosis. However, none of the current medications can eliminate the risk of fracture and rejuvenate the skeleton. To this end, we recently reported that transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) or Sca1(+) cells engineered to overexpress FGF2 results in a significant increase in lamellar bone matrix formation at the endosteum; but this increase was attended by the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism and severe osteomalacia. Here we switch the therapeutic gene to PDGFB, another potent mitogen for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but potentially safer than FGF2. We found that modest overexpression of PDGFB using a relatively weak phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter completely avoided osteomalacia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and simultaneously increased trabecular bone formation and trabecular connectivity, and decreased cortical porosity. These effects led to a 45% increase in the bone strength. Transplantation of PGK-PDGFB-transduced Sca1(+) cells increased MSC proliferation, raising the possibility that PDGF-BB enhances expansion of MSC in the vicinity of the hematopoietic niche where the osteogenic milieu propels the differentiation of MSCs toward an osteogenic destination. Our therapy should have potential clinical applications for patients undergoing HSC transplantation, who are at high risk for osteoporosis and bone fractures after total body irradiation preconditioning. It could eventually have wider application once the therapy can be applied without the preconditioning. PMID:26150503

  10. Effect of added salt and increase in ionic strength on skim milk electroacidification performances.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, L; Ippersiel, D; Gendron, C; Mahdavi, B; Amiot, J; Lamarche, F

    2001-05-01

    Bipolar-memibrane electroacidification (BMEA) technology which uses the property of bipolar membranes to split water and the demineralization action of cation-exchange membranes (CEM), was tested for the production of acid casein. BMEA has numerous advantages in comparison with conventional isoelectric precipitation processes of proteins used in the dairy industry. BMEA uses electricity to generate the desired ionic species to acidify the treated solutions. The process can be precisely controlled, as electro-acidification rate is regulated by the effective current density in the cell. Water dissociation at the bipolar membrane interface is continuous and avoids local excess of acid. In-situ generation of dangerous chemicals (acids and bases) reduces the risks associated with the handling, transportation, use and elimination of these products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of BMEA in different conditions of added ionic strength (p(added) = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and added salt (CaCl2, NaCl and KCl). The combination of KCl and p(added) = 0.5 M gave the best results with a 45% decrease in energy consumption. The increased energy efficiency was the result of a decrease in the anode/cathode voltage difference. This was due to an increase of conductivity, produced by addition of salt, necessary to compensate for the lack of sufficiently mobile ions in the skim milk. However, the addition of salts, irrespective of type or ionic strength, increased the required operation time. The protein profile of isolates were similar under all experimental conditions, except at 1.0 M-CaCl2. PMID:11504388

  11. Increased expression of NTPDases 2 and 3 in mesenteric endothelial cells during schistosomiasis favors leukocyte adhesion through P2Y1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Suellen Darc Santos; Oliveira, Nathália F; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Ornelas, Flavia G I; Ferreira, Zulma S; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Silva, Claudia Lucia Martins

    2016-07-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by an intravascular parasite and linked to phenotypic changes in endothelial cells that favor inflammation. Endothelial cells express P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1R), and their activation by ADP favors leukocyte adhesion to the endothelial monolayer. We aimed to evaluate the influence of schistosomiasis upon endothelial purinergic signaling-mediated leukocyte adhesion. Mesenteric endothelial cells and mononuclear cells from control and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were used in co-culture. P2Y1R levels were similar in both groups. Basal leukocyte adhesion was higher in the infected than in the control group; leukocyte adhesion increased after treatment with the P2Y1R agonist 2-MeSATP in both groups, though it only marginally increased in the infected group. Pre-incubation with the selective P2Y1R antagonist MRS2179 (0.3μM) prevented the agonist effect. However, in the infected group it also reduced the basal leukocyte adhesion, suggesting endothelial cell pre-activation. The endothelial expressions of NTPDases 2 and 3 were significantly increased in the infected group, increasing extracellular ATP hydrolysis and ADP formation by endothelial cells. Therefore, mesenteric endothelial cells are primed by schistosomiasis to a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by an increased expression of NTPDases 2 and 3, favoring ADP accumulation and mononuclear cell adhesion, possibly contributing to mesenteric inflammation and schistosomiasis morbidity. PMID:26924460

  12. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  13. Interfacial characteristics and determination of cohesive and adhesive strength of plasma-coated hydroxyapatite via nanoindentation and microscratch techniques.

    PubMed

    McManamon, Colm; de Silva, Johann P; Power, John; Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Morris, Michael A; Cross, Graham L W

    2014-09-30

    We investigate the chemical composition and mechanical properties of plasma-deposited hydroxyapatite on grit-blasted Ti-6Al-4V coupons as models of typical prosthetic hip implants. Nanoindentation is used to extract the mechanical properties of the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating and to evaluate the behavior of the material as a function of distance from the interface. A microscratch technique was used to determine parameters of cohesive and adhesive failure of the material that are critical in determining the functionality of these biomedical devices. This delamination method has not been studied in detail before and is usually considered to be unsuitable because of the thickness of the HA and the roughness of the substrate. However, through cross-section analysis of the scratch test, we can determine the point at which the HA delaminates from the substrate. It was concluded that spallation occurs locally, and there is no evidence of gross spallation, indicating that the coating is well adhered to the substrate. PMID:25167343

  14. Effect of light activation mode on the incompatibility between one-bottle adhesives and light-cured composites: an in vitro shear bond strength study.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Saffarpour, Aida; Safarpoor, Ida; Moradmand, Masoud; Alavi, Ali Asghar

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of different light activation modes for light-cured resin-based composites on the shear bond strength to dentin of two one-bottle adhesives with differing acidity. In this experimental study, a flat middle dentin surface was prepared on 110 extracted sound molars using a 600-grit polish paper. The teeth were then randomly divided into 10 equal groups (n = 11). One-Step Plus (OS) and Prime & Bond NT (P&B NT) were used according to the manufacturer's instruction with their respective composite (Aelite, Spectrum TPH) applied and cured using five different light-activation modes: 1. Conventional (CO): 600 mW/cm2 (40 seconds) 2. Soft-Start I (SSI): 100 mW/cm2 (10 seconds) 600 mW/cm2 (30 seconds) 3. Soft-Start II (SSII): 200 mW/cm2 (10 seconds), 600 mW/cm2 (30 seconds) 4. Pulse-Delay I (PDI): 100 mW/cm2 (3 seconds), 3-minute delay, 600 mW/cm2 (37 seconds) 5. Pulse-Delay II (PDII): 200 mW/cm2 (3 seconds), 3-minute delay, 600 mW/cm2 (37 seconds) After 24 hours storage in distilled water at room temperature, a shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed using an Instron machine at 1 mm/minute and the results were recorded in MPa. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (p < 0.05). The highest SBS (MPa) was shown in the OS conventional group (19.62 +/- 2.21) and the lowest SBS was shown in P&B NT, PDII (5.93 +/- 1.79). In each group of five curing modes, the mean SBS for P&B NT was significantly lower than OS: conventional mode--P&B NT (17.27 +/- 1.98) vs OS (19.62 +/- 2.21); SSI-P&B NT (10.84 +/- 2.82) vs OS (13.09 +/- 1.24); SSII - P&B NT (14.78 +/- 1.63) vs OS (18.79 +/- 1.57); PDI-P&B NT (5.93 +/- 1.79) vs OS (11.97 +/- 2.59) and PDII-P&B NT (11.82 +/- 1.24) vs OS (16.00 +/- 1.62) (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). For each of the adhesives, the ranking of SBS was as follows: CO > SSII > PDII > SSI > PDI, with the two-paired comparisons of curing modes being significantly different (p < 0.05). The results of the current

  15. Induction of Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Increased Adhesion of Quinolone-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Subinhibitory Levels of Ciprofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Bisognano, Carmelo; Vaudaux, Pierre; Rohner, Peter; Lew, Daniel P.; Hooper, David C.

    2000-01-01

    We recently reported that strain EN1252a, a fluoroquinolone-resistant derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC8325 with mutations in grlA and gyrA, expressed increased levels of fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) and showed a significantly higher attachment to fibronectin-coated polymer surfaces after growth in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin. The present study evaluated the occurrence and frequency of fluoroquinolone-induced FnBP-mediated adhesion in clinical isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Eight of ten MRSA isolates and four of six MSSA isolates with grlA and gyrA mutations exhibited significant increases in attachment to fibronectin-coated surfaces after growth in the presence of one-quarter the MIC of ciprofloxacin. Fluoroquinolone-induced FnBP-mediated adhesion of one clinical MRSA strain and the double mutant strain EN1252a also occurred on coverslips removed from the subcutaneous space of guinea pigs. For strain EN1252a, the regulation of fnb transcription by sub-MICs of ciprofloxacin was studied on reporter plasmids carrying fnb-luxAB fusions. One-quarter of the MIC of ciprofloxacin significantly increased fnbB, but not fnbA, promoter activity of the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant but not its fluoroquinolone-susceptible parent ISP794. This response was abolished by pretreatment with rifampin, indicating an effect at the level of transcription. Activation of the fnbB promoter was not due to an indirect effect of ciprofloxacin on growth rate and still occurred in an agr mutant of strain EN1252a. These data suggest that sub-MIC levels of ciprofloxacin activate the fnbB promoter of some laboratory and clinical isolates, thus contributing to increased production of FnBP(s) and leading to higher levels of bacterial attachment to fibronectin-coated or subcutaneously implanted coverslips. PMID:10817688

  16. Increase in the strength characteristics of Portland cement due to introduction of the compound mineral supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, Liliia; Gichko, Nikolai; Mukhina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    At the initial phase of hardening it is the limestone component that plays a major role in the hardening process, which acts as the substrate for the crystallization of hydrate tumors due to its chemical affinity with the products of Portland cement hydration. After 7 days, the diopside supplement influences the processes more significantly. Diopside has a high modulus of elasticity compared to the cement paste. As a result, stresses are redistributed within the cement paste and the whole composition is hardened. An increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement to more than 66.7% does not provide a substantial increase in the strength of the cement paste. As the hardness of diopside is higher than the hardness of limestone, much more energy is required to grind it down to a usable component. Therefore, a further increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement is not economically feasible. An evaluation of the optimum quantity of input compound mineral supplements can be made based on the ideas of close packing of spherical particles and the Pauling rules. The optimum content of the supplement is 8-8.5% provided that its dispersion and density are close to the dispersion and density of the binder. An increase in the dispersion of the supplement reduces its optimal quantity.

  17. Characterization of silver nanoparticle-infused tissue adhesive for ophthalmic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, William

    This research examined if the infusion of silver nanoparticles into a 2-octyl cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive alters the antibacterial effectiveness and mechanical properties of the adhesive. Silver nanoparticle size and concentration combinations were varied to determine the effects of these factors. Uniform distribution of the silver nanoparticles was achieved before proceeding to testing. Antibacterial effectiveness of the composite adhesive was determined via the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test and by CFU counting. Doping the adhesive with silver nanoparticles resulted in an order of magnitude reduction in bacterial growth. The greatest antibacterial effect came from imbuing 10 microg/mL of 4 nm silver nanoparticles into the tissue adhesive. Despite the noticeable reduction of bacterial growth for the doped adhesives, the difference among the varying silver nanoparticle size and concentration combinations was minimal. The breaking strength of the adhesive increased when silver nanoparticles were added. The adhesive strength of the composite adhesive attached to an incised porcine sclera was also greater than the unaltered adhesive. The greatest breaking load and adhesive force was the 10 microg/mL of 10 nm silver nanoparticle-doped adhesive. The increased mechanical strength of the doped adhesive expands the possible applications of treatment on different areas of the body.

  18. The Cytoskeleton Regulates Cell Attachment Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative information about adhesion strength is a fundamental part of our understanding of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Adhesion assays should measure integrin-ECM bond strength, but reports now suggest that cell components remain behind after exposure to acute force for radial shear assays in the presence of divalent cations that increase integrin-ECM affinity. Here, we show that focal adhesion proteins FAK, paxillin, and vinculin but not the cytoskeletal protein actin remain behind after shear-induced detachment of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Cytoskeletal stabilization increased attachment strength by eightfold, whereas cross-linking integrins to the substrate only caused a 1.5-fold increase. Reducing temperature—only during shear application—also increased attachment strength eightfold, with detachment again occurring between focal adhesion proteins and actin. Detachment at the focal adhesion-cytoskeleton interface was also observed in mouse and human fibroblasts and was ligand-independent, highlighting the ubiquity of this mode of detachment in the presence of divalent cations. These data show that the cytoskeleton and its dynamic coupling to focal adhesions are critically important for cell adhesion in niche with divalent cations. PMID:26153702

  19. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest. PMID:26370773

  20. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest. PMID:26370773

  1. IL-17A and TNF-α Increase the Expression of the Antiapoptotic Adhesion Molecule Amigo-2 in Arthritis Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Giulia; Bonaventura, Paola; Lavocat, Fabien; Miossec, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder, characterized by a persistent immune cell infiltrate in the synovium accompanied by high levels of inflammatory mediators and synovial hyperplasia. Despite significant therapeutic advances, RA remains an important unmet medical need. To discover potential new genes controlling inflammation and apoptosis in synoviocytes, genes induced by the two pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 17A (IL-17A), were systematically searched. We identified Amphoterin-induced gene and ORF 2 (Amigo-2), a novel antiapoptotic adhesion molecule, as synergistically upregulated by the IL-17A/TNF combination specifically in RA synoviocytes. In addition, when RA synoviocytes were cocultured with immune cells, Amigo2 expression was significantly increased in both fibroblasts and immune cells. This induction persisted in RA synoviocytes even after the removal of the immune cells. Amigo2 induction was ERK-dependent and on the contrary, inhibited by JNK. Furthermore, Amigo2 expression levels correlated with apoptosis of the cells when exposed to the proapoptotic agent cadmium (Cd). Interestingly, exposure of the cells to HMGB1 in inflammatory conditions increased synergistically Amigo2 expression and significantly reduced Cd-mediated cellular toxicity. Our findings support a model whereby cell–cell contact with immune cells and exposure to the combination of both inflammatory cytokines and HMGB1 in the joints of RA patients increases Amigo2 expression in synoviocytes in an ERK-dependent manner which, in turn, enhances cellular adhesion and promotes cell survival and cellular proliferation. PMID:27446084

  2. Apple Pomace Extract Improves Endurance in Exercise Performance by Increasing Strength and Weight of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-Woong; Shim, Jae-Jung; Choi, Il-Dong; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ra, Jehyeon; Ku, Hyung Keun; Lee, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae-Youl; Jeung, Woonhee; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Huh, Chul-Sung; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Ursolic acid is a lipophilic pentacyclic triterpenoid found in many fruits and herbs and is used in several herbal folk medicines for diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the effects of apple pomace extract (APE; ursolic acid content, 183 mg/g) on skeletal muscle atrophy. To examine APE therapeutic potential in muscle atrophy, we investigated APE effects on the expression of biomarkers associated with muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. We found that APE inhibited atrophy, while inducing hypertrophy in C2C12 myotubes by decreasing the expression of atrophy-related genes and increasing the expression of hypertrophy-associated genes. The in vivo experiments using mice fed a diet with or without APE showed that APE intake increased skeletal muscle mass, as well as grip strength and exercise capacity. In addition, APE significantly improved endurance in the mice, as evidenced by increased exhaustive running time and muscle weight, and reduced the expression of the genes involved in the development of muscle atrophy. APE also decreased the concentration of serum lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, inorganic phosphate, and creatinine, the indicators of accumulated fatigue and exercise-induced stress. These results suggest that APE may be useful as an ergogenic functional food or dietary supplement. PMID:26331671

  3. Evidence for an increase of DNA contour length at low ionic strength.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, K; Reinert, K E

    1980-01-01

    The polyion chain expansion of DNA was studied by viscometry within the Na+ concentration range c5 = 0.002 M to 0.4 M. The DNA molecular weights M were between 0.5 x 10(6) and 13 x 10(6). The relative change of intrinsic viscosity [eta] is linearly correlated to c5(-1/2) with a slope that increases with increasing M. This behaviour reflects the predominance of helix stiffening in chain expansion. At c5(112) > 0.01(-1/2 M-1/2 (Debye-Hückel screening radius 1/chi > (1/chi)*=3nm) the relative change of [eta] rises with a steeper slope. This effect increases with decreasing M suggesting that helix lengthening contributes to the chain expansion. Our model enables us to interpret other ionic-strength dependent effects known from literature. The start of the significant duplex elongation at (1/chi)* can be correlated to the polyion-charge arrangement. In accordance with our interpretation (1/chi)* is found to be greater for DNA-intercalator complexes. PMID:7433095

  4. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Belwalkar, Vaibhavi Ramkrishna; Gade, Jaykumar; Mankar, Nikhil Purushottam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25) using silane as a control (Group A) and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. PMID:27307666

  5. Overexpression of stress-inducible OsBURP16, the β subunit of polygalacturonase 1, decreases pectin content and cell adhesion and increases abiotic stress sensitivity in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Ma, Yan; Chen, Na; Guo, Siyi; Liu, Huili; Guo, Xiaoyu; Chong, Kang; Xu, Yunyuan

    2014-05-01

    Polygalacturonase (PG), one of the hydrolases responsible for cell wall pectin degradation, is involved in organ consenescence and biotic stress in plants. PG1 is composed of a catalytic subunit, PG2, and a non-catalytic PG1β subunit. OsBURP16 belongs to the PG1β-like subfamily of BURP-family genes and encodes one putative PG1β subunit precursor in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Transcription of OsBURP16 is induced by cold, salinity and drought stresses, as well as by abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. Analysis of plant survival rates, relative ion leakage rates, accumulation levels of H2 O2 and water loss rates of leaves showed that overexpression of OsBURP16 enhanced sensitivity to cold, salinity and drought stresses compared with controls. Young leaves of Ubi::OsBURP16 transgenic plants showed reduced cell adhesion and increased cuticular transpiration rate. Mechanical strength measurement of Ubi::OsBURP16 plants showed that reduced force was required to break leaves as compared with wild type. Transgenic rice showed enhanced PG activity and reduced pectin content. All these results suggested that overexpression of OsBURP16 caused pectin degradation and affected cell wall integrity as well as transpiration rate, which decreased tolerance to abiotic stresses. PMID:24237159

  6. Micromorphology and bond strength evaluation of adhesive interface of a self-adhering flowable composite resin-dentin: Effect of surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Saadat, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin surface treatment on the micromorphology and shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-adhering flowable composite, Vertis Flow (VF). Flat dentin surfaces obtained from sixty extracted human molars were divided into six groups (n = 10) according to the following surface treatments: (G1) control, no treatment; (G2) self-etching adhesive, Optibond All-in-One; (G3) phosphoric acid etching for 15 s; (G4) polyacrylic acid for 10 s; (G5) EDTA for 60 s; and G6) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 15 s. After restoration using VF, SBS was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane test (α = 0.05). Six additional specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. SBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (P < 0.001). SBS of six groups from the highest to the lowest were as follows: (G3) 13.5(A); (G5) 8.98(AB); (G2) 8.85(AB); (G4) 8.21(AB); (G1) 7.53(BC); and (G6) 4.49(C) (groups with the same superscript letter were statistically similar). Morphological analysis revealed numerous long resin tags at the adhesive interface for acid-etched group, with a few short resin tags for the control group and small gap formation for NaOCl-treated group. In conclusion, dentin surface treatments tested differently affected bonding performance of VF; only acid-etching effectively improved this. PMID:26918399

  7. Increased concentrations of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and soluble CD40L in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván G; Jaramillo, Julio C; Alarcón, Marcelo L; Gutiérrez, César L; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Segovia, Fabián M; Leiva, Elba M; Mujica, Verónica E; Icaza, Gloria; Dí, Nora S

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with a high incidence rate of cardiovascular disease. It is characterized by abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, atherogenic dyslipidemia [high LDL-c (low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and low HDL-c (high density lipoprotein cholesterol)] and insulin resistance or glucose intolerance. In the context of MS, alterations in the plasmatic levels of some soluble forms of cell adhesion molecules can appear, e.g., soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and soluble CD40L (sCD40L). The objective of this study was to compare the serum levels of sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sCD40L in MS and non-MS groups and to associate these molecules with the diagnostic criteria of MS. A total of 185 non-smokers between 45 and 64 years of age were included. Of these, 93 corresponded to the MS group and the remaining 92 to a non-MS group (according to modified ATP III criteria). The serum concentration of sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sCD40L was determined by commercial solid phase ELISA. The results were expressed as a median and interquartile range. The MS group showed high levels of sVCAM-1 (558.9 ng/ml; 481.3-667.6 ng/ml) compared with the non-MS group (405.2 ng/ml; 361.0-470.5 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). As well, the median level of sCD40L (3.0 ng/ml; 2.1l-11.7 ng/ml) was significantly higher in the MS group than that in the non-MS group (2.6 ng/ml; 2.3-3.4 ng/ml) (p=0.0061). sE-selectin levels did not differ significantly between the groups: 73.9 ng/ml (58.3-87.0 ng/ml) and 68.5 ng/ml (51.6-97.5 ng/ml) in the MS and non-MS group, respectively. In conclusion, the serum levels of sVCAM-1 and sCD40L, but not sE-selectin, were significantly higher in patients with MS than in subjects that did not present MS. MS may therefore increase the expression of cell adhesion molecules, probably through endothelial activation. PMID:21475854

  8. Surface roughness and bond strength between Y-TZP and self-adhesive resin cement after air particle abrasion protocols.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rafael Santiago de; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Alves, Maria Luiza Lima; Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Gondim, Laísa Daniel; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different air particle abrasion (APA) protocols-with variations in particle types, duration of application, and the distance between the device tip and the ceramic-on the surface roughness (SR) of zirconia-based ceramic (yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal [Y-TZP]) and the shear bond strength (SBS) between Y-TZP and resin cement. In total, 135 sintered Y-TZP blocks were polished and divided into 9 groups according to 3 factors: particle (alumina vs alumina coated with silica), duration (5 vs 10 seconds), and distance (contact vs 10 mm away). All 3 factors significantly influenced the SR values between the experimental groups and the control group. For SBS, only the particle type was a statistically significant factor. Results showed that air particle abrasion with silica-coated alumina resulted in higher SBS, even though the SR values associated with those groups were not the highest. PMID:27599282

  9. Increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton through diet niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Chang, Chun-Yi; García-Comas, Carmen; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Hsieh, Chih-Hao

    2013-09-01

    1. The biodiversity-ecosystem functioning debate is a central topic in ecology. Recently, there has been a growing interest in size diversity because body size is sensitive to environmental changes and is one of the fundamental characteristics of organisms linking many ecosystem properties. However, how size diversity affects ecosystem functioning is an important yet unclear issue. 2. To fill the gap, with large-scale field data from the East China Sea, we tested the novel hypothesis that increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances top-down control on phytoplankton (H1) and compared it with five conventional hypotheses explaining the top-down control: flatter zooplankton size spectrum enhances the strength of top-down control (H2); nutrient enrichment lessens the strength of top-down control (H3); increasing zooplankton taxonomic diversity enhances the strength of top-down control (H4); increasing fish predation decreases the strength of top-down control of zooplankton on phytoplankton through trophic cascade (H5); increasing temperature intensifies the strength of top-down control (H6). 3. The results of univariate analyses support the hypotheses based on zooplankton size diversity (H1), zooplankton size spectrum (H2), nutrient (H3) and zooplankton taxonomic diversity (H4), but not the hypotheses based on fish predation (H5) and temperature (H6). More in-depth analyses indicate that zooplankton size diversity is the most important factor in determining the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton in the East China Sea. 4. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism that increasing predator size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on prey through diet niche partitioning. This mechanism can be explained by the optimal predator-prey body-mass ratio concept. Suppose each size group of zooplankton predators has its own optimal phytoplankton prey size, increasing size diversity of zooplankton would promote diet niche partitioning of predators

  10. Increasing Mechanical Strength of Gelatin Hydrogels by Divalent Metal Ion Removal

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca2+ and Fe2+ play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading. PMID:24736500

  11. Increasing Mechanical Strength of Gelatin Hydrogels by Divalent Metal Ion Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca2+ and Fe2+ play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading.

  12. Fasted Exercise and Increased Dietary Protein Reduces Body Fat and Improves Strength in Jockeys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G; Pritchard, P P; Papageorgiou, C; Phillips, S; Kumar, P; Langan-Evans, C; Routledge, H; Owens, D J; Morton, J P; Close, G L

    2015-11-01

    The present study assessed the effects of a diet and exercise intervention in jockeys on body composition, metabolism, bone and mental health. 10 jockeys followed an individually prescribed 6-wk diet (Carbohydrate=2.5-3.5 g/kg, Protein=2.5 g/kg, Fat=1.0 g/kg). Body mass (59.2±4.6 vs. 57.6±4.5 kg), fat mass (7.5±3.5 vs. 6.2±2.6) and body fat (13.1±5.9 vs. 11.5±4.9%) all decreased (P<0.05) from pre to post-intervention whilst lean mass (47.1±5.3 vs. 47.0±5.5 kg) was maintained (P=0.80). RMR (1703±329 vs. 1975±313 kcal.d(-1)), VO2max (3.8±0.8 vs. 4.1±0.7 L/min(- 1)) chest strength (65±11 vs. 71±13 kg), leg strength (160±28 vs. 175±29 kg) and jumping height (40±6 vs. 48±5 cm) significantly increased (P<0.05). Bone health (DXA) did not change (P>0.05) at hip (-1.04±1.29 vs. - 0.76±0.71) or lumbar sites (-1.32±0.76 vs. - 1.31±0.77). Psychometrics (GHQ-12 and EAT-26) remained unchanged (10.3±4.3 vs. 8.9±3.8 and 14.8±9.6 vs. 11.0±5.6, P>0.05, respectively). This approach represents a marked difference from jockeys' habitual weight-making that largely involves dehydration and food deprivation. PMID:26212241

  13. Molecular Adhesion between Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen network, in simulated physiological conditions. Colloidal force spectroscopy was applied to measure the maximum adhesion force and total adhesion energy between aggrecan end-attached spherical tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) and trypsin-treated cartilage disks with undamaged collagen networks. Studies were carried out in various aqueous solutions to reveal the physical factors that govern aggrecan–collagen adhesion. Increasing both ionic strength and [Ca2+] significantly increased adhesion, highlighting the importance of electrostatic repulsion and Ca2+-mediated ion bridging effects. In addition, we probed how partial enzymatic degradation of the collagen network, which simulates osteoarthritic conditions, affects the aggrecan–collagen interactions. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in aggrecan–collagen adhesion even when there were no detectable changes at the macro- or microscales. It is hypothesized that the aggrecan–collagen adhesion, together with aggrecan–aggrecan self-adhesion, works synergistically to determine the local molecular deformability and energy dissipation of the cartilage matrix, in turn, affecting its macroscopic tissue properties. PMID:24491174

  14. Stickiness--some fundamentals of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cyprien

    2002-12-01

    We review some adhesion mechanisms that have been understood in the field of synthetic adhesives, and more precisely for adhesives that adhere instantaneously (a property named tackiness) and whose adhesive strength usually depends on the applied pressure (pressure-sensitive adhesives). The discussion includes effects of surface roughness, elasticity, cavitation, viscous and elastic fingering, substrate flexibility. PMID:21680396

  15. Inhibition of activin receptor type IIB increases strength and lifespan in myotubularin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Michael W; Read, Benjamin P; Edelstein, Rachel; Yang, Nicole; Pierson, Christopher R; Stein, Matthew J; Wermer-Colan, Ariana; Buj-Bello, Anna; Lachey, Jennifer L; Seehra, Jasbir S; Beggs, Alan H

    2011-02-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of the lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. Patients with XLMTM often have severe perinatal weakness that requires mechanical ventilation to prevent death from respiratory failure. Muscle biopsy specimens from patients with XLMTM exhibit small myofibers with central nuclei and central aggregations of organelles in many cells. It was postulated that therapeutically increasing muscle fiber size would cause symptomatic improvement in myotubularin deficiency. Recent studies have elucidated an important role for the activin-receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) in regulation of muscle growth and have demonstrated that ActRIIB inhibition results in significant muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate whether promoting muscle hypertrophy can attenuate symptoms resulting from myotubularin deficiency, the effect of ActRIIB-mFC treatment was determined in myotubularin-deficient (Mtm1δ4) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, untreated Mtm1δ4 mice have decreased body weight, skeletal muscle hypotrophy, and reduced survival. Treatment of Mtm1δ4 mice with ActRIIB-mFC produced a 17% extension of lifespan, with transient increases in weight, forelimb grip strength, and myofiber size. Pathologic analysis of Mtm1δ4 mice during treatment revealed that ActRIIB-mFC produced marked hypertrophy restricted to type 2b myofibers, which suggests that oxidative fibers in Mtm1δ4 animals are incapable of a hypertrophic response in this setting. These results support ActRIIB-mFC as an effective treatment for the weakness observed in myotubularin deficiency. PMID:21281811

  16. Towards Rocket Engine Components with Increased Strength and Robust Operating Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcu, Bogdan; Hadid, Ali; Lin, Pei; Balcazar, Daniel; Rai, Man Mohan; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    High-energy rotating machines, powering liquid propellant rocket engines, are subject to various sources of high and low cycle fatigue generated by unsteady flow phenomena. Given the tremendous need for reliability in a sustainable space exploration program, a fundamental change in the design methodology for engine components is required for both launch and space based systems. A design optimization system based on neural-networks has been applied and demonstrated in the redesign of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo Pump (LPOTP) turbine nozzle. One objective of the redesign effort was to increase airfoil thickness and thus increase its strength while at the same time detuning the vane natural frequency modes from the vortex shedding frequency. The second objective was to reduce the vortex shedding amplitude. The third objective was to maintain this low shedding amplitude even in the presence of large manufacturing tolerances. All of these objectives were achieved without generating any detrimental effects on the downstream flow through the turbine, and without introducing any penalty in performance. The airfoil redesign and preliminary assessment was performed in the Exploration Technology Directorate at NASA ARC. Boeing/Rocketdyne and NASA MSFC independently performed final CFD assessments of the design. Four different CFD codes were used in this process. They include WIL DCA T/CORSAIR (NASA), FLUENT (commercial), TIDAL (Boeing Rocketdyne) and, a new family (AardvarWPhantom) of CFD analysis codes developed at NASA MSFC employing LOX fluid properties and a Generalized Equation Set formulation. Extensive aerodynamic performance analysis and stress analysis carried out at Boeing Rocketdyne and NASA MSFC indicate that the redesign objectives have been fully met. The paper presents the results of the assessment analysis and discusses the future potential of robust optimal design for rocket engine components.

  17. Adipose-Derived Stem-Cell-Seeded Non-Cross-Linked Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Increases Cellular Infiltration, Vascular Infiltration, and Mechanical Strength of Ventral Hernia Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Iyyanki, Tejaswi S.; Dunne, Lina W.; Zhang, Qixu; Hubenak, Justin; Turza, Kristin C.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) facilitate wound healing by improving cellular and vascular recruitment to the wound site. Therefore, we investigated whether ASCs would augment a clinically relevant bioprosthetic mesh—non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrix (ncl-PADM)—used for ventral hernia repairs in a syngeneic animal model. ASCs were isolated from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of Brown Norway rats, expanded, and labeled with green fluorescent protein. ASCs were seeded (2.5×104 cells/cm2) onto ncl-PADM for 24 h before surgery. In vitro ASC adhesion to ncl-PADM was assessed at 0.5, 1, and 2 h after seeding, and cell morphology on ncl-PADM was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Ventral hernia defects (2×4 cm) were created and repaired with ASC-seeded (n=31) and control (n=32) ncl-PADM. Explants were harvested at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after surgery. Explant remodeling outcomes were evaluated using gross evaluation (bowel adhesions, surface area, and grade), histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining), immunohistochemical analysis (von Willebrand factor VIII), fluorescent microscopy, and mechanical strength measurement at the tissue-bioprosthetic mesh interface. Stem cell markers CD29, CD90, CD44, and P4HB were highly expressed in cultured ASCs, whereas endothelial and hematopoietic cell markers, such as CD31, CD90, and CD45 had low expression. Approximately 85% of seeded ASCs adhered to ncl-PADM within 2 h after seeding, which was further confirmed by scanning electron microcopy examination. Gross evaluation of the hernia repairs revealed weak omental adhesion in all groups. Ultimate tensile strength was not significantly different in control and treatment groups. Conversely, elastic modulus was significantly greater at 4 weeks postsurgery in the ASC-seeded group (p<0.001). Cellular infiltration was significantly higher in the ASC-seeded group at all time points (p<0.05). Vascular infiltration was

  18. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength. PMID:27493829

  19. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Fotouhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength. PMID:27493829

  20. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  1. Hierarchical fabrication of heterojunctioned SrTiO3/TiO2 nanotubes on 3D microporous Ti substrate with enhanced photocatalytic activity and adhesive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Yin, Lu; Zha, Kang; Li, Huirong; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jianxin; Duan, Ke; Feng, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, construction of three-dimensional (3D) architecture and design of heterostructure have been proved to be two important approaches for improving photocatalytic (PC) properties of TiO2-based catalysts. In this work, a 3D microporous surface on Ti substrate (MPT) was prepared by simple acid etching. Then, heterojunctioned SrTiO3/TiO2 nanotubes with dominant {001} facets of anatase TiO2were successfully fabricated on MPT by combining anodization with hydrothermal treatment. The 3D microporous-patterned SrTiO3/TiO2 nanotubes heterojunction shows significantly enhanced photo-current density and ∼200% improved PC effect in degradation of Rhodamine B owing to its higher specific surface area, stronger light-harvesting ability and positive heterojunction effect in comparison with TiO2 nanotubes formed on flat Ti substrate. Moreover, the 3D microporous structure on Ti substrate improved the adhesive strength between the nanotubes layer and Ti substrate, which can be ascribed to the effective release of internal stress. Therefore, this present strategy is expected to expand the application of TiO2-based catalysts in many fields which require excellent PC properties and mechanical stability.

  2. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  3. Adhesion of malignant mammary tumor cells MDA-MB-231 to microvessel wall increases microvascular permeability via degradation of endothelial surface glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tumor cell adhesion on microvascular permeability (P) in intact microvessels, we measured the adhesion rate of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231, the hydraulic conductivity (Lp), the P, and reflection coefficient (σ) to albumin of the microvessels at the initial tumor cell adhesion and after ∼45 min cell perfusion in the postcapillary venules of rat mesentery in vivo. Rats (Sprague-Dawley, 250–300 g) were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium given subcutaneously. A midline incision was made in the abdominal wall, and the mesentery was gently taken out and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual postcapillary venule was perfused with cells at a rate of ∼1 mm/s, which is the mean blood flow velocity in this type of microvessels. At the initial tumor cell adhesion, which was defined as one adherent cell in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, Lp was 1.5-fold and P was 2.3-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.64; after ∼45-min perfusion, the adhesion increased to ∼5 adherent cells in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, while Lp increased to 2.8-fold, P to 5.7-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.42. Combining these measured data with the predictions from a mathematical model for the interendothelial transport suggests that tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall degrades the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) layer. This suggestion was confirmed by immunostaining of heparan sulfate of the ESG on the microvessel wall. Preserving of the ESG by a plasma glycoprotein orosomucoid decreased the P to albumin and reduced the tumor cell adhesion. PMID:22858626

  4. Low-dose sirolimus-eluting hydroxyapatite coating on stents does not increase platelet activation and adhesion ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Alviar, Carlos L; Tellez, Armando; Wang, Michael; Potts, Pamela; Smith, Doug; Tsui, Manus; Budzynski, Wladyslaw; Raizner, Albert E; Kleiman, Neal S; Lev, Eli I; Granada, Juan F; Kaluza, Greg L

    2012-07-01

    We previously found paclitaxel-eluting polymer-coated stents causing more human platelet-monocyte complex formation than bare metal stents in vitro. Presently, we examined patterns of platelet activation and adhesion after exposure to 6 nanofilm HAp-coated (HAp-nano) stents, 6 HAp-microporous-coated (HAp-micro) stents, 5 HAp sirolimus-eluting microporous-coated (HAp-SES) stents and 5 cobalt-chromium stents (BMS) deployed in an in vitro flow system. Blood obtained from healthy volunteers was circulated and sampled at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. By flow cytometry, there were no significant differences in P-Selectin expression between the 4 stent types (HAp-nano = 32.5%; HAp-micro = 42.5%, HAp-SES = 10.23%, BMS = 7% change from baseline at 60 min, p = NS); PAC-1 antibody binding (HAp-nano = 11.8%; HAp-micro = 2.9%, HAp-SES = 18%, BMS = 6.4% change from baseline at 60 min, p = NS) or PMC formation (HAp-nano = 21.6%; HAp-micro = 4%, HAp-SES = 6.6%, BMS = 17.4% change from baseline at 60 min, p = NS). The 4 stent types did not differ in the average number of platelet clusters >10 μm in diameter by SEM (HAp-nano = 2.39 ± 5.75; HAp-micro = 2.26 ± 3.43; HAp-SES = 1.93 ± 3.24; BMS = 1.94 ± 2.41, p = NS). The majority of the struts in each stent group were only mildly covered by platelets, (HAp-nano = 80%, HAp-micro = 61%, HAp-SES = 78% and BMS = 52.1%, p = NS). The HAp-microporous-coated stents (ECD) attracted slightly more proteinaceous material than bare metal stents (HAp-micro = 35% struts with complete protein coverage, P < 0.0001 vs. other 3 stent types). In conclusion, biomimetic stent coating with nanofilm or microporous hydroxyapatite, even when eluting low-dose sirolimus, does not increase the platelet activation in circulating human blood, or platelet adhesion to stent surface when compared to bare metal stents in vitro. PMID:22350685

  5. Gene expression analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex cortical tubers reveals increased expression of adhesion and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Crino, Peter B.; Gorter, Jan A.; Nellist, Mark; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G.M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Breit, Timo M.; Troost, Dirk; Wadman, Wytse J.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are associated with disabling neurological manifestations, including intractable epilepsy. While these malformations are believed to result from the effects of TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations, the molecular mechanisms leading to tuber formation, as well as the onset of seizures remain largely unknown. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip platform to provide the first genome wide investigation of gene expression in surgically resected tubers, compared with histological normal perituberal tissue from the same patients or autopsy control tissue. We identified 2501 differentially expressed genes in cortical tubers compared with autopsy controls. Expression of genes associated with cell adhesion e.g., VCAM1, integrins and CD44, or with the inflammatory response, including complement factors, serpinA3, CCL2 and several cytokines, was increased in cortical tubers, whereas genes related to synaptic transmission e.g., the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1, and voltage-gated channel activity, exhibited lower expression. Gene expression in perituberal cortex was distinct from autopsy control cortex suggesting that even in the absence of tissue pathology the transcriptome is altered in TSC. Changes in gene expression yield insights into new candidate genes that may contribute to tuber formation or seizure onset, representing new targets for potential therapeutic development. PMID:19912235

  6. Effects of contact cap dimension on dry adhesion of bioinspired mushroom-shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Dry adhesion observed in small creatures, such as spiders, insects, and geckos, has many great advantages such as repeatability and strong adhesiveness. In order to mimic these unique performances, fibrillar surface with a mushroom shaped end has drawn lots of attentions because of its advantage in efficiently enhancing adhesion compared with other sphere or simple flat ends. Here, in order to study the effects of contact cap dimension on adhesion strength, patterned surfaces of mushroom-shaped micropillars with differing cap diameters are fabricated based on the conventional photolithography and molding. The normal adhesion strength of these dry adhesives with varying cap diameters is measured with home-built equipment. The strength increases with the rise of cap diameter, and interestingly it becomes strongest when the mushroom caps join together.

  7. LPHN3, a presynaptic adhesion-GPCR implicated in ADHD, regulates the strength of neocortical layer 2/3 synaptic input to layer 5

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Latrophilins (LPHNs) are a small family of neuronal adhesion-GPCRs originally discovered as receptors for the black widow spider toxin α-latrotoxin. Mutations in LPHN3 have recently been identified as risk factors for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in humans, but their physiological function has remained elusive. In this study, we tested two hypotheses regarding LPHN3 function: (1) LPHN3 regulates synaptic transmission by modulating probability of release; and (2) LPHN3 controls synapse development and the abundance of synapses. Results We manipulated LPHN3 expression in mouse layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons and examined the consequences on the L2/3 to L5 cortical microcircuit. Employing an optogenetic strategy combined with shRNA knockdown of LPHN3, we found that LPHN3 did not influence probability of release at synapses formed by L2/3 neurons onto L5 pyramidal cells. The strength of L2/3 afferent input to L5, however, was weakened by loss of LPHN3. Using Synaptophysin-GFP as an anatomical marker of presynaptic terminals, we found that the density of synapses formed by L2/3 axons in L5 was reduced when LPHN3 was lost. Finally, we investigated the structural organization of the extracellular domain of LPHN3. We used single particle negative stain electron microscopy to image the extracellular domain of LPHN3 and showed that the Olfactomedin and Lectin domains form a globular domain on an elongated stalk. Cell-based binding experiments with mutant proteins revealed that the Olfactomedin domain was required for binding to FLRT3, whereas both the Olfactomedin and Lectin domains were involved in binding to Teneurin 1. Mutant LPHN3 lacking the Olfactomedin domain was not capable of rescuing the deficit in presynaptic density following knockdown of endogenous LPHN3. Conclusions We find that LPHN3 regulates the number of synapses formed by L2/3 neurons in L5 and the strength of synaptic drive from the L2/3-L5 pathway. The Olfactomedin

  8. Undulatory physical resistance training program increases maximal strength in elderly type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilberto Monteiro; Montrezol, Fábio Tanil; Pauli, Luciana Santos Souza; Sartori-Cintra, Angélica Rossi; Colantonio, Emilson; Gomes, Ricardo José; Marinho, Rodolfo; de Moura, Leandro Pereira; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of a specific protocol of undulatory physical resistance training on maximal strength gains in elderly type 2 diabetics. Methods The study included 48 subjects, aged between 60 and 85 years, of both genders. They were divided into two groups: Untrained Diabetic Elderly (n=19) with those who were not subjected to physical training and Trained Diabetic Elderly (n=29), with those who were subjected to undulatory physical resistance training. The participants were evaluated with several types of resistance training’s equipment before and after training protocol, by test of one maximal repetition. The subjects were trained on undulatory resistance three times per week for a period of 16 weeks. The overload used in undulatory resistance training was equivalent to 50% of one maximal repetition and 70% of one maximal repetition, alternating weekly. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences (p<0.05) between pre-test and post-test over a period of 16 weeks. Results The average gains in strength were 43.20% (knee extension), 65.00% (knee flexion), 27.80% (supine sitting machine), 31.00% (rowing sitting), 43.90% (biceps pulley), and 21.10% (triceps pulley). Conclusion Undulatory resistance training used with weekly different overloads was effective to provide significant gains in maximum strength in elderly type 2 diabetic individuals. PMID:25628192

  9. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Impact of increasing ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Isley, Sara L.; Jordan, David S.; Penn, R. Lee

    2009-01-08

    This work investigates the role of ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging of sol-gel synthesized titanium dioxide. Research presented here uses X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements to quantify anatase, brookite, and rutile phases as functions of synthetic and aging variables. In addition, the Scherrer equation is used to obtain average crystallite sizes for each phase quantified. Results presented in this work demonstrate that the most control over the sol-gel products can be obtained by modifying the pH during hydrolysis. In addition, while varying the ionic strength during reflux and hydrothermal aging can result in enhanced control over the crystalline phase and crystallite size, the most control can be achieved by varying the ionic strength during synthesis. Finally, sol-gel synthesis at low pH (-0.6) and high-chloride concentration (3 M NaCl) produced a heterogeneous sample composed of nanocrystalline anatase (3.8 nm) and rutile (2.9 nm)

  10. Ionizing radiation enhances platelet adhesion to the extracellular matrix of human endothelial cells by an increase in the release of von Willebrand factor

    SciTech Connect

    Verheij, M.; Dewit, L.G.H. ); Boomgaard, M.N.; Brinkman, H.J.M.; Mourik, J.A. van )

    1994-02-01

    The effect of radiation on the secretion of von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells was studied in a three-compartment culture system. The release of von Willebrand factor was significantly increased at 48 h after a single [gamma]-radiation dose of 20 Gy in both the luminal and abluminal direction by 23 (P < 0.05) and 41% (P < 0.02), respectively. To establish whether the enhanced production of von Willebrand factor affected the thrombogenicity of the extracellular matrix, platelet adhesion to the matrix produced by a monolayer of cultured endothelial cells during 48 h after irradiation was analyzed in a perfusion chamber at high shear rate (1300 s[sup [minus]1]). Platelet adhesion was significantly increased by irradiation both in the presence and in the absence of plasmatic von Willebrand factor by 65 (P < 0.05) and 34.5% (P < 0.005), respectively. Incubation of the perfusate with a monoclonal antibody that blocks the binding of von Willebrand factor to platelet GPIb (CLB-RAg 35) resulted in an almost complete inhibition of platelet adhesion. These data indicate that radiation enhances platelet adhesion to the extracellular matrix by an increase in the release of von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells. This event may be important in early radiation-induced vascular pathology. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Doxycycline-encapsulated nanotube-modified dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, S A; Palasuk, J; Kamocki, K; Geraldeli, S; Gregory, R L; Platt, J A; Windsor, L J; Bottino, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti-matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)-encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)-modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives-but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels-we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of encapsulated MMP

  12. Adhesion between polymers and evaporated gold and nickel films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Y.; Wheeler, D. R.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain information on the adhesion between metal films and polymeric solids, the adhesion force was measured by means of a tensile pull test. It was found that the adhesion strengths between polymeric solids and gold films evaporated on polymer substrates were (1.11 + or - 0.53) multiplied by 10(6) N/M(2) on PTFE, about 5.49 multiplied by 10(6) N/m(2) on UHMWPE, and 6.54x10(6) on 6/6 nylon. The adhesion strengths for nickel films evaporated on PTFE, UHMWPE, and 6/6 nylon were found to be a factor of 1.7 higher than those for the gold coated PTFE, UHMWPE, and 6/6 nylon. To confirm quantitatively the effect of electron irradiation on the adhesion strength between a PTFE solid and metal films, a tensile pull test was performed on the irradiated PTFE specimens, which were prepared by evaporating nickel or gold on PTFE surfaces irradiated by 2-keV electrons for various times. After irradiation, the adhesion strength increased to (4.92 + or - 0.92)x10(6) N/m(2) for nickel coated PTFE and (1.82 + or - 0.48)x10(6) N/m(2) for gold coated PTFE. The improvement in adhesion for nickel is higher than that for gold.

  13. An accelerated buoyancy adhesion assay combined with 3-D morphometric analysis for assessing osteoblast adhesion on microgrooved substrata.

    PubMed

    Sobral, J M; Malheiro, V N; Clyne, T W; Harris, J; Rezk, R; O'Neill, W; Markaki, A E

    2016-07-01

    An accelerated negative buoyancy method has been developed to assess cell adhesion strength. This method has been used in conjunction with 3-D morphometric analysis to understand the effects of surface topology on cell response. Aligned micro-grooved surface topographies (with a range of groove depths) were produced on stainless steel 316L substrates by laser ablation. An investigation was carried out on the effect of the micro-grooved surface topography on cell adhesion strength, cell and nucleus volumes, cell phenotypic expression and attachment patterns. Increased hydrophobicity and anisotropic wettability was observed on surfaces with deeper grooves. A reduction was noted in cell volume, projected areas and adhesion sites for deeper grooves, linked to lower cell proliferation and differentiation rates and also to reduced adhesion strength. The results suggest that the centrifugation assay combined with three-dimensional cell morphometric analysis has considerable potential for obtaining improved understanding of the cell/substrate interface. PMID:26773651

  14. Preparation and testing of plant seed meal-based wood adhesives.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Chapital, Dorselyn C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the interest in plant seed meal-based products as wood adhesives has steadily increased, as these plant raw materials are considered renewable and environment-friendly. These natural products may serve as alternatives to petroleum-based adhesives to ease environmental and sustainability concerns. This work demonstrates the preparation and testing of the plant seed-based wood adhesives using cottonseed and soy meal as raw materials. In addition to untreated meals, water washed meals and protein isolates are prepared and tested. Adhesive slurries are prepared by mixing a freeze-dried meal product with deionized water (3:25 w/w) for 2 hr. Each adhesive preparation is applied to one end of 2 wood veneer strips using a brush. The tacky adhesive coated areas of the wood veneer strips are lapped and glued by hot-pressing. Adhesive strength is reported as the shear strength of the bonded wood specimen at break. Water resistance of the adhesives is measured by the change in shear strength of the bonded wood specimens at break after water soaking. This protocol allows one to assess plant seed-based agricultural products as suitable candidates for substitution of synthetic-based wood adhesives. Adjustments to the adhesive formulation with or without additives and bonding conditions could optimize their adhesive properties for various practical applications. PMID:25867092

  15. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition. PMID:27498501

  16. Increasing Strength and Operational Reliability of Fixed Joints of Tubes by MMA Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Schlyakhova, G. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents peculiar properties of structure formation, phase and chemical composition while welding of low-alloy steel 09MnSi2-l depending on the dynamic characteristics of power sources of different types. Proper selection of power sources enables to decrease burning of alloy elements in metal of weld (Mn by 14% and Si by 17% of the weight ratio), to obtain more homogenous structure of deposited metal, to reduce length of heat-affected zone by 50% and to improve impact strength by 4-9%.

  17. Increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Chang, C.; García-Comas, C.; Gong, G.; Hsieh, C.

    2012-12-01

    Body size is one of the fundamental characteristics of organisms linking many ecosystem properties and functions. Recent studies suggest that environmental changes alter the size structure of pelagic food webs; however, ecosystem consequences of such changes remain unclear. Here we tested our main hypothesis that increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances top-down control on phytoplankton in the East China Sea (H1), as well as five conventional hypotheses explaining the top-down control: shallower zooplankton size spectrum enhances the strength of top-down control (H2); nutrient enrichment lessens the strength of top-down control (H3); increasing zooplankton taxonomic diversity enhances the strength of top-down control (H4); increasing fish predation is linked to decreasing the strength of top-down control of zooplankton on phytoplankton (H5); increasing temperature intensifies the strength of top-down control (H6). While the results of our univariate analyses support H1, H2, H3, and H4, more in depth analyses indicate that zooplankton size diversity is the most important factor in determining the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton in East China Sea. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism that increasing predator size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on prey through diet niche partitioning. This mechanism can be explained by the concept of optimal predator-prey body-mass ratio concept. Suppose each size group of zooplankton predators has its own optimal phytoplankton prey size, increasing size diversity of zooplankton would promote diet niche partitioning of predators and thus elevates the top-down control.Fig. 1 Scatter plots the relationship between zooplankton/phytoplankton biomass ratio versus (A) zooplankton size diversity, (B) slope of zooplankton size spectrum, (C) Zoolankton Shannon diversity, (D) NO3, (E) PO4, (F) SiO3, (G) water temperature, and (H) fish larvae density in the East China Sea. Table 1. Results of the

  18. Sustained load performance of adhesive anchor systems in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Todd Marshall

    Stemming from a tragic failure of an adhesive anchor system, this research project investigated the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors in concrete under different installation and in-service conditions. The literature review investigated the current state of art of adhesive anchors. Extensive discussion was devoted to the behavior of adhesive anchors in concrete as well as the many factors that can affect their short-term and sustained load strength. Existing standards and specifications for the testing, design, construction, and inspection of adhesive anchors were covered. Based on the results of the literature review and the experience of the research group, a triage was conducted on many parameters identified as possibly affecting the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors and the highest priority parameters were investigated in this project. A stress versus time-to-failure approach was used to evaluate sensitivity of three ICC-ES AC 308 approved adhesive anchor systems. Of the various parameters investigated, only elevated in-service temperature and manufacturer's cure time was shown to exhibit adverse effects on sustained loads more than that predicted by short-term tests of fully cured adhesive over a reasonable structure lifetime of 75 years. In a related study, various tests were conducted on the adhesive alone (time-temperature superposition, time-stress superposition, and dogbone tensile tests). The results of that study were used to investigate the existence of a correlation with long-term anchor pullout testing in concrete. No consistent correlations were detected for the adhesives in the study. Tests were also conducted on the effect of early-age concrete on adhesive anchor bond strength. On the basis of confined test bond-strength alone, adhesive A (vinyl ester) did not show any significant increase after 14 days (102% of 28 day strength at 14 days), and adhesive B and C (epoxies) did not show any significant increase after 7 days

  19. Adaptation of Campylobacter jejuni to biocides used in the food industry affects biofilm structure, adhesion strength, and cross-resistance to clinical antimicrobial compounds.

    PubMed

    Techaruvichit, Punnida; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Miya, Satoko; Keeratipibul, Suwimon; Kimura, Bon

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of biocide-adapted Campylobacter jejuni strains that developed into biofilms and their potential to develop clinical resistance to antimicrobial compounds was studied. C. jejuni was grown in sub-lethal concentrations of five biocides used in the food industry. C. jejuni exhibited adaptation to these biocides with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations. The 3-D structures of the biofilms produced by the biocide-adapted cells were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results revealed marked variability in biofilm architecture, including ice-crystal-like structures. Adaptation to the biocides enhanced biofilm formation, with significant increases in biovolume, surface coverage, roughness, and the surface adhesion force of the biofilms. Adaptation to commercial biocides induced resistance to kanamycin and streptomycin. This study suggests that the inappropriate use of biocides may lead to cells being exposed to them at sub-lethal concentrations, which can result in adaptation of the pathogens to the biocides and a subsequent risk to public health. PMID:27353218

  20. Water based adhesive primers on aluminum substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, J.P.; Mori, S.

    1996-12-31

    The number of aluminum alloy bonding applications has been increasing recently in the automobile industry. Primer coating of aluminum substrates is one of the main processes used to promote bond performance. Solvent based organic primers have been used for a long time but environmental regulations now require the substitution of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by alternate materials such as water based adhesive primers. However, the bond strengths obtained with many water based primers are generally lower than for solvent based ones. Water based primers which have some reactive functional groups have been proposed recently but such primers require special treatment. This paper describes a study conducted to optimize bond strength using a water based adhesive as a primer in the adhesive bonding of anodized aluminum.

  1. Effects of montmorillonite addition on the performance of starch-based wood adhesive.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofeng; Wang, Jian; Li, Caiming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Cheng, Li; Hong, Yan

    2015-01-22

    Effects of montmorillonite (MMT) addition on the performance of corn starch-based wood adhesive were investigated. It was found that MMT addition could enhance the shear strength of the starch-based wood adhesive. The shear strength of the adhesive with 5% (w/w, dry starch basis) MMT reached 10.6 MPa in the dry state, which was almost twice that of the same adhesive without MMT. Addition of 5% MMT also produced an approximately 1.2-fold increase in the shear strength in the wet state. Although this addition caused an increase in the viscosity, the resulting adhesive retained both good mobility and viscosity stability during storage. MMT also enhanced the shear-thinning and solid-like behaviors of the adhesive, compared with the adhesive without MMT. Finally, MMT addition improved the thermal stability of the adhesive. In conclusion, addition of MMT to starch-based wood adhesives can improve their overall performance, enhancing their value as alternatives for traditional petrochemical-based wood adhesives. PMID:25439910

  2. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  3. An investigation of carbon fiber/polyphenylene sulfide adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.S.; Drzal, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The level of adhesion between reinforcing fibers and a thermoplastic matrix can have a strong effect on composite mechanical properties. In composites of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) with carbon fibers, Phillips Petroleum Company has reported an increase in transverse tensile strength from 30 MPa to 74 MPa and an increase in transverse flexural strength from 44 to 141 MPa when extrusion grade PPS resin is replaced with a composite grade resin. Since transverse composite properties are particularly sensitive to adhesion, it was suspected that improved fiber/matrix adhesion could be responsible for the improved mechanical properties. Several factors can affect the adhesion between carbon fibers and a semicrystalline thermoplastic such as PPS. These factors include fiber surface structure and chemistry, adsorption of matrix onto fibers, chemical bonding between fiber and matrix, and morphology of the matrix near the fibers. The objectives of this study were to determine the interfacial shear strengths of several types of carbon fibers with both grades of PPS and to determine which factors affect fiber/matrix adhesion. This will allow the authors to determine whether the differences in composite mechanical properties can be correlated to different levels of adhesion and to identify the key factor(s) that lead to any differences in adhesion.

  4. Adhesive for polyester films cures at room temperature, has high initial tack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, C. M.; Fust, G. W.; Welchel, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Quick room-temperature-cure adhesive bonds polyester-insulated flat electrical cables to metal surfaces and various other substrates. The bond strength of the adhesive may be considerably increased by first applying a commercially available polyamide primer to the polyester film.

  5. Doxycycline-Encapsulated Nanotube-Modified Dentin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, S.A.; Palasuk, J.; Kamocki, K.; Geraldeli, S.; Gregory, R.L.; Platt, J.A.; Windsor, L.J.; Bottino, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti–matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)–encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)–modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives—but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels—we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of

  6. Newly developed Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si-Fe biomedical beta titanium alloys with increased strength and enhanced biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Kopova, Ivana; Stráský, Josef; Harcuba, Petr; Landa, Michal; Janeček, Miloš; Bačákova, Lucie

    2016-03-01

    Beta titanium alloys are promising materials for load-bearing orthopaedic implants due to their excellent corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, low elastic modulus and moderate strength. Metastable beta-Ti alloys can be hardened via precipitation of the alpha phase; however, this has an adverse effect on the elastic modulus. Small amounts of Fe (0-2 wt.%) and Si (0-1 wt.%) were added to Ti-35Nb-7Zr-6Ta (TNZT) biocompatible alloy to increase its strength in beta solution treated condition. Fe and Si additions were shown to cause a significant increase in tensile strength and also in the elastic modulus (from 65 GPa to 85 GPa). However, the elastic modulus of TNZT alloy with Fe and Si additions is still much lower than that of widely used Ti-6Al-4V alloy (115 GPa), and thus closer to that of the bone (10-30 GPa). Si decreases the elongation to failure, whereas Fe increases the uniform elongation thanks to increased work hardening. Primary human osteoblasts cultivated for 21 days on TNZT with 0.5Si+2Fe (wt.%) reached a significantly higher cell population density and significantly higher collagen I production than cells cultured on the standard Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In conclusion, the Ti-35Nb-7Zr-6Ta-2Fe-0.5Si alloy proves to be the best combination of elastic modulus, strength and also biological properties, which makes it a viable candidate for use in load-bearing implants. PMID:26706526

  7. A Diagram for Evaluating Delamination of GFRP/Stainless-steel Adhesive Joints by Using Stress Singularity Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Masaaki

    Static tests on double-lap and T-type adhesive joints were performed. We developed a device that applies contact pressure to glass-fiber reinforced plastics/stainless-steel double-lap adhesive joints. The device contains a bolt with which a strain gauge is bonded for controlling contact pressure. Using this device, we investigated the effect of contact pressure on the delamination strength of double-lap adhesive joints. We applied tensile shear loading to double-lap adhesive joints under contact pressure to their adhesive interfaces. We found that the delamination strength of the double-lap adhesive joints increased with increasing contact pressure. On the contrary, when we applied compressive shear stress to them, the delamination strength stayed constant. Therefore the delamination strength of double-lap adhesive joints is dominated by normal stress when contact pressure under tensile shear loading is applied. On the other hand, it was dominated by shear stress when contact pressure under compressive shear loading was applied. Then stress singularity parameters for double-lap and T-type adhesive joints were performed by the FEM. Stress distributions near the bonding edge could be expressed by the stress singularity parameters. Finally, a delamination evaluation diagram using stress singularity parameters was developed. This diagram enables us to evaluate the delamination strength of adhesive joints.

  8. Loss of MLCK leads to disruption of cell-cell adhesion and invasive behavior of breast epithelial cells via increased expression of EGFR and ERK/JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Helfman, D M

    2016-08-25

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression is downregulated in breast cancer, including invasive ductal carcinoma compared with ductal breast carcinoma in situ and metastatic breast tumors. However, little is known about how loss of MLCK expression contributes to tumor progression. MLCK is a component of the actin cytoskeleton and its known role is the phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of myosin II. To gain insights into the role of MLCK in breast cancer, we perturbed its function using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or pharmacological inhibition in untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). Loss of MLCK by siRNAs led to increased cell migration and invasion, disruption of cell-cell adhesions and enhanced formation of focal adhesions at the leading edge of migratory cells. In addition, downregulation of MLCK cooperated with HER2 in MCF10A cells to promote cell migration and invasion and low levels of MLCK is associated with a poor prognosis in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Associated with these altered migratory behaviors were increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways in MLCK downregulated MCF10A cells. By contrast, inhibition of the kinase function of MLCK using pharmacological agents inhibited cell migration and invasion, and did not affect cellular adhesions. Our results show that loss of MLCK contributes to the migratory properties of epithelial cells resulting from changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, and increased epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings suggest that decreased expression of MLCK may have a critical role during tumor progression by facilitating the metastatic potential of tumor cells. PMID:26876209

  9. Minodronic acid ameliorates vertebral bone strength by increasing bone mineral density in 9-month treatment of ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Makoto; Mori, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-07-01

    The effect of treatment for 9months with minodronic acid, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, on vertebral mechanical strength was examined in ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys. Forty skeletally mature female monkeys were randomized into four OVX groups and one sham group (n=8) based on lumbar bone mineral density (BMD). OVX animals were treated orally with 15 and 150μg/kg QD of minodronic acid or 500μg/kg QD alendronate as a reference drug. Measurements of bone turnover markers and lumbar BMD were conducted at 0, 4 and 8months. Measurements of bone mechanical strength and minodronic acid concentration in vertebral bodies were also performed. OVX resulted in a decrease in lumbar BMD and an increase in bone turnover markers at 4 and 8months, compared to the sham group, and the ultimate load on the lumbar vertebra was decreased in OVX animals. Minodronic acid and alendronate prevented the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover markers and decrease in lumbar BMD. Minodronic acid at 150μg/kg increased the ultimate load on lumbar vertebra compared to untreated OVX animals. Regression analysis revealed that the ultimate load was correlated with lumbar BMD and bone mineral content (BMC), and most strongly with the increase in lumbar BMD and BMC over 8months. In a separate analysis within the sham-OVX controls and minodronic acid and alendronate treatment groups, the ultimate loads were also correlated with BMD and BMC. The load-BMD (BMC) correlation in the minodronic acid group showed a trend for a shift to a higher load from the basal relationship in the sham-OVX controls. These results indicate that treatment with minodronic acid for 9months increases vertebral mechanical strength in OVX monkeys, mainly by increasing BMD and BMC. PMID:27155564

  10. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  11. Effects of interlayer thickness and the substrate material on the adhesion properties of CrZrN coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Sung; Kim, Hoe-Kun; La, Joung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Yul

    2016-01-01

    To confirm the influence of the interlayer thickness and substrate material on adhesion properties, CrZrN coatings with various Cr interlayer thickness were deposited on AISI H13, high speed steel, and tungsten carbide using unbalanced magnetron sputtering. The adhesion strength showed maximum value at 300 nm of the interlayer, but as the interlayer increased further to 450 nm, the adhesion strength decreased. The adhesion properties of the coatings were dependent upon not only interlayer thickness but also the substrate materials. The adhesion strength of the coating were measured 12, 32, 53 N on the tungsten carbide, AISI H13 steel, high speed steel, respectively and three different failure modes such as buckling spallation, wedging spallation, and chipping were observed on each substrate. The difference in adhesion properties could be attributed to the difference in value of elastic strain to failure (H/E) among the CrZrN coating, the interlayer, and the substrates material.

  12. Overexpression of BCLXL in Osteoblasts Inhibits Osteoblast Apoptosis and Increases Bone Volume and Strength.

    PubMed

    Moriishi, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Ryo; Miyazaki, Toshihiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ito, Masako; Komori, Toshihisa

    2016-07-01

    The Bcl2 family proteins, Bcl2 and BclXL, suppress apoptosis by preventing the release of caspase activators from mitochondria through the inhibition of Bax subfamily proteins. We reported that BCL2 overexpression in osteoblasts using the 2.3 kb Col1a1 promoter increased osteoblast proliferation, failed to reduce osteoblast apoptosis, inhibited osteoblast maturation, and reduced the number of osteocyte processes, leading to massive osteocyte death. We generated BCLXL (BCL2L1) transgenic mice using the same promoter to investigate BCLXL functions in bone development and maintenance. Bone mineral density in the trabecular bone of femurs was increased, whereas that in the cortical bone was similar to that in wild-type mice. Osteocyte process formation was unaffected and bone structures were similar to those in wild-type mice. A micro-CT analysis showed that trabecular bone volume in femurs and vertebrae and the cortical thickness of femurs were increased. A dynamic bone histomorphometric analysis revealed that the mineralizing surface was larger in trabecular bone, and the bone-formation rate was increased in cortical bone. Serum osteocalcin but not TRAP5b was increased, BrdU-positive osteoblastic cell numbers were increased, TUNEL-positive osteoblastic cell numbers were reduced, and osteoblast marker gene expression was enhanced in BCLXL transgenic mice. The three-point bending test indicated that femurs were stronger in BCLXL transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. The frequency of TUNEL-positive primary osteoblasts was lower in BCLXL transgenic mice than in wild-type mice during cultivation, and osteoblast differentiation was enhanced but depended on cell density, indicating that enhanced differentiation was mainly owing to reduced apoptosis. Increased trabecular and cortical bone volumes were maintained during aging in male and female mice. These results indicate that BCLXL overexpression in osteoblasts increased the trabecular and cortical bone volumes with

  13. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+) Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chao; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian; Hu, Biru

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed "barnacle cement". In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+) plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx) tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as "Trx-Balcp19k gel", and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa) and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA) craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia) and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany). Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials. PMID:26317205

  14. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+) Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian; Hu, Biru

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed “barnacle cement”. In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+) plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx) tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as “Trx-Balcp19k gel”, and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa) and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA) craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia) and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany). Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials. PMID:26317205

  15. Extreme positive allometry of animal adhesive pads and the size limits of adhesion-based climbing

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Clemente, Christofer J.; Dittrich, Alex; Kuo, Chi-Yun; Crosby, Alfred J.; Irschick, Duncan J.; Federle, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Organismal functions are size-dependent whenever body surfaces supply body volumes. Larger organisms can develop strongly folded internal surfaces for enhanced diffusion, but in many cases areas cannot be folded so that their enlargement is constrained by anatomy, presenting a problem for larger animals. Here, we study the allometry of adhesive pad area in 225 climbing animal species, covering more than seven orders of magnitude in weight. Across all taxa, adhesive pad area showed extreme positive allometry and scaled with weight, implying a 200-fold increase of relative pad area from mites to geckos. However, allometric scaling coefficients for pad area systematically decreased with taxonomic level and were close to isometry when evolutionary history was accounted for, indicating that the substantial anatomical changes required to achieve this increase in relative pad area are limited by phylogenetic constraints. Using a comparative phylogenetic approach, we found that the departure from isometry is almost exclusively caused by large differences in size-corrected pad area between arthropods and vertebrates. To mitigate the expected decrease of weight-specific adhesion within closely related taxa where pad area scaled close to isometry, data for several taxa suggest that the pads’ adhesive strength increased for larger animals. The combination of adjustments in relative pad area for distantly related taxa and changes in adhesive strength for closely related groups helps explain how climbing with adhesive pads has evolved in animals varying over seven orders of magnitude in body weight. Our results illustrate the size limits of adhesion-based climbing, with profound implications for large-scale bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:26787862

  16. Extreme positive allometry of animal adhesive pads and the size limits of adhesion-based climbing.

    PubMed

    Labonte, David; Clemente, Christofer J; Dittrich, Alex; Kuo, Chi-Yun; Crosby, Alfred J; Irschick, Duncan J; Federle, Walter

    2016-02-01

    Organismal functions are size-dependent whenever body surfaces supply body volumes. Larger organisms can develop strongly folded internal surfaces for enhanced diffusion, but in many cases areas cannot be folded so that their enlargement is constrained by anatomy, presenting a problem for larger animals. Here, we study the allometry of adhesive pad area in 225 climbing animal species, covering more than seven orders of magnitude in weight. Across all taxa, adhesive pad area showed extreme positive allometry and scaled with weight, implying a 200-fold increase of relative pad area from mites to geckos. However, allometric scaling coefficients for pad area systematically decreased with taxonomic level and were close to isometry when evolutionary history was accounted for, indicating that the substantial anatomical changes required to achieve this increase in relative pad area are limited by phylogenetic constraints. Using a comparative phylogenetic approach, we found that the departure from isometry is almost exclusively caused by large differences in size-corrected pad area between arthropods and vertebrates. To mitigate the expected decrease of weight-specific adhesion within closely related taxa where pad area scaled close to isometry, data for several taxa suggest that the pads' adhesive strength increased for larger animals. The combination of adjustments in relative pad area for distantly related taxa and changes in adhesive strength for closely related groups helps explain how climbing with adhesive pads has evolved in animals varying over seven orders of magnitude in body weight. Our results illustrate the size limits of adhesion-based climbing, with profound implications for large-scale bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:26787862

  17. Inhibition of enamel demineralization and bond-strength properties of bioactive glass containing 4-META/MMA-TBB-based resin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Naohisa; Iijima, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Toshima, Hirokazu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the enamel demineralization-prevention ability and shear bond strength (SBS) properties of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride/methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butyl borane (4-META/MMA-TBB)-based resin containing various amounts (0-50%) of bioactive glass (BG). Disk-shaped specimens were immersed in distilled water and ions released were analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy. Samples were also immersed in lactic acid solution (pH 4.6) to estimate acid-neutralizing ability. Brackets were bonded to human premolars with BG-containing resins and the bonded teeth were alternately immersed in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 d. The enamel hardness was determined by nanoindentation testing at twenty equidistant distances from the external surface. The SBS for each sample was examined. The amounts of ions released [calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), silicon (Si), and boron (B)] and the acid-neutralizing ability increased with increasing BG content. After alternating immersion, the specimens bonded with the BG-containing resin with high BG content were harder than those in the other groups in some locations 1-18.5 μm from the enamel surface. Bioactive glass-containing (10-40%) resin had bond strength equivalent to the control specimen. Thus, the SBS obtained for BG-containing resin (6.5-9.2 MPa) was clinically acceptable, suggesting that this material has the ability to prevent enamel demineralization. PMID:25903115

  18. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  19. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erli, Hans J; Marx, Rudolf; Paar, Othmar; Niethard, Fritz U; Weber, Michael; Wirtz, Dieter C

    2003-01-01

    Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties) usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organ